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Sample records for repeated trials participants

  1. Acceptability and feasibility of repeated mucosal specimen collection in clinical trial participants in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Omosa-Manyonyi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mucosal specimens are essential to evaluate compartmentalized immune responses to HIV vaccine candidates and other mucosally targeted investigational products. We studied the acceptability and feasibility of repeated mucosal sampling in East African clinical trial participants at low risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The Kenya AIDS Vaccine Initiative (KAVI enrolled participants into three Phase 1 trials of preventive HIV candidate vaccines in 2011-2012 at two clinical research centers in Nairobi. After informed consent to a mucosal sub-study, participants were asked to undergo collection of mucosal secretions (saliva, oral fluids, semen, cervico-vaginal and rectal, but could opt out of any collection at any visit. Specimens were collected at baseline and two additional time points. A tolerability questionnaire was administered at the final sub-study visit. Of 105 trial participants, 27 of 34 women (79% and 62 of 71 men (87% enrolled in the mucosal sub-study. Nearly all sub-study participants gave saliva and oral fluids at all visits. Semen was collected from about half the participating men (47-48% at all visits. Cervico-vaginal secretions were collected by Softcup from about two thirds of women (63% at baseline, increasing to 78% at the following visits, with similar numbers for cervical secretion collection by Merocel sponge; about half of women (52% gave cervico-vaginal samples at all visits. Rectal secretions were collected with Merocel sponge from about a quarter of both men and women (24% at all 3 visits, with 16% of men and 19% of women giving rectal samples at all visits. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated mucosal sampling in clinical trial participants in Kenya is feasible, with a good proportion of participants consenting to most sampling methods with the exception of rectal samples. Experienced staff members of both sexes and trained counselors with standardized messaging may improve

  2. Comparison of trial participants and open access users of a web-based physical activity intervention regarding adherence, attrition, and repeated participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Miriam; Martin-Diener, Eva; Bauer, Georg; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Martin, Brian W

    2010-02-10

    Web-based interventions are popular for promoting healthy lifestyles such as physical activity. However, little is known about user characteristics, adherence, attrition, and predictors of repeated participation on open access physical activity websites. The focus of this study was Active-online, a Web-based individually tailored physical activity intervention. The aims were (1) to assess and compare user characteristics and adherence to the website (a) in the open access context over time from 2003 to 2009, and (b) between trial participants and open access users; and (2) to analyze attrition and predictors of repeated use among participants in a randomized controlled trial compared with registered open access users. Data routinely recorded in the Active-online user database were used. Adherence was defined as: the number of pages viewed, the proportion of visits during which a tailored module was begun, the proportion of visits during which tailored feedback was received, and the time spent in the tailored modules. Adherence was analyzed according to six one-year periods (2003-2009) and according to the context (trial or open access) based on first visits and longest visits. Attrition and predictors of repeated participation were compared between trial participants and open access users. The number of recorded visits per year on Active-online decreased from 42,626 in 2003-2004 to 8343 in 2008-2009 (each of six one-year time periods ran from April 23 to April 22 of the following year). The mean age of users was between 38.4 and 43.1 years in all time periods and both contexts. The proportion of women increased from 49.5% in 2003-2004 to 61.3% in 2008-2009 (Popen access users. For open access users, adherence was similar during the first and the longest visits; for trial participants, adherence was lower during the first visits and higher during the longest visits. Of registered open access users and trial participants, 25.8% and 67.3% respectively visited Active

  3. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study ...

  4. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical ... to treat or cure a disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based ...

  5. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Usually, trial participants must show signs of the disease or condition before they can join this type of trial. Prevention Trials Click for more information In prevention trials, ...

  6. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... new tests that could identify a disease in its early stages. Usually, trial participants must show signs ... often healthy people (20 to 80), to judge its safety and side effects, and to find the ...

  7. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available skip navigation Help Search home health topics A-Z Videos A-Z about us Customer Support NIH SeniorHealth Built with You in Mind Resize Text: A A A Change Contrast print sign up Share Home > Health topics A-Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About ...

  8. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... treatment, screening, diagnostic, prevention, and supportive care trials. Treatment Trials In treatment trials, researchers may gather information about experimental treatments, ...

  9. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... trial is to find out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will ... disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based on their phase. The ...

  10. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... trial. Prevention Trials Click for more information In prevention trials, researchers study ways to reduce the risk of getting a disease or a specific medical problem. These trials find out if lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, getting more sleep, ...

  11. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Institutes of Health funds much of this basic research. Screening Trials In screening trials, researchers study ways of finding a disease before symptoms occur. These methods, often called screening tests, can include imaging tests ...

  12. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... disease or prevent a disease from returning. Supportive Care Trials In supportive care trials, researchers look for ways to make life ... groups, and various types of social interventions. Supportive care interventions are not intended to treat or cure ...

  13. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... to obtain preliminary data on whether the drug works in people who have a certain disease or condition. These trials also continue to study safety, including short-term side effects. This phase ...

  14. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will help treat, find, or ... specific medical problem. These trials find out if lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, getting more sleep, ...

  15. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... a disease. A clinical trial may compare experimental products or tests to those already available or may ... Institutes of Health | U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Customer Support | Accessibility | Copyright | Privacy | Viewers and Players

  16. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will help treat, find, or prevent a disease. A clinical trial may compare experimental products or tests to those already available or may compare existing ...

  17. Motivation and frustration in cardiology trial participation: the patient perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara Meneguin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The participation of humans in clinical cardiology trials remains essential, but little is known regarding participant perceptions of such studies. We examined the factors that motivated participation in such studies, as well as those that led to participant frustration. METHODS: Patients who had participated in hypertension and coronary arterial disease (phases II, III, and IV clinical trials were invited to answer a questionnaire. They were divided into two groups: Group I, which included participants in placebo-controlled clinical trials after randomization, and Group II, which included participants in clinical trials in which the tested treatment was compared to another drug after randomization and in which a placebo was used in the washout period. RESULTS: Eighty patients (47 patients in Group I and 33 patients in Group II with different socio-demographic characteristics were interviewed. Approximately 60% of the patients were motivated to participate in the trial with the expectation of personal benefit. Nine participants (11.2% expressed the desire to withdraw, which was due to their perception of risk during the testing in the clinical trial (Group I and to the necessity of repeated returns to the institution (Group II. However, the patients did not withdraw due to fear of termination of hospital treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Although this study had a small patient sample, the possibility of receiving a benefit from the new tested treatment was consistently reported as a motivation to participate in the trials.

  18. Perceptions of reimbursement for clinical trial participation.

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    Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Loza, Melissa; Vincent, Kathleen; Moench, Thomas; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2011-09-01

    A greater understanding of participant views regarding reimbursement will help investigators plan studies that have better potential for reaching target enrollment, maximize efficient recruitment, maintain scientific integrity, and enhance retention over time. As part of a clinical trial in the area of sexual health, healthy women's perceptions of reimbursement for research participation were investigated. Semi-structured, audio-recorded, qualitative interviews were conducted immediately upon women's completion of the clinical trial to enable a participant-driven understanding of perceptions about monetary reimbursement. Audio-recordings were transcribed and analyzed using framework analysis. Women (N = 30) had a mean age of 29.5 ± 5.7 years (range 22-45 years). Sixty-three percent of participants (n = 19) were non-Hispanic (white n = 13, black n = 4, and Asian n = 2), while the remaining were Hispanic (n = 11). Seventy-three percent (n = 22) reported previous participation in research. In general, women viewed reimbursement as a benefit to research participation, the amount of which should reflect time, the inconvenience to the research subject, and the potential for unknown risks in the short- and long-term. They believed reimbursement should take into account the degree of risk of the study, with investigations of experimental products offering greater reimbursement. Women believed that monetary reimbursement is unlikely to coerce an individual to volunteer for a study involving procedures or requirements that they found unacceptable. The results of this study can be used to provide guidance to those planning and evaluating reimbursement for research participation.

  19. Mid-Childhood Bone Mass After Exposure to Repeat Doses of Antenatal Glucocorticoids: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, Christopher J D; Cutfield, Wayne S; Battin, Malcolm R; Dalziel, Stuart R; Crowther, Caroline A; Harding, Jane E

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of women at risk for preterm birth with repeat doses of glucocorticoids reduces neonatal morbidity, but could have adverse effects on skeletal development. We assessed whether exposure to repeat antenatal betamethasone alters bone mass in children whose mothers participated in the Australasian Collaborative Trial of Repeat Doses of Corticosteroids. Women were randomized to a single dose of betamethasone or placebo, ≥7 days after an initial course of glucocorticoids, repeated each week that they remained at risk for preterm birth at children underwent whole-body dual-energy radiograph absorptiometry at 6 to 8 years' corrected age. Of 212 eligible childhood survivors, 185 were studied (87%; 91 repeat betamethasone group; 94 placebo [single course] group). Children exposed to repeat antenatal betamethasone and those exposed to placebo had similar whole-body bone mineral content (median repeat betamethasone: 553 g, interquartile range: 442-712 g; placebo: 567 g, interquartile range: 447-750 g; geometric mean ratio: 0.99; 95% confidence interval: 0.94-1.03, P = .55) and bone area (median repeat betamethasone 832 cm(2), interquartile range: 693-963 cm(2); placebo: 822 cm(2), interquartile range: 710-1020 cm(2); geometric mean ratio: 0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.92-1.07, P = .75). Exposure to repeat doses of antenatal betamethasone compared with a single course of glucocorticoids does not alter bone mass in mid-childhood. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Student Participation in Rover Field Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C. D.; Arvidson, R. E.; Nelson, S. V.; Sherman, D. M.; Squyres, S. W.

    2001-12-01

    The LAPIS program was developed in 1999 as part of the Athena Science Payload education and public outreach, funded by the JPL Mars Program Office. For the past three years, the Athena Science Team has been preparing for 2003 Mars Exploration Rover Mission operations using the JPL prototype Field Integrated Design and Operations (FIDO) rover in extended rover field trials. Students and teachers participating in LAPIS work with them each year to develop a complementary mission plan and implement an actual portion of the annual tests using FIDO and its instruments. LAPIS is designed to mirror an end-to-end mission: Small, geographically distributed groups of students form an integrated mission team, working together with Athena Science Team members and FIDO engineers to plan, implement, and archive a two-day test mission, controlling FIDO remotely over the Internet using the Web Interface for Telescience (WITS) and communicating with each other by email, the web, and teleconferences. The overarching goal of LAPIS is to get students excited about science and related fields. The program provides students with the opportunity to apply knowledge learned in school, such as geometry and geology, to a "real world" situation and to explore careers in science and engineering through continuous one-on-one interactions with teachers, Athena Science Team mentors, and FIDO engineers. A secondary goal is to help students develop improved communication skills and appreciation of teamwork, enhanced problem-solving skills, and increased self-confidence. The LAPIS program will provide a model for outreach associated with future FIDO field trials and the 2003 Mars mission operations. The base of participation will be broadened beyond the original four sites by taking advantage of the wide geographic distribution of Athena team member locations. This will provide greater numbers of students with the opportunity to actively engage in rover testing and to explore the possibilities of

  1. FDA Encourages More Participation, Diversity in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Updates FDA Encourages More Participation, Diversity in Clinical Trials Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... while research is conducted. back to top Do clinical trials have possible risks and benefits? Yes. Sometimes patients ...

  2. Exploring Willingness to Participate in Clinical Trials by Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariera, Katrina L; Murphy, Sheila T; Meng, Jingbo; McLaughlin, Margaret L

    2016-09-07

    African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans are disproportionately affected by cancer, yet underrepresented in cancer clinical trials. Because of this, it is important to understand how attitudes and beliefs about clinical trials vary by ethnicity. A national, random sample of 860 adults was given an online survey about attitudes toward clinical trials. We examined willingness to participate in clinical trials, attitudes toward clinical trials, trust in doctors, attitudes toward alternative and complementary medicine, and preferred information channels. Results indicate that African-American and Hispanic-American participants have more negative attitudes about clinical trials, more distrust toward doctors, more interest in complementary and alternative medicine, and less willingness to participate in clinical trials than white/non-Hispanics, although specific factors affecting willingness to participate vary. The channels people turn to for information on clinical trials also varied by ethnicity. These results help explain the ethnic disparities in cancer clinical trial enrollment by highlighting some potential underlying causes and drawing attention to areas of importance to these groups.

  3. Women's willingness to participate in microbicide trials in Northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharawan, K; Manopaiboon, C; Ellertson, C; Limpakarnjanarat, K; Chaikummao, S; Kilmarx, P H; Blanchard, K; Coggins, C; Mastro, T D; Elias, C

    2001-10-01

    To assess women's interests and concerns regarding participation in trials of microbicides in Chiang Rai, Thailand, we administered structured questionnaires. Before answering the questionnaire, women attended an educational session on microbicides and clinical trials. Of 370 participants, 82% correctly answered 8 or more of the 11 overall comprehension questions, indicating an adequate knowledge base among the women from which to answer questions about attitudes toward microbicide trials. The most common motivations for participating in a trial were "getting tested for HIV" and "doing something good for women's health." The greatest barrier to participation was women's fear that if they proposed use of a microbicide, their husbands might feel protected and thereby have more sex partners. Overall, 6.2% said they would be "definitely willing to participate," and 66.8% said they wanted to participate but wanted to think about it. Most women previously unacquainted with the concept of microbicides or clinical trial design displayed adequate knowledge of these subjects after the short educational session. If women's initial reactions are validated by actual willingness, surveys could prove valuable for selecting sites for microbicide trials, estimating enrollment rates, and tailoring trials to make them most acceptable to women.

  4. Video Helps Prepare Patients to Participate in Cancer Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who took part in a tailored, video-based educational program had a better understanding of and fewer concerns about participating in clinical trials than patients who received text-based educational.

  5. Participant recruitment and motivation for participation in optical technology for cervical cancer screening research trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhatovich, Olga M; Sharman, Mathilde P; Mirabal, Yvette N; Earle, Nan R; Follen, Michele; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2005-12-01

    In order to improve recruitment for cervical cancer screening trials, it is necessary to analyze the effectiveness of recruitment strategies used in current trials. A trial to test optical spectroscopy for the diagnosis of cervical neoplasia recruited 1000 women from the community; the trial evaluated the emerging technology against Pap smears and colposcopically directed biopsies for cervical dysplasia. We have examined women's reasons for participating as well as the effectiveness and efficiency for each recruitment strategy. Reasons for participation were identified and compared between trials. The recruitment method that resulted in the most contacts was newspaper reportorial coverage and advertising, followed by family and friends, then television news coverage. The most cost-effective method for finding eligible women who attend the research appointment is word of mouth from a family member or friend. Recommendations are given for maximizing the efficiency of recruitment for cervical cancer screening trials.

  6. Adolescent Participation in HPV Vaccine Clinical Trials: Are Parents Willing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erves, Jennifer Cunningham; Mayo-Gamble, Tilicia L; Hull, Pamela C; Duke, Lauren; Miller, Stephania T

    2017-03-21

    Approximately one-quarter of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are acquired by adolescents, with a higher burden among racial/ethnic minorities. However, racial/ethnic minorities have been underrepresented in previous HPV vaccine trials. Ongoing and future HPV vaccine optimization trials would benefit from racially- and ethnically-diverse sample of adolescent trial participants. This study examined factors influencing parental willingness to consent to their adolescents' participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials and tested for possible racial differences. A convenience sample of parents of adolescents (N = 256) completed a cross-sectional survey. Chi square analyses were used to assess racial differences in parental HPV vaccine awareness and intentions and willingness to consent to their child participating in an HPV vaccine clinical trial. Ordinal logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with willingness. Approximately 47% of parents were willing to allow their adolescent to participate in HPV vaccine clinical trials (30.7% African American and 48.3% Caucasian, p = .081). African Americans had lower HPV vaccine awareness (p = .006) but not lower intentions to vaccinate (p = .086). Parental willingness was positively associated with the following variables: Child's age (p < .039), Perceived Advantages of HPV Vaccination for Adolescents (p = .002), Parental Trust in Medical Researchers (p < .001), and Level of Ease in Understanding Clinical Trial Information (p = .010). Educating parents about the advantages of HPV vaccines for younger adolescents using low-literacy educational materials and building trust between parents and researchers may increase parental willingness to consent to adolescent participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials.

  7. Pilot and Repeat Trials as Development Tools Associated with Demonstration of Bioequivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglsang, Anders

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to use simulated trials to study how pilot trials can be implemented in relation to bioequivalence testing, and how the use of the information obtained at the pilot stage can influence the overall chance of showing bioequivalence (power) or the chance of approving a truly bioinequivalent product (type I error). The work also covers the use of repeat pivotal trials since the difference between a pilot trial followed by a pivotal trial and a pivotal trial followed by a repeat trial is mainly a question of whether a conclusion of bioequivalence can be allowed after the first trial. Repeating a pivotal trial after a failed trial involves dual or serial testing of the bioequivalence null hypothesis, and the paper illustrates how this may inflate the type I error up to almost 10%. Hence, it is questioned if such practice is in the interest of patients. Tables for power, type I error, and sample sizes are provided for a total of six different decision trees which allow the developer to use either the observed geometric mean ratio (GMR) from the first or trial or to assume that the GMR is 0.95. In cases when the true GMR can be controlled so as not to deviate more from unity than 0.95, sequential design methods ad modum Potvin may be superior to pilot trials. The tables provide a quantitative basis for choosing between sequential designs and pivotal trials preceded by pilot trials.

  8. Clinical trial participant characteristics and saliva and DNA metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Julie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trial and epidemiological studies need high quality biospecimens from a representative sample of participants to investigate genetic influences on treatment response and disease. Obtaining blood biospecimens presents logistical and financial challenges. As a result, saliva biospecimen collection is becoming more frequent because of the ease of collection and lower cost. This article describes an assessment of saliva biospecimen samples collected through the mail, trial participant demographic and behavioral characteristics, and their association with saliva and DNA quantity and quality. Methods Saliva biospecimens were collected using the Oragene® DNA Self-Collection Kits from participants in a National Cancer Institute funded smoking cessation trial. Saliva biospecimens from 565 individuals were visually inspected for clarity prior to and after DNA extraction. DNA samples were then quantified by UV absorbance, PicoGreen®, and qPCR. Genotyping was performed on 11 SNPs using TaqMan® SNP assays and two VNTR assays. Univariate, correlation, and analysis of variance analyses were conducted to observe the relationship between saliva sample and participant characteristics. Results The biospecimen kit return rate was 58.5% among those invited to participate (n = 967 and 47.1% among all possible COMPASS participants (n = 1202. Significant gender differences were observed with males providing larger saliva volume (4.7 vs. 4.5 ml, p = 0.019, samples that were more likely to be judged as cloudy (39.5% vs. 24.9%, p 0.21, P Conclusion Findings from this study show that demographic and behavioral characteristics of smoking cessation trial participants have significant associations with saliva and DNA metrics, but not with the performance of TaqMan® SNP or VNTR genotyping assays. Trial registration COMPASS; registered as NCT00301145 at clinicaltrials.gov.

  9. Differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation among cancer patients in phase 3 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godskesen, T M; Kihlbom, U; Nordin, K; Silén, M; Nygren, P

    2016-05-01

    While participants in clinical oncology trials are essential for the advancement of cancer therapies, factors decisive for patient participation have been described but need further investigation, particularly in the case of phase 3 studies. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials in relation to gender, age, education levels and former trial experience. The results of a questionnaire returned from 88 of 96 patients (92%) were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. There were small, barely relevant differences in trial knowledge among patients when stratified by gender, age or education. Participants with former trial experience were less aware about the right to withdraw. Male participants and those aged ≥65 years were significantly more motivated by a feeling of duty, or by the opinions of close ones. Men seem more motivated than women by external factors. With the awareness that elderly and single male participants might be a vulnerable group and participants with former trial experience are less likely to be sufficiently informed, the information consent process should focus more on these patients. We conclude that the informed consent process seems to work well, with good results within most subgroups.

  10. Using “Clinical Trial Diaries” to Track Patterns of Participation for Serial Healthy Volunteers in U.S. Phase I Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Edelblute, Heather B.; Fisher, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Phase I testing of investigational drugs relies on healthy volunteers as research participants. Many U.S. healthy volunteers enroll repeatedly in clinical trials for the financial compensation. Serial participants are incentivized to ignore restrictions on their participation, and no centralized clinical trial registry prevents dual enrollment. Little is currently known about how healthy volunteers participate in studies over time, hampering the development of policies to protect this group. ...

  11. Clinical trial participants' experiences of completing questionnaires: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Christine; Karner, Julia J; Rappenecker, Julia; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-03-24

    To improve clinical study developments for elderly populations, we aim to understand how they transfer their experiences into validated, standardised self-completed study measurement instruments. We analysed how women (mean 78±8 years of age) participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) cognised study instruments used to evaluate outcomes of the intervention. The interview study was nested in an RCT on chronic neck pain using common measurement instruments situated in an elderly community in Berlin, Germany, which comprised of units for independent and assisted-living options. The sample (n=20 women) was selected from the RCT sample (n=117, 95% women, mean age 76 (SD±8) years). Interview participants were selected using a purposive sampling list based on the RCT outcomes. We asked participants about their experiences completing the RCT questionnaires. Interviews were analysed thematically, then compared with the questionnaires. Interviewees had difficulties in translating complex experiences into a single value on a scale and understanding the relationship of the questionnaires to study aims. Interviewees considered important for the trial that their actual experiences were understood by trial organisers. This information was not transferrable by means of the questionnaires. To rectify these difficulties, interviewees used strategies such as adding notes, adding response categories or skipping an item. Elderly interview participants understood the importance of completing questionnaires for trial success. This led to strategies of completing the questionnaires that resulted in 'missing' or ambiguous data. To improve data collection in elderly populations, educational materials addressing the differential logics should be developed and tested. Pilot testing validated instruments using cognitive interviews may be particularly important in such populations. Finally, when the target of an intervention is a subjective experience, it seems important to create a

  12. Comparison of Characteristics and Outcomes of Trial Participants and Non-participants: Example of Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT-CTN) 0201 Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Nandita; Majhail, Navneet S.; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; He, Naya; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Akpek, Görgün; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Beattie, Sara; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Burns, Linda J.; Dalal, Jignesh D.; Freytes, César O.; Gupta, Vikas; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Lazarus, Hillard M.; LeMaistre, Charles F.; Steinberg, Amir; Szwajcer, David; Wingard, John R.; Wirk, Baldeep; Wood, William A.; Joffe, Steven; Hahn, Theresa E.; Loberiza, Fausto R.; Anasetti, Claudio; Horowitz, Mary M.; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Controversy surrounds the question of whether clinical trial participants have better outcomes than comparable patients who are not treated on a trial. We explored this question using a recent large, randomized, multi-center study comparing peripheral blood (PB) with bone marrow (BM) transplantation from unrelated donors (URD), conducted by the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN). METHODS AND FINDINGS We compared characteristics and outcomes of study participants (n=494) and non-participants (n=1384) who appeared eligible and received similar treatment without enrolling on the BMT CTN trial at participating centers during the study time-period. Data were obtained from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Outcomes were compared between the two groups using Cox proportional hazards regression models. No significant differences in age, sex and disease distribution, race/ ethnicity, HLA matching, comorbidities and interval from diagnosis to HCT were seen between the participants and non-participants. Non-participants were more likely to have lower performance status, lower-risk disease, and older donors, and to receive myeloablative conditioning and anti-thymocyte globulin. Non-participants were also more likely to receive PB grafts, the intervention tested in the trial (66% vs. 50% ptransplant-related mortality, and incidences of acute or chronic GVHD were comparable between the two groups though relapse was higher (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.02–1.46, p=0.028) in non-participants. CONCLUSION Despite differences in certain baseline characteristics, survival was comparable between study participants and non-participants. The results of the BMT CTN trial appear generalizable to the population of trial-eligible patients. PMID:26071866

  13. Incentives to participate in clinical trials: practical and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Steven L; Feldman, James

    2015-09-01

    Clinical trials often offer incentives to encourage individuals to enroll and to enhance follow-up. The scope and nature of incentives used in emergency department (ED)-based trials are unknown. The objective of this study is to characterize the quantity and quality of incentives and other forms of compensation used in clinical trials of human subjects recruited in US EDs. A secondary goal is to provide an historical and ethical analysis of the use of incentives in clinical trials. We reviewed English-language randomized clinical trials conducted in US EDs from 2009 to 2013. Full text of the studies was reviewed to identify whether incentives were used, their value, and timing. Funding source was noted as well. Data are presented with descriptive statistics. Of 1151 articles identified, 76 (6.6%) fit criteria for review. Of these, 7 (9.2%) provided incentive payments. A recently published eighth trial was included as well. The total cash value of incentives offered ranged from $10 to $195. Four studies offered payment at enrollment only. Incentives included cash, debit cards, and gift cards. The use of financial incentives in ED-based trials is uncommon. Studies that use incentives are generally extramurally funded, usually by a federal agency, and include waves of follow-up that continue after discharge from the ED. Payment size is modest. Incentives may improve recruitment and retention in ED-based trials, but authoritative data are lacking. Investigators need to take care to avoid incentives that may be coercive or unduly influence research participants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of a cancer clinical trials web site on discussions about trial participation: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, R F; Barratt, A L; Askie, L M; Butow, P N; McGeechan, K; Crossing, S; Currow, D C; Tattersall, M H N

    2012-07-01

    Cancer patients want access to reliable information about currently recruiting clinical trials. Oncologists and their patients were randomly assigned to access a consumer-friendly cancer clinical trials web site [Australian Cancer Trials (ACT), www.australiancancertrials.gov.au] or to usual care in a cluster randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome, measured from audio recordings of oncologist-patient consultations, was the proportion of patients with whom participation in any clinical trial was discussed. Analysis was by intention-to-treat accounting for clustering and stratification. Thirty medical oncologists and 493 patients were recruited. Overall, 46% of consultations in the intervention group compared with 34% in the control group contained a discussion about clinical trials (P=0.08). The mean consultation length in both groups was 29 min (P=0.69). The proportion consenting to a trial was 10% in both groups (P=0.65). Patients' knowledge about randomized trials was lower in the intervention than the control group (mean score 3.0 versus 3.3, P=0.03) but decisional conflict scores were similar (mean score 42 versus 43, P=0.83). Good communication between patients and physicians is essential. Within this context, a web site such as Australian Cancer Trials may be an important tool to encourage discussion about clinical trial participation.

  15. Recruitment to randomised trials: strategies for trial enrollment and participation study. The STEPS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M K; Snowdon, C; Francis, D; Elbourne, D; McDonald, A M; Knight, R; Entwistle, V; Garcia, J; Roberts, I; Grant, A; Grant, A

    2007-11-01

    To identify factors associated with good and poor recruitment to multicentre trials. Part A: database of trials started in or after 1994 and were due to end before 2003 held by the Medical Research Council and Health Technology Assessment Programmes. Part B: interviews with people playing a wide range of roles within four trials that their funders identified as 'exemplars'. Part C: a large multicentre trial (the CRASH trial) of treatment for head injury. The study used a number of different perspectives ('multiple lenses'), and three components. Part A: an epidemiological review of a cohort of trials. Part B: case studies of trials that appeared to have particularly interesting lessons for recruitment. Part C: a single, in-depth case study to examine the feasibility of applying a business-orientated analytical framework as a reference model in future trials. In the 114 trials found in Part A, less than one-third recruited their original target within the time originally specified, and around one-third had extensions. Factors observed more often in trials that recruited successfully were: having a dedicated trial manager, being a cancer or drug trial, and having interventions only available inside the trial. The most commonly reported strategies to improve recruitment were newsletters and mailshots, but it was not possible to assess whether they were causally linked to changes in recruitment. The analyses in Part B suggested that successful trials were those addressing clinically important questions at a timely point. The investigators were held in high esteem by the interviewees, and the trials were firmly grounded in existing clinical practices, so that the trial processes were not alien to clinical collaborators, and the results could be easily applicable to future practice. The interviewees considered that the needs of patients were well served by participation in the trials. Clinical collaborators particularly appreciated clear delineation of roles, which

  16. Physician participation in clinical research and trials: issues and approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami F Shaban

    2011-03-01

    research culture’. This article examines the barriers to and benefits of physician participation in clinical research as well as interventions needed to increase their participation, including the specific role of undergraduate medical education. The main challenge is the unwillingness of many physicians and patients to participate in clinical trials. Barriers to participation include lack of time, lack of resources, trial-specific issues, communication difficulties, conflicts between the role of clinician and scientist, inadequate research experience and training for physicians, lack of rewards and recognition for physicians, and sometimes a scientifically uninteresting research question, among others. Strategies to encourage physician participation in clinical research include financial and nonfinancial incentives, adequate training, research questions that are in line with physician interests and have clear potential to improve patient care, and regular feedback. Finally, encouraging research culture and fostering the development of inquiry and research-based learning among medical students is now a high priority in order to develop more and better clinician-researchers.Keywords: physician, clinical research, clinical trial, medical education

  17. Participation in a mail survey: role of repeated mailings and characteristics of nonrespondents among recent mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroque, B; Kaminski, M; Bouvier-Colle, M H; Hollebecque, V

    1999-04-01

    This study analysed the characteristics of respondent and nonrespondent mothers at each stage of a survey procedure, from a initial questionnaire to a reminder letter and two repeated mailings. Of 938 mothers of liveborn children who, while maternity inpatients, received a questionnaire and information about a mail survey to follow 2 months later, 828 completed and returned the initial questionnaire, 708 agreed to participate in the mail survey and were sent the mail questionnaire, and 612 finally completed and returned the questionnaire at 2 months. There were differences between respondents and non-respondents for socio-demographic factors at each stage of the process. The final response rate to the mail questionnaire was higher among mothers who were younger, were breast feeding, and had more education, an occupation and fewer children. The characteristics of late respondents were intermediate between those of early to middle respondents and nonrespondents for age, educational level, breast feeding and occupation. Maternal and infant health varied only slightly according to response status. Repeated mailings increased response and diminished selection. A mail questionnaire after contact in a maternity ward is a cost-effective means of gathering data about a large sample of recent mothers and their children.

  18. Group therapy for adolescents with repeated self harm: randomised controlled trial with economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J M; Wood, A J; Kerfoot, M J; Trainor, G; Roberts, C; Rothwell, J; Woodham, A; Ayodeji, E; Barrett, B; Byford, S; Harrington, R

    2011-04-01

    To examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of group therapy for self harm in young people. Two arm, single (assessor) blinded parallel randomised allocation trial of a group therapy intervention in addition to routine care, compared with routine care alone. Randomisation was by minimisation controlling for baseline frequency of self harm, presence of conduct disorder, depressive disorder, and severity of psychosocial stress. Adolescents aged 12-17 years with at least two past episodes of self harm within the previous 12 months. Exclusion criteria were: not speaking English, low weight anorexia nervosa, acute psychosis, substantial learning difficulties (defined by need for specialist school), current containment in secure care. Setting Eight child and adolescent mental health services in the northwest UK. Manual based developmental group therapy programme specifically designed for adolescents who harm themselves, with an acute phase over six weekly sessions followed by a booster phase of weekly groups as long as needed. Details of routine care were gathered from participating centres. Primary outcome was frequency of subsequent repeated episodes of self harm. Secondary outcomes were severity of subsequent self harm, mood disorder, suicidal ideation, and global functioning. Total costs of health, social care, education, and criminal justice sector services, plus family related costs and productivity losses, were recorded. 183 adolescents were allocated to each arm (total n = 366). Loss to follow-up was low (self harm, proportional odds ratio of group therapy versus routine care adjusting for relevant baseline variables was 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.68 to 1.44, P = 0.95) at 6 months and 0.88 (0.59 to 1.33, P = 0.52) at 1 year. For severity of subsequent self harm the equivalent odds ratios were 0.81 (0.54 to 1.20, P = 0.29) at 6 months and 0.94 (0.63 to 1.40, P = 0.75) at 1 year. Total 1 year costs were higher in the group therapy arm (£21,781) than

  19. Non-participants and reasons for non-participation in a pragmatic trial of energy healing as cancer rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Techau, Marzcia Elisa Camille; Lunde, Anita; Pedersen, Christina Gundgaard;

    2014-01-01

    -participation in a pragmatic trial of energy healing for rehabilitation for colorectal cancer. Methods: Three to seven days after postal recruitment, all eligible participants (n=783) were contacted by telephone. Reasons given for non-participation were recorded in 5 categories. Data were analyzed using Chi2. Results: More...

  20. The effects of repeated-sprint training on field-based fitness measures: a meta-analysis of controlled and non-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jonathan; Macpherson, Tom; Spears, Iain; Weston, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Repeated-sprint training appears to be an efficient and practical means for the simultaneous development of different components of fitness relevant to team sports. Our objective was to systematically review the literature and meta-analyse the effect of repeated-sprint training on a selection of field-based measures of athletic performance, i.e. counter-movement jump, 10 m sprint, 20 m sprint, 30 m sprint, repeated-sprint ability and high-intensity intermittent running performance. The SPORTDiscus, PubMed, MEDLINE and Web of Science databases were searched for original research articles. Search terms included 'repeated-sprint training', 'sprint training', 'aerobic endurance', 'repeated-sprint ability', 'counter-movement jump' and 'sprint performance'. Inclusion criteria included intervention consisting of a series of ≤10 s sprints with ≤60 s recovery; trained participants; intervention duration of 2-12 weeks; field-based fitness measures; running- or cycling-based intervention; published up to, and including, February 2014. Our final dataset included six trials for counter-movement jump (two controlled trials), eight trials for 10 m sprint, four trials for 20 m sprint (three controlled trials), two trials for 30 m sprint, eight trials for repeated-sprint ability and three trials for high-intensity intermittent running performance. Analyses were conducted using comprehensive meta-analysis software. Uncertainty in the meta-analysed effect of repeated-sprint training was expressed as 95% confidence limits (CL), along with the probability that the true value of the effect was trivial, beneficial or harmful. Magnitude-based inferences were based on standardised thresholds for small, moderate and large changes of 0.2, 0.6 and 1.2 standard deviations, respectively. Repeated-sprint training had a likely small beneficial effect in non-controlled counter-movement jump trials (effect size 0.33; 95% CL ±0.30), with a possibly moderate beneficial effect in controlled

  1. Why older people refuse to participate in falls prevention trials: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B.M. Elskamp (Annemijn); K.A. Hartholt (Klaas); P. Patka (Peter); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); T.J.M. van der Cammen (Tischa)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground/Objectives: Falls are a major public health problem. Older persons are frequently underrepresented in trials, including falls prevention trials. Insight into possible reasons for non-participation could help to improve trial designs and participation rates among this age-group

  2. Sponsors' participation in conduct and reporting of industry trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, Andreas; Krogsbøll, Lasse T; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Bias in industry-sponsored trials is common and the interpretation of the results can be particularly distorted in favour of the sponsor's product. We investigated sponsors' involvement in the conduct and reporting of industry-sponsored trials.......Bias in industry-sponsored trials is common and the interpretation of the results can be particularly distorted in favour of the sponsor's product. We investigated sponsors' involvement in the conduct and reporting of industry-sponsored trials....

  3. Impact of depressive symptoms, self-esteem and neuroticism on trajectories of overgeneral autobiographical memory over repeated trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashdan, Todd B; Roberts, John E; Carlos, Erica L

    2006-04-01

    The present study examined trajectories of change in the frequency of overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) over the course of repeated trials, and tested whether particular dimensions of depressive symptomatology (somatic and cognitive-affective distress), self-esteem, and neuroticism account for individual differences in these trajectories. Given that depression is associated with impairments in effortful processing, we predicted that over repeated trials depression would be associated with increasingly OGM. Generalised Linear Mixed Models with Penalised Quasi-Likelihood demonstrated significant linear and quadratic trends in OGM over repeated trials, and somatic distress and self-esteem moderated these slopes. The form of these interactions suggested that somatic distress and low self-esteem primarily contribute to OGM during the second half of the trial sequence. The present findings demonstrate the value of a novel analytical approach to OGM that estimates individual trajectories of change over repeated trials.

  4. Two-year follow-up of a randomised trial with repeated antenatal betamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoniemi, O M; Kari, M A; Lano, A; Yliherva, A; Puosi, R; Lehtonen, L; Tammela, O; Hallman, M

    2009-11-01

    Weekly repeated antenatal corticosteroid treatment improves respiratory outcome but decreases fetal growth and may impair neurodevelopmental outcome. We have previously reported that a single repeat betamethasone (BM) dose neither decreased fetal growth nor improved the outcome of preterm infants during the first hospitalisation. To study prospectively whether a single repeat dose of BM influences neurodevelopment and growth within 2 years. Women with imminent delivery before 34.0 gestational weeks were eligible if they remained undelivered for >7 days after a single course of antenatal BM. After stratification, a single repeat dose of BM (12 mg) or placebo was given. The children underwent neurological and psychometric examinations and a speech evaluation at a corrected age of 2 years. Prospective, blinded evaluation following the randomised multicentre trial. 259 (82%) surviving infants completed the 2-year follow-up, 120 in the BM group and 139 in the placebo group. The rate of survival without severe neurodevelopmental impairment was similar in both groups (BM 98%, placebo 99%). The risk of cerebral palsy (BM 2%, placebo 1%), growth or re-hospitalisation rates (BM 60%, placebo 50%) did not differ between the groups. A single repeat dose of antenatal BM tended not to influence physical growth or neurodevelopment at 2 years of age.

  5. Attitudes of small animal practitioners toward participation in veterinary clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Margaret E; Griffith, Emily H; Caney, Sarah M A; Rishniw, Mark; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine attitudes of small animal practitioners toward veterinary clinical trials and variables influencing their likelihood of participating in such trials. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SAMPLE Small animal practitioners with membership in 1 of 2 online veterinary communities (n = 163 and 652). PROCEDURES An online survey was developed for each of 2 veterinary communities, and invitations to participate were sent via email. Each survey included questions designed to collect information on the respondents' willingness to enroll their patients in clinical trials and to recommend participation to clients for their pets. RESULTS More than 80% of respondents to each survey indicated that they spend no time in clinical research. A high proportion of respondents were likely or extremely likely to recommend clinical trial participation to clients for their pets when those trials involved treatments licensed in other countries, novel treatments, respected investigators, or sponsoring by academic institutions, among other reasons. Reasons for not recommending participation included distance, time restrictions, and lack of awareness of ongoing clinical trials; 28% of respondents indicated that they did not usually learn about such clinical trials. Most respondents (79% to 92%) rated their recommendation of a trial as important to their client's willingness to participate. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Participation in veterinary clinical trials by small animal practitioners and their clients and patients appeared low. Efforts should be increased to raise practitioner awareness of clinical trials for which patients might qualify. Specific elements of trial design were identified that could be modified to increase participation.

  6. The Safety of Multiple Flexible Sigmoidoscopies with Mucosal Biopsies in Healthy Clinical Trial Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Wai Kan; Brand, Rhonda M; Camp, Danielle; Edick, Stacey; Mitchell, Carol; Karas, Sherri; Zehmisch, Amanda; Ho, Ken; Brand, Randall E; Harrison, Janet; Abo, Steven; Cranston, Ross D; McGowan, Ian

    2017-08-01

    During Phase 1 pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics studies, participants may undergo multiple sigmoidoscopies, with a collection of 10-20 biopsies during each procedure. This article characterizes the safety of flexible sigmoidoscopies in clinical trial participants. We determined the number of flexible sigmoidoscopies and rectal biopsies that participants underwent and analyzed the frequency, duration, and severity of flexible sigmoidoscopy-related adverse events (AEs). During the study period, 278 participants underwent 1,004 flexible sigmoidoscopies with the collection of 15,930 rectal biopsies. The average number of procedures per participant was 3.6 (median 3; range 1-25), with an average time interval between procedures of 61.8 days (median 28 days; range 1-1,159). There were no serious AEs. Sixteen AEs were related to flexible sigmoidoscopy and occurred in 16 participants, leading to an overall 1.6% (16/1,004) AE rate per procedure and 0.1% (16/15,930) AE rate per biopsy. Of the 16 AEs, 8 (50%) involved abdominal pain, diarrhea, bleeding, flatulence, and bloating, with an average duration of 4.7 days (median 1 day; range 1-28). Most (14/16) AEs were categorized as Grade 1 (mild), whereas two of the AEs were Grade 2 (moderate). No participant withdrew due to procedure-related AEs. Overall, the number of AEs caused by flexible sigmoidoscopy with multiple biopsies was low and the severity was mild, suggesting that this procedure can be safely integrated into protocols requiring repeated intestinal mucosal sampling.

  7. CARDIOLOGY CLINICAL TRIAL PARTICIPATION IN COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS: OBSTACLES AND OPPORTUNITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkin, Carol P.; Altschuler, Andrea; Ackerson, Lynn; Tolsma, Dennis; Rolnick, Sharon J.; Yood, Robert; Weaver, W. Douglas; Von Worley, Ann; Hornbrook, Mark; Magid, David J.; Go, Alan S.

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective of our study was to examine cardiologists’ and organizational leaders’ interest in clinical trial participation and perceived barriers and facilitators to participation within ten diverse non-profit healthcare delivery systems. Trials play a pivotal role in advancing knowledge about the safety and efficacy of cardiovascular interventions and tests. Although cardiovascular trials successfully enroll patients, recruitment challenges persist. Community-based health systems could be an important source of participants and investigators, but little is known about community cardiologists’ experiences with trials. Methods We interviewed 25 cardiology and administrative leaders and mailed questionnaires to all 280 cardiologists at 10 U.S. healthcare organizations. Results The survey received a 73% response rate. While 60% of respondents had not participated in any trials in the past year, nearly 75% wanted greater participation. Cardiologists reported positive attitudes toward trial participation; more than half agreed that trials were their first choice of therapy for patients, if available. Almost all leaders described their organizations as valuing research but not necessarily trials. Major barriers to participation were lack of physician time and insufficient skilled research nurses. Conclusions Cardiologists have considerable interest in trial participation. Major obstacles to increased participation are lack of time and effective infrastructure to support trials. These results suggest that community-based health systems are a rich source for cardiovascular research but additional funding and infrastructure are needed to leverage this resource. PMID:18397842

  8. On the repeated measures designs and sample sizes for randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    For the analysis of longitudinal or repeated measures data, generalized linear mixed-effects models provide a flexible and powerful tool to deal with heterogeneity among subject response profiles. However, the typical statistical design adopted in usual randomized controlled trials is an analysis of covariance type analysis using a pre-defined pair of "pre-post" data, in which pre-(baseline) data are used as a covariate for adjustment together with other covariates. Then, the major design issue is to calculate the sample size or the number of subjects allocated to each treatment group. In this paper, we propose a new repeated measures design and sample size calculations combined with generalized linear mixed-effects models that depend not only on the number of subjects but on the number of repeated measures before and after randomization per subject used for the analysis. The main advantages of the proposed design combined with the generalized linear mixed-effects models are (1) it can easily handle missing data by applying the likelihood-based ignorable analyses under the missing at random assumption and (2) it may lead to a reduction in sample size, compared with the simple pre-post design. The proposed designs and the sample size calculations are illustrated with real data arising from randomized controlled trials.

  9. Orientation of Sandhoppers Under Natural Conditions in Repeated Trials: an Analysis Using Longitudinal Directional Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'elia, A.; Borgioli, C.; Scapini, F.

    2001-12-01

    Zonal recovery is a prompt escape towards the sea performed by sandhoppers under stressful environmental conditions. Differences in habitat features, meteorological conditions during the tests and morphological characteristics of the individuals are all factors affecting orientation. This paper deals with the temporal variation of the orientation of a sandhopper sample, taking into account the effect of some environmental and morphological variables on these changes. The directions chosen by single animals in repeated trials under natural conditions were analysed, using longitudinal circular data. The longitudinal analysis highlights several details about three different kinds of intrapopulation variation due to: sun, wind and eye left/right asymmetry. A clear link between the successive directional responses is demonstrated as well as modulation of behaviour with time: the animals stabilise orientation towards a certain direction in successive trials. The use of longitudinal sets of data in orientation studies produces a good synthesis of directional behaviour, due to several advantages of this kind of analysis. These include the fact that the association between successive behaviours and variability through repeated trials is taken into account; a progressive improvement, due to the integration of information from previous experiences, can be detected; the role of the main cues and factors affecting orientation is more accurately defined; and more parsimonious statistical models can be used to fit the data.

  10. Effects of Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Injection Timing on Medical Abortion Efficacy and Repeat Pregnancy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Elizabeth G; Weaver, Mark A; Louie, Karmen S; Tan, Yi-Ling; Bousiéguez, Manuel; Aranguré-Peraza, Ana Gabriela; Lugo-Hernández, Elba M; Sanhueza, Patricio; Goldberg, Alisa B; Culwell, Kelly R; Kaplan, Clair; Memmel, Lisa; Sonalkar, Sarita; Jamshidi, Roxanne; Winikoff, Beverly

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of timing of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection on medical abortion outcome and risk of repeat pregnancy within the subsequent 6 months. In a multinational randomized trial, we assigned women undergoing medical abortion who wanted depot medroxyprogesterone acetate to administration either with mifepristone (Quickstart group) or after the abortion (Afterstart group). We ascertained abortion outcome, pregnancies, and contraception use over 7 months. From August 2013 to March 2015, we enrolled 461 participants with pregnancy durations of 75 days or less. Of participants included in the abortion outcome analyses, 14 of 220 (6.4%) and 12 of 226 (5.3%) in the Quickstart and Afterstart groups, respectively, had surgery to complete the abortion; the upper 90% confidence limit on this difference was 4.9%, within our prestipulated 5% noninferiority margin. Ongoing pregnancy after initial abortion treatment was significantly more common in the Quickstart group (8/220 [3.6%]) than in the Afterstart group (2/226 [0.9%]); the difference was 2.7% (90% confidence interval 0.4-5.6%). By 6 months, 5 of 213 (2.3%) and 7 of 217 (3.2%) in the Quickstart and Afterstart groups, respectively, became pregnant (exact log-rank test, P=.64). Use of highly effective contraceptives was significantly more common in the Quickstart group at 31 days (P<.001), but no difference was apparent at 6 months. The Quickstart group was significantly more satisfied with group assignment. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate administration with mifepristone did not appreciably increase the risk of surgery after medical abortion but did increase the risk of ongoing pregnancy. It enhanced patient satisfaction, but we found no evidence that it decreased 6-month risk of repeat pregnancy. ClinicalTrials.gov, https://clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01902485.

  11. Assessing the interest to participate in a dengue vaccine efficacy trial among residents of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Guerra, Carmen L; Rodríguez-Acosta, Rosa L; Soto-Gómez, Eunice; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Peña-Orellana, Marisol; Santiago, Luis M; Rivera, Reinaldo; Cruz, R Rhode; Ramírez, Viani; Tomashek, Kay M; Dayan, Gustavo

    2012-07-01

    Dengue, endemic in Puerto Rico, is a major public health problem. Vaccines are thought the best means to prevent dengue because vector control alone has been largely ineffective. We implemented qualitative studies in 2006 and 2010 to determine the acceptability of conducting placebo-controlled dengue vaccine efficacy trials in Puerto Rican children. Key informant interviews and focus groups with parents and children were conducted in municipalities with high dengue incidence. We used structured open-ended questions to determine motivators and attitudes regarding vaccine trial participation. Knowledge about dengue risk and prevention, and knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding vaccines and vaccine trials were assessed. Using grounded theory, we conducted content analysis and established categories and sub-categories of participant responses. All participants were knowledgeable about dengue prevention and perceived children as most affected age groups. Participants were aware of vaccines benefits and they thought a vaccine could prevent dengue. However, most would not allow their children to participate in a placebo-controlled vaccine trial. Barriers included lack of trust in new vaccines and vaccine trial procedures; fear of developing dengue or side effects from the vaccine and lack of information about candidate dengue vaccines. Participants thought information, including results of previous trials might overcome barriers to participation. Motivators for participation were altruism, protection from dengue, free medical attention, and compensation for transportation and participation. Parents would consider children participation if accurate vaccine trial information is provided.

  12. Repeat prenatal corticosteroid prior to preterm birth: a systematic review and individual participant data meta-analysis for the PRECISE study group (prenatal repeat corticosteroid international IPD study group: assessing the effects using the best level of evidence - study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowther Caroline A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this individual participant data (IPD meta-analysis is to assess whether the effects of repeat prenatal corticosteroid treatment given to women at risk of preterm birth to benefit their babies are modified in a clinically meaningful way by factors related to the women or the trial protocol. Methods/Design The Prenatal Repeat Corticosteroid International IPD Study Group: assessing the effects using the best level of Evidence (PRECISE Group will conduct an IPD meta-analysis. The PRECISE International Collaborative Group was formed in 2010 and data collection commenced in 2011. Eleven trials with up to 5,000 women and 6,000 infants are eligible for the PRECISE IPD meta-analysis. The primary study outcomes for the infants will be serious neonatal outcome (defined by the PRECISE International IPD Study Group as one of death (foetal, neonatal or infant; severe respiratory disease; severe intraventricular haemorrhage (grade 3 and 4; chronic lung disease; necrotising enterocolitis; serious retinopathy of prematurity; and cystic periventricular leukomalacia; use of respiratory support (defined as mechanical ventilation or continuous positive airways pressure or other respiratory support; and birth weight (Z-scores. For the children, the primary study outcomes will be death or any neurological disability (however defined by trialists at childhood follow up and may include developmental delay or intellectual impairment (developmental quotient or intelligence quotient more than one standard deviation below the mean, cerebral palsy (abnormality of tone with motor dysfunction, blindness (for example, corrected visual acuity worse than 6/60 in the better eye or deafness (for example, hearing loss requiring amplification or worse. For the women, the primary outcome will be maternal sepsis (defined as chorioamnionitis; pyrexia after trial entry requiring the use of antibiotics; puerperal sepsis; intrapartum fever requiring the use

  13. Adolescent decision making about participation in a hypothetical HIV vaccine trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Andreia B; Ott, Mary A; Lally, Michelle A; Sniecinski, Kevin; Baker, Alyne; Zimet, Gregory D

    2015-03-10

    The purpose of this study was to examine the process of adolescent decision-making about participation in an HIV vaccine clinical trial, comparing it to adult models of informed consent with attention to developmental differences. As part of a larger study of preventive misconception in adolescent HIV vaccine trials, we interviewed 33 male and female 16-19-year-olds who have sex with men. Participants underwent a simulated HIV vaccine trial consent process, and then completed a semistructured interview about their decision making process when deciding whether or not to enroll in and HIV vaccine trial. An ethnographic content analysis approach was utilized. Twelve concepts related to adolescents' decision-making about participation in an HIV vaccine trial were identified and mapped onto Appelbaum and Grisso's four components of decision making capacity including understanding of vaccines and how they work, the purpose of the study, trial procedures, and perceived trial risks and benefits, an appreciation of their own situation, the discussion and weighing of risks and benefits, discussing the need to consult with others about participation, motivations for participation, and their choice to participate. The results of this study suggest that most adolescents at high risk for HIV demonstrate the key abilities needed to make meaningful decisions about HIV vaccine clinical trial participation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Retaining young people in a longitudinal sexual health survey: a trial of strategies to maintain participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nixon Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing trend towards lower participation in questionnaire surveys. This reduces representativeness, increases costs and introduces particular challenges to longitudinal surveys, as researchers have to use complex statistical techniques which attempt to address attrition. This paper describes a trial of incentives to retain longitudinal survey cohorts from ages 16 to 20, to question them on the sensitive topic of sexual health. Methods A longitudinal survey was conducted with 8,430 eligible pupils from two sequential year groups from 25 Scottish schools. Wave 1 (14 years and Wave 2 (16 years were conducted largely within schools. For Wave 3 (18 years, when everyone had left school, the sample was split into 4 groups that were balanced across predictors of survey participation: 1 no incentive; 2 chance of winning one of twenty-five vouchers worth £20; 3 chance of winning one £500 voucher; 4 a definite reward of a £10 voucher sent on receipt of their completed questionnaire. Outcomes were participation at Wave 3 and two years later at Wave 4. Analysis used logistic regression and adjusted for clustering at school level. Results The only condition that had a significant and beneficial impact for pupils was to offer a definite reward for participation (Group 4. Forty-one percent of Group 4 participated in Wave 3 versus 27% or less for Groups 1 to 3. At Wave 4, 35% of Group 4 took part versus 25% or less for the other groups. Similarly, 22% of Group 4 participated in all four Waves of the longitudinal study, whereas for the other three groups it was 16% or less that participated in full. Conclusions The best strategy for retaining all groups of pupils and one that improved retention at both age 18 and age 20 was to offer a definite reward for participation. This is expensive, however, given the many benefits of retaining a longitudinal sample, we recommend inclusion of this as a research cost for cohort and other

  15. What leads Indians to participate in clinical trials? A meta-analysis of qualitative studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin Y Shah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the globalization of clinical trials, large developing nations have substantially increased their participation in multi-site studies. This participation has raised ethical concerns, among them the fear that local customs, habits and culture are not respected while asking potential participants to take part in study. This knowledge gap is particularly noticeable among Indian subjects, since despite the large number of participants, little is known regarding what factors affect their willingness to participate in clinical trials. METHODS: We conducted a meta-analysis of all studies evaluating the factors and barriers, from the perspective of potential Indian participants, contributing to their participation in clinical trials. We searched both international as well as Indian-specific bibliographic databases, including Pubmed, Cochrane, Openjgate, MedInd, Scirus and Medknow, also performing hand searches and communicating with authors to obtain additional references. We enrolled studies dealing exclusively with the participation of Indians in clinical trials. Data extraction was conducted by three researchers, with disagreement being resolved by consensus. RESULTS: Six qualitative studies and one survey were found evaluating the main themes affecting the participation of Indian subjects. Themes included Personal health benefits, Altruism, Trust in physicians, Source of extra income, Detailed knowledge, Methods for motivating participants as factors favoring, while Mistrust on trial organizations, Concerns about efficacy and safety of trials, Psychological reasons, Trial burden, Loss of confidentiality, Dependency issues, Language as the barriers. CONCLUSION: We identified factors that facilitated and barriers that have negative implications on trial participation decisions in Indian subjects. Due consideration and weightage should be assigned to these factors while planning future trials in India.

  16. Participation Bias among Suicidal Adults in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Brown, Gregory K.; Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Fox, Allison J.; Chohan, Mariam Zahid; Beck, Aaron T.

    2011-01-01

    Although individuals who attempt suicide have poor compliance rates with treatment recommendations, the nature and degree of participation bias in clinical treatment research among these individuals is virtually unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine participation bias by comparing the demographic and diagnostic characteristics of adult…

  17. Ethical responsibilities toward indirect and collateral participants in pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Jaye Bea; Merritt, Maria W; Al-Khatib, Sana M; McCall, Debbe; Staman, Karen L; Stepnowsky, Carl

    2015-10-01

    Pragmatic clinical trials are designed to inform decision makers about the benefits, burdens, and risks of health interventions in real-world settings. Pragmatic clinical trials often use for research purposes data collected in the course of clinical practice. The distinctive features of pragmatic clinical trials demand fresh thinking about what is required to act properly toward people affected by their conduct, in ways that go beyond ensuring the protection of rights and welfare for "human research subjects" under conventional research ethics regulations. To stimulate such work, we propose to distinguish among categories of research participants in pragmatic clinical trials as follows: Direct participants: (1) individuals being directly intervened upon and/or (2) individuals from whom personal identifiable data are being collected for the purposes of the pragmatic clinical trial. Indirect participants: individuals who are (1) not identified as direct participants and (2) whose rights and welfare may be affected by the intervention through their routine exposure to the environment in which the intervention is being deployed. Collateral participants: patient groups and other stakeholder communities who may be otherwise affected by the occurrence and findings of the pragmatic clinical trial. We illustrate these distinctions with case examples and discuss the distinctive responsibilities of researchers and pragmatic clinical trial leadership toward each type of participant. We suggest that pragmatic clinical trial investigators, institutional review boards, health systems leaders, and others engaged in the research enterprise work together to identify these participants. For indirect participants, risks and benefits to which they are exposed should be weighed to ensure that their rights and welfare are protected accordingly, and communication strategies should be considered to help them make well-informed decisions. Collateral participants could provide input on the

  18. Perception of the informed consent form by participants in clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Meneguin, Silmara [UNESP; Ayres, Jairo Aparecido

    2014-01-01

    To understand the perception of the participants in controlled clinical trials (CCTs) about the informed consent and describe the meaning of their participation in the research. Qualitative study using the focus group technique. The sample was composed of 19 patients who participated in clinical trials about hypertension and coronary disease in a specialized cardiologic hospital located in the city of Sao Paulo. The methodological framework used was the content analysis. Some of the participa...

  19. Addiction treatment trials: how gender, race/ethnicity, and age relate to ongoing participation and retention in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korte JE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey E Korte1, Carmen L Rosa2, Paul G Wakim2, Harold I Perl21Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, 2Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, MD, USAIntroduction: Historically, racial and ethnic minority populations have been underrepresented in clinical research, and the recruitment and retention of women and ethnic minorities in clinical trials has been a significant challenge for investigators. The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN conducts clinical trials in real-life settings and regularly monitors a number of variables critical to clinical trial implementation, including the retention and demographics of participants.Purpose: The examination of gender, race/ethnicity, and age group differences with respect to retention characteristics in CTN trials.Methods: Reports for 24 completed trials that recruited over 11,000 participants were reviewed, and associations of gender, race/ethnicity, and age group characteristics were examined along with the rate of treatment exposure, the proportion of follow-up assessments obtained, and the availability of primary outcome measure(s.Results: Analysis of the CTN data did not indicate statistical differences in retention across gender or race/ethnicity groups; however, retention rates increased for older participants.Conclusion: These results are based on a large sample of patients with substance use disorders recruited from a treatment-seeking population. The findings demonstrate that younger participants are less likely than older adults to be retained in clinical trials.Keywords: addiction treatment, age, ethnic minorities, gender difference, substance use disorders, race, recruitment, retention, clinical trials

  20. LEADER 7 : Cardiovascular risk profiles of US and European participants in the LEADER diabetes trial differ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Guy E H M; Tack, Cees J.; Pieber, Thomas R.; Comlekci, Abdurrahman; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Baeres, Florian M M; Marso, Steven P.; Buse, John B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To determine whether US and European participants in the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes: Evaluation of cardiovascular outcome Results (LEADER) trial differ regarding risk factors for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Methods: Baseline data, stratified for prior cardiovascular

  1. Differences between participants and nonparticipants in an exercise trial for adults with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Z. de; Munneke, M.; Jansen, L.M.; Ronday, K.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Brand, R.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Zuijderduin, W.M.; Hazes, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the generalizability of the results of a randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of long-term, high-intensity exercises in the rheumatoid arthritis patients in training (RAPIT) trial by comparing the characteristics of the participants with the nonparticipants. MET

  2. How individual participant data meta-analyses have influenced trial design, conduct, and analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tierney, J.F.; Pignon, J.P.; Gueffyier, F.; Clarke, M.; Askie, L.; Vale, C.L.; Burdett, S.; Rovers, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate how individual participant data (IPD) meta-analyses have impacted directly on the design and conduct of trials and highlight other advantages IPD might offer. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Potential examples of the impact of IPD meta-analyses on trials were identified at an in

  3. Young People's Experiences of Participation in Clinical Trials : Reasons for Taking Part

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtenberg, Malou; Maeckelberghe, Els; Locock, Louise; Powell, Lesley; Verhagen, A. A. Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Given the lack of knowledge about safety and efficacy of many treatments for children, pediatric clinical trials are important, but recruitment for pediatric research is difficult. Little is known about children's perspective on participating in trials. The purpose of this study was to understand th

  4. Methodical principles of assessment of financial compensation for clinical trial volunteer participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ye. Dobrova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Due to the necessity to obtain the reliable results of a clinical trial and to distribute it to the general population of patients the problem of recruiting the adequate number of individuals to participate in the study as objects of observation in the group receiving the investigational medicinal product or as a member of the control group should to be solved. Aim of study. The aim of our study was to research and to justify practically the methodological approaches to determining financial compensation for participation of volunteers in the clinical trials and the appropriate methods of its calculation. Material and methods. For the purpose of determining the baseline factors for calculating the hourly compensation the survey of healthy volunteers and of expert professionals as well as the analysis of its results have been done. Questioning healthy volunteers regarding their attitudes towards inconvenience and discomfort during participation in clinical trials was held at the Ukrainian clinical research centers. Survey participants number was 99, they were healthy volunteers who took part in the first phase clinical trial or bioequivalence studies. The expert survey included questioning of the 193 professionals from Ukrainian clinical research centers, CRO, pharmaceutical manufacturers – research sponsors and collaborators State Expert Center Ministry of Health of Ukraine, who were involved in the planning, organization, implementation and evaluation of clinical trials as well as their regulatory control. Results of study. Using the method of pairwise comparisons and iterative refinement procedures the collective estimate of experts questionnaire results has been performed, by the results of which the nine indicators have been identified and the importance of each of them as units of discomfort have been established. Motivational factors of voluntary participation in clinical trials have been studied. Motivation system for

  5. Increasing participation of cancer patients in randomised controlled trials: a systematic review

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    Stirk Lisa

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are many barriers to patient participation in randomised controlled trials of cancer treatments. To increase participation in trials, strategies need to be identified to overcome these barriers. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of interventions to overcome barriers to patient participation in randomised controlled trials (RCTs of cancer treatments. Methods A systematic review was conducted. Published and unpublished studies in any language were searched for in fifteen electronic databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO, from inception to the end of 2004. Studies of any interventions to improve cancer patient participation in RCTs, which reported the change in recruitment rates, were eligible for inclusion. RCTs and non-randomised controlled trials as well as before and after studies reporting baseline rates specific to the population being investigated were included. Data were extracted by one reviewer into structured summary tables and checked for accuracy by a second reviewer. Each included study was assessed against a checklist for methodological quality by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. A narrative synthesis was conducted. Results Eight studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria: three RCTs, two non-randomised controlled trials and three observational studies. Six of the studies had an intervention that had some relevance to the UK. There was no robust evidence that any of the interventions investigated led to an increase in cancer patient participation in RCTs, though one good quality RCT found that urologists and nurses were equally effective at recruiting participants to a treatment trial for prostate cancer. Although there was no evidence of an effect in any of the studies, the evidence was not of sufficient quality to be able to conclude that these interventions therefore do not work. Conclusion There is not a strong evidence-base for interventions that

  6. A theory-based online health behaviour intervention for new university students (U@Uni:LifeGuide): results from a repeat randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, David; Epton, Tracy; Norman, Paul; Sheeran, Paschal; Harris, Peter R; Webb, Thomas L; Julious, Steven A; Brennan, Alan; Thomas, Chloe; Petroczi, Andrea; Naughton, Declan; Shah, Iltaf

    2015-12-07

    This paper reports the results of a repeat trial assessing the effectiveness of an online theory-based intervention to promote healthy lifestyle behaviours in new university students. The original trial found that the intervention reduced the number of smokers at 6-month follow-up compared with the control condition, but had non-significant effects on the other targeted health behaviours. However, the original trial suffered from low levels of engagement, which the repeat trial sought to rectify. Three weeks before staring university, all incoming undergraduate students at a large university in the UK were sent an email inviting them to participate in the study. After completing a baseline questionnaire, participants were randomly allocated to intervention or control conditions. The intervention consisted of a self-affirmation manipulation, health messages based on the theory of planned behaviour and implementation intention tasks. Participants were followed-up 1 and 6 months after starting university. The primary outcome measures were portions of fruit and vegetables consumed, physical activity levels, units of alcohol consumed and smoking status at 6-month follow-up. The study recruited 2,621 students (intervention n=1346, control n=1275), of whom 1495 completed at least one follow-up (intervention n=696, control n=799). Intention-to-treat analyses indicated that the intervention had a non-significant effect on the primary outcomes, although the effect of the intervention on fruit and vegetable intake was significant in the per-protocol analyses. Secondary analyses revealed that the intervention had significant effects on having smoked at university (self-report) and on a biochemical marker of alcohol use. Despite successfully increasing levels of engagement, the intervention did not have a significant effect on the primary outcome measures. The relatively weak effects of the intervention, found in both the original and repeat trials, may be due to the focus on

  7. Novel histone biotinylation marks are enriched in repeat regions and participate in repression of transcriptionally competent genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestinger, Valerie; Wijeratne, Subhashinee S K; Rodriguez-Melendez, Rocio; Zempleni, Janos

    2011-04-01

    Covalent histone modifications play crucial roles in chromatin structure and genome stability. We previously reported biotinylation of lysine (K) residues in histones H2A, H3 and H4 by holocarboxylase synthetase and demonstrated that K12-biotinylated histone H4 (H4K12bio) is enriched in repeat regions and participates in gene repression. The biological functions of biotinylation marks other than H4K12bio are poorly understood. Here, novel biotinylation site-specific antibodies against H3K9bio, H3K18bio and H4K8bio were used in chromatin immunoprecipitation studies to obtain first insights into possible biological functions of these marks. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were conducted in human primary fibroblasts and Jurkat lymphoblastoma cells, and revealed that H3K9bio, H3K18bio and H4K8bio are enriched in repeat regions such as pericentromeric alpha satellite repeats and long-terminal repeats while being depleted in transcriptionally active promoters in euchromatin. Transcriptional stimulation of the repressed interleukin-2 promoter triggered a rapid depletion of histone biotinylation marks at this locus in Jurkat cells, which was paralleled by an increase in interleukin-2 mRNA. Importantly, the enrichment of H3K9bio, H3K18bio and H4K8bio at genomic loci depended on the concentration of biotin in culture media at nutritionally relevant levels, suggesting a novel mechanism of gene regulation by biotin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Motivators to participation in medical trials: the application of social and personal categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhalla, Shayesta; Poole, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The Health Belief Model provides a framework to understand motivators for volunteering for medical research. Motivators can take the form of social and personal benefits. In this systematic review of review articles, we contrast motivators of participation in actual cancer trials to those in actual HIV vaccine trials. We retrieved eight review articles from 2000 to 2012 examining motivators to participation in actual cancer trials. Personal benefits were most often psychological in nature, such as "coping with symptoms." Social benefits included "advancing research," "helping other cancer patients," and "for their family." While specific motivators vary between considerations - cancer research and HIV vaccine trials, these motivators fall into similar categories at similar frequencies. For example, personal/psychological benefits are common in each. Participant recruitment must be mindful of these categories of motivators for both cancer and HIV vaccine research.

  9. Trial of labor compared to repeat cesarean section in women with no other risk factors than a prior cesarean delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studsgaard, Anne; Skorstengaard, Malene; Glavind, Julie

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare outcomes with trial of labor after cesarean (TOLAC) or elective repeat cesarean delivery on maternal request (ERCD-MR). DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Danish university hospital. POPULATION: Women with TOLAC (n = 1161) and women with ERCD-MR (n = 622) between 200...

  10. Does clinical trial participation improve outcomes in patients with ovarian cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, L; Horsley, L; Heesters, A; Machin, J D; Mitchell, C; Clamp, A R; Jayson, G C; Hasan, J

    2016-01-01

    Treatment on a clinical trial is considered to be beneficial to oncology patients. However, supportive evidence for this is scarce. Trial effect describes the phenomenon of improved health outcomes in patients treated with standard of care (SOC) on trial compared to those receiving SOC outside of a clinical trial. We evaluated trial effect in patients with ovarian cancer treated at our tertiary cancer centre. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients with ovarian cancer treated at The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust. Patients treated on one of three first-line clinical trials: (SCOTROC-4, ICON-5, ICON-7) were matched (for age, International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics stage, surgical status and performance status) with individuals receiving the same SOC off trial. Survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier methodology. 60 patients were evaluated; 30 on trial and 30 on SOC off trial. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 21.8 months (control group) and 25.9 months (trial group), median overall survival (OS) was 64.3 months (control group) and 68.9 months (trial group). There was no difference in PFS (log-rank test: HR 0.87 (95% CI 0.48 to 1.54), p=0.6) or OS (log-rank test: HR 0.87 (95% CI 0.46 to 1.64), p=0.7) between groups. Patient survival was similar regardless if treated on trial or as SOC. Our findings do not support trial effect, at least in a tertiary cancer centre. Clinical trial participation in specialised cancer centres promotes best practice to the benefit of all patients. These findings may impact discussions round consent of patients to trials and organisation of oncology services.

  11. Performance-based readability testing of participant information for a Phase 3 IVF trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silcock Jonathan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies suggest that the process of patient consent to clinical trials is sub-optimal. Participant information sheets are important but can be technical and lengthy documents. Performance-based readability testing is an established means of assessing patient information, and this study aimed to test its application to participant information for a Phase 3 trial. Methods An independent groups design was used to study the User Testing performance of the participant information sheet from the Phase 3 'Poor Responders' trial of In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF. 20 members of the public were asked to read it, then find and demonstrate understanding of 21 key aspects of the trial. The participant information sheet was then re-written and re-designed, and tested on 20 members of the public, using the same 21 item questionnaire. Results The original participant information sheet performed well in some places. Participants could not find some answers and some of the found information was not understood. In total there were 30 instances of information being not found or not understood. Answers to three questions were found but not understood by many of the participants, these related to aspects of the drug timing, Follicle Stimulating Hormone and compensation. Only two of the 20 participants could find and show understanding of all question items when using the original sheet. The revised sheet performed generally better, with 17 instances of information being not found or not understood, although the number of 'not found' items increased. Half of the 20 participants could find and show understanding of all question items when using the revised sheet. When asked to compare the versions of the sheet, almost all participants preferred the revised version. Conclusion The original participant information sheet may not have enabled patients fully to give valid consent. Participants seeing the revised sheet were better able to understand the

  12. A multistep recruitment strategy to a participant-intensive clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kim Dupree; Reiner, Ann C

    2010-11-01

    Adequate access to well-informed study participants is key to rapid recruitment and retention to randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs). We describe a novel seven-step recruitment process for enrolling participants in a recently completed drug and exercise RCT in fibromyalgia. The majority decided not to participate during the screening process. Approximately 7% dropped out after beginning the intervention. All participants were enrolled within 14 months, which was 21 months ahead of the projected timeline. We suggest that this strategy ultimately decreased costs, made efficient use of research staff, and provided a consistent message to participants about the RCT.

  13. Reported characteristics of participants in physical therapy-related clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevan, Julia; Haskvitz, Esther M

    2015-06-01

    The inclusion of sociodemographic and anthropometric variables in published clinical trials enables physical therapists to determine the applicability of trial results to patients in their clinics. The aim of this study was to examine the reporting of participant sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics in published physical therapy-related clinical trials. This was a retrospective review of clinical trials from 2 samples drawn from literature applicable to physical therapy. Two reviewers independently extracted data from a random sample of 152 clinical trials from the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and a purposive sample of 85 clinical trials published in the journal Physical Therapy (PTJ). A database containing the occurrence of sociodemographic (age, sex, race/ethnicity, level of education, marital status) and anthropometric variables (height, weight, body mass index) in each article was created to generate descriptive statistics about both samples. Among the sociodemographic variables, at least 90% of articles reported the sex and age of trial participants. Additional sociodemographic characteristics that were reported in 20% to 26% of articles were participant level of education and participant race/ethnicity. The reporting of anthropometric data differed between the 2 samples, with body mass index being most commonly reported in the PEDro sample (48.0%) and weight being most commonly reported in the PTJ sample (38.8%). Articles reviewed were limited by year of publication (from 2008 to 2012 for PTJ articles and 2010 for clinical trials from PEDro) and to English-language-only literature. The physical therapy literature would benefit from enhanced reporting requirements for both sociodemographic and anthropometric data about participants. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  14. African Americans and participation in clinical trials: differences in beliefs and attitudes by gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BeLue, R; Taylor-Richardson, K D; Lin, J; Rivera, A T; Grandison, D

    2006-12-01

    To explore gender differences in perceptions of 1) barriers and motivators to participation in clinical trials and perceived need of clinical trials and 2) perceptions of risks and benefits of participation in clinical trials in African American men and women. Focus groups were conducted among African American participants by gender. A total of 67 African American participated in the focus groups. All focus groups were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was performed by combining the key elements of grounded theory and content analysis with the assistance of the qualitative software ATLAS.ti 5.0. Different themes emerged for men versus women. The business and economic of research were important to male participants. The researcher-participant relationship emerged as one of the strongest themes related to potential female participation in research. Focus group results indicate that African American men and women present different preferences, beliefs and barriers to participation. Men expressed the desire to know information on funding issues, financial benefit and impact of the research. Women expressed the desire to be treated respectfully and as an individual as opposed to just a study subject. Integrating gender preferences into researcher-participant interactions, advertisement, informed consent delivery and advertisement of research studies may lead to increased participation rates. Discussing and presenting relevant information on clinical research funding mechanisms, and the business of clinical research with potential participants may be helpful in building trust with the researcher and the research team. Creating a process for information exchange and methods to minimize the power imbalance between the researcher and participant may also build trust and help participants feel more comfortable to participate in research.

  15. Knowledge about vaccine trials and willingness to participate in an HIV/AIDS vaccine study in the Ugandan military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, J W; George, K; Svilar, G; Ihler, E; Mafigiri, D; Kabugo, M; Mugisha, E

    2001-08-01

    In preparation for HIV vaccine trials, knowledge about vaccines, willingness to participate in a vaccine study, and motivations for participation must be assessed. The Preparation for AIDS Vaccine Evaluation study assessed knowledge about vaccines and vaccine trials and willingness to participate in a hypothetical trial in 1,182 Ugandan military men (aged 18-30 years). Participants received education about vaccine trials and were interviewed during 24 months of follow-up observation. Its key findings are that: 1) throughout follow-up, most participants expressed willingness to participate in a hypothetical HIV vaccine trial; 2) participants are familiar with vaccines but do not clearly distinguish the use of vaccines for prevention or curing; 3) the most common reason given for being interested in participating in a vaccine trial was to be protected from HIV/AIDS; 4) trials' procedures (e.g., placebos, randomization, and blinding) were unfamiliar; and 5) knowledge about trials' procedures increased incrementally over follow-up, but at different rates for different concepts. These data demonstrate that potential vaccine trials' participants may benefit from vaccine trial education if adequate time is allowed to ensure that participants are able to master the complex information required for trial participation.

  16. Applying a Conceptual Framework to Maximize the Participation of Diverse Populations in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoles, A; Cook, E; Ginossar, T; Knight, K D; Ford, M E

    2017-01-01

    The underrepresentation of ethnically diverse populations in cancer clinical trials results in the inequitable distribution of the risks and benefits of this research. Using a case study approach, we apply a conceptual framework of factors associated with the participation of diverse population groups in cancer clinical trials developed by Dr. Jean Ford and colleagues to increase understanding of the specific strategies, and barriers and promoters addressed by these strategies, that resulted in marked success in accrual of racially and ethnically diverse populations in cancer clinical research. Results indicate that the studies presented were able to successfully engage minority participants due to the creation and implementation of multilevel, multifaceted strategies that included: culturally and linguistically appropriate outreach, education, and research studies that were accessible in local communities; infrastructure to support engagement of key stakeholders, clinicians, and organizations serving minority communities; testimonials by ethnically diverse cancer survivors; availability of medical interpretation services; and providing infrastructure that facilitated the engagement in clinical research of clinicians who care for minority patient populations. These strategic efforts were effective in addressing limited awareness of trials, lack of opportunities to participate, and acceptance of engagement in cancer clinical trials. Careful attention to the context and population characteristics in which cancer clinical trials are conducted will be necessary to address disparities in research participation and cancer outcomes. These studies illustrate that progress on minority accrual into clinical research requires intentional efforts to overcome barriers at all three stages of the accrual process: awareness, opportunity, and acceptance of participation.

  17. Participant recruitment to FiCTION, a primary dental care trial - survey of facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keightley, A; Clarkson, J; Maguire, A; Speed, C; Innes, N

    2014-11-01

    To identify reasons behind a lower than expected participant recruitment rate within the FiCTION trial, a multi-centre paediatric primary dental care randomised controlled trial (RCT). An online survey, based on a previously published tool, consisting of both quantitative and qualitative responses, completed by staff in dental practices recruiting to FiCTION. Ratings from quantitative responses were aggregated to give overall scores for factors related to participant recruitment. Qualitative responses were independently grouped into themes. Thirty-nine anonymous responses were received. Main facilitators related to the support received from the central research team and importance of the research question. The main barriers related to low child eligibility rates and the integration of trial processes within routine workloads. These findings have directed strategies for enhancing participant recruitment at existing practices and informed recruitment of further practices. The results help provide a profile of the features required of practices to successfully screen and recruit participants. Future trials in this setting should consider the level of interest in the research question within practices, and ensure trial processes are as streamlined as possible. Research teams should actively support practices with participant recruitment and maintain enthusiasm among the entire practice team.

  18. Differential Short-Term Repeated Forearm Hyperaemic Reactivity in Coronary Artery Disease Patients Compared to Healthy Low Risk Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon L. Bacon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hyperaemic response of the forearm is a widely used technique to assess the vascular reactivity. Little is known about the short-term reproducibility and the possible exhaustion of this response in normal or diseased states. As such, the current study was conducted to assess this phenomenon using a unique nuclear medicine- (NM- based technique. 19 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD undergoing NM exercise stress tests and 15 low risk (LR participants completed 2 reactive hyperaemia tests, using a SPECT-based technique, separated by 15  min. Analyses revealed that CAD patients had lower hyperaemic responses than LR participants (P<.001, and that there was a significant group × time interaction (P<.005, such that LR participants showed a larger decrease in the reactivity (5.2±0.4 to 3.6±0.4 than the CAD patients (2.9±0.3 to 2.6±0.3. These results suggest that there is a variability, due to disease states, in the reproducibility of the hypaeremic reactivity. This needs to be taken into account in short-term repeated measure studies.

  19. Participants as community-based peer educators: Impact on a clinical trial site in KwaZulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Naidoo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Participant recruitment, retention and product adherence are necessary to measure the efficacy or effectiveness of an intervention in a clinical trial. As part of a Phase III HIV prevention trial in a rural area in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa, a peer educator programme was initiated to aid in recruitment and retention of trial participants from the community. Enrolled trial participants who had completed at least 6 months of trial participation and who had honoured all of their scheduled trial visits within that period were approached to be peer educators. Following additional selection criteria, 24 participants were eligible to be trained as peer educators. Training topics included HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections, nutrition, antiretrovirals, clinical trials, and methods of disseminating this information to the community. The role of peer educators was to bring interested women from their community to the trial site for comprehensive education and information about the trial and possibly trial participation. A total of 1879 women were educated by peer educators between July 2004 and December 2006. Of these, 553 women visited the trial site for further education and screening for participation in the trial. Peer educators provided continuous education and support to women enrolled in the trial which also promoted retention, ultimately contributing to the site's 94% retention rate. Recruitment and retention efforts of trial participants are likely to be enhanced by involving trial participants as peer educators. Such trial participants are in a better position to understand cultural dynamics and hence capable of engaging the community with appropriate HIV prevention and trial-related messaging.

  20. Ingestion of High Molecular Weight Carbohydrate Enhances Subsequent Repeated Maximal Power: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jonathan M.; Almada, Anthony L.; Van Eck, Leighsa E.; Shah, Meena; Mitchell, Joel B.; Jones, Margaret T.; Jagim, Andrew R.; Rowlands, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Athletes in sports demanding repeat maximal work outputs frequently train concurrently utilizing sequential bouts of intense endurance and resistance training sessions. On a daily basis, maximal work within subsequent bouts may be limited by muscle glycogen availability. Recently, the ingestion of a unique high molecular weight (HMW) carbohydrate was found to increase glycogen re-synthesis rate and enhance work output during subsequent endurance exercise, relative to low molecular weight (LMW) carbohydrate ingestion. The effect of the HMW carbohydrate, however, on the performance of intense resistance exercise following prolonged-intense endurance training is unknown. Sixteen resistance trained men (23±3 years; 176.7±9.8 cm; 88.2±8.6 kg) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized 3-way crossover design comprising a muscle-glycogen depleting cycling exercise followed by ingestion of placebo (PLA), or 1.2 g•kg•bw-1 of LMW or HMW carbohydrate solution (10%) with blood sampling for 2-h post-ingestion. Thereafter, participants performed 5 sets of 10 maximal explosive repetitions of back squat (75% of 1RM). Compared to PLA, ingestion of HMW (4.9%, 90%CI 3.8%, 5.9%) and LMW (1.9%, 90%CI 0.8%, 3.0%) carbohydrate solutions substantially increased power output during resistance exercise, with the 3.1% (90% CI 4.3, 2.0%) almost certain additional gain in power after HMW-LMW ingestion attributed to higher movement velocity after force kinematic analysis (HMW-LMW 2.5%, 90%CI 1.4, 3.7%). Both carbohydrate solutions increased post-exercise plasma glucose, glucoregulatory and gut hormones compared to PLA, but differences between carbohydrates were unclear; thus, the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Ingestion of a HMW carbohydrate following prolonged intense endurance exercise provides superior benefits to movement velocity and power output during subsequent repeated maximal explosive resistance exercise. This study was registered with

  1. A randomised controlled trial of repeated filmed social contact on reducing mental illness-related stigma in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, S; Yamaguchi, S; Ojio, Y; Ohta, K; Shimada, T; Watanabe, K; Thornicroft, G; Ando, S

    2016-12-19

    Public stigma alters attitudes towards people with mental illness, and is a particular concern for young people since most mental health problems occur in adolescence and young adulthood. However, little is known about the long-term effects of repeated filmed social contact (FSC) on reducing mental health-related stigma among young adults in the general population, compared with self-instructional Internet search (INS) and control interventions. This study is a parallel-group randomised controlled trial over 12 months conducted in Tokyo, Japan. A total of 259 university students (male n = 150, mean age = 20.0 years, s.d. = 1.2) were recruited from 20 colleges and universities between November 2013 and July 2014, without being provided information about the mental health-related survey or trial. Participants were assigned to one of three groups before completion of the baseline survey (FSC/INS/control = 89/83/87). The FSC group received a computer-based 30-min social contact film with general mental health education and five follow-up web-based FSCs at 2-month intervals. The INS group undertook a 30-min search for mental health-related information with five follow-up web-based reminders for self-instructional searches at 2-month intervals. The control group played PC games and had no follow-up intervention. The main outcome measures were the future (intended behaviour) domain of the Reported and Intended Behaviour Scale at 12 months after the intervention. Analysis was conducted in September 2015. At the 12-month follow-up, 218 participants completed the survey (84.1%, 75:70:73). The FSC group showed the greatest change at the 12-month follow-up (FSC: mean change 2.11 [95% CI 1.49, 2.73], INS: 1.04 [0.29, 1.80], control: 0.71 [0.09, 1.33]; FSC v. INS p = 0.037, FSC v. controls p = 0.004). No adverse events were reported during the follow-up period. FSC was more successful in reducing stigma at 12 months after intervention than INS or control interventions. FSC could

  2. South Asian participation in clinical trials: the views of lay people and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain-Gambles, Mah; Atkin, Karl; Leese, Brenda

    2006-07-01

    There is little UK-based empirical research on South Asian participation in clinical trials. The predominantly US literature rarely engages with mainstream debates about ethnicity, diversity and difference. This study was prompted by a lack of knowledge about how South Asian people perceive trial involvement and the risks and benefits involved. Face to face interviews were conducted with 25 health professionals (consultants, GPs, nursing staff, academics, non-medically trained trial co-ordinators, LREC and MREC members) and 60 South Asian lay people (20 Indians, 20 Pakistanis and 20 Bangladeshis) who had not taken part in a trial. The study took place in the Leeds and Bradford areas of England. It was found that lay South Asian attitudes towards clinical trial participation focused on similarities rather than differences with the general UK population, suggesting that the relevance of ethnicity should be kept in perspective. There was no evidence of antipathy amongst South Asians to the concept of clinical trials, and awareness was a correlate of social class, education and younger age. Lay factors that might affect South Asian participation in clinical trials included: age; language, social class; feeling of not belonging/mistrust; culture and religion. Approachable patients (of the same gender, social class and fluent in English) tended to be 'cherry picked' to clinical trials. This practice was justified because of a lack of time, resources and inadequate support. South Asian patients might be systematically excluded from trials due to the increased cost and time associated with their inclusion, particularly in relation to the language barrier. Under-representation might also be due to passive exclusion associated with cultural stereotypes. The paper concludes by applying the theoretical framework of institutional racism as a means of making sense of policy and practice. At the same time, caution is advocated against using ethnicity as the only form of

  3. Community readiness to promote Latinas' participation in breast cancer prevention clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawsin, Catalina R; Borrayo, Evelinn A; Edwards, Ruth; Belloso, Carolina

    2007-07-01

    The high breast cancer (BC) mortality rates that exist among Hispanic women (Latinas) are a health disparity burden that needs to be addressed. Prevention clinical trials are a burgeoning area of cancer prevention efforts and may serve to promote parity. Unfortunately, Latinas, along with other ethnic minority women, continue to be under-represented in this form of research. Previous studies have examined individual barriers to ethnic minorities' participation, but none have assessed community factors contributing to Latinas' under-representation in these studies. The present study addressed these limitations from a community perspective by exploring which factors might inhibit Latinas' participation in clinical trials, specifically BC prevention trials. Using the Community Readiness Model (CRM), 19 key informants were interviewed in four communities, two rural and two urban, in Colorado, USA. The key informant assessment involved a semistructured interview that measured the level of community readiness to encourage participation in BC prevention activities. The results reflected a community climate that did not recognise BC as a health problem that affected Latinas in participating communities. Compared to other healthcare priorities, participation in BC prevention clinical trials was considered a low priority in these communities. Overall, leadership and community resources were not identified or allocated to encourage the participation of Latinas. The results highlight the lack of awareness regarding clinical trials among both community members and leaders. According to the CRM, strategies to enhance awareness at multiple levels in the community are necessary. This study demonstrates how the CRM can be used to better understand a community's perspective on BC, and specifically, the under-representation of Latinas in clinical trials.

  4. Facebook advertising for participant recruitment into a blood pressure clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Erin L; Gilroy, Deborah; Srikusalanukul, Wichat; Abhayaratna, Walter P; Stanton, Tony; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Stowasser, Michael; Sharman, James E

    2017-07-12

    Recruitment of sufficient sample size into clinical trials is challenging. Conventional advertising methods are expensive and are often ineffective. The effectiveness of Facebook for recruitment into blood pressure clinical trials of middle-to-older-aged people is unknown. This study aimed to assess this by comparing Facebook advertising with conventional recruitment methods from a retrospective analysis within a clinical trial. Conventional advertisements (newspaper, radio and posters) were employed for the first 20 months of a randomized controlled clinical trial conducted in three Australian capital cities from Tasmania, Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory. With dwindling participant recruitment, at 20 months a Facebook advertising campaign was employed intermittently over a 4-month period. Recruitment results were retrospectively compared with those using conventional methods in the previous 4 months. Compared with conventional recruitment methods, Facebook advertisement was associated with a significant increase in the number of participants recruited in the Australian Capital Territory (from an average 1.8-7.3/month; P Facebook advertisement was associated with a significant decrease in the age of participants enquiring into the study (from 60.9 to 58.7 years; P Facebook advertising was successful in helping to increase recruitment of middle-to-older aged participants into a blood pressure clinical trial, although there may be some variability in effect that is dependent on location.

  5. Participation bias in a randomised trial of screening for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbech, Mie Sara; Siersma, Volkert; Dirksen, Asger

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Participation bias might affect the results and the representability of randomised controlled trials. We investigated the degree of socio-demographic and psychosocial participation bias in the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST). METHODS: In DLCST the questionnaire COS......-LC (Consequences of Screening in Lung Cancer) was used to measure the psychosocial aspects of screening. To investigate a difference with a comparable representative sample from the Danish population, we sent out an inclusion questionnaire to 3999 Danes in the age from 50 to 70 years randomly selected from...

  6. Falls Assessment Clinical Trial (FACT: design, interventions, recruitment strategies and participant characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawton Beverley

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines recommend multifactorial intervention programmes to prevent falls in older adults but there are few randomised controlled trials in a real life health care setting. We describe the rationale, intervention, study design, recruitment strategies and baseline characteristics of participants in a randomised controlled trial of a multifactorial falls prevention programme in primary health care. Methods Participants are patients from 19 primary care practices in Hutt Valley, New Zealand aged 75 years and over who have fallen in the past year and live independently. Two recruitment strategies were used – waiting room screening and practice mail-out. Intervention participants receive a community based nurse assessment of falls and fracture risk factors, home hazards, referral to appropriate community interventions, and strength and balance exercise programme. Control participants receive usual care and social visits. Outcome measures include number of falls and injuries over 12 months, balance, strength, falls efficacy, activities of daily living, quality of life, and physical activity levels. Results 312 participants were recruited (69% women. Of those who had fallen, 58% of people screened in the practice waiting rooms and 40% when screened by practice letter were willing to participate. Characteristics of participants recruited using the two methods are similar (p > 0.05. Mean age of all participants was 81 years (SD 5. On average participants have 7 medical conditions, take 5.5 medications (29% on psychotropics with a median of 2 falls (interquartile range 1, 3 in the previous year. Conclusion The two recruitment strategies and the community based intervention delivery were feasible and successful, identifying a high risk group with multiple falls. Recruitment in the waiting room gave higher response rates but was less efficient than practice mail-out. Testing the effectiveness of an evidence based intervention in a

  7. Addressing dichotomous data for participants excluded from trial analysis: a guide for systematic reviewers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie A Akl

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Systematic reviewer authors intending to include all randomized participants in their meta-analyses need to make assumptions about the outcomes of participants with missing data. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper is to provide systematic reviewer authors with a relatively simple guidance for addressing dichotomous data for participants excluded from analyses of randomized trials. METHODS: This guide is based on a review of the Cochrane handbook and published methodological research. The guide deals with participants excluded from the analysis who were considered 'non-adherent to the protocol' but for whom data are available, and participants with missing data. RESULTS: Systematic reviewer authors should include data from 'non-adherent' participants excluded from the primary study authors' analysis but for whom data are available. For missing, unavailable participant data, authors may conduct a complete case analysis (excluding those with missing data as the primary analysis. Alternatively, they may conduct a primary analysis that makes plausible assumptions about the outcomes of participants with missing data. When the primary analysis suggests important benefit, sensitivity meta-analyses using relatively extreme assumptions that may vary in plausibility can inform the extent to which risk of bias impacts the confidence in the results of the primary analysis. The more plausible assumptions draw on the outcome event rates within the trial or in all trials included in the meta-analysis. The proposed guide does not take into account the uncertainty associated with assumed events. CONCLUSIONS: This guide proposes methods for handling participants excluded from analyses of randomized trials. These methods can help in establishing the extent to which risk of bias impacts meta-analysis results.

  8. Participation of women in HIV clinical trials: the IPEC-FIOCRUZ experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lake JE

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Jordan E Lake1, Ruth K Friedman2, Cynthia B Cunha2, Sandra W Cardoso2, Valdilea G Veloso2, Judith S Currier1, Beatriz Grinsztejn21Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Fundação Oswaldo Cruz – Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas/IPEC, Rio de Janeiro, State of Rio de Janeiro, BrazilBackground: Fifty percent of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS worldwide are female. In Brazil, for example, 240,000 women are infected with HIV, rates of infection in women have increased over the last two decades, and addressing HIV prevention and treatment for women at risk for, or living with, HIV/AIDS remains a challenge. To better address the needs of women living with HIV in Brazil, the Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas – Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (IPEC-FIOCRUZ HIV Women’s Cohort was established in 1996 to study the natural history of women seeking HIV care. This analysis describes the characteristics of women in the cohort who participated in HIV clinical trials between 1999 and 2008.Methods: A total of 736 Women’s Cohort participants were in active follow-up and 665 participants from the Women’s Cohort were included in univariable and multivariable analyses to determine socioeconomic and sociodemographic factors associated with women’s participation in HIV clinical trials at our site.Results: Of the complete cohort, 23% participated in a clinical trial between January 1999 and July 2008. Odds of participation decreased for women who were younger than 35 years old, currently employed, had an HIV-positive sexual partner, and/or who reported a lifetime history of illicit drug use. Alternatively, the odds of participation increased for women who had more than 8 years of formal education, were living independently, and/or were married or cohabitating.Conclusion: The rate of participation in HIV clinical trials by

  9. Willingness to participate in clinical trials among patients of Chinese heritage: a meta-synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Limkakeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Subjects of Chinese heritage have been found to participate in clinical research at lower rates than other groups despite growing in numbers as a population. While much research has examined research participants' motivation, there has not been a comprehensive synthesis of this information with respect to participants of Chinese descent. We sought to identify the factors that promote and hinder participation in clinical research among participants of Chinese heritage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic review of the literature in Pubmed, OpenJGATE, SCIRUS, and COCHRANE databases and performed a meta-synthesis of retrieved articles. We extracted qualitative data, such as quotes to identify emerging themes. We identified five studies that met our selection criteria. Of them, only one (1/5 was conducted in China while other studies involved Chinese emigrants in USA (3/5 and Singapore (1/5. Participants from China were similar to emigrants with regard to factors that either promoted or decreased research participation. Four studies reported data exclusively on Chinese subjects. Three of the five studies involved qualitative interviews while the others were conducted using a survey design. Six themes favoring research participation were identified: Personal Benefit to Participants, Financial Incentives, Participant Sense of Altruism, Family or Physician Recommendations, Advertisements, and Convenience to the Participant. Five factors were seen as a barrier to participation in clinical trials: Mistrust of Researchers, Language Barrier, Lack of Financial and Other Support, Cultural and Social Barriers, Lack of Knowledge about Clinical Trials. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Chinese heritage clinical research participants value personal benefit, financial incentives, the ability to help others, recommendations of others, advertisements, and convenience when considering clinical research participation. In addition, the

  10. Participant demographics reported in "Table 1" of randomised controlled trials: a case of "inverse evidence"?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furler John

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Data supporting external validity of trial results allows clinicians to assess the applicability of a study's findings to their practice population. Socio-economic status (SES of trial participants may be critical to external validity given the relationship between social and economic circumstances and health. We explored how this is documented in reports of RCTs in four major general medical journals. Methods The contents lists of four leading general medical journals were hand searched to identify 25 consecutive papers reporting RCT results in each journal (n = 100. Data on demographic characteristics were extracted from each paper's Table 1 only (or equivalent. Results Authors infrequently reported key demographic characteristics relating to SES of RCT participants. Age and gender of participants were commonly reported. Less than 10% reported occupational group, employment status, income or area based measures of disadvantage. Conclusions Without adequate reporting of key indicators of SES in trial participants it is unclear if lower SES groups are under-represented. If such groups are systematically under-recruited into trials, this may limit the external validity and applicability of study findings to these groups. This is in spite of the higher health-care need in more disadvantaged populations. Under-representation of low SES groups could underestimate the reported effect of an intervention for those with a higher baseline risk. The marginal benefit identified in a trial with poor or no representation of lower SES participants could significantly underestimate the potential benefit to a low SES community. More transparency in this reporting and greater attention to the impact of SES on intervention outcomes in clinical trials is needed. This could be considered in the next revision of the CONSORT statement.

  11. Prevalence and Determinants of Physician Participation in Conducting Pharmaceutical-sponsored Clinical Trials and Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashar, Bimal H; Miller, Redonda G; Getz, Kelly J; Powe, Nell R

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND The relationship between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry is controversial because of the potential for conflicts of interest. However, little empirical evidence exists on the extent of physician participation in activities sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. OBJECTIVES To determine the prevalence of participation of internal medicine physicians in clinical trials and lectures sponsored by pharmaceutical companies and to describe factors that are associated with such participation. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We conducted a cross-sectional regional survey of 1,000 Maryland internal medicine physicians between February 2000 and January 2001 in order to measure the prevalence of physician participation in pharmaceutical-sponsored clinical trials and lectures. We also collected economic and demographic information to examine potential associations between physician characteristics and engagement in such activities. RESULTS Of 835 eligible physicians 444 (53%) responded, of whom 37% reported engaging in pharmaceutical-sponsored clinical trials and/or lectures to supplement their incomes. In our multivariable analysis, subspecialists versus generalist physicians (odds ratio [OR], 1.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14 to 2.99), physicians in private group-single specialty and academic practice versus physicians in solo practice (OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.19 to 4.44 and OR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.17 to 5.61, respectively), and physicians with higher versus lower annual incomes (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.44) had a greater odds of participation in these activities. Additionally, physicians dissatisfied with their income had a 140% greater odds of participation (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.45 to 3.83) than those who were satisfied with their income. CONCLUSIONS A substantial number of internists engage in pharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials and/or lectures in an effort to supplement their incomes. Physician dissatisfaction with income appears to

  12. Androgen receptor CAG repeat length and TMPRSS2:ETS prostate cancer risk: results From the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figg, William D; Chau, Cindy H; Price, Douglas K; Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J; Cho, Yonggon; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Reichardt, Juergen K V; Tangen, Catherine M; Leach, Robin J; van Bokhoven, Adrie; Thompson, Ian M; Lucia, M Scott

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the association between the length of the polymorphic trinucleotide CAG microsatellite repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene and the risk of prostate cancer containing TMPRSS2:ETS fusion genes. This nested case-control study came from subjects enrolled in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial and included 195 biopsy-proven prostate cancer cases with a known TMPRSS2:ETS status and 1344 matched controls. There was no association between the CAG repeat length and the risk of TMPRSS2:ETS-positive (odds ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-1.04) or TMPRSS2:ETS-negative prostate cancer (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.11) and in patients with low- or high-grade disease. Our findings suggested that AR CAG repeats are not associated with TMPRSS2:ETS formation in prostate cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Ethical or Unethical Persuasion? The Rhetoric of Offers to Participate in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Ellen; Eggly, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Based on a sample of 22 oncology encounters, this article presents a discourse analysis of positive, neutral, or negative valence in the presentation of three elements of informed consent--purpose, benefits, and risks--in offers to participate in clinical trials. It is found that physicians regularly present these key elements of consent with a…

  14. Diagnostic conversion to bipolar disorder in unipolar depressed patients participating in trials on antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, J; Licht, R W; Andersen, K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In unipolar depressed patients participating in trials on antidepressants, we investigated if illness characteristics at baseline could predict conversion to bipolar disorder. METHOD: A long-term register-based follow-up study of 290 unipolar depressed patients with a mean age of 50...

  15. Ethical or Unethical Persuasion? The Rhetoric of Offers to Participate in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Ellen; Eggly, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Based on a sample of 22 oncology encounters, this article presents a discourse analysis of positive, neutral, or negative valence in the presentation of three elements of informed consent--purpose, benefits, and risks--in offers to participate in clinical trials. It is found that physicians regularly present these key elements of consent with a…

  16. Cardiovascular risk factors in children after repeat doses of antenatal glucocorticoids: an RCT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKinlay, Christopher J D; Cutfield, Wayne S; Battin, Malcolm R; Dalziel, Stuart R; Crowther, Caroline A; Harding, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    .... We assessed whether exposure to repeat antenatal betamethasone increased risk factors for later cardiometabolic disease in children whose mothers participated in the Australasian Collaborative Trial...

  17. Engaging diverse communities participating in clinical trials: case examples from across Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doumbo Ogobara

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the advent of increasing international collaborative research involving participants drawn from populations with diverse cultural backgrounds, community engagement becomes very critical for the smooth conduction of the research. The African Malaria Network Trust (AMANET is a pan-African non-governmental organization that sponsors and technically supports malaria vaccine trials in various African countries. Case description AMANET sponsored phase Ib or IIb clinical trials of several malaria vaccine candidates in various Africa countries. In Burkina Faso, Mali and Tanzania trials of the merozoite surface protein 3 -- in its Long Synthetic Peptide configuration (MSP3 LSP -- were conducted. In Mali, the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1 was tested, while a hybrid of glutamate rich protein (GLURP and MSP3 (GMZ2 was tested in Gabon. AMANET recognizes the importance of engaging with the communities from which trial participants are drawn, hence community engagement was given priority in all project activities conducted in the various countries. Discussion and evaluation Existing local social systems were used to engage the communities from which clinical trial participants were drawn. This article focuses on community engagement activities employed at various AMANET-supported clinical trial sites in different countries, highlighting subtle differences in the approaches used. The paper also gives some general pros and cons of community engagement. Conclusions Community engagement enables two-way sharing of accurate information and ideas between researchers and researched communities, which helps to create an environment conducive to smooth research activities with enhanced sense of research ownership by the communities.

  18. Participation in a mobile health intervention trial to improve retention in HIV care: does gender matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kop, Mia L; Muhula, Samuel; Ekström, Anna M; Jongbloed, Kate; Smillie, Kirsten; Abunah, Bonface; Kinagwi, Koki; Kyomuhangi, Lennie B; Gelmon, Lawrence; Ojakaa, David I; Lester, Richard T; Awiti, Patricia O

    2017-02-01

    Background To be consistent with the United Nations' sustainable development goals on gender equality, mobile health (mHealth) programmes should aim to use communications technology to promote the empowerment of women. We conducted a pre-trial analysis of data from the WelTel Retain study on retention in HIV care to assess gender-based differences in phone access, phone sharing and concerns about receiving text messages from a healthcare provider. Methods Between April 2013-June 2015, HIV-positive adults were screened for trial participation at two clinics in urban slums in Nairobi, Kenya. Proportions of men and women excluded from the trial due to phone-related criteria were compared using a chi-square test. Gender-based differences in phone sharing patterns and concerns among trial participants were similarly compared. Results Of 1068 individuals screened, there was no difference in the proportion of men ( n = 39/378, 10.3%) and women ( n = 71/690, 10.3%) excluded because of phone-related criteria ( p-value = 0.989). Among those who shared their phone, women ( n = 52/108, 48.1%) were more likely than men ( n = 6/60, 10.0%) to share with other non-household and household members ( p < 0.001). Few participants had concerns about receiving text messages from their healthcare provider; those with concerns were all women ( n = 6/700). Discussion In this study, men and women were equally able to participate in a trial of an mHealth intervention. Equitable access in these urban slums may indicate the 'gender digital divide' is narrowing in some settings; however, gender-specific phone sharing patterns and concerns regarding privacy must be fully considered in the development and scale-up of mHealth programmes.

  19. Participation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    2011-08-02

    Aug 2, 2011 ... there is still little theorising about those on the other side of the policy equation. ... The concept of participation designates human beings – their priorities, knowledge .... Thus, a person's mode of participation in the enterprise.

  20. Exploring barriers to participation and adoption of telehealth and telecare within the Whole System Demonstrator trial: a qualitative study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanders, Caroline; Rogers, Anne; Bowen, Robert; Bower, Peter; Hirani, Shashivadan; Cartwright, Martin; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Knapp, Martin; Barlow, James; Hendy, Jane; Chrysanthaki, Theti; Bardsley, Martin; Newman, Stanton P

    2012-01-01

    ...: the Whole System Demonstrator (WSD) project. It explores barriers to participation and adoption of TH and TC from the perspective of people who declined to participate or withdrew from the trial...

  1. Attitudes and expectations of patients with neuromuscular diseases about their participation in a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, M; Herson, A; Michon, C C; Hogrel, J Y; Doppler, V; Laloui, K; Herson, S; Payan, C; Eymard, B; Laforêt, P

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to gain a better understanding of the psychological impact of participating in a clinical trial for patients with Pompe disease (Acid Maltase Deficiency). Attitudes and expectations of adult patients with neuromuscular diseases regarding medical trials are as yet unreported. In order to learn about the psychological consequences of participating in a clinical trial, we conducted a prospective assessment of patients with late-onset Pompe Disease, a rare genetic condition, for which no treatment had been available before. This psychological study was carried out as an ancillary study to the randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial described elsewhere (van der Ploeg et al., 2010). We assessed patients (n=8) at inclusion, and at 12 and 18 months for six psychological dimensions: depression (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI), hopelessness (Beck Hopelessness Scale, BHS), anxiety (STAI A-B), quality of life (Whoqol-26), social adjustment (S.A.S-self-report) and locus of control (IPC Levenson). We produced a self-administered questionnaire in order to assess the attitudes, motivations and expectations of patients during the trial. At 12 months, mean social adjustment (SAS-SR, P=0.02) had improved, and at 18 months mean depression score had improved as well (BDI, P=0.03). The quality of life of patients (Whoqol-26) remained unchanged. Throughout the study, patients were more likely to have an internal locus of control than an external one (IPC Levenson). The self-administered questionnaire showed that patients' expectations were disproportionate compared to the medical information they had received starting the trial. For all patients, the first motivation for being enrolled in a clinical trial was "to help research", for half of them the motivation was to "improve their health". Whether patients believed to be part of one group or another (placebo or treatment) depended on their subjective perception of improvement during the trial. Given the small

  2. A pilot study on willingness to participate in future preventive HIV vaccine trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhadev, Mohanarani; Nyamathi, Adeline M; Swaminathan, Soumya; Venkatesan, P; Raja Sakthivel, M; Shenbagavalli, R; Suresh, Anitha; Fahey, John L

    2006-12-01

    In India, phase-I human clinical trials for a preventive HIV vaccine are being conducted at Pune and Chennai Centres. In order to find out the willingness of populations at risk to participate in future preventive HIV vaccine trials (HIVVTs) and to assess the factors that enhance or deter them from participation, a study was conducted at Chennai and Madurai in Tamil Nadu. This cross-sectional study was conducted among transport workers, people attending sexually transmitted infection clinics, injection drug users, men having sex with men, women in sex industry and a representative sample of monogamous married women, by employing measurement scales. A structured questionnaire on knowledge and attitudes about the HIV vaccine was used to measure the participants' knowledge and attitudes about HIV vaccine and HIVVTs. Of the 112 participants, 67 (60%) were men. Mean age of the respondents was 32 yr; 68 per cent were high school educated. Majority of respondents were willing to participate in a future HIVVT and the reasons were altruism, protection from HIV, and support for the researchers. Major concerns were vaccine efficacy, side effects of the vaccine and the impact of a HIV vaccine on the participants' lives. Majority (85%) agreed that sex without condom would not be safe despite the availability of an HIV vaccine. It is likely that high-risk volunteers will be willing to enroll in HIVVTs. Barriers and concerns should be dealt with carefully by providing correct information. Also there is a need for more education to ensure participants' understanding of key concepts of HIV vaccine trial.

  3. Comparison of intraclass correlation coefficient estimates and standard errors between using cross-sectional and repeated measurement data: the Safety Check cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Edward H; Wasserman, Richard; Barkin, Shari

    2011-03-01

    Designing cluster randomized trials in clinical studies often requires accurate estimates of intraclass correlation, which quantifies the strength of correlation between units, such as participants, within a cluster, such as a practice. Published ICC estimates, even when available, often suffer from the problem of wide confidence intervals. Using data from a national, randomized, controlled study concerning violence prevention for children--the Safety Check--we compare the ICC values derived from two approaches only baseline data and using both baseline and follow-up data. Using a variance component decomposition approach, the latter method allows flexibility in handling complex data sets. For example, it allows for shifts in the outcome variable over time and for an unbalanced cluster design. Furthermore, we evaluate the large-sample formula for ICC estimates and standard errors using the bootstrap method. Our findings suggest that ICC estimates range from 0.012 to 0.11 for providers within practice and range from 0.018 to 0.11 for families within provider. The estimates derived from the baseline-only and repeated-measurements approaches agree quite well except in cases in which variation over repeated measurements is large. The reductions in the widths of ICC confidence limits from using repeated measurement over baseline only are, respectively, 62% and 42% at the practice and provider levels. The contribution of this paper therefore includes two elements, which are a methodology for improving the accuracy of ICC, and the reporting of such quantities for pediatric and other researchers who are interested in designing clustered randomized trials similar to the current study.

  4. Simulation for clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials applying a peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate oral clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kazuya; Kayano, Yuichiro; Taguchi, Masato; Hashimoto, Yukiya

    2007-11-01

    We performed a simulation for the clinical pharmacokinetic study, in which blood was sampled at two time points corresponding to the peak concentration (C(peak)) and trough concentration (C(trough)) following repetitive oral drug administration to subjects. We estimated the approximate oral clearance (CL/F(approx)) as 2.D/(C(peak).tau+C(trough).tau), where D is the dose, and tau is the dosing interval. The CL/F(approx) value was accurate for drugs with a long-elimination half-life, and the estimation error of the CL/F value was slightly increased for drugs with a shorter elimination half-life. The accuracy of CL/F(approx) in each subject was not affected by the magnitude of the interindividual pharmacokinetic variability, but was significantly decreased by the larger measurement error of drug concentrations (or intraindividual pharmacokinetic variability). We further performed several computer simulations to mimic statistical hypothesis testing following the clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials. The statistical power to detect the difference of oral clearance between two groups was marginally dependent on the measurement error of drug concentration, but was highly dependent on the interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. These findings suggested that the peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate the CL/F(approx) value is useful for clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials, and that the study design and protocol should be evaluated carefully by computer simulation prior to a real clinical trial.

  5. Recurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation after pulmonary vein isolation: is repeat pulmonary vein isolation enough? A prospective, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Stephanie; Sparn, Korbinian; Reents, Tilko; Ammar, Sonia; Semmler, Verena; Dillier, Roger; Buiatti, Alexandra; Kathan, Susanne; Hessling, Gabriele; Deisenhofer, Isabel

    2015-09-01

    In patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (pAF), pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) has become an accepted treatment option with single procedure success rates of 60-80%. A repeat ablation is performed in ∼30% of patients because of arrhythmia recurrence. The strategy for this repeat procedure is not defined. Patients with pAF recurrence after PVI were prospectively randomized and underwent a second ablation procedure with either PVI of all reconnected veins or PVI with an additional left atrial anterior line. Follow-up in our arrhythmia clinic was every 3 months up to 12 months including 7 day Holter monitoring. A total of 77 patients (mean age 63 ± 9 years, 69% males) were included in the analysis. A repeat PVI was performed in 41 patients, PVI + anterior line in 36 patients. After a follow-up of 12 months, 26 of 41 (63%) patients after repeat PVI and 18 of 36 (50%) patients with PVI + anterior line were in stable sinus rhythm off antiarrhythmic medication (P = 0.26). In most patients (12 of 15 patients with PVI and 14 of 18 patients with PVI + anterior line) with an arrhythmia recurrence after the second procedure, the recurring arrhythmia was paroxysmal AF. In 2 of 15 patients of the PVI group and in 4 of 18 patients of the PVI + anterior line group atypical flutter was the reoccurring arrhythmia (P = NS). In this prospective randomized trial, patients with a recurrence of paroxysmal AF had no better outcome after repeat PVI + one left atrial line compared with patients with repeat PVI only. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Are Parents of Preschool Children Inclined to Give Consent for Participation in Nutritional Clinical Trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dipen Vasudev; Phatak, Ajay Gajanan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Micronutrient deficiencies can lead to anemia, growth restriction, and poor motor and cognitive development. A clinical trial was planned to assess the impact of nutritional supplementation on cognitive measures in preschool children. Conducting clinical trials in children is difficult due to underlying laws, hesitation of the research community, and difficult enrollment. We carried out a questionnaire-based feasibility survey to assess the interest of parents towards participation in such a nutrition-based study. Methods After approval from the Institutional Human Research Ethics Committee, the principals of four kindergarten schools at Vallabh Vidyanagar, Anand, Gujarat, India consented to participate. Children at the participating schools were distributed a consent form and pre-tested questionnaire, to be taken home for parents to sign, fill and return. Results Out of a total of 1049 consent forms and questionnaires distributed, 602 (57.39%) signed and filled forms were returned. Despite fair awareness regarding the need of research, parents’ willingness to involve their children in a 6 month duration research study, not requiring invasive measures like blood pricks, was 180 (29.9%). Nearly half (250, 41.5%) did not respond and more than a quarter (172, 28.6%) declined participation on behalf of their children. Conclusion The interest level of a pre-school child's parents for participation of the child in a nutrition intervention study evaluating cognitive measures like memory is low. Understanding the study population’s motivating and inhibiting factors leading to decreased participation in clinical trials is necessary to facilitate the creation of a pertinent evidence base. PMID:27732680

  7. Effect of Repeated Anthelminthic Treatment on Malaria in School Children in Kenya: A Randomized, Open-Label, Equivalence Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepha, Stella; Nuwaha, Fred; Nikolay, Birgit; Gichuki, Paul; Mwandawiro, Charles S; Mwinzi, Pauline N; Odiere, Maurice R; Edwards, Tansy; Allen, Elizabeth; Brooker, Simon J

    2016-01-15

    School children living in the tropics are often concurrently infected with plasmodium and helminth parasites. It has been hypothesized that immune responses evoked by helminths may modify malaria-specific immune responses and increase the risk of malaria. We performed a randomized, open-label, equivalence trial among 2436 school children in western Kenya. Eligible children were randomized to receive either 4 repeated doses or a single dose of albendazole and were followed up during 13 months to assess the incidence of clinical malaria. Secondary outcomes were Plasmodium prevalence and density, assessed by repeat cross-sectional surveys over 15 months. Analysis was conducted on an intention-to-treat basis with a prespecified equivalence range of 20%. During 13 months of follow-up, the incidence rate of malaria was 0.27 episodes/person-year in the repeated treatment group and 0.26 episodes/person-year in the annual treatment group (incidence difference, 0.01; 95% confidence interval, -.03 to .06). The prevalence and density of malaria parasitemia did not differ by treatment group at any of the cross-sectional surveys. Our findings suggest that repeated deworming does not alter risks of clinical malaria or malaria parasitemia among school children and that school-based deworming in Africa may have no adverse consequences for malaria. NCT01658774. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  8. Patient willingness for repeat screening and preference for CT colonography and optical colonoscopy in ACRIN 6664: the National CT Colonography trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareen, Ilana F; Siewert, Bettina; Vanness, David J; Herman, Benjamin; Johnson, C D; Gatsonis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Current American Cancer Society recommendations for colon cancer screening include optical colonoscopy every 10 years or computed tomography colonography (CTC) every 5 years. Bowel preparation (BP) is currently required for both screening modalities. To compare ACRIN 6664: the National CT Colonography Trial (NCTCT) participant experiences with CTC and optical colonoscopy (OC), procedure preference, and willingness to return for each procedure. Participants from fifteen NCTCT sites, who underwent CTC followed by OC under sedation, were invited to complete questionnaires 2 weeks postexam, asking about procedure preference, physical discomfort, and embarrassment experienced and whether that discomfort and embarrassment was better or worse than expected during BP, CTC, and OC, as well as willingness to return for repeat CTC and OC at different time intervals. A total of 2,310 of 2,600 patients (89%) returned their questionnaires. Of patients reporting a preference, 1,058 (46.6%) preferred CTC, 569 (25.0%) preferred OC, and 626 (27.6%) reported no preference. Participant-reported discomfort worse than expected differed significantly between CTC (32.9%) and OC (5.0%) (Pembarrassment worse than expected with OC were associated with increased intention to adhere with CTC in the future. Conversely, embarrassment experienced during CTC and discomfort worse than expected on CTC were associated with increased intention to adhere with OC in the future. While a larger proportion of participants indicated that they preferred CTC to OC, willingness to undergo repeat CTC compared to OC was limited by unanticipated exam discomfort and embarrassment and CTC's shorter screening interval.

  9. Development and initial validation of the Therapeutic Misunderstanding Scale for use with clinical trials research participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Pak Hei Benedito; O'Rourke, Norm

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic misconception is evident when clinical trials participants conflate research and treatment, erroneously believing that every aspect of the research is intended to be for their direct benefit. We developed the 20-item Therapeutic Misunderstanding Scale (TMU) based on responses from 464 community-dwelling adults 50+ years of age (Study 1). A three-factor solution based on Horng and Grady's (2003) three-facets definition was identified using both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA and CFA; these analyses were performed on separate samples). CFA results point to a second-order solution where each of Horng and Grady's three facets contribute significantly to the measurement of a higher-order therapeutic misunderstanding latent construct. Internal consistency of TMU responses (full scale) as well as the therapeutic misconception, misestimation, and optimism subscales were calculated as α = 0.88, α = 0.83, α = 0.79, and α = 0.75, respectively. These results were subsequently supported with responses from former clinical trials participants (Study 2). This TMU provides applied researchers a brief measure for use in future studies as well as a screening instrument for clinicians to more fully assess informed consent for participation in clinical trials research.

  10. Diagnostic conversion to bipolar disorder in unipolar depressed patients participating in trials on antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmskov, J; Licht, R W; Andersen, K; Bjerregaard Stage, T; Mørkeberg Nilsson, F; Bjerregaard Stage, K; Valentin, J B; Bech, P; Ernst Nielsen, R

    2017-02-01

    In unipolar depressed patients participating in trials on antidepressants, we investigated if illness characteristics at baseline could predict conversion to bipolar disorder. A long-term register-based follow-up study of 290 unipolar depressed patients with a mean age of 50.8 years (SD=11.9) participating in three randomized trials on antidepressants conducted in the period 1985-1994. The independent effects of explanatory variables were examined by applying Cox regression analyses. The overall risk of conversion was 20.7%, with a mean follow-up time of 15.2 years per patient. The risk of conversion was associated with an increasing number of previous depressive episodes at baseline, [HR 1.18, 95% CI (1.10-1.26)]. No association with gender, age, age at first depressive episode, duration of baseline episode, subtype of depression or any of the investigated HAM-D subscales included was found. The patients were followed-up through the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register, which resulted in inherent limitations such as possible misclassification of outcome. In a sample of middle-aged hospitalized unipolar depressed patients participating in trials on antidepressants, the risk of conversion was associated with the number of previous depressive episodes. Therefore, this study emphasizes that unipolar depressed patients experiencing a relatively high number of recurrences should be followed more closely, or at least be informed about the possible increased risk of conversion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. At what price? A cost-effectiveness analysis comparing trial of labour after previous Caesarean versus elective repeat Caesarean delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fawsitt, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    Elective repeat caesarean delivery (ERCD) rates have been increasing worldwide, thus prompting obstetric discourse on the risks and benefits for the mother and infant. Yet, these increasing rates also have major economic implications for the health care system. Given the dearth of information on the cost-effectiveness related to mode of delivery, the aim of this paper was to perform an economic evaluation on the costs and short-term maternal health consequences associated with a trial of labour after one previous caesarean delivery compared with ERCD for low risk women in Ireland.

  12. Insurance denials for cancer clinical trial participation after the Affordable Care Act mandate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Christine B; Antonelli, Kaitlyn R; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Saint Onge, Jarron M; Ellis, Shellie D

    2017-08-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes a mandate requiring most private health insurers to cover routine patient care costs for cancer clinical trial participation; however, the impact of this provision on cancer centers' efforts to accrue patients to clinical trials has not been well described. First, members of cancer research centers and community-based institutions (n = 252) were surveyed to assess the status of insurance denials, and then, a focused survey (n = 77) collected denial details. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine associations between the receipt of denials and site characteristics. Overall, 62.7% of the initial survey respondents reported at least 1 insurance denial during 2014. Sites using a precertification process were 3.04 times more likely to experience denials (95% confidence interval, 1.55-5.99; P ≤ .001), and similar rates of denials were reported from sites located in states with preexisting clinical trial coverage laws versus states without them (82.3% vs 85.1%; χ = 50.7; P ≤ .001). Among the focused survey sites, academic centers reported denials more often than community sites (71.4% vs 46.4%). The failure of plans to cover trial participation was cited as the most common reason provided for denials (n = 33 [80.5%]), with nearly 80% of sites (n = 61) not receiving a coverage response from the insurer within 72 hours. Despite the ACA's mandate for most insurers to cover routine care costs for cancer clinical trial participation, denials and delays continue. Denials may continue because some insurers remain exempt from the law, or they may signal an implementation failure. Delays in coverage may affect patient participation in trials. Additional efforts to eliminate this barrier will be needed to achieve federal initiatives to double the pace of cancer research over the next 5 years. Future work should assess the law's effectiveness at the patient level to inform these efforts

  13. Volunteer feedback and perceptions after participation in a phase I, first-in-human Ebola vaccine trial: An anonymous survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayer, Julie-Anne; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Huttner, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The continued participation of volunteers in clinical trials is crucial to advances in healthcare. Few data are available regarding the satisfaction and impressions of healthy volunteers after participation in phase I trials, many of which lead to unexpected adverse events. We report feedback from over 100 adult volunteers who took part in a first-in-human trial conducted in a high-income country testing an experimental Ebola vaccine causing significant reactogenicity, as well as unexpected arthritis in one fifth of participants. The anonymous, internet-based satisfaction survey was sent by email to all participants upon their completion of this one-year trial; it asked 24 questions concerning volunteers’ motivations, impressions of the trial experience, and overall satisfaction. Answers were summarized using descriptive statistics. Of the 115 trial participants, 103 (90%) filled out the survey. Fifty-five respondents (53%) were male. Thirty-five respondents (34%) were healthcare workers, many of whom would deploy to Ebola-affected countries. All respondents cited scientific advancement as their chief motivation for participation, while 100/103 (97%) and 61/103 (59%) reported additional “humanitarian reasons” and potential protection from Ebolavirus, respectively. Although investigators had documented adverse events in 97% of trial participants, only 74 of 103 respondents (72%) recalled experiencing an adverse event. All reported an overall positive experience, and 93/103 (90%) a willingness to participate in future trials. Given the high level of satisfaction, no significant associations could be detected between trial experiences and satisfaction, even among respondents reporting adverse events lasting weeks or months. Despite considerable reactogenicity and unexpected vaccine-related arthritis, all survey respondents reported overall satisfaction. While this trial’s context was unique, the positive feedback is likely due at least in part to the intense

  14. Participants' preference for type of leaflet used to feed back the results of a randomised trial: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brealey, Stephen; Andronis, Lazaros; Dennis, Laura; Atwell, Christine; Bryan, Stirling; Coulton, Simon; Cox, Helen; Cross, Ben; Fylan, Fiona; Garratt, Andrew; Gilbert, Fiona; Gillan, Maureen; Hendry, Maggie; Hood, Kerenza; Houston, Helen; King, David; Morton, Veronica; Robling, Michael; Russell, Ian; Wilkinson, Clare

    2010-12-01

    Hundreds of thousands of volunteers take part in medical research, but many will never hear from researchers about what the study revealed. There is a growing demand for the results of randomised trials to be fed back to research participants both for ethical research practice and for ensuring their co-operation in a trial. This study aims to determine participants' preferences for type of leaflet (short versus long) used to summarise the findings of a randomised trial; and to test whether certain characteristics explained participants' preferences. 553 participants in a randomised trial about General Practitioners' access to Magnetic Resonance Imaging for patients presenting with suspected internal derangement of the knee were asked in the final follow-up questionnaire whether they would like to be fed back the results of the trial. Participants who agreed to this were included in a postal questionnaire survey asking about their preference, if any, between a short and a long leaflet and what it was about the leaflet that they preferred. Multinomial logistic regression was used to test whether certain demographics of responding participants along with treatment group explained whether a participant had a preference for type of leaflet or no preference. Of the participants who returned the final follow-up questionnaire, 416 (88%) agreed to receive the results of the trial. Subsequently 132 (32%) participants responded to the survey. Most participants preferred the longer leaflet (55%) and the main reasons for this were the use of technical information (94%) and diagrams (89%). There was weak evidence to suggest that gender might explain whether participants have a preference for type of leaflet or not (P = 0.084). Trial participants want to receive feed back about the results and appear to prefer a longer leaflet. Males and females might require information to be communicated to them differently and should be the focus of further research. The trial is registered

  15. Repeated testing improves achievement in a blended learning approach for risk competence training of medical students: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreckelsen, C; Juenger, J

    2017-09-26

    Adequate estimation and communication of risks is a critical competence of physicians. Due to an evident lack of these competences, effective training addressing risk competence during medical education is needed. Test-enhanced learning has been shown to produce marked effects on achievements. This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated tests implemented on top of a blended learning program for risk competence. We introduced a blended-learning curriculum for risk estimation and risk communication based on a set of operationalized learning objectives, which was integrated into a mandatory course "Evidence-based Medicine" for third-year students. A randomized controlled trial addressed the effect of repeated testing on achievement as measured by the students' pre- and post-training score (nine multiple-choice items). Basic numeracy and statistical literacy were assessed at baseline. Analysis relied on descriptive statistics (histograms, box plots, scatter plots, and summary of descriptive measures), bootstrapped confidence intervals, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and effect sizes (Cohen's d, r) based on adjusted means and standard deviations. All of the 114 students enrolled in the course consented to take part in the study and were assigned to either the intervention or control group (both: n = 57) by balanced randomization. Five participants dropped out due to non-compliance (control: 4, intervention: 1). Both groups profited considerably from the program in general (Cohen's d for overall pre vs. post scores: 2.61). Repeated testing yielded an additional positive effect: while the covariate (baseline score) exhibits no relation to the post-intervention score, F(1, 106) = 2.88, p > .05, there was a significant effect of the intervention (repeated tests scenario) on learning achievement, F(1106) = 12.72, p blended learning approach can be improved significantly by implementing a test-enhanced learning design, namely repeated testing. As

  16. Scientific tools, fake treatments, or triggers for psychological healing: how clinical trial participants conceptualise placebos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Felicity L; Jacobson, Eric E; Shaw, Jessica R; Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2012-03-01

    Placebos are an essential tool in randomised clinical trials, where they are used to control for bias and contextual healing effects. Placebos and their effects are also studied from multiple diverse perspectives, but the perspectives of placebo recipients are seldom considered. Research shows that people form cognitive and affective representations of active treatments such as medicines, and that they use these representations to guide their behaviour; it seems reasonable to suggest that people might also think about and develop representations of placebos. We adopted a qualitative approach to examine in detail how participants in one RCT, conducted in the USA, conceptualised placebos. 12 people were interviewed 3 times each, at the start, middle, and end of a trial of placebo effects and acupuncture for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). The interview data were analysed inductively and we identified four ways in which the participants conceptualised placebos: placebos are necessary for research; placebo effects are fake; placebo acupuncture is not real acupuncture; placebos have real effects mediated by psychological mechanisms. Participants' conceptualisations of placebos were dynamic and situated in a broader psychological and socio-cultural context. Seeing placebo effects as legitimate seemed to be facilitated by having more holistic models of healing, viewing IBS as psychological, and seeing treatment as multifactorial. However, some participants maintained a negative view of placebo effects (e.g. as illusions) that was apparently inconsistent with their other beliefs (e.g. in mind-body healing mechanisms). This may indicate a dominance of negative discourses around placebos at a socio-cultural level. Negative views of placebos are inconsistent with evidence that placebo treatments can have positive effects on symptoms. RCT participants should be informed about potential benefits of placebo treatments to avoid misunderstandings and unease. Future work should

  17. Multiple treatment comparisons in a series of anti-malarial trials with an ordinal primary outcome and repeated treatment evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youdom Solange

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT are widely used in African countries, including Cameroon. Between 2005 and 2007, five randomized studies comparing different treatment arms among artesunate-amodiaquine and other ACT were conducted in Cameroonian children aged two to 60 months who had uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. In these studies, the categorical criterion proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO to assess the relative effectiveness of anti-malarial drugs was repeatedly evaluated on Days 14, 21 and 28 after treatment initiation. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of different treatments on this repeated ordinal outcome, hence using the fully available information. Methods The quantitative synthesis was based on individual patient data. Due to the incomplete block design concerning treatment arms between different trials, a mixed treatment comparison (MTC meta-analysis approach was adopted. The repeated ordinal outcome was modelled through a latent variable, as a proportional odds mixed model with trial, period and treatment arms as covariates. The model was further complexified to account for the variance heterogeneity, and the individual log-residual variance was modelled as a linear mixed model, as well. The effects of individual covariates at inclusion, such as parasitaemia, fever, gender and weight, were also tested. Model parameters were estimated using a Bayesian approach via the WinBUGS software. After selecting the best model using Deviance Information Criterion (DIC, mixed treatment comparisons were based on the estimated treatment effects. Results Modeling the residual variance improved the model ability to adjust the data. The results showed that, compared to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHPP was significantly more efficacious. Artesunate-chlorproguanil-dapsone (ASCD was less efficacious than artesunate

  18. Participant selection for preventive Regenerative Medicine trials: ethical challenges of selecting individuals at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemansburg, Sophie L; Habets, Michelle G J L; Dhert, Wouter J A; van Delden, Johannes J M; Bredenoord, Annelien L

    2015-11-01

    The innovative field of Regenerative Medicine (RM) is expected to extend the possibilities of prevention or early treatment in healthcare. Increasingly, clinical trials will be developed for people at risk of disease to investigate these RM interventions. These individuals at risk are characterised by their susceptibility for developing clinically manifest disease in future due to the existence of degenerative abnormalities. So far, there has been little debate about the ethical appropriateness of including such individuals at risk in clinical trials. We discuss three main challenges of selecting this participant model for testing RM interventions: the challenge of achieving a proportional risk-benefit balance; complexities in the trial design in terms of follow-up and sample size; and the difficulty of obtaining informed consent due to the many uncertainties. We conclude that selecting the model is not ethically justifiable for first-in-man trials with RM interventions due to the high risks and uncertainties. However, the model can be ethically appropriate for testing the efficacy of RM interventions under the following conditions: interventions should be low risk; the degenerative abnormalities (and other risk factors) should be strongly related with disease within a short time frame; robust preclinical evidence of efficacy needs to be present; and the informed consent procedure should contain extra safeguards with regard to communication on uncertainties.

  19. Familiarization Protocol Influences Reproducibility of 20-km Cycling Time-Trial Performance in Novice Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Hibbert

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exercise performance is reproducible in experienced athletes; however, less trained participants exhibit greater variability in performance and pacing. To reduce variability, it is common practice to complete a familiarization prior to experimental testing. However, there are no clear guidelines for familiarizing novice participants to a cycling time-trial (TT, and research findings from novice populations may still be influenced by learning effects. Accordingly, the aims of this study were to establish the variability between TTs after administering differing familiarization protocols (duration or type and to establish the number of familiarization trials required to limit variability over multiple trials.Methods: Thirty recreationally active participants, with no prior experience of a TT, performed a 20-km cycling TT on five separate occasions, after completing either a full (FF, 20-km TT, n = 10, a half (HF, 10-km TT, n = 10 or an equipment familiarization (EF, 5-min cycling, n = 10.Results: Variability of TT duration across five TTs was the lowest after completing FF (P = 0.69, ηp2 = 0.05 compared to HF (P = 0.08, ηp2 = 0.26 and EF (P = 0.07, ηp2 = 0.21. In the FF group after TT2, the effect size for changes in TT duration was small (d < 0.49. There were large differences between later TTs in HF (d = 1.02, TT3-TT4 and EF (d = 1.12, TT4-TT5. The variability in mean power output profiles between trials was lowest within FF, with a similar pacing profile reproduced between TT3-TT5.Discussion: Familiarization of the exercise protocol influenced reproducibility of pacing and performance over multiple, maximal TTs, with best results obtained after a full experience of the exercise compared to HF and EF. The difference of TT1 to later TTs indicates that one familiarization is not adequate in reducing the variability of performance for novice participants. After the FF and an additional TT, performance changes between TTs were small

  20. A Randomized Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Local Endometrial Injury on the Clinical Pregnancy Rate of Frozen Embryo Transfer Cycles in Patients With Repeated Implantation Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensieh Shahrokh-Tehraninejad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Repeated implantation failure (RIF is a condition in which the embryos implantation decreases in the endometrium. So, our aim was to evaluate the effect of local endometrial injury on embryo transfer results.Materials and methods: In this simple randomized clinical trial (RCT, a total of 120 patients were selected. The participants were less than 40 years old, and they are in their minimum two cycles of vitro fertilization (IVF. Patients were divided randomly into two groups of LEI (Local endometrial injury and a control group (n = 60 in each group. The first group had four small endometrial injuries from anterior, posterior, and lateral uterus walls which were obtained from people who were in 21th day of their previous IVF cycle. The second group was the patients who have not received any intervention.Results: The experimental and control patients were matched in the following factors. Regarding the clinical pregnancy rate, there was no significant difference noted between the experimental and the control group.Conclusion: Local endometrial injury in a preceding cycle does not increase the clinical pregnancy rate in the subsequent FET cycle of patients with repeated implantation failure.

  1. ClinicalTrials.gov, stem cells and 'pay-to-participate' clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leigh

    2017-07-19

    Numerous US businesses that engage in direct-to-consumer advertising of stem cell interventions that are not US FDA-approved also recruit clients by listing 'pay-to-participate' studies listed on ClinicalTrials.gov . Individuals considering enrolling in such studies and NIH officials responsible for overseeing the database need to be aware that some businesses are using the registry to promote unapproved stem cell interventions that study subjects are charged to receive. Inclusion of such studies in ClinicalTrials.gov reveals that the database needs better screening tools. In particular, screening should evaluate whether studies submitted to the registry have been reviewed and permitted to proceed by the FDA in the case of clinical studies requiring FDA clearance in addition to institutional review board approval.

  2. HIV vaccine-induced sero-reactivity: a challenge for trial participants, researchers, and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Yegor; Zinszner, Helene; Karg, Carissa; Brooks, Katie; Coombs, Robert; Hural, John; Holt, Renee; Fast, Pat; Allen, Mary

    2015-03-03

    Antibody-inducing vaccines are a major focus in the preventive HIV vaccine field. Because the most common tests for HIV infection rely on detecting antibodies to HIV, they may also detect antibodies induced by a candidate HIV vaccine. The detection of vaccine-induced antibodies to HIV by serological tests is most commonly referred to as vaccine-induced sero-reactivity (VISR). VISR can be misinterpreted as a sign of HIV infection in a healthy study participant. In a participant who has developed vaccine-induced antibodies, accurate diagnosis of HIV infection (or lack thereof) may require specialized tests and algorithms (differential testing) that are usually not available in community settings. Organizations sponsoring clinical testing of preventive HIV vaccine candidates have an ethical obligation not only to inform healthy volunteers about the potential problems associated with participating in a clinical trial but also to help manage any resulting issues. This article explores the scope of VISR-related issues that become increasingly prevalent as the search for an effective HIV vaccine continues and will be paramount once a preventive vaccine is deployed. We also describe ways in which organizations conducting HIV vaccine trials have addressed these issues and outline areas where more work is needed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Contraceptive Use and Pregnancy Incidence Among Women Participating in an HIV Prevention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akello, Carolyne A; Bunge, Katherine E; Nakabiito, Clemensia; Mirembe, Brenda G; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Mishra, Anupam; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Chirenje, Zvavahera M; Celum, Connie; Balkus, Jennifer E

    2017-06-01

    Recent HIV prevention trials required use of effective contraceptive methods to fulfill eligibility for enrollment. We compared pregnancy rates in a subset of participants enrolled in the Microbicide Trials Network protocol (MTN-003), a randomized trial of chemoprophylaxis to prevent HIV acquisition among women aged 18-45 years who initiated depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) or combined oral contraceptives (COCs) at enrollment, relative to those already using DMPA or COCs. Data were analyzed from MTN-003 participants from Uganda. Before enrollment, information on contraceptive type and initiation date was obtained. Urine pregnancy tests were performed at monthly follow-up visits. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare pregnancy incidence among new users (initiated ≤60 days before enrollment) and established users (initiated >60 days before enrollment). Of 322 women enrolled, 296 were COC or DMPA users, 82 (28%) were new users, and 214 (72%) were established users. Pregnancy incidence was higher among new contraceptive users compared to established users (20.70% vs. 10.55%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.66; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.93-2.96). Among DMPA users, pregnancy incidence was 10.20% in new users versus 3.48% in established users (HR = 2.56; 95% CI 0.86-7.65). Among new COC users, pregnancy incidence was 42.67% in new users versus 23.67% in established COC users (adjusted HR = 1.74; 95% CI 0.87-3.48). New contraceptive users, regardless of method, at the Uganda MTN-003 site had an increased pregnancy risk compared to established users, which may be due to contraceptive initiation primarily for trial eligibility. New users may benefit from intensive contraceptive counseling and additional contraceptive options, including longer acting reversible contraceptives.

  4. Reasons Why Post-Trial Access to Trial Drugs Should, or Need not be Ensured to Research Participants: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sofaer, Neema; Strech, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background: researchers and sponsors increasingly confront the issue of whether participants in a clinical trial should have post-trial access (PTA) to the trial drug. Legislation and guidelines are inconsistent, ambiguous or silent about many aspects of PTA. Recent research highlights the potential importance of systematic reviews (SRs) of reason-based literatures in informing decision-making in medicine, medical research and health policy. Purpose: to systematically review reasons why drug ...

  5. Multiple-objective response-adaptive repeated measurement designs in clinical trials for binary responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuanyuan; Li, Yin; Wang, Jing; Carriere, Keumhee C

    2014-02-20

    A multiple-objective allocation strategy was recently proposed for constructing response-adaptive repeated measurement designs for continuous responses. We extend the allocation strategy to constructing response-adaptive repeated measurement designs for binary responses. The approach with binary responses is quite different from the continuous case, as the information matrix is a function of responses, and it involves nonlinear modeling. To deal with these problems, we first build the design on the basis of success probabilities. Then we illustrate how various models can accommodate carryover effects on the basis of logits of response profiles as well as any correlation structure. Through computer simulations, we find that the allocation strategy developed for continuous responses also works well for binary responses. As expected, design efficiency in terms of mean squared error drops sharply, as more emphasis is placed on increasing treatment benefit than estimation precision. However, we find that it can successfully allocate more patients to better treatment sequences without sacrificing much estimation precision.

  6. Who participates in a randomized trial of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) after breast cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, Hanne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Andersen, Klaus Kaae;

    2013-01-01

    Danish population-based registries and clinical databases to determine differences in demographics, breast cancer and co-morbidity among 1208 women eligible for a randomized controlled trial (www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00990977) of mindfulness-based stress reduction MBSR. RESULTS: Participants......BACKGROUND: Discussion regarding the necessity to identify patients with both the need and motivation for psychosocial intervention is ongoing. Evidence for an effect of mindfulness-based interventions among cancer patients is based on few studies with no systematic enrollment. METHODS: We used...

  7. Understanding how coping strategies and quality of life maintain hope in patients deliberating phase I trial participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Biessen, Diane A; van der Helm, Peer G; Klein, Dennis; van der Burg, Simone; Mathijssen, Ron H; Lolkema, Martijn P; de Jonge, Maja J

    2017-06-30

    This study aimed to understand how hope and motivation of patients considering phase I trial participation are affected by psychological factors such as coping strategies and locus of control (LoC) and general well-being as measured by the quality of life (QoL). An exploratory cross-sectional study was performed in patients with incurable cancer (N = 135) referred to our phase I unit for the first time. Patients were potentially eligible for phase I trial participation and participated in our study while deliberating phase I trial participation. We used questionnaires on hope, motivation to participate, coping, LoC, and QoL. To investigate the nature and magnitude of the relationships between the scales, a structural equation modeling (SEM) was fitted to the data. Hope significantly predicted the motivation to participate in phase I trials. Predictors of hope were a combination of flexible and tenacious goal pursuit (both P phase I trial participation seem to use a pact of tenacious and flexible coping and control to stay hopeful. Furthermore, hope and QoL positively affected each other. The psychological pact may promote an adaptation enabling them to adjust to difficult circumstances by unconsciously ignoring information, called dissonance reduction. This mechanism may impair their ability to provide a valid informed consent. We suggest including a systematic exploration of patients' social context and values before proposing a phase I trial. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Characteristic adverse events and their incidence among patients participating in acute ischemic stroke trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Kerrick; Fulton, Rachael L; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; Lees, Kennedy R

    2014-09-01

    Adverse events (AE) in trial populations present a major burden to researchers and patients, yet most events are unrelated to investigational treatment. We aimed to develop a coherent list of expected AEs, whose incidence can be predicted by patient characteristics that will inform future trials and perhaps general poststroke care. We analyzed raw AE data from patients participating in acute ischemic stroke trials. We identified events that occurred with a lower 99% confidence bound greater than nil. Among these, we applied receiver operating characteristic principles to select the fewest types of events that together represented the greatest number of reports. Using ordinal logistic regression, we modeled the incidence of these events as a function of patient age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and multimorbidity status, defining Pstroke. Right hemisphere (odds ratio [OR], 1.67), increasing baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (OR, 1.11), multimorbidity status (OR, 1.09 per disease), patient age (OR, 1.01 per year), height (OR, 1.01 per centimeter), diastolic blood pressure (OR, 0.99 per mm Hg), and smoking (OR, 0.82) were independently associated with developing more AEs but together explained only 13% of the variation. A list of 132 expected AEs after acute ischemic stroke may be used to simplify interpretation and reporting of complications. AEs can be modestly predicted by patient characteristics, facilitating stratification of patients by risk for poststroke complications. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. From question-behaviour effects in trials to the social psychology of research participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCambridge, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The 'question-behaviour effect' (QBE) has attracted much recent attention within health psychology, where it has also been referred to as the 'mere measurement' effect. There are other conceptualisations of similar phenomena in related disciplines. This paper explores the implications of the QBE for the safety of inferences about intervention effectiveness within the context of randomised controlled trials evaluating health behaviour change interventions. It draws attention to poorly understood mechanisms by which bias is introduced with conventional thinking about trial design and analysis. The threat to valid inference on intervention effectiveness posed by the QBE applies even when its effects are small and regardless of the specific content of the QBE. The nature of the resulting bias does not fit well within existing bias classification schemes, such as that proposed by the Cochrane Collaboration. The QBE is one possible consequence of research participation and it is suggested that the social psychology of research participation is very much underdeveloped. Possible future directions for health psychology research in this area are considered.

  10. Understanding practice-based research participation: The differing motivations of engaged vs. non-engaged clinicians in pragmatic clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna A. Messner

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that clinicians not already participating in practice-based trials may have a narrower range of motivations than those already participating. The lack of a broader view of possible benefits to participation may also translate into more obdurate recruiting challenges. These results point to the need for recruitment, engagement, and messaging approaches differentially tailored to the needs and interests of non-participating practices.

  11. At what price? A cost-effectiveness analysis comparing trial of labour after previous caesarean versus elective repeat caesarean delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Fawsitt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elective repeat caesarean delivery (ERCD rates have been increasing worldwide, thus prompting obstetric discourse on the risks and benefits for the mother and infant. Yet, these increasing rates also have major economic implications for the health care system. Given the dearth of information on the cost-effectiveness related to mode of delivery, the aim of this paper was to perform an economic evaluation on the costs and short-term maternal health consequences associated with a trial of labour after one previous caesarean delivery compared with ERCD for low risk women in Ireland. METHODS: Using a decision analytic model, a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA was performed where the measure of health gain was quality-adjusted life years (QALYs over a six-week time horizon. A review of international literature was conducted to derive representative estimates of adverse maternal health outcomes following a trial of labour after caesarean (TOLAC and ERCD. Delivery/procedure costs derived from primary data collection and combined both "bottom-up" and "top-down" costing estimations. RESULTS: Maternal morbidities emerged in twice as many cases in the TOLAC group than the ERCD group. However, a TOLAC was found to be the most-effective method of delivery because it was substantially less expensive than ERCD (€ 1,835.06 versus € 4,039.87 per women, respectively, and QALYs were modestly higher (0.84 versus 0.70. Our findings were supported by probabilistic sensitivity analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians need to be well informed of the benefits and risks of TOLAC among low risk women. Ideally, clinician-patient discourse would address differences in length of hospital stay and postpartum recovery time. While it is premature advocate a policy of TOLAC across maternity units, the results of the study prompt further analysis and repeat iterations, encouraging future studies to synthesis previous research and new and relevant evidence under a single

  12. The placebo effect and the influence of participant expectation on hearing aid trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Piers; Powell, Samantha; Munro, Kevin J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of participant expectation on the outcome of a trial that compared two behind-the-ear hearing aids with identical electroacoustic performance, except that one was called a "new" hearing aid and the other a "conventional" hearing aid. Twenty experienced adult hearing aid users were told that they were taking part in a trial that compared new and conventional hearing aid technology. They attended a single test session where they were fitted with each hearing aid, in a balanced design, set to the same National Acoustic Laboratories' nonlinear fitting procedure (Version 1) prescription target for a typical age-related hearing impairment. Outcome measures were selected to be representative of hearing aids trials and included (i) the Four Alternative Auditory Feature test (presented at 65 dB (A) and SNR ratio of +2 dB), (ii) sound quality ratings for six different sound samples (a selection of speech, music, and environmental sounds), and (iii) overall personal preference. There was marginally better mean performance with the new hearing aid on the Four Alternative Auditory Feature test (M = 62.3%, SD = 10.4 versus M = 60.7%, SD = 9.0; z = -1.84, p = 0.03, one-tailed, effect size Pearson's r = 0.08; although p = 0.06, two-tailed). The new hearing aid was also consistently rated more highly on all sound quality ratings and this difference was statistically significant (M = 9.12, SD = 1.02 versus M = 8.35, SD 1.17; z = -2.88, p interpret cautiously any hearing aid trial that did not control for this effect.

  13. Participants' preference for type of leaflet used to feed back the results of a randomised trial: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houston Helen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hundreds of thousands of volunteers take part in medical research, but many will never hear from researchers about what the study revealed. There is a growing demand for the results of randomised trials to be fed back to research participants both for ethical research practice and for ensuring their co-operation in a trial. This study aims to determine participants' preferences for type of leaflet (short versus long used to summarise the findings of a randomised trial; and to test whether certain characteristics explained participants' preferences. Methods 553 participants in a randomised trial about General Practitioners' access to Magnetic Resonance Imaging for patients presenting with suspected internal derangement of the knee were asked in the final follow-up questionnaire whether they would like to be fed back the results of the trial. Participants who agreed to this were included in a postal questionnaire survey asking about their preference, if any, between a short and a long leaflet and what it was about the leaflet that they preferred. Multinomial logistic regression was used to test whether certain demographics of responding participants along with treatment group explained whether a participant had a preference for type of leaflet or no preference. Results Of the participants who returned the final follow-up questionnaire, 416 (88% agreed to receive the results of the trial. Subsequently 132 (32% participants responded to the survey. Most participants preferred the longer leaflet (55% and the main reasons for this were the use of technical information (94% and diagrams (89%. There was weak evidence to suggest that gender might explain whether participants have a preference for type of leaflet or not (P = 0.084. Conclusions Trial participants want to receive feed back about the results and appear to prefer a longer leaflet. Males and females might require information to be communicated to them differently and should

  14. Does message framing predict willingness to participate in a hypothetical HIV vaccine trial: an application of Prospect Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeli, Michael; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Kagee, Ashraf; Swartz, Leslie; Bullemor-Day, Philippa

    2013-01-01

    It is vital that enough participants are willing to participate in clinical trials to test HIV vaccines adequately. It is, therefore, necessary to explore what affects peoples' willingness to participate (WTP) in such trials. Studies have only examined individual factors associated with WTP and not the effect of messages about trial participation on potential participants (e.g., whether losses or gains are emphasized, or whether the outcome is certain or uncertain). This study explores whether the effects of message framing on WTP in a hypothetical HIV vaccine trial are consistent with Prospect Theory. This theory suggests that people are fundamentally risk averse and that (1) under conditions of low risk and high certainty, gain-framed messages will be influential (2) under conditions of high risk and low certainty, loss-framed messages will be influential. This cross-sectional study recruited 283 HIV-negative students from a South African university who were given a questionnaire that contained matched certain gain-framed, certain loss-framed, uncertain gain-framed, and uncertain loss-framed statements based on common barriers and facilitators of WTP. Participants were asked to rate how likely each statement was to result in their participation in a hypothetical preventative HIV vaccine trial. Consistent with Prospect Theory predictions, for certain outcomes, gain-framed messages were more likely to result in WTP than loss-framed messages. Inconsistent with predictions, loss-framed message were not more likely to be related to WTP for uncertain outcomes than gain-framed messages. Older students were less likely to express their WTP across the different message frames. Recruitment for HIV vaccine trials should pay attention to how messages about the trial are presented to potential participants.

  15. Factors Influencing Participation in Clinical Trials: Emergency Medicine vs. Other Specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Anita; Kincaid, Hope M.; Curtis, Charity; Semler, Lauren; Meyers, Matthew; Johnson, Melanie; Careyva, Beth A.; Stello, Brian; Friel, Timothy J.; Knouse, Mark C.; Smulian, John C.; Jacoby, Jeanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated factors that influence emergency medicine (EM) patients’ decisions to participate in clinical trials and whether the impact of these factors differs from those of other medical specialties. Methods A survey was distributed in EM, family medicine (FM), infectious disease (ID), and obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN) outpatient waiting areas. Eligibility criteria included those who were 18 years of age or older, active patients on the day of the survey, and able to complete the survey without assistance. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test and ordinal logistic regression analyses to identify differences in participants’ responses. Results A total of 2,893 eligible subjects were approached, and we included 1,841 surveys in the final analysis. Statistically significant differences (p≤0.009) were found for eight of the ten motivating factors between EM and one or more of the other specialties. Regardless of a patient’s gender, race, and education, the relationship with their doctor was more motivating to patients seen in other specialties than to EM patients (FM [odds ratio {OR}:1.752, 95% confidence interval {CI}{1.285–2.389}], ID [OR:3.281, 95% CI{2.293–4.695}], and OB/GYN [OR:2.408, 95% CI{1.741–3.330}]). EM’s rankings of “how well the research was explained” and whether “the knowledge learned would benefit others” as their top two motivating factors were similar across other specialties. All nine barriers showed statistically significant differences (p≤0.008) between EM and one or more other specialties. Participants from all specialties indicated “risk of unknown side effects” as their strongest barrier. Regardless of the patients’ race, “time commitment” was considered to be more of a barrier to other specialties when compared to EM (FM [OR:1.613, 95% CI{1.218–2.136}], ID [OR:1.340, 95% CI{1.006–1.784}], or OB/GYN [OR:1.901, 95% CI{1.431–2.526}]). Among the six resources assessed that help

  16. Patient willingness for repeat screening and preference for CT colonography and optical colonoscopy in ACRIN 6664: the National CT Colonography trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareen IF

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ilana F Gareen,1,2 Bettina Siewert,3 David J Vanness,4 Benjamin Herman,2 CD Johnson,5 Constantine Gatsonis2,6 1Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA; 2Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA; 3Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 4Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA; 5Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, USA; 6Department of Biostatistics, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA Background: Current American Cancer Society recommendations for colon cancer screening include optical colonoscopy every 10 years or computed tomography colonography (CTC every 5 years. Bowel preparation (BP is currently required for both screening modalities.Purpose: To compare ACRIN 6664: the National CT Colonography Trial (NCTCT participant experiences with CTC and optical colonoscopy (OC, procedure preference, and willingness to return for each procedure.Materials and methods: Participants from fifteen NCTCT sites, who underwent CTC followed by OC under sedation, were invited to complete questionnaires 2 weeks postexam, asking about procedure preference, physical discomfort, and embarrassment experienced and whether that discomfort and embarrassment was better or worse than expected during BP, CTC, and OC, as well as willingness to return for repeat CTC and OC at different time intervals.Results: A total of 2,310 of 2,600 patients (89% returned their questionnaires. Of patients reporting a preference, 1,058 (46.6% preferred CTC, 569 (25.0% preferred OC, and 626 (27.6% reported no preference. Participant-reported discomfort worse than expected differed significantly between CTC (32.9% and OC (5.0% (P<0.001. About 79.3% were willing to be screened again with CTC in 5 years, and 96.6% with OC in 10 years. Discomfort and embarrassment worse than expected with OC were associated

  17. Unequal Burden of Disease, Unequal Participation in Clinical Trials: Solutions from African American and Latino Community Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Marvella E.; Siminoff, Laura A.; Pickelsimer, Elisabeth; Mainous, Arch G.; Smith, Daniel W.; Diaz, Vanessa A.; Soderstrom, Lea H.; Jefferson, Melanie S.; Tilley, Barbara C.

    2013-01-01

    African Americans and Latinos are underrepresented in clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to elicit solutions to participation barriers from African Americans and Latinos. Fifty-seven adults (32 African Americans, 25 Latinos) ages 50 years and older participated. The Institute of Medicine's "Unequal Treatment" conceptual framework was…

  18. Why do patients choose (not) to participate in an exercise trial during adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waart, van Hanna; Harten, van Wim H.; Buffart, Laurien M.; Sonke, Gabe S.; Stuiver, Martijn M.; Aaronson, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Only between 25% and 50% of patients invited to participate in clinical trial-based physical exercise programs during cancer treatment agree to do so. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated significantly with the decision (not) to participate in a randomized controlle

  19. Why do patients choose (not) to participate in an exercise trial during adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waart, H.; van Harten, W.H.; Buffart, L.M.; Sonke, G.S.; Stuiver, M.M.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Only between 25% and 50% of patients invited to participate in clinical trial-based physical exercise programs during cancer treatment agree to do so. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated significantly with the decision (not) to participate in a randomized controll

  20. Participant Preferences for Pharmacologic Chronic Pain Treatment Trial Characteristics: An ACTTION Adaptive Choice-Based Conjoint Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shannon M; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Kitt, Rachel A; Markman, John D; Vaughan, Janet A; Cowan, Penney; Kopecky, Ernest A; Malamut, Richard; Sadosky, Alesia; Tive, Leslie; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2016-11-01

    Barriers to clinical trial recruitment can delay study completion, potentially resulting in increased costs and an unrepresentative sample. In the current study of 150 participants with chronic pain, we used a computerized adaptive choice-based conjoint survey that included 8 characteristics that may affect enrollment in pharmacologic pain treatment trials (ie, treatment allocation, frequency of pain ratings, treatment administration method, current medications, number of study visits, availability of evening and weekend visits, invasiveness of laboratory procedures, payment). These data were analyzed using Sawtooth Software ver. 8.4.8 (Sawtooth Software, Inc, Orem, UT), which identifies the characteristics that dominate participants' decisions across multiple sets of potential trials. Three characteristics had the largest relative importance in participants' trial preferences: 1) invasiveness of required laboratory procedures (ie, 22%), with no procedures or blood tests preferred over ice-water sensory testing or skin biopsy; 2) ability to continue current pain medications (21%); and 3) payment for study participation (21%), with higher payment preferred. The fourth most important characteristic was number of study visits (13%), with participants preferring fewer in-person visits and more phone contacts. Understanding the preferences of potential participants is an important step toward enhancing enrollment in pain treatment trials.

  1. Is one trial enough for repeated testing? Same-day assessments of walking, mobility and fine hand use in people with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Marie; Petitclerc, Emilie; Hébert, Luc J; Gagnon, Cynthia

    2017-02-01

    Performance-based assessments of physical function are essential in people with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) to monitor disease progression and evaluate interventions. Commonly used are the six-minute walk test, the 10 m-walk test, the timed up-and-go test, the timed-stands test, grip strength tests and the nine-hole peg test. The number of trials needed on a same-day test occasion and whether the first, best or average of trials should be reported as result is unknown. Thus, the aim was to describe and explore differences between trials in these measures of walking, mobility and fine hand use in 70 adults with DM1. Three trials were performed for each test except for the six-minute walk test where two trials were allowed. There were statistical significant differences over trials in all tests except for the 10 m-walk test and grip strength tests. Pair-wise comparisons showed that the second and third trials were in general better than the first, although effect sizes were small. At which trial the individuals performed their best differed between individuals and tests. People with severe muscular impairment had difficulties to perform repeated trials. Intraclass correlation coefficients were all high in analyses exploring how to report results. The conclusion and clinical implication is that, for a same-day test occasion, one trial is sufficient for the 10 m-walk test and grip strength tests, and that repeated trials should be allowed in the timed up-and-go test, timed-stands test and nine-hole peg tests. We recommend that two trials are performed for these latter tests as such a protocol could accommodate people with various levels of impairments and physical limitations.

  2. In the loop: Practices of self-monitoring from accounts by trial participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Rebecca; Cohn, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Self-monitoring, by which individuals record and appraise ongoing information about the status of their body in order to improve their health, has been a key element in the personal management of conditions such as diabetes, but it is now also increasingly used in relation to health-associated behaviours. The introduction of self-monitoring as an intervention to change behaviour is intended to provide feedback that can be used by individuals to both assess their status and provide ongoing support towards a goal that may be formally set or remains implicit. However, little attention has been paid to how individuals actually engage in the process or act upon the information they receive. This article addresses this by exploring how participants in a particular trial (‘Get Moving’) experienced the process and nature of feedback. Although the trial aimed to compare the potential efficacy of three different monitoring activities designed to encourage greater physical activity, participants did not present distinctly different accounts of each intervention and the specifics of the feedback provided. Instead, their accounts took the form of much more extended and personal narratives that included other people and features of the environment. We draw on these broader descriptions to problematise the notion of self-monitoring and conclude that self-monitoring is neither solely about ‘self’ nor is it exclusively about ‘monitoring’. We suggest that a more expansive social and material understanding of feedback can give insight into the ways information is made active and meaningful for individuals in their everyday contexts. PMID:26466601

  3. What Influences Participation in QI? A Randomized Trial of Addiction Treatment Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazier, Kyle L; Quanbeck, Andrew R; Oruongo, John; Robinson, James; Ford, James H; McCarty, Dennis; Pulvermacher, Alice; Johnson, Roberta A; Gustafson, David H

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare providers have increased the use of quality improvement (QI) techniques, but organizational variables that affect QI uptake and implementation warrant further exploration. This study investigates organizational characteristics associated with clinics that enroll and participate over time in QI. The Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) conducted a large cluster-randomized trial of outpatient addiction treatment clinics, called NIATx 200, which randomized clinics to one of four QI implementation strategies: (1) interest circle calls, (2) coaching, (3) learning sessions, and (4) the combination of all three components. Data on organizational culture and structure were collected before, after randomization, and during the 18-month intervention. Using univariate descriptive analyses and regression techniques, the study identified two significant differences between clinics that enrolled in the QI study (n = 201) versus those that did not (n = 447). Larger programs were more likely to enroll and clinics serving more African Americans were less likely to enroll. Once enrolled, higher rates of QI participation were associated with clinics' not having a hospital affiliation, being privately owned, and having staff who perceived management support for QI. The study discusses lessons for the field and future research needs.

  4. Why values elicitation techniques enable people to make informed decisions about cancer trial participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Purva; Bekker, Hilary L; Summers, Barbara A; Velikova, Galina

    2011-03-01

    Decision aids help patients make informed treatment decisions. Values clarification (VC) techniques are part of decision aids that help patients assimilate the information with their personal values. There is little evidence that these techniques contribute to enhanced decision making over and above the provision of good quality information. To assess whether VC techniques are active ingredients in enhancing informed decision making and explain how and why they work. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (i) information only, (ii) information plus implicit task, (iii) information plus explicit task. Thirty healthy women from a UK University participated by making a hypothetical choice between taking part in a clinical trial and having the standard treatment for breast cancer. Verbal protocols were elicited by think-aloud method and content analysed to assess informed decision making; a questionnaire was completed after the decision assessing decision preference, perceptions of decisional conflict and ambivalence. Data were analysed using multivariate statistics. No participants changed their decision preference as a result of the VC techniques. Women in the explicit VC group evaluated more information in accord with personal values, expressed lower ambivalence, decisional uncertainty and greater clarity of personal values than those in the implicit VC and control groups. Feelings of ambivalence about both options were related to decisional conflict. Explicit VC techniques are likely to be active ingredients in decision aids. They work by enabling people to deliberate about the decision information in accord with their personal values, which is associated with a better decision experience. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Recruitment and Reasons for Non-Participation in a Family-Coping-Orientated Palliative Home Care Trial (FamCope)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammari, Anne Birgitte Hjuler; Hendriksen, Carsten; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan

    2015-01-01

    professionals. However, an unexpectedly high number of families declined participation in the trial. We describe and discuss the recruitment strategy and patient reported reasons for non-participation to add to the knowledge about what impedes recruitment and to identify the factors that influence willingness...... to participate in research aimed at family coping early in the palliative care trajectory. Patients with advanced cancer and their closest relative were recruited from medical, surgical, and oncological departments. Reasons for non-participation were registered and characteristics of participants and non...... to affect willingness to receive a family-coping-orientated care approach and impeded recruitment to this trial. Our findings can be used in further research and in clinical practice in order to construct interventions and target relevant populations for early family-coping-orientated palliative care....

  6. Influence of the number of trials and the exercise to rest ratio in repeated sprint ability, with changes of direction and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscello, Bruno; Tozzo, Nazzareno; Briotti, Gianluca; Padua, Elvira; Ponzetti, Francesco; D'Ottavio, Stefano

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if there were different trends in physical fatigue observed in 3 different sets, of 7 trials each, in repeated sprint training, performed in 3 different modes: straight sprinting over 30 m, shuttle sprinting over 15 + 15 m, and sprinting over 30 m with changes of direction. Recovery time among trials in the sets was administered according to the 1:5 exercise to rest ratio. The sets were performed on 3 different days, with at least 48 hours between each set. The study involved 17 trained male soccer players (height, 177.33 ± 6.21 cm; body mass, 71.63 ± 9.58 kg; body mass index, 23 ± 2.39 kg·m; age, 21.94 ± 3.58 years). To compare the different values of the time recorded, an index of fatigue was used. Significant differences among trials within each set (repeated measures analysis of variance; p repeated sprint ability in nonlinear and multidirectional sprints (shuttle and change of direction), which might imply a different number of trials within the set or different exercise to rest ratios from the ones usually adopted for straight sprinting, to induce similar trends of fatigue. As practical applications, the estimated numbers of necessary trials in the different sets and the possible exercise to rest ratios, resulting from mathematical modeling, are provided for each investigated sprinting mode.

  7. Recruitment and retention of participants in randomised controlled trials: a review of trials funded and published by the United Kingdom Health Technology Assessment Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Stephen J; Bonacho Dos Anjos Henriques-Cadby, Inês; Bortolami, Oscar; Flight, Laura; Hind, Daniel; Jacques, Richard M; Knox, Christopher; Nadin, Ben; Rothwell, Joanne; Surtees, Michael; Julious, Steven A

    2017-03-20

    Substantial amounts of public funds are invested in health research worldwide. Publicly funded randomised controlled trials (RCTs) often recruit participants at a slower than anticipated rate. Many trials fail to reach their planned sample size within the envisaged trial timescale and trial funding envelope. To review the consent, recruitment and retention rates for single and multicentre randomised control trials funded and published by the UK's National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme. HTA reports of individually randomised single or multicentre RCTs published from the start of 2004 to the end of April 2016 were reviewed. Information was extracted, relating to the trial characteristics, sample size, recruitment and retention by two independent reviewers. Target sample size and whether it was achieved; recruitment rates (number of participants recruited per centre per month) and retention rates (randomised participants retained and assessed with valid primary outcome data). This review identified 151 individually RCTs from 787 NIHR HTA reports. The final recruitment target sample size was achieved in 56% (85/151) of the RCTs and more than 80% of the final target sample size was achieved for 79% of the RCTs (119/151). The median recruitment rate (participants per centre per month) was found to be 0.92 (IQR 0.43-2.79) and the median retention rate (proportion of participants with valid primary outcome data at follow-up) was estimated at 89% (IQR 79-97%). There is considerable variation in the consent, recruitment and retention rates in publicly funded RCTs. Investigators should bear this in mind at the planning stage of their study and not be overly optimistic about their recruitment projections. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Patient perspectives on participation in the ENABLE II randomized controlled trial of a concurrent oncology palliative care intervention: benefits and burdens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Cristine; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Li, Zhongze; Hegel, Mark; Ahles, Tim A; Bakitas, Marie

    2013-04-01

    ENABLE (Educate, Nurture, Advise Before Life Ends) II was one of the first randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of a concurrent oncology palliative care intervention on quality of life, mood, and symptom control for advanced cancer patients and their caregivers. However, little is known about how participants experience early palliative care and the benefits and burdens of participating in a palliative care clinical trial. To gain a deeper understanding of participants' perspectives of the intervention and palliative care trial participation. A qualitative descriptive study using thematic analysis to determine benefits and burdens of a new palliative care intervention and trial participation. Of the 72 participants who were alive when the study commenced, 53 agreed to complete an in-depth, semi-structured interview regarding the ENABLE II intervention and clinical trial participation. Participants' perceptions of intervention benefits were represented by four themes: enhanced problem-solving skills, better coping, feeling empowered, and feeling supported or reassured. Three themes related to trial participation: helping future patients and contributing to science, gaining insight through completion of questionnaires, and trial/intervention aspects to improve. The benefits of the intervention and the positive aspects of trial participation outweighed trial "burdens". This study raises additional important questions relevant to future trial design and intervention development: when should a palliative care intervention be initiated and what aspects of self-care and healthy living should be offered in addition to palliative content for advanced cancer patients when they are feeling well?

  9. Using Controversial Mock Trials in "Psychology and Law" Courses: Suggestions from Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, James L., Jr.; Harvey, James; McNamara, Rebecca; Svoboda, Andrea; Gulbrandson, Raina; Hendren, Jennifer; Greedy, Tiffany; Leybold, Christie

    2002-01-01

    Describes a mock trial focused on Jack Kevorkian and an euthanasia case that was included in a psychology and law course. Discusses the course format, provides the reactions to the mock trial by students and consultants, and includes suggestions for improving the mock trial. (CMK)

  10. Effects of Study Design and Allocation on participant behaviour - ESDA: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeran Paschal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background What study participants think about the nature of a study has been hypothesised to affect subsequent behaviour and to potentially bias study findings. In this trial we examine the impact of awareness of study design and allocation on participant drinking behaviour. Methods/Design A three-arm parallel group randomised controlled trial design will be used. All recruitment, screening, randomisation, and follow-up will be conducted on-line among university students. Participants who indicate a hazardous level of alcohol consumption will be randomly assigned to one of three groups. Group A will be informed their drinking will be assessed at baseline and again in one month (as in a cohort study design. Group B will be told the study is an intervention trial and they are in the control group. Group C will be told the study is an intervention trial and they are in the intervention group. All will receive exactly the same brief educational material to read. After one month, alcohol intake for the past 4 weeks will be assessed. Discussion The experimental manipulations address subtle and previously unexplored ways in which participant behaviour may be unwittingly influenced by standard practice in trials. Given the necessity of relying on self-reported outcome, it will not be possible to distinguish true behaviour change from reporting artefact. This does not matter in the present study, as any effects of awareness of study design or allocation involve bias that is not well understood. There has been little research on awareness effects, and our outcomes will provide an indication of the possible value of further studies of this type and inform hypothesis generation. Trial Registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR: ACTRN12610000846022

  11. Assessing a cognitive music training for older participants: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele; Mangiacotti, Anthony

    2017-04-12

    In a randomised controlled trial, we investigated whether a cognitive training based on rhythm-music and music improvisation exercises had positive effects on executive functions in older participants. Thirty-five residents in a guest home with mild-moderate cognitive impairment and healthy ageing were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 18) featuring cognitive music training composed of 12 bi-weekly 70-min sessions, and a control group (n = 17) attended 12 bi-weekly 45-min sessions of gymnastic activities offered by the institute. A neuropsychological test battery was administered at baseline and at the end of treatment, including the Mini-Mental State Examination, verbal fluency test, Trail Making Test A, attentional matrices test and clock-drawing test. Pre-test and post-test comparison showed a significant improvement for the experimental group reflected in the Mini-Mental State Examination (F(1,33) = 13.906; p cognitive protocol based on music-rhythmic exercises and music improvisation exercises is associated with improved cognitive functions in older people with mild-moderate cognitive impairment regardless of the individual's degree of cognitive reserve. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. User Participation and Engagement With the See Me Smoke-Free mHealth App: Prospective Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Chris A; Romine, James K; Bell, Melanie L; Armin, Julie; Gordon, Judith S

    2017-10-09

    The See Me Smoke-Free (SMSF) mobile health (mHealth) app was developed to help women quit smoking by targeting concerns about body weight, body image, and self-efficacy through cognitive behavioral techniques and guided imagery audio files addressing smoking, diet, and physical activity. A feasibility trial found associations between SMSF usage and positive treatment outcomes. This paper reports a detailed exploration of program use among eligible individuals consenting to study participation and completing the baseline survey (participants) and ineligible or nonconsenting app installers (nonparticipants), as well as the relationship between program use and treatment outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine whether (1) participants were more likely to set quit dates, be current smokers, and report higher levels of smoking at baseline than nonparticipants; (2) participants opened the app and listened to audio files more frequently than nonparticipants; and (3) participants with more app usage had a higher likelihood of self-reported smoking abstinence at follow up. The SMSF feasibility trial was a single arm, within-subjects, prospective cohort study with assessments at baseline and 30 and 90 days post enrollment. The SMSF app was deployed on the Google Play Store for download, and basic profile characteristics were obtained for all app installers. Additional variables were assessed for study participants. Participants were prompted to use the app daily during study participation. Crude differences in baseline characteristics between trial participants and nonparticipants were evaluated using t tests (continuous variables) and Fisher exact tests (categorical variables). Exact Poisson tests were used to assess group-level differences in mean usage rates over the full study period using aggregate Google Analytics data on participation and usage. Negative binomial regression models were used to estimate associations of app usage with participant baseline

  13. Relationship between plaque score and video-monitored brushing performance after repeated instruction--a controlled, randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, N; Klimek, J; Ganss, C

    2013-03-01

    Aim of this prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trial was to use the modified bass technique (MBT) and a specific brushing sequence to investigate whether two types of instruction methods lead to differences in plaque reduction and whether plaque reduction is related to technique adoption. Ninety-eight participants were randomly assigned to three groups: (1) control, no instruction; (2) verbal instruction by means of a leaflet; and (3) verbal instruction supported by demonstration, no leaflet. Brushing performance was video monitored. Plaque score (Turesky modified QHI (T-QHI)) was measured at baseline, afterwards participants received instructions. After 2 weeks, T-QHI was measured for a second time, and participants were re-instructed. After another 2 weeks, T-QHI was measured for a third time. At baseline, T-QHI did not differ between groups ((1) 1.99 ± 0.51, (2) 1.90 ± 0.51, (3) 1.93 ± 0.56). The second measurement revealed an improvement of T-QHI in the instructed groups and in the non-instructed control group ((1) 1.80 ± 0.47, (2) 1.58 ± 0.58, (3) 1.64 ± 0.58; n.s. between groups); in the intervention groups, remotivation achieved no further improvement ((1) 1.72 ± 0.48, (2) 1.52 ± 0.58, (3) 1.50 ± 0.69; n.s. between groups and compared to second measurement). Improvement of T-QHI was not related to proper performance of technique or brushing sequence. Those who fully adopted the brushing technique, the sequence or both did not have lower plaque scores. Technical performance and effectiveness were not linked. Within the study setting, the MBT was not effective in reducing plaque scores. The general recommendation of the MBT should be re-evaluated in further studies.

  14. Exploring barriers and facilitators to participation of male-to-female transgender persons in preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrasik, Michele Peake; Yoon, Ro; Mooney, Jessica; Broder, Gail; Bolton, Marcus; Votto, Teress; Davis-Vogel, Annet

    2014-06-01

    Observed seroincidence and prevalence rates in male-to-female (MTF) transgender individuals highlight the need for effective targeted HIV prevention strategies for this community. In order to develop an effective vaccine that can be used by transgender women, researchers must understand and address existing structural issues that present barriers to this group's participation in HIV vaccine clinical trials. Overcoming barriers to participation is important for ensuring HIV vaccine acceptability and efficacy for the MTF transgender community. To explore barriers and facilitators to MTF transgender participation in preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials, the HIV Vaccine Trials Network conducted focus groups among transgender women in four urban areas (Atlanta, Boston, Philadelphia, and San Francisco). Barriers and facilitators to engagement of transgender women in preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials led to the following recommendations: (a) transgender cultural competency training, (b) creating trans-friendly environments, (c) true partnerships with local trans-friendly organizations and health care providers, (d) protocols that focus on transgender specific issues, and (e) data collection and tracking of transgender individuals. These results have implications for the conduct of HIV vaccine trials, as well as engagement of transgender women in research programs in general.

  15. Participant Recruitment and Engagement in Automated eHealth Trial Registration: Challenges and Opportunities for Recruiting Women Who Experience Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol-McLain, Jane; McLean, Christine; Rohan, Maheswaran; Sisk, Rose; Dobbs, Terry; Nada-Raja, Shyamala; Wilson, Denise; Vandal, Alain C

    2016-10-25

    Automated eHealth Web-based research trials offer people an accessible, confidential opportunity to engage in research that matters to them. eHealth trials may be particularly useful for sensitive issues when seeking health care may be accompanied by shame and mistrust. Yet little is known about people's early engagement with eHealth trials, from recruitment to preintervention autoregistration processes. A recent randomized controlled trial that tested the effectiveness of an eHealth safety decision aid for New Zealand women in the general population who experienced intimate partner violence (isafe) provided the opportunity to examine recruitment and preintervention participant engagement with a fully automated Web-based registration process. The trial aimed to recruit 340 women within 24 months. The objective of our study was to examine participant preintervention engagement and recruitment efficiency for the isafe trial, and to analyze dropout through the registration pathway, from recruitment to eligibility screening and consent, to completion of baseline measures. In this case study, data collection sources included the trial recruitment log, Google Analytics reports, registration and program metadata, and costs. Analysis included a qualitative narrative of the recruitment experience and descriptive statistics of preintervention participant engagement and dropout rates. A Koyck model investigated the relationship between Web-based online marketing website advertisements (ads) and participant accrual. The isafe trial was launched on September 17, 2012. Placement of ads in an online classified advertising platform increased the average number of recruited participants per month from 2 to 25. Over the 23-month recruitment period, the registration website recorded 4176 unique visitors. Among 1003 women meeting eligibility criteria, 51.55% (517) consented to participate; among the 501 women who enrolled (consented, validated, and randomized), 412 (82.2%) were

  16. Altruistic reasoning in adolescent-parent dyads considering participation in a hypothetical sexual health clinical trial for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Noé Rubén; Williams, Camille Y; Ipp, Lisa S; Catallozzi, Marina; Rosenthal, Susan L; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki

    2016-04-01

    Altruism is a well-established reason underlying research participation. Less is known about altruism in adolescent-parent decision-making about clinical trials enrolling healthy adolescents. This qualitative investigation focused on identifying spontaneous statements of altruism within adolescent-parent (dyadic) discussions of participation in a hypothetical phase I clinical trial related to adolescent sexual health. Content analysis revealed several response patterns to each other's altruistic reasoning. Across 70 adolescent-parent dyads in which adolescents were 14-17 years of age and 91% of their parents were mothers, a majority (61%) of dyadic discussions included a statement reflecting altruism. Parents responded to adolescents' statements of altruism more frequently than adolescents responded to parents' statements. Responses included: expresses concern, reiterates altruistic reasoning, agrees with altruistic reasoning, and adds to/expands altruistic reasoning. Since an altruistic perspective was often balanced with concerns about risk or study procedures, researchers cannot assume that altruism will directly lead to study participation. Optimizing the informed consent process for early phase clinical trials involving healthy adolescents may include supporting parents to have conversations with their adolescents which will enhance their capacity to consider all aspects of trial participation.

  17. Willingness to participate in HIV therapeutic vaccine trials among HIV-infected patients on ART in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Dong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: More and more HIV therapeutic vaccines will enter clinical trials; however, little is known about the willingness to participate (WTP in HIV therapeutic vaccine trials among HIV-positive individuals. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the WTP in HIV therapeutic vaccine trials among Chinese HIV-infected patients. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey on HIV-positive inpatients and outpatients at Shanghai Public Health Center. A total of 447 participants were recruited into this study. Following an introduction with general information on HIV therapeutic vaccine and its potential effectiveness and side effects, each participant completed a questionnaire in a self-administered form. The questionnaires covered demographics, high-risk behaviors, clinical characteristics and willingness to participate in HIV therapeutic vaccine trial. RESULTS: The overall willingness to participate in HIV therapeutic vaccine trials was 91.5%. Interestingly, multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that the willingness was higher for those sexually infected by HIV (odds ratio [OR]: 4.36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.53-12.41, diagnosed as HIV-1 infection for greater than 5 years (OR: 7.12, 95% CI: 1.83-27.76, and with the presence of infectious complications (OR: 2.75; 95% CI: 1.02-7.45. The primary reason for participation was to delay or reduce antiretroviral treatment (ART and to avoid ART side effects (76.6%, and then followed by delaying disease progression (74.9%, increasing immune response to suppress opportunistic infections (57.7% and preventing the development of drug resistance (37.1%. Reasons for unwillingness to participate mainly included concern for safety (37.0%, lack of knowledge on therapeutic vaccine (33.3%, and satisfaction with ART effectiveness (22.2%. CONCLUSIONS: The WTP in HIV therapeutic vaccine trials was high among HIV-infected Chinese patients. HIV+ subjects who acquired infection through sexual contact and who

  18. Exploring barriers to participation and adoption of telehealth and telecare within the Whole System Demonstrator trial: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders Caroline

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telehealth (TH and telecare (TC interventions are increasingly valued for supporting self-care in ageing populations; however, evaluation studies often report high rates of non-participation that are not well understood. This paper reports from a qualitative study nested within a large randomised controlled trial in the UK: the Whole System Demonstrator (WSD project. It explores barriers to participation and adoption of TH and TC from the perspective of people who declined to participate or withdrew from the trial. Methods Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 people who declined to participate in the trial following explanations of the intervention (n = 19, or who withdrew from the intervention arm (n = 3. Participants were recruited from the four trial groups (with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, or social care needs; and all came from the three trial areas (Cornwall, Kent, east London. Observations of home visits where the trial and interventions were first explained were also conducted by shadowing 8 members of health and social care staff visiting 23 people at home. Field notes were made of observational visits and explored alongside interview transcripts to elicit key themes. Results Barriers to adoption of TH and TC associated with non-participation and withdrawal from the trial were identified within the following themes: requirements for technical competence and operation of equipment; threats to identity, independence and self-care; expectations and experiences of disruption to services. Respondents held concerns that special skills were needed to operate equipment but these were often based on misunderstandings. Respondents’ views were often explained in terms of potential threats to identity associated with positive ageing and self-reliance, and views that interventions could undermine self-care and coping. Finally, participants were reluctant to

  19. Misreporting of Product Adherence in the MTN-003/VOICE Trial for HIV Prevention in Africa: Participants' Explanations for Dishonesty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Elizabeth T; Mensch, B; Musara, P; Hartmann, M; Woeber, K; Etima, J; van der Straten, A

    2017-02-01

    Consistent over-reporting of product use limits researchers' ability to accurately measure adherence and estimate product efficacy in HIV prevention trials. While lying is a universal characteristic of the human condition, growing evidence of a stark discrepancy between self-reported product use and biologic or pharmacokinetic evidence demands examination of the reasons research participants frequently misrepresent product use in order to mitigate this challenge in future research. This study (VOICE-D) was an ancillary post-trial study of the vaginal and oral interventions to control the epidemic (VOICE) phase IIb trial (MTN 003). It was conducted in three African countries to elicit candid accounts from former VOICE trial participants about why actual product use was lower than reported. In total 171 participants were enrolled between December 2012 and March 2014 in South Africa (n = 47), Uganda (n = 59) and Zimbabwe (n = 65). Data suggested that participants understood the importance of daily product use and honest reporting, yet acknowledged that research participants typically lie. Participants cited multiple reasons for misreporting adherence, including human nature, self-presentation with study staff, fear of repercussions (study termination resulting in loss of benefits and experience of HIV-related stigma), a permissive environment in which it was easy to get away with misreporting, and avoiding inconvenient additional counseling. Some participants also reported mistrust of the staff and reciprocal dishonesty about the study products. Many suggested real-time blood-monitoring during trials would encourage greater fidelity to product use and honesty in reporting. Participants at all sites understood the importance of daily product use and honesty, while also acknowledging widespread misreporting of product use. Narratives of dishonesty may suggest a wider social context of hiding products from partners and distrust about research, influenced by rumors

  20. ParticipACTION: A mass media campaign targeting parents of inactive children; knowledge, saliency, and trialing behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauvin Lise

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In late 2007, Canada's ParticipACTION national physical activity mass media campaign was re-launched, with an initial campaign targeting parents of elementary school-aged children. The campaign informed them about the risks of physical inactivity for children and youth. The purpose of this study was to assess campaign awareness and understanding following the campaign, and to identify whether exposure to this campaign was likely associated with behaviour change. Methods A convenience sample of 1,500 adults was recruited though an existing panel (n = 60,000 of Canadian adults to participate in online surveys. Initial campaign exposure included "prompted" and "unprompted" recall of specific physical activity messages from the 2007 ParticipACTION campaign, knowledge of the benefits of PA, saliency, and initial trial behaviours to help their children become more active. Results One quarter of respondents showed unprompted recall of specific message content from the ParticipACTION campaign, and prompted recall was 57%. Message recall and understanding was associated with knowledge about physical activity, and that in turn was related to high saliency. Saliency was associated with each of the physical activity-related trial behaviours asked. Conclusion Campaign awareness and understanding was high following this ParticipACTION campaign, and was associated with intermediate campaign outcomes, including saliency and trial behaviours. This is relevant to campaign evaluations, as it suggests that an initial focus on influencing awareness and understanding is likely to lead to more substantial change in campaign endpoints.

  1. Recruitment and retention of participants for an international type 1 diabetes prevention trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franciscus, Margaret; Nucci, Anita; Bradley, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Trial to Reduce Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR) is the first multicenter international type 1 diabetes (T1D) prevention trial to be undertaken. A unique feature of TRIGR has been recruitment of eligible pregnant women and enrollment of newbor...

  2. A systematic survey on reporting and methods for handling missing participant data for continuous outcomes in randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Flórez, Ivan D; Colunga Lozano, Luis E; Aloweni, Fazila Abu Bakar; Kennedy, Sean Alexander; Li, Aihua; Craigie, Samantha; Zhang, Shiyuan; Agarwal, Arnav; Lopes, Luciane C; Devji, Tahira; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Riva, John J; Wang, Mengxiao; Jin, Xuejing; Fei, Yutong; Alexander, Paul; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Zhang, Yuan; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Kahale, Lara A; Akl, Elie A; Schünemann, Holger J; Thabane, Lehana; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2017-08-01

    To assess analytic approaches randomized controlled trial (RCT) authors use to address missing participant data (MPD) for patient-important continuous outcomes. We conducted a systematic survey of RCTs published in 2014 in the core clinical journals that reported at least one patient-important outcome analyzed as a continuous variable. Among 200 studies, 187 (93.5%) trials explicitly reported whether MPD occurred. In the 163 (81.5%) trials that reported the occurrence of MPD, the median and interquartile ranges of the percentage of participants with MPD were 11.4% (2.5%-22.6%).Among the 147 trials in which authors made clear their analytical approach to MPD, the approaches chosen included available data only (109, 67%); mixed-effect models (10, 6.1%); multiple imputation (9, 4.5%); and last observation carried forward (9, 4.5). Of the 163 studies reporting MPD, 16 (9.8%) conducted sensitivity analyses examining the impact of the MPD and (18, 11.1%) discussed the risk of bias associated with MPD. RCTs reporting continuous outcomes typically have over 10% of participant data missing. Most RCTs failed to use optimal analytic methods, and very few conducted sensitivity analyses addressing the possible impact of MPD or commented on how MPD might influence risk of bias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Decision-Making Process Related to Participation in Phase I Clinical Trials: A Nonsystematic Review of the Existing Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorini, Alessandra; Mazzocco, Ketti; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Due to the lack of other treatment options, patient candidates for participation in phase I clinical trials are considered the most vulnerable, and many ethical concerns have emerged regarding the informed consent process used in the experimental design of such trials. Starting with these considerations, this nonsystematic review is aimed at analyzing the decision-making processes underlying patients' decision about whether to participate (or not) in phase I trials in order to clarify the cognitive and emotional aspects most strongly implicated in this decision. Considering that there is no uniform decision calculus and that many different variables other than the patient-physician relationship (including demographic, clinical, and personal characteristics) may influence patients' preferences for and processing of information, we conclude that patients' informed decision-making can be facilitated by creating a rigorously developed, calibrated, and validated computer tool modeled on each single patient's knowledge, values, and emotional and cognitive decisional skills. Such a tool will also help oncologists to provide tailored medical information that is useful to improve the shared decision-making process, thereby possibly increasing patient participation in clinical trials. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Recruitment and retention of participants in a pragmatic randomized intervention trial at three community health clinics: results and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Erica T; Glasgow, Russell E; Emmons, Karen M; Bennett, Gary G; Askew, Sandy; Rosner, Bernard; Colditz, Graham A

    2013-03-06

    Obesity and hypertension and their associated health complications disproportionately affect communities of color and people of lower socioeconomic status. Recruitment and retention of these populations in research trials, and retention in weight loss trials has been an ongoing challenge. Be Fit, Be Well was a pragmatic randomized weight loss and hypertension management trial of patients attending one of three community health centers in Boston, Massachusetts. Participants were asked to complete follow-up assessments every 6-months for two years. We describe challenges encountered and strategies implemented to recruit and retain trial participants over the 24-month intervention. We also identify baseline participant characteristics associated with retention status. Retention strategies included financial incentives, contact between assessment visits, building relationships with health center primary care providers (PCPs) and staff, and putting participant convenience first. Active refusal rates were low with 130 of 2,631 patients refusing participation (4.9%). Of 474 eligible persons completing telephone screening, 365 (77.0%) completed their baseline visit and were randomized into the study. The study population was predominantly non-Hispanic Black (71.2%), female (68.5%) and reported annual household income of less than $35,000 (70.1%). Recruitment strategies included use of passive approval of potential participants by PCPs, use of part-time staff, and outsourcing calls to a call center. A total of 314 (86.0%) people completed the 24-month visit. Retention levels varied across study visits and intervention condition. Most participants completed three or more visits (69.6%), with 205 (56.2%) completing all four. At 24-months, lower retention was observed for males and the intervention condition. Retention strategies included building strong relationships with clinic staff, flexibility in overcoming participant barriers through use of taxi vouchers, night and

  5. ExStroke Pilot Trial of the effect of repeated instructions to improve physical activity after ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Gudrun; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Zeng, Xianrong;

    2009-01-01

    To investigate if repeated verbal instructions about physical activity to patients with ischaemic stroke could increase long term physical activity.......To investigate if repeated verbal instructions about physical activity to patients with ischaemic stroke could increase long term physical activity....

  6. Patients or volunteers? The impact of motivation for trial participation on the efficacy of patient decision Aids: a secondary analysis of a Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James G; Joyce, Kerry E; Stacey, Dawn; Thomson, Richard G

    2015-05-01

    Efficacy of patient decision aids (PtDAs) may be influenced by trial participants' identity either as patients seeking to benefit personally from involvement or as volunteers supporting the research effort. To determine if study characteristics indicative of participants' trial identity might influence PtDA efficacy. We undertook exploratory subgroup meta-analysis of the 2011 Cochrane review of PtDAs, including trials that compared PtDA with usual care for treatment decisions. We extracted data on whether participants initiated the care pathway, setting, practitioner interactions, and 6 outcome variables (knowledge, risk perception, decisional conflict, feeling informed, feeling clear about values, and participation). The main subgroup analysis categorized trials as "volunteerism" or "patienthood" on the basis of whether participants initiated the care pathway. A supplementary subgroup analysis categorized trials on the basis of whether any volunteerism factors were present (participants had not initiated the care pathway, had attended a research setting, or had a face-to-face interaction with a researcher). Twenty-nine trials were included. Compared with volunteerism trials, pooled effect sizes were higher in patienthood trials (where participants initiated the care pathway) for knowledge, decisional conflict, feeling informed, feeling clear, and participation. The subgroup difference was statistically significant for knowledge only (P = 0.03). When trials were compared on the basis of whether volunteerism factors were present, knowledge was significantly greater in patienthood trials (P < 0.001), but there was otherwise no consistent pattern of differences in effects across outcomes. There is a tendency toward greater PtDA efficacy in trials in which participants initiate the pathway of care. Knowledge acquisition appears to be greater in trials where participants are predominantly patients rather than volunteers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Financial Concerns About Participation in Clinical Trials Among Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yu-Ning; Schluchter, Mark D; Albrecht, Terrance L; Benson, Al Bowen; Buzaglo, Joanne; Collins, Michael; Flamm, Anne Lederman; Fleisher, Linda; Katz, Michael; Kinzy, Tyler G; Liu, Tasnuva M; Manne, Sharon; Margevicius, Seunghee; Miller, Dawn M; Miller, Suzanne M; Poole, David; Raivitch, Stephanie; Roach, Nancy; Ross, Eric; Meropol, Neal J

    2016-02-10

    The decision to enroll in a clinical trial is complex given the uncertain risks and benefits of new approaches. Many patients also have financial concerns. We sought to characterize the association between financial concerns and the quality of decision making about clinical trials. We conducted a secondary data analysis of a randomized trial of a Web-based educational tool (Preparatory Education About Clinical Trials) designed to improve the preparation of patients with cancer for making decisions about clinical trial enrollment. Patients completed a baseline questionnaire that included three questions related to financial concerns (five-point Likert scales): "How much of a burden on you is the cost of your medical care?," "I'm afraid that my health insurance won't pay for a clinical trial," and "I'm worried that I wouldn't be able to afford the costs of treatment on a clinical trial." Results were summed, with higher scores indicating greater concerns. We used multiple linear regressions to measure the association between concerns and self-reported measures of self-efficacy, preparation for decision making, distress, and decisional conflict in separate models, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. One thousand two hundred eleven patients completed at least one financial concern question. Of these, 27% were 65 years or older, 58% were female, and 24% had a high school education or less. Greater financial concern was associated with lower self-efficacy and preparation for decision making, as well as with greater decisional conflict and distress, even after adjustment for age, race, sex, education, employment, and hospital location (P < .001 for all models). Financial concerns are associated with several psychological constructs that may negatively influence decision quality regarding clinical trials. Greater attention to patients' financial needs and concerns may reduce distress and improve patient decision making. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical

  8. Surrendering control, or nothing to lose: Parents' preferences about participation in a randomised trial of childhood strabismus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Deborah; Hogan, Vanessa; Powell, Christine J; Sloper, John J; Speed, Chris; Taylor, Robert H; Tiffin, Peter; Clarke, Michael P

    2015-08-01

    Intermittent exotropia is the most common form of divergent strabismus (squint) in children. Evidence regarding its optimum management is limited. A pilot randomised controlled trial has recently been completed (Surgery versus Active Monitoring in Intermittent Exotropia trial) to determine the feasibility of a full randomised controlled trial. To identify drivers for and barriers against parents' participation in Surgery versus Active Monitoring in Intermittent Exotropia and to seek their views on information received, the need for randomisation, and enhancing acceptability. Multiple method qualitative study using semi-structured telephone interviews to explore parents' motivations and trial screening logs to provide an indication of common barriers. Exploratory thematic analysis identified key themes. A total of 48 interviews were conducted (14 participants; 34 non-participants). Barriers included no desire for surgery/preference to 'wait and see', wanting surgery immediately, feeling uncomfortable about 'surrendering control' over decision-making/being managed 'at random', lack of confidence in the effectiveness of surgery, believing the risks outweighed the benefits, and lack of trust. Drivers included desiring surgery, 'nothing to lose', benefits offsetting the risks, and being in a trial would result in better care. Some also mentioned 'doing their bit' for research. Suggestions for enhancing acceptability included allowing choice of treatment group, giving more time for decision-making, expanding on information given, and improving communication. Many felt the necessity of randomisation was adequately explained, but there was some indication that it was misunderstood. Information extracted from the screening logs of 80/89 eligible non-participants indicated the most prevalent barrier was not wanting surgery/preferring to observe (56%), followed by desiring surgery straightaway (15%). Opposition to randomisation/wanting to retain control was recorded in 9% of

  9. Repeated Remote Ischemic Conditioning Effect on Ankle-brachial Index in Diabetic Patients - A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahvazian, Najmeh; Rafiee, Mansour; Rahmanian, Masoud; Razavi-Ratki, Seyed Kazem; Farahzadi, Mohammad Hadi

    2017-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a phenomenon where a short period of ischemia in one organ protects against further ischemia in the other organs. We hypothesized that RIPC occurring in diabetic patients with ankle brachial index (ABI) between 0.70 and 0.90 were included with peripheral arterial disease, would make the better coronary flow resulted in the increasing ABI. This randomized clinical trial study was done in the Afshar Cardiovascular Hospital in Yazd between 2013 and 2014. Sixty participants were randomly divided into two groups (intervention and control groups). The intervention group was undergoing RIPC, and the control group was tested without RIPC. RIPC was stimulated by giving three cycles of 5 min of ischemia followed by 5 min of reperfusion of both upper arms using a blood pressure cuff inflated to 200 mm Hg (n = 30). This was compared with no RIPC group which consisted of placing a deflated blood pressure cuff on the upper limbs (n = 30). The mean of ABI level before intervention in the RIPC and control group group was 0.82 ± 0.055 and 0.83 ± 0.0603 (P = 0.347) respectively, with no significant difference. It was 0.86 ± 0.066 in the RIPC group compared the control 0.83 ± 0.0603 (P = 0.046). So levels of ABI were greater after intervention in the RIPC group. The mean of ABI level increase from 0.82 ± 0.05 to 0.86 ± 0.06 in RIPC group (P = 0.008). So the intervention group showed a significant increase in ABI. RIPC through using a simple, noninvasive technique, composing three cycles of 5 min-ischemia of both upper arms, showing a significant increase in ABI level in diabetic patients.

  10. Understanding barriers to involving community midwives in identifying research participants; experience of the first steps randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jane; Barnes, Jacqueline; Spiby, Helen; Elbourne, Diana

    2015-08-01

    to explore barriers to the involvement of community midwives in identifying women in early pregnancy as potential participants in the first steps study, a randomised controlled trial of a new intervention to provide health and parenting support to potentially vulnerable women. descriptive qualitative investigation using semi-structured audio-recorded interviews. community midwifery offices. volunteer sample of 13 community midwives. themes derived from content analysis. understanding of their role in the research process was unclear to many midwives. Confusion arose about the difference between potential participant identification and trial recruitment. There were concerns about the eligibility criteria and it was suggested that there was insufficient time during booking appointments, and sometimes insufficient information, to determine potential eligibility. Midwives had concerns about some aspects of the intervention, which incorporated routine midwifery care, and had expectations that women may not like a group programme. This may have led some not to mention the trial. They were, however positive about the programme׳s potential for beneficial impacts on mothers and infants. dedicated research midwives may be the best option if research studies need to identify potential participants early in pregnancy, so that they can communicate with all their colleagues. if community midwives are asked to be involved in time-critical research they are likely to need additional local resources and support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Power, fairness and trust: understanding and engaging with vaccine trial participants and communities in the setting up the EBOVAC-Salone vaccine trial in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enria, Luisa; Lees, Shelley; Smout, Elizabeth; Mooney, Thomas; Tengbeh, Angus F; Leigh, Bailah; Greenwood, Brian; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Larson, Heidi

    2016-11-08

    This paper discusses the establishment of a clinical trial of an Ebola vaccine candidate in Kambia District, Northern Sierra Leone during the epidemic, and analyses the role of social science research in ensuring that lessons from the socio-political context, the recent experience of the Ebola outbreak, and learning from previous clinical trials were incorporated in the development of community engagement strategies. The paper aims to provide a case study of an integrated social science and communications system in the start-up phase of the clinical trial. The paper is based on qualitative research methods including ethnographic observation, interviews with trial participants and key stakeholder interviews. Through the case study of EBOVAC Salone, the paper suggests ways in which research can be used to inform communication strategies before and during the setting up of the trial. It explores notions of power, fairness and trust emerging from analysis of the Sierra Leonean context and through ethnographic research, to reflect on three situations in which social scientists and community liaison officers worked together to ensure successful community engagement. Firstly, a section on "power" considers the pitfalls of considering communities as homogeneous and shows the importance of understanding intra-community power dynamics when engaging communities. Secondly, a section on "fairness" shows how local understandings of what is fair can help inform the design of volunteer recruitment strategies. Finally, a section on "trust" highlights how historically rooted rumours can be effectively addressed through active dialogue rather than through an approach focused on correcting misinformation. The paper firstly emphasises the value of social science in the setting up of clinical trials, in terms of providing an in depth understanding of context and social dynamics. Secondly, the paper suggests the importance of a close collaboration between research and community

  12. Results of a Community Randomized Study of a Faith-Based Education Program to Improve Clinical Trial Participation among African Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M. Frew

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of a cluster randomized clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of a church-based educational intervention aimed at improving African Americans’ (AA participation in clinical trials. Two hundred and twenty-one AA subjects ages ≥50 years from six predominantly AA churches were randomized to intervention or control condition. The intervention included three educational sessions about clinical trials and health disparities; control participants completed questionnaires. Primary endpoints of the study were differences in individual subjects' intentions to obtain clinical trial information and intention to join a clinical trial, as determined by 10 point scale items at baseline, three and six months. A statistically significant increase in the intention to obtain clinical trial information at the three and six month time points was observed in the intervention group, but not the control group. Older participants (65–95 years were less likely than younger participants (50–64 years to increase their motivation to seek clinical trial information by the three and six month time points. No significant increases were observed in intention to join clinical trials. This randomized trial shows that AA church-based educational interventions are likely to increase the motivation of AA subjects to obtain clinical trial information and are therefore potentially effective at ameliorating the underrepresentation of AA subjects in clinical trials.

  13. Interim data monitoring to enroll higher-risk participants in HIV prevention trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umo-Otong John

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower-than-expected incidence of HIV undermines sample size calculations and compromises the power of a HIV prevention trial. We evaluated the effectiveness of interim monitoring of HIV infection rates and on-going modification of recruitment strategies to enroll women at higher risk of HIV in the Cellulose Sulfate Phase III study in Nigeria. Methods We analyzed prevalence and incidence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, demographic and sexual behavior characteristics aggregated over the treatment groups on a quarterly basis. The site investigators were advised on their recruitment strategies based on the findings of the interim analyses. Results A total of 3619 women were screened and 1644 enrolled at the Ikeja and Apapa clinics in Lagos, and at the Central and Peripheral clinics in Port Harcourt. Twelve months after study initiation, the overall incidence of HIV was less than one-third of the pre-study assumption, with rates of HIV that varied substantially between clinics. Due to the low prevalence and incidence rates of HIV, it was decided to close the Ikeja clinic in Lagos and to find new catchment areas in Port Harcourt. This strategy was associated with an almost two-fold increase in observed HIV incidence during the second year of the study. Conclusion Given the difficulties in estimating HIV incidence, a close monitoring of HIV prevalence and incidence rates during a trial is warranted. The on-going modification of recruitment strategies based on the regular analysis of HIV rates appeared to be an efficient method for targeting populations at greatest risk of HIV infection and increasing study power in the Nigeria trial. Trial Registration The trial was registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov registry under #NCT00120770 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00120770

  14. Retention of clinical trial participants in a study of nongonococcal urethritis (NGU), a sexually transmitted infection in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeannette Y; Lensing, Shelly Y; Schwebke, Jane R

    2012-07-01

    Nongonococcal urethritis (NGU), an inflammation of the urethra not caused by gonorrhea, is the most common urethritis syndrome seen in men in the United States. It is a sexually transmitted infection commonly caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, a pathogen which occurs more frequently in African-American men compared to white men. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors related to retention of study participants in a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial that evaluated four treatment regimens for the treatment of NGU. After the one-week treatment period, follow-up visits were scheduled during days 15-19 and days 35-45. Participants were phoned prior to scheduled appointments to encourage attendance, and contacted after missed appointments to reschedule their clinic visits. Of the 305 male study participants, 298 (98%) were African-American, 164 (54%) were 25 years of age or younger, and 80 (31%) had a post-secondary school education. The overall retention rate was 75%. Factors associated with study completion were educational level attained and clinical center. Participants with higher levels of education were more likely to complete the study. Clinical centers with the highest retention rates also provided the highest monetary incentives for participation. The retention rate for this study suggests that strategies are needed for improving the proportion of study participants that complete a clinical trial among young men with a sexually transmitted disease. These strategies may include increasing contacts with study participants to remind them of scheduled study visits using text messaging or social media and the use of financial incentives.

  15. Patient participation in cancer clinical trials: A pilot test of lay navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen B. Cartmell

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: In this formative single-arm pilot project, initial evidence was found for the potential effect of a lay navigation intervention on CT understanding and enrollment. A randomized controlled trial is needed to examine the efficacy of the intervention for improving CT education and enrollment.

  16. Systematic analysis of changes in cannabis use among participants in control conditions of randomised controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Rebgetz

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: While further high-quality data is needed to confirm the observed effects, these results provide a baseline from which researchers and practitioners can estimate the extent of change required to detect effects of cannabis treatments in services or treatment trials.

  17. Participation of older people in preauthorization trials of recently approved medicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beers, Erna; Moerkerken, Dineke C; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Egberts, Toine C G; Jansen, Paul A F

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the inclusion of older people in clinical trials of recently authorized medicines, evaluating adherence to the 20-year-old International Conference of Harmonisation (ICH) guideline on geriatrics (E7). DESIGN: Observational. SETTING: European public assessment reports, publ

  18. Development and piloting of a decision aid for women considering participation in the Sentinel Node Biopsy versus Axillary Clearance 2 breast cancer trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraskova, Ilona; Butow, Phyllis; Fisher, Alana; Bonner, Carissa; Anderson, Caroline; Bu, Stella; Scarlet, Jenni; Stockler, Martin R; Wetzig, Neil; Ung, Owen; Campbell, Ian

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to (1) develop a decision aid for women considering participation in the Sentinel Node Biopsy versus Axillary Clearance 2 (SNAC-2) breast cancer surgical trial and (2) obtain evidence on its acceptability, feasibility, and potential efficacy in routine trial clinical practice via a two-stage pilot. The decision aid was developed according to International Patient Decision Aid Standards. Study 1: an initial pilot involved 25 members of the consumer advocacy group, Breast Cancer Network Australia. Study 2: the main pilot involved 20 women eligible to participate in the SNAC-2 trial in New Zealand. In both pilots, a questionnaire assessed: information and involvement preferences, decisional conflict, SNAC-2 trial-related understanding and attitudes, psychological distress, and general decision aid feedback. A follow-up telephone interview elicited more detailed feedback on the decision aid design and content. In both pilots, participants indicated good subjective and objective understanding of SNAC-2 trial and reported low decisional conflict and anxiety. The decision aid was found helpful when deciding about trial participation and provided additional, useful information to the standard trial information sheet. The development and two-stage piloting process for this decision aid resulted in a resource that women found very acceptable and helpful in assisting decision-making about SNAC-2 trial participation. The process and findings provide a guide for developing other trial decision aids. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Attitudes of Patients in Developing Countries Toward Participating in Clinical Trials: A Survey of Saudi Patients Attending Primary Health Care Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lateefa O. Al-Dakhil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Clinical trials are experimental projects that include patients as subjects. A number of benefits are directly associated with clinical trials. Healthcare processes and outcomes can be improved with the help of clinical trials. This study aimed to assess the attitudes and beliefs of patients about their contribution to and enrolment in clinical trials. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used for data collection and analysis. A questionnaire was developed with six categories to derive effective outcomes. Results: Of the 2000 participants approached to take part in the study, 1081 agreed. The majority of the study population was female, well educated, and unaware of clinical trials. Only 324 subjects (30.0% had previously agreed to participate in a clinical trial. The majority (87.1% were motivated to participate in clinical trials due to religious aspects. However, fear of any risk was the principal reason (79.8% that reduced their motivation to participate. Conclusions: The results of this study revealed that patients in Saudi Arabia have a low awareness and are less willing to participate in clinical trials. Different motivational factors and awareness programs can be used to increase patient participation in the future.

  20. Effects of Culture, Age, Gender, and Repeated Trials on Rote Song Learning Skills of Children 6-9 Years Old from England, Panama, Poland, Spain, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Randall S.; Brotons, Melissa; Fyk, Janina; Castillo, Argelis

    1997-01-01

    Examines the effect of repeated trials on children aged six to nine from different countries learning a new song. States that: (1) culture influences responses; (2) rote singing improves with age; (3) girls responses are better; and (4) children repeat rhythms more accurately before they can pitch match melodic contours and precise pitches. (CMK)

  1. Participant recruitment in sensitive surveys: a comparative trial of 'opt in' versus 'opt out' approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunt, Katherine J; Shlomo, Natalie; Addington-Hall, Julia

    2013-01-01

    ... by returning a reply slip is frequently adopted. However, in observational research the risk to participants is lower than in clinical research and so some surveys have used an 'opt-out' system...

  2. Non-participation in systematic screening for osteoporosis-the ROSE trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothmann, M J; Möller, S; Holmberg, T

    2017-01-01

    education, lower income, and higher comorbidity. In the intervention group, ticking "not interested in DXA" in the questionnaire was associated with older age, living alone, and low self-perceived fracture risk. Women with previous fracture or history of parental hip fracture were more likely to accept......Population-based screening for osteoporosis is still controversial and has not been implemented. Non-participation in systematic screening was evaluated in 34,229 women age 65-81 years. Although participation rate was high, non-participation was associated with comorbidity, aging other risk factors...... for fractures, and markers of low social status, e.g., low income, pension, and living alone. A range of strategies is needed to increase participation, including development of targeted information and further research to better understand the barriers and enablers in screening for osteoporosis. INTRODUCTION...

  3. Informed consent from cognitively impaired persons participating in research trials: comparative law observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Petrini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the ethical requirements to be considered when conducting clinical trials involving human subjects whose mental condition limits their ability to understand the information and to express fully autonomous and informed consent. It does not address other categories of vulnerable persons, such as children, or advanced directives concerning end-of-life care. There are many ethical issues entailed in clinical trials involving subjects with mental disabilities: how to obtain informed consent, balancing risks and benefits, balancing individual benefits with collective scientific and social interests, legal representation and many more. This article focuses on the issues surrounding the concept of minimal risk and the relationship between informed consent and risk. These issues are addressed with particular emphasis on the regulations adopted by the European Union and the federal government of the United States of America. The conclusion proposes a list of working criteria.

  4. Long-term survival of participants in the prostate cancer prevention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L Silberstein

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT is a seminal study in the field of urology. More than 10 years after its initial publication, updated data from this trial continue to shape our understanding of prostate cancer. Among the major findings from the PCPT has been the demonstration that prostate cancer is common in men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA once thought to be in the normal range, [1] finasteride prevents the development of benign prostatic hypertrophy, [2] it increases the sensitivity of PSA [3] and digital rectal examination. [4] Furthermore the PCPT helped to establish the link between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, [5] and perhaps most importantly finasteride demonstrated a 25% relative risk reduction in the diagnosis of prostate cancer compared with placebo. [6

  5. At What Price? A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Comparing Trial of Labour after Previous Caesarean versus Elective Repeat Caesarean Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fawsitt, C.G.; Bourke, J.; Greene, R.A.; Everard, C.M.; Murphy, A.; Lutomski, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elective repeat caesarean delivery (ERCD) rates have been increasing worldwide, thus prompting obstetric discourse on the risks and benefits for the mother and infant. Yet, these increasing rates also have major economic implications for the health care system. Given the dearth of inform

  6. Minority participation in a school-based randomized clinical trial of tooth decay prevention in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Suchitra; Milgrom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To describe the strategies-based on the social triad concept of a partnership of researchers, school personnel and community-employed to recruit low-income, minority parent/caregivers of kindergarten children into a school-based tooth decay prevention trial in the United States. The study site was an urban school district with five elementary schools. Recruitment was carried out once each year for three years. Recruitment involved strategies at the school district, school, classroom, and student-parent level. A coalition of researchers, school personnel and community individuals was established for communication and recruitment. Outreach workers from the community were hired to promote, recruit, and disseminate oral health information. Study promotion included both print materials (logos, flyers, pictorial story boards) and presentations at school and community events. The School District Superintendent and administrators approved the study, and all five school principals and kindergarten teachers participated. All children within the classrooms were eligible: the overall participation rate of was 86% (580/672). Community outreach workers actively facilitated the recruitment and participants were recruited at open house for parent-teacher meeting (37% of all participants), sending letters and consent forms home (31%), at a prearranged convenient time during drop off and pick up of the child at their respective schools (30%), curriculum nights and health fairs (2%). Utilizing the social triad concept led to success in planning and carrying out the recruitment of predominantly minority school children with high participation rates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of complementary medicine by adult patients participating in cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparber, A; Bauer, L; Curt, G; Eisenberg, D; Levin, T; Parks, S; Steinberg, S M; Wootton, J

    2000-05-01

    To document the prevalence, demographic correlates, patterns of use, and beliefs about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies of adult patients enrolled in National Cancer Institute (NCI) clinical trials. Prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive survey. W.G. Magnuson Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. Convenience sample of 100 English-speaking, adult patients with cancer admitted to intramural clinical trials. A standardized, 99-item questionnaire assessing use of CAM therapies pre- and postcancer diagnosis was administered by face-to-face interview. Use of CAM therapies, beliefs, communication with physician. 63% used at least one CAM therapy, with an average use of two therapies per patient. Men were significantly less likely to use a therapy than women; women were more likely to use numerous therapies. Cancer diagnosis seems to have had no influence overall on the frequency of use of CAM therapies. The major reasons stated for CAM use were for treatment-related medical conditions as well as depression, anxiety, and insomnia. The most frequently reported therapies were spiritual, relaxation, imagery, exercise, lifestyle diet (e.g., macrobiotic, vegetarian), and nutritional supplementation. Patients unanimously believed that these complementary therapies helped to improve their quality of life through more effective coping with stress, decreasing the discomforts of treatment and illness, and giving them a sense of control. Patients with cancer use various complementary therapies to cope with their disease and the rigors of clinical trials. Women and those with higher educational backgrounds were more frequent users. Nurses who provide care to subjects of biomedical research have an opportunity and responsibility regarding their patients' use of CAM therapies. Nurses may use in-house resources to help evaluate subjects' use of a CAM modality or to provide quality-of-life therapies such as relaxation, imagery, or

  8. Informed consent and placebo effects: a content analysis of information leaflets to identify what clinical trial participants are told about placebos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity L Bishop

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Placebo groups are used in randomised clinical trials (RCTs to control for placebo effects, which can be large. Participants in trials can misunderstand written information particularly regarding technical aspects of trial design such as randomisation; the adequacy of written information about placebos has not been explored. We aimed to identify what participants in major RCTs in the UK are told about placebos and their effects. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a content analysis of 45 Participant Information Leaflets (PILs using quantitative and qualitative methodologies. PILs were obtained from trials on a major registry of current UK clinical trials (the UKCRN database. Eligible leaflets were received from 44 non-commercial trials but only 1 commercial trial. The main limitation is the low response rate (13.5%, but characteristics of included trials were broadly representative of all non-commercial trials on the database. 84% of PILs were for trials with 50:50 randomisation ratios yet in almost every comparison the target treatments were prioritized over the placebos. Placebos were referred to significantly less frequently than target treatments (7 vs. 27 mentions, p<001 and were significantly less likely than target treatments to be described as triggering either beneficial effects (1 vs. 45, p<001 or adverse effects (4 vs. 39, p<001. 8 PILs (18% explicitly stated that the placebo treatment was either undesirable or ineffective. CONCLUSIONS: PILs from recent high quality clinical trials emphasise the benefits and adverse effects of the target treatment, while largely ignoring the possible effects of the placebo. Thus they provide incomplete and at times inaccurate information about placebos. Trial participants should be more fully informed about the health changes that they might experience from a placebo. To do otherwise jeopardises informed consent and is inconsistent with not only the science of placebos but also the

  9. Predictors of retention among African American and Hispanic older adult research participants in the Well Elderly 2 randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Mike; Jackson, Jeanne; Mandel, Deborah; Blanchard, Jeanine; Holguin, Jess; Lai, Mei-Ying; Marterella, Abbey; Vigen, Cheryl; Gleason, Sarah; Lam, Claudia; Azen, Stan; Clark, Florence

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to document predictors of long-term retention among minority participants in the Well Elderly 2 Study, a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for community-dwelling older adults. The primary sample included 149 African American and 92 Hispanic men and women aged 60 to 95 years, recruited at senior activity centers and senior residences. Chi-square and logistic regression procedures were undertaken to examine study-based, psychosocial and health-related predictors of retention at 18 months following study entry. For both African Americans and Hispanics, intervention adherence was the strongest predictor. Retention was also related to high active coping and average (vs. high or low) levels of activity participation among African Americans and high social network strength among Hispanics. The results suggest that improved knowledge of the predictors of retention among minority elders can spawn new retention strategies that can be applied at individual, subgroup, and sample-wide levels.

  10. Effectiveness of 6 months of tailored text message reminders for obese male participants in a worksite weight loss program: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Sohee; Steinhubl, Steven; Kim, Sohye; Bae, Woo Kyung; Han, Jong Soo; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Lee, Keehyuck; Kim, Mi Jin

    2015-02-03

    Worksite nutrition and physical activity interventions are important to help overweight and obese employees lose weight, but costs and insufficient sustained motivation prevent the majority of these programs from succeeding. Tailored text messaging in aiding weight management has been effective in several studies, but no studies have evaluated the effect of a tailored text message service on weight loss in a worksite health promotion program. We studied the efficacy of a tailored text-messaging intervention for obese male participants in a worksite weight loss program of 6 months duration. The study was an unblinded, randomized controlled trial. Men with a body mass index greater than 25 kg/m(2) were recruited from the Korea District Heating Corporation, the Korea Expressway Corporation, and the Korea Gas Corporation. The participants were identified by nurse managers. Participants were randomly allocated to 1 of the following 2 groups for 24 weeks: (1) intervention group, which received tailored text message reminders every other day plus 4 offline education sessions and brief counseling with monthly weight check by nurses for weight control over 6 months and (2) control group, which received the 4 offline education sessions and brief counseling with monthly weight check by nurses about weight control over 6 months. The primary outcome was the difference in weight loss at 6 months. A mixed-model repeated-measures analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of the intervention group's weight loss compared with the control group. A total of 205 obese men were randomized into either the intervention (n=104) or the control group (n=101). At the end of 6 months, the intervention group (n=63) had lost 1.71 kg (95% CI -2.53 to -0.88) and the control group (n=59) had lost 1.56 kg (95% CI -2.45 to -0.66); the difference between the 2 groups was not significant (mean difference -0.15, 95% CI -1.36 to 1.07). At the end of the study, 60% (34/57) of the intervention group

  11. Ethical considerations of randomized control trials with human participants in dentistry. A reflective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    A potential conflict is built into the roles of dentists and researchers with regard to ethical principles such as beneficence, nonmaleficence, respect for autonomy, and justice. The practitioner has an obligation to do what is believed to be best for the individual patient: the dentist as researcher has an obligation to use rigorous experimental methods, including randomized control trials (RCTs) to discover what is best for patients generally, including the investigation of experimental modalities. This is the equipoise problem-how can a professional be assured of offering the most beneficial treatment available if only using approaches that have worked in the past? This essay explores the ethical foundations for this challenge and proposes a groundwork for balancing ethical obligations to patients and the needs for scientific and public health advances.

  12. Music preferences of mechanically ventilated patients participating in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiderscheit, Annie; Breckenridge, Stephanie J; Chlan, Linda L; Savik, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving measure and supportive modality utilized to treat patients experiencing respiratory failure. Patients experience pain, discomfort, and anxiety as a result of being mechanically ventilated. Music listening is a non-pharmacological intervention used to manage these psychophysiological symptoms associated with mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine music preferences of 107 MV patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial that implemented a patient-directed music listening protocol to help manage the psychophysiological symptom of anxiety. Music data presented includes the music genres and instrumentation patients identified as their preferred music. Genres preferred include: classical, jazz, rock, country, and oldies. Instrumentation preferred include: piano, voice, guitar, music with nature sounds, and orchestral music. Analysis of three patients' preferred music received throughout the course of the study is illustrated to demonstrate the complexity of assessing MV patients and the need for an ongoing assessment process.

  13. Progestogens to prevent preterm birth in twin pregnancies: an individual participant data meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuit Ewoud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is the principal factor contributing to adverse outcomes in multiple pregnancies. Randomized controlled trials of progestogens to prevent preterm birth in twin pregnancies have shown no clear benefits. However, individual studies have not had sufficient power to evaluate potential benefits in women at particular high risk of early delivery (for example, women with a previous preterm birth or short cervix or to determine adverse effects for rare outcomes such as intrauterine death. Methods/design We propose an individual participant data meta-analysis of high quality randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of progestogen treatment in women with a twin pregnancy. The primary outcome will be adverse perinatal outcome (a composite measure of perinatal mortality and significant neonatal morbidity. Missing data will be imputed within each original study, before data of the individual studies are pooled. The effects of 17-hydroxyprogesterone caproate or vaginal progesterone treatment in women with twin pregnancies will be estimated by means of a random effects log-binomial model. Analyses will be adjusted for variables used in stratified randomization as appropriate. Pre-specified subgroup analysis will be performed to explore the effect of progestogen treatment in high-risk groups. Discussion Combining individual patient data from different randomized trials has potential to provide valuable, clinically useful information regarding the benefits and potential harms of progestogens in women with twin pregnancy overall and in relevant subgroups.

  14. Validity of 12-Month Falls Recall in Community-Dwelling Older Women Participating in a Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerrie M. Sanders

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare 12-month falls recall with falls reported prospectively on daily falls calendars in a clinical trial of women aged ≥70 years. Methods. 2,096 community-dwelling women at high risk of falls and/or fracture completed a daily falls calendar and standardised interviews when falls were recorded, for 12 months. Data were compared to a 12-month falls recall question that categorised falls status as “no falls,” “a few times,” “several,” and “regular” falls. Results. 898 (43% participants reported a fall on daily falls calendars of whom 692 (77% recalled fall(s at 12 months. Participants who did not recall a fall were older (median 79.3 years versus 77.8 years, P=0.028. Smaller proportions of fallers who sustained an injury or accessed health care failed to recall a fall (all P<0.04. Among participants who recalled “no fall,” 85% reported zero falls on daily calendars. Few women selected falls categories of “several times” or “regular” (4.1% and 0.4%, resp. and the sensitivity of these categories was low (30% to 33%. Simply categorising participants into fallers or nonfallers had 77% sensitivity and 94% specificity. Conclusion. For studies where intensive ascertainment of falls is not feasible, 12-month falls recall questions with fewer responses may be an acceptable alternative.

  15. Protein and calorie intakes in adult and pediatric subjects with urea cycle disorders participating in clinical trials of glycerol phenylbutyrate☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Debra; Diaz, George A.; Lee, Brendan; Bartley, James; Longo, Nicola; Berquist, William; Le Mons, Cynthia; Rudolph-Angelich, Ingrid; Porter, Marty; Scharschmidt, Bruce F.; Mokhtarani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Little prospectively collected data are available comparing the dietary intake of urea cycle disorder (UCD) patients to UCD treatment guidelines or to healthy individuals. Objective To examine the protein and calorie intakes of UCD subjects who participated in clinical trials of glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB) and compare these data to published UCD dietary guidelines and nutritional surveys. Design Dietary data were recorded for 45 adult and 49 pediatric UCD subjects in metabolic control during participation in clinical trials of GPB. Protein and calorie intakes were compared to UCD treatment guidelines, average nutrient intakes of a healthy US population based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA). Results In adults, mean protein intake was higher than UCD recommendations but lower than RDA and NHANES values, while calorie intake was lower than UCD recommendations, RDA and NHANES. In pediatric subjects, prescribed protein intake was higher than UCD guidelines, similar to RDA, and lower than NHANES data for all age groups, while calorie intake was at the lower end of the recommended UCD range and close to RDA and NHANES data. In pediatric subjects height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) Z-scores were within normal range (− 2 to 2). Conclusions Pediatric patients treated with phenylbutyrate derivatives exhibited normal height and weight. Protein and calorie intakes in adult and pediatric UCD subjects differed from UCD dietary guidelines, suggesting that these guidelines may need to be reconsidered. PMID:27014577

  16. So different, yet so similar: meta-analysis and policy modeling of willingness to participate in clinical trials among Brazilians and Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammar, Guilherme; Meister, Henrique; Shah, Jatin; Phadtare, Amruta; Cofiel, Luciana; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2010-12-16

    With the global expansion of clinical trials and the expectations of the rise of the emerging economies known as BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India and China), the understanding of factors that affect the willingness to participate in clinical trials of patients from those countries assumes a central role in the future of health research. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis (SRMA) of willingness to participate in clinical trials among Brazilian patients and then we compared it with Indian patients (with results of another SRMA previously conducted by our group) through a system dynamics model. Five studies were included in the SRMA of Brazilian patients. Our main findings are 1) the major motivation for Brazilian patients to participate in clinical trials is altruism, 2) monetary reimbursement is the least important factor motivating Brazilian patients, 3) the major barrier for Brazilian patients to not participate in clinical trials is the fear of side effects, and 4) Brazilian patients are more likely willing to participate in clinical trials than Indians. Our study provides important insights for investigators and sponsors for planning trials in Brazil (and India) in the future. Ignoring these results may lead to unnecessary fund/time spending. More studies are needed to validate our results and for better understanding of this poorly studied theme.

  17. Baseline Characteristics of Participants in the Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Richard H.; Margolis, Karen L.; Papademetriou, Vasilios; Cushman, William C.; Ford, Charles E.; Bettencourt, Judy; Alderman, Michael H.; Basile, Jan N.; Black, Henry R.; DeQuattro, Vincent; Eckfeldt, John; Hawkins, C. Morton; Perry, H. Mitchell; Proschan, Michael

    2001-01-01

    -Diuretics and ss-blockers have been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in people with hypertension in long-term clinical trials. No study has compared newer more costly antihypertensive agents (calcium antagonists, ACE inhibitors, and alpha-adrenergic blockers) with diuretics for reducing the incidence of cardiovascular disease in an ethnically diverse group of middle-aged and elderly hypertensive patients. The study is a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled clinical trial designed to determine whether the incidence of the primary outcome, fatal coronary heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction, differs between treatment initiation with a diuretic versus each of 3 other antihypertensive drugs. Men and women aged >/=55 years with at least 1 other cardiovascular disease risk factor were randomly assigned to chlorthalidone (12.5 to 25 mg/d), amlodipine (2.5 to 10 mg/d), lisinopril (10 to 40 mg/d), or doxazosin (2 to 8 mg/d) for planned follow-up of 4 to 8 years. This report describes the baseline characteristics of the Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) participants. A total of 42 448 participants were randomized from 625 sites in the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands. The mean age was 67 years, with 35% aged >/=70 years. Among those randomized, 36% were black, 19% were Hispanic, and 47% were women. The sample includes a high proportion of people with diabetes (36%), patients with existing cardiovascular disease (47%), and smokers (22%). There were no important differences between the randomized treatment groups at baseline. ALLHAT will add greatly to our understanding of the management of hypertension by providing an answer to the following question: are newer antihypertensive agents similar, superior, or inferior to traditional treatment with diuretics?

  18. Recruitment strategies, design, and participant characteristics in a trial of weight-loss and metformin in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Marinac, Catherine R; Natarajan, Loki; Hartman, Sheri J; Cadmus-Bertram, Lisa; Flatt, Shirley W; Li, Hongying; Parker, Barbara; Oratowski-Coleman, Jesica; Villaseñor, Adriana; Godbole, Suneeta; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2016-03-01

    Weight loss and metformin are hypothesized to improve breast cancer outcomes; however the joint impacts of these treatments have not been investigated. Reach for Health is a randomized trial using a 2 × 2 factorial design to investigate the effects of weight loss and metformin on biomarkers associated with breast cancer prognosis among overweight/obese postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. This paper describes the trial recruitment strategies, design, and baseline sample characteristics. Participants were randomized in equal numbers to (1) placebo, (2) metformin, (3) weight loss intervention and placebo, or (4) weight-loss intervention and metformin. The lifestyle intervention was a personalized, telephone-based program targeting a 7% weight-loss in the intervention arm. The metformin dose was 1500 mg/day. The duration of the intervention was 6 months. Main outcomes were biomarkers representing 3 metabolic systems putatively related to breast cancer mortality: glucoregulation, inflammation, and sex hormones. Between August 2011 and May 2015, we randomized 333 breast cancer survivors. Mass mailings from the California Cancer Registry were the most successful recruitment strategy with over 25,000 letters sent at a cost of $191 per randomized participant. At baseline, higher levels of obesity were significantly associated with worse sleep disturbance and impairment scores, lower levels of physical activity and higher levels of sedentary behavior, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and lower quality of life (p<0.05 for all). These results illustrate the health burden of obesity. Results of this trial will provide mechanistic data on biological pathways and circulating biomarkers associated with lifestyle and pharmacologic interventions to improve breast cancer prognosis.

  19. A model for community representation and participation in HIV prevention trials among women who engage in transactional sex in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagi, Charles; Vallely, Andrew; Kasindi, Stella; Chiduo, Betty; Desmond, Nicola; Soteli, Selephina; Kavit, Natujwa; Vallely, Lisa; Lees, Shelley; Hayes, Richard; Ross, David

    2008-10-01

    Actively engaging communities in effective partnerships for the design and implementation of HIV prevention research is vital to the successful conduct of ethically robust, locally-appropriate clinical trials in developing countries. This is especially true in vulnerable at-risk sub-populations, where definitions of "community", "participation" and "representation" can be difficult to apply. This study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of a participatory model of community liaison among an occupational cohort of women at high-risk of HIV and sexually-transmitted infections in Mwanza City, northwest Tanzania in preparation for a Phase III vaginal microbicide trial. This approach was rooted in participatory action-orientated research and used tools adapted from participatory learning and action techniques. During the feasibility study, a mobile community-based sexual and reproductive health service for women working as informal food vendors or in traditional and modern bars, restaurants, hotels and guesthouses was established in 10 city wards. Participatory mapping was carried out by project fieldworkers and wards divided into 78 geographical clusters of facilities in consultation with community members and study participants. Representatives at cluster and ward level were elected in a process facilitated by the site Community Liaison Officer and a site-level Community Advisory Committee established. A logical framework was used to guide the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the community liaison system (CLS) within the broader feasibility study. The CLS was essential to the successful conduct of the feasibility study and has now been consolidated and expanded as part of the on-going MDP301 Phase III microbicide trial in Mwanza. The participatory model presented in this paper is likely to be generalisable to other vulnerable, stigmatised, at-risk study populations in resource-limited settings.

  20. Additional notes on clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials applying a peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate oral clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaai, Mari; Kayano, Yuichiro; Shimizu, Takako; Taguchi, Masato; Hashimoto, Yukiya

    2008-01-01

    In the previous study, we performed a simulation of a clinical pharmacokinetic trial, in which blood was sampled at two time points corresponding to the peak concentration (C(peak)) and trough concentration (C(trough)) following repetitive oral administration at the dose, D, and dosing interval, tau. The approximate oral clearance (CL/F(approx)), estimated as 2 x D/(C(peak) x tau+C(trough) x tau), is accurate for drugs with an elimination half-life comparative to or longer than tau; however, it was suggested that we might not use CL/F(approx) for drugs with a considerably short elimination half-life relative to tau. In the present study, we evaluated the accuracy of the alternative oral clearance (CL/F(exp)) estimated by the simple monoexponential model. In contrast to CL/F(approx), CL/F(exp) was accurate for drugs with a short elimination half-life relative to tau. The present finding in conjunction with our previous study suggested that the peak-and-trough sampling design is promising for the clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trial for drugs with not only slow but also rapid elimination from the body. We think that the accuracy and precision of the two analysis methods to estimate oral clearance (CL/F(approx) and CL/F(exp)) for a target drug should be evaluated carefully before and after a real clinical trial.

  1. Cardiovascular safety of exenatide BID: an integrated analysis from controlled clinical trials in participants with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushmanova Irina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is important for patients that treatments for diabetes not increase cardiovascular (CV risk. The objective of this analysis was to examine retrospectively the CV safety of exenatide BID, a GLP-1 receptor agonist approved for treating hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes not adequately controlled with diet and exercise. Individual participant data was pooled to assess the relative risk (RR of CV events with exenatide BID versus a pooled comparator (PC group treated with either placebo or insulin from 12 controlled, randomized, clinical trials ranging from 12-52 weeks. Mean baseline values for HbA1c (8.33-8.38%, BMI (31.3-31.5 kg/m2, and duration of diabetes (8 y were similar between groups. Trials included patients with histories of microvascular and/or macrovascular disease. Customized primary major adverse CV events (MACE included stroke, myocardial infarction, cardiac mortality, acute coronary syndrome, and revascularization procedures. The Primary MACE RR (0.7; 95% CI 0.38, 1.31, calculated by the Mantel-Haenszel method (stratified by study, suggested that exenatide use (vs. PC did not increase CV risk; this result was consistent across multiple analytic methods. Because the trials were not designed to assess CV outcomes, events were identified retrospectively from a list of preferred terms by physicians blinded to treatment. Other limitations included the low number of CV events, the short duration of trials (≤1 y, and a single active comparator (insulin. The results of these analyses are consistent with those of a recent retrospective analysis of a large insurance database that found that patients treated with exenatide twice daily were less likely to have a CV event than were patients treated with other glucose-lowering therapies. Keywords: GLP-1 receptor agonist, diabetes, cardiovascular safety

  2. Experiences of patients and professionals participating in the HITS home blood pressure telemonitoring trial: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Janet; Ure, Jenny; Pagliari, Claudia; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2013-05-28

    To explore the experiences of patients and professionals taking part in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of remote blood pressure (BP) telemonitoring supported by primary care. To identify factors facilitating or hindering the effectiveness of the intervention and those likely to influence its potential translation to routine practice. Qualitative study adopting a qualitative descriptive approach. 25 patients, 11 nurses and 9 doctors who were participating in an RCT of BP telemonitoring. A maximum variation sample of patients from within the trial based on age, sex and deprivation status of the practice was sought. 6 primary care practices in Scotland. Data were collected via taped semistructured interviews. Initial thematic analysis was inductive. Multiple strategies were employed to ensure that the analysis was credible and trustworthy. Prior to the trial, both patients and professionals were reluctant to increase the medication based on single BP measurements taken in the surgery. BP measurements based on multiple electronic readings were perceived as more accurate as a basis for action. Patients using telemonitoring became more engaged in the clinical management of their condition. Professionals reported that telemonitoring challenged existing roles and work practices and increased workload. Lack of integration of telemonitoring data with the electronic health record was perceived as a drawback. BP telemonitoring in a usual care setting can provide a trusted basis for medication management and improved BP control. It increases patients' engagement in the management of their condition, but supporting telemetry and greater patient engagement can increase professional workloads and demand changes in service organisation. Successful service design in practice would have to take account of how additional roles and responsibilities could be realigned with existing work and data management practices. The embedded qualitative study was included in the protocol for

  3. Basic fibroblast growth factor predicts cardiovascular disease occurrence in participants from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial

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    Mark B Zimering

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present study was to test whether plasma basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF levels predict future cardiovascular disease (CVD occurrence in adults from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial. Methods: Nearly four- hundred veterans, 40 years of age or older, having a mean baseline diabetes duration of 11.4 years were recruited from outpatient clinics at six geographically distributed sites in the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT. Within the VADT, they were randomly assigned to intensive or standard glycemic treatment, with follow-up as much as seven and one-half years. Cardiovascular disease occurrence was examined at baseline in the patient population and during randomized treatment. Plasma bFGF was determined with a sensitive, specific two-site enzyme-linked immunoassay at the baseline study visit in all 399 subjects. Results: One hundred-five first cardiovascular events occurred in these 399 subjects. The best fit model of risk factors associated with the time to first cardiovascular disease occurrence (in the study over a seven and one-half year period had as significant predictors: prior cardiovascular event, (hazard ratio [HR] 3.378; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 3.079- 3.807; P < .0001, baseline plasma bFGF (HR 1.008; 95% CI 1.002-1.014; P =.01, age, (HR 1.027; 95% CI 1.004-1.051; P =.019, baseline plasma triglycerides, (HR 1.001; 95% CI 1.000-1.002; P =.02 and diabetes duration-treatment interaction (P =.03. Intensive glucose-lowering was associated with significantly decreased hazard ratios for CVD occurrence (0.38-0.63 in patients with known diabetes duration of 0-10 years, and non-significantly increased hazard ratios for CVD occurrence (0.82-1.78 in patients with longer diabetes duration. Conclusion: High level ofplasma basic fibroblast growth factor is a predictive biomarker of future cardiovascular

  4. ExStroke Pilot Trial of the effect of repeated instructions to improve physical activity after ischaemic stroke: a multinational randomised controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Gudrun; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Zeng, Xianrong;

    2009-01-01

    training programme before discharge and at five follow-up visits during 24 months. Control patients had follow-up visits with the same frequency but without instructions in physical activity. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physical activity assessed with the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) at each...... infarction, or falls and fractures. CONCLUSION: Repeated encouragement and verbal instruction in being physically active did not lead to a significant increase in physical activity measured by the PASE score. More intensive strategies seem to be needed to promote physical activity after ischaemic stroke...

  5. Pharmacist participation in hospital ward teams and hospital readmission rates among people with dementia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Maria; Sjölander, Maria; Pfister, Bettina; Jonsson, Jeanette; Schneede, Jörn; Lövheim, Hugo

    2017-07-01

    To assess whether comprehensive medication reviews conducted by clinical pharmacists as part of a healthcare team reduce drug-related hospital readmission rates among people with dementia or cognitive impairment. This randomized controlled trial was carried out between January 9, 2012, and December 2, 2014. Patients aged ≥65 years with dementia or cognitive impairment admitted to three wards at two hospitals located in Northern Sweden were included. Of the 473 deemed eligible for participation, 230 were randomized to intervention and 230 to control group by block randomization. The primary outcome, risk of drug-related hospital readmissions, was assessed at 180 days of follow-up by intention-to-treat analysis. During the 180 days of follow-up, 18.9% (40/212) of patients in the intervention group and 23.0% (50/217) of those in the control group were readmitted for drug-related reasons (HR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.53-1.21, p = 0.28, univariable Cox regression). Heart failure was significantly more common in the intervention group. After adjustment for heart failure as a potential confounder and an interaction term, multiple Cox regression analysis indicated that pharmacist participation significantly reduced the risk of drug-related readmissions (HR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.27-0.90, p = 0.02). A post-hoc analysis showed a significantly reduced risk of 30-day readmissions due to drug-related problems in the total sample (without adjustment for heart failure). Participation of clinical pharmacists in healthcare team conducting comprehensive medication reviews did not significantly reduce the risk of drug-related readmissions in patients with dementia or cognitive impairment; however, post-hoc and subgroup analyses indicated significant effects favoring the intervention. More research is needed. Clinical trials NCT01504672.

  6. Attempted operative vaginal delivery vs repeat cesarean in the second stage among women undergoing a trial of labor after cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Moeun; Roy, Archana; Grobman, William A

    2017-04-01

    It is not well-characterized whether attempting operative vaginal delivery is a safe and effective alternative among women who undergo a trial of labor after cesarean delivery who are unable to complete second-stage labor with a spontaneous vaginal delivery. The purpose of this study was to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes that are associated with attempted operative vaginal delivery with those that are associated with second-stage repeat cesarean delivery without an operative vaginal delivery attempt among women who undergo a trial of labor after cesarean delivery. This is a retrospective secondary analysis of data from Cesarean Registry of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network. Women who underwent a trial of labor after cesarean delivery who were at least 36 weeks gestation were eligible for analysis if they had a live, singleton, nonanomalous gestation in cephalic presentation and reached second-stage labor (defined as complete cervical dilation) with a fetal station of at least +2. The data for women who had an attempted operative vaginal delivery with either forceps or vacuum were compared with those of women who underwent second stage repeat cesarean delivery without operative vaginal delivery attempt. Outcomes of maternal and neonatal complications were compared between groups with bivariable and multivariable analyses. Of 1230 women whose cases were eligible for analysis, 945 women (76.8%) had an attempted operative vaginal delivery. Of those who underwent attempted operative vaginal delivery, 914 women (96.7%) achieved a vaginal delivery. Women who attempted operative vaginal delivery had a lower mean body mass index (30.4±6.0 vs 31.8±5.9 kg/m(2); P=.001) and gestational age (39.5±1.3 vs 39.8±1.2 weeks; P=.012) at delivery and were more likely to be of non-Hispanic black race (30.0% vs 22.1%; P=.002), to have had a previous vaginal delivery (34.9% vs 20

  7. Effect of repeated Waon therapy on exercise tolerance and pulmonary function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a pilot controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hiroshi Kikuchi,1,2 Nobuyoshi Shiozawa,1 Shingo Takata,1 Kozo Ashida,1 Fumihiro Mitsunobu11Division of Medicine, Misasa Medical Center, Okayama University Hospital, Misasa, Tottori, Japan; 2Division of Internal Medicine, Takamatsu Hospital KKR, Takamatsu, JapanPurpose: Controlled clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of repeated Waon therapy for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have yet to be conducted. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated Waon therapy exhibits an adjuvant effect on conventional therapy for COPD patients.Patients and methods: This prospective trial comprised 20 consecutive COPD patients who satisfied the criteria of the Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD guidelines, stages 1–4. They were assigned to either a Waon or control group. The patients in the Waon group received both repeated Waon therapy and conventional therapy, including medications, such as long-acting inhaled β2 agonists, long-acting anticholinergics and xanthine derivatives, and pulmonary rehabilitation. The Waon therapy consisted of sitting in a 60°C sauna room for 15 minutes, followed by 30 minutes of being warmed with blankets once a day, 5 days a week, for a total of 20 times. The patients in the control group received only conventional therapy. Pulmonary function and the 6-minute walk test were assessed before and at 4 weeks after the program.Results: The change in vital capacity (0.30 ± 0.4 L and in peak expiratory flow (0.48 ± 0.79 L/s in the Waon group was larger than the change in the vital capacity (0.02 ± 0.21 L (P=0.077 and peak expiratory flow (−0.11 ± 0.72 L/s (P=0.095 in the control group. The change in forced expiratory flow after 50% of expired forced vital capacity in the Waon group, 0.08 (0.01–0.212 L/s, was larger than that in the control group, −0.01 (−0.075–0.04 L/s (P=0.019. Significant differences were not observed in the change in any

  8. A cluster-based randomized controlled trial promoting community participation in arsenic mitigation efforts in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Christine

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To reduce arsenic (As exposure, we evaluated the effectiveness of training community members to perform water arsenic (WAs testing and provide As education compared to sending representatives from outside communities to conduct these tasks. Methods We conducted a cluster based randomized controlled trial of 20 villages in Singair, Bangladesh. Fifty eligible respondents were randomly selected in each village. In 10 villages, a community member provided As education and WAs testing. In a second set of 10 villages an outside representative performed these tasks. Results Overall, 53% of respondents using As contaminated wells, relative to the Bangladesh As standard of 50 μg/L, at baseline switched after receiving the intervention. Further, when there was less than 60% arsenic contaminated wells in a village, the classification used by the Bangladeshi and UNICEF, 74% of study households in the community tester villages, and 72% of households in the outside tester villages reported switching to an As safe drinking water source . Switching was more common in the outside-tester (63% versus community-tester villages (44%. However, after adjusting for the availability of arsenic safe drinking water sources, well switching did not differ significantly by type of As tester (Odds ratio =0.86[95% confidence interval 0.42-1.77. At follow-up, among those using As contaminated wells who switched to safe wells, average urinary As concentrations significantly decreased. Conclusion The overall intervention was effective in reducing As exposure provided there were As-safe drinking water sources available. However, there was not a significant difference observed in the ability of the community and outside testers to encourage study households to use As-safe water sources. The findings of this study suggest that As education and WAs testing programs provided by As testers, irrespective of their residence, could be used as an effective, low cost

  9. The Challenges of Conducting a Nurse-Led Intervention in a Randomized Controlled Trial with Vulnerable Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the challenges encountered by researchers while conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT testing the efficacy of a healthy lifestyle educational and exercise intervention for people with serious mental illness. RCTs, even though considered the “gold standard” of research designs, are still prone to risks of potential bias and threats to their validity. Based on researcher reflexivity, the combination of reflection and action, during the conduct of the study, this paper outlines a number of challenges faced by the researchers. These included managing the need of participants to tell their story and be heard, reluctance of participants to remain in allocated groups, participant literacy, dual role of the nurse nurse-researcher, and reporting the benefits of nonstatistical results of a quantitative research project. Recommendations for conducting future behaviour intervention studies of this type include the incorporation of a reflexive component for the nurse nurse-researcher, highlighting the importance of taking a reflexive stance in both qualitative and quantitative research designs.

  10. When is it rational to participate in a clinical trial? A game theory approach incorporating trust, regret and guilt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djulbegovic Benjamin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs remain an indispensable form of human experimentation as a vehicle for discovery of new treatments. However, since their inception RCTs have raised ethical concerns. The ethical tension has revolved around “duties to individuals” vs. “societal value” of RCTs. By asking current patients “to sacrifice for the benefit of future patients” we risk subjugating our duties to patients’ best interest to the utilitarian goal for the good of others. This tension creates a key dilemma: when is it rational, from the perspective of the trial patients and researchers (as societal representatives of future patients, to enroll in RCTs? Methods We employed the trust version of the prisoner’s dilemma since interaction between the patient and researcher in the setting of a clinical trial is inherently based on trust. We also took into account that the patient may have regretted his/her decision to participate in the trial, while a researcher may feel guilty because he/she abused the patient’s trust. Results We found that under typical circumstances of clinical research, most patients can be expected not to trust researchers, and most researchers can be expected to abuse the patients’ trust. The most significant factor determining trust was the success of experimental or standard treatments, respectively. The more that a researcher believes the experimental treatment will be successful, the more incentive the researcher has to abuse trust. The analysis was sensitive to the assumptions about the utilities related to success and failure of therapies that are tested in RCTs. By varying all variables in the Monte Carlo analysis we found that, on average, the researcher can be expected to honor a patient’s trust 41% of the time, while the patient is inclined to trust the researcher 69% of the time. Under assumptions of our model, enrollment into RCTs represents a rational strategy that can meet

  11. When is it rational to participate in a clinical trial? A game theory approach incorporating trust, regret and guilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Hozo, Iztok

    2012-06-22

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) remain an indispensable form of human experimentation as a vehicle for discovery of new treatments. However, since their inception RCTs have raised ethical concerns. The ethical tension has revolved around "duties to individuals" vs. "societal value" of RCTs. By asking current patients "to sacrifice for the benefit of future patients" we risk subjugating our duties to patients' best interest to the utilitarian goal for the good of others. This tension creates a key dilemma: when is it rational, from the perspective of the trial patients and researchers (as societal representatives of future patients), to enroll in RCTs? We employed the trust version of the prisoner's dilemma since interaction between the patient and researcher in the setting of a clinical trial is inherently based on trust. We also took into account that the patient may have regretted his/her decision to participate in the trial, while a researcher may feel guilty because he/she abused the patient's trust. We found that under typical circumstances of clinical research, most patients can be expected not to trust researchers, and most researchers can be expected to abuse the patients' trust. The most significant factor determining trust was the success of experimental or standard treatments, respectively. The more that a researcher believes the experimental treatment will be successful, the more incentive the researcher has to abuse trust. The analysis was sensitive to the assumptions about the utilities related to success and failure of therapies that are tested in RCTs. By varying all variables in the Monte Carlo analysis we found that, on average, the researcher can be expected to honor a patient's trust 41% of the time, while the patient is inclined to trust the researcher 69% of the time. Under assumptions of our model, enrollment into RCTs represents a rational strategy that can meet both patients' and researchers' interests simultaneously 19% of the time

  12. The Effects of the UK Pregnancies Better Eating and Activity Trial Intervention on Dietary Patterns in Obese Pregnant Women Participating in a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Angela C.; Schneeberger, Caroline; Seed, Paul T.; Barr, Suzanne; Poston, Lucilla; Goff, Louise M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of the UK Pregnancies Better Eating and Activity Trial (UPBEAT) behavioral intervention on dietary patterns in obese pregnant women. METHODS Dietary patterns were derived from Food Frequency Questionnaires using principal component analysis in 183 UPBEAT pilot study participants. RESULTS Two unhealthy dietary patterns, processed and traditional, predominantly characterized by foods high in sugar and fat, improved [processed −0.54 (−0.92 to −0.16), P = 0.006 and traditional −0.83 (−1.20 to −0.45), P < 0.001] following the intervention, while a cultural pattern that was found to be associated with the Black African/Caribbean participants did not change [−0.10 (−0.46 to 0.26), P = 0.589]. CONCLUSION Unhealthy dietary patterns are evident in obese pregnant women. The UPBEAT intervention was effective in improving maternal dietary patterns; however, obese pregnant women from minority ethnic groups may be less receptive to intervention. PMID:27385914

  13. The effect of IPS on participants' engagement, quality of life, empowerment, and motivation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areberg, Cecilia; Bejerholm, Ulrika

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of Individual Placement and Support (IPS) with regard to non-vocational outcomes among individuals with severe mental illness. A randomized controlled trial was carried out, comparing IPS with traditional vocational rehabilitation. The Empowerment Scale, the Worker Role Interview, the Profile of Occupational Engagement, and the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life were administered to 120 clients, at baseline, six, and 18 months. IPS participants showed higher scores in quality of life (p = 0.002), empowerment (p = 0.047), and work motivation (p = 0.033) at 18 months. Within the IPS group, a significant change in QOL was shown at six (p = 0.002) and 18 months (p = 0.000), and in occupational engagement (p = 0.003; p = 0.012). IPS can be part of a recovery process as individuals may increase their life satisfaction and time spent in daily occupations and community life.

  14. Inpatient trial of an artificial pancreas based on multiple model probabilistic predictive control with repeated large unannounced meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Fraser; Niemeyer, Günter; Wilson, Darrell M; Bequette, B Wayne; Benassi, Kari S; Clinton, Paula; Buckingham, Bruce A

    2014-11-01

    Closed-loop control of blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes offers the potential to reduce the incidence of diabetes complications and reduce the patients' burden, particularly if meals do not need to be announced. We therefore tested a closed-loop algorithm that does not require meal announcement. A multiple model probabilistic predictive controller (MMPPC) was assessed on four patients, revised to improve performance, and then assessed on six additional patients. Each inpatient admission lasted for 32 h with five unannounced meals containing approximately 1 g/kg of carbohydrate per admission. The system used an Abbott Diabetes Care (Alameda, CA) Navigator(®) continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and Insulet (Bedford, MA) Omnipod(®) insulin pump, with the MMPPC implemented through the artificial pancreas system platform. The controller was initialized only with the patient's total daily dose and daily basal pattern. On a 24-h basis, the first cohort had mean reference and CGM readings of 179 and 167 mg/dL, respectively, with 53% and 62%, respectively, of readings between 70 and 180 mg/dL and four treatments for glucose values time spent euglycemic. There was one controller-induced hypoglycemic episode. For the 30 unannounced meals in the second cohort, the mean reference and CGM premeal, postmeal maximum, and 3-h postmeal values were 139 and 132, 223 and 208, and 168 and 156 mg/dL, respectively. The MMPPC, tested in-clinic against repeated, large, unannounced meals, maintained reasonable glycemic control with a mean blood glucose level that would equate to a mean glycated hemoglobin value of 7.2%, with only one controller-induced hypoglycemic event occurring in the second cohort.

  15. Two to five repeated measurements per patient reduced the required sample size considerably in a randomized clinical trial for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smedslund Geir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient reported outcomes are accepted as important outcome measures in rheumatology. The fluctuating symptoms in patients with rheumatic diseases have serious implications for sample size in clinical trials. We estimated the effects of measuring the outcome 1-5 times on the sample size required in a two-armed trial. Findings In a randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effects of a mindfulness-based group intervention for patients with inflammatory arthritis (n=71, the outcome variables Numerical Rating Scales (NRS (pain, fatigue, disease activity, self-care ability, and emotional wellbeing and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20 were measured five times before and after the intervention. For each variable we calculated the necessary sample sizes for obtaining 80% power (α=.05 for one up to five measurements. Two, three, and four measures reduced the required sample sizes by 15%, 21%, and 24%, respectively. With three (and five measures, the required sample size per group was reduced from 56 to 39 (32 for the GHQ-20, from 71 to 60 (55 for pain, 96 to 71 (73 for fatigue, 57 to 51 (48 for disease activity, 59 to 44 (45 for self-care, and 47 to 37 (33 for emotional wellbeing. Conclusions Measuring the outcomes five times rather than once reduced the necessary sample size by an average of 27%. When planning a study, researchers should carefully compare the advantages and disadvantages of increasing sample size versus employing three to five repeated measurements in order to obtain the required statistical power.

  16. Predictors of Retention Among African American and Hispanic Older Adult Research Participants in the Well Elderly 2 Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Mike; Jackson, Jeanne; Mandel, Deborah; Blanchard, Jeanine; Holguin, Jess; Lai, Mei-Ying; Marterella, Abbey; Vigen, Cheryl; Gleason, Sarah; Lam, Claudia; Azen, Stan; Clark, Florence

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document predictors of long-term retention among minority participants in the Well Elderly 2 Study, a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for community-dwelling older adults. The primary sample included 149 African American and 92 Hispanic men and women aged 60–95 years, recruited at senior activity centers and senior residences. Chi-square and logistic regression procedures were undertaken to examine study-based, psychosocial, and health-related predictors of retention at 18 months following study entry. For both African Americans and Hispanics, intervention adherence was the strongest predictor. Retention was also related to high active coping and average (vs. high or low) levels of activity participation among African Americans and high social network strength among Hispanics. The results suggest that improved knowledge of the predictors of retention among minority elders can spawn new retention strategies that can be applied at individual, subgroup, and sample-wide levels. PMID:24652865

  17. Participation outcomes in a randomized trial of 2 models of upper-limb rehabilitation for children with congenital hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakzewski, Leanne; Ziviani, Jenny; Abbott, David F; Macdonell, Richard A; Jackson, Graeme D; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2011-04-01

    To determine if constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is more effective than bimanual training to improve occupational performance and participation in children with congenital hemiplegia. Single-blind randomized comparison trial with evaluations at baseline, 3, and 26 weeks. Community facilities in 2 Australian states. Referred sample of children (N=64; mean age ± SD, 10.2±2.7y, 52% boys) were matched for age, sex, side of hemiplegia, and upper-limb function and were randomized to CIMT or bimanual training. After random allocation, 100% of CIMT and 94% of the bimanual training group completed the intervention. Each intervention was delivered in day camps (total 60 h over 10d) using a circus theme with goal-directed training. Children receiving CIMT wore a tailor-made glove during the camp. The primary outcome was the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Secondary measures included the Assessment of Life Habits (LIFE-H), Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment, and School Function Assessment. There were no between-group differences at baseline. Both groups made significant changes for COPM performance at 3 weeks (estimated mean difference =2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-3.6; PRehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Iowa Gambling Task with non-clinical participants: Effects of using real + virtual cards and additional trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Overman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT in clinical populations can be interpreted only in relation to established base line performance in normal populations. As in all comparisons of assessment tools, the normal base line must reflect performance under conditions in which subjects can function at their best levels. In this review, we show that a number of variables enhance IGT performance in non-clinical participants. First, optimal performance is produced by having participants turn over real cards while viewing virtual cards on a computer screen. The use of only virtual cards results in significantly lower performance than the combination of real + virtual cards. Secondly, administration of more than 100 trials also enhances performance. When using the real/virtual card procedure, performance is shown to significantly increase from early adolescence through young adulthood. Under these conditions young (mean age 19 years and older (mean age 59 years adults perform equally. Females, as a group, score lower than males because females tend to choose cards from high-frequency-of-gain Deck B. Groups of females with high or low gonadal hormones perform equally. Concurrent tasks, e.g., presentation of aromas, decrease performance in males. Age and gender effects are discussed in terms of a dynamic between testosterone and orbital prefrontal cortex.

  19. Clinical trial management of participant recruitment, enrollment, engagement, and retention in the SMART study using a Marketing and Information Technology (MARKIT) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anjali; Calfas, Karen J; Marshall, Simon J; Robinson, Thomas N; Rock, Cheryl L; Huang, Jeannie S; Epstein-Corbin, Melanie; Servetas, Christina; Donohue, Michael C; Norman, Gregory J; Raab, Fredric; Merchant, Gina; Fowler, James H; Griswold, William G; Fogg, B J; Patrick, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Advances in information technology and near ubiquity of the Internet have spawned novel modes of communication and unprecedented insights into human behavior via the digital footprint. Health behavior randomized controlled trials (RCTs), especially technology-based, can leverage these advances to improve the overall clinical trials management process and benefit from improvements at every stage, from recruitment and enrollment to engagement and retention. In this paper, we report the results for recruitment and retention of participants in the SMART study and introduce a new model for clinical trials management that is a result of interdisciplinary team science. The MARKIT model brings together best practices from information technology, marketing, and clinical research into a single framework to maximize efforts for recruitment, enrollment, engagement, and retention of participants into a RCT. These practices may have contributed to the study's on-time recruitment that was within budget, 86% retention at 24 months, and a minimum of 57% engagement with the intervention over the 2-year RCT. Use of technology in combination with marketing practices may enable investigators to reach a larger and more diverse community of participants to take part in technology-based clinical trials, help maximize limited resources, and lead to more cost-effective and efficient clinical trial management of study participants as modes of communication evolve among the target population of participants. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Randomized intervention trial on preventive home visits to older people: baseline and follow-up characteristics of participants and non-participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, Mikkel; Avlund, Kirsten; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    of municipality employees) was done at municipality level. In total 5,788 home-dwelling 75- and 80-year-olds living in these municipalities were invited to participate in the study. Written consent was obtained from 4,060 persons (participation rate 71%). RESULTS: During five-year follow-up non-participants had...

  1. GP Participation and Recruitment of Patients to RCTs: Lessons from Trials of Acupuncture and Exercise for Low Back Pain in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally E. M. Bell-Syer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with general practitioner (GP participation and the recruitment of people to trials in primary care, based on data from two trials of interventions for treating chronic low back pain. The study was based on data from two randomized controlled trials (RCTs, one involving exercise, the other acupuncture, and subsequent reporting by GPs in a postal questionnaire. The exercise trial achieved 62% recruitment whereas the acupuncture trial achieved 100% recruitment. In both trials GPs most efficient at referring patients were those with a special interest in the subject area, and those known personally to the research team. A follow-up GP questionnaire found that both trials had maintained a high profile with over 80% of GPs, and successful recruitment strategies included project reminder letters, updates and personal contacts. Achieving target recruitment of patients in the acupuncture trial was aided by the deliberate application of lessons learned in the exercise trial, in particular the need to keep initial study entry criteria broad, with subsequent filtering undertaken by the study researcher. In addition the use of effective methods of maintaining the trial profile, the involvement of a GP advisor, the decision to maximize the recruitment of GPs early in the trial and the direct recruitment of interested individual GPs. The successful recruitment of patients to trials in primary care requires careful planning and continuous monitoring from the outset. Prior to starting recruitment, it is useful to identify previous trials in a similar environment in order to learn from their experience and optimize patient recruitment.

  2. How Bioethics is Complementing Human Rights in Realizing Health Access for Clinical Trial Participants: The Case of Formative PrEP Access in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jerome

    2015-06-11

    Following the demise of apartheid, human rights in South Africa are now constitutionally enshrined.The right to health in South Africa's Constitution has been credited with transforming the lives of millions of people by triggering programmatic reforms in HIV treatment and the prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV.However, a constitutionally enshrined right to health offers no guarantee that clinical trial participants will enjoy post-trial access to beneficial interventions. Using access to HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in South Africa as an example, this paper argues that adherence to bioethics norms could realize the right to health for trial participants following the end of a clinical trial.

  3. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more information about safety and effectiveness, studying different populations and different dosages and using the drug in ... effectiveness and safety are monitored in large, diverse populations. Sometimes the side effects of a drug may ...

  4. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... effectiveness and safety are monitored in large, diverse populations. Sometimes the side effects of a drug may not become clear ... Support | Accessibility | Copyright | Privacy | Viewers and ...

  5. Clinical Trials - Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OCD) Panic Disorder Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Schizophrenia Social Phobia (Social Anxiety Disorder) Conditions Specific to Women Conditions Related to Mental Disorders Other Ways To ...

  6. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... experimental treatments, their risks, and how well they work compare existing therapies to decide which one, or a combination of them, is the best treatment for a disease evaluate treatment methods such as surgical techniques, psychiatric therapy, or radiotherapy. ...

  7. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the best treatment for a disease evaluate treatment methods such as surgical techniques, psychiatric therapy, or radiotherapy. ... of finding a disease before symptoms occur. These methods, often called screening tests, can include imaging tests ...

  8. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... in this topic was provided by the National Library of Medicine Topic last reviewed: December 2013 For ... site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. National Library of Medicine | National Institutes of Health | U.S. Department ...

  9. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... more sleep, keeping mentally active, or eating nutritious foods, can prevent a problem taking certain medicines, or ... usually described based on their phase. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration typically requires Phase 1, 2 ...

  10. Regulatory T Cell Responses in Participants with Type 1 Diabetes after a Single Dose of Interleukin-2: A Non-Randomised, Open Label, Adaptive Dose-Finding Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, John A.; Porter, Linsey; Smyth, Deborah J.; Rainbow, Daniel B.; Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Yang, Jennie H.; Bell, Charles J. M.; Schuilenburg, Helen; Challis, Ben; Clarke, Pamela; Coleman, Gillian; Dawson, Sarah; Goymer, Donna; Kennet, Jane; Brown, Judy; Greatorex, Jane; Goodfellow, Ian; Evans, Mark; Mander, Adrian P.; Bond, Simon; Wicker, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin-2 (IL-2) has an essential role in the expansion and function of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs reduce tissue damage by limiting the immune response following infection and regulate autoreactive CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs) to prevent autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). Genetic susceptibility to T1D causes alterations in the IL-2 pathway, a finding that supports Tregs as a cellular therapeutic target. Aldesleukin (Proleukin; recombinant human IL-2), which is administered at high doses to activate the immune system in cancer immunotherapy, is now being repositioned to treat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders at lower doses by targeting Tregs. Methods and Findings To define the aldesleukin dose response for Tregs and to find doses that increase Tregs physiologically for treatment of T1D, a statistical and systematic approach was taken by analysing the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single doses of subcutaneous aldesleukin in the Adaptive Study of IL-2 Dose on Regulatory T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes (DILT1D), a single centre, non-randomised, open label, adaptive dose-finding trial with 40 adult participants with recently diagnosed T1D. The primary endpoint was the maximum percentage increase in Tregs (defined as CD3+CD4+CD25highCD127low) from the baseline frequency in each participant measured over the 7 d following treatment. There was an initial learning phase with five pairs of participants, each pair receiving one of five pre-assigned single doses from 0.04 × 106 to 1.5 × 106 IU/m2, in order to model the dose-response curve. Results from each participant were then incorporated into interim statistical modelling to target the two doses most likely to induce 10% and 20% increases in Treg frequencies. Primary analysis of the evaluable population (n = 39) found that the optimal doses of aldesleukin to induce 10% and 20% increases in Tregs were 0.101 × 106 IU/m2 (standard error [SE] = 0.078, 95% CI = −0

  11. A Novel Use of a Statewide Telecolposcopy Network for Recruitment of Participants in a Phase I Clinical Trial of a Human Papillomavirus Therapeutic Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Shawna L.; Spencer, Horace J.; Greenfield, William W.; Low, Gordon; Hitt, W. Chuck; Quick, Charles M.; Jeffus, Susanne K.; Blackmon, Victoria; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Background Historically, recruitment and retention of young women in intervention-based clinical trials has been challenging. In August 2012, enrollment for a clinical trial testing of an investigational human papillomavirus (HPV) therapeutic vaccine called PepCan was opened at our institution. This study was an open-label, single arm, single institution, dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial. Women with recent Papanicolau smear results showing high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) or cannot rule out HSIL were eligible to enroll. Patients with biopsy-confirmed HSIL were also eligible. Colposopy was performed at the screening visit, and participants became eligible for vaccination when the diagnosis of HSIL was confirmed with biopsy and other inclusion criteria were met. Purpose The aim of this study was to identify strategies and factors effective in recruitment and retention of study participants. Methods Potential vaccine candidates were recruited through direct advertisement as well as referrals, including through the Arkansas telecolposcopy network. The network is a federally funded program, administered by physicians and advanced practice nurses. The network telemedically links rural health sites and allows physician-guided colposcopy and biopsies to be conducted by advanced practice nurses. A variety of strategies were employed to assure good retention including face-to-face contact with the study coordinator at the time of consent and most of study visits, frequent contact using text messaging, phone calls, and e-mails, and creation of a private Facebook page to improve communication among research staff and study participants. A questionnaire, inquiring about motivation for joining the study, occupation, education, household income, number of children, and number of sexual partners, was administered at the screening visit with the intent of identifying factor(s) associated with recruitment and retention. Results Thirty-seven participants were

  12. Proactive recruitment predicts participant retention to end of treatment in a secondhand smoke reduction trial with low-income maternal smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Bradley N; Wileyto, E Paul; Hovell, Melbourne F; Nair, Uma S; Jaffe, Karen; Tolley, Natalie M; Audrain-McGovern, Janet

    2011-09-01

    Improving smoking intervention trial retention in underserved populations remains a public health priority. Low retention rates undermine clinical advancements that could reduce health disparities. To examine the effects of recruitment strategies on participant retention among 279 low-income, maternal smokers who initiated treatment in a 16-week behavioral counseling trial to reduce child secondhand smoke exposure (SHSe). Participants were recruited using either reactive strategies or methods that included proactive strategies. Logistic regression analysis was used to test associations among retention and recruitment method in the context of other psychosocial and sociodemographic factors known to relate to retention. Backwards stepwise procedures determined the most parsimonious solution. Ninety-four percent of participants recruited with proactive + reactive methods were retained through end of treatment compared to 74.7% of reactive-recruited participants. Retention likelihood was five times greater if participants were recruited with proactive + reactive strategies rather than reactive recruitment alone (odds ration [OR] = 5.36; confidence interval [CI], 2.31-12.45). Greater knowledge of SHS consequences (OR = 1.58; CI, 1.07-2.34) was another significant factor retained in the final LR model. Proactive recruitment may improve retention among underserved smokers in behavioral intervention trials. Identifying factors influencing retention may improve the success of recruitment strategies in future trials, in turn, enhancing the impact of smoking interventions.

  13. The effectiveness of community day-long CBT-I workshops for participants with insomnia symptoms: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Naomi; Stewart, Robert; Andiappan, Manoharan; Smith, Anna; Espie, Colin A; Brown, June S L

    2012-06-01

    Insomnia is a very common and disabling symptom. Whilst evidence for the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy for people diagnosed with insomnia (CBT-I) is strong, few people seek help and not many services offer CBT-I. Less intensive adaptations of CBT-I have been shown to be valuable, and given the size of the problem and low rates of help-seeking, an accessible intervention with a large capacity is needed. Day-long CBT-I psycho-educational workshops (each for up to 30 people), to which members of the public with insomnia symptoms could self-refer, have been developed. This randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of these workshops. Baseline measures were taken from 151 participants, who were then randomised to experimental or waiting-list control groups. Scores of the experimental group and the control group were compared 3 months after baseline. Random effects models found a significant interaction between time and group, indicating differences between the control and experimental groups on the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Post hoc analyses indicated that ISI scores decreased significantly in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Promising results were also found on corroborative sleep diary measures. Access to the workshops was good, with 50% of participants having never previously sought help for sleep difficulties from their GP. CBT-I workshops proved to be both accessible and effective in reducing insomnia symptoms in the medium term. They may represent a feasible brief intervention with the potential to address unmet treatment needs of adults complaining of insomnia symptoms.

  14. Interim analysis for binary outcome trials with a long fixed follow-up time and repeated outcome assessments at pre-specified times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpia, Sameer; Julian, Jim A; Gu, Chushu; Thabane, Lehana; Levine, Mark N

    2014-01-01

    In trials with binary outcomes, assessed repeatedly at pre-specified times and where the subject is considered to have experienced a failure at the first occurrence of the outcome, interim analyses are performed, generally, after half or more of the subjects have completed follow-up. Depending on the duration of accrual relative to the length of follow-up, this may be inefficient, since there is a possibility that the trial will have completed accrual prior to the interim analysis. An alternative is to plan the interim analysis after subjects have completed follow-up to a time that is less than the fixed full follow-up duration. Using simulations, we evaluated three methods to estimate the event proportion for the interim analysis in terms of type I and II errors and the probability of early stopping. We considered: 1) estimation of the event proportion based on subjects who have been followed for a pre-specified time (less than the full follow-up duration) or who experienced the outcome; 2) estimation of the event proportion based on data from all subjects that have been randomized by the time of the interim analysis; and 3) the Kaplan-Meier approach to estimate the event proportion at the time of the interim analysis. Our results show that all methods preserve and have comparable type I and II errors in certain scenarios. In these cases, we recommend using the Kaplan-Meier method because it incorporates all the available data and has greater probability of early stopping when the treatment effect exists.

  15. Psychiatric treatment following participation in the CapOpus randomized trial for patients with comorbid cannabis use disorder and psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten Rygaard; Orlovska, Sonja; Fohlmann, Allan;

    2013-01-01

    Randomized trials targeting cannabis use disorders in patients with psychosis have generally been unsuccessful. One of the largest such trials was the CapOpus trial, which had an impact on the number of monthly joints used, but not on the number of days with cannabis use or positive or negative...

  16. Efficacy of Folic Acid Supplementation in Autistic Children Participating in Structured Teaching: An Open-Label Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caihong Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are recognized as a major public health issue. Here, we evaluated the effects of folic acid intervention on methylation cycles and oxidative stress in autistic children enrolled in structured teaching. Sixty-six autistic children enrolled in this open-label trial and participated in three months of structured teaching. Forty-four children were treated with 400 μg folic acid (two times/daily for a period of three months during their structured teaching (intervention group, while the remaining 22 children were not given any supplement for the duration of the study (control group. The Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC and Psychoeducational Profile-third edition (PEP-3 were measured at the beginning and end of the treatment period. Folic acid, homocysteine, and glutathione metabolism in plasma were measured before and after treatment in 29 autistic children randomly selected from the intervention group and were compared with 29 age-matched unaffected children (typical developmental group. The results illustrated folic acid intervention improved autism symptoms towards sociability, cognitive verbal/preverbal, receptive language, and affective expression and communication. Furthermore, this treatment also improved the concentrations of folic acid, homocysteine, and normalized glutathione redox metabolism. Folic acid supplementation may have a certain role in the treatment of children with autism.

  17. Efficacy of Folic Acid Supplementation in Autistic Children Participating in Structured Teaching: An Open-Label Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Caihong; Zou, Mingyang; Zhao, Dong; Xia, Wei; Wu, Lijie

    2016-06-07

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are recognized as a major public health issue. Here, we evaluated the effects of folic acid intervention on methylation cycles and oxidative stress in autistic children enrolled in structured teaching. Sixty-six autistic children enrolled in this open-label trial and participated in three months of structured teaching. Forty-four children were treated with 400 μg folic acid (two times/daily) for a period of three months during their structured teaching (intervention group), while the remaining 22 children were not given any supplement for the duration of the study (control group). The Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC) and Psychoeducational Profile-third edition (PEP-3) were measured at the beginning and end of the treatment period. Folic acid, homocysteine, and glutathione metabolism in plasma were measured before and after treatment in 29 autistic children randomly selected from the intervention group and were compared with 29 age-matched unaffected children (typical developmental group). The results illustrated folic acid intervention improved autism symptoms towards sociability, cognitive verbal/preverbal, receptive language, and affective expression and communication. Furthermore, this treatment also improved the concentrations of folic acid, homocysteine, and normalized glutathione redox metabolism. Folic acid supplementation may have a certain role in the treatment of children with autism.

  18. Self-rated health among Mayan women participating in a randomised intervention trial reducing indoor air pollution in Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Kirk R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoor air pollution (IAP from solid fuels is a serious health problem in low-income countries that can be alleviated using improved stoves. Although women are the principal users, few studies have investigated the self-assessed impact of the stoves on their health and lives. Methods This study was conducted in rural highland Guatemala, involving 89 intervention and 80 control Mayan Indian young women (mean 27.8 years, SD 7.2. Outcomes were assessed after approximately 18 months use of the new stove. Our objectives were to compare self-rated health and change in health among women participating in a randomised control trial comparing a chimney stove with an open fire, to describe impacts on women's daily lives and their perceptions of how reduced kitchen smoke affects their own and their children's health. Results On intention-to-treat analysis, 52.8% of intervention women reported improvement in health, compared to 23.8% of control women (p Conclusion Women's perception of their health was improved, but although smoke reduction was valued, this was linked mainly with alleviation of non-respiratory symptoms like eye discomfort and headache. More focus on such symptoms may help in promoting demand for improved stoves and cleaner fuels, but education about more severe consequences of IAP exposure is also required.

  19. Odanacatib for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: development history and design and participant characteristics of LOFT, the Long-Term Odanacatib Fracture Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, H G; Dempster, D W; Eisman, J A; Greenspan, S L; McClung, M R; Nakamura, T; Papapoulos, S; Shih, W J; Rybak-Feiglin, A; Santora, A C; Verbruggen, N; Leung, A T; Lombardi, A

    2015-02-01

    Odanacatib is a cathepsin K inhibitor investigated for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Phase 2 data indicate that 50 mg once weekly inhibits bone resorption and increases bone mineral density, with only a transient decrease in bone formation. We describe the background, design and participant characteristics for the phase 3 registration trial. Odanacatib (ODN) is a selective cathepsin K inhibitor being evaluated for the treatment of osteoporosis. In a phase 2 trial, ODN 50 mg once weekly reduced bone resorption while preserving bone formation and progressively increased BMD over 5 years. We describe the phase III Long-Term ODN Fracture Trial (LOFT), an event-driven, randomized, blinded placebo-controlled trial, with preplanned interim analyses to permit early termination if significant fracture risk reduction was demonstrated. An extension was planned, with participants remaining on their randomized treatment for up to 5 years, then transitioning to open-label ODN. The three primary outcomes were radiologically determined vertebral, hip, and clinical non-vertebral fractures. Secondary end points included clinical vertebral fractures, BMD, bone turnover markers, and safety and tolerability, including bone histology. Participants were women, 65 years or older, with a BMD T-score≤-2.5 at the total hip (TH) or femoral neck (FN) or with a prior radiographic vertebral fracture and a T-score≤-1.5 at the TH or FN. They were randomized to ODN or placebo tablets. All received weekly vitamin D3 (5600 international units (IU)) and daily calcium supplements as needed to ensure a daily intake of approximately 1200 mg. Altogether, 16,713 participants were randomized at 387 centers. After a planned interim analysis, an independent data monitoring committee recommended that the study be stopped early due to robust efficacy and a favorable benefit/risk profile. Following the base study closeout, 8256 participants entered the study extension. This report details the

  20. Features predicting weight loss in overweight or obese participants in a web-based intervention: randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindal, Emily; Freyne, Jill; Saunders, Ian; Berkovsky, Shlomo; Smith, Greg; Noakes, Manny

    2012-12-12

    Obesity remains a serious issue in many countries. Web-based programs offer good potential for delivery of weight loss programs. Yet, many Internet-delivered weight loss studies include support from medical or nutritional experts, and relatively little is known about purely web-based weight loss programs. To determine whether supportive features and personalization in a 12-week web-based lifestyle intervention with no in-person professional contact affect retention and weight loss. We assessed the effect of different features of a web-based weight loss intervention using a 12-week repeated-measures randomized parallel design. We developed 7 sites representing 3 functional groups. A national mass media promotion was used to attract overweight/obese Australian adults (based on body mass index [BMI] calculated from self-reported heights and weights). Eligible respondents (n = 8112) were randomly allocated to one of 3 functional groups: information-based (n = 183), supportive (n = 3994), or personalized-supportive (n = 3935). Both supportive sites included tools, such as a weight tracker, meal planner, and social networking platform. The personalized-supportive site included a meal planner that offered recommendations that were personalized using an algorithm based on a user's preferences for certain foods. Dietary and activity information were constant across sites, based on an existing and tested 12-week weight loss program (the Total Wellbeing Diet). Before and/or after the intervention, participants completed demographic (including self-reported weight), behavioral, and evaluation questionnaires online. Usage of the website and features was objectively recorded. All screening and data collection procedures were performed online with no face-to-face contact. Across all 3 groups, attrition was high at around 40% in the first week and 20% of the remaining participants each week. Retention was higher for the supportive sites compared to the information-based site only

  1. Regulatory T Cell Responses in Participants with Type 1 Diabetes after a Single Dose of Interleukin-2: A Non-Randomised, Open Label, Adaptive Dose-Finding Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, John A; Evangelou, Marina; Cutler, Antony J; Pekalski, Marcin L; Walker, Neil M; Stevens, Helen E; Porter, Linsey; Smyth, Deborah J; Rainbow, Daniel B; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Esposito, Laura; Hunter, Kara M D; Loudon, Kevin; Irons, Kathryn; Yang, Jennie H; Bell, Charles J M; Schuilenburg, Helen; Heywood, James; Challis, Ben; Neupane, Sankalpa; Clarke, Pamela; Coleman, Gillian; Dawson, Sarah; Goymer, Donna; Anselmiova, Katerina; Kennet, Jane; Brown, Judy; Caddy, Sarah L; Lu, Jia; Greatorex, Jane; Goodfellow, Ian; Wallace, Chris; Tree, Tim I; Evans, Mark; Mander, Adrian P; Bond, Simon; Wicker, Linda S; Waldron-Lynch, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) has an essential role in the expansion and function of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs reduce tissue damage by limiting the immune response following infection and regulate autoreactive CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs) to prevent autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). Genetic susceptibility to T1D causes alterations in the IL-2 pathway, a finding that supports Tregs as a cellular therapeutic target. Aldesleukin (Proleukin; recombinant human IL-2), which is administered at high doses to activate the immune system in cancer immunotherapy, is now being repositioned to treat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders at lower doses by targeting Tregs. To define the aldesleukin dose response for Tregs and to find doses that increase Tregs physiologically for treatment of T1D, a statistical and systematic approach was taken by analysing the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single doses of subcutaneous aldesleukin in the Adaptive Study of IL-2 Dose on Regulatory T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes (DILT1D), a single centre, non-randomised, open label, adaptive dose-finding trial with 40 adult participants with recently diagnosed T1D. The primary endpoint was the maximum percentage increase in Tregs (defined as CD3+CD4+CD25highCD127low) from the baseline frequency in each participant measured over the 7 d following treatment. There was an initial learning phase with five pairs of participants, each pair receiving one of five pre-assigned single doses from 0.04 × 106 to 1.5 × 106 IU/m2, in order to model the dose-response curve. Results from each participant were then incorporated into interim statistical modelling to target the two doses most likely to induce 10% and 20% increases in Treg frequencies. Primary analysis of the evaluable population (n = 39) found that the optimal doses of aldesleukin to induce 10% and 20% increases in Tregs were 0.101 × 106 IU/m2 (standard error [SE] = 0.078, 95% CI = -0.052, 0.254) and 0.497 × 106 IU/m2

  2. Regulatory T Cell Responses in Participants with Type 1 Diabetes after a Single Dose of Interleukin-2: A Non-Randomised, Open Label, Adaptive Dose-Finding Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Todd

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-2 (IL-2 has an essential role in the expansion and function of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs. Tregs reduce tissue damage by limiting the immune response following infection and regulate autoreactive CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs to prevent autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D. Genetic susceptibility to T1D causes alterations in the IL-2 pathway, a finding that supports Tregs as a cellular therapeutic target. Aldesleukin (Proleukin; recombinant human IL-2, which is administered at high doses to activate the immune system in cancer immunotherapy, is now being repositioned to treat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders at lower doses by targeting Tregs.To define the aldesleukin dose response for Tregs and to find doses that increase Tregs physiologically for treatment of T1D, a statistical and systematic approach was taken by analysing the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single doses of subcutaneous aldesleukin in the Adaptive Study of IL-2 Dose on Regulatory T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes (DILT1D, a single centre, non-randomised, open label, adaptive dose-finding trial with 40 adult participants with recently diagnosed T1D. The primary endpoint was the maximum percentage increase in Tregs (defined as CD3+CD4+CD25highCD127low from the baseline frequency in each participant measured over the 7 d following treatment. There was an initial learning phase with five pairs of participants, each pair receiving one of five pre-assigned single doses from 0.04 × 106 to 1.5 × 106 IU/m2, in order to model the dose-response curve. Results from each participant were then incorporated into interim statistical modelling to target the two doses most likely to induce 10% and 20% increases in Treg frequencies. Primary analysis of the evaluable population (n = 39 found that the optimal doses of aldesleukin to induce 10% and 20% increases in Tregs were 0.101 × 106 IU/m2 (standard error [SE] = 0.078, 95% CI = -0.052, 0.254 and 0.497

  3. The impact of farmers’ participation in field trials in creating awareness and stimulating compliance with the World Health Organization’s farm-based multiple-barrier approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amponsah, Owusu; Vigre, Håkan; Schou, Torben Wilde;

    2016-01-01

    The results of a study aimed as assessing the extent to which urban vegetable farmers’ participation in field trials can impact on their awareness and engender compliance with the World Health Organization’s farm-based multiple-barrier approach are presented in this paper. Both qualitative...

  4. Brief Report: Impact of Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) on Carer Burden and Community Participation in Challenging Behaviour--Results from a Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassiotis, A.; Robotham, D.; Canagasabey, A.; Marston, L.; Thomas, B.; King, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Applied behaviour analysis (ABA) reduces challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability. There is interest, however, in whether such interventions reduce carer burden and increase community participation in this group. Methods: A 6-month randomised controlled trial was followed by a longer-term naturalistic follow-up of…

  5. What is the impact of obtaining medical clearance to participate in a randomised controlled trial examining a physical activity intervention on the socio-demographic and risk factor profiles of included participants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mitch J; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Caperchione, Cristina M; Rebar, Amanda L; Maeder, Anthony J; Tague, Rhys; Savage, Trevor N; van Itallie, Anetta; Mummery, W Kerry; Kolt, Gregory S

    2016-12-07

    Requiring individuals to obtain medical clearance to exercise prior to participation in physical activity interventions is common. The impact this has on the socio-demographic characteristic profiles of participants who end up participating in the intervention is not clear. As part of the multi-component eligibility screening for inclusion in a three-arm randomised controlled trial examining the efficacy of a web-based physical activity intervention, individuals interested in participating were required to complete the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q). The PAR-Q identified individuals as having lower or higher risk. Higher-risk individuals were required to obtain medical exercise clearance prior to enrolment. Comparisons of the socio-demographic characteristics of the lower- and higher-risk individuals were performed using t tests and chi-square tests (p = 0.05). A total of 1244 individuals expressed interest in participating, and 432 were enrolled without needing to undergo further screening. Of the 251 individuals required to obtain medical clearance, 148 received clearance, 15 did not receive clearance and 88 did not return any form of clearance. A total of 105 individuals were enrolled after obtaining clearance, and the most frequent reason for being required to seek clearance was for using blood pressure/heart condition medication. Higher-risk individuals were significantly older, had a higher body mass index and engaged in more sedentary behaviour than lower-risk individuals. Use of more inclusive participant screening protocols that maintain high levels of participant safety are encouraged. Allowing individuals to obtain medical clearance to participate can result in including a more diverse population likely to benefit most from participation. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ( ACTRN12611000157976 ). Registered on 9 February 2011.

  6. Strategies of persuasion in offers to participate in cancer clinical trials I: Topic placement and topic framing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Ellen; Eggly, Susan; Winckles, Andrew; Albrecht, Terrance L

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are the gold standard in medical research evaluating new treatments in cancer care; however, in the United States, too few patients enroll in trials, especially patients from minority groups. Offering patients the option of a clinical trial is an ethically-charged communicative event for oncologists. One particularly vexed ethical issue is the use of persuasion in trial offers. Based on a corpus of 22 oncology encounters with Caucasian-American (n = 11) and African-American (n = 11) patients, this discourse analysis describes oncologists' use of two persuasive strategies related to the linguistic structure of trial offers: topic placement and topic framing. Findings are presented in total and by patient race, and discussed in terms of whether these strategies may constitute ethical or unethical persuasion, particularly with respect to the ethical issue of undue influence and the social issue of underrepresentation of minorities in cancer clinical trials.

  7. Pregnancy incidence and risk factors among women participating in vaginal microbicide trials for HIV prevention: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Musekiwa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pregnancy is contraindicated in vaginal microbicide trials for the prevention of HIV infection in women due to the unknown maternal and fetal safety of the microbicides. Women who become pregnant are taken off the microbicide during pregnancy period but this result in reduction of the power of the trials. Strategies to reduce the pregnancy rates require an understanding of the incidence and associated risk factors of pregnancy in microbicide trials. This systematic review estimates the overall incidence rate of pregnancy in microbicide trials and describes the associated risk factors. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was carried out to identify eligible studies from electronic databases and other sources. Two review authors independently selected studies and extracted relevant data from included studies. Meta-analysis of incidence rates of pregnancy was carried out and risk factors of pregnancy were reported narratively. RESULTS: Fifteen studies reporting data from 10 microbicide trials (N=27,384 participants were included. A total of 4,107 participants (15.0% fell pregnant and a meta-analysis of incidence rates of pregnancy from 8 microbicide trials (N=25,551 yielded an overall incidence rate of 23.37 (95%CI: 17.78 to 28.96 pregnancies per 100 woman-years. However, significant heterogeneity was detected. Hormonal injectable, intra-uterine device (IUD or implants or sterilization, older age, more years of education and condom use were associated with lower pregnancy. On the other hand, living with a man, history of pregnancy, self and partner desire for future baby, oral contraceptive use, increased number of unprotected sexual acts and inconsistent use of condoms were associated with higher pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence rate of pregnancy in microbicide trials is high and strategies for its reduction are urgently required in order to improve the sample size and power of these trials.

  8. Repeated nebulisation of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, Eric W F W; Armstrong, David K; Ashby, Deborah; Bayfield, Katie J; Bilton, Diana; Bloomfield, Emily V; Boyd, A Christopher; Brand, June; Buchan, Ruaridh; Calcedo, Roberto; Carvelli, Paula; Chan, Mario; Cheng, Seng H; Collie, D David S; Cunningham, Steve; Davidson, Heather E; Davies, Gwyneth; Davies, Jane C; Davies, Lee A; Dewar, Maria H; Doherty, Ann; Donovan, Jackie; Dwyer, Natalie S; Elgmati, Hala I; Featherstone, Rosanna F; Gavino, Jemyr; Gea-Sorli, Sabrina; Geddes, Duncan M; Gibson, James S R; Gill, Deborah R; Greening, Andrew P; Griesenbach, Uta; Hansell, David M; Harman, Katharine; Higgins, Tracy E; Hodges, Samantha L; Hyde, Stephen C; Hyndman, Laura; Innes, J Alastair; Jacob, Joseph; Jones, Nancy; Keogh, Brian F; Limberis, Maria P; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Maclean, Alan W; Manvell, Michelle C; McCormick, Dominique; McGovern, Michael; McLachlan, Gerry; Meng, Cuixiang; Montero, M Angeles; Milligan, Hazel; Moyce, Laura J; Murray, Gordon D; Nicholson, Andrew G; Osadolor, Tina; Parra-Leiton, Javier; Porteous, David J; Pringle, Ian A; Punch, Emma K; Pytel, Kamila M; Quittner, Alexandra L; Rivellini, Gina; Saunders, Clare J; Scheule, Ronald K; Sheard, Sarah; Simmonds, Nicholas J; Smith, Keith; Smith, Stephen N; Soussi, Najwa; Soussi, Samia; Spearing, Emma J; Stevenson, Barbara J; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Turkkila, Minna; Ureta, Rosa P; Waller, Michael D; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Wilson, James M; Wolstenholme-Hogg, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Lung delivery of plasmid DNA encoding the CFTR gene complexed with a cationic liposome is a potential treatment option for patients with cystic fibrosis. We aimed to assess the efficacy of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis. Methods We did this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial in two cystic fibrosis centres with patients recruited from 18 sites in the UK. Patients (aged ≥12 years) with a forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 50–90% predicted and any combination of CFTR mutations, were randomly assigned, via a computer-based randomisation system, to receive 5 mL of either nebulised pGM169/GL67A gene–liposome complex or 0·9% saline (placebo) every 28 days (plus or minus 5 days) for 1 year. Randomisation was stratified by % predicted FEV1 (<70 vs ≥70%), age (<18 vs ≥18 years), inclusion in the mechanistic substudy, and dosing site (London or Edinburgh). Participants and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was the relative change in % predicted FEV1. The primary analysis was per protocol. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621867. Findings Between June 12, 2012, and June 24, 2013, we randomly assigned 140 patients to receive placebo (n=62) or pGM169/GL67A (n=78), of whom 116 (83%) patients comprised the per-protocol population. We noted a significant, albeit modest, treatment effect in the pGM169/GL67A group versus placebo at 12 months' follow-up (3·7%, 95% CI 0·1–7·3; p=0·046). This outcome was associated with a stabilisation of lung function in the pGM169/GL67A group compared with a decline in the placebo group. We recorded no significant difference in treatment-attributable adverse events between groups. Interpretation Monthly application of the pGM169/GL67A gene therapy formulation was associated with a significant, albeit modest, benefit in FEV1 compared with placebo at 1 year, indicating a stabilisation of

  9. Baseline participant characteristics and risk for dropout from ten obesity randomized controlled trials: a pooled analysis of individual level data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Ann Kaiser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Understanding participant demographic characteristics that inform the optimal design of obesity RCTs have been examined in few studies. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of individual participant characteristics and dropout rates (DORs in obesity randomized controlled trials (RCT by pooling data from several publicly available datasets for analyses. We comprehensively characterize DORs and patterns in obesity RCTs at the individual study level, and describe how such rates and patterns vary as a function of individual-level characteristics. Methods: We obtained and analyzed nine publicly-available, obesity RCT datasets that examined weight loss or weight gain prevention as a primary or secondary endpoint. Four risk factors for dropout were examined by Cox proportional hazards including sex, age, baseline BMI, and race/ethnicity. The individual study data were pooled in the final analyses with a random effect for study, and HR and 95% CIs were computed. Results: Results of the multivariate analysis indicated that the risk of dropout was significantly higher for females compared to males (HR= 1.24, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.46. Hispanics and Non-Hispanic blacks had a significantly higher dropout rate compared to non-Hispanic whites (HR= 1.62, 95% CI = 1.37, 1.91; HR= 1.22, 95% CI = 1.11, 1.35, respectively. There was a significantly increased risk of dropout associated with advancing age (HR= 1.02, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.02 and increasing BMI (HR= 1.03, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.04. Conclusion/Significance: As more studies may focus on special populations, researchers designing obesity RCTs may wish to oversample in certain demographic groups if attempting to match comparison groups based on generalized estimates of expected dropout rates, or otherwise adjust a priori power estimates. Understanding true reasons for dropout may require additional methods of data gathering not generally employed in obesity RCTs, e.g. time on

  10. Effects of primary caregiver participation in vestibular rehabilitation for unilateral neglect patients with right hemispheric stroke: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai CY

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chin-Ying Dai,1,2 Yu-Hui Huang,3,4 Li-Wei Chou,5,6 Shiao-Chi Wu,7 Ray-Yau Wang,8 Li-Chan Lin9 1School of Nursing, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Nursing, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan; 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 4School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 6School of Chinese Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 7Institute of Health and Welfare Policy, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 8Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 9Institute of Clinical and Community Health Nursing, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Introduction: The current study aims to investigate the effects of primary caregiver participation in vestibular rehabilitation (VR on improving the measures of neglect, activities of daily living (ADL, balance, and falls of unilateral neglect (UN patients. Methods: This study is a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Both experimental (n = 24 and control groups (n = 24 received conventional rehabilitation. The experimental group undertook VR for a month. During the first and second weeks, a registered nurse trained the experimental group in VR. The primary caregivers in the experimental group supervised and guided their patients in VR during the third and fourth weeks. The outcome measures were neglect, ADL, balance, and falls. Results: The two groups of UN patients showed a significant improvement in neglect, ADL, and balance over time. Based on the generalized estimating equations model, an interaction was observed between groups and times. Significant interactions were observed between the VR group

  11. Participant experiences from chronic administration of a multivitamin versus placebo on subjective health and wellbeing: a double-blind qualitative analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarris Jerome

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While many randomised controlled trials have been conducted on multivitamins, to our knowledge no qualitative research exploring the subjective experience of taking a multivitamin during a clinical trial has been reported. Methods Semi-structured and open-ended written questions were incorporated into a 16-week double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel groups trial of once-daily multivitamin administration. At the final study visit (week 16, three open-ended questions were posed to elucidate any positive, negative or unusual experiences from taking either the multivitamin or matched placebo. Qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken by researchers who were blind as to treatment condition of participants, and triangulation (independent analysis from three researchers was employed to ensure methodological rigour. Participant’s experiences were categorised as “positive” or “negative” and a Chi Square analysis was then applied to each of the experiential themes, to compare experiences between the multivitamin and placebo groups, (subdividing the groups by gender. Usual experiences were categorised and discussed separately. Results Of the 182 participants enrolled, 116 completed the study and qualitative data were available from 114 participants. Thematic analysis revealed significant effects in favour of the multivitamin over placebo for participants experiencing increased energy levels (p=.022 and enhanced mood (p=.027. The beneficial effect on energy levels was particularly evident among female participants. A trend was found for participants reporting better sleep in the multivitamin over placebo. The multivitamin and placebo groups did not significantly differ in perceived positive or negative effects in areas relating to other aspects of mental function or physical health. No significant negative effects were revealed, although there was a non-significant trend for more people in the multivitamin

  12. Patient participation in postoperative care activities in patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery: Multimedia Intervention for Managing patient Experience (MIME). Study protocol for a cluster randomised crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonall, Jo; de Steiger, Richard; Reynolds, John; Redley, Bernice; Livingston, Patricia; Botti, Mari

    2016-07-18

    Patient participation is an important indicator of quality care. Currently, there is little evidence to support the belief that participation in care is possible for patients during the acute postoperative period. Previous work indicates that there is very little opportunity for patients to participate in care in the acute context. Patients require both capability, in terms of having the required knowledge and understanding of how they can be involved in their care, and the opportunity, facilitated by clinicians, to engage in their acute postoperative care. This cluster randomised crossover trial aims to test whether a multimedia intervention improves patient participation in the acute postoperative context, as determined by pain intensity and recovery outcomes. A total of 240 patients admitted for primary total knee replacement surgery will be invited to participate in a cluster randomised, crossover trial and concurrent process evaluation in at least two wards at a major non-profit private hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Patients admitted to the intervention ward will receive the multimedia intervention daily from Day 1 to Day 5 (or day of discharge, if prior). The intervention will be delivered by nurses via an iPad™, comprising information on the goals of care for each day following surgery. Patients admitted to the control ward will receive usual care as determined by care pathways currently in use across the organization. The primary endpoint is the "worst pain experienced in the past 24 h" on Day 3 following TKR surgery. Pain intensity will be measured using the numerical rating scale. Secondary outcomes are interference of pain on activities of daily living, length of stay in hospital, function and pain following TKR surgery, overall satisfaction with hospitalisation, postoperative complications and hospital readmission. The results of this study will contribute to our understanding of the effectiveness of interventions that provide knowledge and

  13. PARTICIPANT BLINDING AND GASTROINTESTINAL ILLNESS IN A RANDOMIZED, CONTROLLED TRIAL OF AN IN-HOME DRINKING WATER INTERVENTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. There is no consensus about the level of risk of gastrointestinal illness posed by consumption of drinking water that meets all regulatory requirements. Earlier drinking water intervention trials from Canada suggested that 14% - 40% of such gastrointestinal il...

  14. Decision Making in the PICU: An Examination of Factors Influencing Participation Decisions in Phase III Randomized Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Slosky

    2014-01-01

    participate were not related to enrollment. Conclusion. Decisions to participate in research by surrogates of children in the PICU appear to relate to child demographics and subtleties in communication; however, no modifiable characteristics were related to increased participation, indicating that the informed consent process may not be compromised in this population.

  15. A comparison of customised and prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: a participant-blinded randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paton Joanne S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration may be prevented if the mechanical stress transmitted to the plantar tissues is reduced. Insole therapy is one practical method commonly used to reduce plantar loads and ulceration risk. The type of insole best suited to achieve this is unknown. This trial compared custom-made functional insoles with prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for ulceration of neuropathic diabetic feet. Method A participant-blinded randomised controlled trial recruited 119 neuropathic participants with diabetes who were randomly allocated to custom-made functional or prefabricated insoles. Data were collected at issue and six month follow-up using the F-scan in-shoe pressure measurement system. Primary outcomes were: peak pressure, forefoot pressure time integral, total contact area, forefoot rate of load, duration of load as a percentage of stance. Secondary outcomes were patient perceived foot health (Bristol Foot Score, quality of life (Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life. We also assessed cost of supply and fitting. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Results There were no differences between insoles in peak pressure, or three of the other four kinetic measures. The custom-made functional insole was slightly more effective than the prefabricated insole in reducing forefoot pressure time integral at issue (27% vs. 22%, remained more effective at six month follow-up (30% vs. 24%, p=0.001, but was more expensive (UK £656 vs. £554, p Conclusion The custom-made insoles are more expensive than prefabricated insoles evaluated in this trial and no better in reducing peak pressure. We recommend that where clinically appropriate, the more cost effective prefabricated insole should be considered for use by patients with diabetes and neuropathy. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov (NCT00999635. Note: this trial was registered on completion.

  16. Recruitment, screening, and baseline participant characteristics in the WALK 2.0 study: A randomized controlled trial using web 2.0 applications to promote physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Caperchione

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: The results of this recruitment process demonstrate the successful use of multiple strategies to obtain a diverse sample of adults eligible to take part in a web-based physical activity promotion intervention. The use of dual screening processes ensured safe participation in the intervention. This approach to recruitment and physical activity screening can be used as a model for further trials in this area.

  17. Inhibitors and facilitators of willingness to participate (WTP) in an HIV vaccine trial: construction and initial validation of the Inhibitors and Facilitators of Willingness to Participate Scale (WPS) among women at risk for HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincham, Dylan; Kagee, Ashraf; Swartz, Leslie

    2010-04-01

    A psychometric scale assessing inhibitors and facilitators of willingness to participate (WTP) in an HIV vaccine trial has not yet been developed. This study aimed to construct and derive the exploratory factor structure of such a scale. The 35-item Inhibitors and Facilitators of Willingness to Participate Scale (WPS) was developed and administered to a convenience sample of 264 Black females between the ages of 16 and 49 years living in an urban-informal settlement near Cape Town. The subscales of the WPS demonstrated good internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranging between 0.69 and 0.82. A principal components exploratory factor analysis revealed the presence of five latent factors. The factors, which accounted for 45.93% of the variance in WTP, were (1) personal costs, (2) safety and convenience, (3) stigmatisation, (4) personal gains and (5) social approval and trust. Against the backdrop of the study limitations, these results provide initial support for the reliability and construct validity of the WPS among the most eligible trial participants in the Western Cape of South Africa.

  18. Effect of Repeated Food Morsel Splitting on Jaw Muscle Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A, Kumar; Svensson, Krister G; Baad-Hansen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Mastication is a complex motor task often initiated by splitting of the food morsel between the anterior teeth. Training of complex motor tasks has consistently been shown to trigger neuroplastic changes in corticomotor control and optimization of muscle function. It is not known if training...... and repeated food morsel splitting lead to changes in jaw muscle function. Objective: To investigate if repeated splitting of food morsels in participants with natural dentition changes the force and jaw muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity. Methods: Twenty healthy volunteers (mean age = 26.2 ± 3.9 years......) participated in a single one-hour session divided into six series. Each series consisted of ten trials of a standardized behavioral task (total of 60 trials). The behavioral task was to hold and split a food morsel (8 mm, 180 mg placebo tablet) placed on a bite force transducer with the anterior teeth...

  19. Consistency of Repeated Naming in Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E. Galletta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background People with mild aphasia and healthy elderly often exhibit similar impairments on language tests of word retrieval. However, variable practice effects in object naming by three individuals with aphasia compared to young and elderly adults have been reported (Wingfield et al. 2006. Wingfield et al. (2006 found that naming of the same pictures of objects over five trials demonstrated decreasing response latencies over repeated trials for both older and younger adults, but not for individuals with aphasia. In fact, among their three participants with aphasia, response latencies in the consecutive trials differed considerably. The authors suggested that different underlying processes may be involved in word retrieval for people with aphasia compared to adults without brain injuries. In our study we aimed to further consider the effect of practice on both object and action naming in individuals with mild aphasia. Method One woman with anomic aphasia (age 38 years; WAB Aphasia Quotient = 88 and one healthy woman (age 25 years participated. Both were native English speakers and reported 18 years of formal education. Participants were tested individually, with a set of 27 object pictures and a set of 27 action pictures presented one at a time on a computer screen. The participants were instructed to name each picture as quickly as possible as soon as each picture appeared on the screen. There were 10 trials of each set of pictures, with different random orders for each trial. The order of presentation of the object and action picture sets alternated across participants. Naming responses were recorded to computer sound files for later measurements of response latencies. A brief tone was presented simultaneous with the picture onset, allowing later measurement of response latencies from the onset of picture presentation to the onset of the participant’s correct response. Results Our findings resembled those reported in Wingfield et al. (2006

  20. Two to five repeated measurements per patient reduced the required sample size considerably in a randomized clinical trial for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Smedslund Geir; Zangi Heidi Andersen; Mowinckel Petter; Hagen Kåre Birger

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Patient reported outcomes are accepted as important outcome measures in rheumatology. The fluctuating symptoms in patients with rheumatic diseases have serious implications for sample size in clinical trials. We estimated the effects of measuring the outcome 1-5 times on the sample size required in a two-armed trial. Findings In a randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effects of a mindfulness-based group intervention for patients with inflammatory arthritis (n=71)...

  1. Client satisfaction among participants in a randomized trial comparing oral methadone and injectable diacetylmorphine for long-term opioid-dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brissette Suzanne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substitution with opioid-agonists (e.g., methadone has shown to be an effective treatment for chronic long-term opioid dependency. Patient satisfaction with treatment has been associated with improved addiction treatment outcomes. However, there is a paucity of studies evaluating patients' satisfaction with Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST. In the present study, participants' satisfaction with OST was evaluated at 3 and 12 months. We sought to test the relationship between satisfaction and patients' characteristics, the treatment modality received and treatment outcomes. Methods Data from a randomized controlled trial, the North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI, conducted in Vancouver and Montreal (Canada between 2005-2008, was analyzed. The NAOMI study compared the effectiveness of oral methadone vs. injectable diacetylmorphine over 12 months. A small sub-group of patients received injectable hydromorphone on a double blind basis with diacetylmorphine. The Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8 was used to measure satisfaction with treatment. CSQ-8 scores, as well as retention and response to treatment, did not differ between those receiving hydromorphone and diacetylmorphine at 3 or 12 months assessments; therefore, these two groups were analyzed together as the 'injectable' treatment group. Results A total of 232 (92% and 237 (94% participants completed the CSQ-8 at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Participants in both groups were highly satisfied with treatment. Independent of treatment group, participants satisfied with treatment at 3 months were more likely to be retained at 12 months. Multivariate analysis indicated that satisfaction was greater among those randomized to the injection group after controlling for treatment effectiveness. Participants who were retained, responded to treatment, and had fewer psychological symptoms were more satisfied with treatment. Finally, open-ended comments were made by

  2. WE-B-207-02: CT Lung Cancer Screening and the Medical Physicist: A Dosimetry Summary of CT Participants in the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C. [National Cancer Institute (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) was a multi-center randomized, controlled trial comparing a low-dose CT (LDCT) to posterior-anterior (PA) chest x-ray (CXR) in screening older, current and former heavy smokers for early detection of lung cancer. Recruitment was launched in September 2002 and ended in April 2004 when 53,454 participants had been randomized at 33 screening sites in equal proportions. Funded by the National Cancer Institute this trial demonstrated that LDCT screening reduced lung cancer mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) cited NLST findings and conclusions in its deliberations and analysis of lung cancer screening. Under the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the USPSTF favorable recommendation regarding lung cancer CT screening assisted in obtaining third-party payers coverage for screening. The objective of this session is to provide an introduction to the NLST and the trial findings, in addition to a comprehensive review of the dosimetry investigations and assessments completed using individual NLST participant CT and CXR examinations. Session presentations will review and discuss the findings of two independent assessments, a CXR assessment and the findings of a CT investigation calculating individual organ dosimetry values. The CXR assessment reviewed a total of 73,733 chest x-ray exams that were performed on 92 chest imaging systems of which 66,157 participant examinations were used. The CT organ dosimetry investigation collected scan parameters from 23,773 CT examinations; a subset of the 75,133 CT examinations performed using 97 multi-detector CT scanners. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated using a Monte Carlo code. An experimentally-validated CT scanner simulation was coupled with 193 adult hybrid computational phantoms representing the height and weight of the current U.S. population. The dose to selected organs was calculated using the organ dose library and the abstracted scan

  3. WE-B-207-01: CT Lung Cancer Screening and the Medical Physicist: Background, Findings and Participant Dosimetry Summary of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, R. [Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) was a multi-center randomized, controlled trial comparing a low-dose CT (LDCT) to posterior-anterior (PA) chest x-ray (CXR) in screening older, current and former heavy smokers for early detection of lung cancer. Recruitment was launched in September 2002 and ended in April 2004 when 53,454 participants had been randomized at 33 screening sites in equal proportions. Funded by the National Cancer Institute this trial demonstrated that LDCT screening reduced lung cancer mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) cited NLST findings and conclusions in its deliberations and analysis of lung cancer screening. Under the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the USPSTF favorable recommendation regarding lung cancer CT screening assisted in obtaining third-party payers coverage for screening. The objective of this session is to provide an introduction to the NLST and the trial findings, in addition to a comprehensive review of the dosimetry investigations and assessments completed using individual NLST participant CT and CXR examinations. Session presentations will review and discuss the findings of two independent assessments, a CXR assessment and the findings of a CT investigation calculating individual organ dosimetry values. The CXR assessment reviewed a total of 73,733 chest x-ray exams that were performed on 92 chest imaging systems of which 66,157 participant examinations were used. The CT organ dosimetry investigation collected scan parameters from 23,773 CT examinations; a subset of the 75,133 CT examinations performed using 97 multi-detector CT scanners. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated using a Monte Carlo code. An experimentally-validated CT scanner simulation was coupled with 193 adult hybrid computational phantoms representing the height and weight of the current U.S. population. The dose to selected organs was calculated using the organ dose library and the abstracted scan

  4. A novel use of a statewide telecolposcopy network for recruitment of participants in a Phase I clinical trial of a human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Shawna L; Spencer, Horace J; Greenfield, William W; Low, Gordon; Hitt, Wilbur C; Quick, Charles M; Jeffus, Susanne K; Blackmon, Victoria; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, recruitment and retention of young women in intervention-based clinical trials have been challenging. In August 2012, enrollment for a clinical trial testing of an investigational human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccine called PepCan was opened at our institution. This study was an open-label, single-arm, single-institution, dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial. Women with recent Papanicolaou smear results showing high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or results that could not rule out high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were eligible to enroll. Patients with biopsy-confirmed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were also eligible. Colposcopy was performed at the screening visit, and participants became eligible for vaccination when the diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion was confirmed with biopsy and other inclusion criteria were met. The aim of this study was to identify strategies and factors effective in recruitment and retention of study participants. Potential vaccine candidates were recruited through direct advertisement as well as referrals, including referrals through the Arkansas telecolposcopy network. The network is a federally funded program, administered by physicians and advanced practice nurses. The network telemedically links rural health sites and allows physician-guided colposcopy and biopsies to be conducted by advanced practice nurses. A variety of strategies were employed to assure good retention, including face-to-face contact with the study coordinator at the time of consent and most of study visits; frequent contact using text messaging, phone calls, and e-mails; and creation of a private Facebook page to improve communication among research staff and study participants. A questionnaire, inquiring about motivation for joining the study, occupation, education, household income, number of children, and number of sexual partners, was administered at the screening visit with the intent of

  5. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-01-01

    Background Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-reach populations), cost effectiveness, and usability. However, to date, no studies have examined how participants recruited via social media progress through a study compared with those recruited using more traditional recruitment strategies. Objectives (1) Examine whether visiting the study website prior to being contacted by researchers creates self-screened participants who are more likely to progress through all study phases (eligible, enrolled, completed); (2) compare conversion percentages and cost effectiveness of each recruitment method at each study phase; and, (3) compare demographic and smoking characteristics of participants recruited through each strategy to determine if they attract similar samples. Methods Participants recruited to a smoking cessation clinical trial were grouped by how they had become aware of the study: via social media (Facebook) or traditional media (eg, newspaper, flyers, radio, word of mouth). Groups were compared based on throughput data (conversion percentages and cost) as well as demographic and smoking characteristics. Results Visiting the study website did not result in individuals who were more likely to be eligible for (P=.24), enroll in (P=.20), or complete (P=.25) the study. While using social media was more cost effective than traditional methods when we examined earlier endpoints of the recruitment process (cost to obtain a screened respondent: AUD $22.73 vs $29.35; cost to obtain an eligible respondent: $37.56 vs $44.77), it was

  6. The Effect of Participation in Support Groups on Depression, Anxiety and Stress in Family Caregivers of People with Alzheimers: Randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Taati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine the effect of participation in support groups on the depression, anxiety and stress level of caregivers of patients with Alzheimer. This study was a single blind randomized clinical controlled trial (RCT with 80 family caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s (per group=40. The intervention group participated in eight sessions 1.5- 2 hours in support groups. The tool used in this study was the DASS-21 questionnaire for measuring depression, anxiety and stress level of the caregivers, analysis of parametric data, using SPSS version 21. Findings showed, participation in support groups showed no significant difference on depression, anxiety and stress in family caregivers of Alzheimer patients in the control group and the intervention group. Given that caring for these patients by their family members are very sensitive and costly issues for policy makers and health service providers, community and families of these patients.

  7. [Women participation in clinical trials. A preliminary study in the files of the Spanish Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goya, Noa Laguna; Rodríguez-Trelles, Fernando de Andrés

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of the gender bias in clinical trials is not unanimous. The aim of this study has been the assessment of the current situation in Spain regarding the manipulation of data from clinical trials at the publication of the Law of Equality. We have examined the study design, sample population, demographic data and baseline clinical characteristics of participants, results and conclusions of the trial in the summaries of the final reports of clinical trials received in the first four months of 2007 in the Agencia Española de Medicamentos y Productos Sanitarios. From twenty-five documents analysed, in their results and conclusions: Five subdivide data sets by age and gender, thirteen do not subdivide data by gender nor do they provide a conclusion, three do not subdivide results neither but do describe severe side effect by gender and four others provide no results or conclusions. Only twenty percent of the reviewed summaries provide data subdivided by gender. This could be due to the fact that it has not been made or that it was not given enough importance to include it in the summary, neither of which is satisfactory. A more detailed study is difficult due to the current quality of the summaries provided of the final reports of the clinical trials, which is the only document that is mandatory to send to the AEMPS once the trial has concluded. We expect that with the publication of the new Law of Equality this situation will improve, given the growing evidence of the relevance of the subdivision by gender.

  8. The business case for provider participation in clinical trials research: an application to the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H; Reiter, Kristin L; Weiner, Bryan J; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2013-01-01

    Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. The aim of this study was to explore whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program, a long-standing federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semistructured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research.

  9. Effect of virtual reality exposure therapy on social participation in people with a psychotic disorder (VRETp): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pot-Kolder, Roos; Veling, Wim; Geraets, Chris; van der Gaag, Mark

    2016-01-13

    Many patients with a psychotic disorder participate poorly in society. When psychotic disorders are in partial remission, feelings of paranoia, delusions of reference, social anxiety and self-stigmatization often remain at diminished severity and may lead to avoidance of places and people. Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) is an evidence-based treatment for several anxiety disorders. For patients with a psychotic disorder, the VRETp was developed to help them experience exposure to feared social situations. The present study aims to investigate the effects of VRETp on social participation in real life among patients with a psychotic disorder. The study is a single-blind randomized controlled trial with two conditions: the active condition, in which participants receive the virtual reality treatment together with treatment as usual (TAU), and the waiting list condition, in which participants receive TAU only. The two groups are compared at baseline, at 3 months posttreatment and at 6 months follow-up. All participants on the waiting list are also offered the virtual reality treatment after the follow-up measurements are completed. The primary outcome is social participation. Secondary outcomes are quality of life, interaction anxiety, depression and social functioning in general. Moderator and mediator analyses are conducted with stigma, cognitive schemata, cognitive biases, medication adherence, simulator sickness and presence in virtual reality. If effective, a cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted. Results from the posttreatment measurement can be considered strong empirical indicators of the effectiveness of VRETp. The 6-month follow-up data may provide reliable documentation of the long-term effects of the treatment on the outcome variables. Data from pre-treatment and mid-treatment can be used to reveal possible pathways of change. Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN12929657 . Date of registration: 8 September 2015.

  10. Lung cancer incidence and mortality in National Lung Screening Trial participants who underwent low-dose CT prevalence screening: a retrospective cohort analysis of a randomised, multicentre, diagnostic screening trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patz, Edward F; Greco, Erin; Gatsonis, Constantine; Pinsky, Paul; Kramer, Barnett S; Aberle, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Annual low-dose CT screening for lung cancer has been recommended for high-risk individuals, but the necessity of yearly low-dose CT in all eligible individuals is uncertain. This study examined rates of lung cancer in National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) participants who had a negative prevalence (initial) low-dose CT screen to explore whether less frequent screening could be justified in some lower-risk subpopulations. Methods We did a retrospective cohort analysis of data from the NLST, a randomised, multicentre screening trial comparing three annual low-dose CT assessments with three annual chest radiographs for the early detection of lung cancer in high-risk, eligible individuals (aged 55–74 years with at least a 30 pack-year history of cigarette smoking, and, if a former smoker, had quit within the past 15 years), recruited from US medical centres between Aug 5, 2002, and April 26, 2004. Participants were followed up for up to 5 years after their last annual screen. For the purposes of this analysis, our cohort consisted of all NLST participants who had received a low-dose CT prevalence (T0) screen. We determined the frequency, stage, histology, study year of diagnosis, and incidence of lung cancer, as well as overall and lung cancer-specific mortality, and whether lung cancers were detected as a result of screening or within 1 year of a negative screen. We also estimated the effect on mortality if the first annual (T1) screen in participants with a negative T0 screen had not been done. The NLST is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00047385. Findings Our cohort consisted of 26 231 participants assigned to the low-dose CT screening group who had undergone their T0 screen. The 19 066 participants with a negative T0 screen had a lower incidence of lung cancer than did all 26 231 T0-screened participants (371·88 [95% CI 337·97–408·26] per 100 000 person-years vs 661·23 [622·07–702·21]) and had lower lung cancer

  11. Participation in Training for Depression Care Quality Improvement: A Randomized Trial of Community Engagement or Technical Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Bowen; Ngo, Victoria K; Ong, Michael K; Pulido, Esmeralda; Jones, Felica; Gilmore, James; Stoker-Mtume, Norma; Johnson, Megan; Tang, Lingqi; Wells, Kenneth Brooks; Sherbourne, Cathy; Miranda, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    .... This study compared program- and staff-level participation in depression care quality improvement training among programs enrolled in CEP, which trained networks of health care and social-community...

  12. Exercise and Motor Training in People with Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review of Participant Characteristics, Intervention Delivery, Retention Rates, Adherence, and Adverse Events in Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie E. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is research evidence that exercise and motor training are beneficial for people with Parkinson's disease (PD, and clinicians seek to implement optimal programs. This paper summarizes important factors about the nature and reporting of randomized controlled trials of exercise and/or motor training for people with PD which are likely to influence the translation of research into clinical practice. Searches identified 53 relevant trials with 90 interventions conducted for an average duration of 8.3 (SD 4.2 weeks. Most interventions were fully supervised (74% and conducted at a facility (79%. Retention rates were high with 69% of interventions retaining ≥85% of their participants; however adherence was infrequently reported, and 72% of trials did not report adverse events. Overall, the labor-intensive nature of most interventions tested in these trials and the sparse reporting of adherence and adverse events are likely to pose difficulties for therapists attempting to balance benefits and costs when selecting protocols that translate to sustainable clinical practice for people with PD.

  13. A Comparison Between Caucasians and African Americans in Willingness to Participate in Cancer Clinical Trials: The Roles of Knowledge, Distrust, Information Sources, and Religiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jingbo; McLaughlin, Margaret; Pariera, Katrina; Murphy, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to (a) examine the roles of knowledge, distrust in medical professionals, information sources, and 2 dimensions of religiosity (i.e., religious activity and religious belief) in influencing willingness to participate (WTP) in cancer clinical trials and to (b) compare the results for Caucasians and African Americans in order to inform future recruitment. An online survey was fielded via a Knowledge Networks panel with a nationally representative sample including 478 Caucasians and 173 African Americans. The results showed that distrust in medical professionals was a strong barrier to WTP for both ethnic groups, whereas factual knowledge about trial procedures was not associated with WTP for either ethnic group. Seeking trial information from doctors was positively associated with WTP for Caucasians; seeking trial information from hospitals was positively associated with WTP for African Americans. More interestingly, levels of religious activity negatively predicted WTP for Caucasians but positively predicted WTP for African Americans. Self-reported religious belief was not associated with WTP for either ethnic group. In sum, although distrust is a common barrier to WTP, the influence of preferred information sources and religious activity on WTP varies as a function of ethnicity.

  14. Participation in Training for Depression Care Quality Improvement: A Randomized Trial of Community Engagement or Technical Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bowen; Ngo, Victoria K; Ong, Michael K; Pulido, Esmeralda; Jones, Felica; Gilmore, James; Stoker-Mtume, Norma; Johnson, Megan; Tang, Lingqi; Wells, Kenneth Brooks; Sherbourne, Cathy; Miranda, Jeanne

    2015-08-01

    Community engagement and planning (CEP) could improve dissemination of depression care quality improvement in underresourced communities, but whether its effects on provider training participation differ from those of standard technical assistance, or resources for services (RS), is unknown. This study compared program- and staff-level participation in depression care quality improvement training among programs enrolled in CEP, which trained networks of health care and social-community agencies jointly, and RS, which provided technical support to individual programs. Matched programs from health care and social-community service sectors in two communities were randomly assigned to RS or CEP. Data were from 1,622 eligible staff members from 95 enrolled programs. Primary outcomes were any staff trained (for programs) and total hours of training (for staff). Secondary staff-level outcomes were hours of training in specific depression collaborative care components. CEP programs were more likely than RS programs to participate in any training (p=.006). Within health care sectors, CEP programs were more likely than RS programs to participate in training (p=.016), but within social-community sectors, there was no difference in training by intervention. Among staff who participated in training, mean training hours were greater among CEP programs versus RS programs for any type of training (ptraining related to each component of depression care (pstaff participation in depression care improvement efforts in underresourced communities.

  15. Evaluating the effectiveness of GP endorsement on increasing participation in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme in England: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damery Sarah

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The success and cost-effectiveness of bowel cancer screening depends on achieving and maintaining high screening uptake rates. The involvement of GPs in screening has been found to improve patient compliance. Therefore, the endorsement of screening by GPs may increase uptake rates amongst non-responders. Methods/Design A two-armed randomised controlled trial will evaluate the effectiveness of a GP endorsed reminder in improving patient participation in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (NHSBCSP. Up to 30 general practices in the West Midlands with a screening uptake rate of less than 50% will be recruited and patients identified from the patient lists of these practices. Eligible patients will be those aged 60 to 74, who have previously been invited to participate in bowel screening but who have been recorded by the Midlands and North West Bowel Cancer Screening Hub as non-responders. Approximately 4,380 people will be randomised in equal numbers to either the intervention (GP letter and duplicate FOBt kit or control (no additional contact arms of the trial. The primary outcome measure will be the difference in the uptake rate of FOBt screening for bowel cancer between the intervention and control groups at 13 weeks after the GP endorsed reminder and duplicate FOBt kit are sent. Secondary outcome measures will be subgroup analyses of uptake according to gender, age and deprivation quartile, and the validation of methods for collecting GP, NHSBCSP and patient costs associated with the intervention. Qualitative work (30 to 40 semi-structured interviews will be undertaken with individuals in the intervention arm who return a FOBt kit, to investigate the relative importance of the duplicate FOBt kit, reminder to participate, and GP endorsement of that reminder in contributing to individuals' decisions to participate in screening. Discussion Implementing feasible, acceptable and cost-effective strategies to improve

  16. From rehabilitation to recovery: protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating a goal-based intervention to reduce depression and facilitate participation post-stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Keith

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is much discourse in healthcare about the importance of client-centred rehabilitation, however in the realm of community-based therapy post-stroke there has been little investigation into the efficacy of goal-directed practice that reflects patients' valued activities. In addition, the effect of active involvement of carers in such a rehabilitation process and their subsequent contribution to functional and emotional recovery post-stroke is unclear. In community based rehabilitation, interventions based on patients' perceived needs may be more likely to alter such outcomes. In this paper, we describe the methodology of a randomised controlled trial of an integrated approach to facilitating patient goal achievement in the first year post-stroke. The effectiveness of this intervention in reducing the severity of post-stroke depression, improving participation status and health-related quality of life is examined. The impact on carers is also examined. Methods/Design Patients (and their primary carers, if available are randomly allocated to an intervention or control arm of the study. The intervention is multimodal and aims to screen for adverse stroke sequelae and address ways to enhance participation in patient-valued activities. Intervention methods include: telephone contacts, written information provision, home visitation, and contact with treating health professionals, with further relevant health service referrals as required. The control involves treatment as usual, as determined by inpatient and community rehabilitation treating teams. Formal blinded assessments are conducted at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation, and at six and twelve months post-stroke. The primary outcome is depression. Secondary outcome measures include participation and activity status, health-related quality of life, and self-efficacy. Discussion The results of this trial will assist with the development of a model for community

  17. Validation of Heart Failure Events in the Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT Participants Assigned to Doxazosin and Chlorthalidone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leenen Frans HH

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT is a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled trial designed to compare the rate of coronary heart disease events in high-risk hypertensive participants initially randomized to a diuretic (chlorthalidone versus each of three alternative antihypertensive drugs: alpha-adrenergic blocker (doxazosin, ACE-inhibitor (lisinopril, and calcium-channel blocker (amlodipine. Combined cardiovascular disease risk was significantly increased in the doxazosin arm compared to the chlorthalidone arm (RR 1.25; 95% CI, 1.17–1.33; P P Methods and Results Baseline characteristics (age, race, sex, blood pressure did not differ significantly between treatment groups (P P = 0.83. Conclusion Results of the validation process supported findings of increased heart failure in the ALLHAT doxazosin treatment arm compared to the chlorthalidone treatment arm.

  18. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Mai; Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-08-10

    Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-reach populations), cost effectiveness, and usability. However, to date, no studies have examined how participants recruited via social media progress through a study compared with those recruited using more traditional recruitment strategies. (1) Examine whether visiting the study website prior to being contacted by researchers creates self-screened participants who are more likely to progress through all study phases (eligible, enrolled, completed); (2) compare conversion percentages and cost effectiveness of each recruitment method at each study phase; and, (3) compare demographic and smoking characteristics of participants recruited through each strategy to determine if they attract similar samples. Participants recruited to a smoking cessation clinical trial were grouped by how they had become aware of the study: via social media (Facebook) or traditional media (eg, newspaper, flyers, radio, word of mouth). Groups were compared based on throughput data (conversion percentages and cost) as well as demographic and smoking characteristics. Visiting the study website did not result in individuals who were more likely to be eligible for (P=.24), enroll in (P=.20), or complete (P=.25) the study. While using social media was more cost effective than traditional methods when we examined earlier endpoints of the recruitment process (cost to obtain a screened respondent: AUD $22.73 vs $29.35; cost to obtain an eligible respondent: $37.56 vs $44.77), it was less cost effective in later endpoints

  19. The effectiveness of a physical activity stimulation programme for children with cerebral palsy on social participation, self-perception and quality of life: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wely, Leontien; Balemans, Astrid Cj; Becher, Jules G; Dallmeijer, Annet J

    2014-10-01

    To determine the effects of a six-month physical activity stimulation programme on social participation, self-perception and quality of life in children with cerebral palsy. Multicentre randomized controlled trial with concealed allocation, blinded assessments and intention-to-treat analysis. Paediatric physiotherapy practices, special schools for children with a disability, and the child's own home. Forty-nine children with spastic cerebral palsy (28 male), aged 7-13 years, able to walk with and without walking aids. The intervention group followed a six-month physical activity stimulation programme involving counselling through motivational interviewing, home-based physiotherapy and four months of fitness training. The control group continued regular paediatric physiotherapy. Outcomes included social participation in domestic life, social participation in recreation and leisure (Life-Habits for Children questionnaire and Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment questionnaire), self-perception (Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Children) and parent-reported quality of life (Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire). Assessments were performed at baseline, at six months (except quality of life) and at twelve months. Intervention resulted in a positive effect on social participation in domestic life at twelve months (mean between-group difference = 0.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.1 to 1.7 [1-10 scale], P = 0.03), but not at six months. No significant effects were found for social participation in recreation and leisure, self-perception at six months and twelve months or for quality of life at twelve months. The combination of counselling, home-based physiotherapy and fitness training was not effective in improving social participation in recreation and leisure, self-perception or quality of life, but did show a potential for improving social participation in domestic life over the longer term. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. THE ROLE OF PATIENTS AND MEDICAL SPECIALISTS IN ACHIEVING HIGHER LEVEL OF THERAPY COMPLIANCE- AN EXAMPLE WITH WILLINGNESS TO PARTICIPATE IN CLINICAL TRIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Stoev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients’ compliance is a leading factor in achieving determined endpoints of a treatment process. Low patient compliance with prescribed therapeutic plan is very common in both ambulatory practice and clinical trials. Non-adherence of subjects in clinical studies can seriously jeopardize validity of results obtained during randomized clinical trials (RCTs.METHODS: Both systematic literature review and cross-sectional survey were conducted among physicians and patients to determine evaluation of therapy adherence by both groups. RESULTS: According to the analytical reviews in published articles, the most common definition of therapy adherence or compliance is “the ability and willingness of patients to abide to a prescribed therapeutic regimen”. There is a strong correlation between patient adherence to the therapeutic regimen determined by the study protocol of RCTs, and the validity of efficacy and safety evaluation of the investigated medicinal product. Analysis of the results from the conducted survey lead to the conclusion that 35% of physician’s state that the results of ongoing therapy are highly dependent on patient compliance. As far as patients are concerned, almost half of the respondents have answered they comply with the prescribed therapy and would evaluate the treatment process as successful. Both patients and medical professionals declare their willingness to participate in clinical trials and strictly stick to the requirements of the study protocol.Conclusion: These results decisively confirmed that the control of a disease is a bilateral process between the patient and the doctor. Patient satisfaction with their current therapy directly correlates with the results of treatment. Majority of patients evaluate their possible participation in a clinical trial as an opportunity to get an access to a better medical service. Both medical professionals and patients declare their strong motivation to comply with the

  1. Baseline comparison of three health utility measures and the feeling thermometer among participants in the action to control cardiovascular risk in diabetes trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisch Dennis W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health utility (HU measures are used as overall measures of quality of life and to determine quality adjusted life years (QALYs in economic analyses. We compared baseline values of three HUs including Short Form 6 Dimensions (SF-6D, and Health Utilities Index, Mark II and Mark III (HUI2 and HUI3 and the feeling thermometer (FT among type 2 diabetes participants in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD trial. We assessed relationships between HU and FT values and patient demographics and clinical variables. Methods ACCORD was a randomized clinical trial to test if intensive controls of glucose, blood pressure and lipids can reduce the risk of major cardiovascular disease (CVD events in type 2 diabetes patients with high risk of CVD. The health-related quality of life (HRQOL sub-study includes 2,053 randomly selected participants. Interclass correlations (ICCs and agreement between measures by quartile were used to evaluate relationships between HU’s and the FT. Multivariable regression models specified relationships between patient variables and each HU and the FT. Results The ICCs were 0.245 for FT/SF-6D, 0.313 for HUI3/SF-6D, 0.437 for HUI2/SF-6D, 0.338 for FT/HUI2, 0.337 for FT/HUI3 and 0.751 for HUI2/HUI3 (P P P  Conclusions The agreements between the different HUs were poor except for the two HUI measures; therefore HU values derived different measures may not be comparable. The FT had low agreement with HUs. The relationships between HUs and demographic and clinical measures demonstrate how severity of diabetes and other clinical and demographic factors are associated with HUs and FT measures. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00000620

  2. Payments to normal healthy volunteers in phase 1 trials: avoiding undue influence while distributing fairly the burdens of research participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltis, Ana S

    2009-02-01

    Clinical investigators must engage in just subject recruitment and selection and avoid unduly influencing research participation. There may be tension between the practice of keeping payments to participants low to avoid undue influence and the requirements of justice when recruiting normal healthy volunteers for phase 1 drug studies. By intentionally keeping payments low to avoid unduly influenced participation, investigators, on the recommendation or insistence of institutional review boards, may be targeting or systematically recruiting healthy adult members of lower socio-economic groups for participation in phase 1 studies. Investigators are at risk of routinely failing to fulfill the obligation of justice, which prohibits the systematic targeting and recruiting of subjects for reasons unrelated to the nature of the study. Insofar as we take seriously the obligation to engage in just subject recruitment and selection, I argue that we must acknowledge the implications low payments might have for subject recruitment and selection and examine the effect of low payments. If low payments de facto target the less well-off for phase 1 studies, we must defend the priority ranking of the obligation to avoid undue influence over the obligation of justice or adopt an alternative recruitment approach. This paper identifies a number of alternatives to the current system of low-value payments to research participants.

  3. Effect of rAd5-Vector HIV-1 Preventive Vaccines on HIV-1 Acquisition: A Participant-Level Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunda Huang

    Full Text Available Three phase 2b, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized efficacy trials have tested recombinant Adenovirus serotype-5 (rAd5-vector preventive HIV-1 vaccines: MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef in Step and Phambili, and DNA/rAd5 HIV-1 env/gag/pol in HVTN505. Due to efficacy futility observed at the first interim analysis in Step and HVTN505, participants of all three studies were unblinded to their vaccination assignments during the study but continued follow-up. Rigorous meta-analysis can provide crucial information to advise the future utility of rAd5-vector vaccines.We included participant-level data from all three efficacy trials, and three Phase 1-2 trials evaluating the HVTN505 vaccine regimen. We predefined two co-primary analysis cohorts for assessing the vaccine effect on HIV-1 acquisition. The modified-intention-to-treat (MITT cohort included all randomly assigned participants HIV-1 uninfected at study entry, who received at least the first vaccine/placebo, and the Ad5 cohort included MITT participants who received at least one dose of rAd5-HIV vaccine or rAd5-placebo. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs of HIV-1 infection (vaccine vs. placebo and evaluate HR variation across vaccine regimens, time since vaccination, and subgroups using interaction tests.Results are similar for the MITT and Ad5 cohorts; we summarize MITT cohort results. Pooled across the efficacy trials, over all follow-up time 403 (n = 224 vaccine; n = 179 placebo of 6266 MITT participants acquired HIV-1, with a non-significantly higher incidence in vaccine recipients (HR 1.21, 95% CI 0.99-1.48, P = 0.06. The HRs significantly differed by vaccine regimen (interaction P = 0.03; MRKAd5 HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.11-1.78, P = 0.005 vs. DNA/rAd5 HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.61-1.26, P = 0.48. Results were similar when including the Phase 1-2 trials. Exploratory analyses based on the efficacy trials supported that the MRKAd5 vaccine-increased risk was

  4. Effect of rAd5-Vector HIV-1 Preventive Vaccines on HIV-1 Acquisition: A Participant-Level Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunda; Follmann, Dean; Nason, Martha; Zhang, Lily; Huang, Ying; Mehrotra, Devan V; Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Janes, Holly; Keefer, Michael C; Churchyard, Gavin; Robb, Merlin L; Fast, Patricia E; Duerr, Ann; McElrath, M Juliana; Corey, Lawrence; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Kublin, James G; Robertson, Michael; Hammer, Scott M; Gray, Glenda E; Buchbinder, Susan P; Gilbert, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Three phase 2b, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized efficacy trials have tested recombinant Adenovirus serotype-5 (rAd5)-vector preventive HIV-1 vaccines: MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef in Step and Phambili, and DNA/rAd5 HIV-1 env/gag/pol in HVTN505. Due to efficacy futility observed at the first interim analysis in Step and HVTN505, participants of all three studies were unblinded to their vaccination assignments during the study but continued follow-up. Rigorous meta-analysis can provide crucial information to advise the future utility of rAd5-vector vaccines. We included participant-level data from all three efficacy trials, and three Phase 1-2 trials evaluating the HVTN505 vaccine regimen. We predefined two co-primary analysis cohorts for assessing the vaccine effect on HIV-1 acquisition. The modified-intention-to-treat (MITT) cohort included all randomly assigned participants HIV-1 uninfected at study entry, who received at least the first vaccine/placebo, and the Ad5 cohort included MITT participants who received at least one dose of rAd5-HIV vaccine or rAd5-placebo. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of HIV-1 infection (vaccine vs. placebo) and evaluate HR variation across vaccine regimens, time since vaccination, and subgroups using interaction tests. Results are similar for the MITT and Ad5 cohorts; we summarize MITT cohort results. Pooled across the efficacy trials, over all follow-up time 403 (n = 224 vaccine; n = 179 placebo) of 6266 MITT participants acquired HIV-1, with a non-significantly higher incidence in vaccine recipients (HR 1.21, 95% CI 0.99-1.48, P = 0.06). The HRs significantly differed by vaccine regimen (interaction P = 0.03; MRKAd5 HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.11-1.78, P = 0.005 vs. DNA/rAd5 HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.61-1.26, P = 0.48). Results were similar when including the Phase 1-2 trials. Exploratory analyses based on the efficacy trials supported that the MRKAd5 vaccine-increased risk was concentrated in

  5. Renal-cell carcinoma risk estimates based on participants in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial and national lung screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotan, Yair; Karam, Jose A; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Gupta, Amit; Roupret, Morgan; Bensalah, Karim; Margulis, Vitaly

    2016-04-01

    Current knowledge regarding risk of renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) is based on meta-analyses of case-control studies. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial and National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) provide robust prospective databases with clinical information and rates of cancer development. PLCO and NLST were used to identify risk factors for RCC. Data were extracted from PLCO and NLST to stratify risk of RCC by sex, race, age at inclusion, obesity, and smoking status. Incidence rates between groups were compared using the chi-square test. We excluded urothelial carcinomas. Overall, 701/154,118 and 190/53,242 RCCs were detected in PLCO and NLST, respectively. Incidence rates were higher in men (PLCO: 0.56 vs. 0.28/1000 person y, NLST: 0.73 vs. 0.35/1000 person y; both with P60 years, obesity, and intensity of smoking were associated with higher risk of developing RCC. In the NLST, sex and morbid obesity increased the risk for RCC but age, ethnicity, and smoking intensity were not predictors. There was no effect of screening for other cancers on detection of RCC. High-grade (grades ≥3) RCCs were diagnosed in 145 (20.7%) and 60 (31.6%) in the PLCO and NLST. In PLCO, age (60-64y), male sex, obesity, and current smokers with>50 pack years were at increased risk for high-grade RCC. In NLST, only male sex was an independent predictor of high-grade RCC. Age over 60 years, male sex, smoking intensity, and obesity affect the risk of RCC. Identification of a high-risk population may allow a pilot study of rational screening for RCC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Randomized controlled trial assessing participation and quality of life in a supported speed treadmill training exercise program vs. a strengthening program for children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, P E; Banks, D; Johnston, T E; Campbell, S R; Gaughan, J P; Ross, S A; Engsberg, J R; Tucker, C

    2012-01-01

    A multi-site Randomized-Controlled Trial compared a home-based Supported Speed Treadmill Training Exercise Program (SSTTEP) with a strengthening exercise program in children with cerebral palsy (CP) on the following categories; Participation, quality of life (QOL), self-concept, goal attainment, and satisfaction. Twenty-six children with spastic cerebral palsy were assigned by site-based block randomization to the SSTTEP (n=14) or strengthening exercise (n=12) group. Both groups participated in a two week clinic-based induction period and continued the intervention at home for ten weeks. Data were collected at baseline, post-intervention (12 weeks), and follow-up (16 weeks). Assessments included the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment Scale, Pediatric Quality of Life Cerebral Palsy Module, and Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale. Evaluators were blinded to group assignment at two sites. Satisfaction and performance on individual goals, participation, and parent-reported QOL improved in both groups with improvement maintained for four weeks post intervention. The hypothesis that the SSTTEP group would have better outcomes than the exercise group was not supported. However, both groups showed that children with CP can make gains in participation, individual goals, and satisfaction following a 12-week intensive exercise intervention, and these findings persisted for four weeks post intervention.

  7. Inflammatory Mediators in Tracheal Aspirates of Preterm Infants Participating in a Randomized Trial of Inhaled Nitric Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Elena; Uhlig, Ulrike; Yang, Yang; Fuchs, Hans W.; Zemlin, Michael; Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Maier, Rolf F.; Hummler, Helmut D.; Uhlig, Stefan; Thome, Ulrich H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Ventilated preterm infants frequently develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) which is associated with elevated inflammatory mediators in their tracheal aspirates (TA). In animal models of BPD, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been shown to reduce lung inflammation, but data for human preterm infants is missing. Methods Within a European multicenter trial of NO inhalation for preterm infants to prevent BPD (EUNO), TA was collected to determine the effects of iNO on pulmonary inflammation. TA was collected from 43 premature infants randomly assigned to receive either iNO or placebo gas (birth weight 530–1230 g, median 800 g, gestational age 24 to 28 2/7 weeks, median 26 weeks). Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, interferon γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), neuropeptide Y and leukotriene B4 were measured in serial TA samples from postnatal day 2 to 14. Furthermore, TA levels of nitrotyrosine and nitrite were determined under iNO therapy. Results The TA levels of IP-10, IL-6, IL-8, MIP-1α, IL-1β, ASM and albumin increased with advancing postnatal age in critically ill preterm infants, whereas nitrotyrosine TA levels declined in both, iNO-treated and placebo-treated infants. The iNO treatment generally increased nitrite TA levels, whereas nitrotyrosine TA levels were not affected by iNO treatment. Furthermore, iNO treatment transiently reduced early inflammatory and fibrotic markers associated with BPD development including TGF-β1, IP-10 and IL-8, but induced a delayed increase of ASM TA levels. Conclusion Treatment with iNO may have played a role in reducing several inflammatory and fibrotic mediators in TA of preterm infants compared to placebo-treated infants. However, survival without BPD was not affected in the main EUNO trial. Trial registration NCT00551642 PMID:28046032

  8. Long-term follow-up of study participants from prophylactic HIV vaccine clinical trials in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Claudia; Jaoko, Walter; Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Mpendo, Juliet; Nanvubya, Annet; Karita, Etienne; Bayingana, Roger; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Chomba, Elwyn; Kilembe, William; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Nyombayire, Julien; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Lehrman, Jennifer; Cox, Josephine; Allen, Susan; Dally, Len; Smith, Carol; Fast, Patricia E

    2014-01-01

    Long-term safety is critical for the development and later use of a vaccine to prevent HIV/AIDS. Likewise, the persistence of vaccine-induced antibodies and their impact on HIV testing must be established. IAVI has sponsored several Phase I and IIA HIV vaccine trials enrolling healthy, HIV-seronegative African volunteers. Plasmid DNA and viral vector based vaccines were tested. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported. After completion of vaccine trials conducted between 2001–2007, both vaccine and placebo recipients were offered enrolment into an observational long-term follow-up study (LTFU) to monitor potential late health effects and persistence of immune responses. At scheduled 6-monthly clinic visits, a health questionnaire was administered; clinical events were recorded and graded for severity. Blood was drawn for HIV testing and cellular immune assays. 287 volunteers were enrolled; total follow-up after last vaccination was 1463 person years (median: 5.2 years). Ninety-three (93)% of volunteers reported good health at their last LTFU visit. Infectious diseases and injuries accounted for almost 50% of the 175 reported clinical events, of which over 95% were mild or moderate in severity. There were 30 six pregnancies, six incident HIV infections and 14 volunteers reported cases of social harm. Persistence of immune responses was rare. No safety signal was identified. No potentially vaccine-related medical condition, no immune mediated disease, or malignancy was reported. HIV vaccines studied in these trials had a low potential of induction of persisting HIV antibodies. PMID:24374365

  9. Role of Informed Consent in a Decision-making on Participation in The Clinical Trial: Multicenter study in Russia “Face to Face”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Zvonareva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Currently, clinical trials (CT remain the only technology, which provides proof of efficacy and safety of new drugs and their subsequent release to the market. Medical researcher and informed consent (IC are the main (and often the only source of information for the patient about the upcoming clinical trials, and thus have a direct impact on the perception of clinical trials, and on the patient’s decision about participation. However, the degree of influence of these factors on the clinical trials participants still remains unclear.Materials and methods. A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted in different cities of the Russian Federation. Patients who had previous experience in CTs (or were enrolled in a CT at the time of this study were asked to complete a questionnaire.Results. To assess the impact of researcher, all respondents were divided into 2 groups: patients that acquainted with IC in collaboration with the researcher, and the other group, which reviewed IC form independently. We evaluated the importance of the factors influencing the decision-making process on participation in clinical trials. According to our data, the most important factors were professional monitoring services (3,72 ± 1,00, regular condition monitoring (3,66 ± 0,98, and better medical care (3,62 ± 1,00. These factors were evaluated at significantly lower score by group of patients that acquainted with IC together with the researcher (3,55 ±0,94, vs 4,01 ± 0,90, p = 0,002; 3,52 ± 1,01 vs 3,87 ± 0,90, p = 0,040; 3,49 ± 0,94, vs 3,83 ± 1,06, p = 0,020 respectively. In assessing the factors that had negative impact on the interest in participating in a clinical trial, the most significant were risk of side effects (3,01 ± 1,27, study of new medication (2,68 ± 1,21, and the risk of getting into the placebo group (2,64 ± 1,34 (so-called “objective” risk factors. At the same time, risk of side effects and risk of

  10. Neck-cooling improves repeated sprint performance in the heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eSunderland

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effect of neck-cooling during exercise on repeated sprint ability in a hot environment. Seven team-sport playing males completed two experimental trials involving repeated sprint exercise (5 x 6 s before and after two 45 min bouts of a football specific intermittent treadmill protocol in the heat (33.0  0.2 ºC; 53 ± 2% relative humidity. Participants wore a neck-cooling collar in one of the trials (CC. Mean power output and peak power output declined over time in both trials but were higher in CC (540 ± 99 v 507 ± 122W, d = 0.32; 719 ± 158 v 680 ± 182 W, d = 0.24 respectively. The improved power output was particularly pronounced (d = 0.51 – 0.88 after the 2nd 45 min bout but the CC had no effect on % fatigue. The collar lowered neck temperature and the thermal sensation of the neck (P 0.05. There were no trial differences but interaction effects were demonstrated for prolactin concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE. Prolactin concentration was initially higher in the collar cold trial and then was lower from 45 minutes onwards (interaction trial x time P=0.04. RPE was lower during the football intermittent treadmill protocol in the collar cold trial (interaction trial x time P = 0.01. Neck-cooling during exercise improves repeated sprint performance in a hot environment without altering physiological or neuroendocrinological responses. RPE is reduced and may partially explain the performance improvement.

  11. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  12. A sense of security: Spouses’ experiences of participating in an orthopaedic case management intervention (the SICAM-trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher Berthelsen, Connie; Kristensson, Jimmie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore and describe spouses' experiences of participating in a case management intervention during older patients' fast-track programme having total hip replacement as well as which intervention elements they found useful. Data were collected through qualitative inter...

  13. Sexually Transmitted Infections in Women Participating in a Biomedical Intervention Trial in Durban: Prevalence, Coinfections, and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbai, Nathlee Samantha; Wand, Handan; Ramjee, Gita

    2013-01-01

    Background. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) continue to be a significant public health problem especially among women of reproductive age in Africa. Methods. A total of 2236 women that had enrolled in the MDP301 vaginal microbicide trial were tested for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhea (NG), Treponema pallidum, and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV). Results. CT was identified as the most prevalent STI (11%) followed by TV (10%), NG, and Syphilis (3%). The highest prevalence of coinfection was reported between T. pallidum and TV (19.67%, P = 0.004), followed by CT and TV (13.52%, P ≤ 0.001). Risk factors that were significantly associated with STI acquisition were women of 23 years of age or younger (HR: 1.50, 95% CI 1.17, 1.93), baseline STI with CT (HR: 1.77, 95% CI 1.32, 2.35), TV (HR: 1.58, 95% CI, 1.20, 2.10), and T. pallidum (HR: 5.13, 95% CI 3.65, 7.22), and a low education level (HR: 1.30, 95% CI 1.02, 1.66). Conclusion. Young women with lower education and a history of STIs are at high risk of multiple STIs. Prevention programs should consider target approach to STI prevention among young women. This trial is registered with ISRCTN64716212.

  14. Sexually Transmitted Infections in Women Participating in a Biomedical Intervention Trial in Durban: Prevalence, Coinfections, and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathlee Samantha Abbai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs continue to be a significant public health problem especially among women of reproductive age in Africa. Methods. A total of 2236 women that had enrolled in the MDP301 vaginal microbicide trial were tested for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT, Neisseria gonorrhea (NG, Treponema pallidum, and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV. Results. CT was identified as the most prevalent STI (11% followed by TV (10%, NG, and Syphilis (3%. The highest prevalence of coinfection was reported between T. pallidum and TV (19.67%, P=0.004, followed by CT and TV (13.52%, P≤0.001. Risk factors that were significantly associated with STI acquisition were women of 23 years of age or younger (HR: 1.50, 95% CI 1.17, 1.93, baseline STI with CT (HR: 1.77, 95% CI 1.32, 2.35, TV (HR: 1.58, 95% CI, 1.20, 2.10, and T. pallidum (HR: 5.13, 95% CI 3.65, 7.22, and a low education level (HR: 1.30, 95% CI 1.02, 1.66. Conclusion. Young women with lower education and a history of STIs are at high risk of multiple STIs. Prevention programs should consider target approach to STI prevention among young women. This trial is registered with ISRCTN64716212.

  15. Baseline characteristics of participants in the JUPITER trial, a randomized placebo-controlled primary prevention trial of statin therapy among individuals with low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridker, Paul M; Fonseca, Francisco A H; Genest, Jacques; Gotto, Antonio M; Kastelein, John J P; Khurmi, Nardev S; Koenig, Wolfgang; Libby, Peter; Lorenzatti, Alberto J; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Shepherd, James; Willerson, James T; Glynn, Robert J

    2007-12-01

    The Justification for the Use of statins in Primary prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled primary prevention trial of statin therapy among persons with average to low levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol who are at increased cardiovascular risk due to elevated plasma concentrations of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). A total of 17,802 persons with LDL cholesterolor=2 mg/L were recruited from 26 countries and randomly allocated to 20 mg/day rosuvastatin or placebo. In contrast to previous studies of statin therapy in primary prevention, JUPITER is evaluating a group with modest plasma concentrations of LDL cholesterol (median 108 mg/dl, interquartile range 94 to 119). Further, the trial includes 6,801 women (38.2%) and 5,577 participants with metabolic syndrome (32.1%). Thus, in addition to broadening our understanding of statin therapy and inflammation, the JUPITER trial will provide important and clinically relevant information on primary prevention among patients who do not currently qualify for lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, as 20 mg of rosuvastatin can reduce LDL cholesterol by up to 50%, JUPITER will also provide crucial safety data for several thousand patients who should achieve LDL cholesterol levels<50 mg/dl on a long-term basis.

  16. Design, and participant enrollment, of a randomized controlled trial evaluating effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a community-based case management intervention, for patients suffering from COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sabrina Storgaard; Pedersen, Kjeld Møller; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2015-01-01

    patients were randomized into two groups: the case-managed group and the usual-care group. Participant characteristics were obtained at baseline, and measures on effectiveness and costs were obtained through questionnaires and registries within a 12-month follow-up period. In the forthcoming analysis......Background: Case management interventions are recommended to improve quality of care and reduce costs in chronic care, but further evidence on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is needed. The objective of this study is the reporting of the design and participant enrollment of a randomized...... controlled trial, conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a community-based case management model for patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). With a focus on support for self-care and care coordination, the intervention was hypothesized to result...

  17. Rationale and design of the iPap trial: a randomized controlled trial of home-based HPV self-sampling for improving participation in cervical screening by never- and under-screened women in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Farhana; English, Dallas R; Simpson, Julie A; Brotherton, Julia M L; Drennan, Kelly; Mullins, Robyn; Heley, Stella; Wrede, C David; Saville, Marion; Gertig, Dorota M

    2014-03-19

    Organized screening based on Pap tests has substantially reduced deaths from cervical cancer in many countries, including Australia. However, the impact of the program depends upon the degree to which women participate. A new method of screening, testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA to detect the virus that causes cervical cancer, has recently become available. Because women can collect their own samples for this test at home, it has the potential to overcome some of the barriers to Pap tests. The iPap trial will evaluate whether mailing an HPV self-sampling kit increases participation by never- and under-screened women within a cervical screening program. The iPap trial is a parallel randomized controlled, open label, trial. Participants will be Victorian women age 30-69 years, for whom there is either no record on the Victorian Cervical Cytology Registry (VCCR) of a Pap test (never-screened) or the last recorded Pap test was between five to fifteen years ago (under-screened). Enrolment information from the Victorian Electoral Commission will be linked to the VCCR to determine the never-screened women. Variables that will be used for record linkage include full name, address and date of birth. Never- and under-screened women will be randomly allocated to either receive an invitation letter with an HPV self-sampling kit or a reminder letter to attend for a Pap test, which is standard practice for women overdue for a test in Victoria. All resources have been focus group tested. The primary outcome will be the proportion of women who participate, by returning an HPV self-sampling kit for women in the self-sampling arm, and notification of a Pap test result to the Registry for women in the Pap test arm at 3 and 6 months after mailout. The most important secondary outcome is the proportion of test-positive women who undergo further investigations at 6 and 12 months after mailout of results. The iPap trial will provide strong evidence about whether HPV self

  18. What are People's Experiences of a Novel Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Bipolar Disorders? A Qualitative Investigation with Participants on the TEAMS Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Emmeline; Tai, Sara; Gebbia, Piersanti; Mansell, Warren

    2017-05-01

    Background Psychological interventions for bipolar disorders typically produce mixed outcomes and modest effects. The need for a more effective intervention prompted the development of a new cognitive behavioural therapy, based on an integrative cognitive model ('Think Effectively About Mood Swings' [TEAMS] therapy). Unlike previous interventions, TEAMS addresses current symptoms and comorbidities, and helps clients achieve long-term goals. A pilot randomized controlled trial (the TEAMS trial) of the therapy has recently concluded. This study explored participants' experiences of TEAMS, recommendations for improvement and experiences of useful changes post-therapy. Methods Fourteen TEAMS therapy participants took part in semi-structured interviews. Their accounts were analysed using interpretative thematic analysis. Two researchers coded the dataset independently. Member checks were conducted of the preliminary themes. Results Two overarching themes; 'useful elements of therapy' and 'changes from therapy' encompassed 12 emerging subthemes. Participants appreciated having opportunities to talk and described the therapy as person-centred and delivered by caring, approachable and skilled therapists. Some recommended more sessions than the 16 provided. Helpful therapeutic techniques were reported to be, normalization about moods, methods to increase understanding of moods, relapse-prevention, reappraisal techniques and metaphors. However, some did not find therapeutic techniques helpful. Post-therapy, many reported changes in managing mood swings more effectively and in their thinking (although some participants reported changes in neither). Many described increased acceptance of themselves and of having bipolar disorder, increased productivity and reduced anxiety in social situations. Conclusions The present study evaluates participants' therapy experiences in detail, including aspects of therapy viewed as helpful, and meaningful post-therapy outcomes. Copyright

  19. Improvement of Quality of Life (QOL) in Osteoporotic Patients by Elcatonin Treatment: A Trial Taking the Participants' Preference into Account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoh, K; Uzawa, T; Orito, T; Tanaka, K

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is associated with compromised quality of life (QOL), to which pain has the most important contribution. Elcatonin, a derivative of calcitonin, is widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis in two ways. One is as the inhibitor of osteoclastic bone resorption. The other is for osteoporosis-related pain based on the unique analgesic effects of elcatonin. Since pain is subjective in nature, and QOL is the only clinical outcome representing the patients' subjective perception of health status, pain associated with osteoporosis would be best evaluated based on QOL assessment. Evidence based medicine gives the highest remarks to the double-blinded, randomized controlled trial, which, however, cannot be free from methodological problems on some occasions. For example, it is practically impossible to remain blinded in the trial of a potent analgesia, which in turn causes biases. Thus, the significance of taking the patients' preference into account is increasingly acknowledged. In this study, 45 osteoporotic patients were given brochures describing the pros and cons on the three treatment choices; calcium and alfacalcidol, additional use of elcatonin, and additional use of bisphosphonate. Those who favored elcatonin were older, had more vertebral fractures, and lower QOL scores. QOL was evaluated before and three months after the treatment using SF-8; the most widely used generic questionnaire, and RDQ; a lumbago-specific measure. Elcatonin treatment improved physical function, general health, and vitality of SF-8, and RDQ score. Although this is a preliminary study, our results suggest that patients with vertebral fracture(s) have impaired QOL and more likely to favor elcatonin treatment expecting analgesia.

  20. Long term streptomycin toxicity in the treatment of Buruli Ulcer: follow-up of participants in the BURULICO drug trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor Klis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli Ulcer (BU is a tropical infectious skin disease that is currently treated with 8 weeks of intramuscular streptomycin and oral rifampicin. As prolonged streptomycin administration can cause both oto- and nephrotoxicity, we evaluated its long term toxicity by following-up former BU patients that had received either 4 or 8 weeks of streptomycin in addition to other drugs between 2006 and 2008, in the context of a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Former patients were retrieved in 2012, and oto- and nephrotoxicity were determined by audiometry and serum creatinine levels. Data were compared with baseline and week 8 measurements during the drug trial. RESULTS: Of the total of 151 former patients, 127 (84% were retrieved. Ototoxicity was present in 29% of adults and 25% of children. Adults in the 8 week streptomycin group had significantly higher hearing thresholds in all frequencies at long term follow-up, and these differences were most prominent in the high frequencies. In children, no differences between the two treatment arms were found. Nephrotoxicity that had been detected in 14% of adults and in 13% of children during treatment, was present in only 2.4% of patients at long term follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged streptomycin administration in the adult study subjects caused significant persistent hearing loss, especially in the high frequency range. Nephrotoxicity was also present in both adults and children but appeared to be transient. Streptomycin should be given with caution especially in patients aged 16 or older, and in individuals with concurrent risks for renal dysfunction or hearing loss.

  1. Acute kidney injury in patients with systemic sclerosis participating in hematopoietic cell transplantation trials in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosing, Chitra; Nash, Richard; McSweeney, Peter; Mineishi, Shin; Seibold, James; Griffith, Linda M; Shulman, Howard; Goldmuntz, Ellen; Mayes, Maureen; Parikh, Chirag R; Crofford, Leslie; Keyes-Elstein, Lynette; Furst, Daniel; Steen, Virginia; Sullivan, Keith M

    2011-05-01

    Recipients of hematopoietic cell transplantation may be at risk for developing acute kidney injury (AKI), and this risk may be increased in patients who undergo transplantation for severe systemic sclerosis (SSc) due to underlying scleroderma renal disease. AKI after transplantation can increase treatment-related mortality. To better define these risks, we analyzed 91 patients with SSc who were enrolled in 3 clinical trials in the United States of autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Eleven (12%) of the 91 patients with SSc in these studies (8 undergoing autologous HCT, 1 undergoing allogeneic HCT, 1 pretransplantation, 1 given i.v. cyclophosphamide on a transplantation trial) experienced AKI, of whom 8 required dialysis and/or therapeutic plasma exchange. AKI injury in the 9 HCT recipients developed a median of 35 days (range, 0-90 days) after transplantation. Ten of 11 patients with AKI received angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I) therapy. The etiology of AKI was attributed to scleroderma renal crisis in 6 patients (including 2 with normotensive renal crisis), to AKI of uncertain etiology in 2 patients, and to AKI superimposed on scleroderma kidney disease in 3 patients. Eight of the 11 patients died, one each because of progression of SSc, multiorgan failure, gastrointestinal and pulmonary bleeding, pericardial tamponade and pulmonary complications, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, graft-versus-host disease, and malignancy. Limiting nephrotoxins, cautious use of corticosteroids, renal shielding during total body irradiation, strict control of blood pressure, and aggressive use of ACE-Is may be of importance in preventing renal complications after HCT for SSc.

  2. P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

    Science.gov (United States)

    P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

  3. Impact of Periodic Presumptive Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis on the Vaginal Microbiome among Women Participating in the Preventing Vaginal Infections Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkus, Jennifer E; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Anzala, Omu; Kimani, Joshua; Andac, Chloe; Schwebke, Jane; Fredricks, David N; McClelland, R Scott

    2017-03-01

    Evidence suggests that specific vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) may increase the risk of adverse health outcomes in women. Among women participating in a randomized, double-blinded trial, we assessed the effect of periodic presumptive treatment (PPT) on detection of select vaginal bacteria. High-risk women from the United States and Kenya with a recent vaginal infection received intravaginal metronidazole 750 mg plus miconazole 200 mg or placebo for 5 consecutive nights each month for 12 months. Vaginal fluid specimens were collected via polyester/polyethylene terephthalate swabs every other month and tested for bacteria, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. The effect of PPT on bacterium detection was assessed among all participants and stratified by country. Of 234 women enrolled, 221 had specimens available for analysis. The proportion of follow-up visits with detectable quantities was lower in the PPT arm versus the placebo arm for the following bacteria: BVAB1, BVAB2, Atopobium vaginae, Leptotrichia/Sneathia, and Megasphaera. The magnitude of reductions was greater among Kenyan participants as compared to US participants. Use of monthly PPT for 1 year reduced colonization with several bacteria strongly associated with BV. The role of PPT to improve vaginal health should be considered, and efforts to improve the impact of PPT regimens are warranted.

  4. A randomized clinical trial of diabetes self-management for Mexican Americans: Are there serendipitous health benefits for supporters of study participants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon A Brown

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Studies of social support in diabetes have focused on the effects of support on the person with type 2 diabetes. We explored diabetes prevention effects of a culturally tailored diabetes self-management intervention in individuals without diabetes who were supporters of intervention participants. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial that involved 256 Mexican Americans with diabetes. Each study participant designated a supporter—spouse, relative, friend—who attended intervention sessions and assisted participants in attaining effective diabetes self-management. Supporter’s glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C data were tracked for 1 year to determine diabetes conversion rates in supporters without diabetes at baseline. Results: Fewer individuals in the intervention group (n = 9 converted to an A1C above the 7% threshold, compared to the 1-year wait-listed control group (n = 16. We found a statistically significant difference (p = .021 at 12 months in the number of individuals whose A1C was ⩽8%, with fewer supporters above threshold in the intervention group (reduction of 48%. Supporters in the intervention group with prediabetes, based on baseline A1C, experienced a slight reduction in A1C, while control group supporters with prediabetes experienced an increase. Discussion: The results suggest that there are potential benefits for family members and other supporters of persons with diabetes who participated in diabetes self-management programs.

  5. Neurological syndrome in an HIV-prevention trial participant randomized to daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (300 mg) and emtricitabine (200 mg) in Bondo, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owino, Fredrick; Mandala, Justin; Ambia, Julie; Agot, Kawango; Van Damme, Lut

    2013-01-01

    Side effects of antiretroviral drug use by HIV-positive patients have been extensively studied; however, there are limited data on the side effects of antiretroviral drugs used as an HIV prophylaxis among healthy, HIV-negative individuals. Here we report on an unusual neuropathy in a 24-year-old participant in the FEM-PrEP trial. This was a Phase III randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial to test the safety and effectiveness of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (300 mg) and emtricitabine (200 mg) (TDF-FTC) to prevent HIV. At the eighth week of taking TDF-FTC with moderate adherence, the participant complained of mild paresthesiae, numbness, and a tingling sensation in her upper limbs that was associated with pain and cold. After an additional 4 days, she developed a disabling weakness of her upper limbs and tremors in her hands. The study product was discontinued, and within 2 weeks she was free of all symptoms. One month after restarting the drug, she complained of posture-dependent numbness of her upper limbs. Results of clinical and neurological exams, laboratory tests, and magnetic resonance imaging are described here. PMID:24353443

  6. Neurological syndrome in an HIV-prevention trial participant randomized to daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (300 mg and emtricitabine (200 mg in Bondo, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owino F

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fredrick Owino,1 Justin Mandala,2 Julie Ambia,3 Kawango Agot,1 Lut Van Damme2 1Impact Research and Development Organization, Kisumu, Kenya; 2Department of Global Health, Population, and Nutrition, FHI 360, Washington, DC, USA; 3KAVI-Institute of Clinical Research, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya Abstract: Side effects of antiretroviral drug use by HIV-positive patients have been extensively studied; however, there are limited data on the side effects of antiretroviral drugs used as an HIV prophylaxis among healthy, HIV-negative individuals. Here we report on an unusual neuropathy in a 24-year-old participant in the FEM-PrEP trial. This was a Phase III randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial to test the safety and effectiveness of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (300 mg and emtricitabine (200 mg (TDF-FTC to prevent HIV. At the eighth week of taking TDF-FTC with moderate adherence, the participant complained of mild paresthesiae, numbness, and a tingling sensation in her upper limbs that was associated with pain and cold. After an additional 4 days, she developed a disabling weakness of her upper limbs and tremors in her hands. The study product was discontinued, and within 2 weeks she was free of all symptoms. One month after restarting the drug, she complained of posture-dependent numbness of her upper limbs. Results of clinical and neurological exams, laboratory tests, and magnetic resonance imaging are described here. Keywords: pre-exposure prophylaxis, toxic neuropathy, NRTI

  7. The effect of an educational intervention on coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients' participation rate in cardiac rehabilitation programs: a controlled health care trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikov Ilia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation has a beneficial effect on the prognosis and quality of life of cardiac patients, and has been found to be cost-effective. This report describes a comprehensive and low cost educational intervention designed to increase the attendance at cardiac rehabilitation programs of patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods/Design A controlled prospective intervention trial. The control arm comprised 520 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery between January 2004 and May 2005 in five medical centers across Israel. This group received no additional treatment beyond usual care. The intervention arm comprised 504 patients recruited from the same cardiothoracic departments between June 2005 and November 2006. This group received oral and written explanations about the advantages of participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs and a telephone call two weeks after hospital discharge intended to further encourage their enrollment. The medical staff attended a one-hour seminar on cardiac rehabilitation. In addition, it was recommended that referral to cardiac rehabilitation be added to the letter of discharge from the hospital. Both study groups were interviewed before surgery and one-year post surgery. A one-year post-operative interview assessed factors affecting patient attendance at cardiac rehabilitation programs, as well as the structure and content of the cardiac rehabilitation programs attended. Anthropometric parameters were measured at pre- and post-operative interviews;- and medical information was obtained from patient medical records. The effect of cardiac rehabilitation on one- and three-year mortality was assessed. Discussion We report a low cost yet comprehensive intervention designed to increase cardiac rehabilitation participation by raising both patient and medical staff awareness to the potential benefits of cardiac rehabilitation. Trial

  8. Accuracy and Repeatability of the Gait Analysis by the WalkinSense System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo P. de Castro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WalkinSense is a new device designed to monitor walking. The aim of this study was to measure the accuracy and repeatability of the gait analysis performed by the WalkinSense system. Descriptions of values recorded by WalkinSense depicting typical gait in adults are also presented. A bench experiment using the Trublu calibration device was conducted to statically test the WalkinSense. Following this, a dynamic test was carried out overlapping the WalkinSense and the Pedar insoles in 40 healthy participants during walking. Pressure peak, pressure peak time, pressure-time integral, and mean pressure at eight-foot regions were calculated. In the bench experiments, the repeatability (i among the WalkinSense sensors (within, (ii between two WalkinSense devices, and (iii between the WalkinSense and the Trublu devices was excellent. In the dynamic tests, the repeatability of the WalkinSense (i between stances in the same trial (within-trial and (ii between trials was also excellent (ICC > 0.90. When the eight-foot regions were analyzed separately, the within-trial and between-trials repeatability was good-to-excellent in 88% (ICC > 0.80 of the data and fair in 11%. In short, the data suggest that the WalkinSense has good-to-excellent levels of accuracy and repeatability for plantar pressure variables.

  9. High HIV-1 prevalence, risk behaviours, and willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials in fishing communities on Lake Victoria, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Kiwanuka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa are generalized, but high-risk subgroups exist within these epidemics. A recent study among fisher-folk communities (FFC in Uganda showed high HIV prevalence (28.8% and incidence (4.9/100 person-years. However, those findings may not reflect population-wide HIV rates in FFC since the study population was selected for high-risk behaviour. Methods: Between September 2011 and March 2013, we conducted a community-based cohort study to determine the population representative HIV rates and willingness to participate (WTP in hypothetical vaccine trials among FFC, Uganda. At baseline (September 2011–January 2012, a household enumeration census was done in eight fishing communities (one lakeshore and seven islands, after which a random sample of 2200 participants aged 18–49 years was selected from 5360 individuals. Interviewer-administered questionnaire data were collected on HIV risk behaviours and WTP, and venous blood was collected for HIV testing using rapid HIV tests with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA confirmation. Adjusted prevalence proportion ratios (adj.PPRs of HIV prevalence were determined using log-binomial regression models. Results: Overall baseline HIV prevalence was 26.7% and was higher in women than men (32.6% vs. 20.8%, p<0.0001. Prevalence was lower among fishermen (22.4% than housewives (32.1%, farmers (33.1% and bar/lodge/restaurant workers (37%. The adj.PPR of HIV was higher among women than men (adj.PPR =1.50, 95%; 1.20, 1.87 and participants aged 30–39 years (adj.PPR=1.40, 95%; 1.10, 1.79 and 40–49 years (adj.PPR=1.41, 95%; 1.04, 1.92 compared to those aged 18–24 years. Other factors associated with HIV prevalence included low education, previous marriage, polygamous marriage, alcohol and marijuana use before sex. WTP in hypothetical vaccine trials was 89.3% and was higher in men than women (91.2% vs. 87.3%, p=0.004 and among island communities compared to

  10. Increase in cruciferous vegetable intake in women previously treated for breast cancer participating in a dietary intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia A; Rock, Cheryl L; Caan, Bette J; Flatt, Shirley W; Al-Delaimy, Wael A; Newman, Vicky A; Hajek, Richard A; Chilton, Janice A; Pierce, John P

    2007-01-01

    Consumption of cruciferous vegetables has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk mechanistically and in population-based studies, although evidence has been inconsistent. This inconsistency may be related to limitations in quantifying and qualifying cruciferous vegetable exposure using standard instruments for dietary assessment (for example, food-frequency questionnaires, FFQs) or due to low levels of intake demonstrated among U.S. population samples. Cruciferous vegetable intake data are presented from a longitudinal study of a high-vegetable dietary intervention to reduce breast cancer recurrence among breast cancer survivors (n=1,156; 536 intervention and 620 comparison group subjects). Intake was assessed using repeat administration of an FFQ and cross-sectional administration of a cruciferous vegetable-specific FFQ (CVFFQ). Mean intake in the intervention group assessed using the standard FFQ was 37.7 g/day at baseline and increased to 57.1 g/day at 12 mo (P=0.0001) and was sustained through 48 mo. Broccoli and cabbage were the most commonly consumed cruciferous vegetables, regardless of the instrument used to assess intake. Differences in intake by group assignment were shown for raw cruciferous vegetables (30.2 g/day vs. 24.6 g/day, assessed using the CVFFQ), suggesting increased exposure to biologically active, cancer-preventive food constituents. These data suggest that this study population will be the first U.S. population sample to provide ample quantity and variety in cruciferous intake to examine whether these vegetables are protective against breast cancer recurrence.

  11. Facilitation of fear extinction in phobic participants with a novel cognitive enhancer: a randomized placebo controlled trial of yohimbine augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Mark B; Smits, Jasper A J; Otto, Michael W; Sanders, Carlijn; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2009-04-01

    Preliminary animal research suggests that yohimbine hydrochloride, a selective competitive alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, accelerates fear extinction and converts ineffective extinction regimens (long intertrial intervals) to effective ones. This randomized placebo controlled study examined the potential exposure enhancing effect of yohimbine hydrochloride in claustrophobic humans. Participants (71% undergraduate students and 29% community volunteers) displaying marked claustrophobic fear (n=24) were treated with 2 1-h in vivo exposure sessions. Participants were randomly allocated to take 10.8mg yohimbine hydrochloride (n=12) or placebo (n=12) prior to each exposure session. Outcome measures included peak fear during a behavioral avoidance task, the Claustrophobia Questionnaire, and the Claustrophobic Concerns Questionnaire. Results showed that both conditions improved significantly at post-treatment with no significant difference between groups. Consistent with prediction the group that took yohimbine hydrochloride prior to exposure sessions showed significantly greater improvement in peak fear at the one-week follow-up behavioral assessment (d=1.68). This was also true across other outcome measures with large to very large effect sizes. These data provide initial support for exposure enhancing effect of single-dose yohimbine hydrochloride in a clinical application.

  12. Prevalence and correlates of pulmonary emphysema in smokers and former smokers. A densitometric study of participants in the ITALUNG trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camiciottoli, Gianna [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento Area Critica, Firenze (Italy); Cavigli, Edoardo; Grassi, Luca; Orlandi, Ilaria; Picozzi, Giulia; Mascalchi, Mario [Universita di Firenze, Radiodiagnostica, Dipartimento Fisiopatologia Clinica, Firenze (Italy); Diciotti, Stefano [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Firenze (Italy); Zappa, Marco; Paci, Eugenio [Centro di Studio e Prevenzione Oncologica, Firenze (Italy); Pegna, Andrea Lopes [Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria di Careggi, Pneumologia, Firenze (Italy); Falaschi, Fabio [Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Pisana, Radiodiagnostica II, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-01-15

    We assessed with computed tomography (CT) densitometry the prevalence of emphysema in 266 (175 men and 91 women; mean age 64{+-}4 years) smokers and former smokers enrolled in the ITALUNG trial of lung cancer screening with low-dose thin-slice CT. Whole-lung volume and the relative area at -950 Hounsfield units (RA{sub 950}) and mean lung attenuation (MLA) in 1 of every 10 slices (mean, 24 slices per subject) were measured. Lung volume, MLA and RA950 significantly correlated each other and with age. Average RA950>6.8% qualifying for emphysema was present in 71(26.6%) of 266 subjects, with a higher prevalence in men than in women (30.3% vs 19.8%; p=0.003). Only in smokers was a weak (r=0.18; p=0.05) correlation between RA950 and packs/year observed. In multiple regression analysis, the variability of RA950 (R2=0.24) or MLA (R2=0.34) was significantly, but weakly explained by age, lung volume and packs/year. Other factors besides smoking may also have a significant role in the etiopathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. (orig.)

  13. Repeatability of hypoxia PET imaging using [{sup 18}F]HX4 in lung and head and neck cancer patients: a prospective multicenter trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zegers, Catharina M.L.; Elmpt, Wouter van; Lambin, Philippe [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Szardenings, Katrin [Threshold Pharmaceuticals, South San Francisco, CA (United States); Kolb, Hartmuth; Chien, David [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Siemens Molecular Imaging Biomarker Research, Culver City, CA (United States); Waxman, Alan [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Subramaniam, Rathan M. [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiologic Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Moon, Dae Hyuk [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brunetti, Jacqueline C. [Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, NJ (United States); Srinivas, Shyam M. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Hypoxia is an important factor influencing tumor progression and treatment efficacy. The aim of this study was to investigate the repeatability of hypoxia PET imaging with [{sup 18}F]HX4 in patients with head and neck and lung cancer. Nine patients with lung cancer and ten with head and neck cancer were included in the analysis (NCT01075399). Two sequential pretreatment [{sup 18}F]HX4 PET/CT scans were acquired within 1 week. The maximal and mean standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}) were defined and the tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated. In addition, hypoxic volumes were determined as the volume of the tumor with a TBR >1.2 (HV{sub 1.2}). Bland Altman analysis of the uptake parameters was performed and coefficients of repeatability were calculated. To evaluate the spatial repeatability of the uptake, the PET/CT images were registered and a voxel-wise comparison of the uptake was performed, providing a correlation coefficient. All parameters of [{sup 18}F]HX4 uptake were significantly correlated between scans: SUV{sub max} (r = 0.958, p < 0.001), SUV{sub mean} (r = 0.946, p < 0.001), TBR{sub max} (r = 0.962, p < 0.001) and HV{sub 1.2} (r = 0.995, p < 0.001). The relative coefficients of repeatability were 15 % (SUV{sub mean}), 17 % (SUV{sub max}) and 17 % (TBR{sub max}). Voxel-wise analysis of the spatial uptake pattern within the tumors provided an average correlation of 0.65 ± 0.14. Repeated hypoxia PET scans with [{sup 18}F]HX4 provide reproducible and spatially stable results in patients with head and neck cancer and patients with lung cancer. [{sup 18}F]HX4 PET imaging can be used to assess the hypoxic status of tumors and has the potential to aid hypoxia-targeted treatments. (orig.)

  14. Dietary magnesium intake improves insulin resistance among non-diabetic individuals with metabolic syndrome participating in a dietary trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinsong; Persuitte, Gioia; Olendzki, Barbara C; Wedick, Nicole M; Zhang, Zhiying; Merriam, Philip A; Fang, Hua; Carmody, James; Olendzki, Gin-Fei; Ma, Yunsheng

    2013-09-27

    Many cross-sectional studies show an inverse association between dietary magnesium and insulin resistance, but few longitudinal studies examine the ability to meet the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for magnesium intake through food and its effect on insulin resistance among participants with metabolic syndrome (MetS). The dietary intervention study examined this question in 234 individuals with MetS. Magnesium intake was assessed using 24-h dietary recalls at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Fasting glucose and insulin levels were collected at each time point; and insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). The relation between magnesium intake and HOMA-IR was assessed using linear mixed models adjusted for covariates. Baseline magnesium intake was 287 ± 93 mg/day (mean ± standard deviation), and HOMA-IR, fasting glucose and fasting insulin were 3.7 ± 3.5, 99 ± 13 mg/dL, and 15 ± 13 μU/mL, respectively. At baseline, 6-, and 12-months, 23.5%, 30.4%, and 27.7% met the RDA for magnesium. After multivariate adjustment, magnesium intake was inversely associated with metabolic biomarkers of insulin resistance (P 3.6) over time was 71% lower [odds ratio (OR): 0.29; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12, 0.72] in participants in the highest quartile of magnesium intake than those in the lowest quartile. For individuals meeting the RDA for magnesium, the multivariate-adjusted OR for high HOMA-IR over time was 0.37 (95% CI: 0.18, 0.77). These findings indicate that dietary magnesium intake is inadequate among non-diabetic individuals with MetS and suggest that increasing dietary magnesium to meet the RDA has a protective effect on insulin resistance.

  15. Multivariate analysis of bipolar mania: retrospectively assessed structure of bipolar I manic and mixed episodes in randomized clinical trial participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Alan C; Suppes, Trisha; Ostacher, Michael J; Eudicone, James M; McQuade, Robert; Forbes, Andy; Carlson, Berit X

    2013-01-10

    Manic episodes are heterogeneous. Mixed states may differ in important clinical characteristics from other manic episodes. However, it has not been established whether mixed states are a distinct type of episodes, or a common basic structure exists across manic episodes. Using 2179 well-characterized subjects in the pretreatment phase of six randomized, clinical trials, we conducted rotated factor analysis followed by cluster analysis, using all items from the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale. Analyses were conducted for all subjects (n=2179) and for those in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) mixed (n=644) and non-mixed (n=1535) episodes separately. There were five factors characterized (in order of variance accounted for) as depression, mania, sleep disturbance, judgment/impulsivity and irritability/hostility. Cluster analysis identified five clusters. Three were predominately manic, with depression scores below average for the overall group. Two had high average depression scores; these clusters differed in irritability/hostility. Judgment/impulsivity scores were similar across factors. Essentially identical factors and clusters existed whether analyses were done in all subjects or only in subjects classified by DSM-IV as mixed or non-mixed. Exclusion criteria of studies may limit generalizability of findings. All manic episodes, whether mixed or non-mixed, shared a similar structure according to factor/cluster analysis. Patients with high depression factor scores were heterogeneous with respect to irritability. These data suggest that depressive symptoms should be considered a dimensional property across manic episodes, rather than as defining a specific type of episode. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship between sleep quality and quantity and weight loss in women participating in a weight-loss intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia A; Morrow, Kelly L; Flatt, Shirley W; Wertheim, Betsy C; Perfect, Michelle M; Ravia, Jennifer J; Sherwood, Nancy E; Karanja, Njeri; Rock, Cheryl L

    2012-07-01

    Evidence suggests that individuals who report fewer total hours of sleep are more likely to be overweight or obese. Few studies have prospectively evaluated weight-loss success in relation to reported sleep quality and quantity. This analysis sought to determine the association between sleep characteristics and weight loss in overweight or obese women enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of a weight-loss program. We hypothesized that in overweight/obese women, significant weight loss would be demonstrated more frequently in women who report a better Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) Global Score or sleep >7 h/night as compared to women who report a worse PSQI score or sleep ≤7 h/night. Women of ages 45.5 ± 10.4 (mean ± SD) years and BMI of 33.9 ± 3.3 (n = 245) were randomized and completed PSQI at baseline and 6 months; 198 had weight change assessed through 24 months. At baseline, 52.7% reported PSQI scores above the clinical cutoff of 5. Better subjective sleep quality increased the likelihood of weight-loss success by 33% (relative risk (RR), 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.52-0.86), as did sleeping >7 h/night. A worse Global Score at 6 months was associated with a 28% lower likelihood of continued successful weight loss at 18 months, but unassociated by 24 months. These results suggest that sleep quality and quantity may contribute to weight loss in intervention-based studies designed to promote weight control in overweight/obese adult women.

  17. ‘It’s not about money, it’s about my health’: determinants of participation and adherence among women in an HIV-HSV2 prevention trial in Johannesburg, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacPhail C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Catherine MacPhail,1 Sinead Delany-Moretlwe,1 Philippe Mayaud21Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute, School of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa; 2Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UKAbstract: High levels of adherence in clinical trials are essential for producing accurate intervention efficacy estimates. Adherence to clinical trial products and procedures is dependent on the motivations that drive participants. Data are presented to document reasons for trial participation and adherence to daily aciclovir for HSV-2 and HIV-1 genital shedding suppression among 300 HIV-1/HSV-2 seropositive women in South Africa. In-depth interviews after exit from the trial with 31 randomly selected women stratified by age and time since HIV diagnosis confirmed high levels of adherence measured during the trial. Main reasons for trial participation were related to seeking high-quality health care, which explains high levels of adherence in both study arms. Concerns that women would abuse reimbursements, fabricate data, and share or dump pills were not corroborated. Altruism is not a primary motivator in these settings where access to quality services is an issue. This study provides further evidence that good adherence of daily medication is possible in developing countries, particularly where study activities resonate with participants or fill an unmet need.Keywords: adherence, trial, HIV prevention, South Africa

  18. Effects of cervical spine manual therapy on range of motion, head repositioning, and balance in participants with cervicogenic dizziness: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Susan A; Callister, Robin; Katekar, Michael G; Rivett, Darren A

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the effects of 2 manual therapy interventions on cervical spine range of motion (ROM), head repositioning accuracy, and balance in patients with chronic cervicogenic dizziness. Randomized controlled trial with 12-week follow-up using blinded outcome assessment. University School of Health Sciences. Participants (N=86; mean age ± SD, 62.0 ± 12.7 y; 50% women) with chronic cervicogenic dizziness. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: sustained natural apophyseal glides (SNAGs) with self-SNAG exercises, passive joint mobilization (PJM) with ROM exercises, or a placebo. Participants each received 2 to 6 treatments over 6 weeks. Cervical ROM, head repositioning accuracy, and balance. SNAG therapy resulted in improved (P ≤.05) cervical spine ROM in all 6 physiological cervical spine movement directions immediately posttreatment and at 12 weeks. Treatment with PJM resulted in improvement in 1 of the 6 cervical movement directions posttreatment and 1 movement direction at 12 weeks. There was a greater improvement (Pbalance or head repositioning accuracy. SNAG treatment improved cervical ROM, and the effects were maintained for 12 weeks after treatment. PJM had very limited impact on cervical ROM. There was no conclusive effect of SNAGs or PJMs on joint repositioning accuracy or balance in people with cervicogenic dizziness. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Fornaro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental Retardation (MR is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in adaptive daily life skills and difficulties in social and interpersonal functioning. Since multiple causes may contribute to MR, associated clinical pictures may vary accordingly. Nevertheless, when psychiatric disorders as Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD and/or alcohol abuse co-exist, their proper detection and management is often troublesome, essentially due to a limited vocabulary MR people could use to describe their symptoms, feelings and concerns, and the lack of reliable screening tools. Furthermore, MR people are among the most medicated subjects, with (over prescription of antidepressants and/or typical antipsychotics being the rule rather than exception. Thus, treatment resistance or even worsening of depression, constitute frequent occurrences. This report describes the case of a person with MR who failed to respond to repetitive trials of antidepressant monotherapies, finally recovering using aripiprazole to fluvoxamine augmentation upon consideration of a putative bipolar diathesis for “agitated” TRD. Although further controlled investigations are needed to assess a putative bipolar diathesis in some cases of MR associated to TRD, prudence is advised in the long-term prescription of antidepressant monotherapies in such conditions.

  20. Predictors of participation in parenting workshops for improving adolescent behavioral and mental health: results from the common sense parenting trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Charles B; Mason, W Alex; Haggerty, Kevin P; Thompson, Ronald W; Fernandez, Kate; Casey-Goldstein, Mary; Oats, Robert G

    2015-04-01

    Engaging and retaining participants are crucial to achieving adequate implementation of parenting interventions designed to prevent problem behaviors among children and adolescents. This study examined predictors of engagement and retention in a group-based family intervention across two versions of the program: a standard version requiring only parent attendance for six sessions and an adapted version with two additional sessions that required attendance by the son or daughter. Families included a parent and an eighth grader who attended one of five high-poverty schools in an urban Pacific Northwest school district. The adapted version of the intervention had a higher rate of engagement than the standard version, a difference that was statistically significant after adjusting for other variables assessed at enrollment in the study. Higher household income and parent education, younger student age, and poorer affective quality in the parent-child relationship predicted greater likelihood of initial attendance. In the adapted version of the intervention, parents of boys were more likely to engage with the program than those of girls. The variables considered did not strongly predict retention, although retention was higher among parents of boys. Retention did not significantly differ between conditions. Asking for child attendance at workshops may have increased engagement in the intervention, while findings for other predictors of attendance point to the need for added efforts to recruit families who have less socioeconomic resources, as well as families who perceive they have less need for services.

  1. Motivation for Participating in a Weight Loss Program and Financial Incentives: An Analysis from a Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Crane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis investigated if changes in autonomous or controlled motivation for participation in a weight loss program differed between individuals offered a financial incentive for weight loss compared to individuals not offered an incentive. Additionally, the same relationships were tested among those who lost weight and either received or did not receive an incentive. This analysis used data from a year-long randomized worksite weight loss program that randomly assigned employees in each worksite to either a low-intensity weight loss program or the same program plus small financial incentives for weight loss ($5.00 per percentage of initial weight lost. There were no differences in changes between groups on motivation during the study, however, increases in autonomous motivation were consistently associated with greater weight losses. This suggests that the small incentives used in this program did not lead to increases in controlled motivation nor did they undermine autonomous motivation. Future studies are needed to evaluate the magnitude and timing of incentives to more fully understand the relationship between incentives and motivation.

  2. Effect of repeated intracoronary injection of bone marrow cells in patients with ischaemic heart failure the Danish stem cell study - congestive heart failure trial (DanCell-CHF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, A.C.; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Thayssen, P.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that myocardial regeneration may be achieved by a single intracoronary bone marrow derived stem cell infusion in selected patients with ischaemic heart disease. The effect is uncertain in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure and it is not known whether...... repeated infusions would have additional positive effects. AIMS: To assess whether two treatments of intracoronary infusion of bone marrow stem cells, administered 4 months apart, could improve left ventricular (LV) systolic function in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure. METHODS: The study......, NYHA class improved (pstem cell treatment in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  3. Evaluation of sedative effects of single and repeated doses of 50 mg and 150 mg tolperisone hydrochloride. Results of a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulin, J; Kovács, L; Ramm, S; Horvath, F; Ebeling, L; Kohnen, R

    1998-07-01

    Sedative effects of single and repeated doses of 50 mg and 150 mg tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydocalm), a centrally active muscle-relaxing agent, were evaluated in a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial. A total of 72 healthy young adults balanced by sex were randomized to receive 50 mg or 150 mg tolperisone hydrochloride or placebo t.i.d. for a period of 8 days. Control examinations were performed in the mornings of days 1 and 8 before intake of the morning dose and at 1.5, 4 and 6 hours postdose. The psychomotoric test battery used in this trial revealed no sedative effects of tolperisone hydrochloride in the given doses at any control examination. Subjective mood ratings quantified by the Welzel Colored Scales were not impaired either. The lack of differences in sedative potentials of tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo was confirmed by tests on differences and by tests on equivalence using 95% CI. The present study substantiates clinical experience and previous clinical trials demonstrating that tolperisone hydrochloride, though being a centrally active muscle relaxant, does not cause any sedation and does not impair reaction times.

  4. Sleep outcomes in youth with chronic pain participating in a randomized controlled trial of online cognitive-behavioral therapy for pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fales, Jessica; Palermo, Tonya M; Law, Emily F; Wilson, Anna C

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are commonly reported in youth with chronic pain. We examined whether online cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pain management would impact youth's sleep. Subjective sleep quality and actigraphic sleep were evaluated in 33 youth (M = 14.8 years; 70% female) with chronic pain participating in a larger randomized controlled trial of online-CBT. The Internet treatment condition (n = 17) received 8-10 weeks of online-CBT + standard care, and the wait-list control condition (n = 16) continued with standard care. Although pain improved with online-CBT, no changes were observed in sleep outcomes. Shorter pretreatment sleep duration was associated with less improvement in posttreatment functioning. Findings underscore the need for further development in psychological therapies to more intensively target sleep loss in youth with chronic pain.

  5. A systematic survey of the methods literature on the reporting quality and optimal methods of handling participants with missing outcome data for continuous outcomes in randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Alyass, Akram; Vanniyasingam, Thuva; Sadeghirad, Behnam; Flórez, Iván D; Pichika, Sathish Chandra; Kennedy, Sean Alexander; Abdulkarimova, Ulviya; Zhang, Yuan; Iljon, Tzvia; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Colunga Lozano, Luis E; Aloweni, Fazila Abu Bakar; Lopes, Luciane C; Yepes-Nuñez, Juan José; Fei, Yutong; Wang, Li; Kahale, Lara A; Meyre, David; Akl, Elie A; Thabane, Lehana; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2017-08-01

    To conduct (1) a systematic survey of the reporting quality of simulation studies dealing with how to handle missing participant data (MPD) in randomized control trials and (2) summarize the findings of these studies. We included simulation studies comparing statistical methods dealing with continuous MPD in randomized controlled trials addressing bias, precision, coverage, accuracy, power, type-I error, and overall ranking. For the reporting of simulation studies, we adapted previously developed criteria for reporting quality and applied them to eligible studies. Of 16,446 identified citations, the 60 eligible generally had important limitations in reporting, particularly in reporting simulation procedures. Of the 60 studies, 47 addressed ignorable and 32 addressed nonignorable data. For ignorable missing data, mixed model was most frequently the best on overall ranking (9 times best, 34.6% of times tested) and bias (10, 55.6%). Multiple imputation was also performed well. For nonignorable data, mixed model was most frequently the best on overall ranking (7, 46.7%) and bias (8, 57.1%). Mixed model performance varied on other criteria. Last observation carried forward (LOCF) was very seldom the best performing, and for nonignorable MPD frequently the worst. Simulation studies addressing methods to deal with MPD suffered from serious limitations. The mixed model approach was superior to other methods in terms of overall performance and bias. LOCF performed worst. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of participant focus groups to identify barriers and facilitators to worksite exercise therapy adherence in randomized controlled trials involving firefighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayer JM

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available John M Mayer,1 James L Nuzzo,1 Simon Dagenais2 1School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, 2Palladian Health, West Seneca, NY, USA Background: Firefighters are at increased risk for back injuries, which may be mitigated through exercise therapy to increase trunk muscle endurance. However, long-term adherence to exercise therapy is generally poor, limiting its potential benefits. Focus groups can be used to identify key barriers and facilitators to exercise adherence among study participants. Objective: To explore barriers and facilitators to worksite exercise therapy adherence among firefighters to inform future randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Methods: Participants enrolled in a previous RCT requiring twice-weekly worksite exercise therapy for 24 weeks were asked to take part in moderated focus group discussions centered on eight open-ended questions related to exercise adherence. Responses were analyzed qualitatively using a social ecological framework to identify key intrapersonal, interpersonal, and institutional barriers and potential facilitators to exercise adherence. Results: A total of 27 participants were included in the four focus group discussions, representing 50% of those assigned to a worksite exercise therapy group in the previous RCT, in which only 67% of scheduled exercise therapy sessions were completed. Lack of self-motivation was cited as the key intrapersonal barrier to adherence, while lack of peer support was the key interpersonal barrier reported, and lack of time to exercise during work shifts was the key institutional barrier identified. Conclusion: Focus group discussions identified both key barriers and potential facilitators to increase worksite exercise therapy adherence among firefighters. Future studies should consider educating and reminding participants about the benefits of exercise, providing individual and group incentives based on

  7. Agave Inulin Supplementation Affects the Fecal Microbiota of Healthy Adults Participating in a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holscher, Hannah D; Bauer, Laura L; Gourineni, Vishnupriya; Pelkman, Christine L; Fahey, George C; Swanson, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Prebiotics resist digestion, providing fermentable substrates for select gastrointestinal bacteria associated with health and well-being. Agave inulin differs from other inulin type fibers in chemical structure and botanical origin. Preclinical animal research suggests these differences affect bacterial utilization and physiologic outcomes. Thus, research is needed to determine whether these effects translate to healthy adults. We evaluated agave inulin utilization by the gastrointestinal microbiota by measuring fecal fermentative end products and bacterial taxa. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-period, crossover trial was undertaken in healthy adults (n = 29). Participants consumed 0, 5.0, or 7.5 g agave inulin/d for 21 d with 7-d washouts between periods. Participants recorded daily dietary intake; fecal samples were collected during days 16-20 of each period and were subjected to fermentative end product analysis and 16S Illumina sequencing. Fecal Actinobacteria and Bifidobacterium were enriched (P agave inulin/d, respectively, compared with control. Desulfovibrio were depleted 40% with agave inulin compared with control. Agave inulin tended (P agave inulin (g/kcal) and Bifidobacterium (r = 0.41, P agave inulin/d) per kilocalorie was positively associated with fecal butyrate (r = 0.30, P = 0.005), tended to be positively associated with Bifidobacterium (r = 0.19, P = 0.08), and was negatively correlated with Desulfovibrio abundance (r = -0.31, P = 0.004). Agave inulin supplementation shifted the gastrointestinal microbiota composition and activity in healthy adults. Further investigation is warranted to determine whether the observed changes translate into health benefits in human populations. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01925560. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Speak fast, use jargon, and don't repeat yourself: a randomized trial assessing the effectiveness of online videos to supplement emergency department discharge instructions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare L Atzema

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emergency department discharge instructions are variably understood by patients, and in the setting of emergency department crowding, innovations are needed to counteract shortened interaction times with the physician. We evaluated the effect of viewing an online video of diagnosis-specific discharge instructions on patient comprehension and recall of instructions. METHODS: In this prospective, single-center, randomized controlled trial conducted between November 2011 and January 2012, we randomized emergency department patients who were discharged with one of 38 diagnoses to either view (after they left the emergency department a vetted online video of diagnosis-specific discharge instructions, or to usual care. Patients were subsequently contacted by telephone and asked three standardized questions about their discharge instructions; one point was awarded for each correct answer. Using an intention-to-treat analysis, differences between groups were assessed using univariate testing, and with logistic regression that accounted for clustering on managing physician. A secondary outcome measure was patient satisfaction with the videos, on a 10-point scale. RESULTS: Among 133 patients enrolled, mean age was 46.1 (s.d.D. 21.5 and 55% were female. Patients in the video group had 19% higher mean scores (2.5, s.d. 0.7 than patients in the control group (2.1, s.d. 0.8 (p=0.002. After adjustment for patient age, sex, first language, triage acuity score, and clustering, the odds of achieving a fully correct score (3 out of 3 were 3.5 (95% CI, 1.7 to 7.2 times higher in the video group, compared to the control group. Among those who viewed the videos, median rating of the videos was 10 (IQR 8 to 10. CONCLUSIONS: In this single-center trial, patients who viewed an online video of their discharge instructions scored higher on their understanding of key concepts around their diagnosis and subsequent care. Those who viewed the videos found them to

  9. Effect of Repeated Food Morsel Splitting on Jaw Muscle Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A, Kumar; Svensson, Krister G; Baad-Hansen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Mastication is a complex motor task often initiated by splitting of the food morsel between the anterior teeth. Training of complex motor tasks has consistently been shown to trigger neuroplastic changes in corticomotor control and optimization of muscle function. It is not known if training......) participated in a single one-hour session divided into six series. Each series consisted of ten trials of a standardized behavioral task (total of 60 trials). The behavioral task was to hold and split a food morsel (8 mm, 180 mg placebo tablet) placed on a bite force transducer with the anterior teeth......: There was no evident optimization of jaw motor function in terms of reduction in the variability of bite force values and muscle activity, when this simple task was repeated up to sixty times, in participants with normal intact periodontium....

  10. Sexual scripting of heterosexual penile-anal intercourse amongst participants in an HIV prevention trial in South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duby, Zoe; Hartmann, Miriam; Montgomery, Elizabeth T; Colvin, Christopher J; Mensch, Barbara; van der Straten, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    Sexual risk-taking is influenced by individual, interpersonal and social factors. This paper presents findings from a qualitative follow-up study to a clinical trial evaluating biomedical HIV prevention products among African women, explored participants' perceptions and experiences of heterosexual penile-anal intercourse, as well as the gendered power dynamics and relationship contexts in which this sexual behaviour occurs. In-depth interviews were conducted with 88 women from South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe. Findings reveal that despite its social stigmatisation, women engage in penile-anal intercourse for reasons including male pleasure, relationship security, hiding infidelity, menstruation, vaginal infections, money and beliefs that it will prevent HIV transmission. In addition, participants described experiences of non-consensual penile-anal intercourse. We used sexual scripting theory as an analytical framework with which to describe the sociocultural and relationship contexts and gendered power dynamics in which these practices occur. These data on the distinct individual, dyadic and social contexts of heterosexual penile-anal intercourse, and the specific factors that may contribute to women's HIV risk, make a unique contribution to our understanding of heterosexual behaviour in these sub-Saharan countries, thereby helping to inform both current and future HIV prevention efforts for women in the region.

  11. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a participative community singing programme as a health promotion initiative for older people: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coulton Simon P

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growth in numbers of older people represents a considerable cost to health and social care services in the United Kingdom. There is an acknowledged need to address issues of social exclusion and both the physical and mental health of this age group. In recent years there has been much interest in the potential contribution of the arts to the health of communities and individuals. There is some evidence that participative singing may be of benefit to older people, however studies to date are limited in number and have lacked rigour. There is therefore a need to build on this knowledge base to provide more quantifiable evidence of both effectiveness and cost effectiveness of singing as a health intervention for this population group. Methods The proposed study is a pragmatic randomised controlled trial with two parallel arms. The primary hypothesis is that singing groups for older people improve both physical and mental aspects of quality of life when compared to usual activities. Potential participants will be volunteers over 60 years living in the community and recruited through publicity. Eligible and consenting participants will be randomized to either a singing group or a control group. Singing groups will take part in a twelve week planned programme of singing and control groups will continue with usual activities. The primary outcome measure will be the York SF-12, a health related quality of life measure which will be administered at baseline, three and six months after baseline. The study will evaluate both effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Discussion This study proposes to add to the existing body of evidence on the value of singing for older people by using a rigorous methodological design, which includes a power calculation, a standardised intervention and assessment of cost-effectiveness. It should be regarded as a stage in a progressive programme of studies in this area. If group singing is found to be

  12. Continued Follow-Up of Phambili Phase 2b Randomized HIV-1 Vaccine Trial Participants Supports Increased HIV-1 Acquisition among Vaccinated Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Moodie

    Full Text Available The Phase 2b double-blinded, randomized Phambili/HVTN 503 trial evaluated safety and efficacy of the MRK Ad5 gag/pol/nef subtype B HIV-1 preventive vaccine vs placebo in sexually active HIV-1 seronegative participants in South Africa. Enrollment and vaccinations stopped and participants were unblinded but continued follow-up when the Step study evaluating the same vaccine in the Americas, Caribbean, and Australia was unblinded for non-efficacy. Final Phambili analyses found more HIV-1 infections amongst vaccine than placebo recipients, impelling the HVTN 503-S recall study.HVTN 503-S sought to enroll all 695 HIV-1 uninfected Phambili participants, provide HIV testing, risk reduction counseling, physical examination, risk behavior assessment and treatment assignment recall. After adding HVTN 503-S data, HIV-1 infection hazard ratios (HR vaccine vs. placebo were estimated by Cox models.Of the 695 eligible, 465 (67% enrolled with 230 from the vaccine group and 235 from the placebo group. 38% of the 184 Phambili dropouts were enrolled. Enrollment did not differ by treatment group, gender, or baseline HSV-2. With the additional 1286 person years of 503-S follow-up, the estimated HR over Phambili and HVTN 503-S follow-up was 1.52 (95% CI 1.08-2.15, p = 0.02, 82 vaccine/54 placebo infections. The HR was significant for men (HR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.49, 5.06, p = 0.001 but not for women (HR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.73, 1.72, p = 0.62.The additional follow-up from HVTN 503-S supported the Phambili finding of increased HIV-1 acquisition among vaccinated men and strengthened the evidence of lack of vaccine effect among women.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00413725 SA National Health Research Database DOH-27-0207-1539.

  13. Prospective Preference Assessment of Patients' Willingness to Participate in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Anand [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A.; Paly, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Halpern, Scott D. [Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Center for Bioethics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Christodouleas, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Coen, John J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate patients' willingness to participate (WTP) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with proton beam therapy (PBT) for prostate cancer (PCa). Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study in which we prospectively enrolled patients with clinically localized PCa. We used purposive sampling to ensure a diverse sample based on age, race, travel distance, and physician. Patients participated in a semi-structured interview in which they reviewed a description of a hypothetical RCT, were asked open-ended and focused follow-up questions regarding their motivations for and concerns about enrollment, and completed a questionnaire assessing characteristics such as demographics and prior knowledge of IMRT or PBT. Patients' stated WTP was assessed using a 6-point Likert scale. Results: Forty-six eligible patients (33 white, 13 black) were enrolled from the practices of eight physicians. We identified 21 factors that impacted patients' WTP, which largely centered on five major themes: altruism/desire to compare treatments, randomization, deference to physician opinion, financial incentives, and time demands/scheduling. Most patients (27 of 46, 59%) stated they would either 'definitely' or 'probably' participate. Seventeen percent (8 of 46) stated they would 'definitely not' or 'probably not' enroll, most of whom (6 of 8) preferred PBT before their physician visit. Conclusions: A substantial proportion of patients indicated high WTP in a RCT comparing IMRT and PBT for PCa.

  14. Design and baseline characteristics of participants in the TRial of Economic Incentives to Promote Physical Activity (TRIPPA): a randomized controlled trial of a six month pedometer program with financial incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Eric A; Sahasranaman, Aarti; John, Geraldine; Haaland, Benjamin A; Bilger, Marcel; Sloan, Robert A; Nang, Ei Ei Khaing; Evenson, Kelly R

    2015-03-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are emerging as the predominant global health challenge of this century. Physical inactivity is one of the primary risk factors for NCDs. Therefore, increasing physical activity levels is a public health imperative. The arrival of affordable wearable technologies, such as wireless pedometers, provides one strategy for encouraging walking. However, the effectiveness of these technologies in promoting sustained behavior change has not been established. Insights from economics suggest that incentives may be a useful strategy for increasing maintenance and effectiveness of behavior change interventions, including physical activity interventions that rely on wearable technologies. The aim of this trial is to test the effectiveness of a common wireless pedometer with or without one of two types of incentives (cash or donations to charity) for reaching weekly physical activity goals. We present here the design and baseline characteristics of participants of this four arm randomized controlled trial. 800 full-time employees (desk-bound office workers) belonging to 15 different worksites (on average, 53 (sd: 37) employees at each worksite) were successfully randomized to one of four study arms. If shown to be effective, wearable technologies in concert with financial incentives may provide a scalable and affordable health promotion strategy for governments and employers seeking to increase the physical activity levels of their constituents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Randomized, controlled, assessor-blind clinical trial to assess the efficacy of single- versus repeated-dose albendazole to treat ascaris lumbricoides, trichuris trichiura, and hookworm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegnika, Ayola A; Zinsou, Jeannot F; Issifou, Saadou; Ateba-Ngoa, Ulysse; Kassa, Roland F; Feugap, Eliane N; Honkpehedji, Yabo J; Dejon Agobe, Jean-Claude; Kenguele, Hilaire M; Massinga-Loembe, Marguerite; Agnandji, Selidji T; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Ramharter, Michael; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Kremsner, Peter G; Lell, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    In many regions where soil-transmitted helminth infections are endemic, single-dose albendazole is used in mass drug administration programs to control infections. There are little data on the efficacy of the standard single-dose administration compared to that of alternative regimens. We conducted a randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded clinical trial to determine the efficacies of standard and extended albendazole treatment against soil-transmitted helminth infection in Gabon. A total of 175 children were included. Adequate cure rates and egg reduction rates above 85% were found with a single dose of albendazole for Ascaris infection, 85% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73, 96) and 93.8% (CI, 87.6, 100), respectively, while two doses were necessary for hookworm infestation (92% [CI, 78, 100] and 92% [CI, 78, 100], respectively). However, while a 3-day regimen was not sufficient to cure Trichuris (cure rate, 83% [CI, 73, 93]), this regimen reduced the number of eggs up to 90.6% (CI, 83.1, 100). The rate ratios of two- and three-dose regimens compared to a single-dose treatment were 1.7 (CI, 1.1, 2.5) and 2.1 (CI, 1.5, 2.9) for Trichuris and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) for hookworm. Albendazole was safe and well tolerated in all regimens. A single-dose albendazole treatment considerably reduces Ascaris infection but has only a moderate effect on hookworm and Trichuris infections. The single-dose option may still be the preferred regimen because it balances efficacy, safety, and compliance during mass drug administration, keeping in mind that asymptomatic low-level helminth carriage may also have beneficial effects. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01192802.).

  16. Effect of Repeated Whole Blood Donations on Aerobic Capacity and Hemoglobin Mass in Moderately Trained Male Subjects: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurrens, Julie; Steiner, Thomas; Ponette, Jonathan; Janssen, Hans Antonius; Ramaekers, Monique; Wehrlin, Jon Peter; Vandekerckhove, Philippe; Deldicque, Louise

    2016-12-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the impact of three whole blood donations on endurance capacity and hematological parameters and to determine the duration to fully recover initial endurance capacity and hematological parameters after each donation. Twenty-four moderately trained subjects were randomly divided in a donation (n = 16) and a placebo (n = 8) group. Each of the three donations was interspersed by 3 months, and the recovery of endurance capacity and hematological parameters was monitored up to 1 month after donation. Maximal power output, peak oxygen consumption, and hemoglobin mass decreased (p blood donation with a maximal decrease of 4, 10, and 7%, respectively. Hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, ferritin, and red blood cell count (RBC), all key hematological parameters for oxygen transport, were lowered by a single donation (p donations (p blood donation was 11% for hematocrit, 10% for hemoglobin concentration, 50% for ferritin, and 12% for RBC (p donation group. Maximal, but not submaximal, endurance capacity was altered after blood donation in moderately trained people and the expected increase in capacity after multiple maximal exercise tests was not present when repeating whole blood donations.

  17. Impact of exercise to improve gait efficiency on activity and participation in older adults with mobility limitations: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSwearingen, Jessie M; Perera, Subashan; Brach, Jennifer S; Wert, David; Studenski, Stephanie A

    2011-12-01

    Definitive evidence that exercise interventions that improve gait also reduce disability is lacking. A task-oriented, motor sequence learning exercise intervention has been shown to reduce the energy cost of walking and improve gait speed, but whether the intervention also improves activity and participation has not been demonstrated. The objective of this study was to compare the impact of a task-oriented, motor sequence learning exercise (TO) intervention and the impact of an impairment-oriented, multicomponent exercise (IO) intervention on activity and participation outcomes in older adults with mobility limitations. The mediating effects of a change in the energy cost of walking on changes in activity and participation also were determined. This study was a single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Setting The study was conducted in an ambulatory clinical research training center. The study participants were 47 older adults (mean age=77.2 years, SD=5.5) with slow and variable gait. Intervention The intervention was a 12-week, physical therapist-guided program of TO or IO. Measures of activity (gait speed over an instrumented walkway; daily physical activity measured with an accelerometer; confidence in walking determined with the Gait Efficacy Scale; and physical function determined with the total, basic lower-extremity, and advanced lower-extremity components of the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument [Late-Life FDI]) and participation (disability limitation dimension and instrumental role [home and community task performance] domain components of the Late-Life FDI) were recorded before and after the intervention. The energy cost of walking was determined from the rate of oxygen consumption during self-paced treadmill walking at the physiological steady state standardized by walking speed. An adjusted comparison of activity and participation outcomes in the treatment arms was made by use of an analysis of covariance model, with baseline and change in

  18. Domiciliary VR-Based Therapy for Functional Recovery and Cortical Reorganization: Randomized Controlled Trial in Participants at the Chronic Stage Post Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Belén Rubio; Nirme, Jens; Camacho, Irene; Duarte, Esther; Rodríguez, Susana; Cuxart, Ampar; Duff, Armin; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2017-08-07

    Most stroke survivors continue to experience motor impairments even after hospital discharge. Virtual reality-based techniques have shown potential for rehabilitative training of these motor impairments. Here we assess the impact of at-home VR-based motor training on functional motor recovery, corticospinal excitability and cortical reorganization. The aim of this study was to identify the effects of home-based VR-based motor rehabilitation on (1) cortical reorganization, (2) corticospinal tract, and (3) functional recovery after stroke in comparison to home-based occupational therapy. We conducted a parallel-group, controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of domiciliary VR-based therapy with occupational therapy in inducing motor recovery of the upper extremities. A total of 35 participants with chronic stroke underwent 3 weeks of home-based treatment. A group of subjects was trained using a VR-based system for motor rehabilitation, while the control group followed a conventional therapy. Motor function was evaluated at baseline, after the intervention, and at 12-weeks follow-up. In a subgroup of subjects, we used Navigated Brain Stimulation (NBS) procedures to measure the effect of the interventions on corticospinal excitability and cortical reorganization. Results from the system's recordings and clinical evaluation showed significantly greater functional recovery for the experimental group when compared with the control group (1.53, SD 2.4 in Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory). However, functional improvements did not reach clinical significance. After the therapy, physiological measures obtained from a subgroup of subjects revealed an increased corticospinal excitability for distal muscles driven by the pathological hemisphere, that is, abductor pollicis brevis. We also observed a displacement of the centroid of the cortical map for each tested muscle in the damaged hemisphere, which strongly correlated with improvements in clinical scales. These

  19. Design, and participant enrollment, of a randomized controlled trial evaluating effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a community-based case management intervention, for patients suffering from COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen SS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Storgaard Sørensen,1 Kjeld Møller Pedersen,1 Ulla Møller Weinreich,2,3 Lars Holger Ehlers,1 1Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Faculty of Social Sciences and Faculty of Health Sciences, Aalborg University, Aalborg East, Denmark; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 3The Clinical Institute, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark Background: Case management interventions are recommended to improve quality of care and reduce costs in chronic care, but further evidence on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is needed. The objective of this study is the reporting of the design and participant enrollment of a randomized controlled trial, conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a community-based case management model for patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. With a focus on support for self-care and care coordination, the intervention was hypothesized to result in a reduced number of COPD-related hospital admissions. Patients and methods: The design was a randomized controlled trial conducted from 2012 to 2014 with randomization and intervention at patient level. The study took place in Aalborg Municipality, a larger municipality in Denmark. A total of 150 COPD patients were randomized into two groups: the case-managed group and the usual-care group. Participant characteristics were obtained at baseline, and measures on effectiveness and costs were obtained through questionnaires and registries within a 12-month follow-up period. In the forthcoming analysis, effectiveness will be evaluated on COPD-related hospital admissions, mortality, health- related quality of life, and self-care. An economic evaluation will examine the cost-effectiveness of case management against current usual care from the perspective of the health care sector. Results: Baseline characteristics were comparable between the two groups except for the

  20. Acceptability of the 6-PACK falls prevention program: A pre-implementation study in hospitals participating in a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anna L; Morello, Renata T; Ayton, Darshini R; Hill, Keith D; Brand, Caroline A; Livingston, Patricia M; Botti, Mari

    2017-01-01

    There is limited evidence to support the effectiveness of falls prevention interventions in the acute hospital setting. The 6-PACK falls prevention program includes a fall-risk tool; 'falls alert' signs; supervision of patients in the bathroom; ensuring patients' walking aids are within reach; toileting regimes; low-low beds; and bed/chair alarms. This study explored the acceptability of the 6-PACK program from the perspective of nurses and senior staff prior to its implementation in a randomised controlled trial. A mixed-methods approach was applied involving 24 acute wards from six Australian hospitals. Participants were nurses working on participating wards and senior hospital staff including: Nurse Unit Managers; senior physicians; Directors of Nursing; and senior personnel involved in quality and safety or falls prevention. Information on program acceptability (suitability, practicality and benefits) was obtained by surveys, focus groups and interviews. Survey data were analysed descriptively, and focus group and interview data thematically. The survey response rate was 60%. Twelve focus groups (n = 96 nurses) and 24 interviews with senior staff were conducted. Falls were identified as a priority patient safety issue and nurses as key players in falls prevention. The 6-PACK program was perceived to offer practical benefits compared to current practice. Nurses agreed fall-risk tools, low-low beds and alert signs were useful for preventing falls (>70%). Views were mixed regarding positioning patients' walking aid within reach. Practical issues raised included access to equipment; and risk of staff injury with low-low bed use. Bathroom supervision was seen to be beneficial, however not always practical. Views on the program appropriateness and benefits were consistent across nurses and senior staff. Staff perceived the 6-PACK program as suitable, practical and beneficial, and were open to adopting the program. Some practical concerns were raised highlighting

  1. Barriers and enablers to the implementation of the 6-PACK falls prevention program: A pre-implementation study in hospitals participating in a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayton, Darshini R; Barker, Anna L; Morello, Renata T; Brand, Caroline A; Talevski, Jason; Landgren, Fiona S; Melhem, Mayer M; Bian, Evelyn; Brauer, Sandra G; Hill, Keith D; Livingston, Patricia M; Botti, Mari

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for effective falls prevention interventions in acute wards is limited. One reason for this may be suboptimal program implementation. This study aimed to identify perceived barriers and enablers of the implementation of the 6-PACK falls prevention program to inform the implementation in a randomised controlled trial. Strategies to optimise successful implementation of 6-PACK were also sought. A mixed-methods approach was applied in 24 acute wards from 6 Australian hospitals. Participants were nurses working on participating wards and senior hospital staff including Nurse Unit Managers; senior physicians; Directors of Nursing; and senior personnel involved in quality and safety or falls prevention. Information on barriers and enablers of 6-PACK implementation was obtained through surveys, focus groups and interviews. Questions reflected the COM-B framework that includes three behaviour change constructs of: capability, opportunity and motivation. Focus group and interview data were analysed thematically, and survey data descriptively. The survey response rate was 60% (420/702), and 12 focus groups (n = 96 nurses) and 24 interviews with senior staff were conducted. Capability barriers included beliefs that falls could not be prevented; and limited knowledge on falls prevention in patients with complex care needs (e.g. cognitive impairment). Capability enablers included education and training, particularly face to face case study based approaches. Lack of resources was identified as an opportunity barrier. Leadership, champions and using data to drive practice change were recognised as opportunity enablers. Motivation barriers included complacency and lack of ownership in falls prevention efforts. Motivation enablers included senior staff articulating clear goals and a commitment to falls prevention; and use of reminders, audits and feedback. The information gained from this study suggests that regular practical face-to-face education and training for nurses

  2. Acceptability of the 6-PACK falls prevention program: A pre-implementation study in hospitals participating in a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Keith D.; Brand, Caroline A.; Livingston, Patricia M.; Botti, Mari

    2017-01-01

    There is limited evidence to support the effectiveness of falls prevention interventions in the acute hospital setting. The 6-PACK falls prevention program includes a fall-risk tool; ‘falls alert’ signs; supervision of patients in the bathroom; ensuring patients’ walking aids are within reach; toileting regimes; low-low beds; and bed/chair alarms. This study explored the acceptability of the 6-PACK program from the perspective of nurses and senior staff prior to its implementation in a randomised controlled trial. A mixed-methods approach was applied involving 24 acute wards from six Australian hospitals. Participants were nurses working on participating wards and senior hospital staff including: Nurse Unit Managers; senior physicians; Directors of Nursing; and senior personnel involved in quality and safety or falls prevention. Information on program acceptability (suitability, practicality and benefits) was obtained by surveys, focus groups and interviews. Survey data were analysed descriptively, and focus group and interview data thematically. The survey response rate was 60%. Twelve focus groups (n = 96 nurses) and 24 interviews with senior staff were conducted. Falls were identified as a priority patient safety issue and nurses as key players in falls prevention. The 6-PACK program was perceived to offer practical benefits compared to current practice. Nurses agreed fall-risk tools, low-low beds and alert signs were useful for preventing falls (>70%). Views were mixed regarding positioning patients’ walking aid within reach. Practical issues raised included access to equipment; and risk of staff injury with low-low bed use. Bathroom supervision was seen to be beneficial, however not always practical. Views on the program appropriateness and benefits were consistent across nurses and senior staff. Staff perceived the 6-PACK program as suitable, practical and beneficial, and were open to adopting the program. Some practical concerns were raised

  3. Barriers and enablers to the implementation of the 6-PACK falls prevention program: A pre-implementation study in hospitals participating in a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline A.; Landgren, Fiona S.; Melhem, Mayer M.; Bian, Evelyn; Brauer, Sandra G.; Hill, Keith D.; Livingston, Patricia M.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for effective falls prevention interventions in acute wards is limited. One reason for this may be suboptimal program implementation. This study aimed to identify perceived barriers and enablers of the implementation of the 6-PACK falls prevention program to inform the implementation in a randomised controlled trial. Strategies to optimise successful implementation of 6-PACK were also sought. A mixed-methods approach was applied in 24 acute wards from 6 Australian hospitals. Participants were nurses working on participating wards and senior hospital staff including Nurse Unit Managers; senior physicians; Directors of Nursing; and senior personnel involved in quality and safety or falls prevention. Information on barriers and enablers of 6-PACK implementation was obtained through surveys, focus groups and interviews. Questions reflected the COM-B framework that includes three behaviour change constructs of: capability, opportunity and motivation. Focus group and interview data were analysed thematically, and survey data descriptively. The survey response rate was 60% (420/702), and 12 focus groups (n = 96 nurses) and 24 interviews with senior staff were conducted. Capability barriers included beliefs that falls could not be prevented; and limited knowledge on falls prevention in patients with complex care needs (e.g. cognitive impairment). Capability enablers included education and training, particularly face to face case study based approaches. Lack of resources was identified as an opportunity barrier. Leadership, champions and using data to drive practice change were recognised as opportunity enablers. Motivation barriers included complacency and lack of ownership in falls prevention efforts. Motivation enablers included senior staff articulating clear goals and a commitment to falls prevention; and use of reminders, audits and feedback. The information gained from this study suggests that regular practical face-to-face education and training for nurses

  4. Sexual scripting of heterosexual penile-anal intercourse amongst participants in an HIV prevention trial in South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duby, Zoe; Hartmann, Miriam; Montgomery, Elizabeth T.; Colvin, Christopher J.; Mensch, Barbara; van der Straten, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    Sexual risk-taking is influenced by individual, interpersonal and social factors. This paper presents findings from a qualitative followup study to a clinical trial evaluating biomedical HIV prevention products among African women, explored participants’ perceptions and experiences of heterosexual penile-anal intercourse, as well as the gendered power dynamics and relationship contexts in which this sexual behaviour occurs. In-depth interviews were conducted with 88 women from South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe. Findings reveal that despite its social stigmatisation, women engage in penile-anal intercourse for reasons including male pleasure, relationship security, hiding infidelity, menstruation, vaginal infections, money and beliefs that it will prevent HIV transmission. In addition, participants described experiences of non-consensual penile-anal intercourse. We used sexual scripting theory as an analytical framework with which to describe the sociocultural and relationship contexts and gendered power dynamics in which these practices occur. These data on the distinct individual, dyadic and social contexts of heterosexual penile-anal intercourse, and the specific factors that may contribute to women’s HIV risk, make a unique contribution to our understanding of heterosexual behaviour in these sub-Saharan countries, thereby helping to inform both current and future HIV prevention efforts for women in the region. PMID:26223703

  5. Investigators' viewpoint of clinical trials in India: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallath, Mohandas K; Chawla, Tanuj

    2017-01-01

    India's success in producing food and milk for its population (Green Revolution and White Revolution) happened because of scientific research and field trials. Likewise improving the health of Indians needs clinical research and clinical trials. A Large proportion of the sick Indians are poor, illiterate with no access to good health care. They are highly vulnerable to inducement and exploitation in clinical trials. The past two decades saw the rise and fall of clinical trials in India. The rise happened when our regulators created a favorable environment, and Indian investigators were invited to participate in global clinical trials. The gap between the demand and supply resulted in inadequate protection of the trial participants. Reports of abuses of the vulnerable trial participants followed by public interest litigations led to strengthening of regulations by the regulators. The stringent new regulations made the conduct of clinical trials more laborious and increased the cost of clinical trials in India. There was a loss of interest in sponsored clinical trials resulting in the fall in global clinical trials in India. Following repeated appeals by the investigators, the Indian regulators have recently relaxed some of the stringent regulations, while continuing to ensure the adequate patient protection. Clinical trials that are relevant to our population and conducted by well-trained investigators and monitored by trained and registered Ethics Committees will increase in the future. We must remain vigilant, avoid previous mistakes, and strive hard to protect the trial participants in the future trials.

  6. Investigators' viewpoint of clinical trials in India: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallath, Mohandas K.; Chawla, Tanuj

    2017-01-01

    India's success in producing food and milk for its population (Green Revolution and White Revolution) happened because of scientific research and field trials. Likewise improving the health of Indians needs clinical research and clinical trials. A Large proportion of the sick Indians are poor, illiterate with no access to good health care. They are highly vulnerable to inducement and exploitation in clinical trials. The past two decades saw the rise and fall of clinical trials in India. The rise happened when our regulators created a favorable environment, and Indian investigators were invited to participate in global clinical trials. The gap between the demand and supply resulted in inadequate protection of the trial participants. Reports of abuses of the vulnerable trial participants followed by public interest litigations led to strengthening of regulations by the regulators. The stringent new regulations made the conduct of clinical trials more laborious and increased the cost of clinical trials in India. There was a loss of interest in sponsored clinical trials resulting in the fall in global clinical trials in India. Following repeated appeals by the investigators, the Indian regulators have recently relaxed some of the stringent regulations, while continuing to ensure the adequate patient protection. Clinical trials that are relevant to our population and conducted by well-trained investigators and monitored by trained and registered Ethics Committees will increase in the future. We must remain vigilant, avoid previous mistakes, and strive hard to protect the trial participants in the future trials.

  7. Investigators' viewpoint of clinical trials in India: Past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohandas K Mallath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available India's success in producing food and milk for its population (Green Revolution and White Revolution happened because of scientific research and field trials. Likewise improving the health of Indians needs clinical research and clinical trials. A Large proportion of the sick Indians are poor, illiterate with no access to good health care. They are highly vulnerable to inducement and exploitation in clinical trials. The past two decades saw the rise and fall of clinical trials in India. The rise happened when our regulators created a favorable environment, and Indian investigators were invited to participate in global clinical trials. The gap between the demand and supply resulted in inadequate protection of the trial participants. Reports of abuses of the vulnerable trial participants followed by public interest litigations led to strengthening of regulations by the regulators. The stringent new regulations made the conduct of clinical trials more laborious and increased the cost of clinical trials in India. There was a loss of interest in sponsored clinical trials resulting in the fall in global clinical trials in India. Following repeated appeals by the investigators, the Indian regulators have recently relaxed some of the stringent regulations, while continuing to ensure the adequate patient protection. Clinical trials that are relevant to our population and conducted by well-trained investigators and monitored by trained and registered Ethics Committees will increase in the future. We must remain vigilant, avoid previous mistakes, and strive hard to protect the trial participants in the future trials.

  8. Protocol for a randomized controlled trial testing the impact of feedback on familial risk of chronic diseases on family-level intentions to participate in preventive lifestyle behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Carlene J; de la Haye, Kayla; Coveney, John; Hughes, Donna L; Hutchinson, Amanda; Miller, Caroline; Prichard, Ivanka; Ward, Paul; Koehly, Laura M

    2016-09-13

    Common disease risk clusters in families due to shared genetics, exposure to environmental risk factors, and because many health behaviours are established and maintained in family environments. This randomised controlled trial will test whether the provision of a family health history (FHH) risk assessment tool increases intentions and engagement in health behaviors. Message distribution and collective behavior change within family networks will be mapped using social network analysis. The relative intervention impact will be compared between families from different ethnic backgrounds. One hundred and fifty mothers (50 Anglo-Australian, 50 Italian-Australian, 50 Vietnamese-Australian) will be recruited, with four or more other family members across three generations, including a child (aged 10-18 years). Each family is randomly assigned to intervention or control. At baseline and 6-month follow-up, all participants complete surveys to assess dietary and physical activity intentions and behaviors, attitudes towards food, and perceived disease risk. Intervention families receive a visual pedigree detailing their FHH of diabetes, heart disease, breast and bowel cancer, a health education workbook to ascertain members' disease risk (i.e. average or above average risk), and screening and primary prevention recommendations. After completion of follow-up assessments, controls will receive their pedigree and workbook. The primary hypothesis is that attitudes and lifestyle behaviors will improve more within families exposed to FHH feedback, although the extent of this improvement may vary between families from different ethnic backgrounds. Additionally, the extent of improvement in the treatment group will be moderated by the level of family disease risk, with above-average risk leading to greater improvement. A secondary aim will explore different family members' roles in message distribution and collective responses to risk using social network approaches and to compare

  9. Repeated treatment of recurrent uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Senegal with fixed-dose artesunate plus amodiaquine versus fixed-dose artemether plus lumefantrine: a randomized, open-label trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Aichatou

    2011-08-01

    treatment with no clinical consequence. Conclusions Study results confirmed the satisfactory efficacy and safety profile of ASAQ and AL. Moreover, in patients who were treated at least twice, repeated administration of ASAQ or AL did not identify any major safety issues. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00540410.

  10. Breastfeeding patterns and its determinants among mothers living with Human Immuno-deficiency Virus -1 in four African countries participating in the ANRS 12174 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somé, Eric N; Engebretsen, Ingunn M S; Nagot, Nicolas; Meda, Nicolas; Lombard, Carl; Vallo, Roselyne; Peries, Marianne; Kankasa, Chipepo; Tumwine, James K; Hofmeyr, G Justus; Singata, Mandisa; Harper, Kim; Van De Perre, Philippe; Tylleskar, Thorkild

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 transmission rates have been reduced over the last decade, an estimated 2 million new infections per year arise, including 220,000 paediatric cases. The main post-natal HIV exposure is through breastfeeding, where both its duration and modality (exclusive or not) are associated with postnatal transmission. The ANRS 12174 trial compared HIV-1 postnatal transmission of 2 prophylaxis drugs for infants during lactation (lamivudine and lopinavir-ritonavir). Our objective has been to examine the feeding practices and the determinants of exclusive/ predominant (EPBF) or any breastfeeding among the participants of this trial in Burkina Faso, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia. Mothers infected with HIV-1 and their uninfected offspring were followed from day 7 after birth for 50 weeks, keeping monthly records of their feeding patterns. Feeding was classified into 3 categories: 1) exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months, only breast-milk being given to infant for 6 months, 2) predominant breastfeeding, breast-milk with liquid-based items being given, and 3) mixed feeding, other non-breast milk or solid food being given in addition to breast milk with or without liquid-based items. The categories were merged into 2 groups: EPBF applying to infants aged feeding applying to infants of any age. The feeding patterns have been given as Kaplan-Meier curves. A flexible parametric multiple regression model was used to identify the determinants of the mothers' feeding behaviour. A total of 1,225 mother-infant pairs provided feeding data from Burkina Faso (N = 204), South Africa (N = 213), Uganda (N = 274) and Zambia (N = 534) between November 2009 and March 2013. The mean maternal age was 27.4 years and the mean BMI was 24.5. 57.7 and 93.9% of mothers initiated breastfeeding within the first hour and first day, respectively. Overall, the median durations of any form of breastfeeding and EPBF were 40.6, and 20.9 weeks, respectively. Babies randomized

  11. Association of obesity with DNA mismatch repair status and clinical outcome in patients with stage II or III colon carcinoma participating in NCCTG and NSABP adjuvant chemotherapy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinicrope, Frank A; Foster, Nathan R; Yoon, Harry H; Smyrk, Thomas C; Kim, George P; Allegra, Carmen J; Yothers, Greg; Nikcevich, Daniel A; Sargent, Daniel J

    2012-02-01

    Although the importance of obesity in colon cancer risk and outcome is recognized, the association of body mass index (BMI) with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) status is unknown. BMI (kg/m(2)) was determined in patients with TNM stage II or III colon carcinomas (n = 2,693) who participated in randomized trials of adjuvant chemotherapy. The association of BMI with MMR status and survival was analyzed by logistic regression and Cox models, respectively. Overall, 427 (16%) tumors showed deficient MMR (dMMR), and 630 patients (23%) were obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Obesity was significantly associated with younger age (P = .021), distal tumor site (P = .012), and a lower rate of dMMR tumors (10% v 17%; P Obesity remained associated with lower rates of dMMR (odds ratio, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.79; P obese patients, rates of dMMR were lower in men compared with women (8% v 13%; P = .041). Obesity was associated with higher recurrence rates (P = .0034) and independently predicted worse disease-free survival (DFS; hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.64; P = .0010) and overall survival (OS), whereas dMMR predicted better DFS (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.74; P obese patients. Colon cancers from obese patients are less likely to show dMMR, suggesting obesity-related differences in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. Although obesity was independently associated with adverse outcome, the favorable prognostic impact of dMMR was maintained among obese patients.

  12. Performance of a Redesigned HIV Selectest Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Optimized To Minimize Vaccine-Induced Seropositivity in HIV Vaccine Trial Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penezina, Oksana; Krueger, Neil X.; Rodriguez-Chavez, Isaac R.; Busch, Michael P.; Hural, John; Kim, Jerome H.; O'Connell, Robert J.; Hunter, Eric; Aboud, Said; Higgins, Keith; Kovalenko, Victor; Clapham, David; Crane, David

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine-induced seropositivity (VISP) or seroreactivity (VISR), defined as the reaction of antibodies elicited by HIV vaccines with antigens used in HIV diagnostic immunoassays, can result in reactive assay results for vaccinated but uninfected individuals, with subsequent misclassification of their infection status. The eventual licensure of a vaccine will magnify this issue and calls for the development of mitigating solutions in advance. An immunoassay that discriminates between antibodies elicited by vaccine antigens and those elicited by infection has been developed to address this laboratory testing need. The HIV Selectest is based on consensus and clade-specific HIV peptides that are omitted in many HIV vaccine constructs. The assay was redesigned to enhance performance across worldwide clades and to simplify routine use via a standard kit format. The redesigned assay was evaluated with sera from vaccine trial participants, HIV-infected and uninfected individuals, and healthy controls. The HIV Selectest exhibited specificities of 99.5% with sera from uninfected recipients of 6 different HIV vaccines and 100% with sera from normal donors, while detecting HIV-1 infections, including intercurrent infections, with 95 to 100% sensitivity depending on the clade, with the highest sensitivities for clades A and C. HIV Selectest sensitivity decreased in very early seroconversion specimens, which possibly explains the slightly lower sensitivity observed for asymptomatic blood donors than for clinical HIV cases. Thus, the HIV Selectest provides a new laboratory tool for use in vaccine settings to distinguish the immune response to HIV vaccine antigens from that due to true infection. PMID:24403525

  13. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  14. The Patient Deficit Model Overturned: a qualitative study of patients' perceptions of invitation to participate in a randomized controlled trial comparing selective bladder preservation against surgery in muscle invasive bladder cancer (SPARE, CRUK/07/011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moynihan Clare

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that poor recruitment into clinical trials rests on a patient ‘deficit’ model – an inability to comprehend trial processes. Poor communication has also been cited as a possible barrier to recruitment. A qualitative patient interview study was included within the feasibility stage of a phase III non-inferiority Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT (SPARE, CRUK/07/011 in muscle invasive bladder cancer. The aim was to illuminate problems in the context of randomization. Methods The qualitative study used a ‘Framework Analysis’ that included ‘constant comparison’ in which semi-structured interviews are transcribed, analyzed, compared and contrasted both between and within transcripts. Three researchers coded and interpreted data. Results Twenty-four patients agreed to enter the interview study; 10 decliners of randomization and 14 accepters, of whom 2 subsequently declined their allocated treatment. The main theme applying to the majority of the sample was confusion and ambiguity. There was little indication that confusion directly impacted on decisions to enter the SPARE trial. However, confusion did appear to impact on ethical considerations surrounding ‘informed consent’, as well as cause a sense of alienation between patients and health personnel. Sub-optimal communication in many guises accounted for the confusion, together with the logistical elements of a trial that involved treatment options delivered in a number of geographical locations. Conclusions These data highlight the difficulty of providing balanced and clear trial information within the UK health system, despite best intentions. Involvement of multiple professionals can impact on communication processes with patients who are considering participation in RCTs. Our results led us to question the ‘deficit’ model of patient behavior. It is suggested that health professionals might consider facilitating a context in which patients

  15. Baseline and follow-up characteristics of participants and nonparticipants in a randomized clinical trial of multifactorial fall prevention in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Ane B; Andersen, Hanne E; Pedersen, Kirsten D;

    2009-01-01

    outpatient department. PARTICIPANTS: One thousand one hundred five community-dwelling adults aged 65 and older who had sustained at least one injurious fall. MEASUREMENTS: Marital status, housing tenure, income, comorbidity, hospitalization, fractures, and drug use before invitation to participate...

  16. Assessing sex-differences and the effect of timing of vaccination on immunogenicity, reactogenicity and efficacy of vaccines in young children: study protocol for an individual participant data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voysey, Merryn; Pollard, Andrew J; Perera, Rafael; Fanshawe, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Disease incidence differs between males and females for some infectious or inflammatory diseases. Sex-differences in immune responses to some vaccines have also been observed, mostly to viral vaccines in adults. Little evidence is available on whether sex-differences occur in response to immunisation in infancy even though this is the age group in which most vaccines are administered. Factors other than sex, such as timing or coadministration of other vaccines, can also influence the immune response to vaccination. Methods and analysis Individual participant data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of vaccines in healthy infants and young children will be conducted. Fully anonymised data from ∼170 randomised controlled trials of vaccines for diphtheria, tetanus, Bordetella pertussis, polio, Haemophilus influenzae type B, hepatitis B, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella and rotavirus will be combined for analysis. Outcomes include measures of immunogenicity (immunoglobulins), reactogenicity, safety and disease-specific clinical efficacy. Data from trials of vaccines containing similar components will be combined in hierarchical models and the effect of sex and timing of vaccinations estimated for each outcome separately. Ethics and dissemination Systematic reviews of published estimates of sex-differences cannot adequately answer questions in this field since such comparisons are never the main purpose of a clinical trial, thus a large degree of reporting bias exists in the published literature. Recent improvements in the widespread availability of individual participant data from randomised controlled trials makes it feasible to conduct extensive individual participant data meta-analyses which were previously impossible, thereby reducing the effect of publication or reporting bias on the understanding of the infant immune response. Preliminary results will be available in 2016 with final

  17. The Patient Deficit Model Overturned: a qualitative study of patients' perceptions of invitation to participate in a randomized controlled trial comparing selective bladder preservation against surgery in muscle invasive bladder cancer (SPARE, CRUK/07/011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Clare; Lewis, Rebecca; Hall, Emma; Jones, Emma; Birtle, Alison; Huddart, Robert

    2012-11-29

    Evidence suggests that poor recruitment into clinical trials rests on a patient 'deficit' model - an inability to comprehend trial processes. Poor communication has also been cited as a possible barrier to recruitment. A qualitative patient interview study was included within the feasibility stage of a phase III non-inferiority Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) (SPARE, CRUK/07/011) in muscle invasive bladder cancer. The aim was to illuminate problems in the context of randomization. The qualitative study used a 'Framework Analysis' that included 'constant comparison' in which semi-structured interviews are transcribed, analyzed, compared and contrasted both between and within transcripts. Three researchers coded and interpreted data. Twenty-four patients agreed to enter the interview study; 10 decliners of randomization and 14 accepters, of whom 2 subsequently declined their allocated treatment.The main theme applying to the majority of the sample was confusion and ambiguity. There was little indication that confusion directly impacted on decisions to enter the SPARE trial. However, confusion did appear to impact on ethical considerations surrounding 'informed consent', as well as cause a sense of alienation between patients and health personnel.Sub-optimal communication in many guises accounted for the confusion, together with the logistical elements of a trial that involved treatment options delivered in a number of geographical locations. These data highlight the difficulty of providing balanced and clear trial information within the UK health system, despite best intentions. Involvement of multiple professionals can impact on communication processes with patients who are considering participation in RCTs. Our results led us to question the 'deficit' model of patient behavior. It is suggested that health professionals might consider facilitating a context in which patients feel fully included in the trial enterprise and potentially consider alternatives to

  18. Patient information in phase I trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Katrine Toubro; Lassen, Ulrik; Mau-Sørensen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    influenced by the drug being tested, information procedures, physician-related factors and the patient's individual approach to decision-making. Patients have difficulties correctly repeating the purpose of a phase I trial. In several studies, the majority of the patients expressed expectations of personal......OBJECTIVE: To review what is known about cancer patients' decisions to enter a phase I trial and how they and their relatives perceive the information they receive when they are invited to participate. METHODS: This systematic review is based on the principles of "preferred reporting items...... for systematic reviews and meta-analyses" (PRISMA). A systematic search was performed in the PubMed, Embase and PsycInfo databases, supplemented by a search for unpublished literature. RESULTS: We identified 37 studies for inclusion in this review. Patients' decisions to participate in a phase I trial were...

  19. Feasibility Study of a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Telephone-Delivered Problem Solving-Occupational Therapy Intervention to Reduce Participation Restrictions in Rural Breast Cancer Survivors Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Mark T.; Lyons, Kathleen D.; Hull, Jay G.; Kaufman, Peter; Urquhart, Laura; Li, Zhongze; Ahles, Tim A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy often experience functional effects of treatment that limit participation in life activities. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a novel intervention for these restrictions, determine acceptability of the intervention, and preliminarily assess its effects. Methods A pilot RCT of a telephone-delivered Problem Solving and Occupational Therapy intervention (PST-OT) to improve participation restrictions in rural breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Thirty-one participants with Stages 1-3 breast cancer were randomized to 6 weekly sessions of PST-OT (n=15) and Usual Care (n=16). The primary study outcome was the feasibility of conducting the trial. Secondary outcomes were functional, quality of life and emotional status as assessed at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Results Of 46 patients referred 31 were enrolled (67% recruitment rate), of which 6 participants withdrew (81% retention rate). Twenty-four participants completed all study-related assessments (77%). Ninety-two percent of PST-OT participants were highly satisfied with the intervention, and 92% reported PST-OT to be helpful/very helpful for overcoming participation restrictions. Ninety-seven percent of planned PST-OT treatment sessions were completed. Completion rates for PST-OT homework tasks were high. Measures of functioning, quality of life and emotional state favored the PST-OT condition. Conclusion This pilot study suggests that an RCT of the PST-OT intervention is feasible to conduct with rural breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy and that PST-OT may have positive effects on function, quality of life, and emotional state. PMID:20821373

  20. Feasibility study of a randomized controlled trial of a telephone-delivered problem-solving-occupational therapy intervention to reduce participation restrictions in rural breast cancer survivors undergoing chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Mark T; Lyons, Kathleen D; Hull, Jay G; Kaufman, Peter; Urquhart, Laura; Li, Zhongze; Ahles, Tim A

    2011-10-01

    Breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy often experience functional effects of treatment that limit participation in life activities. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a novel intervention for these restrictions, determine acceptability of the intervention, and preliminarily assess its effects. A pilot RCT of a telephone-delivered Problem-solving and Occupational Therapy intervention (PST-OT) to improve participation restrictions in rural breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Thirty-one participants with Stages 1-3 breast cancer were randomized to 6 weekly sessions of PST-OT (n = 15) and usual care (n = 16). The primary study outcome was the feasibility of conducting the trial. Secondary outcomes were functional, quality of life and emotional status as assessed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Of 46 patients referred 31 were enrolled (67% recruitment rate), of which 6 participants withdrew (81% retention rate). Twenty-four participants completed all study-related assessments (77%). Ninety-two percent of PST-OT participants were highly satisfied with the intervention, and 92% reported PST-OT to be helpful/very helpful for overcoming participation restrictions. Ninety-seven percent of planned PST-OT treatment sessions were completed. Completion rates for PST-OT homework tasks were high. Measures of functioning, quality of life, and emotional state favored the PST-OT condition. This pilot study suggests that an RCT of the PST-OT intervention is feasible to conduct with rural breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy and that PST-OT may have positive effects on function, quality of life, and emotional state. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Demographic and HIV-specific characteristics of participants enrolled in the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, S; Babiker, A G; Emery, S;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The risks and benefits of initiating antiretroviral treatment (ART) at high CD4 cell counts have not been reliably quantified. The Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study is a randomized international clinical trial that compares immediate with deferred initiation...

  2. Evaluation of subcutaneous proleukin (interleukin-2) in a randomized international trial (ESPRIT): Geographical and gender differences in the baseline characteristics of participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Pett; H. Wand; M.G. Law; R. Arduino; J.C. Lopez; B. Knysz; L.C. Pereira; S. Pollack; P. Reiss; G. Tambussi

    2006-01-01

    Background: ESPRIT, is a phase III, open-label, randomized, international clinical trial evaluating the effects of subcutaneous recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) plus antiretroviral therapy (ART) versus ART alone on HIV-disease progression and death in HIV-1-infected individuals with CD4+ T-cells >=

  3. Alterations in left ventricular, left atrial, and right ventricular structure and function to cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents with type 2 diabetes participating in the TODAY clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are limited. Echocardiography was performed in the last year of the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) clinical trial (median 4.5 yr from diagnosis of T2D, average age 18 yr), incl...

  4. Academician A.N. Sokolovsky and other prosecutors and judges who participated in the ULU (SVU trial (based on the materials of the State Political Department of the People’s Commissariat of Internal Affairs and the court records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Moskalov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ULU (Union of Liberation of Ukraine or Soiuz Osvobozhdeniia Ukrainy trial has been studied in the article. This trial was held in 1930 in Ukraine and initiated the mass repressions of Ukrainian intellectuals by the Stalin regime. Forty five (45 persons, in particular academicians, professors and employees of popular schooling, doctors and writers were brought to trial. A well-known scientist, academician S.A. Yefremov, the literature historian and the writer of political essays, who headed this organization, was put on trial. Defendants, the members of ULU were accused of clandestine, anti-Soviet, and nationalist activities. This trial was highlighted by mass-media. The historians studied the case fabrication, the inquest, the legal procedure, and who were the main defendants. Quite different objective has been set by the authors of this research paper; their task was to narrate a story of the adverse party of ULU trial, in particular the people that constituted the court, prosecuting officials and public prosecutors at the trial and their fate. Academician A.N. Sokolovsky was the main figure of the public prosecution, who represented the scientific circles of Ukraine. The reasons for nomination of academician A.N. Sokolovsky as the public prosecutor and also his personal motivations have been analyzed in the scientific paper. Also information about other principal participants of the trial and prosecution has been given, in particular the president of the court A.T. Prykhodko, associate justice Prof. I.P. Sokoliansky, Prof. G.I. Volkov, public prosecutors O.A. Slisarenko, P.P. Liubchenko, the prosecutors M.V. Mikhailike and L.S. Akhmatov. The course of trial and the participation of A.N. Sokolovsky in it, the questions put to the defendants, and his personal attitude to the ULU case have been described in the article. The research done allowed us to come to the conclusion that the importance of ULU trial went beyond the struggle with old

  5. Introducing a Third Timed Up & Go Test Trial Improves Performances of Hospitalized and Community-Dwelling Older Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Mette L; Jønsson, Line R; Kristensen, Morten T

    Originally, the Timed Up & Go (TUG) test was described as including a practice trial before a timed trial, but recent studies in individuals with hip fracture have reported that performance improved with a third trial and that high intertester reliability was achieved when the fastest of 3 timed trials was used. Thus, the fastest of 3 TUG trials is recommended when testing individuals with hip fracture. To our knowledge, no study has examined the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability on the TUG test (defined as no further improvement on subsequent trials) when performed by older individuals without hip fracture. The aim of the study, therefore, was to examine whether a third TUG trial is faster than either of 2 TUG trials conducted according to standardized TUG instructions and whether the fastest of 3 trials is the most appropriate measure to apply in hospitalized and community-dwelling older individuals. Eighty-two participants (50 from a geriatric hospital unit and 32 from an outpatient geriatric center; 52 women, 30 men) with a mean (SD) age of 83.6 (7.9) years were included in this cross-sectional study. All participants (except one from the hospital unit) performed 3 TUG trials, as fast as safely possible on the same day, and separated by up to 1-minute pauses. A rollator (4-wheeled rolling walker) was used as a standardized walking aid in the geriatric hospital unit, whereas participants used their normal walking aid (if any) in the outpatient geriatric center. The fastest trial was trial 3 for 47 (57%), trial 2 for 25 (31%), and trial 1 for 10 (12%). Repeated-measures analyses of variance with Bonferroni corrections showed that TUG times improved from trial 1 to trial 3 (P timed trials was significantly (P < .001) faster than the other 2 trials. We suggest that the fastest of the 3 TUG trials is recorded instead of the second trial in both hospitalized and community-dwelling older individuals.

  6. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  7. PREVIEW: Prevention of Diabetes through Lifestyle Intervention and Population Studies in Europe and around the World. Design, Methods, and Baseline Participant Description of an Adult Cohort Enrolled into a Three-Year Randomised Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Fogelholm

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Type-2 diabetes (T2D is one of the fastest growing chronic diseases worldwide. The PREVIEW project has been initiated to find the most effective lifestyle (diet and physical activity for the prevention of T2D, in overweight and obese participants with increased risk for T2D. The study is a three-year multi-centre, 2 × 2 factorial, randomised controlled trial. The impact of a high-protein, low-glycaemic index (GI vs. moderate protein, moderate-GI diet in combination with moderate or high-intensity physical activity on the incidence of T2D and the related clinical end-points are investigated. The intervention started with a two-month weight reduction using a low-calorie diet, followed by a randomised 34-month weight maintenance phase comprising four treatment arms. Eight intervention centres are participating (Denmark, Finland, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Spain, Bulgaria, Australia, and New Zealand. Data from blood specimens, urine, faeces, questionnaires, diaries, body composition assessments, and accelerometers are collected at months 0, 2, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36. In total, 2326 adults were recruited. The mean age was 51.6 (SD 11.6 years, 67% were women. PREVIEW is, to date, the largest multinational trial to address the prevention of T2D in pre-diabetic adults through diet and exercise intervention. Participants will complete the final intervention in March, 2018.

  8. HIV-1 specific IgA detected in vaginal secretions of HIV uninfected women participating in a microbicide trial in Southern Africa are primarily directed toward gp120 and gp140 specificities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E Seaton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many participants in microbicide trials remain uninfected despite ongoing exposure to HIV-1. Determining the emergence and nature of mucosal HIV-specific immune responses in such women is important, since these responses may contribute to protection and could provide insight for the rational design of HIV-1 vaccines. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We first conducted a pilot study to compare three sampling devices (Dacron swabs, flocked nylon swabs and Merocel sponges for detection of HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA antibodies in vaginal secretions. IgG antibodies from HIV-1-positive women reacted broadly across the full panel of eight HIV-1 envelope (Env antigens tested, whereas IgA antibodies only reacted to the gp41 subunit. No Env-reactive antibodies were detected in the HIV-negative women. The three sampling devices yielded equal HIV-1-specific antibody titers, as well as total IgG and IgA concentrations. We then tested vaginal Dacron swabs archived from 57 HIV seronegative women who participated in a microbicide efficacy trial in Southern Africa (HPTN 035. We detected vaginal IgA antibodies directed at HIV-1 Env gp120/gp140 in six of these women, and at gp41 in another three women, but did not detect Env-specific IgG antibodies in any women. CONCLUSION: Vaginal secretions of HIV-1 infected women contained IgG reactivity to a broad range of Env antigens and IgA reactivity to gp41. In contrast, Env-binding antibodies in the vaginal secretions of HIV-1 uninfected women participating in the microbicide trial were restricted to the IgA subtype and were mostly directed at HIV-1 gp120/gp140.

  9. Effect of virtual reality exposure therapy on social participation in people with a psychotic disorder (VRETp) : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot-Kolder, Roos; Veling, Wim; Geraets, Chris; van der Gaag, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients with a psychotic disorder participate poorly in society. When psychotic disorders are in partial remission, feelings of paranoia, delusions of reference, social anxiety and self-stigmatization often remain at diminished severity and may lead to avoidance of places and peopl

  10. Parent Reflections of Experiences of Participating in a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Behavioral Intervention for Infants at Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freuler, Ashley C.; Baranek, Grace T.; Tashjian, Christene; Watson, Linda R.; Crais, Elizabeth R.; Turner-Brown, Lauren M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite the mounting evidence of efficacy of early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders, there is little research that considers the various perceptions and resources with which parents respond to the pressures and opportunities associated with participation in early intervention. Research is particularly lacking…

  11. Participants, Usage, and Use Patterns of a Web-Based Intervention for the Prevention of Depression Within a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelders, S.M.; Bohlmeijer, E.T.; Gemert-Pijnen, van J.E.W.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although Web-based interventions have been shown to be effective, they are not widely implemented in regular care. Nonadherence (ie, participants not following the intervention protocol) is an issue. By studying the way Web-based interventions are used and whether there are differences b

  12. Do Effects of Social-Emotional Learning Programs Vary by Level of Parent Participation? Evidence from the Randomized Trial of INSIGHTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Meghan P.; Cappella, Elise; O'Connor, Erin; Hill, Jennifer L.; McClowry, Sandee

    2016-01-01

    Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) programs aim to improve students' social-emotional competencies in order to enhance their achievement. Although SEL programs typically implement classroom curricula, some programs also include a component for parents. Yet, little is known about the types of parents likely to participate in services, and whether…

  13. Effect of virtual reality exposure therapy on social participation in people with a psychotic disorder (VRETp) : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot-Kolder, Roos; Veling, Wim; Geraets, Chris; van der Gaag, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many patients with a psychotic disorder participate poorly in society. When psychotic disorders are in partial remission, feelings of paranoia, delusions of reference, social anxiety and self-stigmatization often remain at diminished severity and may lead to avoidance of places and

  14. Cost effectiveness and budgetary impact of the Boston University approach to Psychiatric Rehabilitation for societal participation in people with severe mental illness : a randomised controlled trial protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanches, Sarita A.; Swildens, Wilma E.; van Busschbach, Jooske T.; Stant, A. Dennis; Feenstra, Talitha L.; van Weeghel, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with Severe Mental Illness (SMI) frequently experience problems with regard to societal participation (i.e. work, education and daily activities outside the home), and require professional support in this area. The Boston University approach to Psychiatric Rehabilitation (BPR) is

  15. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to This Site Terms and Conditions Disclaimer ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly ... of human participants conducted around the world. ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly ...

  16. A randomised controlled trial to improve general practitioners' services in cancer rehabilitation: Effects on general practitioners' proactivity and on patients' participation in rehabilitation activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, SH; Søndergaard, J; Larsen, PV

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have evaluated initiatives targeting implementation of cancer rehabilitation. In this study we aim to test the effects of a complex intervention designed to improve general practitioners' (GPs) involvement in cancer rehabilitation. Outcomes were proactive contacts to patients...... to an intervention and 469 to a control group. The intervention included a patient interview about rehabilitation with a rehabilitation coordinator at the hospital, comprehensive information to the GP about individual needs for rehabilitation, and an encouragement to the GP to contact the patient proactively......- or GP-reported extent of GP proactivity. Further, no effect was observed on patient participation in rehabilitation activities during the 14-month follow-up period. Discussion. The intervention had no effect on GP proactivity or on patient participation in rehabilitation activities. However, analyses...

  17. Recruitment and Baseline Characteristics of Participants in the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER—A Randomized Controlled Lifestyle Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiia Ngandu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to describe the study recruitment and baseline characteristics of the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER study population. Potential study participants (age 60–77 years, the dementia risk score ≥6 were identified from previous population-based survey cohorts and invited to the screening visit. To be eligible, cognitive performance measured at the screening visit had to be at the mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. Of those invited (n = 5496, 48% (n = 2654 attended the screening visit, and finally 1260 eligible participants were randomized to the intervention and control groups (1:1. The screening visit non-attendees were slightly older, less educated, and had more vascular risk factors and diseases present. The mean (SD age of the randomized participants was 69.4 (4.7 years, Mini-Mental State Examination 26.7 (2.0 points, systolic blood pressure 140.1 (16.2 mmHg, total serum cholesterol 5.2 (1.0 mmol/L for, and fasting glucose 6.1 (0.9 mmol/L for, with no difference between intervention and control groups. Several modifiable risk factors were present at baseline indicating an opportunity for the intervention. The FINGER study will provide important information on the effect of lifestyle intervention to prevent cognitive impairment among at risk persons.

  18. Recruitment and baseline characteristics of participants in the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER)-a randomized controlled lifestyle trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngandu, Tiia; Lehtisalo, Jenni; Levälahti, Esko; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lindström, Jaana; Peltonen, Markku; Solomon, Alina; Ahtiluoto, Satu; Antikainen, Riitta; Hänninen, Tuomo; Jula, Antti; Mangialasche, Francesca; Paajanen, Teemu; Pajala, Satu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Strandberg, Timo; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Soininen, Hilkka; Kivipelto, Miia

    2014-09-10

    Our aim is to describe the study recruitment and baseline characteristics of the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) study population. Potential study participants (age 60-77 years, the dementia risk score ≥ 6) were identified from previous population-based survey cohorts and invited to the screening visit. To be eligible, cognitive performance measured at the screening visit had to be at the mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. Of those invited (n = 5496), 48% (n = 2654) attended the screening visit, and finally 1260 eligible participants were randomized to the intervention and control groups (1:1). The screening visit non-attendees were slightly older, less educated, and had more vascular risk factors and diseases present. The mean (SD) age of the randomized participants was 69.4 (4.7) years, Mini-Mental State Examination 26.7 (2.0) points, systolic blood pressure 140.1 (16.2) mmHg, total serum cholesterol 5.2 (1.0) mmol/L for, and fasting glucose 6.1 (0.9) mmol/L for, with no difference between intervention and control groups. Several modifiable risk factors were present at baseline indicating an opportunity for the intervention. The FINGER study will provide important information on the effect of lifestyle intervention to prevent cognitive impairment among at risk persons.

  19. Effects of sodium phosphate and beetroot juice supplementation on repeated-sprint ability in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher L; Henry, Timothy; Guelfi, Kym; Dawson, Brian; McNaughton, Lars R; Wallman, Karen

    2015-10-01

    Sodium phosphate (SP) and beetroot juice (BJ) supplementation was assessed on repeated-sprint ability (RSA). Thirteen female team-sport participants completed four trials: (1) SP and BJ (SP + BJ), (2) SP and placebo (for BJ), (3) BJ and placebo (for SP) and (4) placebo (for SP + BJ), with ~21 days separating each trial. After each trial, participants performed a simulated team-game circuit (STGC) consisting of four 15 min quarters, with a 6 × 20-m repeated-sprint set performed at the start, half-time and end. Total sprint times were between 0.95-1.30 and 0.83-1.12 s faster for each RSA set and 3.25 and 3.12 s faster overall (~5% improvement) after SP compared with placebo and BJ, respectively (p = 0.02 for sets 1, 2 and overall; Cohen's effect size: d = -0.51 to -0.90 for all sets and overall). Additionally, total sprint times were 0.48 s faster after SP + BJ compared with placebo (set 2; p = 0.05, ~2% improvement). Furthermore, best sprints were 0.13-0.23 and 0.15-0.20 s faster (~6% improvement; p sprint times were faster after SP compared with placebo and BJ.

  20. Effects of nutritional supplementation during pregnancy on early adult disease risk: follow up of offspring of participants in a randomised controlled trial investigating effects of supplementation on infant birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, John; Tang, Lie; Hobbs, F D Richard; Wharton, Brian; Holder, Roger; Hussain, Shakir; Nichols, Linda; Stewart, Paul; Clark, Penny; Luzio, Steve; Holly, Jeff; Smith, George Davey

    2013-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that improving fetal growth may improve adult health. Experimental evidence from nutritional supplementation trials undertaken amongst pregnant women in the less developed world does not show strong or consistent effects on adult disease risk and no trials from the more developed world have previously been reported. To test the hypothesis that nutritional supplementation during pregnancy influences offspring disease risk in adulthood. Clinical assessment of a range of established diseases risk markers in young adult offspring of 283 South Asian mothers who participated in two trials of nutritional supplementation during pregnancy (protein/energy/vitamins; energy/vitamins or vitamins only) at Sorrento Maternity Hospital in Birmingham UK either unselected or selected on the basis of nutritional status. 236 (83%) offspring were traced and 118 (50%) of these were assessed in clinic. Protein/energy/vitamins supplementation amongst undernourished mothers was associated with increased infant birthweight. Nutritional supplementation showed no strong association with any one of a comprehensive range of markers of adult disease risk and no consistent pattern of association with risk across markers in offspring of either unselected or undernourished mothers. We found no evidence that nutritional supplements given to pregnant women are an important influence on adult disease risk however our study lacked power to estimate small effects. Our findings do not provide support for a policy of nutritional supplementation for pregnant women as an effective means to improve adult health in more developed societies.

  1. Effects of nutritional supplementation during pregnancy on early adult disease risk: follow up of offspring of participants in a randomised controlled trial investigating effects of supplementation on infant birth weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Macleod

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Observational evidence suggests that improving fetal growth may improve adult health. Experimental evidence from nutritional supplementation trials undertaken amongst pregnant women in the less developed world does not show strong or consistent effects on adult disease risk and no trials from the more developed world have previously been reported. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that nutritional supplementation during pregnancy influences offspring disease risk in adulthood. DESIGN: Clinical assessment of a range of established diseases risk markers in young adult offspring of 283 South Asian mothers who participated in two trials of nutritional supplementation during pregnancy (protein/energy/vitamins; energy/vitamins or vitamins only at Sorrento Maternity Hospital in Birmingham UK either unselected or selected on the basis of nutritional status. RESULTS: 236 (83% offspring were traced and 118 (50% of these were assessed in clinic. Protein/energy/vitamins supplementation amongst undernourished mothers was associated with increased infant birthweight. Nutritional supplementation showed no strong association with any one of a comprehensive range of markers of adult disease risk and no consistent pattern of association with risk across markers in offspring of either unselected or undernourished mothers. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence that nutritional supplements given to pregnant women are an important influence on adult disease risk however our study lacked power to estimate small effects. Our findings do not provide support for a policy of nutritional supplementation for pregnant women as an effective means to improve adult health in more developed societies.

  2. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  3. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  4. Home-based HPV self-sampling improves participation by never-screened and under-screened women: Results from a large randomized trial (iPap) in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Farhana; English, Dallas R; Simpson, Julie A; Drennan, Kelly T; Mullins, Robyn; Brotherton, Julia M L; Wrede, C David; Heley, Stella; Saville, Marion; Gertig, Dorota M

    2016-07-15

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine whether HPV self-sampling increases participation in cervical screening by never- and under-screened (not screened in past 5 years) women when compared with a reminder letter for a Pap test. Never- or under-screened Victorian women aged 30-69 years, not pregnant and with no prior hysterectomy were eligible. Within each stratum (never-screened and under-screened), we randomly allocated 7,140 women to self-sampling and 1,020 to Pap test reminders. The self-sampling kit comprised a nylon tipped flocked swab enclosed in a dry plastic tube. The primary outcome was participation, as indicated by returning a swab or undergoing a Pap test; the secondary outcome, for women in the self-sampling arm with a positive HPV test, was undergoing appropriate clinical investigation. The Roche Cobas® 4800 test was used to measure presence of HPV DNA. Participation was higher for the self-sampling arm: 20.3 versus 6.0% for never-screened women (absolute difference 14.4%, 95% CI: 12.6-16.1%, p sampling improves participation in cervical screening for never- and under-screened women and most women with HPV detected have appropriate clinical investigation.

  5. Ambivalent participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes-Green, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Participation in young peoples' sexual cultures in Maputo, Mozambique led to reflections about the field dynamics of power, participation, desire, and discomfort. Structural inequalities of race, gender, and educational status resulted in informants seeing me as a morally righteous person to whom...... they could not give open accounts about sexual practice. Attempting to overcome these barriers, I participated in excessive nightlife activities, and as a consequence they began viewing me as a more accepting and reliable person. Although breaking down these barriers provided invaluable insight......' continued participation. I show how negotiating the risks of participation may simultaneously satisfy the desire for knowledge and curb erotic desires....

  6. Unfolding Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Halskov, Kim; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Unfolding Participation workshop is to outline an agenda for the next 10 years of participatory design (PD) and participatory human computer interaction (HCI) research. We will do that through a double strategy: 1) by critically interrogating the concept of participation (unfolding...... the concept itself), while at the same time, 2) reflecting on the way that participation unfolds across different participatory configurations. We invite researchers and practitioners from PD and HCI and fields in which information technology mediated participation is embedded (e.g. in political studies......, urban planning, participatory arts, business, science and technology studies) to bring a plurality of perspectives and expertise related to participation....

  7. Unfolding Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Halskov, Kim; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Unfolding Participation workshop is to outline an agenda for the next 10 years of participatory design (PD) and participatory human computer interaction (HCI) research. We will do that through a double strategy: 1) by critically interrogating the concept of participation (unfolding......, urban planning, participatory arts, business, science and technology studies) to bring a plurality of perspectives and expertise related to participation.......The aim of the Unfolding Participation workshop is to outline an agenda for the next 10 years of participatory design (PD) and participatory human computer interaction (HCI) research. We will do that through a double strategy: 1) by critically interrogating the concept of participation (unfolding...... the concept itself), while at the same time, 2) reflecting on the way that participation unfolds across different participatory configurations. We invite researchers and practitioners from PD and HCI and fields in which information technology mediated participation is embedded (e.g. in political studies...

  8. Nonparametric modeling and analysis of association between Huntington's disease onset and CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanyuan; Wang, Yuanjia

    2014-04-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with a dominant genetic mode of inheritance caused by an expansion of CAG repeats on chromosome 4. Typically, a longer sequence of CAG repeat length is associated with increased risk of experiencing earlier onset of HD. Previous studies of the association between HD onset age and CAG length have favored a logistic model, where the CAG repeat length enters the mean and variance components of the logistic model in a complex exponential-linear form. To relax the parametric assumption of the exponential-linear association to the true HD onset distribution, we propose to leave both mean and variance functions of the CAG repeat length unspecified and perform semiparametric estimation in this context through a local kernel and backfitting procedure. Motivated by including family history of HD information available in the family members of participants in the Cooperative Huntington's Observational Research Trial (COHORT), we develop the methodology in the context of mixture data, where some subjects have a positive probability of being risk free. We also allow censoring on the age at onset of disease and accommodate covariates other than the CAG length. We study the theoretical properties of the proposed estimator and derive its asymptotic distribution. Finally, we apply the proposed methods to the COHORT data to estimate the HD onset distribution using a group of study participants and the disease family history information available on their family members.

  9. The Effects of Test Trial and Processing Level on Immediate and Delayed Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sau Hou

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of test trial and processing level on immediate and delayed retention. A 2 × 2 × 2 mixed ANOVAs was used with two between-subject factors of test trial (single test, repeated test) and processing level (shallow, deep), and one within-subject factor of final recall (immediate, delayed). Seventy-six college students were randomly assigned first to the single test (studied the stimulus words three times and took one free-recall test) and the repeated test trials (studied the stimulus words once and took three consecutive free-recall tests), and then to the shallow processing level (asked whether each stimulus word was presented in capital letter or in small letter) and the deep processing level (whether each stimulus word belonged to a particular category) to study forty stimulus words. The immediate test was administered five minutes after the trials, whereas the delayed test was administered one week later. Results showed that single test trial recalled more words than repeated test trial in immediate final free-recall test, participants in deep processing performed better than those in shallow processing in both immediate and delayed retention. However, the dominance of single test trial and deep processing did not happen in delayed retention. Additional study trials did not further enhance the delayed retention of words encoded in deep processing, but did enhance the delayed retention of words encoded in shallow processing. PMID:28344679

  10. The Effects of Test Trial and Processing Level on Immediate and Delayed Retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sau Hou Chang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of test trial and processing level on immediate and delayed retention. A 2 × 2 × 2 mixed ANOVAs was used with two between-subject factors of test trial (single test, repeated test and processing level (shallow, deep, and one within-subject factor of final recall (immediate, delayed. Seventy-six college students were randomly assigned first to the single test (studied the stimulus words three times and took one free-recall test and the repeated test trials (studied the stimulus words once and took three consecutive free-recall tests, and then to the shallow processing level (asked whether each stimulus word was presented in capital letter or in small letter and the deep processing level (whether each stimulus word belonged to a particular category to study forty stimulus words. The immediate test was administered five minutes after the trials, whereas the delayed test was administered one week later. Results showed that single test trial recalled more words than repeated test trial in immediate final free-recall test, participants in deep processing performed better than those in shallow processing in both immediate and delayed retention. However, the dominance of single test trial and deep processing did not happen in delayed retention. Additional study trials did not further enhance the delayed retention of words encoded in deep processing, but did enhance the delayed retention of words encoded in shallow processing.

  11. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  12. Sexually transmitted infection screening uptake and knowledge of sexually transmitted infection symptoms among female sex workers participating in a community randomised trial in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Pamela K; Campos, Pablo E; Garcia, Patricia J; Carcamo, Cesar P; Buendia, Clara; Hughes, James P; Mejia, Carolina; Garnett, Geoff P; Holmes, King K

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate condom use, sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening, and knowledge of STI symptoms among female sex workers in Peru associated with sex work venues and a community randomised trial of STI control. One component of the Peru PREVEN intervention conducted mobile-team outreach to female sex workers to reduce STIs and increase condom use and access to government clinics for STI screening and evaluation. Prevalence ratios were calculated using multivariate Poisson regression models with robust standard errors, clustering by city. As-treated analyses were conducted to assess outcomes associated with reported exposure to the intervention. Care-seeking was more frequent in intervention communities, but differences were not statistically significant. Female sex workers reporting exposure to the intervention had a significantly higher likelihood of condom use, STI screening at public health clinics, and symptom recognition compared to those not exposed. Compared with street- or bar-based female sex workers, brothel-based female sex workers reported significantly higher rates of condom use with last client, recent screening exams for STIs, and HIV testing. Brothel-based female sex workers also more often reported knowledge of STIs and recognition of STI symptoms in women and in men. Interventions to promote STI detection and prevention among female sex workers in Peru should consider structural or regulatory factors related to sex work venues.

  13. Conceptualizing Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka; Bruun Jensen, Bjarne

    Although participation is not a new issue, it would be fair to say that consequential participation, which implies young people engaging in meaningful dialogue with adults and institutions and influencing decision-making processes in matters that concern them, is still in its infancy. This document...... and society. It then describes different forms, modes or qualities of participation and proposes a specific model of facilitating participatory work with young people - the IVAC approach (Investigation-Vision-Action-Change). The concept of action, types of actions aimed at initiating change and corresponding...... aims to set the scene for discussing young people's participation in different domains that have an impact on their lives. It outlines the meaning and different interpretations of the concept of "participation" before reviewing why participation is an important issue in relation to young people...

  14. Thermic effect of a meal and appetite in adults: an individual participant data meta-analysis of meal-test trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Ravn

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thermic effect of a meal (TEF has previously been suggested to influence appetite. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether there is an association between appetite and TEF. Second, to examine whether protein intake is associated with TEF or appetite. Design: Individual participant data (IPD meta-analysis on studies were performed at the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Five randomized meal-test studies, with 111 participants, were included. The included studies measured energy expenditure (EE in respiration chambers and pre- and postprandial appetite sensations using Visual Analog Scales (VAS. The primary meta-analysis was based on a generic-inverse variance random-effects model, pooling individual study Spearman's correlation coefficients, resulting in a combined r-value with 95% confidence interval (95% CI. The I2 value quantifies the proportion (% of the variation in point estimates due to among-study differences. Results: The IPD meta-analysis found no association between satiety and TEF expressed as the incremental area under the curve (TEFiAUC (r=0.06 [95% CI −0.16 to 0.28], P=0.58; I2=15.8%. Similarly, Composite Appetite Score (CAS was not associated with TEFiAUC (r=0.08 [95% CI −0.12 to 0.28], P = 0.45; I2=0%. Posthoc analyses showed no association between satiety or CAS and TEF expressed as a percentage of energy intake (EI (P>0.49 or TEF expressed as a percentage of baseline EE (P>0.17. When adjusting for covariates, TEFiAUC was associated with protein intake (P=0.0085. Conclusions: This IPD meta-analysis found no evidence supporting an association between satiety or CAS and TEF at protein intakes ∼15 E% (range 11–30 E%.

  15. Quality assurance standards drive improvements in the profile of radiation therapy departments participating in trials of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Warren; Hurkmans, Coen W; Poortmans, Philip M; Maingon, Philippe; Monti, Angelo F; van Os, Marjolein J H; Weber, Damien C

    2014-09-01

    The Facility Questionnaire (FQ) of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Radiation Oncology Group (EORTC-ROG) evaluates the human, technical and organizational resources at each EORTC member institution. The purpose of this study is to use the FQ database to assess the improvement of radiation therapy (RT) structures and resources within the EORTC compared to the previous surveys performed by our group. We report the content of the current FQ database, completed online by 156 EORTC candidate member institutions from 22 countries between February 2011 and February 2013. Results are compared to FQ-published data from 1992 and 2007. The average number of patients per year per EORTC institution is 2381 (range 350-12,000) an 18.2% increase compared to the 2007 figures. From 2007 to 2013 the average number of radiation oncologists, physicists and radiation technologists per EORTC institution has increased by 27% (from 8.5 to 10.8), 41% (from 5.2 to 7.4) and 38% (from 26.1 to 36.1) respectively. Consequently the number of patients per year per radiation oncologist has decreased from 258 to 243, for physicists from 426 to 354 and for radiation technologists from 107 to 86. One hundred and forty-six (94%) and 101 (65%) institutions can now deliver IMRT and SBRT, compared to 77 (79%) and 53 (54%) in 2007. The standards set by the EORTC-ROG are met by a continually improving number of institutions, helping to safeguard use of advanced technologies in EORTC-ROG clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Uptake of voluntary counselling and testing among young people participating in an HIV prevention trial: comparison of opt-out and opt-in strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Baisley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV voluntary counselling and testing (VCT is an integral component of HIV prevention and treatment programmes. However, testing coverage in sub-Saharan Africa is still low, particularly among young people. As treatment becomes more widely available, strategies to expand VCT coverage are critically important. We compare VCT uptake using two delivery strategies (opt-in and opt-out within the MEMA kwa Vijana trial in 20 communities in northwest Tanzania. METHODS: We analysed data from 12,590 young persons (median (IQR age 22 years (20-23 to assess the effect of delivery strategy on VCT uptake. Ten communities used an opt-in approach and 10 used opt-out, balanced across intervention and control. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with uptake within each strategy. RESULTS: VCT uptake was significantly higher with the opt-out approach (90.9% vs 60.5%, prevalence ratio = 1.51, CI = 1.41-1.62. Among females, uptake in the opt-out approach was associated with decreased knowledge of HIV acquisition, sex with a casual partner, and being HSV-2 seronegative; among males, uptake was associated with lower education and increasing lifetime partners. In contrast, uptake using the opt-in approach varied by ethnic group, religion and marital status, and increased with increasing knowledge of STI acquisition (males or pregnancy prevention (females. CONCLUSION: VCT uptake among young people was extremely high when offered an opt-out strategy. Sociodemographic and knowledge factors affected uptake in different ways depending on delivery strategy. Increased knowledge may increase young persons' self-efficacy, which may have a different impact on testing uptake, depending on the approach used.

  17. Evaluating HIV prevention efforts using semiparametric regression models: results from a large cohort of women participating in an HIV prevention trial from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Ramjee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe and quantify the differences in risk behaviours, HIV prevalence and incidence rates by birth cohorts among a group of women in Durban, South Africa. Methods: Cross-sectional and prospective cohort analyses were conducted for women who consented to be screened and enrolled in an HIV prevention trial. Demographic and sexual behaviours were described by five-year birth cohorts. Semiparametric regression models were used to investigate the bivariate associations between these factors and the birth cohorts. HIV seroconversion rates were also estimated by birth cohorts. Results: The prevalence of HIV-1 infection at the screening visit was lowest (20.0% among the oldest (born before 1960 cohorts, while the highest prevalence was observed among those born between 1975 and 79. Level of education increased across the birth cohorts while the median age at first sexual experience declined among those born after 1975 compared to those born before 1975. Only 33.03% of the oldest group reported ever using a condom while engaging in vaginal sex compared to 73.68% in the youngest group; however, HIV and other sexually transmitted infection (STI incidence rates were significantly higher among younger women compared to older women. Conclusions: These findings clearly suggest that demographic and sexual risk behaviours are differentially related to the birth cohorts. Significantly high HIV and STI incidence rates were observed among the younger group. Although the level of education increased, early age at sexual debut was more common among the younger group. The continuing increase in HIV and STI incidence rates among the later cohorts suggests that the future trajectory of the epidemic will be dependent on the infection patterns in younger birth cohorts.

  18. The effect of camera viewing angle on posture assessment repeatability and cumulative spinal loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, C A; Albert, W J; Wrigley, A T; Callaghan, J P

    2007-06-01

    Video-based task analysis in the workplace is often limited by equipment location and production line arrangement, therefore making it difficult to capture the motion in a single plane. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of camera placement on an observer's ability to accurately assess working postures in three dimensions and the resultant influence on the reliability and repeatability of calculated cumulative loading variables. Four video cameras were placed at viewing angles of 0 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees and 90 degrees to the frontal plane, enabling the simultaneous collection of views of four lifting tasks (two symmetric and two asymmetric). A total of 11 participants were trained in the use of the 3DMatch 3-D posture matching software package (developed at the University of Waterloo) and were required to analyse 16 lifting trials. Four of the participants were randomly selected to return within 72 h and repeat the analysis protocol to test intra-observer repeatability. Posture matching agreement between camera views was higher when the body segments had a minimal range of motion during the task. There was no significant participant main effect; however, there was a significant (p 0.75). Joint anterior shear and joint posterior shear both provided fair to good reliability (0.4 > ICC camera viewing angle on an observer's ability to match working postural exposure was found to be small.

  19. Authoring Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papazu, Irina

    2016-01-01

    . By turning to material participation, a concept inspired by Noortje Marres and Jennifer Gabrys, the efforts put into Samsø’s energy transformation by the islanders are given specificity. While much literature on public participation foregrounds public meetings and other spaces for deliberation and debate...

  20. Nigella sativa improves glycemic control and ameliorates oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: placebo controlled participant blinded clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Kaatabi

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Our previous study has shown glucose lowering effect produced by 3 months supplementation of Nigella sativa (NS in combination with oral hypoglycemic drugs among type 2 diabetics. This study explored the long term glucose lowering effect (over one year of NS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on oral hypoglycemic drugs and to study its effect on redox status of such patients.114 type 2 diabetic patients on standard oral hypoglycemic drugs were assigned into 2 groups by convenience. The control group (n = 57 received activated charcoal as placebo and NS group (n = 57 received 2g NS, daily, for one year in addition to their standard medications. Fasting blood glucose (FBG, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, C- peptide, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS at the baseline, and every 3 months thereafter were determined. Insulin resistance and β-cell activity were calculated using HOMA 2 calculator.Comparison between the two groups showed a significant drop in FBG (from 180 ± 5.75 to 180 ± 5.59 in control Vs from 195 ± 6.57 to 172 ± 5.83 in NS group, HbA1c (from 8.2 ± 0.12 to 8.5 ± 0.14 in control VS from 8.6 ± 0.13 to 8.2 ± 0.14 in NS group, and TBARS (from 48.3 ± 6.89 to 52.9 ± 5.82 in control VS from 54.1 ± 4.64 to 41.9 ± 3.16 in NS group, in addition to a significant elevation in TAC, SOD and glutathione in NS patients compared to controls. In NS group, insulin resistance was significantly lower, while β-cell activity was significantly higher than the baseline values during the whole treatment period.Long term supplementation with Nigella sativa improves glucose homeostasis and enhances antioxidant defense system in type 2 diabetic patients treated with oral hypoglycemic drugs.Clinical Trials Registry-India (CTRI CTRI/2013/06/003781.

  1. Can You Teach a Teen New Tricks? Problem Solving Skills Training Improves Oral Medication Adherence in Pediatric Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Participating in a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, Rachel N; Gumidyala, Amitha P; Nguyen, Eve; Plevinsky, Jill M; Poulopoulos, Natasha; Thomason, Molly M; Walter, Jennifer G; Wojtowicz, Andrea A; Blank, Ellen; Gokhale, Ranjana; Kirschner, Barbara S; Miranda, Adrian; Noe, Joshua D; Stephens, Michael C; Werlin, Steven; Kahn, Stacy A

    2015-11-01

    Medication nonadherence is associated with higher disease activity, greater health care utilization, and lower health-related quality of life in pediatric inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Problem solving skills training (PSST) is a useful tool to improve adherence in patients with chronic diseases but has not been fully investigated in IBD. This study assessed feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of PSST in pediatric IBD. Recruitment occurred during outpatient clinic appointments. After completion of baseline questionnaires, families were randomized to a treatment group or wait-list comparison group. The treatment group received either 2 or 4 PSST sessions. Youth health-related quality of life was assessed at 3 time points, and electronic monitoring of oral medication adherence occurred for the study duration. Seventy-six youth (ages 11-18 years) on an oral IBD maintenance medication participated. High retention (86%) and treatment fidelity rates (95%) supported feasibility. High satisfaction ratings (mean values ≥4.2 on 1-5 scale) supported intervention acceptability. Modest increases in adherence occurred after 2 PSST sessions among those with imperfect baseline adherence (d = 0.41, P 0.05). Phone-delivered PSST was feasible and acceptable. Efficacy estimates were similar to those of lengthier interventions conducted in other chronic illness populations. Older adolescents benefited more from the intervention than their younger counterparts.

  2. Cardiovascular risk factors in children after repeat doses of antenatal glucocorticoids: an RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, Christopher J D; Cutfield, Wayne S; Battin, Malcolm R; Dalziel, Stuart R; Crowther, Caroline A; Harding, Jane E

    2015-02-01

    Treatment of women at risk for preterm birth with repeat doses of glucocorticoids reduces neonatal morbidity but could have adverse long-term effects on cardiometabolic health in offspring. We assessed whether exposure to repeat antenatal betamethasone increased risk factors for later cardiometabolic disease in children whose mothers participated in the Australasian Collaborative Trial of Repeat Doses of Corticosteroids. Women were randomized to betamethasone or placebo treatment, ≥ 7 days after an initial course of glucocorticoids, repeated each week that they remained at risk for preterm birth at children were assessed at 6 to 8 years' corrected age for body composition, insulin sensitivity, ambulatory blood pressure, and renal function. Of 320 eligible childhood survivors, 258 were studied (81%; 123 repeat betamethasone group; 135 placebo [single course] group). Children exposed to repeat antenatal betamethasone and those exposed to placebo had similar total fat mass (geometric mean ratio 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78 to 1.23), minimal model insulin sensitivity (geometric mean ratio 0.89, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.08), 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (mean difference systolic 0 mm Hg, 95% CI -2 to 2; diastolic 0 mm Hg, 95% CI -1 to 1), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (mean difference 1.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2), 95% CI -3.2 to 5.6). Exposure to repeat doses of antenatal betamethasone compared with a single course of glucocorticoids does not increase risk factors for cardiometabolic disease at early school age. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  4. The Effects of Calcium Channel Blockers in the Prevention of Stroke in Adults with Hypertension: A Meta-Analysis of Data from 273,543 Participants in 31 Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gui Jv; Yang, Mao Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a major risk factor for the development of stroke. It is well known that lowering blood pressure decreases the risk of stroke in people with moderate to severe hypertension. However, the specific effects of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) against stroke in patients with hypertension as compared to no treatment and other antihypertensive drug classes are not known. Methods and Findings This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated CCBs effect on stroke in patients with hypertension in studies of CCBs versus placebo, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), β-adrenergic blockers, and diuretics. The PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, OVID, CNKI, MEDCH, and WANFANG databases were searched for trials published in English or Chinese during the period January 1, 1996 to July 31, 2012. A total of 177 reports were collected, among them 31 RCTs with 273,543 participants (including 130,466 experimental subjects and 143,077 controls) met the inclusion criteria. In these trials a total of 9,550 stroke events (4,145 in experimental group and 5,405 in control group) were reported. CCBs significantly decreased the incidence of stroke compared with placebo (OR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.61–0.75, pACEIs (OR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.8–1.02, p = 0.12) or diuretics (OR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.84–1.07, p = 0.39). Conclusion In a pooled analysis of data of 31 RCTs measuring the effect of CCBs on stroke, CCBs reduced stroke more than placebo and β-adrenergic blockers, but were not different than ACEIs and diuretics. More head to head RCTs are warranted. PMID:23483932

  5. Effect of repeated intracoronary injection of bone marrow cells in patients with ischaemic heart failure the Danish stem cell study--congestive heart failure trial (DanCell-CHF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Møller, Jacob E; Thayssen, Per;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that myocardial regeneration may be achieved by a single intracoronary bone marrow derived stem cell infusion in selected patients with ischaemic heart disease. The effect is uncertain in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure and it is not known whether...... repeated infusions would have additional positive effects. AIMS: To assess whether two treatments of intracoronary infusion of bone marrow stem cells, administered 4 months apart, could improve left ventricular (LV) systolic function in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure. METHODS: The study...... was prospective and non-randomised, comprising an observational baseline period of 4 months followed by an interventional period of 12 months. Intracoronary bone marrow cell infusion was performed at the end of the baseline period and repeated 4 months later. RESULTS: 32 patients were included. LV ejection...

  6. CD8 and CD4 epitope predictions in RV144: no strong evidence of a T-cell driven sieve effect in HIV-1 breakthrough sequences from trial participants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Dommaraju

    Full Text Available The modest protection afforded by the RV144 vaccine offers an opportunity to evaluate its mechanisms of protection. Differences between HIV-1 breakthrough viruses from vaccine and placebo recipients can be attributed to the RV144 vaccine as this was a randomized and double-blinded trial. CD8 and CD4 T cell epitope repertoires were predicted in HIV-1 proteomes from 110 RV144 participants. Predicted Gag epitope repertoires were smaller in vaccine than in placebo recipients (p = 0.019. After comparing participant-derived epitopes to corresponding epitopes in the RV144 vaccine, the proportion of epitopes that could be matched differed depending on the protein conservation (only 36% of epitopes in Env vs 84-91% in Gag/Pol/Nef for CD8 predicted epitopes or on vaccine insert subtype (55% against CRF01_AE vs 7% against subtype B. To compare predicted epitopes to the vaccine, we analyzed predicted binding affinity and evolutionary distance measurements. Comparisons between the vaccine and placebo arm did not reveal robust evidence for a T cell driven sieve effect, although some differences were noted in Env-V2 (0.022≤p-value≤0.231. The paucity of CD8 T cell responses identified following RV144 vaccination, with no evidence for V2 specificity, considered together both with the association of decreased infection risk in RV 144 participants with V-specific antibody responses and a V2 sieve effect, lead us to hypothesize that this sieve effect was not T cell specific. Overall, our results did not reveal a strong differential impact of vaccine-induced T cell responses among breakthrough infections in RV144 participants.

  7. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  8. Effects of sodium phosphate and caffeine loading on repeated-sprint ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher; Guelfi, Kym; Dawson, Brian; McNaughton, Lars; Wallman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The effects of sodium phosphate and caffeine supplementation were assessed on repeated-sprint ability. Using a randomised, double-blind, Latin-square design, 12 female, team-sport players participated in four trials: (1) sodium phosphate and caffeine, (2) sodium phosphate and placebo (for caffeine), (3) caffeine and placebo (for sodium phosphate) and (4) placebo (for sodium phosphate and caffeine), with ~21 days separating each trial. After each trial, participants performed a simulated team-game circuit (4 × 15 min quarters) with 6 × 20-m repeated-sprints performed once before (Set 1), at half-time (Set 2), and after end (Set 3). Total sprint times were faster after sodium phosphate and caffeine supplementation compared with placebo (Set 1: P = 0.003; Set 2: d = -0.51; Set 3: P sprint times were faster after sodium phosphate supplementation compared with placebo (Set 1: d = -0.52; Set 3: d = -0.58). Best sprint results were faster after sodium phosphate and caffeine supplementation compared with placebo (Set 3: P = 0.007, d = -0.90) and caffeine (Set 3: P = 0.024, d = -0.73). Best sprint times were also faster after sodium phosphate supplementation compared with placebo (d = -0.54 to -0.61 for all sets). Sodium phosphate and combined sodium phosphate and caffeine loading improved repeated-sprint ability.

  9. Enhanced performance feedback and patient participation to improve hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers in the setting of established multimodal promotion: a single-centre, cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, Andrew James; Sax, Hugo; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Touveneau, Sylvie; Longtin, Yves; Zingg, Walter; Pittet, Didier

    2016-12-01

    Hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers remains suboptimal despite standard multimodal promotion, and evidence for the effectiveness of novel interventions is urgently needed. We aimed to assess the effect of enhanced performance feedback and patient participation on hand hygiene compliance in the setting of multimodal promotion. We did a single-centre, cluster randomised controlled trial at University of Geneva Hospitals (Geneva, Switzerland). All wards hosting adult, lucid patients, and all health-care workers and patients in these wards, were eligible. After a 15-month baseline period, eligible wards were assigned by computer-generated block randomisation (1:1:1), stratified by the type of ward, to one of three groups: control, enhanced performance feedback, or enhanced performance feedback plus patient participation. Standard multimodal hand hygiene promotion was done hospital-wide throughout the study. The primary outcome was hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (according to the WHO Five Moments of Hand Hygiene) at the opportunity level, measured by direct observation (20-min sessions) by 12 validated infection control nurses, with each ward audited at least once every 3 months. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN43599478. We randomly assigned 67 wards to the control group (n=21), enhanced performance feedback (n=24), or enhanced performance feedback plus patient participation (n=22) on May 19, 2010. One ward in the control group became a high-dependency unit and was excluded from analysis. During 1367 observation sessions, 12 579 hand hygiene opportunities were recorded. Between the baseline period (April 1, 2009, to June 30, 2010) and the intervention period (July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012), mean hand hygiene compliance increased from 66% (95% CI 62-70) to 73% (70-77) in the control group (odds ratio [OR] 1·41, 95% CI 1·21-1·63), from 65% (62-69) to 75% (72-77) in the enhanced performance feedback group (1·61, 1·41-1

  10. Overcoming Addictions, a Web-Based Application, and SMART Recovery, an Online and In-Person Mutual Help Group for Problem Drinkers, Part 2: Six-Month Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Trial and Qualitative Feedback From Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Reid K; Lenberg, Kathryn L; Delaney, Harold D

    2016-01-01

    the amount of improvement from baseline to the average of the follow-ups. We found that participants who stopped drinking before joining the clinical trial had significantly better outcomes than participants who were still drinking when they joined the study. Neither Internet fluency nor participants’ reported ease of navigating the site had an impact on outcomes. Conclusions These results support our first experimental hypothesis but not the second. On average, participants improved on all dependent measures. Both SR and OA helped participants recover from their problem drinking. Web-based interventions can help even those individuals with lengthy histories of heavy drinking to make clinically significant reductions in their consumption and related problems. These interventions work well for individuals in the action stage of change. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01389297; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01389297 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6kLNUNDcc) PMID:27701064

  11. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  12. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  13. Facilitating and inhibiting effects of priming and selection criteria in a sequence of dichotic listening trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saetrevik, Bjørn

    2012-08-01

    Competing models of attention make different predictions of how priming from recent stimulus processing could interact with intended selection. The present experiment examined the interaction between exogenous attention and endogenous priming across trial sequences. A sound cue directed attention to left, right or both sides before a dichotic syllable pair was presented. Participants were asked to report one syllable from each trial. Results showed that responses were slower on trials where one of the presented syllables had also been presented on the previous trial. Within these trials, the repeated syllable was selected less frequently, and the responses doing so were slower. Examined according to response choice on the preceding trial, syllables that had been ignored on the preceding trial tended to be ignored on the current trial (negative priming), while syllables that had been selected on the preceding trial tended to be selected on the current trial (positive priming). Responses that followed these selection biases were faster than responses that did not. Response selection was also influenced by the attention direction cue for the current trial, but not by the cue presented on the preceding trial. The results support an attentional model where traces from the preceding processing are retained, and current selection is biased to minimize cognitive conflict between recent and current processing. Negative priming appears to be due to after-effects of preceding processing, independently of the intentions behind that processing. The study accounts for positive and negative priming of dichotic listening sequences within an established, computationally viable biased competition framework.

  14. Impact of lipid-based nutrient supplements and corn-soy blend on energy and nutrient intake among moderately underweight 8-18-month-old children participating in a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakwalakwa, Chrissie M; Ashorn, Per; Phuka, John C; Cheung, Yin Bun; Briend, André; Maleta, Kenneth M

    2015-12-01

    Nutrition interventions have an effect on growth, energy and nutrient intake, and development, but there are mixed reports on the effect of supplementation of energy-dense foods on dietary intake. This substudy aimed at assessing the effect of supplementation with corn-soy blend (CSB) or lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) on energy and nutrient intake in moderately underweight children participating in a clinical trial. A total of 188 children aged 8-18 months participated and received daily either 284 kcal from CSB or 220 kcal from LNS and no supplements (control). An interactive 24-h recall method was used to estimate energy and nutrient intakes in the groups. Total mean energy intake was 548 kcal, 551 kcal and 692 kcal in the control, CSB and LNS groups, respectively (P = 0.011). The mean (95% confidence interval) intake of energy and protein were 144 (37-250; P Energy intake from non-supplement foods was significantly lower in the CSB group compared with the control group, but not in the LNS group, suggesting a lower displacement of non-supplement foods with LNS. Both CSB and LNS supplementation resulted in higher intakes of calcium, iron, zinc and vitamin C compared with controls (all P ≤ 0.001). This study indicates that LNS might be superior to CSB to supplement underweight children as it results in higher energy intake, but this requires confirmation in other settings.

  15. Rationale and Design of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Multicenter Trial to Study Efficacy, Security, and Long Term Effects of Intermittent Repeated Levosimendan Administration in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure: LAICA study

    OpenAIRE

    García-González, Martín J.; de Mora-Martín, Manuel; López-Fernández, Silvia; López-Díaz, Javier; Martínez Sellés Oliveria Soares, Manuel; Romero-García, José; Cordero, Marco; Lara-Padrón, Antonio; Marrero-Rodríguez, Francisco; García-Saiz, María del Mar

    2013-01-01

    Background Advanced heart failure (HF) is associated with high morbidity and mortality; it represents a major burden for the health system. Episodes of acute decompensation requiring frequent and prolonged hospitalizations account for most HF-related expenditure. Inotropic drugs are frequently used during hospitalization, but rarely in out-patients. The LAICA clinical trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of monthly levosimendan infusion in patients with advanced HF to reduce th...

  16. Overcoming Addictions, a Web-Based Application, and SMART Recovery, an Online and In-Person Mutual Help Group for Problem Drinkers, Part 2: Six-Month Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Trial and Qualitative Feedback From Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, William; Hester, Reid K; Lenberg, Kathryn L; Delaney, Harold D

    2016-10-04

    the average of the follow-ups. We found that participants who stopped drinking before joining the clinical trial had significantly better outcomes than participants who were still drinking when they joined the study. Neither Internet fluency nor participants' reported ease of navigating the site had an impact on outcomes. These results support our first experimental hypothesis but not the second. On average, participants improved on all dependent measures. Both SR and OA helped participants recover from their problem drinking. Web-based interventions can help even those individuals with lengthy histories of heavy drinking to make clinically significant reductions in their consumption and related problems. These interventions work well for individuals in the action stage of change. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01389297; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01389297 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6kLNUNDcc).

  17. Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Harvey M; Cooke, Karl; Sumners, David P; Mileva, Katya N; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-12-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) is a critical success factor for intermittent sport performance. Repeated sprint training has been shown to improve RSA, we hypothesised that hypoxia would augment these training adaptations. Thirty male well-trained academy rugby union and rugby league players (18.4 ± 1.5 years, 1.83 ± 0.07 m, 88.1 ± 8.9 kg) participated in this single-blind repeated sprint training study. Participants completed 12 sessions of repeated sprint training (10 × 6 s, 30 s recovery) over 4 weeks in either hypoxia (13% FiO₂) or normoxia (21% FiO₂). Pretraining and post-training, participants completed sports specific endurance and sprint field tests and a 10 × 6 s RSA test on a non-motorised treadmill while measuring speed, heart rate, capillary blood lactate, muscle and cerebral deoxygenation and respiratory measures. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test performance improved after RS training in both groups, but gains were significantly greater in the hypoxic (33 ± 12%) than the normoxic group (14 ± 10%, prepeated aerobic high intensity workout than an equivalent normoxic training. Performance gains are evident in the short term (4 weeks), a period similar to a preseason training block.

  18. Factors influencing the clinical expression of intermediate CAG repeat length mutations of the Huntington's disease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegyres, Peter K; Shu, Chen-Chun; Chen, Huei-Yang; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-02-01

    Our aim is to elucidate the clinical variables associated with the development of manifest HD in patients with intermediate CAG repeat lengths. 2,167 participants were seen throughout 44 research sites in the United States, Canada or Australia over a five-year natural history observational study (2006-2011) (Trial # NCT00313495). The Chi-square test and a generalised linear model were used to examine the differences in demographics and cognitive tests among three groups of CAG repeat length. The mixed model was then used to examine the time effect on cognitive assessments by CAG groups. No patient with CAG repeat length 27-35 developed manifest HD, whereas three patients with 36-39 did. Total motor score, maximal chorea score and maximal dystonia score were significantly different at baseline (p CAG 36-39; those with an associated university degree or higher education were less frequently diagnosed as manifest HD (OR 0.10, 95 % CI 0.02-0.54, p = 0.007). Age, smoking and lower education achievement were found to be significantly associated with higher odds of manifest HD in patients with intermediate CAG repeat length mutations.

  19. Claiming Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabian, Louise; Samson, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    with participation are currently strong influential factors in Danish planning. The article explores the use of participatory DIY urban design in two cases: the relocation of beer drinkers in Enghave Square and the Carlsberg City development in Copenhagen, Denmark. Carlsberg City is the most thorough Danish example...

  20. Artificial leucine rich repeats as new scaffolds for protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baabur-Cohen, Hemda; Dayalan, Subashini; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2011-04-15

    The leucine rich repeat (LRR) motif that participates in many biomolecular recognition events in cells was suggested as a general scaffold for producing artificial receptors. We describe here the design and first total chemical synthesis of small LRR proteins, and their structural analysis. When evaluating the tertiary structure as a function of different number of repeating units (1-3), we were able to find that the 3-repeats sequence, containing 90 amino acids, folds into the expected structure.

  1. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  2. Statins decrease all-cause mortality only in CKD patients not requiring dialysis therapy--a meta-analysis of 11 randomized controlled trials involving 21,295 participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barylski, Marcin; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Toth, Peter P; Salari, Pooneh; Ray, Kausik K; Pencina, Michael J; Rizzo, Manfredi; Rysz, Jacek; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nicholls, Stephen J; Banach, Maciej

    2013-06-01

    The available studies have reported the benefits of statins on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. However studies in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis yielded conflicting results. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis and provide the most reliable trial data to date on the impact of statin therapy on cardiovascular events and death from all causes in CKD patients. Data from PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Scopus for the years 1966 to October 2012 were searched. The final meta-analysis included 11 randomized controlled trials involving 21,295 participants with CKD. Among them 6857 were on dialysis. The use of statins in subjects with non-dialysis-dependent CKD resulted in a marked reduction in death from all causes (relative risk [RR]: 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.55-0.79; pcauses (RR: 0.69; 95%CI: 0.55-0.68; p=0.0012), cardiovascular events (RR: 0.55; 95%CI: 0.4-0.75; p=0.0001) and stroke (RR: 0.66; 95%CI: 0.5-0.88; p=0.0022). The use of statins in dialysis-dependent CKD patients resulted in a non-significant effect on death from all causes (RR: 0.99; 95%CI: 0.88-1.11; p=0.85) and stroke (RR: 1.31; 95%CI: 0.9-1.89; p>0.05), but had the effect of reducing death from cardiac causes (RR: 0.79; 95%CI: 0.64-0.98; pCKD. According to the very limited data the obtained results suggest caution in expecting a reduction in cardiovascular events in patients on dialysis.

  3. The effects of calcium channel blockers in the prevention of stroke in adults with hypertension: a meta-analysis of data from 273,543 participants in 31 randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Jv Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertension is a major risk factor for the development of stroke. It is well known that lowering blood pressure decreases the risk of stroke in people with moderate to severe hypertension. However, the specific effects of calcium channel blockers (CCBs against stroke in patients with hypertension as compared to no treatment and other antihypertensive drug classes are not known. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluated CCBs effect on stroke in patients with hypertension in studies of CCBs versus placebo, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs, β-adrenergic blockers, and diuretics. The PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, OVID, CNKI, MEDCH, and WANFANG databases were searched for trials published in English or Chinese during the period January 1, 1996 to July 31, 2012. A total of 177 reports were collected, among them 31 RCTs with 273,543 participants (including 130,466 experimental subjects and 143,077 controls met the inclusion criteria. In these trials a total of 9,550 stroke events (4,145 in experimental group and 5,405 in control group were reported. CCBs significantly decreased the incidence of stroke compared with placebo (OR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.61-0.75, p<1×10(-5, β-adrenergic blockers combined with diuretics (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.83-0.95, p = 7×10(-5 and β-adrenergic blockers (OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.72-0.87, p<1×10(-5, statistically significant difference was not found between CCBs and ACEIs (OR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.8-1.02, p = 0.12 or diuretics (OR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.84-1.07, p = 0.39. CONCLUSION: In a pooled analysis of data of 31 RCTs measuring the effect of CCBs on stroke, CCBs reduced stroke more than placebo and β-adrenergic blockers, but were not different than ACEIs and diuretics. More head to head RCTs are warranted.

  4. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of 2% lidocaine HCl with different epinephrine concentration for local anesthesia in participants undergoing surgical extraction of impacted mandibular third molars: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, crossover, phase IV trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karm, Myong-Hwan; Park, Fiona Daye; Kang, Moonkyu; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kang, Jeong Wan; Kim, Seungoh; Kim, Yong-Deok; Kim, Cheul-Hong; Seo, Kwang-Suk; Kwon, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Chul-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Woo; Hong, Sung-Woon; Lim, Mi Hyoung; Nam, Seung Kwan; Cho, Jae Min

    2017-05-01

    The most commonly impacted tooth is the third molar. An impacted third molar can ultimately cause acute pain, infection, tumors, cysts, caries, periodontal disease, and loss of adjacent teeth. Local anesthesia is employed for removing the third molar. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 or 1:200,000 epinephrine for surgical extraction of bilateral impacted mandibular third molars. Sixty-five healthy participants underwent surgical extraction of bilateral impacted mandibular third molars in 2 separate visits while under local anesthesia with 2% lidocaine with different epinephrine concentration (1:80,000 or 1:200,000) in a double-blind, randomized, crossover trial. Visual analog scale pain scores obtained immediately after surgical extraction were primarily evaluated for the 2 groups receiving different epinephrine concentrations. Visual analog scale pain scores were obtained 2, 4, and 6 hours after administering an anesthetic. Onset and duration of analgesia, onset of pain, intraoperative bleeding, operator's and participant's overall satisfaction, drug dosage, and hemodynamic parameters were evaluated for the 2 groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in any measurements except hemodynamic factors (P >.05). Changes in systolic blood pressure and heart rate following anesthetic administration were significantly greater in the group receiving 1:80,000 epinephrine than in that receiving 1:200,000 epinephrine (P ≤.01). The difference in epinephrine concentration between 1:80,000 and 1:200,000 in 2% lidocaine liquid does not affect the medical efficacy of the anesthetic. Furthermore, 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine has better safety with regard to hemodynamic parameters than 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. Therefore, we suggest using 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine rather than 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine for surgical extraction of impacted

  5. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  6. Effect of Beta alanine and sodium bicarbonate supplementation on repeated-sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducker, Kagan J; Dawson, Brian; Wallman, Karen E

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate if combining beta alanine (BA) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) supplementation could lead to enhanced repeated-sprint performance in team-sport athletes, beyond what is possible with either supplement alone. Participants (n = 24) completed duplicate trials of a repeated-sprint test (3 sets; 6 × 20 m departing every 25 seconds, 4 minutes active recovery between sets) and were then allocated into 4 groups as follows: BA only (n = 6; 28 days BA, acute sodium chloride placebo); NaHCO3 only (n = 6; 28 days glucose placebo, acute NaHCO3); BA/NaHCO3 (n = 6; 28 days BA, acute NaHCO3); placebo only (n = 6; 28 days glucose placebo, acute sodium chloride placebo), then completed duplicate trials postsupplementation. Sodium bicarbonate alone resulted in moderate effect size (d = 0.40-0.71) and "likely" and "very likely" benefit for overall total sprint times (TST) and for each individual set and for first sprint (sets 2 and 3) and best sprint time (sets 2 and 3). Combining BA and NaHCO3 resulted in "possible" to "likely" benefits for overall TST and for sets 2 and 3. First sprint (set 3) and best sprint time (sets 2 and 3) also showed "likely" benefit after this trial. The BA and placebo groups showed no differences in performance after supplementation. In conclusion, these results indicate that supplementation with acute NaHCO3 improved repeated-sprint performance more than either a combination of NaHCO3 and BA or BA alone.

  7. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ... to HIV Can anyone participate in an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? It depends on the study. Some ...

  8. Effects of repeated snowboard exercise in virtual reality with time lags of visual scene behind body rotation on head stability and subjective slalom run performance in healthy young subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoshiro; Nishiike, Suetaka; Kitahara, Tadashi; Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Imai, Takao; Ito, Taeko; Sato, Go; Matsuda, Kazunori; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Takeda, Noriaki

    2016-11-01

    After repeated snowboard exercises in the virtual reality (VR) world with increasing time lags in trials 3-8, it is suggested that the adaptation to repeated visual-vestibulosomatosensory conflict in the VR world improved dynamic posture control and motor performance in the real world without the development of motion sickness. The VR technology was used and the effects of repeated snowboard exercise examined in the VR world with time lags between visual scene and body rotation on the head stability and slalom run performance during exercise in healthy subjects. Forty-two healthy young subjects participated in the study. After trials 1 and 2 of snowboard exercise in the VR world without time lag, trials 3-8 were conducted with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 s time lags of the visual scene that the computer creates behind board rotation, respectively. Finally, trial 9 was conducted without time lag. Head linear accelerations and subjective slalom run performance were evaluated. The standard deviations of head linear accelerations in inter-aural direction were significantly increased in trial 8, with a time lag of 0.6 s, but significantly decreased in trial 9 without a time lag, compared with those in trial 2 without a time lag. The subjective scores of slalom run performance were significantly decreased in trial 8, with a time lag of 0.6 s, but significantly increased in trial 9 without a time lag, compared with those in trial 2 without a time lag. Motion sickness was not induced in any subjects.

  9. Repeated sprint ability is not enhanced by caffeine, arginine, and branched-chain amino acids in moderately trained soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolao, Andrea; Zanotto, Tobia; Carraro, Nicolò; Fornasier, Tommaso; Zaccaria, Marco; Neunhaeuserer, Daniel; Bergamin, Marco

    2017-02-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of a dietary supplementation on the repeated sprint ability (RSA) performance in recreationally trained team sports athletes. Twelve young men underwent a RSA exercise protocol in five trials, in which participants ingested carbohydrates (CHO) plus caffeine (Caf), CHO plus arginine (Arg), CHO plus branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), CHO plus Caf, Arg, and BCAA (ALL), and CHO only. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, hematic lactate, ratings of perceived exertion, average sprint time, total time, best sprint time, peak power, and average power were taken. Data revealed no significant effects neither on physiological nor performance parameters with any of the supplements.

  10. Repeated sprint ability is not enhanced by caffeine, arginine, and branched-chain amino acids in moderately trained soccer players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolao, Andrea; Zanotto, Tobia; Carraro, Nicolò; Fornasier, Tommaso; Zaccaria, Marco; Neunhaeuserer, Daniel; Bergamin, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of a dietary supplementation on the repeated sprint ability (RSA) performance in recreationally trained team sports athletes. Twelve young men underwent a RSA exercise protocol in five trials, in which participants ingested carbohydrates (CHO) plus caffeine (Caf), CHO plus arginine (Arg), CHO plus branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), CHO plus Caf, Arg, and BCAA (ALL), and CHO only. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, hematic lactate, ratings of perceived exertion, average sprint time, total time, best sprint time, peak power, and average power were taken. Data revealed no significant effects neither on physiological nor performance parameters with any of the supplements. PMID:28349034

  11. Effects of sodium phosphate and caffeine ingestion on repeated-sprint ability in male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Benjamin J; Dawson, Brian T; Buck, Christopher; Wallman, Karen E

    2016-03-01

    To assess the effects of sodium phosphate (SP) and caffeine supplementation on repeated-sprint performance. Randomized, double-blind, Latin-square design. Eleven team-sport males participated in four trials: (1) SP (50mgkg(-1) of free fat-mass daily for six days) and caffeine (6mgkg(-1) ingested 1h before exercise); SP+C, (2) SP and placebo (for caffeine), (3) caffeine and placebo (for SP) and (4) placebo (for SP and caffeine). After loading, participants performed a simulated team-game circuit (STGC) consisting of 2×30min halves, with 6×20-m repeated-sprint sets performed at the start, half-time and end of the STGC. There were no interaction effects between trials for first-sprint (FS), best-sprint (BS) or total-sprint (TS) times (p>0.05). However, SP resulted in the fastest times for all sprints, as supported by moderate to large effect sizes (ES; d=0.51-0.83) and 'likely' to 'very likely' chances of benefit, compared with placebo. Compared with caffeine, SP resulted in 'possible' to 'likely' chances of benefit for FS, BS and TS for numerous sets and a 'possible' chance of benefit compared with SP+C for BS (set 2). Compared with placebo, SP+C resulted in moderate ES (d=0.50-0.62) and 'possible' to 'likely' benefit for numerous sprints, while caffeine resulted in a moderate ES (d=0.63; FS: set 3) and 'likely' chances of benefit for a number of sets. While not significant, ES and qualitative analysis results suggest that SP supplementation may improve repeated-sprint performance when compared with placebo. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of repeated outcome measures from longitudinal studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanjia WANG; Naihua DUAN

    2011-01-01

    @@ In many clinical studies repeated measurements of an outcome are collected over time.For example,in an 8-week study of treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder,the severity of the disorder may be measured weekly using the Yale-Brown-Obsessive-Compulsive-Disorder-Scale (YBOCS).For each study participant who completes the study,there will be nine repeated measures of YBOCS (a baseline assessment plus eight assessments during the course of treatment).Such a study in which participants are followed and measured repeatedly over time is called a longitudinal study and the resulting data are called longitudinal data.

  13. A phase I study of combined docetaxel and repeated high activity {sup 186}Re-HEDP in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone (the TAXIUM trial)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodewaard-de Jong, Joyce M. van; Bloemendal, Haiko J. [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de; Haas, Marie J. de [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Bezooijen, Bart P.J. van [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Urology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Wilson, Richard H.; O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals have palliative benefit in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone. Recent studies have shown improvement of survival and quality of life when radiopharmaceuticals were given repeatedly or in combination with chemotherapy. We designed a phase I study combining docetaxel and {sup 186}Re-labelled hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (HEDP) in men with CRPC and bone metastases to evaluate toxicity. A dose escalation schedule was designed consisting of four dose levels with a standard dosage of docetaxel (75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly). {sup 186}Re-HEDP was given in increasing activities (1,250 MBq up to 2,500 MBq) after the third and sixth cycle of docetaxel. Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any grade 4 toxicity lasting more than 7 days or any grade 3 toxicity that did not recover within 10 days. Three patients were planned for each dose level expanding to six if a DLT occurred. Fourteen patients were recruited with a median age of 64.6 years. One DLT, grade 3 thrombocytopenia lasting >10 days, occurred at dose level 3 leading to expansion of this group to six. One of these patients had an episode of acute renal failure which resolved. Because of production problems of {sup 186}Re-HEDP dose level 4 was not started. Combined therapy with docetaxel and {sup 186}Re-HEDP is generally well tolerated in patients with CRPC metastatic to bone. We will conduct a randomized phase II study using three cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly followed by {sup 188}Re-HEDP 40 MBq/kg body weight, followed by another three cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2}, followed by {sup 188}Re-HEDP 20 MBq/kg body weight. (orig.)

  14. Single and repeated moderate consumption of native or dealcoholized red wine show different effects on antioxidant parameters in blood and DNA strand breaks in peripheral leukocytes in healthy volunteers: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN68505294

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spengler Ulrich

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Red wine (RW is rich in antioxidant polyphenols that might protect from oxidative stress related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Antioxidant effects after single ingestion of RW or dealcoholized RW (DRW have been observed in several studies, but results after regular consumption are contradictory. Thus, we examined if single or repeated consumption of moderate amounts of RW or DRW exert antioxidant activity in vivo. Methods Total phenolic content and concentration of other antioxidants in plasma/serum, total antioxidant capacity (TEAC in plasma as well as DNA strand breaks in peripheral leukocytes were measured in healthy non-smokers A before, 90 and 360 min after ingestion of one glass of RW, DRW or water; B before and after consumption of one glass of RW or DRW daily for 6 weeks. DNA strand breaks (SB were determined by single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet Assay in untreated cells and after induction of oxidative stress ex vivo with H2O2 (300 μM, 20 min. Results Both RW and DRW transiently increased total phenolic content in plasma after single consumption, but only RW lead to a sustained increase if consumed regularly. Plasma antioxidant capacity was not affected by single or regular consumption of RW or DRW. Effects of RW and DRW on DNA SB were conflicting. DNA strand breaks in untreated cells increased after a single dose of RW and DRW, whereas H2O2 induced SB were reduced after DRW. In contrast, regular RW consumption reduced SB in untreated cells but did not affect H2O2 induced SB. Conclusion The results suggest that consumption of both RW and DRW leads to an accumulation of phenolic compounds in plasma without increasing plasma antioxidant capacity. Red wine and DRW seem to affect the occurrence of DNA strand breaks, but this cannot be referred to antioxidant effects.

  15. Efficacy and tolerance of repeated oral doses of tolperisone hydrochloride in the treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm: results of a prospective placebo-controlled double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratzel, H G; Alken, R G; Ramm, S

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of oral tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydocalm) in the treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm was assessed in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 138 patients, aged between 20 and 75 years, with painful reflex muscle spasm associated with diseases of the spinal column or proximal joints were enrolled in eight rehabilitation centers. Patients were randomized to receive either 300 mg tolperisone hydrochloride or placebo for a period of 21 days. Both treatment groups recovered during the 3 weeks rehabilitation program. However, tolperisone hydrochloride proved to be significantly superior to placebo: the change score of the pressure pain threshold as the primary target parameter significantly increased during therapy with tolperisone hydrochloride (P = 0.03, valid-case-analysis) compared to the results obtained on placebo treatment. The overall assessment of efficacy by the patient also demonstrated significant differences in favor of tolperisone hydrochloride. Best results were seen in patients aged between 40 and 60 years with a history of complaints shorter than 1 year and with concomitant physical therapy. The evaluation of safety data, i.e., adverse events, biochemical and hematological laboratory parameters, demonstrated no differences between tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo. As a conclusion tolperisone hydrochloride represents an effective and safe treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm without the typical side effects of centrally active muscle relaxants.

  16. Is voice therapy an effective treatment for dysphonia? A randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    MacKenzie, K.; Millar,