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Sample records for repeated tomography experiments

  1. The Perpetual Repeater: an Educative Musical Experience.

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    Svetlana Skriagina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Music Undergraduate Program of the Universidad Pedagógica Nacional (National Pedagogic University, two musical events were planned: an original work written for choir, soloists and symphonic band, and an opera for children. As a result, the cantata ‘The Perpetual Repeater” has been created as an adaptation of a work named “50 Milions de Segons” (50 Millions of Seconds, staged by the CATANIA project of the Barcelona Servei Educatiu de L’Auditori. This work tells the story of those school teachers who, paradoxically enough repeat the same course year after year. After visiting L’Auditori of Barcelona to participate in the pedagogic musical work carried out with school children, we considered the possibility of developing an analogous project, in a similar sociocultural and educational environment, within our Music Undergraduate Program. So, this article deals with two fundamental moments which are essential to understand the educational work implemented with the ISPA students of sixth degree, as well as with a group of the program’s students: The Purpose, which describes in detail the planning of the musical work for children, and The Experience, in which the way the process of The Perpetual Repeater Cantatawas carried out is described.

  2. Childhood experiences and repeated suicidal behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Gertrud; Nielsen, Bent; Rask, P

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of various events in childhood on suicidal behavior in adult age. For this purpose, 99 patients admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of Odense University Hospital after making a suicide attempt were followed for 5 years, to register repeated...... suicidal behavior. The results showed that three fourths of the patients attempted suicide more than once (62% nonfatal and 14% fatal outcome). The sex distribution was about the same among the first-evers as among the repeaters. Most repeaters were younger people in their twenties and thirties......, and the first-evers on average were past the age of 40. Somewhat unexpectedly, significantly more repeaters than first-evers had grown up with both their parents. However, the results also showed that significantly more repeaters than first-evers had had an unhappy childhood. This indicates...

  3. Repeatability of Perimacular Ganglion Cell Complex Analysis with Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

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    Ng, Dorothy S. K.; Preeti Gupta; Yih Chung Tham; Chye Fong Peck; Tien Yin Wong; Mohammad Kamran Ikram; Cheung, Carol Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the repeatability of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to measure macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thicknesses and compare retinal ganglion cell parameters between algorithms. Methods. Ninety-two nonglaucomatous eyes from 92 participants underwent macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thickness measurement using OCT-HS100 Glaucoma 3D algorithm and these measurements were repeated for 34 subjects. All subjects also had macular ganglion cell-in...

  4. Accuracy and repeatability of anthropometric facial measurements using cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Gerrits, Peter O.; Ren, Yijin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and repeatability of linear anthropometric measurements on the soft tissue surface model generated from cone beam computed tomography scans. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of seven cadaver heads. The accuracy and r

  5. The Repeatability Experiment of SIGMOD 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manolescu, I.; Afanasiev, L.; Arion, A.; Dittrich, J.; Manegold, S.; Polyzotis, N.; Schnaitter, K.; Senellart, P.; Zoupanos, S.; Shasha, D.

    2008-01-01

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters' programs against their data to verify the experiments published. This paper discusses the rationale for this effort, the community's reaction, our experiences, and advice for future similar efforts.

  6. The repeatability experiment of SIGMOD 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manolescu, I.; Afanasiev, L.; Arion, A.; Dittrich, J.; Manegold, S.; Polyzotis, N.; Schnaitter, K.; Senellart, P.; Zoupanos, S.; Shasha, D.

    2008-01-01

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters' programs against their data to verify the experiments published. This paper discusses the rationale for this effort, the community's reaction, our experiences, and advice for future similar efforts.

  7. Choice in the repeated-gambles experiment.

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    Silberberg, A; Murray, P; Christensen, J; Asano, T

    1988-09-01

    Humans chose 10 times between two roulette wheels projected on a monitor. During the first trial, the left wheel provided a hypothetical $100 with p = .94, and the right wheel provided $250 with p = .39. A titration procedure adjusted the probability of a $250 win across trials to permit estimation of an indifference point between alternatives. In Experiment 1, intertrial-interval duration (25 vs. 90 s) and whether sessions began with an intertrial interval or a trial were varied in a 2 x 2 design in this risky-choice procedure. Risk aversion (preference for the $100 wheel) increased with intertrial interval but was unaffected by whether sessions began with a trial or an intertrial interval. In Experiment 2, all sessions began with a trial, and subjects were informed that the experiment ended after 10 trials. Intertrial-interval duration had no effect on choice. In Experiment 3, intertrial-interval duration and whether subjects were given $10 or $10,000 before beginning were varied among four groups in a 2 x 2 design. In all other ways, the procedure was unchanged from Experiment 2. Intertrial interval had no effect on choice, but the $10,000 groups showed less risk aversion than the $10 groups. These results can be explained more readily in terms of Kahneman and Tversky's (1984) notion of "framing of the prospect" than in terms of Rachlin, Logue, Gibbon, and Frankel's (1986) behavioral account of risky choice.

  8. Diagnosis and Progression of Sacroiliitis in Repeated Sacroiliac Joint Computed Tomography

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    Mats Geijer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the clinical utility of repeat sacroiliac joint computed tomography (CT in sacroiliitis by assessing the proportion of patients changing from normal to pathologic at CT and to which degree there is progression of established sacroiliitis at repeat CT. Methods. In a retrospective analysis of 334 patients (median age 34 years with symptoms suggestive of inflammatory back pain, CT had been performed twice, in 47 of these thrice, and in eight patients four times. The studies were scored as normal, equivocal, unilateral sacroiliitis, or bilateral sacroiliitis. Results. There was no change in 331 of 389 repeat examinations. Ten patients (3.0% had progressed from normal or equivocal to unilateral or bilateral sacroiliitis. Of 43 cases with sacroiliitis on the first study, 36 (83.7% progressed markedly. Two normal cases had changed to equivocal. Eight equivocal cases were classified as normal on the repeat study. In further two patients, only small changes within the scoring grade equivocal were detected. Conclusions. CT is a valuable examination for diagnosis of sacroiliitis, but a repeated examination detects only a few additional cases of sacroiliitis. Most cases with already established sacroiliitis showed progression of disease.

  9. Repeatability and reproducibility of optic nerve head perfusion measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography

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    Chen, Chieh-Li; Bojikian, Karine D.; Xin, Chen; Wen, Joanne C.; Gupta, Divakar; Zhang, Qinqin; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Chen, Philip P.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) has increasingly become a clinically useful technique in ophthalmic imaging. We evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of blood perfusion in the optic nerve head (ONH) measured using optical microangiography (OMAG)-based OCTA. Ten eyes from 10 healthy volunteers are recruited and scanned three times with a 68-kHz Cirrus HD-OCT 5000-based OMAG prototype system (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Dublin, California) centered at the ONH involving two separate visits within six weeks. Vascular images are generated with OMAG processing by detecting the differences in OCT signals between consecutive B-scans acquired at the same retina location. ONH perfusion is quantified as flux, vessel area density, and normalized flux within the ONH for the prelaminar, lamina cribrosa, and the full ONH. Coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) are used to evaluate intravisit and intervisit repeatability, and interobserver reproducibility. ONH perfusion measurements show high repeatability [CV≤3.7% (intravisit) and ≤5.2% (intervisit)] and interobserver reproducibility (ICC≤0.966) in all three layers by three metrics. OCTA provides a noninvasive method to visualize and quantify ONH perfusion in human eyes with excellent repeatability and reproducibility, which may add additional insight into ONH perfusion in clinical practice.

  10. Capturing learning effects on eye movements in repeated measures experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Martin; Orquin, Jacob Lund; Fiedler, Susann

    We propose and illustrate that repeated exposure to stimuli sets increases the size of the saccade amplitudes. Saccadic amplitudes are closely related to the perceptual span and therefore used as a measure for the information intake in an experiment. Studies on expertise have shown that experts...... experiment in which 68 participants made choices between four alternatives with three different between subject conditions varying in presentation format (verbal matrix, a pictorial matrix, and a realistic product representation). The results consistently demonstrate an increase of the saccade amplitude over...... the course of the experiment independent of condition. We conclude by discussing our results in the light of the possible increase of the perceptual span and its implications for the research procedure in eye-tracking experiments with a repeated measurement design....

  11. Repeatability of Perimacular Ganglion Cell Complex Analysis with Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

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    Ng, Dorothy S K; Gupta, Preeti; Tham, Yih Chung; Peck, Chye Fong; Wong, Tien Yin; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Cheung, Carol Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the repeatability of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to measure macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thicknesses and compare retinal ganglion cell parameters between algorithms. Methods. Ninety-two nonglaucomatous eyes from 92 participants underwent macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thickness measurement using OCT-HS100 Glaucoma 3D algorithm and these measurements were repeated for 34 subjects. All subjects also had macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness measured by Cirrus HD-OCT Ganglion Cell Analysis algorithm. Intraclass correlation coefficient and Pearson's correlation analyses were performed. Results. Subfields of both macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thicknesses had high intraclass correlation coefficient values between 0.979 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.958-0.989) and 0.981 (95% CI: 0.963, 0.991) and between 0.70 (95% CI: 0.481-0.838) and 0.987 (95% CI: 0.956-0.989), respectively. The overall average ganglion cell complex and macular average ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thicknesses were strongly correlated (r = 0.83,  P HS100 Glaucoma 3D algorithm is highly repeatable, and strongly correlates to retinal ganglion cell parameters assessed by Ganglion Cell Analysis algorithm. A comprehensive evaluation of retinal ganglion cells may be possible with OCT-HS100.

  12. Repeatability of Perimacular Ganglion Cell Complex Analysis with Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy S. K. Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the repeatability of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to measure macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thicknesses and compare retinal ganglion cell parameters between algorithms. Methods. Ninety-two nonglaucomatous eyes from 92 participants underwent macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thickness measurement using OCT-HS100 Glaucoma 3D algorithm and these measurements were repeated for 34 subjects. All subjects also had macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness measured by Cirrus HD-OCT Ganglion Cell Analysis algorithm. Intraclass correlation coefficient and Pearson’s correlation analyses were performed. Results. Subfields of both macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thicknesses had high intraclass correlation coefficient values between 0.979 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.958–0.989 and 0.981 (95% CI: 0.963, 0.991 and between 0.70 (95% CI: 0.481–0.838 and 0.987 (95% CI: 0.956–0.989, respectively. The overall average ganglion cell complex and macular average ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thicknesses were strongly correlated (r=0.83, P<0.001.  Conclusions. The assessment of macular and perimacular retinal ganglion cell parameters by OCT-HS100 Glaucoma 3D algorithm is highly repeatable, and strongly correlates to retinal ganglion cell parameters assessed by Ganglion Cell Analysis algorithm. A comprehensive evaluation of retinal ganglion cells may be possible with OCT-HS100.

  13. Impact of repeat computerized tomography replans in the radiation therapy of head and neck cancers

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    Virendra Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical changes can occur during course of head-and-neck (H and N radiotherapy like tumor shrinkage, decreased edema and/or weight loss. This can lead to discrepancies in planned and delivered dose increasing the dose to organs at risk. A study was conducted to determine the volumetric and dosimetric changes with the help of repeat computed tomography (CT and replanning for selected H and N cancer patients treated with IMRT plans to see for these effects. In 15 patients with primary H and N cancer, a repeat CT scan after 3 rd week of radiotherapy was done when it was clinically indicated and then two plans were generated on repeat CT scan, actual plan (AP planned on repeat CT scan, and hybrid plan (HP, which was generated by applying the first intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plan (including monitoring units to the images of second CT scan. Both plans (AP and HP on repeat CT scan were compared for volumetric and dosimetric parameter. The mean variation in volumes between CT and repeat CT were 44.32 cc, 82.2 cc, and 149.83 cc for gross tumor volume (GTV, clinical target volumes (CTV, and planning target volume (PTV, respectively. Mean conformity index and homogeneity index was 0.68 and 1.07, respectively for AP and 0.5 and 1.16, respectively for HP. Mean D 95 and D 99 of PTV was 97.92% (standard deviation, SD 2.32 and 93.4% (SD 3.75, respectively for AP and 92.8% (SD 3.83 and 82.8% (SD 8.0, respectively for HP. Increase in mean doses to right parotid, left parotid, spine, and brainstem were 5.56 Gy (D mean , 3.28 Gy (D mean , 1.25 Gy (D max , and 3.88 Gy (D max , respectively in HP compared to AP. Repeat CT and replanning reduces the chance of discrepancies in delivered dose due to volume changes and also improves coverage to target volume and further reduces dose to organ at risk.

  14. Treatment of bacterial brain abscess by repeated aspiration. Follow up by serial computed tomography

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    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Fukushima, Takeo; Hirakawa, Katsuyuki; Kimura, Hideo; Tomonaga, Masamichi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-02-01

    Bacterial brain abscess often requires repeated aspiration before the abscess finally resolves. However, there are no guidelines for treatment by aspiration; for example, when should the abscess be tapped again, or when can an abscess be treated by antibiotics alone without further aspiration. Eleven patients with bacterial brain abscess treated by aspiration were evaluated to establish treatment guidelines for brain abscess, in particular the abscess size on serial computed tomography (CT) after aspiration. CT was performed about 24 hours after aspiration to evaluate the size of the abscess, and almost weekly during follow up. The diameter of the brain abscess before and after the initial and last aspirations were reviewed. In eight of the 11 patients, abscesses were aspirated repeatedly: two to three times in most patients. The diameter of the abscesses was 2.5-4.5 cm (mean 3.5 cm) before the last aspiration, and 1.4-3.4 cm (mean 2.3 cm) after the last aspiration, or when continuous drainage was discontinued. Perifocal edema was moderately decreased within 3 weeks after the last aspiration by medical treatment alone, with a concomitant decrease in the volume of the abscess. There were no deaths, and most patients had a favorable outcome. These results suggest that after the diameter of the abscess becomes less than 2 to 3 cm and does not increase anymore on serial CT, medical treatment alone can be anticipated to give satisfactory results without further aspiration. (author)

  15. Repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanumunthadu, Daren; Ilginis, Tomas; Restori, Marie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to determine the intrasession repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT)-derived retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). METHODS: A prospective study consisting of patients with...

  16. Estimating groundwater velocity using apparent resistivity tomography: A sandbox experiment

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    Chen, J. L.; Chen, C. H.; Kuo, C. L.; Fen, C. S.; Wu, C. C.

    2016-08-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) technique can estimate groundwater velocity to within 5% of the pre-set groundwater velocity. The apparent conductivity obtained by the ERT technique is linearly related to the groundwater conductivity, as described by Archie's law. Gaussian-like profiles of the tracer concentration were demonstrated with the ERT technique, and the estimated dispersion coefficient was between 0.0015 and 0.0051 cm2/sec. In terms of monitoring changes in groundwater conductivity, the ERT technique has two major advantages over monitoring wells: (1) it measures a larger area and provides more representative results; and, (2) it does not withdraw groundwater samples, and therefore does not affect the groundwater flow. The objective of this research is to measure groundwater velocity with the ERT technique using only one well. The experiments in this research were divided into two parts. The first part evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of the ERT technique using a dipole-dipole array, and the second part estimated the groundwater velocity in a sandbox using the ERT technique. The length, width, and height of the sandbox, which was made of acrylic, were 1.5, 5, and 1.0 m, respectively. The ERT sandbox was sequentially filled with 5-cm layers of the silica sand to a total height of 70 cm. A total of 32 electrodes spaced every 5-cm were installed in the center of the sandbox. Three monitoring wells were installed along the line of the electrodes. Both no-flow and constant flow (NaCl solution with electrical conductivity and concentration of 5,000 μs/cm and 2.456 g/L, respectively) tracer experiments were conducted.

  17. Breathing of the Nevado del Ruiz volcano reservoir, Colombia, inferred from repeated seismic tomography

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    Vargas, Carlos. A.; Koulakov, Ivan; Jaupart, Claude; Gladkov, Valery; Gomez, Eliana; El Khrepy, Sami; Al-Arifi, Nassir

    2017-01-01

    Nevado del Ruiz volcano (NRV), Columbia, is one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world and caused the death of 25,000 people in 1985. Using a new algorithm for repeated tomography, we have found a prominent seismic anomaly with high values of the Vp/Vs ratio at depths of 2–5 km below the surface, which is associated with a shallow magma reservoir. The amplitude and shape of this anomaly changed during the current phase of unrest which began in 2010. We interpret these changes as due to the ascent of gas bubbles through magma and to degassing of the reservoir. In 2011–2014, most of this gas escaped through permeable roof rocks, feeding surface fumarole activity and leading to a gradual decrease of the Vp/Vs ratio in the reservoir. This trend was reversed in 2015–2016 due to replenishment of the reservoir by a new batch of volatile-rich magma likely to sustain further volcanic activity. It is argued that the recurring “breathing” of the shallow reservoir is the main cause of current eruptions at NRV. PMID:28393851

  18. Breathing of the Nevado del Ruiz volcano reservoir, Colombia, inferred from repeated seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Carlos. A.; Koulakov, Ivan; Jaupart, Claude; Gladkov, Valery; Gomez, Eliana; El Khrepy, Sami; Al-Arifi, Nassir

    2017-04-01

    Nevado del Ruiz volcano (NRV), Columbia, is one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world and caused the death of 25,000 people in 1985. Using a new algorithm for repeated tomography, we have found a prominent seismic anomaly with high values of the Vp/Vs ratio at depths of 2-5 km below the surface, which is associated with a shallow magma reservoir. The amplitude and shape of this anomaly changed during the current phase of unrest which began in 2010. We interpret these changes as due to the ascent of gas bubbles through magma and to degassing of the reservoir. In 2011-2014, most of this gas escaped through permeable roof rocks, feeding surface fumarole activity and leading to a gradual decrease of the Vp/Vs ratio in the reservoir. This trend was reversed in 2015-2016 due to replenishment of the reservoir by a new batch of volatile-rich magma likely to sustain further volcanic activity. It is argued that the recurring “breathing” of the shallow reservoir is the main cause of current eruptions at NRV.

  19. Optimal experiment design revisited: fair, precise and minimal tomography

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    Nunn, J; Puentes, G; Lundeen, J S; Walmsley, I A

    2009-01-01

    Given an experimental set-up and a fixed number of measurements, how should one take data in order to optimally reconstruct the state of a quantum system? The problem of optimal experiment design (OED) for quantum state tomography was first broached by Kosut et al. [arXiv:quant-ph/0411093v1]. Here we provide efficient numerical algorithms for finding the optimal design, and analytic results for the case of 'minimal tomography'. We also introduce the average OED, which is independent of the state to be reconstructed, and the optimal design for tomography (ODT), which minimizes tomographic bias. We find that these two designs are generally similar. Monte-Carlo simulations confirm the utility of our results for qubits. Finally, we adapt our approach to deal with constrained techniques such as maximum likelihood estimation. We find that these are less amenable to optimization than cruder reconstruction methods, such as linear inversion.

  20. “Panda Smiled Again - Credit Goes to Repeated Early Stage Computed Tomography Scan: An Interesting Case Report”

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    Jaiswal Manish

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Extradural hematoma (EDH is considered to be a rare in head trauma associated with arrested hydrocephalus, and represents a serious pathology from which complete recovery can be expected if urgent intervention done in time. In this case report, the authors present an arrested hydrocephalus patient who was apparently asymptomatic at the time of hospital admission with a mild head injury and developed rapidly increasing size of EDH. The value of repeated early Computed tomography (CT scan and the pathogenesis of rapidly increasing size of EDH in arrested hydrocephalic patient are discussed.

  1. Numerical experiment for nonlinear full-wave tomography. 3; Hisenkei full wave tomography no suchi jikken

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    Tsuchiya, T. [Dia Consultants Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Nonlinear full-wave tomography (FWT) is under investigation to improve the estimation accuracy of Vp/Vs distributions. Full-wave tomography is one of the underground structure exploration methods mainly using Tarantola`s nonlinear local optimization method (LOM). Numerical experiment for FWT was carried out assuming relatively weak nonlinear underground structure. In the case of inversion by local optimization method, adequate preconditioning is important. Utilization of geological information is also effective in estimating low-frequency components of a model. As far as data are obtained under proper observation arrangement, even in actual field, precise estimation of Vp/Vs distributions is possible by FWT using explosion in a hole as wave source. In full-wave tomography, selection of observation arrangement is essential for both Vp and Vs. However, the proper arrangement is different between Vp and Vs. Approach to different analyses for Vp and Vs is also necessary by using only proper data for Vp and Vs among obtained data sets. 4 figs.

  2. Repeat cranial tomography in patients with mild head injury and stable neurological examination - a perspective from a developing country

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sadaf Nasir; Manzar Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of altered findings on repeat cranial tomography (CT) in patients with mild head injury along with stable neurological examination at tertiary care hospital.Methods: Cross-sectional study was done in the Department of Radiology, Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi from January 2008 to September 2010. All patients with mild head injury in terms of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) who underwent repeat scan without clinical or neurological deterioration in the emergency department of a tertiary care centre were included. The collected data were accordingly entered and analyzed by the principal investigator using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0.Results: In all 275 patients, only 17 (6%) of the patients were found worseing on repeat CT, 120 (43.63%)scans improved, 138 (50.18%) unchanged and 17 (6.18%)worsened. None of these patients showed signs of clinical deterioration.Conclusion: Our results suggest that for patients with mild head injury and stable neurological examination, only 6% of them show deterioration on repeat CT, especially when patients' GCS is below 13.

  3. Repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumunthadu, Daren; Ilginis, Tomas; Restori, Marie; Sagoo, Mandeep S; Tufail, Adnan; Balaggan, Kamaljit S; Patel, Praveen J

    2017-05-01

    The aim was to determine the intrasession repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT)-derived retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). A prospective study consisting of patients with active nAMD enrolled in the Distance of Choroid Study at Moorfields Eye Hospital, London. Patients underwent three 12×9 mm macular raster scans using the deep range imaging (DRI) OCT-1 SS-OCT (Topcon) device in a single imaging session. Retinal and choroidal thicknesses were calculated for the ETDRS macular subfields. Repeatability was calculated according to methods described by Bland and Altman. 39 eyes of 39 patients with nAMD were included with a mean (±SD) age of 73.9 (±7.2) years. The mean (±SD) retinal thickness of the central macular subfield was 225.7 μm (±12.4 μm). The repeatability this subfield, expressed as a percentage of the mean central macular subfield thickness, was 23.2%. The percentage repeatability of the other macular subfields ranged from 13.2% to 28.7%. The intrasession coefficient of repeatability of choroidal thickness of the central macular subfield was 57.2 μm with a mean choroidal thickness (±SD) of 181 μm (±15.8 μm). This study suggests that a change >23.2% of retinal thickness and 57.2 μm choroidal thickness in the central macular subfield is required to distinguish true clinical change from measurement variability when using the DRI OCT-1 device to manage patients with nAMD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Repeatability and reproducibility of anterior chamber volume measurements using 3-dimensional corneal and anterior segment optical coherence tomography.

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    Fukuda, Shinichi; Kawana, Keisuke; Yasuno, Yoshiaki; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of anterior chamber volume (ACV) measurements using swept-source 3-dimensional corneal and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (CAS-OCT) and dual Scheimpflug imaging. Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. Nonrandomized clinical trial. Measurements were taken in normal eyes (subject group) and in eyes with primary angle closure (PAC) (patient group). In the subject group, the entire ACV and the central 8.0 mm diameter ACV were measured using CAS-OCT and dual Scheimpflug imaging. In the patient group, the entire ACV and 8.0 mm ACV were measured using CAS-OCT. The coefficient of variation and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated to evaluate repeatability and reproducibility, and the correlation between the 2 devices was assessed. In the subject group, the mean 8.0 mm ACV was 110.14 mm(3) ± 12.57 (SD) using CAS-OCT and 114.51 ± 14.69 mm(3) using Scheimpflug imaging; there was a significant linear correlation (r = 0.878, P ACV on CAS-OCT was 165.15 ± 29.29 mm(3). The ICCs of the 8.0 mm and entire ACV measurements were greater than 0.94. The coefficients of repeatability and reproducibility of the 8.0 mm ACV and entire ACV measurements were less than 5%. In the patient group, the 8.0 mm and entire ACV measurements showed good reproducibility and repeatability. The CAS-OCT method allowed noninvasive measurement of the entire ACV with sufficient repeatability and reproducibility. The 8.0 mm ACV measurements with CAS-OCT and Scheimpflug imaging were comparable. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 4D x-ray phase contrast tomography for repeatable motion of biological samples

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    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography based on a grating interferometer was applied to fast and dynamic measurements of biological samples. To achieve this, the scanning procedure in the tomographic scan was improved. A triangle-shaped voltage signal from a waveform generator to a Piezo stage was used for the fast phase stepping in the grating interferometer. In addition, an optical fiber coupled x-ray scientific CMOS camera was used to achieve fast and highly efficient image acquisitions. These optimizations made it possible to perform an x-ray phase contrast tomographic measurement within an 8 min scan with density resolution of 2.4 mg/cm3. A maximum volume size of 13 × 13 × 6 mm3 was obtained with a single tomographic measurement with a voxel size of 6.5 μm. The scanning procedure using the triangle wave was applied to four-dimensional measurements in which highly sensitive three-dimensional x-ray imaging and a time-resolved dynamic measurement of biological samples were combined. A fresh tendon in the tail of a rat was measured under a uniaxial stretching and releasing condition. To maintain the freshness of the sample during four-dimensional phase contrast tomography, the temperature of the bathing liquid of the sample was kept below 10° using a simple cooling system. The time-resolved deformation of the tendon and each fascicle was measured with a temporal resolution of 5.7 Hz. Evaluations of cross-sectional area size, length of the axis, and mass density in the fascicle during a stretching process provided a basis for quantitative analysis of the deformation of tendon fascicle.

  6. Effects of Repeated Practice and Contextual-Writing Experiences on College Students' Writing Skills.

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    Johnstone, Karla M.; Ashbaugh, Hollis; Warfield, Terry D.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of both general and task-specific writing experiences on college students' writing-skill development. As predicted, repeated practice was associated with superior writing skills and after controlling for repeated practice, writing within a specific test domain was associated with superior writing skills. Implications for…

  7. Gallium-67 Scintigraphy in the Era of Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography; Tertiary centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badriya Al-Suqri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Although 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT has largely replaced the use of gallium-67 (67Ga scintigraphy in the evaluation and follow-up of lymphoma patients, 67Ga scans are still of value, particularly in countries where no PET/CT service is available. The current study presents the experience of a tertiary care centre using 67Ga scintigraphy for the evaluation of lymphomas and infections. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of all 67Ga scans performed between 2007 and 2011 at the Royal Hospital in Muscat, Oman. Images and reports of 67Ga scans were compared to clinical and radiological follow-up data including CT and PET/CT scans and biopsies when available. Results: A total of 74 patients were referred for 67Ga scintigraphy during this period with 12 patients excluded due to lack of follow-up data, resulting in 62 patients. Among these patients, 90 67Ga scans were performed, including 59 for lymphoma, 29 for infection and two for sarcoidosis assessment. Of the infection assessment scans, 22 were performed to assess pyrexia of unknown origin and seven for follow-up after known infections. Sensitivity and specificity were found to be 80% and 88%, respectively, for the lymphoma assessment scans. For the infection assessment scans, sensitivity and specificity were reported to be 80% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Results from this study were consistent with other reported rates of 67Ga scan sensitivity and specificity in the evaluation of lymphomas and infections. This indicates that 67Ga scintigraphy is a useful tool for these types of evaluations when PET/CT services are not available.

  8. REPEATED LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: EXPERIENCE OF RUSSIAN SCIENTIFIC CENTER OF RADIOLOGY AND SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY (RSCRST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Granov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives the report about the experience in repeated liver transplantation (LT. Totally 99 LT including 6 repeated operation at five patients performed between june 1999 and june 2011. In 3 of 6 cases bile ducts necroses was the indication to repeated LT. Retransplantations were connected with difficulties, enlargement of duration and replacement therapy volume, also explained high number of complication after operation. It is demonstrated that chronic biliary infection and bad condition of patients are the main reasons of complication and poor prognosis after repeated liver transplantation. 

  9. Inference for an Experiment based on Repeated Majority Votes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-15

    with the experimental setup used, if paranormal abilities do exist they may operate on the sequence as a whole, and the trials may not be independent so...assumption in the ESP experiment, since paranormal abilities, if they exist, may operate on the entire sequence as a whole. With this assumption

  10. Repeatability of Choroidal Thickness Measurements on Enhanced Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography Using Different Posterior Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Vivian S; Moisseiev, Elad; Cunefare, David; Farsiu, Sina; Moshiri, Ala; Yiu, Glenn

    2016-09-01

    To assess the reliability of manual choroidal thickness measurements by comparing different posterior boundary definitions of the choroidal-scleral junction on enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). Reliability analysis. Two graders marked the choroidal-scleral junction with segmentation software using different posterior boundaries: (1) the outer border of the choroidal vessel lumen, (2) the outer border of the choroid stroma, and (3) the inner border of the sclera, to measure the vascular choroidal thickness (VCT), stromal choroidal thickness (SCT), and total choroidal thickness (TCT), respectively. Measurements were taken at 0.5-mm intervals from 1.5 mm nasal to 1.5 mm temporal to the fovea, and averaged continuously across the central 3 mm of the macula. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of reliability (CR) were compared to assess intergrader and intragrader reliability. Choroidal thickness measurements varied significantly with different posterior boundaries (P choroidal-scleral junction visibility was Choroidal thickness measurements are more reproducible when measured to the border of the choroid stroma (SCT) than the vascular lumen (VCT) or sclera (TCT). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Input/output system identification - Learning from repeated experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Horta, Lucas G.; Longman, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes three approaches and possible variations for the determination of the Markov parameters for forced response data using general inputs. It is shown that, when the parameters in the solution procedure are bootstrapped, the results can be obtained very efficiently, but the errors propagate throughout all parameters. By arranging the data in a different form and using singular value decomposition, the resulting identified parameters are more accurate, in the least number of successive experiments, at the expense of a large matrix singular value decomposition. When a recursive procedure is employed, the calculations can be performed very efficiently, but the number of repetitions of the experiments is much greater for a given accuracy than for any of the previous approaches. An alternative formulation is proposed to combine the advantages of each of the approaches.

  12. Responses to Anomalous Data Obtained from Repeatable Experiments in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jer-Yann

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible responses to anomalous data obtained from experiments that are repeatable by carrying out additional or alternative experiments in the laboratory. Based on an analysis of responses from scientists to anomalous data taken from identification experiments on the Vinland Map, it was assumed…

  13. Repeated stressful experiences differently affect brain dopamine receptor subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglisi-Allegra, S.; Cabib, S. (Istituto di Psicobiologia e Psicofarmacologia (CNR), Roma (Italy)); Kempf, E.; Schleef, C. (Centre de Neurochimi, Strasbourg (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    The binding of tritiated spiperone (D2 antagonist) and tritiated SCH 23390 (D1 antagonist), in vivo, was investigated in the caudatus putamen (CP) and nucleus accumbens septi (NAS) of mice submitted to ten daily restraint stress sessions. Mice sacrificed 24 hr after the last stressful experience presented a 64% decrease of D2 receptor density (Bmax) but no changes in D1 receptor density in the NAS. In the CP a much smaller (11%) reduction of D2 receptor density was accompanied by a 10% increase of D1 receptors. These results show that the two types of dopamine (DA) receptors adapt in different or even opposite ways to environmental pressure, leading to imbalance between them.

  14. Greenhouse Gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobler Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exelis has recently developed a novel laser-based instrument to aid in the autonomous real-time monitoring and mapping of CO2 concentration over a two-dimensional area. The Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE instrument uses two transceivers and a series of retroreflectors to continuously measure the differential transmission over a number of overlapping lines of sight or “chords”, forming a plane. By inverting the differential transmission measurements along with locally measured temperature (T, pressure (P and relative humidity (RH the average concentration of CO2 along each chord can be determined and, based on the overlap between chords, a 2D map of CO2 concentration over the measurement plane can be estimated. The GreenLITE system was deployed to the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT center in Bozeman, Montana, in Aug-Sept 2014, where more than 200 hours of data were collected over a wide range of environmental conditions, while utilizing a controlled release of CO2 into a segmented underground pipe [1]. The system demonstrated the ability to identify persistent CO2 sources at the test facility and showed strong correlation with an independent measurement using a LI-COR based system. Here we describe the measurement approach, instrument design, and results from the deployment to the ZERT site.

  15. Electrical resistance tomography experiments at the Oregon Graduate Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; LaBrecque, D.; Barber, W.

    1995-04-01

    Three controlled experiments were conducted at the Oregon Graduate Institute (OGI) with the purpose of evaluating electrical resistance tomography for imaging underground processes associated with in-situ site assessment and remediation. The OGI facilities are unique: a double-wall tank 10 m square and 5 m deep, filled with river bottom sediments and instrumented for geophysical and hydrological studies. At this facility, liquid contaminants could be released into the confined soil at a scale sufficiently large to represent real-world physical phenomena. In the first test, images of electrical resistivity were made before and during a controlled spill of gasoline into a sandy soil. The primary purpose was to determine if electrical resistivity images could detect the hydrocarbon in either the vadose or saturated zone. Definite changes in electrical resistivity were observed in both the vadose and saturated soils. The effects were an increase in resistivity of as much as 10% above pre-release values. A single resistive anomaly was imaged, directly below the release point, principally within the vadose zone but extending below the phreatic surface. The anomaly remained identifiable in tomograms taken two days after the release ended with clear indications of lateral spreading along the water table. The second test involved electrical resistance measurements before, during, and after air sparging in a saturated soil. The primary purpose was to determine if the electrical images could be used to detect and delineate the extent of the zone influenced by sparging. The images showed an increase of about 20% in resistivity over background values within the sparged zone and the extent of the imaged zone agreed with that inferred from other information. Electrical resistivity tomography measurements were made under a simulated oil storage tank in the third test. Comparison of images taken before and during separate releases of brine and water showed effects of changes

  16. ALTERED HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND AMYGDALAR NEURONAL ACTIVITY IN ADULT MICE WITH REPEATED EXPERIENCE OF AGGRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy eSmagin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The repeated experience of winning in a social conflict setting elevates levels of aggression and may lead to violent behavioral patterns. Here we use a paradigm of repeated aggression and fighting deprivation to examine changes in behavior, neurogenesis, and neuronal activity in mice with positive fighting experience. We show that for males, repeated positive fighting experience induces persistent demonstration of aggression and stereotypic behaviors in daily agonistic interactions, enhances aggressive motivation, and elevates levels of anxiety. When winning males are deprived of opportunities to engage in further fights, they demonstrate increased levels of aggressiveness. Positive fighting experience results in increased levels of progenitor cell proliferation and production of young neurons in the hippocampus. This increase is not diminished after a fighting deprivation period. Furthermore, repeated winning experience decreases the number of activated (c-fos positive cells in the basolateral amygdala and increases the number of activated cells in the hippocampus; a subsequent no-fight period restores the number of c-fos-positive cells. Our results indicate that extended positive fighting experience in a social conflict heightens aggression, increases proliferation of neuronal progenitors and production of young neurons in the hippocampus, and decreases neuronal activity in the amygdala; these changes can be modified by depriving the winners of the opportunity for further fights.

  17. CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY WITH DUAL SOURCE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: INITIAL EXPERIENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu-hua Zhang; Wen-min Zhao; Wen-bin Mou; Li-ren Zhang; Wen-ling Zhu; Qi Miao; Qi Fang; Zheng-yu Jin; Shu-yang Zhang; Song-bai Lin; Dong-jing Li; Ling-yan Kong; Yi-ning Wang; Lan Song; Yun Wang

    2007-01-01

    To explore the scan technique and image quality of coronary angiography with dual source computed tomography (CT) without oral metoprolol preparation.Methods Plain and enhanced dual source CT coronary angiography without oral metoprolol preparation was prospectively performed in 600 patients. Calcium scoring with plain scan images as well as multi-planar reconstruction( MPR ), maximum intensity projection (MIP), and volume rendering technique (VRT) reconstruction with enhanced scan images were performed in all cases. The scan technique and post-reconstruction experience was summarized. The image quality was classified as 1 to 4 points, and coronary segments classified according to the American Heart Association standards were evaluated.Results The average calcium score of the 600 cases was 213.6 ± 298.7 (0-3 216. 5). The average heart rate of the enhanced scan was 82.1 ± 16.2 (47-139) bpm. The post-reconstruction methods with which coronary segments could be shown as best as possible consisted of single phase reconstruction method, two or more phases supplemented method, and electrocardiogram editing method. Altogether 8 457 coronary segments were evaluated, among which 97.2% were evaluated as point 1, 1.7% point 2, 0.5% point 3, and0.6% point 4. The coronary segments in 261 cases were completely normal, while 360 segments were diagnosed with < 50% stenosis and 625 segments with ≥50%stenosis.Conclusions Excellent coronary artery image can be obtained with dual source CT in patients with any heart rate without oral metoprolol preparation. Heart rate is not a major source of the artifact, coronary segments can be well shown with single or multiple-phase reconstruction method.

  18. Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobler, Jeremy [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Zaccheo, T. Scott [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Blume, Nathan [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Pernini, Timothy [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Braun, Michael [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Botos, Christopher [Exelis Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This report describes the development and testing of a novel system, the Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE), for Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) of CO2 at Geological Carbon Storage (GCS) sites. The system consists of a pair of laser based transceivers, a number of retroreflectors, and a set of cloud based data processing, storage and dissemination tools, which enable 2-D mapping of the CO2 in near real time. A system was built, tested locally in New Haven, Indiana, and then deployed to the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) facility in Bozeman, MT. Testing at ZERT demonstrated the ability of the GreenLITE system to identify and map small underground leaks, in the presence of other biological sources and with widely varying background concentrations. The system was then ruggedized and tested at the Harris test site in New Haven, IN, during winter time while exposed to temperatures as low as -15 °CºC. Additional testing was conducted using simulated concentration enhancements to validate the 2-D retrieval accuracy. This test resulted in a high confidence in the reconstruction ability to identify sources to tens of meters resolution in this configuration. Finally, the system was deployed for a period of approximately 6 months to an active industrial site, Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP), where >1M metric tons of CO2 had been injected into an underground sandstone basin. The main objective of this final deployment was to demonstrate autonomous operation over a wide range of environmental conditions with very little human interaction, and to demonstrate the feasibility of the system for long term deployment in a GCS environment.

  19. Hydraulic/partitioning tracer tomography for DNAPL source zone characterization: small-scale sandbox experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illman, Walter A; Berg, Steven J; Liu, Xiaoyi; Massi, Antonio

    2010-11-15

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) are prevalent at a large number of sites throughout the world. The variable release history, unstable flow, and geologic heterogeneity make the spatial distribution of DNAPLs complex. This causes difficulties in site remediation contributing to long-term groundwater contamination for decades to centuries. We present laboratory experiments to demonstrate the efficacy of Sequential Successive Linear Estimator (SSLE) algorithm that images DNAPL source zones. The algorithm relies on the fusion of hydraulic and partitioning tracer tomography (HPTT) to derive the best estimate of the K heterogeneity, DNAPL saturation (S(N)) distribution, and their uncertainty. The approach is nondestructive and can be applied repeatedly. Results from our laboratory experiments show that S(N) distributions compare favorably with DNAPL distributions observed in the sandbox but not so with local saturation estimates from core samples. We also found that the delineation of K heterogeneity can have a large impact on computed S(N) distributions emphasizing the importance of accurate delineation of hydraulic heterogeneity.

  20. Optimal experiment design for time-lapse traveltime tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajo-Franklin, J.B.

    2009-10-01

    Geophysical monitoring techniques offer the only noninvasive approach capable of assessing both the spatial and temporal dynamics of subsurface fluid processes. Increasingly, permanent sensor arrays in boreholes and on the ocean floor are being deployed to improve the repeatability and increase the temporal sampling of monitoring surveys. Because permanent arrays require a large up-front capital investment and are difficult (or impossible) to re-configure once installed, a premium is placed on selecting a geometry capable of imaging the desired target at minimum cost. We present a simple approach to optimizing downhole sensor configurations for monitoring experiments making use of differential seismic traveltimes. In our case, we use a design quality metric based on the accuracy of tomographic reconstructions for a suite of imaging targets. By not requiring an explicit singular value decomposition of the forward operator, evaluation of this objective function scales to problems with a large number of unknowns. We also restrict the design problem by recasting the array geometry into a low dimensional form more suitable for optimization at a reasonable computational cost. We test two search algorithms on the design problem: the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method and the Multilevel Coordinate Search algorithm. The algorithm is tested for four crosswell acquisition scenarios relevant to continuous seismic monitoring, a two parameter array optimization, several scenarios involving four parameter length/offset optimizations, and a comparison of optimal multi-source designs. In the last case, we also examine trade-offs between source sparsity and the quality of tomographic reconstructions. One general observation is that asymmetric array lengths improve localized image quality in crosswell experiments with a small number of sources and a large number of receivers. Preliminary results also suggest that high-quality differential images can be generated using only a small

  1. Can a Repeated Opt-Out Reminder remove hypothetical bias in discrete choice experiments?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alemu, Mohammed Hussen; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    Recent papers have suggested that use of a so-called Repeated Opt-Out Reminder (ROOR) might mitigate hypothetical bias in stated Discrete Choice Experiments (DCE), but evidence so far has only been circumstantial. We provide the first comprehensive test of whether a ROOR can actually mitigate...

  2. Instance-Based Learning: Integrating Sampling and Repeated Decisions from Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Cleotilde; Dutt, Varun

    2011-01-01

    In decisions from experience, there are 2 experimental paradigms: sampling and repeated-choice. In the sampling paradigm, participants sample between 2 options as many times as they want (i.e., the stopping point is variable), observe the outcome with no real consequences each time, and finally select 1 of the 2 options that cause them to earn or…

  3. Differences in granular materials for analogue modelling: Insights from repeated compression tests analyzed with X-ray Computed Tomography and image analysis software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkmueller, M.; Schreurs, G.

    2009-12-01

    Six different granular materials for analogue modelling have been investigated using a sandbox with a compressional set-up and X-ray computed tomography (XRCT). The evolving structures were evaluated with image analysis software. The sandbox has one movable sidewall that is driven by a computer-controlled servomotor at 20 cm/h. A 12 cm wide and 20 cm long sheet of hard cardboard was placed on the base of the sandbox and attached to the moving sidewall creating a velocity discontinuity. The whole sandbox was covered on the inside with Alkor foil to reduce sidewall friction. Computed Tomography was used to scan the whole volume in 3 mm increments of shortening until 15 mm maximum deformation was reached. The second approach was a scanning procedure to a maximum deformation of 80 mm in 2 mm increments of shortening for the first 10 mm and in 5 mm increments for the last 70 mm. The short deformation scans were repeated three times to investigate reproducibility. The long deformation scans were performed twice. The physical properties of the materials (table 1) have been described in a previous material benchmark. Four natural quartz sands and two artificial granular materials, corundum brown sand and glass beads, have been used. The two artificial materials were used for this experimental series as examples for very angular and very rounded sands in contrast to the sub-rounded to angular natural quartz sands. The short deformation experiments show partly large differences in thrust angles of both front and back-thrust, in timing of thrust initiation, and in the degree of undulation of thrusts. The coarse-grained sands show smooth and low undulating thrusts that are only affected by the sidewall friction whereas the thrusts in fine-grained sands undulate significantly and partly divide and merge in an anastomosing fashion. The coarse-grained sand thrusts are clearer visualized by XRCT, which indicates a wider shear zone where the material dilates. Furthermore, the

  4. Computed Tomography Support for Microgravity Materials Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Engel, H. Peter; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The accurate measurement of density in both liquid and solid samples is of considerable interest to Principal Investigators with materials science experiments slated for the ISS. The work to be described is an innovative application of a conventional industrial nondestructive evaluation instrument. Traditional applications of industrial computed tomography (CT) rely on reconstructing cross sections of large structures to provide two-dimensional planar views which can identify defects such as porosity, or other material anomalies. This has been done on microgravity materials science experiments to check the integrity of ampoule-cartridge assemblies for safety purposes. With a substantially monoenergetic flux, as can be obtained with a radioactive cobalt source, there will be a direct correlation between absorption and density. Under such conditions it then becomes possible to make accurate measurements of density throughout a sample, and even when the sample itself is enclosed within a furnace and a safety required cartridge. Such a system has been installed at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and is available to PIs to examine samples before and after flight. The CT system is being used to provide density information for two purposes. Firstly, the determination of density changes from liquid to solid is vital information to the PI for purposes of modeling the solidification behavior of his sample, and to engineers who have to design containment ampoules and must allow for shrinkage and other volume changes that may occur during processing. While such information can be obtained by pycnometric measurements, the possibility of using a furnace installed on the CT system enables one to examine potentially dangerous materials having high vapor pressures, while not needing visible access to the material. In addition, uniform temperature can readily be obtained, and the system can be controlled to ramp up, hold, and ramp down while collecting data over a wide range of

  5. Computed Tomography Support for Microgravity Materials Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Engel, H. Peter; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The accurate measurement of density in both liquid and solid samples is of considerable interest to Principal Investigators with materials science experiments slated for the ISS. The work to be described is an innovative application of a conventional industrial nondestructive evaluation instrument. Traditional applications of industrial computed tomography (CT) rely on reconstructing cross sections of large structures to provide two-dimensional planar views which can identify defects such as porosity, or other material anomalies. This has been done on microgravity materials science experiments to check the integrity of ampoule-cartridge assemblies for safety purposes. With a substantially monoenergetic flux, as can be obtained with a radioactive cobalt source, there will be a direct correlation between absorption and density. Under such conditions it then becomes possible to make accurate measurements of density throughout a sample, and even when the sample itself is enclosed within a furnace and a safety required cartridge. Such a system has been installed at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and is available to PIs to examine samples before and after flight. The CT system is being used to provide density information for two purposes. Firstly, the determination of density changes from liquid to solid is vital information to the PI for purposes of modeling the solidification behavior of his sample, and to engineers who have to design containment ampoules and must allow for shrinkage and other volume changes that may occur during processing. While such information can be obtained by pycnometric measurements, the possibility of using a furnace installed on the CT system enables one to examine potentially dangerous materials having high vapor pressures, while not needing visible access to the material. In addition, uniform temperature can readily be obtained, and the system can be controlled to ramp up, hold, and ramp down while collecting data over a wide range of

  6. The Repeatability Assessment of Three-Dimensional Capsule-Intraocular Lens Complex Measurements by Means of High-Speed Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pingjun; Li, Jin; Savini, Giacomo; Huang, Jinhai; Huang, Shenghai; Zhao, Yinying; Liao, Na; Lin, Lei; Yu, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Yun-e

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To rebuild the three-dimensional (3-D) model of the anterior segment by high-speed swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) and evaluate the repeatability of measurement for the parameters of capsule-intraocular lens (C-IOL) complex. Methods Twenty-two pseudophakic eyes from 22 patients were enrolled. Three continuous SSOCT measurements were performed in all eyes and the tomograms obtained were used for 3-D reconstruction. The output data were used to evaluate the measurement repeatability. The parameters included postoperative aqueous depth (PAD), the area and diameter of the anterior capsule opening (Area and D), IOL tilt (IOL-T), horizontal, vertical, and space decentration of the IOL, anterior capsule opening, and IOL-anterior capsule opening. Results PAD, IOL-T, Area, D, and all decentration measurements showed high repeatability. Repeated measure analysis showed there was no statistically significant difference among the three continuous measurements (all P > .05). Pearson correlation analysis showed high correlation between each pair of them (all r >0.90, P<0.001). ICCs were all more than 0.9 for all parameters. The 95% LoAs of all parameters were narrow for comparison of three measurements, which showed high repeatability for three measurements. Conclusion SSOCT is available to be a new method for the 3-D measurement of C-IOL complex after cataract surgery. This method presented high repeatability in measuring the parameters of the C-IOL complex. PMID:26600254

  7. Risk of Delayed Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Anticoagulated Patients after Minor Head Trauma: The Role of Repeat Cranial Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swap, Clifford; Sidell, Margo; Ogaz, Raquel; Sharp, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Context: Patients receiving anticoagulant medications who experience minor head injury are at increased risk of an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) developing, even after an initial computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain yields normal findings. Conflicting evidence exists regarding the frequency at which delayed bleeding occurs. Objective: To identify the frequency of delayed traumatic ICH in patients receiving warfarin or clopidogrel. Design: We performed a retrospective observational study of adult trauma encounters for anticoagulated patients undergoing head CT at 1 of 13 Kaiser Permanente Southern California Emergency Departments (EDs) between 2007 and 2011. Encounters were identified using structured data from electronic health and administrative records, and then records were individually reviewed for validation of results. Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome measure was ICH within 60 days of an ED visit with a normal head CT result. Results: Our sample included 443 (260 clopidogrel and 183 warfarin) eligible ED encounters with normal findings of initial head CT. Overall, 11 patients (2.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4%–4.4%) had a delayed ICH, and events occurred at similar rates between the clopidogrel group (6/260, 2.3%, CI 1.1%–5.0%) and warfarin group (5/183, 2.7%, CI 1.2%–6.2%). Conclusion: Trauma patients in the ED who are receiving warfarin or clopidogrel have approximately a 2.5% risk of delayed ICH after an initial normal finding on a head CT. PMID:26901269

  8. [Pro-aggressive effect of diazepam in male mice with repeated experience of aggression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, A E; Smagin, D A; Bondar', N P; Galiamina, A G; Kudriavtseva, N N

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that repeated experience of aggression is attended with the development of increased anxiety in male mice. The paper aimed to investigate effect of anxiolytic, diazepam, on the level of anxiety and aggression in these animals. The drug was chronically administrated for two weeks at the process of aggression experience acquisition. It was shown that diazepam decreased anxiety but didn't influence aggression level assessed by total time of attacks. However, diazepam decreased demonstration of aggressive grooming in part of aggressive males. Group of diazepam-treated aggressive males which displayed aggressive grooming didn't differ in level of anxiety and aggression in saline-treated male mice. Diazepam had anxiolytic and pro-aggressive effects in male mice without demonstrating aggressive grooming. Thus, we can conclude that anxiolytic effect of diazepam is accompanied with increased aggression as side effect in some male mice which have repeated experience of aggression.

  9. The effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of atmospheric pressure plasma plume propagation: I. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, L.; Chang, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-09-01

    One of the significant differences between the traditional streamers and the plasma jets is the repeatability of their propagation. In this paper, the effect of the seed electron density on the repeatability of the plasma jets is investigated. The seed electron density plays an essential role in the propagation of plasma plume which is in either repeatable mode or random mode depending on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. By measuring the propagation velocities and the ignition delay time, it is found that the propagation velocities of the plasma plume are independent of the seed electron density. However, the jitter of the ignition delay time strongly depends on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. After detailed analyzing of the experiment results, it is concluded that the minimum seed electron density required for the plasma bullet to propagate in repeatable mode is on the order of 108 cm-3 for gas pressure of 2 × 104 Pa. The minimum required seed electron density for the gas pressure of 4 × 103 Pa is on the order of 107 cm-3. Further analysis shows that, at one atmospheric pressure, the required minimum seed electron density for repeatable mode is on the order of 109 cm-3.

  10. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getchell Thomas V

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease or absence (Control of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB or cerebellum (CER. In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. Results In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the α-level (αnew = 0.0033 determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD procedure at the level of αnew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER for each gene examined. Conclusions A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  11. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Wood, Constance L; Getchell, Thomas V; Getchell, Marilyn L; Stromberg, Arnold J

    2004-12-30

    Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease) or absence (Control) of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB) or cerebellum (CER). In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH) procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR) at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the alpha-level (alphanew = 0.0033) determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD) procedure at the level of alphanew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER) for each gene examined. A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  12. Polarization-Sensitive Quantum Optical Coherence Tomography: Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, Mark C; Teich, Malvin Carl

    2010-01-01

    Polarization-sensitive quantum optical coherence tomography (PS-QOCT) makes use of a Type-II twin-photon light source for carrying out optical sectioning with polarization sensitivity. A BBO nonlinear optical crystal pumped by a Ti:sapphire psec-pulsed laser is used to confirm the theoretical underpinnings of this imaging paradigm. PS-QOCT offers even-order dispersion cancellation with simultaneous access to the group-velocity dispersion characteristics of the interstitial medium between the reflecting surfaces of the sample.

  13. Consolidation effect of repeated processing of declarative knowledge in mental experiences during human sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolli, Carlo; Fagioli, Igino; Mazzetti, Michela; Tuozzi, Giovanni

    2006-05-15

    Sleep may positively influence declarative memory through the processing, which transforms items of declarative knowledge into contents of mental sleep experience (MSE). A prediction from this general hypothesis is that the consolidation level should be higher for the output of items repeatedly processed and transformed into identical or very similar (so-called interrelated) contents of distinct MSEs of the same night rather than for the output of items presumably processed once (that is, all other, non-interrelated contents). Two experiments examined whether and how far the frequency and long-term retention of interrelated contents depend on the repeated processing of given items rather than on the experimental procedure applied for detection of interrelated contents. This procedure entails both multiple awakenings and a verbal report of MSE after awakening. Multiple awakenings could facilitate the re-access and elaboration of some contents into the subsequent (i.e. contiguous) MSE rather than non-contiguous MSEs; verbal reports could enhance the delayed recall of interrelated contents in as much as repeatedly encoded. The first experiment showed that interrelated contents were more frequent and better retained than both non-interrelated and pseudo-interrelated (i.e. by-chance similar or identical) contents, and even more in pairs of contiguous than non-contiguous MSEs collected from the first four periods of REM sleep on each experimental night. The second experiment showed that the frequency and retention rate of interrelated contents, while higher than those of non-interrelated and pseudo-interrelated contents, were not significantly different in pairs of MSEs which were verbally or mentally recalled after awakening provoked during the first four periods of REM sleep in each experimental night. Taken together, these findings indicate that the advantage provided by repeated processing during REM sleep for the consolidation of the output of items of declarative

  14. Declining trend in the use of repeat computed tomography for trauma patients admitted to a level I trauma center for traffic-related injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Psoter, Kevin J., E-mail: kevinp2@u.washington.edu [Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Box 357236, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Roudsari, Bahman S., E-mail: roudsari@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology, Comparative Effectiveness, Cost and Outcomes Research Center, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359960, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Graves, Janessa M., E-mail: janessa@u.washington.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359960, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Mack, Christopher, E-mail: cdmack@uw.edu [Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359960, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Jarvik, Jeffrey G., E-mail: jarvikj@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology and Department of Neurological Surgery, Comparative Effectiveness, Cost and Outcomes Research Center, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359960, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: To evaluate the trend in utilization of repeat (i.e. ≥2) computed tomography (CT) and to compare utilization patterns across body regions for trauma patients admitted to a level I trauma center for traffic-related injuries (TRI). Materials and Methods: We linked the Harborview Medical Center trauma registry (1996–2010) to the billing department data. We extracted the following variables: type and frequency of CTs performed, age, gender, race/ethnicity, insurance status, injury mechanism and severity, length of hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and final disposition. TRIs were defined as motor vehicle collisions, motorcycle, bicycle and pedestrian-related injuries. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between utilization of different body region repeat (i.e. ≥2) CTs and year of admission, adjusting for patient and injury-related characteristics that could influence utilization patterns. Results: A total of 28,431 patients were admitted for TRIs over the study period and 9499 (33%) received repeat CTs. From 1996 to 2010, the proportion of patients receiving repeat CTs decreased by 33%. Relative to 2000 and adjusting for other covariates, patients with TRIs admitted in 2010 had significantly lower odds of undergoing repeat head (OR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.49–0.76), pelvis (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.27–0.52), cervical spine (OR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.12–0.43), and maxillofacial CTs (OR = 0.24; 95% CI: 0.10–0.57). However, they had higher odds of receiving repeat thoracic CTs (OR = 1.86; 95% CI: 1.02–3.38). Conclusion: A significant decrease in the utilization of repeat CTs was observed in trauma patients presenting with traffic-related injuries over a 15-year period.

  15. Declining trend in the use of repeat computed tomography for trauma patients admitted to a level I trauma center for traffic-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psoter, Kevin J; Roudsari, Bahman S; Graves, Janessa M; Mack, Christopher; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the trend in utilization of repeat (i.e. ≥2) computed tomography (CT) and to compare utilization patterns across body regions for trauma patients admitted to a level I trauma center for traffic-related injuries (TRI). We linked the Harborview Medical Center trauma registry (1996-2010) to the billing department data. We extracted the following variables: type and frequency of CTs performed, age, gender, race/ethnicity, insurance status, injury mechanism and severity, length of hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and final disposition. TRIs were defined as motor vehicle collisions, motorcycle, bicycle and pedestrian-related injuries. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between utilization of different body region repeat (i.e. ≥2) CTs and year of admission, adjusting for patient and injury-related characteristics that could influence utilization patterns. A total of 28,431 patients were admitted for TRIs over the study period and 9499 (33%) received repeat CTs. From 1996 to 2010, the proportion of patients receiving repeat CTs decreased by 33%. Relative to 2000 and adjusting for other covariates, patients with TRIs admitted in 2010 had significantly lower odds of undergoing repeat head (OR=0.61; 95% CI: 0.49-0.76), pelvis (OR=0.37; 95% CI: 0.27-0.52), cervical spine (OR=0.23; 95% CI: 0.12-0.43), and maxillofacial CTs (OR=0.24; 95% CI: 0.10-0.57). However, they had higher odds of receiving repeat thoracic CTs (OR=1.86; 95% CI: 1.02-3.38). A significant decrease in the utilization of repeat CTs was observed in trauma patients presenting with traffic-related injuries over a 15-year period. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A coastal acoustic tomography experiment in the Tokyo Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANEKO Arata; HACHIYA Hiroyuki; HASHIMOTO Noriaki; YAMAGUCHI Keisuke; YAMAMOTO Tokuo; GOHDA Noriaki; ZHENG Hong; SYAMSUDIN Fadli; LIN Ju; NGUYEN Hong-Quang; MATSUYAMA Masaji

    2005-01-01

    Eight sets of coastal acoustic tomography (CAT) systems were deployed during November 29 to December 10, 2002 at the coasts on both sides of Tokyo Bay to measure tidal current structures at 15-min interval. Sound transmission across the Tokyo Bay (between Yokohama and Chiba)was successfully traced,even under severe interference from ship generated wakes and bubbles. Tidal current fields changing from northward to southward flow are well reconstructed by the inverse analysis of travel-time difference data for a period with the best sound transmission condition. It is suggested that the CAT is the most powerful tool to continuously map tidal current fields in the coastal seas with heavy shipping traffic and fisheries activity.

  17. Measuring Starlight Deflection during the 2017 Eclipse: Repeating the Experiment that made Einstein Famous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Donald

    2016-05-01

    In 1919, astronomers performed an experiment during a solar eclipse, attempting to measure the deflection of stars near the sun, in order to verify Einstein's theory of general relativity. The experiment was very difficult and the results were marginal, but the success made Albert Einstein famous around the world. Astronomers last repeated the experiment in 1973, achieving an error of 11%. In 2017, using amateur equipment and modern technology, I plan to repeat the experiment and achieve a 1% error. The best available star catalog will be used for star positions. Corrections for optical distortion and atmospheric refraction are better than 0.01 arcsec. During totality, I expect 7 or 8 measurable stars down to magnitude 9.5, based on analysis of previous eclipse measurements taken by amateurs. Reference images, taken near the sun during totality, will be used for precise calibration. Preliminary test runs performed during twilight in April 2016 and April 2017 can accurately simulate the sky conditions during totality, providing an accurate estimate of the final uncertainty.

  18. Augmenting short cheap talk scripts with a repeated opt-out reminder in choice experiment surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2014-01-01

    Hypothetical bias continues to be a major challenge for stated preference methods. Cheap Talk (CT) has been found to be an effective remedy in some applications, though empirical results are ambiguous. We discuss reasons why CT may fail to effectively remove specific types of hypothetical bias...... in Choice Experiments. We suggest augmenting CT in Choice Experiments with a so-called Opt-Out Reminder (OOR). Prior to each choice set, the OOR explicitly instructs respondents to choose the opt-out alternative, if they find the experimentally designed alternatives too expensive. In an empirical survey we...... find the OOR to significantly reduce total WTP and to some extent also marginal WTP beyond the capability of the CT applied without the OOR. This suggests that the CT practice should be adapted to fit the potentially different decision processes and repeated choices structure of the Choice Experiment...

  19. The effects of repeated exposure to graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages: A field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Arie; Bos, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on cigarette packages. In this field-experiment, 118 smokers were assigned to 1 of 2 conditions with either graphic fear appeals or textual warnings on their cigarette packages. During 3 weeks, fear and disgust were assessed 6 times. The intention to quit smoking after 3 weeks and quitting activity during the 3 weeks were the dependent measures. The effects of 3 pretest individual difference moderators were tested: disengagement beliefs, number of cigarettes smoked a day, and readiness to quit. Three weeks of exposure to the graphic fear appeals led to a stronger intention to quit, but only when smokers scored low on disengagement beliefs, or were heavier smokers. In addition, smokers low in disengagement more often reported to have cut down on smoking in the graphic condition. There were no indications of habituation of fear and disgust over the 3 weeks. The effects of graphic fear appeals depended on smokers' characteristics: The moderators may explain the mixed findings in the literature. The lack of habituation may be caused by the renewal of the graphics every few days. The used field-experimental design with natural repeated exposure to graphics is promising.

  20. Uncontrolled variables in frying studies: differences in repeatability between thermoxidation and frying experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobarganes, Carmen

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Palm oil, soybean oil and partially hydrogenated soybean oil were used to define the repeatability of oil degradation under thermoxidation in the absence of food and during the frying of potatoes. Total polar compounds and their constituent polymeric triglycerides, oxidized monomeric triglycerides and diglycerides were analyzed. The oils were thermoxidized under standard conditions in a Rancimat apparatus at 180 °C for 25 hours. Discontinuous frying experiments were carried out in triplicate in three apparently identical domestic fryers. Five batches of potatoes were fried per day in each fryer. Oils were heated at 180 °C in periods of 5 h per day during 5 consecutive days so that the total heating period was 25 h. Repeatability was high in the thermoxidation assays and rather low in the frying experiments. Significant differences between the oils were found in the thermoxidation experiments, while no significant differences were found in the frying assays due to large standard deviations. The participation of variables related to the fryer performance which are difficult to control, was deduced. Among them, differences in the heating/cooling cycles at high temperature might be important. The contribution of fryer performance to the decreased repeatability was confirmed in further frying experiments with palm oil. Results showed that repeatability for the same fryer was higher than that obtained when different fryers were considered.Se estudia la repetibilidad de los resultados obtenidos en el calentamiento de los aceites y grasas a temperatura elevada utilizando aceite de palma, aceite de soja y aceite de soja parcialmente hidrogenado. Partiendo de la repetibilidad de las determinaciones analíticas utilizadas para la evaluación de la degradación de los aceites y grasas a elevada temperatura, el análisis de compuestos polares y de su distribución en polímeros de triglicéridos, triglicéridos monómeros oxidados y diglicéridos, se

  1. The effect of repeated freeze-thaw cycles on human muscle tissue visualized by postmortem computed tomography (PMCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klop, Anthony C; Vester, Marloes E M; Colman, Kerri L; Ruijter, Jan M; Van Rijn, Rick R; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether effects of repetitive freeze-thaw cycles, with various thawing temperatures, on human muscle tissue can be quantified using postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) technology. An additional objective was to determine the preferred thawing temperature for muscle tissue in this study. Human cadaver upper extremities were divided into two different thawing temperature groups and underwent a series of four freeze-thaw cycles in total. Axial CT scans were performed after each cycle. CT attenuation (in Hounsfield units, HU) was measured in four muscles of the upper extremities. HU values changed significantly with the introduction of each subsequent freeze-thaw cycle. Moreover, the changes in HU values were different for each thawing group. There was a significant increase of HU values in both groups between t0 and t1 . Unfrozen tissue showed large variation of HU values in all samples. It was possible to distinguish between samples thawed at different thawing temperatures based on their respective HU values. It is advisable to keep the number of freeze-thaw cycles to just one, if the human cadaveric tissue is to be used for educational purposes. The preferred thawing temperature in this study is 2°C. Clin. Anat. 30:799-804, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors Clinical Anatomy published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Clinical Anatomists.

  2. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Retinal Neuronal and Axonal Measures on Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Patients with Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Hong-Teck Loh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWith increasing interest in determining if measurement of retinal neuronal structure with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT is useful in accessing neurodegenerative process in cognitive decline and development of dementia, it is important to evaluate whether the SD-OCT measurements are repeatable and reproducible in these patients.MethodsThis is a retrospective cohort study. Patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI with no change in global clinical dementia rating (CDR score at 1-year follow-up were eligible to be included. Ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL parameters were measured with SD-OCT at baseline, 6-month, and 1-year follow-up visits. At baseline, SD-OCT scans were repeated to access intra-visit repeatability of the SD-OCT measurement. SD-OCT measurement over three visits was used to access inter-visit reproducibility. We calculated intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC and coefficients of variation (CoVs.ResultsWe included 32 patients with stable AD and 29 patients with stable MCI in the final analysis. For GC-IPL measures, the average intra-visit ICC was 0.969 (range: 0.948–0.985, and CoV was 1.81% (range: 1.14–2.40; while the average inter-visit ICC was 0.968 (0.941–0.985, and CoV was 1.91% (range: 1.24–2.32. The average ICC and CoV of intra-visit RNFL measured were 0.965 (range: 0.937–0.986 and 2.32% (range: 1.34–2.90%, respectively. The average ICC and CoV of inter-visit RNFL measures were 0.927 (range: 0.845–0.961 and 3.83% (range: 2.71–5.25%, respectively.ConclusionBoth GC-IPL and RNFL measurements had good intra-visit repeatability and inter-visit reproducibility over 1 year in elderly patients with no decline in cognitive function, suggesting that SD-OCT is a reliable tool to assess neurodegenerative process over time.

  3. A review of repeat prostate biopsies and the influence of technique on cancer detection: our experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinlan, M R

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Follow-up of patients with an initial negative prostate biopsy, but surrounding whom a suspicion of prostate cancer persists, is difficult. In addition, debate exists as to the optimal technique for repeat prostate biopsy. AIMS: To assess the cancer detection rate on repeat prostate biopsy. METHODS: We reviewed patients who underwent prostate biopsy in our department in 2005 who had >or=1 previous biopsy within the preceding 5 years. Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy and the influence of the number of biopsy cores were recorded. RESULTS: Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy was 15.4%, with approximately 60% detected on the first repeat biopsy, but approximately 10% not confirmed until the fourth repeat biopsy. Gleason score was similar regardless of the time of diagnosis (6.1-6.5). Mean interval between first biopsy and cancer diagnosis (range 18-55 months) depended on the number of repeat procedures. There was an association between the number of biopsy cores and cancer detection. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the practice of increasing the number of cores taken on initial and first repeat biopsy to maximise prostate cancer detection and reduce the overall number of biopsies needed.

  4. The Effects of Repeated Exposure to Graphic Fear Appeals on Cigarette Packages: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; Bos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on cigarett

  5. The Effects of Repeated Exposure to Graphic Fear Appeals on Cigarette Packages : A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Arie; Colin, Bos,

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on cigarett

  6. The Effects of Repeated Exposure to Graphic Fear Appeals on Cigarette Packages : A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Arie; Colin, Bos,

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on

  7. The Effects of Repeated Exposure to Graphic Fear Appeals on Cigarette Packages: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; Bos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on

  8. Computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of lung lesions: an oncology center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Fonte, Alexandre Calabria da; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: marcosduarte@yahoo.com.b [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis; Andrade, Marcony Queiroz de [Hospital Alianca, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Gross, Jefferson Luiz [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Chest Surgery

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The present study is aimed at describing the experience of an oncology center with computed tomography guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 97 computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions performed in the period between 1996 and 2004 in a Brazilian reference oncology center (Hospital do Cancer - A.C. Camargo). Information regarding material appropriateness and the specific diagnoses were collected and analyzed. Results: Among 97 lung biopsies, 94 (96.9%) supplied appropriate specimens for histological analyses, with 71 (73.2%) cases being diagnosed as malignant lesions and 23 (23.7%) diagnosed as benign lesions. Specimens were inappropriate for analysis in three cases. The frequency of specific diagnosis was 83 (85.6%) cases, with high rates for both malignant lesions with 63 (88.7%) cases and benign lesions with 20 (86.7%). As regards complications, a total of 12 cases were observed as follows: 7 (7.2%) cases of hematoma, 3 (3.1%) cases of pneumothorax and 2 (2.1%) cases of hemoptysis. Conclusion: Computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy of lung lesions demonstrated high rates of material appropriateness and diagnostic specificity, and low rates of complications in the present study. (author)

  9. Phantom and mouse experiments of time-domain fluorescence tomography using total light approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Shinpei; Yano, Akira; Uchida, Kazuki; Mitsui, Yohei; Yoshida, Masaki; Takekoshi, Masashi; Marjono, Andhi; Gao, Feng; Hoshi, Yoko; Kida, Ikuhiro; Masamoto, Kazuto; Yamada, Yukio

    2013-04-01

    Phantom and mouse experiments of time-domain fluorescence tomography were conducted to demonstrate the total light approach which was previously proposed by authors. The total light approach reduces the computation time to solve the forward model for light propagation. Time-resolved temporal profiles were acquired for cylindrical phantoms having single or double targets containing indocyanine green (ICG) solutions. The reconstructed images of ICG concentration reflected the true distributions of ICG concentration with a spatial resolution of about 10 mm. In vivo experiments were conducted using a mouse in which an ICG capsule was embedded beneath the skin in the abdomen. The reconstructed image of the ICG concentration again reflected the true distribution of ICG although artifacts due to autofluorescence appeared in the vicinity of the skin. The effectiveness of the total light approach was demonstrated by the phantom and mouse experiments.

  10. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography investigation of magnetic FePt nanoclusters: First experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folcke, E.; Larde, R. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Universite de Rouen, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Le Breton, J.M., E-mail: jean-marie.lebreton@univ-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Universite de Rouen, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Gruber, M.; Vurpillot, F. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Universite de Rouen, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Shield, J.E.; Rui, X. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska, N104 WSEC, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Patterson, M.M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie, WI 54751 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FePt nanoclusters dispersed in a Cr matrix were studied by atom probe tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulated experiments were conducted to study the artefacts of the analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In FePt nanoclusters, Fe and Pt are present in equiatomic proportions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FePt nanoclusters are homogeneous, no core-shell structure is observed. - Abstract: FePt nanoclusters dispersed in a Cr matrix have been investigated by laser-assisted atom probe tomography. The results were analysed according to simulated evaporation experiments. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions reveal the presence of nanoclusters roughly spherical in shape, with a size in good agreement with previous transmission electron microscopy observations. Some clusters appear to be broken up after the evaporation process due to the fact that the Cr matrix has a lower evaporation field than Fe and Pt. It is thus shown that the observed FePt nanoclusters are chemically homogeneous. They contain Fe and Pt in equiatomic proportions, with no core-shell structure observed.

  11. Initial Experience with a Cone-beam Breast Computed Tomography-guided Biopsy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Posy J; Morgan, Renee C; Conover, David L; Arieno, Andrea L

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate our initial experience with a cone-beam breast computed tomography (BCT)-guided breast biopsy system for lesion retrieval in phantom studies for use with a cone-beam BCT imaging system. Materials and Methods: Under the Institutional Review Board approval, a phantom biopsy study was performed using a dedicated BCT-guided biopsy system. Fifteen biopsies were performed on each of the small, medium, and large anthropomorphic breast phantoms with both BCT and stereotactic guidance for comparison. Each set of the 45 phantoms contained masses and calcification clusters of varying sizes. Data included mass/calcium retrieval rate and dose and length of procedure time for phantom studies. Results: Phantom mass and calcium retrieval rate were 100% for BCT and stereotactic biopsy. BCT dose for small and medium breast phantoms was found to be equivalent to or less than the corresponding stereotactic approach. Stereotactic-guided biopsy dose was 34.2 and 62.5 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. BCT-guided biopsy dose was 15.4 and 30.0 mGy for small and medium breast phantoms, respectively. Both computed tomography biopsy and stereotactic biopsy study time ranged from 10 to 20 min. Conclusion: Initial experience with a BCT-guided biopsy system has shown to be comparable to stereotactic biopsy in phantom studies with equivalent or decreased dose. PMID:28217404

  12. Field and synthetic experiments for virtual source crosswell tomography in vertical wells: Perth Basin, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalki, Majed; Harris, Brett; Dupuis, J. Christian

    2013-11-01

    It is common for at least one monitoring well to be located proximally to a production well. This presents the possibility of applying crosswell technologies to resolve a range of earth properties between the wells. We present both field and synthetic examples of dual well walk-away vertical seismic profiling in vertical wells and show how the direct arrivals from a virtual source may be used to create velocity images between the wells. The synthetic experiments highlight the potential of virtual source crosswell tomography where large numbers of closely spaced receivers can be deployed in multiple wells. The field experiment is completed in two monitoring wells at an aquifer storage and recovery site near Perth, Western Australia. For this site, the crosswell velocity distribution recovered from inversion of travel times between in-hole virtual sources and receivers is highly consistent with what is expected from sonic logging and detailed zero-offset vertical seismic profiling. When compared to conventional walkaway vertical seismic profiling, the only additional effort required to complete dual-well walkaway vertical seismic profiling is the deployment of seismic sensors in the second well. The significant advantage of virtual source crosswell tomography is realised where strong near surface heterogeneity results in large travel time statics.

  13. Geneva University - The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    Geneva University École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Wednesday 14 March 2012 SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE 11.15 a.m. - Science II, Auditoire 1S081, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography Dr Chiara CASELLA   ETH Zurich   PET (Positron Emission Tomography) is a tool for in-vivo functional imaging, successfully used since the earliest days of nuclear medicine. It is based on the detection of the two coincident 511 keV photons from the annihilation of a positron, emitted from a radiotracer injected into the body. Tomographic analysis of the coincidence data allows for a 3D reconstructed image of the source distribution. The AX-PET experiment proposes a novel geometrical approach for a PET scanner, in which l...

  14. CLIFF COLLAPSE HAZARD FROM REPEATED MULTICOPTER UAV ACQUISITIONS: RETURN ON EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. B. Dewez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cliff collapse poses a serious hazard to infrastructure and passers-by. Obtaining information such as magnitude-frequency relationship for a specific site is of great help to adapt appropriate mitigation measures. While it is possible to monitor hundreds-of-meter-long cliff sites with ground based techniques (e.g. lidar or photogrammetry, it is both time consuming and scientifically limiting to focus on short cliff sections. In the project SUAVE, we sought to investigate whether an octocopter UAV photogrammetric survey would perform sufficiently well in order to repeatedly survey cliff face geometry and derive rock fall inventories amenable to probabilistic rock fall hazard computation. An experiment was therefore run on a well-studied site of the chalk coast of Normandy, in Mesnil Val, along the English Channel (Northern France. Two campaigns were organized in January and June 2015 which surveyed about 60 ha of coastline, including the 80-m-high cliff face, the chalk platform at its foot, and the hinterland in a matter of 4 hours from start to finish. To conform with UAV regulations, the flight was flown in 3 legs for a total of about 30 minutes in the air. A total of 868 and 1106 photos were respectively shot with a Sony NEX 7 with fixed focal 16mm. Three lines of sight were combined: horizontal shots for cliff face imaging, 45°-oblique views to tie plateau/platform photos with cliff face images, and regular vertical shots. Photogrammetrically derived dense point clouds were produced with Agisoft Photoscan at ultra-high density (median density is 1 point every 1.7cm. Point cloud density proved a critical parameter to reproduce faithfully the chalk face’s geometry. Tuning down the density parameter to “high” or “medium”, though efficient from a computational point of view, generated artefacts along chalk bed edges (i.e. smoothing the sharp gradient and ultimately creating ghost volumes when computing cloud to cloud differences. Yet

  15. Cliff Collapse Hazard from Repeated Multicopter Uav Acquisitions: Return on Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewez, T. J. B.; Leroux, J.; Morelli, S.

    2016-06-01

    Cliff collapse poses a serious hazard to infrastructure and passers-by. Obtaining information such as magnitude-frequency relationship for a specific site is of great help to adapt appropriate mitigation measures. While it is possible to monitor hundreds-of-meter-long cliff sites with ground based techniques (e.g. lidar or photogrammetry), it is both time consuming and scientifically limiting to focus on short cliff sections. In the project SUAVE, we sought to investigate whether an octocopter UAV photogrammetric survey would perform sufficiently well in order to repeatedly survey cliff face geometry and derive rock fall inventories amenable to probabilistic rock fall hazard computation. An experiment was therefore run on a well-studied site of the chalk coast of Normandy, in Mesnil Val, along the English Channel (Northern France). Two campaigns were organized in January and June 2015 which surveyed about 60 ha of coastline, including the 80-m-high cliff face, the chalk platform at its foot, and the hinterland in a matter of 4 hours from start to finish. To conform with UAV regulations, the flight was flown in 3 legs for a total of about 30 minutes in the air. A total of 868 and 1106 photos were respectively shot with a Sony NEX 7 with fixed focal 16mm. Three lines of sight were combined: horizontal shots for cliff face imaging, 45°-oblique views to tie plateau/platform photos with cliff face images, and regular vertical shots. Photogrammetrically derived dense point clouds were produced with Agisoft Photoscan at ultra-high density (median density is 1 point every 1.7cm). Point cloud density proved a critical parameter to reproduce faithfully the chalk face's geometry. Tuning down the density parameter to "high" or "medium", though efficient from a computational point of view, generated artefacts along chalk bed edges (i.e. smoothing the sharp gradient) and ultimately creating ghost volumes when computing cloud to cloud differences. Yet, from a hazard point of

  16. Joking Culture: The Role of Repeated Humorous Interactions on Group Processes during Challenge Course Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Erin; Siharath, Kassidy; Bell, Steven; Nguyen, Kim; Baker, Carla

    2011-01-01

    When groups form, they develop their own culture from the shared meaning created from their interactions. Humor is part of every social group, and when repeatedly referenced, it forms a joking culture. The joking culture of small groups influences group processes by smoothing group interaction, forming a collective identity, separating the group…

  17. Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography for NAPL Source Zone Characterization: Sandbox Experiment Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, M. A.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing the distribution and extent of NAPL contamination is an important step in determining appropriate remedial actions. NAPL has a complex mode of transportation in the heterogeneous subsurface domain, which results in difficulties for cleaning up contaminated sites. Here, we use sandbox experiments to demonstrate the effectiveness of Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography (OHT) for NAPL source zone characterization. In a saturated soil fluid system, the effective hydraulic conductivity (K) is dependent on the soil properties, fluid density, and fluid viscosity. By taking advantage of the differences of fluid properties before and after NAPL intrusion, we can estimate the NAPL source zone migration throughout time by imaging changes in effective K. Using OHT testing, we can derive the K heterogeneities before, during and after NAPL intrusion. NAPL source zone can be located by subtracting the background K from the K tomogram after NAPL intrusion. This approach can avoid mass extraction and injection that occurs in traditional hydraulic tomography approaches while obtain a good estimation of subsurface K heterogeneity and NAPL migration. We believe this method is more cost effective and efficient for field remediation applications.

  18. Lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography: Canadian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, H.C.; Patsios, D.; Paul, N.S. [Univ. Health Network, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Heidi.Roberts@uhn.on.ca (and others)

    2007-10-15

    In 2003, the department of medical imaging at the University Health Network in Toronto, Ontario, became the first Canadian site of the International Early Lung Cancer Action Program (I-ELCAP). We report the results from the first 1000 baseline studies. Between June 2003 and December 2005, we enrolled 1000 high-risk smokers (that is, smokers with a history of a least 10 pack years, or the equivalent of one pack daily for 10 years), aged 55 years or older. A low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) (40 to 60 mA, 120 kV) was performed with 1.0mm to 1.25 collimation. Nodules found at baseline were followed according to the I-ELCAP protocol: 1) no noncalcified nodules (NCNs) or NCNs {<=} 4 mm or nonsolid nodules < 8 mm, annual repeat: 2) NCNs {>=} 5mm or nonsolid nodules {>=} 8 mm, 3-month follow up: or 3) nonsolid nodules {>=} 15 mm, antibiotics and 1-month follow-up. The first 100 study participants were aged 63 years, standard deviation (SD) 6 years, with a smoking history of 38 pack years, SD 22 pack years; 662 (66%) were former smokers, and 338 (34%) were current smokers; 453 (45%) were men, and 547 (55%) were women. Of the participants, 256 (26%) had a positive baseline low-dose computed tomography (LCDT) scan; 227 (23%) were followed after 3 months and 15 (1.6%) after 1 month; 7 (0.7%) received a contrast-enhanced CT and 6 (0.6%) an immediate CT-guided biopsy. Twenty-six invasive procedures were performed: 22 CT-guided biopsies, 1 ultrasound-guided lymph node metastasis biopsy, 1 bronchoscopic biopsy and 2 surgeries. The malignancy rate of the invasive procedures was 85%. Overall, the malignancy prevalence is 2.2%. Of the malignancies, 20 are lung carcinomas: 19 non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) (14 adenocarcinoma or bronchioalveolar carcinoma [BAC], 4 squamous carcinoma, and 1 large-cell carcinoma) and 1 small-cell carcinoma; 15 (78%) of the NSCLCs are Stage 1. Fourteen patients underwent surgery (1 pneumonectomy, 9 lobectomies, and 4 segmentectomies

  19. Repeating Pulsed Magnet System for Axion-like Particle Searches and Vacuum Birefringence Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, T; Namba, T; Asai, S; Kobayashi, T; Matsuo, A; Kindo, K; Nojiri, H

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a repeating pulsed magnet system which generates magnetic fields of about 10 T in a direction transverse to an incident beam over a length of 0.8 m with a repetition rate of 0.2 Hz. Its repetition rate is by two orders of magnitude higher than usual pulsed magnets. It is composed of four low resistance racetrack coils and a 30 kJ transportable capacitor bank as a power supply. The system aims at axion-like particle searches with a pulsed light source and vacuum birefringence measurements. We report on the details of the system and its performances.

  20. Repeating pulsed magnet system for axion-like particle searches and vacuum birefringence experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, T.; Inada, T.; Namba, T.; Asai, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Matsuo, A.; Kindo, K.; Nojiri, H.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a repeating pulsed magnet system which generates magnetic fields of about 10 T in a direction transverse to an incident beam over a length of 0.8 m with a repetition rate of 0.2 Hz. Its repetition rate is by two orders of magnitude higher than usual pulsed magnets. It is composed of four low resistance racetrack coils and a 30 kJ transportable capacitor bank as a power supply. The system aims at axion-like particle searches with a pulsed light source and vacuum birefringence measurements. We report on the details of the system and its performances.

  1. [Experience with the regeneration and repeated use of dialyzers (1977-1987)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gál, G; Kiss, E; Tichy, B; Búzás, E

    1989-10-01

    During ten years 59616 haemodialyses were performed with 18139 capillary dialysers on 226 patients being in the final stage of chronic renal insufficiency. With the semi-automatic technique applied blood can be eliminated from the dialyser in 15-20 minutes. Formalin used for desinfection is washed out of the apparatus such a way, that formalin content of the last washing solution ranges between 0-0.1 microgram/ml. Anti-N antibody indicating the presence of formalin could be detected in the serum of 2 patients out of the 120 cases tested. The same dialyser is used repeatedly on one patient, 3.29-times on the average. The regenerated dialyser eliminates compounds of small-and middle molecular weight with the same efficiency up to the 4th repeated use. Ratio of pyrogenic reactions is low, 0.08%. Neither infection or sepsis associated with the regeneration occurred. Rehabilitation degree as well as the survival time of patient corresponded with the average European standard. Because of the "first use syndrome" (allergic symptoms, hypotension, nausea, vomiting, headache, cramps etc.) with 5 patients haemodialysis could be performed only with regenerated dialysers dialyses. From the considerable sums saved by regeneration process 7 satellite dialysing units were established and equipped.

  2. Postmortem computed tomography with the use of air for blood vessel enhancement--Early experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowska-Solonynko, Aleksandra; Solonynko, Bohdan; Fudalej, Marcin; Żyłkowski, Jarosław

    2016-04-01

    Postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) is gaining popularity in forensic medicine. Computed tomography routinely performed in clinical medicine involves intravenous contrast administration. Unfortunately, postmortem examinations are typically limited to uncontrasted CT scans, where blood vessels and their potential injury sites are invisible. One serious problem is the fact that due to the process of decomposition, contrast agents used for vessel visualization in the living cannot be used in cadavers. Therefore, a special contrast agent designed for cadavers has been developed. This contrast agent has a high density and is lipophilic. Its use ensures very good visualization of blood vessels it is, however, associated with high costs and may alter findings of a later histopathological examination. This study presents early experience with the air as negative contrast agent to enhance all blood vessels in the body. The carbon dioxide (CO2) gas has been used as a contrast agent in live individuals with contraindications against the use of iodinated contrast. In corpses with advanced postmortem changes, putrefaction gases also considerably enhance the visibility of blood vessels and organs they fill. There have also been some positive effects with the use of gas in postmortem angiography of coronary vessels. These findings encouraged us to attempt air administration via catheters introduced into the femoral artery or a central venous access site in the superior vena cava. The gas distributed easily throughout the body and surprisingly well contrasted both arteries and veins of various caliber. The presence of the air administered into vessels did not cause any apparent, significant alterations in autopsy findings. Although optimization of the gas administration technique requires further studies, we can already say that this is a promising direction in postmortem angiography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrical capacitance volume tomography for measurement soil water infiltration in vessel experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Mukhlisin; Marlin Ramadhan Baidillah; Mohd Raihan Taha

    2014-01-01

    Electrical capacitance volume tomography (ECVT) is a recently-developed technique for real-time, non-invasive 3D monitoring of processes involving materials with strong contrasts in dielectric permittivity. This work is first application of the method to visualization of water flow in soil. We describe the principles behind the method, and then demonstrate its use with a simple laboratory infiltration experiment. 32 ECVT sensors were installed on the sides of an empty PVC column. Water was poured into the column at a constant rate, and ECVT data were collected every second. The column was then packed with dry sand and again supplied with water at a constant rate with data collected every second. Data were analyzed to give bulk average water contents, which proved consistent with the water supply rates. Data were also analyzed to give 3D images (216 voxels) allowing visualization of the water distribution during the experiments. Result of this work shows that water infiltration into the soil, wall flow, progress of the unstable wetting front and the final water distribution are clearly visible.

  4. Preliminary experiments on pharmacokinetic diffuse fluorescence tomography of CT-scanning mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanqi; Wang, Xin; Yin, Guoyan; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Limin

    2016-10-01

    In vivo tomographic imaging of the fluorescence pharmacokinetic parameters in tissues can provide additional specific and quantitative physiological and pathological information to that of fluorescence concentration. This modality normally requires a highly-sensitive diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) working in dynamic way to finally extract the pharmacokinetic parameters from the measured pharmacokinetics-associated temporally-varying boundary intensity. This paper is devoted to preliminary experimental validation of our proposed direct reconstruction scheme of instantaneous sampling based pharmacokinetic-DFT: A highly-sensitive DFT system of CT-scanning mode working with parallel four photomultiplier-tube photon-counting channels is developed to generate an instantaneous sampling dataset; A direct reconstruction scheme then extracts images of the pharmacokinetic parameters using the adaptive-EKF strategy. We design a dynamic phantom that can simulate the agent metabolism in living tissue. The results of the dynamic phantom experiments verify the validity of the experiment system and reconstruction algorithms, and demonstrate that system provides good resolution, high sensitivity and quantitativeness at different pump speed.

  5. [Anxiogenic and anxiolytic effects of lithium chloride under preventive and therapeutic treatments of male mice with repeated experience of aggression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagin, D A; Kudryavtseva, N N

    2014-01-01

    Repeated experience of aggression in daily agonistic interactions is accompanied by development of changes in behaviors and psychoemotional states indicating the development of the psychopathology of aggressive behavior, which are difficult to correct by drugs used for decrease of aggression in the clinics. In this paper the influence of lithium chloride on the behavior of aggressive males in different tests assessing anxiety, communication and exploratory activity (elevated plus maze test, social interaction test, partition test), as well as aggressiveness (agonistic interaction test) were studied. Lithium chloride (Sigma-Aldrich Co, 100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was administered preventively to male in ranging from the 7th day of agonistic interactions, as well as therapeutically to males with 21 days of aggression experience during the period without agonistic interactions. Also the effects of chronic lithium chloride treatment on behaviors of animals without agonistic interactions (intact mice) were studied. Period of drug and saline (as the controls) treatment--14 days. It has been shown that preventive lithium chloride treatment of male mice with repeated experience of aggression induced pronounced anxiogenic effect, under therapeutic treatment--nxiolytic effects. Anxiolytic effect was also observed in intact males. There is no effect of lithium chloride on aggression. Differences in the effects of lithium chloride under preveitive and therapeutic treatments, as well as the causes of individual sensitivity to the drug in male mice in one group were discussed.

  6. Extracting Tree Height from Repeat-Pass PolInSAR Data : Experiments with JPL and ESA Airborne Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavalle, Marco; Ahmed, Razi; Neumann, Maxim; Hensley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our latest developments and experiments with the random-motion-over-ground (RMoG) model used to extract canopy height and other important forest parameters from repeat-pass polarimetricinterferometric SAR (Pol-InSAR) data. More specifically, we summarize the key features of the RMoG model in contrast with the random-volume-over-ground (RVoG) model, describe in detail a possible inversion scheme for the RMoG model and illustrate the results of the RMoG inversion using airborne data collected by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  7. Extracting Tree Height from Repeat-Pass PolInSAR Data : Experiments with JPL and ESA Airborne Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavalle, Marco; Ahmed, Razi; Neumann, Maxim; Hensley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our latest developments and experiments with the random-motion-over-ground (RMoG) model used to extract canopy height and other important forest parameters from repeat-pass polarimetricinterferometric SAR (Pol-InSAR) data. More specifically, we summarize the key features of the RMoG model in contrast with the random-volume-over-ground (RVoG) model, describe in detail a possible inversion scheme for the RMoG model and illustrate the results of the RMoG inversion using airborne data collected by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  8. Augmenting short cheap talk scripts with a repeated opt-out reminder in choice experiment surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    reasons why Cheap Talk may fail to effectively remove hypothetical bias, especially in Choice Experiments. In this light, we suggest augmenting Cheap Talk in Choice Experiments with a so-called Opt-Out Reminder. Prior to each single choice set, the Opt-Out Reminder explicitly instructs respondents...... to choose the opt-out alternative if they find the experimentally designed alternatives too expensive. In an empirical Choice Experiment survey we find the Opt-Out Reminder to significantly reduce total WTP and to some extent also marginal WTP beyond the capability of the Cheap Talk applied without the Opt...... Talk with a dynamic Opt-Out Reminder can be an effective and promising improvement in the ongoing effort to remedy the particular types of hypothetical bias that potentially continue to invalidate Choice Experiment surveys....

  9. Investigation of Groundwater Flow Variations near a Recharge Pond with Repeat Deliberate Tracer Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan F Clark

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Determining hydraulic connections and travel times between recharge facilities and production wells has become increasingly important for permitting and operating managed aquifer recharge (MAR sites, a water supply strategy that transfers surface water into aquifers for storage and later extraction. This knowledge is critical for examining water quality changes and assessing the potential for future contamination. Deliberate tracer experiments are the best method for determining travel times and identifying preferential flow paths between recharge sites over the time scales of weeks to a few years. This paper compares the results of two deliberate tracer experiments at Kraemer Basin, Orange County, CA, USA. Results from the first experiment, which was conducted in October 1998, showed that a region of highly transmissive sedimentary material extends down gradient from the basin for more than 3 km [1]. Mean groundwater velocities were determined to be approximately 2 km/year in this region based on the arrival time of the tracer center of mass. A second experiment was initiated in January 2008 to determine if travel times from this basin to monitoring and production wells changed during the past decade in response to new recharge conditions. Results indicate that flow near Kraemer Basin was stable, and travel times to most wells determined during both experiments agree within the experimental uncertainty.

  10. Augmenting short cheap talk scripts with a repeated opt-out reminder in choice experiment surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    reasons why Cheap Talk may fail to effectively remove hypothetical bias, especially in Choice Experiments. In this light, we suggest augmenting Cheap Talk in Choice Experiments with a so-called Opt-Out Reminder. Prior to each single choice set, the Opt-Out Reminder explicitly instructs respondents...... Talk with a dynamic Opt-Out Reminder can be an effective and promising improvement in the ongoing effort to remedy the particular types of hypothetical bias that potentially continue to invalidate Choice Experiment surveys.......Hypothetical bias remains a major problem when valuing non-market goods with stated preference methods. Originally developed for Contingent Valuation studies, Cheap Talk has been found to effectively reduce hypothetical bias in some applications, though empirical results are ambiguous. We discuss...

  11. The experience of repeated and traumatic loss among Crow Indian children: response patterns and intervention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, K A

    1983-01-01

    Crow Indian children residing on the Montana Reservation appear to experience traumatic losses of family members and friends with much greater frequency than children in the population at large. Responses to these losses include interpersonal distancing, and sadness without apparent anger. Assessment and clinical intervention are considered within the sociocultural context of Indian child client and white, middle-class clinician.

  12. A repeated measures experiment of green exercise to improve self-esteem in UK school children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Reed

    Full Text Available Exercising in natural, green environments creates greater improvements in adult's self-esteem than exercise undertaken in urban or indoor settings. No comparable data are available for children. The aim of this study was to determine whether so called 'green exercise' affected changes in self-esteem; enjoyment and perceived exertion in children differently to urban exercise. We assessed cardiorespiratory fitness (20 m shuttle-run and self-reported physical activity (PAQ-A in 11 and 12 year olds (n = 75. Each pupil completed two 1.5 mile timed runs, one in an urban and another in a rural environment. Trials were completed one week apart during scheduled physical education lessons allocated using a repeated measures design. Self-esteem was measured before and after each trial, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE and enjoyment were assessed after completing each trial. We found a significant main effect (F (1,74, = 12.2, p<0.001, for the increase in self-esteem following exercise but there was no condition by exercise interaction (F (1,74, = 0.13, p = 0.72. There were no significant differences in perceived exertion or enjoyment between conditions. There was a negative correlation (r = -0.26, p = 0.04 between habitual physical activity and RPE during the control condition, which was not evident in the green exercise condition (r = -0.07, p = 0.55. Contrary to previous studies in adults, green exercise did not produce significantly greater increases in self-esteem than the urban exercise condition. Green exercise was enjoyed more equally by children with differing levels of habitual physical activity and has the potential to engage less active children in exercise.

  13. New gas detector setup for on-axis STIM tomography experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, A. C.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Fonte, P.; Beasley, D. G.; Alves, L. C.; da Silva, R. C.

    2013-07-01

    A gas flow ionization chamber for use with on-axis scanning transmission ion microscopy tomography (STIM-T) has been developed. The entrance window is composed of a square silicon nitride membrane 100 nm thick and 1 mm2 in area. The use of this type of window does not add significantly to the energy resolution with the MeV H+ or He+ particles used in STIM, and proved to be resistant to high proton fluence in the irradiated spot. The ability of such detector to withstand direct beam hit with acceptable energy resolution makes it suitable for on-axis STIM-T, in this respect outperforming the more standard Si PIN diodes, which performance is known to degrade above fluences of ∼1010-1012 cm-2. The present in-line design while allowing easy mounting of the detector to the existing target chamber, has the peculiarity of providing a practical way of replacing the Si3N4 membrane in case it brakes while operating. The concept of gas ionization chamber under development is expected to become ideal for on-axis STIM-T experiments due to its low ageing during operation, and anticipated attainable speed and energy resolution.

  14. New gas detector setup for on-axis STIM tomography experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, A.C., E-mail: ana.marques@ctn.ist.utl.pt [IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Fraga, M.M.F.R. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Departamento de Física, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Fonte, P. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Beasley, D.G.; Alves, L.C.; Silva, R.C. da [IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    A gas flow ionization chamber for use with on-axis scanning transmission ion microscopy tomography (STIM-T) has been developed. The entrance window is composed of a square silicon nitride membrane 100 nm thick and 1 mm{sup 2} in area. The use of this type of window does not add significantly to the energy resolution with the MeV H{sup +} or He{sup +} particles used in STIM, and proved to be resistant to high proton fluence in the irradiated spot. The ability of such detector to withstand direct beam hit with acceptable energy resolution makes it suitable for on-axis STIM-T, in this respect outperforming the more standard Si PIN diodes, which performance is known to degrade above fluences of ∼10{sup 10}–10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. The present in-line design while allowing easy mounting of the detector to the existing target chamber, has the peculiarity of providing a practical way of replacing the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membrane in case it brakes while operating. The concept of gas ionization chamber under development is expected to become ideal for on-axis STIM-T experiments due to its low ageing during operation, and anticipated attainable speed and energy resolution.

  15. Optimal design of measurement settings for quantum-state-tomography experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Huang, Shilin; Luo, Zhihuang; Li, Keren; Lu, Dawei; Zeng, Bei

    2017-09-01

    Quantum state tomography is an indispensable but costly part of many quantum experiments. Typically, it requires measurements to be carried out in a number of different settings on a fixed experimental setup. The collected data are often informationally overcomplete, with the amount of information redundancy depending on the particular set of measurement settings chosen. This raises a question about how one should optimally take data so that the number of measurement settings necessary can be reduced. Here, we cast this problem in terms of integer programming. For a given experimental setup, standard integer-programming algorithms allow us to find the minimum set of readout operations that can realize a target tomographic task. We apply the method to certain basic and practical state-tomographic problems in nuclear-magnetic-resonance experimental systems. The results show that considerably fewer readout operations can be found using our technique than by using the previous greedy search strategy. Therefore, our method could be helpful for simplifying measurement schemes to minimize the experimental effort.

  16. FEM-based simulation of a fluorescence tomography experiment using anatomical MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wuwei; Elmer, Andreas; Augath, Mark-Aurel; Rudin, Markus

    2016-03-01

    A hybrid system combining fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is attractive for preclinical imaging as it allows fusion of molecular information derived from FMT and anatomical reference data derived from MRI. We have previously developed such a system and demonstrated its performance in biological applications. For reconstruction slab geometry with homogeneous optical parameters was assumed, which led to undesirable artifacts. In order to exploit the power of the hybrid system, the use of MRI derived anatomical information, as a constraint for FMT reconstruction, appears logical. Heterogeneity of tissues and irregular surface derived from MRI can be accounted for by generating a mesh using the finite element method (FEM), and attributing optical parameters to individual mesh points. We have established a forward simulation tool based on TOAST++ to mimic an FMT experiment. MRI images were recorded on a 9.4T MR scanner using a T1-weighted pulse sequence. The voxelized dataset was processed by iso2mesh to yield a 3D-mesh. Four steps of FMT simulation were included: 1) Assignment of optical properties, 2) Specification of boundary conditions and generation of 3) excitation and 4) emission maps. FEM-derived results were compared with those obtained using the analytical solution of Green's function and with experimental data with a single fluorescent inclusion in a silicon phantom. Once, the forward modeling method is properly validated it will be used as a central element of a reconstruction algorithm for analyzing data derived from a hybrid FMT/MRI setup.

  17. The precision of micro-tomography in bone taphonomic experiments and the importance of registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Garff, Erwan; Mesli, Vadim; Delannoy, Yann; Colard, Thomas; De Jonckheere, Julien; Demondion, Xavier; Hédouin, Valéry

    2017-04-01

    Micro-computed tomography (μCT) provides micrometric 3D images and has been used in forensic studies for anthropology pubis measurement or insect description for post mortem interval estimation. Studies have suggested using registration, a superimposing images method between a reference and a target. This technique avoids positioning bias and increase the precision of μCT. However, no clear study has reported the precision with μCT analysis before or after registration in a forensic field. One fresh post mortem sample of a human cranial vault was collected. Two successive μCT acquisitions (resolution 10μm) of it were performed without repositioning. The data from the second acquisition were copied and registered by two trained operators (operators 1 and 2). Operator 1 performed a second registration process after 1 week (operator 1 bis). The images were analysed. The bone volume (BV), bone surface (BS), number of trabeculae (TbN), trabecular thickness (TbTh) and mean trabecular distance (TbSp) were compared before and after registration. The mean (±SD), the coefficient of variation (%CV), and the precision error of the standard deviation absolute value and of the coefficient of variation between operators 1 and 2 (inter-subject variability) and between operator 1 and 1 bis (intra-subject variability) were calculated. We also collected the second phalanx of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers on the hands of a second individual. Two successive scans (resolution 27μm) were performed without repositioning. A comparison (mean±SD of BV, BS, TbN, TbTh, TbSp) was made between the first and second scans with and without registration, and an ANOVA repeated measures procedure was performed. For the vault, we show that after 30 registrations for each operator (1, 2 and 1 bis), the mean and %CV were very close for each variable and between operators. For BV and BS, the difference in the mean value was approximately 0.01 (mm(3) and mm(2), respectively). The precision error was

  18. A Hydraulic Tomography Experiment in Fractured Sedimentary Rocks, Newark Basin, New Jersey, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedeman, C. R.; Barrash, W.; Thrash, C. J.; Johnson, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography was performed in July 2015 in contaminated fractured mudstone beds at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in the Newark Basin near Trenton, NJ using seven existing wells. The spatial arrangement of wells (in a circle of 9 m radius with one central well), the use of packers to divide the wells into multiple monitoring intervals, and the deployment of fiber optic pressure transducers enabled collection of a hydraulic tomography dataset comprising high-resolution drawdown observations at an unprecedented level of spatial detail for fractured rocks. The experiment involved 45-minute cross-hole aquifer tests, conducted by pumping from a given packer-isolated well interval and continuously monitoring drawdowns in all other well intervals. The collective set of drawdown data from all tests and intervals displays a wide range of behavior suggestive of highly heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) within the tested volume, such as: drawdown curves for different well intervals crossing one another on drawdown-time plots; variable drawdown curve shapes, including linear segments on log-log plots; variable order and magnitude of time-lag and/or drawdown for intervals of a given well in response to pumping from similar fractures or stratigraphic units in different wells; and variable groupings of wells and intervals showing similar responses for different pumping tests. The observed behavior is consistent with previous testing at the NAWC indicating that K within and across individual mudstone beds can vary by orders of magnitude over scales of meters. Preliminary assessment of the drawdown data together with a rich set of geophysical logs suggests an initial conceptual model that includes densely distributed fractures of moderate K at the shallowest depths of the tested volume, connected high-K bedding-plane-parting fractures at intermediate depths, and sparse low-K fractures in the deeper rocks. Future work will involve tomographic inversion of

  19. Repeated Structural Imaging Reveals Nonlinear Progression of Experience-Dependent Volume Changes in Human Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Elisabeth; Kühn, Simone; Verrel, Julius; Mårtensson, Johan; Bodammer, Nils Christian; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lövdén, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Evidence for experience-dependent structural brain change in adult humans is accumulating. However, its time course is not well understood, as intervention studies typically consist of only 2 imaging sessions (before vs. after training). We acquired up to 18 structural magnetic resonance images over a 7-week period while 15 right-handed participants practiced left-hand writing and drawing. After 4 weeks, we observed increases in gray matter of both left and right primary motor cortices relative to a control group; 3 weeks later, these differences were no longer reliable. Time-series analyses revealed that gray matter in the primary motor cortices expanded during the first 4 weeks and then partially renormalized, in particular in the right hemisphere, despite continued practice and increasing task proficiency. Similar patterns of expansion followed by partial renormalization are also found in synaptogenesis, cortical map plasticity, and maturation, and may qualify as a general principle of structural plasticity. Research on human brain plasticity needs to encompass more than 2 measurement occasions to capture expansion and potential renormalization processes over time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography for the Packed Bed Reactor ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marashdeh, Qussai; Motil, Brian; Wang, Aining; Liang-Shih, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Fixed packed bed reactors are compact, require minimum power and maintenance to operate, and are highly reliable. These features make this technology a highly desirable unit operation for long duration life support systems in space. NASA is developing an ISS experiment to address this technology with particular focus on water reclamation and air revitalization. Earlier research and development efforts funded by NASA have resulted in two hydrodynamic models which require validation with appropriate instrumentation in an extended microgravity environment. To validate these models, the instantaneous distribution of the gas and liquid phases must be measured.Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) is a non-invasive imaging technology recently developed for multi-phase flow applications. It is based on distributing flexible capacitance plates on the peripheral of a flow column and collecting real-time measurements of inter-electrode capacitances. Capacitance measurements here are directly related to dielectric constant distribution, a physical property that is also related to material distribution in the imaging domain. Reconstruction algorithms are employed to map volume images of dielectric distribution in the imaging domain, which is in turn related to phase distribution. ECVT is suitable for imaging interacting materials of different dielectric constants, typical in multi-phase flow systems. ECVT is being used extensively for measuring flow variables in various gas-liquid and gas-solid flow systems. Recent application of ECVT include flows in risers and exit regions of circulating fluidized beds, gas-liquid and gas-solid bubble columns, trickle beds, and slurry bubble columns. ECVT is also used to validate flow models and CFD simulations. The technology is uniquely qualified for imaging phase concentrations in packed bed reactors for the ISS flight experiments as it exhibits favorable features of compact size, low profile sensors, high imaging speed, and

  1. Computed tomography guided needle biopsy: experience from 1,300 procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojniak, Rubens; Isberner, Rony Klaus; Viana, Luciana Marinho; Yu, Liao Shin; Aita, Alessandro Amorim; Soares, Fernando Augusto [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia e Patologia

    2006-01-15

    Context and objective: computed tomography (CT) guided biopsy is widely accepted as effective and safe for diagnosis in many settings. Accuracy depends on target organ and needle type. Cutting needles present advantages over fine needles. This study presents experience from CT guided biopsies performed at an oncology center. Design and setting: retrospective study at Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo.Methods: 1,300 consecutive CT guided biopsies performed between July 1994 and February 2000 were analyzed. Nodules or masses were suspected as primary malignancy in 845 cases (65%) or metastatic lesion in 455 (35%). 628 lesions were thoracic, 281 abdominal, 208 retroperitoneal, 134 musculoskeletal and 49 head/neck. All biopsies were performed by one radiologist or under his supervision: 765 (59%) with 22-gauge fine-needle/aspiration technique and 535 (41%) with automated 16 or 18-gauge cutting-needle biopsy. Results: adequate samples were obtained in 70-92% of fine-needle and 93-100% of cutting-needle biopsies. The specific diagnosis rates were 54-67% for fine-needle and 82-100% for cutting-needle biopsies, according to biopsy site. For any site, sample adequacy and specific diagnosis rate were always better for cutting-needle biopsy. Among 530 lung biopsies, there were 84 pneumothorax (16%) and two hemothorax (0.3%) cases, with thoracic drainage in 24 (4.9%). Among abdominal and retroperitoneal biopsies, there were two cases of major bleeding and one of peritonitis. Conclusion: both types of needle showed satisfactory results, but cutting-needle biopsy should be used when specific diagnosis is desired without greater incidence of complications. (author)

  2. SPECTRUM OF FUNCTIONING ISLET CELL TUMOR ON MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: EXPERIENCE ON 70 PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-dan Xue; Zheng-yu Jin; Wei Liu; Hao Sun; Reto Merges; Xuan Wang; Xiao-na Zhang; Yun Wang; Wen-min Zhao; Jiu-hong Chen

    2008-01-01

    Objective To review experience in preoperative detection of islet cell tumors using multislice computed tomo-graphy (MSCT) and summarize various imaging features of functioning islet cell tumors on enhanced MSCT.Methods Seventy patients with clinical or pathological diagnosis of functioning pancreatic islet cell tumor between October 2003 and February 2007 were included in this retrospective study. Seventy-four enhanced MSCT scans in these patients were identified. All MSCT scans were interpreted by two experienced radiologists by consensus interpretation.Surgery and pathology reports were used to confirm the diagnosis, localization, and size of tumors.Results Totally, 73 functioning islet cell tumors including 65 benign insulinomas, 2 benign giucagnnomas, 3 ma-lignant insulinomas, and 3 malignant glucagonomas were pathologically diagnosed. Tumors in only two cases were not found by MSCT. In 67 benign lesions, 32 showed typical enhancement style, 21 showed prolonged enhancement in por-tal venous phase, 4 showed delayed enhancement, 4 had iso-dense enhancement with normal pancreatic parenchyma, 2 had no enhancement at all in arterial phase and portal venous phase, and 4 had inhomogeneous enhancement with necro-sis or cyst-formation. Patchy or spotty calcifications were found in 3 of the 67 tumors. In 6 malignant islet cell tumors,vessel invasion (2/6) and bowel invasion (1/6) were seen. Different enhancement patterns were shown. All hepatic metastases showed hyper-enhancement during their arterial phase.Conelusions Pancreatic islet cell tumor may display a wide spectrum of presentations in MSCT. Umors with unu-sual appearances often present as diagunstie challenges. Non-contrast and post-contrast multiphase scans are recommen-ded for the localization of functioning islet cell tumors.

  3. Multislice computed tomography perfusion imaging for visualization of acute pulmonary embolism: animal experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildberger, Joachim Ernst; Spuentrup, Elmar; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Guenther, Rolf W. [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Klotz, Ernst; Ditt, Hendrik [Computed Tomography, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of our animal study was to evaluate a new computed tomography (CT) subtraction technique for visualization of perfusion defects within the lung parenchyma in subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE). Seven healthy pigs were entered into a prospective trial. Acute PE was artificially induced by fresh clot material prior to the CT scans. Within a single breath-hold, whole thorax CT scans were performed with a 16-slice multidetector-row CT scanner (SOMATOM Sensation 16; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) before and after intravenous application of 80 ml of contrast medium with a flow rate of 4 ml/s, followed by a saline chaser. The scan parameters were 120 kV and 100 mAs{sub eff}, using a thin collimation of 16 x 0.75 mm and a table speed/rotation of 15-18 mm (pitch, 1.25-1.5; rotation time, 0.5 s). Axial source images were reconstructed with an effective slice thickness of 1 mm (overlap, 30%). A new automatic subtraction technique was used. After 3D segmentation of the lungs in the plain and contrast-enhanced series, threshold-based extraction of major airways and vascular structures in the contrast images was performed. This segmentation was repeated in the plain CT images segmenting the same number of vessels and airways as in the contrast images. Both scans were registered onto each other using nonrigid registration. After registration both image sets were filtered in a nonlinear fashion excluding segmented airways and vessels. After subtracting the plain CT data from the contrast data the resulting enhancement images were color-encoded and overlaid onto the contrast-enhanced CT angiography (CTA) images. This color-encoded combined display of parenchymal enhancement of the lungs was evaluated interactively on a workstation (Leonardo, Siemens) in axial, coronal and sagittal plane orientations. Axial contrast-enhanced CTA images were rated first, followed by an analysis of the combination images. Finally, CTA images were reread focusing on areas with perfusion

  4. Simulation Experiments in Electromagnetic Tomography Well Logging in Two-phase flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xiling; Zhao Yanwei

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic Computer Tomography (ECT) is a method to probe the interior of an inhomogeneous medium via surface measurement in a non-linear way. Due to the great differences in conductivity and permittivity between oil and water in the well, Electromagnetic Tomography Well Logging (ETWL), a new flow imaging measurement system, is proposed to describe the distribution and movement of oil/water two-phase flow in the well by scanning the detected region and applying a suitable data processing algorithm. The results of the numerical simulation and physical modeling show that the system could provide a clear image of the flow profile.

  5. Experiences and benefits of positron emitted tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) combined with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) in the diagnosis of Stage 1 sarcoidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUH Shi-ping; WU Tzu-chin; WANG Yao-tung; TSAO Thomas Chang-yao; CHEN Jia-yuh

    2007-01-01

    Background:The purpose of this study was to describe our experiences and analyze the benefits of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) combined with positron emitted tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of patients with early (Stage 1) sarcoidosis.Methods:From 1995 to 2006,seven patients (two males,five females),with ages ranging from 26 to 58 years,were impressed with Stage 1 sarcoidosis (mediastinal or hilar lymph nodes involvements without lung involvement) by histological examination of intrathoracic lymph nodes (LNs) and/or lung parenchyma taken from VATS biopsy.Three of them received PET or PET-CT evaluation.VATS was approached from the right and left side in one and six patients,respectively,according to the locations of their lesions.Results:All the VATS biopsied LNs or lung specimens were adequate for establishing diagnosis.Mediastinal LNs were taken from Groups 3,4 in four,Group 7 in two,and Groups 5,6 in one of them.Hilar LNs biopsies were performed in four cases.Lung biopsy was performed in all but two cases.All of them were expressed pathologically or radiologically as Stage 1 sarcoidosis.PET-CT revealed high emission signals over these affected LNs.These patients received oral steroid treatment or follow up only.All of them were followed up from 5 months to 11 years with satisfactory results.Conclusion:VATS biopsy is a minimally invasive,safe and effective procedure.It can be used as a diagnostic alternative of transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB),and can harvest larger and more areas of specimens than mediastinoscopy for staging patients with sarcoidosis.PET-CT can provide us more accurate information about the characteristics and localization of these lesions before biopsy.VATS combined with PET-CT can provide more accurate and earlier diagnosis of patients with unknown intrathoracic lesions,including the sarcoidosis.

  6. Clinical experiences with optical coherence tomography in epithelial (pre)malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Ronni

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the potential of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to differentiate between normal tissue and (pre)malignant tissue in epithelial cancers. It can be divided in research performed in the genital area and the field of melanoma. Chapter 2 describes the principles of the OCT-tec

  7. Clinical experiences with optical coherence tomography in epithelial (pre)malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Ronni; Wessels, R.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the potential of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to differentiate between normal tissue and (pre)malignant tissue in epithelial cancers. It can be divided in research performed in the genital area and the field of melanoma. Chapter 2 describes the principles of the OCT-techn

  8. Experiments of Tomography-Based SAR Techniques with P-Band Polarimetric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardini, F.; Pardini, M.

    2009-04-01

    New opportunities are arising in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observation of forest scenarios, especially with decimetric and metric radio wavelengths, which possess the capability of penetrating into volumes. Given its capabilities in the three-dimensional imaging of the scattering properties of the observed scene, SAR Tomography (Tomo-SAR) constitutes a good candidate for the analysis of the vertical structure of the forest. In this work, the results are presented of the application of tomography-based SAR techniques to P-band airborne data over a boreal forest from the ESA BioSAR-1 project. Results of an adaptive tomographic analysis are presented, also with a low resolution dataset, which emulates a satellite acquisition. In order to mitigate the geometric perspective effects due to the poor range resolution, the principle is introduced of the application of a common band pre-filtering to tomography. Then, a coherent layer canceller is derived to possibly apply interferometric techniques conceived for single layer scenarios to two layer scenarios. Finally, a stabilized adaptive polarimetric Tomo-SAR (PolTomo-SAR) method is proposed for estimating the 3D polarimetric scattering mechanism of the scene with low distorsions.

  9. Repeat rainfall simulation experiments for assessing the evolution of overland flow generation and inter-rill erosion following wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keizer, Jan Jacob; Malvar, Maruxa; Prats, Sergio; Nunes, João. Pedro

    2010-05-01

    The EROSFIRE project selected field rainfall simulation experiments (RSE's) as a time-and cost-effective approach to gather runoff and soil loss data under the rapidly changing conditions typical for commercial eucalypt plantations in Portugal following wildfires. These RSE data were first and foremost envisaged for initial parameterization and calibration of a physically-based model like MEFIDIS. Subsequent model assessment at larger spatial scales would then be based on slope-scale erosion plot data collected at a small number of selected sites. The present work, however, will in principle be confined to an analysis of the measurement results of the RSE's in two recently burnt eucalypt plantations. Repeat RSE's were carried out in two adjacent but contrasting eucalypt stands on steep hillslopes in north-central Portugal. This involved six occasions ranging from 3 to 24 months after a moderate severity fire in July 2005. A paired-plot experimental design was employed that comprised two pairs of RSE's at each site and occasion. From a grand total of 46 RSE's: (i) 24 and 22 RSE's involved application rates of 45-50 and 80-85 mm h-1, respectively; (ii) 22 took place in a stand that had been ploughed in downslope direction several years before the wildfire and 24 in an unploughed stand. The results showed a clear tendency for extreme-intensity RSE's to produce higher runoff amounts and greater soil and organic matter losses than the simultaneous high-intensity RSE's on the neighbouring plots. Nonetheless, there were marked exceptions, both in space (for one of the plot pairs) and time (under intermediate soil water repellency conditions). Also, overland flow generation and erosion varied significantly along the various field campaigns. This temporal pattern noticeably differed from a straightforward decline with time-after-fire, rather suggesting a seasonal component that reflected broad variations in topsoil water repellency. The ploughed site produced less runoff

  10. Resistivity and self-potential tomography applied to groundwater remediation and contaminant plumes: Sandbox and field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, D.; Revil, A.; Hort, R. D.; Munakata-Marr, J.; Atekwana, E. A.; Kulessa, B.

    2015-11-01

    Geophysical methods can be used to remotely characterize contaminated sites and monitor in situ enhanced remediation processes. We have conducted one sandbox experiment and one contaminated field investigation to show the robustness of electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential (SP) tomography for these applications. In the sandbox experiment, we injected permanganate in a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated environment under a constant hydraulic gradient. Inverted resistivity tomograms are able to track the evolution of the permanganate plume in agreement with visual observations made on the side of the tank. Self-potential measurements were also performed at the surface of the sandbox using non-polarizing Ag-AgCl electrodes. These data were inverted to obtain the source density distribution with and without the resistivity information. A compact horizontal dipole source located at the front of the plume was obtained from the inversion of these self-potential data. This current dipole may be related to the redox reaction occurring between TCE and permanganate and the strong concentration gradient at the front of the plume. We demonstrate that time-lapse self-potential signals can be used to track the kinetics of an advecting oxidizer plume with acceptable accuracy and, if needed, in real time, but are unable to completely resolve the shape of the plume. In the field investigation, a 3D resistivity tomography is used to characterize an organic contaminant plume (resistive domain) and an overlying zone of solid waste materials (conductive domain). After removing the influence of the streaming potential, the identified source current density had a magnitude of 0.5 A m-2. The strong source current density may be attributed to charge movement between the neighboring zones that encourage abiotic and microbially enhanced reduction and oxidation reactions. In both cases, the self-potential source current density is located in the area of strong resistivity

  11. The Effects of Group Leader Learning Style on Student Knowledge Gain in a Leadership Camp Setting: A Repeated-Measures Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Terry, Robert, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Many state FFA associations conduct summer camps focusing on leadership and personal development for FFA members. Interestingly, little research has been conducted on the impact or outcomes of these common activities. The purpose of this split-plot factorial repeated-measures experiment was to assess the level of campers' learning of the…

  12. Genetic variation, phenotypic stability, and repeatability of drought response in European larch throughout 50 years in a common garden experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jan-Peter; Grabner, Michael; Karanitsch-Ackerl, Sandra; Mayer, Konrad; Weißenbacher, Lambert; Schueler, Silvio; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2017-01-31

    Assessing intra-specific variation in drought stress response is required to mitigate the consequences of climate change on forest ecosystems. Previous studies suggest that European larch (Larix decidua Mill.), an important European conifer in mountainous and alpine forests, is highly vulnerable to drought. In light of this, we estimated the genetic variation in drought sensitivity and its degree of genetic determination in a 50-year-old common garden experiment in the drought-prone northeastern Austria. Tree ring data from larch provenances originating from across the species' natural range were used to estimate the drought reaction in four consecutive drought events (1977, 1981, 1990–1994, and 2003) with extremely low standardized precipitation- and evapotranspiration-index values that affected growth in all provenances. We found significant differences among provenances across the four drought periods for the trees’ capacity to withstand drought (resistance) and for their capacity to reach pre-drought growth levels after drought (resilience). Provenances from the species' northern distribution limit in the Polish lowlands were found to be more drought resistant and showed higher stability across all drought periods than provenances from mountainous habitats at the southern fringe. The degree of genetic determination, as estimated by the repeatability, ranged up to 0.39, but significantly differed among provenances, indicating varying degrees of natural selection at the provenance origin. Generally, the relationship between the provenances’ source climate and drought behavior was weak, suggesting that the contrasting patterns of drought response are a result of both genetic divergence out of different refugial lineages and local adaptation to summer or winter drought conditions. Our analysis suggests that European larch posseses high genetic variation among and within provenances that can be used for assisted migration and breeding programs.

  13. Antioxidant responses in estuarine invertebrates exposed to repeated oil spills: Effects of frequency and dosage in a field manipulative experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrini-Neto, Leonardo; Pereira, Letícia; Martins, César C; Silva de Assis, Helena C; Camus, Lionel; Lana, Paulo C

    2016-08-01

    We have experimentally investigated the effects of repeated diesel spills on the bivalve Anomalocardia brasiliana, the gastropod Neritina virginea and the polychaete Laeonereis culveri, by monitoring the responses of oxidative stress biomarkers in a subtropical estuary. Three frequencies of exposure events were compared against two dosages of oil in a factorial experiment with asymmetrical controls. Hypotheses were tested to distinguish between (i) the overall effect of oil spills, (ii) the effect of diesel dosage via different exposure regimes, and (iii) the effect of time since last spill. Antioxidant defense responses and oxidative damage in the bivalve A. brasiliana and the polychaete L. culveri were overall significantly affected by frequent oil spills compared to undisturbed controls. The main effects of diesel spills on both species were the induction of SOD and GST activities, a significant increase in LPO levels and a decrease in GSH concentration. N. virginea was particularly tolerant to oil exposure, with the exception of a significant GSH depletion. Overall, enzymatic activities and oxidative damage in A. brasiliana and L. culveri were induced by frequent low-dosage spills compared to infrequent high-dosage spills, although the opposite pattern was observed for N. virginea antioxidant responses. Antioxidant responses in A. brasiliana and L. culveri were not affected by timing of exposure events. However, our results revealed that N. virginea might have a delayed response to acute high-dosage exposure. Experimental in situ simulations of oil exposure events with varying frequencies and intensities provide a useful tool for detecting and quantifying environmental impacts. In general, antioxidant biomarkers were induced by frequent low-dosage exposures compared to infrequent high-dosage ones. The bivalve A. brasiliana and the polychaete L. culveri are more suitable sentinels due to their greater responsiveness to oil and also to their wider geographical

  14. Optimized data masks for focussed solar tomography: background and artificial diagnostic experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S. J.; Pijpers, F. P.; Thompson, M. J.

    2007-06-01

    Context: The use of solar tomography for detecting subsurface features in the Sun is now well established. It customarily proceeds from an analysis of data on the solar surface given weightings in a predetermined geometric (e.g. centre-annulus) configuration. Aims: We seek to improve these weightings by developing a scheme for choosing optimal combinations of data that maximise the contribution from signal at a desired horizontal and depth location. Methods: We employ a subtractive optimally localized averaging (SOLA) scheme to pick weights for particular data points and analyse the quality of the results. Results: We show in this work that particularly by using wave kernels instead of rays for modelling purposes, one can do well at localizing a measurement through our techniques while achieving desirable error-magnification properties.

  15. Experience with post-mortem computed tomography in Southern Denmark 2006-11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To explore the ability of post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) to establish the cause of death. (2) To investigate the inter-method variation between autopsy and PMCT. (3) To investigate whether PMCT can select cases for autopsy. (4) To investigate the importance of histology...... and was less reliable at detecting injuries in inner organs, small hematomas and vesseltransections. PMCT was unable to detect thrombosis, thromboembolism, cirrhosis, esophagealvarices, myocardialinfarctions and myocardial scartissue, peritonitis and gastro-intestinal ulcerations. At least 15% of the autopsies...... in this study could have been substituted by PMCT. Histology yielded important new information in onefourth of the cases, but this proportion was much smaller among cases for which we estimated that the autopsy could have been substituted by PMCT. Conclusion: PMCT is a valuable supplement to autopsy and may...

  16. Broadband chemical species tomography: Measurement theory and a proof-of-concept emission detection experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Samuel J.; Tsang, Roger W.; Daun, Kyle J.

    2017-09-01

    This work introduces broadband-absorption based chemical species tomography (CST) as a novel approach to reconstruct hydrocarbon concentrations from open-path attenuation measurements. In contrast to monochromatic CST, which usually involves solving a mathematically ill-posed linear problem, the measurement equations in broadband CST are nonlinear due to the integration of the radiative transfer equation over the detection spectrum. We present a transfer function that relates broadband transmittances to a path-integrated concentration, suitable for tomographic reconstruction, and use a Bayesian reconstruction technique that combines the measurement data with a priori assumptions about the spatial distribution of the target species. The technique is demonstrated by reconstructing a propane plume, and validating the results by point concentration measurements made with a flame ionization detector.

  17. Determinants and Experiences of Repeat Pregnancy among HIV-Positive Kenyan Women--A Mixed-Methods Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Akelo

    Full Text Available To identify factors associated with repeat pregnancy subsequent to an index pregnancy among women living with HIV (WLWH in western Kenya who were enrolled in a 24-month phase-II clinical trial of triple-ART prophylaxis for prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and to contextualize social and cultural influences on WLWH's reproductive decision making.A mixed-methods approach was used to examine repeat pregnancy within a 24 month period after birth. Counselor-administered questionnaires were collected from 500 WLWH. Forty women (22 with a repeat pregnancy; 18 with no repeat pregnancy were purposively selected for a qualitative interview (QI. Simple and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed for quantitative data. Thematic coding and saliency analysis were undertaken for qualitative data.Eighty-eight (17.6% women had a repeat pregnancy. Median maternal age was 23 years (range 15-43 years and median gestational age at enrollment was 34 weeks. In multiple logistic regression analyses, living in the same compound with a husband (adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 2.33; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.14, 4.75 was associated with increased odds of repeat pregnancy (p ≤ 0.05. Being in the 30-43 age group (AOR: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.87, having talked to a partner about family planning (FP use (AOR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.29, 0.98, and prior usage of FP (AOR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.82 were associated with a decrease in odds of repeat pregnancy. QI findings centered on concerns about modern contraception methods (side effects and views that they 'ruined the womb' and a desire to have the right number of children. Religious leaders, family, and the broader community were viewed as reinforcing cultural expectations for married women to have children. Repeat pregnancy was commonly attributed to contraception failure or to lack of knowledge about post-delivery fertility.In addition to cultural context, reproductive health programs for WLWH may need to

  18. Effect of reader experience on variability, evaluation time and accuracy of coronary plaque detection with computed tomography coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saur, Stefan C.; Szekely, Gabor [ETH Zurich, Computer Vision Laboratory, Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Group, Boston, MA (United States); Stolzmann, Paul; Baumueller, Stephan; Leschka, Sebastian; Scheffel, Hans; Desbiolles, Lotus [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Fuchs, Thomas J. [ETH Zurich, Department of Computer Science, Zurich (Switzerland); Cattin, Philippe C. [ETH Zurich, Computer Vision Laboratory, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Basel, Medical Image Analysis Center, Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-07-15

    To assess the effect of reader experience on variability, evaluation time and accuracy in the detection of coronary artery plaques with computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). Three independent, blinded readers with three different experience levels twice labelled 50 retrospectively electrocardiography (ECG)-gated contrast-enhanced dual-source CTCA data sets (15 female, age 67.3 {+-} 10.4 years, range 46-86 years) indicating the presence or absence of coronary plaques. The evaluation times for the readings were recorded. Intra- and interobserver variability expressed as {kappa} statistics and sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values were calculated for plaque detection, with a consensus reading of the three readers taken as the standard of reference. A bootstrap method was applied in the statistical analysis to account for clustering. Significant correlations were found between reader experience and, respectively, evaluation times (r = -0.59, p < 0.05) and intraobserver variability (r = 0.73, p < 0.05). The evaluation time significantly differed among the readers (p < 0.05). The observer variability for plaque detection, compared with the consensus, varied between {kappa} = 0.582 and {kappa} = 0.802. Variability of plaque detection was significantly smaller (p < 0.05) and more accurate (p < 0.05) for the most experienced reader. Reader experience significantly correlated with observer variability, evaluation time and accuracy of coronary plaque detection at CTCA. (orig.)

  19. Difficult diagnosis of gout: the benefit of dual energy computed tomography, initial experience in routine clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Löckmann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gout, one of the most common inflammatory arthritides in humans, is still difficult to diagnose in challenging situations, when fluid for arthrocentesis or an apparent tophus are absent and, for example, an infection as differential diagnosis has to be ruled out. Dual energy computed tomography (DECT is an established tool for detection and characterisation of uric acid stones in the urinary tract and has recently been used to detect and display urate deposits. Our first experiences with DECT as a diagnostic tool in routine clinical practice show, that DECT is a promising imaging technique which allows the detection of monosodium urate deposits and benefits the routine diagnosis of tophaceous gout particularly in diffuse soft tissue swelling of the limbs, without the possibility of needle aspiration. However, DECT does not seem suitable to detect dissolved urate crystals, neither in vitro nor in vivo.

  20. Uptake of uranium in Atlantic salmon gills following exposure experiments demonstrated by SR-XRF tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, O.C.; Cagno, S.; Brit Salbu, H.C.T. [Centre of Excellence in Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, Norwegian University of Life Sciences - UMB (Norway); Vanmeert, F.; Nuyts, G.; Janssens, K. [University of Antwerp (Belgium); Alfeld, M.; Falkenberg, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron - DESY (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide as well as a heavy metal that can be found in elevated concentrations (mg/L) in the aquatic environment and therefore may pose a risk to aquatic organisms including fish. The major challenges in monitoring the fate of U in complex media, such as soils, sediments and water are to identify mobile and bioavailable U species, interactions with environmental components, transfer to organisms via sorption to surfaces and across membranes, and the internal distribution of target organs. As part of a larger study, U accumulation in gills and internal organs (e.g. liver) as well as mortality of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) were studied as a function of U concentration as well as pH of the exposure water. As Atlantic salmon does not ingest freshwater, the major pathway for uptake of U in the liver is hypothesized to be by transfer across the gills. However, to our best knowledge, active uptake of U within gill filaments has never been proven. In the present work, we demonstrate that following 96 hours exposure of 6 mg U/l in freshwater at pH 7 and 1 mg U/l at pH 5, U was actively taken up in the Atlantic Salmon gill filaments. The internal distribution of U within exposed organisms was visualized using μXRF/μXRD two-dimensional scanning and XRF/XRD tomography at the microprobe end-station of the PETRA III P06 beamline. The recently developed and highly efficient Maia detector array was successfully employed to record extended high-resolution element-specific maps of the tissue samples. First, conventional 2D μXRF/μXRD mapping allowed to identify the axial planes in the samples actually containing U. On the same samples, higher resolution virtual cross-sections were obtained (18 keV, 0.6 μm beam size) by means of μXRF/μXRD tomography of the planes in which U was encountered. The results proved that U not only adheres to the external boundary of the fish gills, but it is also taken up via gills. The results of this work

  1. Catheter visualisation in MR tomography: first animal experimental experiences with field inhomogeneity catheters; Kathetervisualisierung in der MR-Tomographie: erste tierexperimentelle Erfahrungen mit Feldinhomogenitaetskathetern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, G. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fue Radiologische Diagnostik; Glowinski, A. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fue Radiologische Diagnostik; Neuerburg, J.; Buecker, A.; Vaals, J.J. van; Hurtak, W.; Guenther, R.W.

    1997-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of a new developed field inhomogeneity catheter for interventional MR imaging in vivo. Materials and methods: Three different prototypes of a field inhomogeneity catheter were investigated in 6 pigs. The catheters were introduced in Seldinger technique via the femoral vessels over a guide wire on an interventional MR system (Philips Gyroscan NT combined with a C-arm fluoroscopy unit [Philips BV 212]). Catheters were placed in veins and arteries. The catheter position was controlled by a fast gradient echo sequence (Turbo Field Echo [TEF]). Results: Catheters were introduced over a guide wire without complications in all cases. Using the field inhomogeneity concept, catheters were easily visualised in the inferior vena cava and the aorta by the fast gradient echo technique on MR in all cases. Although aortic branches were successfully cannulated, the catheters were not displayed by the TFE technique due to the complex and tortuous anatomy. All animals survived the experiments without complications. Conclusion: MR guided visualisation of a field inhomogeneity catheter is a simple concept which can be realised on each MR scanner and may allow intravascular MR guided interventions in future. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zielsetzung: Ziel der Untersuchungen war die Ueberpruefung der Tauglichkeit eines neu entwickelten Feldinhomogenitaetskatheters fuer die interventionelle MR-Tomographie in vivo. Material und Methoden: An 6 Schweinen wurden an einem interventionellen MR-Tomographen (Philips Gyroscan NT in Verbindung mit einer C-Bogen-Durchleuchtungseinheit [Philips BV 212]) in Seldinger-Technik ueber die Femoralgefaesse drei verschiedene Prototypen eines neu entwickelten Feldinhomogenitaetskatheters venoes und arteriell plaziert und mittels schneller Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen (Turbo Field Echo) MR-tomographisch dargestellt. Ergebnisse: Alle Katheter konnten problemlos ueber Fuehrungsdraehte in das Gefaesssystem eingefuehrt werden. Die Darstellung

  2. Experience with carbon-11 choline positron emission tomography in prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzerke, J.; Neumaier, B.; Guhlmann, A.; Reske, S.N. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Prang, J.; Volkmer, B.; Kleinschmidt, K.; Hautmann, R. [Dept. of Urology, Univ. of Ulm (Germany)

    2000-09-01

    We investigated the potential of carbon-11 choline positron emission tomography (PET) for the detection of lymph node and bone metastases in prostate cancer. A total of 23 patients were studied (known metastases: 8; suspicion of metastases: 3; primary staging: 12). Whole-body PET imaging was performed 5 min after injection of the tracer and completed within 1 h. Focally increased tracer uptake in bone or abdominal lymph node regions was interpreted as representing tumour involvement. All known bone and lymph node metastases could be recognized by [{sup 11}C]choline PET. One out of ten negative scans for primary staging was false-negative (lymph node <1 cm) and one out of two positive scans was false-positive with regard to lymph node involvement (focal bowel activity). It is concluded that [{sup 11}C]choline PET is a promising new tool for the primary staging of prostate cancer, with lymph node and bone metastases demonstrating high tracer uptake. Therapeutic management could be influenced by these results in that the technique may permit avoidance of surgical lymph node exploration. (orig.)

  3. Intraoperative Perfusion Computed Tomography in Carotid Endarterectomy: Initial Experience in 16 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhe; Peng, Dingwei; Sun, Zhenghui; Wu, Chen; Xu, Bainan; Wang, Fuyu; Zhou, Dingbiao; Dong, Tianxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the changes in perfusion computed tomography (PCT) parameters in carotid endarterectomy (CEA), and to discuss the use of intraoperative PCT in CEA. Material/Methods Sixteen patients with carotid stenosis who also underwent CEA with intraoperative CT were recruited in this study. We calculated quantitative data on cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), time to peak (TTP), and the relative parameter values, including relative CBF (rCBF), relative CBV (rCBV), and relative TTP (rTTP). The role of PCT was assessed and compared to conventional monitoring methods. Results There were no significant differences in any of the parameters in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) territory (P>0.05). In the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory, the CBF and CBV increased and TTP decreased in the operated side during CEA; the rCBF and rCBV increased and the rTTP decreased significantly (P<0.05). In 16 patients, CT parameters were improved, SSEP was normal, and MDU was abnormal. In 3 patients, CBF increased by more than 70% during CEA. Relative PCT parameters are sensitive indicators for detecting early cerebral hemodynamic changes during CEA. Cerebral hemodynamics changed significantly in the MCA territory during CEA. Conclusions Intraoperative PCT could be an important adjuvant monitoring method in CEA. PMID:27657307

  4. Intravascular optical coherence tomography to characterize tissue deformation during angioplasty: preliminary experiments with artery phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarnoush, Hamed; Vergnole, Sébastien; Pazos, Valérie; Bisaillon, Charles-Étienne; Boulet, Benoit; Lamouche, Guy

    2012-09-01

    We explored the potential of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) to assess deformation during angioplasty balloon inflation. Using a semi-compliant balloon and artery phantoms, we considered two experimental scenarios. The goal for the first scenario was to investigate if variation in the elasticity of the structure surrounding the balloon could be sensed by IVOCT monitoring. In this scenario, we used three single-layer phantoms with various mechanical properties. Image analysis was performed to extract the inner and outer diameters of the phantoms at various pressures. The goal for the second scenario was twofold. First, we investigated the IVOCT capability to monitor a more complex balloon inflation process. The balloon was in a folded state prior to inflation. This allowed studying two stages of deformation: during balloon unfolding and during balloon expansion. Second, we investigated IVOCT capability to monitor the deformation in a three-layer phantom used to better mimic a true artery. So, not only were the IVOCT images processed to provide the inner and outer diameters of the phantom, but the layer thicknesses were also determined. In both scenarios, IVOCT monitoring revealed to be very efficient in providing relevant information about the phantom deformation during balloon inflation.

  5. A Micromegas-based telescope for muon tomography: The WatTo experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteille, S.; Attié, D.; Baron, P.; Calvet, D.; Magnier, P.; Mandjavidze, I.; Procureur, S.; Riallot, M.; Winkler, M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports about the first Micromegas-based telescope built for applications in muon tomography. The telescope consists of four, 50×50 cm2 resistive multiplexed Micromegas with a 2D layout and a self-triggering electronics based on the Dream chip. Thanks to the multiplexing, the four detectors were readout with a single Front-End Unit. The high voltages were provided by a dedicated card using low consumption CAEN miniaturized modules. A nano-PC (Hummingboard) ensured the HV control and monitoring coupled with a temperature feedback as well as the data acquisition and storage. The overall consumption of the instrument yielded 30 W only, i.e. the equivalent of a standard bulb. The telescope was operated outside during 3.5 months to image the water tower of the CEA-Saclay research center, including a 1.5-month campaign with solar panels. The development of autonomous, low consumption muon telescopes with unprecedented accuracy opens new applications in imaging as well as in the field of muon metrology.

  6. Iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) in cardiac computed tomography: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer; Schmidt, Bernhard; Seltmann, Martin; Muschiol, Gerd; Ropers, Dieter; Daniel, Werner Günther; Achenbach, Stephan

    2011-10-01

    Improvements in image quality in cardiac computed tomography may be achieved through iterative image reconstruction techniques. We evaluated the ability of "Iterative Reconstruction in Image Space" (IRIS) reconstruction to reduce image noise and improve subjective image quality. 55 consecutive patients undergoing coronary CT angiography to rule out coronary artery stenosis were included. A dual source CT system and standard protocols were used. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered back projection and IRIS. Image noise, attenuation within the coronary arteries, contrast, signal to noise and contrast to noise parameters as well as subjective classification of image quality (using a scale with four categories) were evaluated and compared between the two image reconstruction protocols. Subjective image quality (2.8 ± 0.4 in filtered back projection and 2.8 ± 0.4 in iterative reconstruction) and the number of "evaluable" segments per patient 14.0 ± 1.2 in filtered back projection and 14.1 ± 1.1 in iterative reconstruction) were not significant different between the two methods. However iterative reconstruction had a lower image noise (22.6 ± 4.5 HU vs. 28.6 ± 5.1 HU) and higher signal to noise and image to noise ratios in the proximal coronary arteries. IRIS reduces image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio in coronary CT angiography, thus providing potential for reducing radiation exposure.

  7. Multidetector computed tomography features of pancreatic metastases from leiomyosarcoma: Experience at a tertiary cancer center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Hyun Suh; Abhishek Keraliya; Atul B Shinagare; Kyung Won Kim; Nikhil H Ramaiya; Sree Harsha Tirumani

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the multidetector computed tomography features of pancreatic metastasis from leiomyosarcoma(LMS).METHODS: Between January 1995 and December 2012, 13 consecutive patients(11 women, 2 men; mean age of 57 years; range, 38-78 years) with pancreatic metastases from LMS were included in our study. Imaging features including location, number, largest dimension, tumor attenuation and enhancement characteristics, presence of necrosis, pancreatic ductal dilatation, common bile duct(CBD) dilatation, presence of pancreatitis, and atrophy were documented.RESULTS: The most common site of origin of the pancreatic metastases from LMS was uterus(38.5%), followed by retroperitoneum(30.8%) and extremity(23.1%). None of the patients in our study had pancreas as the first site of metastasis. All patients developed pancreatic metastases at a median interval of 24 mo. Pancreatic metastases from LMS were solitary in 8/13 patients and multiple in 5/13 patients, had no predilection for any part of the pancreas, were hypovascular on arterial phase in 10/13 patients and associated with pancreatic duct dilatation in 3/13 patients. None had CBD dilatation. None of the pancreatic metastases in LMS cohort caused pancreatitis, and atrophy. Median duration of follow-up was 19 mo for LMS cohort during which two patients underwent resection of metastasis(median survival 45 mo) while the remaining underwent systemic therapy(median survival 13 mo).CONCLUSION: Pancreatic metastases from LMS are often solitary and hypovascular masses and less commonly associated with pancreatic ductal dilatation, CBD dilatation, pancreatitis or pancreatic atrophy. Surgical resection of solitary LMS pancreatic metastasis can be considered due to the long survival of these patients.

  8. Computed tomography whole body imaging in multi-trauma: 7 years experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, M.A. [Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: msampson@doctors.org.uk; Colquhoun, K.B.M. [Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Hennessy, N.L.M. [Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15

    AIM: To assess the impact of the introduction of a computed tomography (CT) imaging protocol for multi-trauma patients on the workload, overall diagnostic yield, and effect on detection of cervical spine injury and pneumothorax. METHOD: Between February 1997 and April 2004, all patients presenting acutely to the Emergency Department (ED) with haemodynamically stable trauma (Abbreviated Injury Scale 3 or more) involving more than two body systems were imaged with a comprehensive pre-set helical CT protocol (including non-contrast head, cervical spine: cranio-cervical and cervico-thoracic junctions; and oral and intravenous contrast-enhanced thoracic, abdomen and pelvis) after initial triage and a standard trauma series of radiographs (chest, lateral C-spine and pelvis). Diagnosis of cervical spine fracture and pneumothorax was noted before and after the CT protocol was carried out and findings from all studies were recorded prospectively. RESULTS: Over the 7-year period 296 multi-trauma CT studies were completed of which 41 (13.8%) were negative. Of the positive cases there were 127 (43%) head injuries; 25 cervical spine fractures (8%); 66 pelvic fractures (22%);48 thoracic or lumbar spine fractures (16%); 97 pneumothoraces (33%); 22 mediastinal injuries (7%) and 49 intra-abdominal injuries (17%) with 19 (6%) splenic tears/ruptures. Positive findings included many unsuspected injuries, including 19 cervical spine fractures which were not demonstrated on the standard lateral radiograph from the resuscitation room. Of the 97 CT detected pneumothoraces, 12 were bilateral, 52 already had a chest drain in situ and 36 were not detected on initial supine chest radiography in the resuscitation room. One undetected case had bilateral tension pneumothoraces that were promptly drained on the CT table. Only three patients did not complete their multi-trauma examination because of deterioration in clinical condition and these were all immediately returned to the resuscitation

  9. First-pass perfusion computed tomography: Initial experience in differentiating adrenal adenoma from metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Zhongwei [Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong, University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 201102 (China); Xia Chunmei [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Shanghai Medical, College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu Yanbo; Shi Weiping [Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong, University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Miao Fei [Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong, University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)], E-mail: fmiao818@gmail.com

    2010-03-15

    Objective: To differentiate adrenal adenoma from metastasis in patients using perfusion computed tomography (PCT) imaging. Methods: Thirty-two patients with adrenal masses underwent first-pass PCT imaging. Of these patients, twenty-one were diagnosed with adrenal adenoma, and the others with metastases. Perfusion maps of blood volume (BV), blood flow (BF), mean transit time (MTT) and permeability surface-area production (PS) were generated with an Advantage Windows workstation using the CT perfusion 3.0 software (General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Histopathologic sections immunostained for CD34 were quantitatively evaluated for microvessel density (MVD). Results: The perfusion parameters such as BV, BF and PS were statistically significant different between the two groups, with adenomas showing higher mean BV (12.18 versus 3.86), BF (97.51 versus 45.99) and PS (21.73 versus 10.93) compared with metastases (p < 0.05). For BV, a cutoff point of 7.30 was found to have a sensitivity of 95.2% and a specificity of 100% to differentiate between adenoma and metastasis. The sensitivity and specificity were 81.0 and 80.0%, respectively, for BF with a cutoff point of 71.96; and 85.7 and 86.7%, respectively, for PS with a cutoff point of 12.70 to differentiate adenoma and metastasis. A comparison of MVD counts from adenomas with those from metastases showed a significant difference (p < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed in the four perfusion parameters and MVD between lipid rich and lipid poor adenomas. Conclusion: PCT may be useful for evaluating the neovascularization of adrenal masses and differentiating adenoma from metastasis on the basis of PCT parameters. Adenomas show higher BV, BF and PS compared with metastases. According our data, the optimal threshold BV is 7.30, resulting in a sensitivity of 95.2% and a specificity of 100% for the differentiation of adenoma from metastasis. Adrenal adenomas have similar hemodynamic profiles

  10. Quantitative strain analysis in analogue modelling experiments: insights from X-ray computed tomography and tomographic image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, J.; Klinkmueller, M.; Schreurs, G.; Wieneke, B.

    2009-04-01

    The combination of scaled analogue modelling experiments, advanced research in analogue material mechanics (Lohrmann et al. 2003, Panien et al. 2006), X-ray computed tomography and new high-resolution deformation monitoring techniques (2D/3D Digital Image Correlation) is a new powerful tool not only to examine the evolution and interaction of faulting in analogue models, but also to evaluate relevant controlling factors such as mechanics, sedimentation, erosion and climate. This is of particular interest for applied problems in the energy sector (e.g., structurally complex reservoirs, LG & CO2 underground storage) because the results are essential for geological and seismic interpretation as well as for more realistically constrained fault/fracture simulations and reservoir characterisation. X-ray computed tomography (CT) analysis has been successfully applied to analogue models since the late 1980s. This technique permits visualisation of the interior of an analogue model without destroying it. Technological improvements have resulted in more powerful X-ray CT scanners that allow periodic acquisition of volumetric data sets thus making it possible to follow the 3-D evolution of the model structures with time (e.g. Schreurs et al., 2002, 2003). Optical strain monitoring (Digital Image Correlation, DIC) in analogue experiments (Adam et al., 2005) represents an important advance in quantitative physical modelling and in helping to understand non-linear rock deformation processes. Optical non-intrusive 2D/3D strain and surface flow analysis by DIC is a new methodology in physical modelling that enables the complete quantification of localised and distributed model deformation. The increase in spatial/temporal strain data resolution of several orders of magnitude makes physical modelling - used for decades to visualize the kinematic processes of geological deformation processes - a unique research tool to determine what fundamental physical processes control tectonic

  11. 64-row multi-dector computed tomography coronary image from a center with early experience: first illustration of learning curve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sze Piaw CHIN; Tiong Kiam ONG; Wei Ling CHAN; Chee Khoon LIEW; M.Tobias Seyfarth; Fong Yean Yip ALAN; Houng Bang LIEW; Kui Hian SIM

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives The recent joint ACCF/AHA clinical competence statement on cardiac imaging with multi-detector computed tomography recommended a minimum of 6 months training and 300 contrast examinations, of which the candidate must be directly involved in at least 100 studies. Whether this is adequate to become proficient in interpretation of coronary computed tomogsignificant coronary stenosis in a center with 1 year's experience using a 64-row scanner. Methods A total of 778 patients underwent contrast-enhanced CTA between January and December 2005. Out of these patients, 301 patients also underwent contrast-enhanced conventional coronary angiography (CCA). These patients were divided into 4 groups according to the time the examination was underwent. Group Q1: first quarter of the year (n=20), Group Q2: second quarter (n=128), Group Q3: third quarter (n=134), and Group Results The sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values were Q1 - 64%, 89%, 49% and 94%, respectively; Q2 -79%, 96%, 74% and 97%, respectively; Q3 - 78%, 96%, 74%, 97%, respectively, and Q4 - 100% for all. Conclusions In a center with formal training and high caseload, our accuracy in CTA analysis reached a plateau after 6 months experience. Test-bolus protocols produce better image quality and can improve accuracy. New centers embarking on CTA will need to overcome an initial 6-month learning curve depending upon the caseload during which time they should consider correlation with CCA.

  12. Investigation of the Feasibility of Utilizing Gamma Emission Computed Tomography in Evaluating Fission Product Migration in Irradiated TRISO Fuel Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-10-01

    In the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) the TRISO particle fuel serves as the primary fission product containment. However the large number of TRISO particles present in proposed HTGRs dictates that there will be a small fraction (~10-4 to 10-5) of as manufactured and in-pile particle failures that will lead to some fission product release. The matrix material surrounding the TRISO particles in fuel compacts and the structural graphite holding the TRISO particles in place can also serve as sinks for containing any released fission products. However data on the migration of solid fission products through these materials is lacking. One of the primary goals of the AGR-3/4 experiment is to study fission product migration from failed TRISO particles in prototypic HTGR components such as structural graphite and compact matrix material. In this work, the potential for a Gamma Emission Computed Tomography (GECT) technique to non-destructively examine the fission product distribution in AGR-3/4 components and other irradiation experiments is explored. Specifically, the feasibility of using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS) system for this GECT application is considered. To test the feasibility, the response of the PGS system to idealized fission product distributions has been simulated using Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations. Previous work that applied similar techniques during the AGR-1 experiment will also be discussed as well as planned uses for the GECT technique during the post irradiation examination of the AGR-2 experiment. The GECT technique has also been applied to other irradiated nuclear fuel systems that were currently available in the HFEF hot cell including oxide fuel pins, metallic fuel pins, and monolithic plate fuel.

  13. Pressure pain threshold changes after repeated mechano-nociceptive stimulation of the trapezius muscle: possible influence of previous pain experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjölund, Bengt H; Persson, Ann L

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relation between repeated noxious pressure over the trapezius muscle and changes in pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in a before-after trial design. A conditioning series of 30 mechano-nociceptive stimuli was applied manually with a handheld algometer probe, and PPTs were measured...... who had given birth to 1 or several children (Ptested at a second session, a clear correlation of PPT reactions (r=0.527; Pmuscle in healthy females evokes moderate and temporary...... over 1 trapezius muscle (skin anaesthetized) in 27 healthy women before and after the intervention. With a mean stimulation rate of 0.40 Hz and a mean nociceptive stimulation intensity of 1.78 x Threshold, subjects were found to systematically react with a change in PPT, either a decrease...

  14. Repeated downsizing contact: the effects of similar and dissimilar layoff experiences on work and well-being outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sarah; Grunberg, Leon; Greenberg, Edward

    2004-07-01

    In this longitudinal study, the authors compared 1,244 white- and blue-collar workers who reported 0, 1, or 2 contacts with layoffs; all were employees of a large manufacturing company that had engaged in several mass waves of downsizing. Consistent with a stress-vulnerability model, workers with a greater number of exposures to both direct and indirect downsizing reported significantly lower levels of job security and higher levels of role ambiguity, intent to quit, depression, and health problems. Findings did not support the idea that workers became more resilient as they encountered more layoff events. The authors found only partial evidence that the similarity or dissimilarity of the type of repeated downsizing exposure played a role in how workers reported changes in these outcome variables.

  15. Towards a validation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for use in forensic science: repeatability and reproducibility experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlethaler, Cyril; Leona, Marco; Lombardi, John R

    2016-11-01

    In order for a new analytical technique such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to be used in a routine manner, data and studies on the validation of the method are required. In that context, we performed a systematic study of the variability observed at different levels of the analytical procedure (i.e. respectively measurement, sampling, colloids aliquots, colloids batches, laboratories). Our goal is to provide data towards a qualitative validation of the technique for identification purposes. Three molecules of forensic interest were used as probes, respectively crystal violet, methamphetamine and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). We demonstrate that the method is repeatable with RSD and multivariate techniques (PCA). The % RSD at the different analytical stages vary between the molecules and the peaks considered. The repeatability is on the order of 2-6% for crystal violet, and 5-16% for TNT. Methamphetamine binds very weakly to the silver colloids giving much greater variability in the measurements (5-29%). We show that spectra measured in the same conditions (e.g. same laboratory and instrument), even a few days apart, are comparable and stable. The largest source of variation has been identified to be the measurement conditions and the associated random fluctuations in intensity (i.e. Brownian motion of the particles, solvent evaporation and concentration). The influence of the substrate is confirmed to be negligible. However, the reproducibility between different laboratories and different instruments introduced the largest source of variability (∼ 10-70%). Despite these factors, we demonstrate that qualitative identification of the species under analysis by measurement and comparison of peaks position is always successful even though quantitative analysis is, at present, difficult. Regardless of the amount of variability determined, the molecules could always be successfully identified, even on different instruments from different laboratories by

  16. The use of handheld spectral domain optical coherence tomography in pediatric ophthalmology practice: Our experience of 975 infants and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Mallipatna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Optical coherence tomography (OCT is an important imaging tool assessing retinal architecture. In this article, we report a single centers experience of using handheld spectral domain (SD-OCT in a pediatric population using the Envisu 2300 (Bioptigen Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC, USA. Methods: We studied SD-OCT images from 975 patients imaged from January 2011 to December 2014. The variety of cases that underwent an SD-OCT was analyzed. Cases examples from different case scenarios were selected to showcase unique examples of many diseases. Results: Three hundred and sixty-eight infants (37.7% were imaged for retinopathy of prematurity, 362 children (37.1% underwent the test for evaluation of suboptimal vision or an unexplained vision loss, 126 children (12.9% for evaluation of nystagmus or night blindness, 54 children (5.5% for an intraocular tumor or a mass lesion such as retinoblastoma, and 65 children (6.7% for other diseases of the pediatric retina. The unique findings in the retinal morphology seen with some of these diseases are discussed. Conclusion: The handheld SD-OCT is useful in the evaluation of the pediatric retinal diseases. The test is useful in the assessment of vision development in premature children, evaluation of unexplained vision loss and amblyopia, nystagmus and night blindness, and intraocular tumors (including retinoblastoma.

  17. Monitoring a shallow geothermal experiment in a sandy aquifer using electrical resistivity tomography: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Thomas; Vandenbohede, Alexander; Nguyen, Frederic; Lebbe, Luc

    2010-05-01

    The use of low-enthalpy geothermal ressources is increasingly growing in Europe and around the world. This domain constitutes an essential field of research and development in the diversification of energy ressources to hinder global warming. The advantages of very low temperature systems are, first, that they are much more available than the geothermal high temperature, since the underground often contains important shallow aquifers (e.g. alluvial plains), and second, that their exploitation involve relatively low costs of implementation. Very low energy systems exhibit underground fluid with a temperature ranging from 5 to 30 ° C, which may be used for cooling or heating. The two main modes of exploitation of geothermal energy rely on the extraction of the hydrothermal fluid in the aquifer from wells and on the circulation of a heat transfer fluid in a closed and buried geothermal circuit. Underground heat exchange and overall exploitation system design may be undertaken in an optimized and sustainable fashion if the parameters governing the coupled heat transport and flow equations are know to a certain degree. As for many underground reservoir problems, sufficient knowledge on the distribution of the parameters of interests (e.g. thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, thermomechanic dispersitivity, effective porosity) must be obtained to perform reliable predictions. Designing novel experiments to estimate those parameters in-situ is therefore essential. In this framework, we examine the feasibility of a thermal tracer experiment similar to the ones performed in hydrogeology or hydrogeophysics. The test consists in following the evolution of a heat plume through the underground as it is injected in one well and pumped to another one. The thermal tracer evolution is followed by gathering electrical resistivity (ERT) images in a time-lapse framework over 10 days. In this contribution, we examine the potential of ERT to image such thermal plume and its

  18. Comparisons of Derived Metrics from Computed Tomography (CT) Scanned Images of Fluvial Sediment from Gravel-Bed Flume Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voepel, Hal; Ahmed, Sharif; Hodge, Rebecca; Leyland, Julian; Sear, David

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainty in bedload estimates for gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize arrangement, orientation and resultant forces of fluvial sediment in river beds. Water working of grains leads to structural differences between areas of the bed through particle sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. In this study, non-destructive, micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging in 3D is used to visualize, quantify and assess the internal geometry of sections of a flume bed that have been extracted keeping their fabric intact. Flume experiments were conducted at 1:1 scaling of our prototype river. From the volume, center of mass, points of contact, and protrusion of individual grains derived from 3D scan data we estimate 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and local grain exposure. Here metrics are derived for images from two flume experiments: one with a bed of coarse grains (>4mm) and the other where sand and clay were incorporated into the coarse flume bed. In addition to deriving force networks, comparison of metrics such as critical shear stress, pivot angles, grain distributions, principle axis orientation, and pore space over depth are made. This is the first time bed stability has been studied in 3D using CT scanned images of sediment from the bed surface to depths well into the subsurface. The derived metrics, inter-granular relationships and characterization of bed structures will lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty, as well as improved understanding of relationships between sediment structure, grain size distribution and channel topography.

  19. Fast laboratory-based micro-computed tomography for pore-scale research: Illustrative experiments and perspectives on the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultreys, Tom; Boone, Marijn A.; Boone, Matthieu N.; De Schryver, Thomas; Masschaele, Bert; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, the wide-spread implementation of laboratory-based X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanners has revolutionized both the experimental and numerical research on pore-scale transport in geological materials. The availability of these scanners has opened up the possibility to image a rock's pore space in 3D almost routinely to many researchers. While challenges do persist in this field, we treat the next frontier in laboratory-based micro-CT scanning: in-situ, time-resolved imaging of dynamic processes. Extremely fast (even sub-second) micro-CT imaging has become possible at synchrotron facilities over the last few years, however, the restricted accessibility of synchrotrons limits the amount of experiments which can be performed. The much smaller X-ray flux in laboratory-based systems bounds the time resolution which can be attained at these facilities. Nevertheless, progress is being made to improve the quality of measurements performed on the sub-minute time scale. We illustrate this by presenting cutting-edge pore scale experiments visualizing two-phase flow and solute transport in real-time with a lab-based environmental micro-CT set-up. To outline the current state of this young field and its relevance to pore-scale transport research, we critically examine its current bottlenecks and their possible solutions, both on the hardware and the software level. Further developments in laboratory-based, time-resolved imaging could prove greatly beneficial to our understanding of transport behavior in geological materials and to the improvement of pore-scale modeling by providing valuable validation.

  20. Seismic amplification within the Seattle Basin, Washington State: Insights from SHIPS seismic tomography experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelson, C.M.; Brocher, T.M.; Miller, K.C.; Pratt, T.L.; Trehu, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent observations indicate that the Seattle sedimentary basin, underlying Seattle and other urban centers in the Puget Lowland, Washington, amplifies long-period (1-5 sec) weak ground motions by factors of 10 or more. We computed east-trending P- and S-wave velocity models across the Seattle basin from Seismic Hazard Investigations of Puget Sound (SHIPS) experiments to better characterize the seismic hazard the basin poses. The 3D tomographic models, which resolve features to a depth of 10 km, for the first time define the P- and S-wave velocity structure of the eastern end of the basin. The basin, which contains sedimentary rocks of Eocene to Holocene, is broadly symmetric in east-west section and reaches a maximum thickness of 6 km along our profile beneath north Seattle. A comparison of our velocity model with coincident amplification curves for weak ground motions produced by the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake suggests that the distribution of Quaternary deposits and reduced velocity gradients in the upper part of the basement east of Seattle have significance in forecasting variations in seismic-wave amplification across the basin. Specifically, eastward increases in the amplification of 0.2- to 5-Hz energy correlate with locally thicker unconsolidated deposits and a change from Crescent Formation basement to pre-Tertiary Cascadia basement. These models define the extent of the Seattle basin, the Seattle fault, and the geometry of the basement contact, giving insight into the tectonic evolution of the Seattle basin and its influence on ground shaking.

  1. First experience with single-source dual-energy computed tomography in six patients with acute arthralgia: a feasibility experiment using joint aspiration as a reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekhoff, Torsten; Kiefer, Tobias; Hamm, Bernd; Hermann, Kay-Geert A. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ziegeler, Katharina; Feist, Eugen [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Berlin (Germany); Mews, Juergen [Toshiba Medical Systems Europe, BV, Zoetermeer (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is an emerging imaging technique for examining patients with suspected gout. Single-source dual-energy CT (S-DECT) is a new way of obtaining DECT information on conventional CT scanners rather than using special dual-source CT systems. We tested the feasibility of S-DECT (320-row CT; Aquilion ONE, Toshiba Medical Systems, Otawara, Japan) in 6 patients (5 men, 1 woman; mean age 61.3, range 48 to 69 years) with acute arthralgia and suspected gout, and compared the S-DECT findings with the results of joint aspiration. Three patients had a diagnosis of gouty arthritis with negatively birefringent crystals in synovial fluid, in addition to gouty tophi in S-DECT. Three patients had no detectable crystals by polarization microscopy and no tophi on DECT. Their final diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis, activated osteoarthritis, and septic arthritis in one case each. This initial experience suggests that S-DECT might be a valuable alternative to dual-source CT. Hence, more patients may benefit from its additional diagnostic abilities in the future. (orig.)

  2. Clinical experiences of treating septic arthritis in the equine by repeated joint lavage: a series of 39 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, M C; van Weeren, P R; Rijkenhuizen, A B

    2000-08-01

    The condition of septic arthritis was treated in 12 foals with 21 affected joints (Group I) and in 27 adult horses. The adult horses were divided into three groups, based on aetiology of the condition: haematogenous (Group II, n = 6), iatrogenic (Group III, n = 6), and perforating trauma (Group IV, n = 15). The treatment consisted of an initial systemic antibiotic that anticipated the microbial agents that were considered most likely per group, repeated through-and-through joint lavages every other day and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The antibiotics were adjusted to the results of bacteriological culture and susceptibility tests. Joint lavages were continued until the white blood cell count dropped below 15 G/l and bacteriological culture was negative, after which a single dose of a short-acting corticosteroid was administered intra-articularly. Joint recovery rate in group I was 71%. Patient recovery rate of the foals, however, was lower (42%). Three foals were killed for reasons other than arthritis; one foal because of an arthritis-related problem and three foals because of persistent arthritis. Overall joint recovery rate, equalling patient recovery rate, in the adult horses was 81%. The expected predominance of Streptococcus spp. in haematogenous arthritis in adult horses was not confirmed, indicating that in these cases also, an initial antibiotic treatment with a broad-spectrum combination is preferable. It is concluded that with intensive treatment, the prognosis of septic arthritis in the adult horse can be classified as fair to even good. Results in the foals are not as good, but this seems to be more due to the specific problems surrounding the equine neonate than to unresponsiveness to the treatment.

  3. Examination of funnel chests by X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography: First results and experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raithel, H.J.; Hartung, M.; Gruennewig, B.; Willital, G.

    1983-01-01

    Funnel chest (pectus excavatum) is a congenital malformation of the thorax. Operative correction must presently be regarded as the treatment of choise. In addition to cosmetical and psychological reasons, there are mainly functional aspects justifying a surgery. The indication for surgery results mostly from the objective clinical-diagnostical findings. This article describes the efficiency of both X-ray computerized tomography and also nuclear magnetic resonance tomography (NMR-CAT) which has only recently been introduced to clinical diagnostics.

  4. Endangered North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) experience repeated, concurrent exposure to multiple environmental neurotoxins produced by marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Gregory J; Mikulski, Christina M; King, Kristen L; Roth, Patricia B; Wang, Zhihong; Leandro, Luis F; DeGrasse, Stacey L; White, Kevin D; De Biase, Daniela; Gillett, Roxanne M; Rolland, Rosalind M

    2012-01-01

    The western North Atlantic population of right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) is one of the most critically endangered of any whale population in the world. Among the factors considered to have potentially adverse effects on the health and reproduction of E. glacialis are biotoxins produced by certain microalgae responsible for causing harmful algal blooms. The worldwide incidence of these events has continued to increase dramatically over the past several decades and is expected to remain problematic under predicted climate change scenarios. Previous investigations have demonstrated that N. Atlantic right whales are being exposed to at least two classes of algal-produced environmental neurotoxins-paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) and domoic acid (DA). Our primary aims during this six-year study (2001-2006) were to assess whether the whales' exposure to these algal biotoxins occurred annually over multiple years, and to what extent individual whales were exposed repeatedly and/or concurrently to one or both toxin classes. Approximately 140 right whale fecal samples obtained across multiple habitats in the western N. Atlantic were analyzed for PSTs and DA. About 40% of these samples were attributed to individual whales in the North Atlantic Right Whale Catalog, permitting analysis of biotoxin exposure according to sex, age class, and reproductive status/history. Our findings demonstrate clearly that right whales are being exposed to both of these algal biotoxins on virtually an annual basis in multiple habitats for periods of up to six months (April through September), with similar exposure rates for females and males (PSTs: ∼70-80%; DA: ∼25-30%). Notably, only one of 14 lactating females sampled did not contain either PSTs or DA, suggesting the potential for maternal toxin transfer and possible effects on neonatal animals. Moreover, 22% of the fecal samples tested for PSTs and DA showed concurrent exposure to both neurotoxins, leading to questions of interactive

  5. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  6. Optically stimulated luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz due to repeated use in single aliquot readout: Experiments and computer simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKeever, S.W.S.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Agersnap Larsen, N.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a study to examine sensitivity changes in single aliquot techniques using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) a series of experiments has been conducted with single aliquots of natural quartz, and the data compared with the results of computer simulations of the type of processes...... believed to be occurring. The computer model used includes both shallow and deep ('hard-to-bleach') traps, OSL ('easy-to-bleach') traps, and radiative and non-radiative recombination centres. The model has previously been used successfully to account for sensitivity changes in quartz due to thermal...... trap and deep trap effects....

  7. Effectiveness of Repeat Angiographic Assessment in Patients Designated for Radioembolization Using Yttrium-90 Microspheres With Initial Extrahepatic Accumulation of Technitium-99m Macroaggregated Albumin: A Single Center's Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudeck, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.dudeck@med.ovgu.de; Wilhelmsen, Skadi; Ulrich, Gerhard; Loewenthal, David; Pech, Maciej; Amthauer, Holger; Ricke, Jens [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a workflow consisting of repeat assessment in patients planned for yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) radioembolization in case of nontarget visceral technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc)-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) accumulation despite initial prophylactic coil embolization of nonhepatic arteries. Materials and Methods: In 341 patients with primary and secondary liver cancer, pretreatment hepatic angiograms, as well as single-photon emission computed tomography coregistered with magnetic resonance imaging scans, were obtained. Extrahepatic tracer deposition was identified in 33 patients (9.7%) necessitating repeat assessment. Images were reviewed to correlate the site of MAA accumulation with causative gastrointestinal vessels, and repeat angiograms served as reference standard. Results: At repeat angiography, the source of extrahepatic flow was identified and eliminated in 31 of 33 patients (93.9%). In 20 patients (60.6%), successful embolization of nontarget vessels was achieved, in 13 patients (39.4%), MAA was administered more distally. Afterward, extrahepatic MAA deposition was eliminated in 30 patients (90.9%). Conclusion: The algorithm of repeat assessment in case of extrahepatic MAA accumulation has proven highly effective to eliminate extrahepatic shunting, thus decreasing the risk of postradioembolization complications due to inadvertent visceral microsphere deposition.

  8. Geophysical wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chaoguang

    2000-11-01

    This study is concerned with geophysical wave tomography techniques that include advanced diffraction tomography, traveltime calculation techniques and simultaneous attenuation and velocity tomography approaches. We propose the source independent approximation, the Modified Quasi-Linear approximation and develop a fast and accurate diffraction tomography algorithm that uses this approximation. Since the Modified Quasi-Linear approximation accounts for the scattering fields within scatterers, this tomography algorithm produces better image quality than conventional Born approximation tomography algorithm does with or without the presence of multiple scatterers and can be used to reconstruct images of high contrast objects. Since iteration is not required, this algorithm is efficient. We improve the finite difference traveltime calculation algorithm proposed by Vidale (1990). The bucket theory is utilized in order to enhance the sorting efficiency, which accounts for about ten percent computing time improvement for large velocity models. Snell's law is employed to solve the causality problem analytically, which enables the modified algorithm to compute traveltimes accurately and rapidly for high velocity contrast media. We also develop two simultaneous attenuation and velocity tomography approaches, which use traveltimes and amplitude spectra of the observed data, and discuss some of their applications. One approach is processing geophysical data that come from one single survey and the other deals with the repeated survey cases. These approaches are nonlinear and therefore more accurate than linear tomography. A linear system for wave propagation and constant-Q media are assumed in order to develop the tomography algorithms. These approaches not only produce attenuation and velocity images at the same time but also can be used to infer the physical rock properties, such as the dielectric permittivity, the electric conductivity, and the porosity. A crosshole radar

  9. ROSA/LSTF experiment report for RUN SB-CL-24 repeated core heatup phenomena during 0.5% cold leg break LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Anoda, Yoshinari [Department of Reactor Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    A small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) in a Westinghouse-type four-loop PWR was simulated in an experiment (SB-CL-24) conducted at the Large-Scale Test Facility (LSTF) with an intention to study repeated core heatup during a long-term cooldown process. The experiment was conducted on February 28, 1990 with specified test conditions including failure assumptions both on the high pressure injection (HPI) and the auxiliary feedwater systems, and the intentional secondary system depressurization as an operator action. The secondary depressurization contributed to promote the primary depressurization and the actuation of accumulator injection system (AIS). A temporary core heatup was observed in each of three loopseal clearing (LSC) processes. A significant core heatup occurred in the following boil-off process after loss of the secondary coolant mass and the AIS termination due to increase of the primary pressure. By additional opening of the pressurizer relief valves and safety valves, the primary pressure rapidly decreased to result in the low pressure injection (LPI) which cooled the heated core. This report summarizes results of the experiment (SB-CL-24) in addition to typical responses of some accident indication systems including the core exit thermocouples (CETs) and the water level meters in the primary system. (author)

  10. Hydraulic Properties of Fractured Rock Samples at In-Situ Conditions - Insights from Lab Experiments Using X-Ray Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehler, Mathias; Stöckhert, Ferdinand; Duda, Mandy; Renner, Jörg; Bracke, Rolf

    2017-04-01

    The hydraulic properties of low-porosity rock formations are controlled by the geometry of open fractures, joints and faults. Aperture, surface roughness, accessible length, and thus, the volume available for fluids associated of such interfaces are strongly affected by their state of stress. Moreover, these properties may evolve with time in particular due to processes involving chemically active fluids. Understanding the physico-chemical interactions of rocks with fluids at reservoir conditions will help to predict the long-term reservoir development and to increase the efficiency of geothermal power plants. We designed an x-ray transparent flow-through cell. Confining pressure can be up to 50 MPa and pore fluid can currently be circulated through the sample with pressures of up to 25 MPa. All wetted parts are made of PEEK to avoid corrosion when using highly saline fluids. Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate hydraulic properties of fractured low-porosity samples under reservoir conditions while x-rays transmit the sample. The cell is placed inside a µCT scanner with a 225 kV multifocal x-ray tube for high resolution x-ray tomography. Samples measure 10 mm in diameter and 25 mm in length resulting in a voxel resolution of approximately 10 µm. Samples with single natural as well as artificial fractures were subjected to various confining pressures ranging from 2.5 MPa to 25 MPa. At each pressure level, effective permeability was determined from steady-state flow relying on Darcy's law. In addition, a full 3D image was recorded by the µCT scanner to gain information on the fracture aperture and geometry. Subvolumes (400x400x400 voxels) of the images were analyzed to reduce computational cost. The subvolumes were filtered in 3D with an edge preserving non-local means filter. Further quantification algorithms were implemented in Matlab. Segmentation into pore space and minerals was done automatically for all datasets by a peak finder algorithm

  11. Imaging technique for magnetic susceptibility and resistivity by electromagnetic tomography. 1. Numerical experiments; EM tomography ni yoru taijiritsu to hiteiko no imaging gijutsu. 1. Suchi jikken ni yoru kisoteki kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakashita, S.; Fukuoka, K. [OYO Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    This paper proposes imaging techniques which utilize electromagnetic waves in a wide frequency band for magnetic susceptibility and resistivity, and describes the basic investigation results by numerical experiments. The electromagnetic tomography generates electromagnetic waves by passing current through a receiving coil, to measure their magnetic components by an induction coil. The magnetic field generated by the electromagnetic waves can be handled as a pseudo-static one, when the current is passed at a sufficiently low frequency, and the field response measured by an induction coil contains information mainly regarding magnetic susceptibility. The field generates induction as transmitting frequency is increased, and the measured magnetic response contains mainly regarding resistivity. They can be measured for imaging susceptibility, when distance between the holes is 50 to 100m or less and transmitting frequency is 100 to 10Hz or less. The use of the expanded Born approximation allows to establish a high-speed model for imaging resistivity. 23 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Monitoring temporal opacity fluctuations of large structures with muon tomography : a calibration experiment using a water tower tank

    CERN Document Server

    Jourde, Kevin; Marteau, Jacques; d'Ars, Jean de Bremond; Gardien, Serge; Girerd, Claude; Ianigro, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The idea of using secondary cosmic muons to scan the internal structure of a given body has known significant developments since the first archaeological application by Alvarez and collaborators on the Gizah pyramids. Recent applications cover the fields of volcanology, hydrology, civil engineering, mining, archaeology etc. Muon radiography features are essentially identical to those of medical X-ray imaging techniques. It is a contrast densitometry method using the screening effect of the body under study on the natural flux of cosmic muons. This technique is non-invasive and complements the standard geophysical techniques, e.g. electrical tomography or gravimetry. It may be applied to a large variety of geological targets, among which the domes of active volcanoes. In this context muon tomography presents the noticeable advantage to perform measurements of large volumes, with a large aperture, from a distant point, far from the potentially dangerous zones. The same conclusions apply regarding the monitoring...

  13. Characterization and quantification of the role of coherence in ultrafast quantum biological experiments using quantum master equations, atomistic simulations, and quantum process tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Rebentrost, Patrick; Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2010-01-01

    Long-lived electronic coherences in various photosynthetic complexes at cryogenic and room temperature have generated vigorous efforts both in theory and experiment to understand their origins and explore their potential role to biological function. The ultrafast signals resulting from the experiments that show evidence for these coherences result from many contributions to the molecular polarization. Quantum process tomography (QPT) was conceived in the context of quantum information processing to characterize and understand general quantum evolution of controllable quantum systems, for example while carrying out quantum computational tasks. We introduce our QPT method for ultrafast experiments, and as an illustrative example, apply it to a simulation of a two-chromophore subsystem of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson photosynthetic complex, which was recently shown to have long-lived quantum coherences. Our Fenna-Matthews-Olson model is constructed using an atomistic approach to extract relevant parameters for the s...

  14. Time-Dependent Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, B. R.

    2008-12-01

    Temporal changes in seismic wave speeds in the Earth's crust have been measured at several locations, notably The Geysers geothermal area in California, in studies that used three-dimensional seismic tomography. These studies have used conventional tomography methods to invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets independently and assumed that any differences in the derived structures reflect real temporal variations. Such an assumption is dangerous because the results of repeated tomography experiments would differ even if the structure did not change, simply because of variation in the seismic ray distribution caused by the natural variation in earthquake locations. This problem can be severe when changes in the seismicity distribution are systematic, as, for example, at the onset of an aftershock sequence. The sudden change in the ray distribution can produce artifacts that mimic changes in the seismic wave speeds at the time of a large earthquake. Even if the source locations did not change (if only explosion data were used, for example), derived structures would inevitably differ because of observational errors. A better approach to determining what temporal changes are truly required by the data is to invert multiple data sets simultaneously, imposing constraints to minimize differences between the models for different epochs. This problem is similar to that of seeking models similar to some a priori initial assumption, and a method similar to "damped least squares" can solve it. The order of the system of normal equations for inverting data from two epochs is twice as large as that for a single epoch, and solving it by standard methods requires eight times the computational labor. We present an algorithm for reducing this factor to two, so that inverting multiple epochs simultaneously is comparable in difficulty to inverting them independently, and illustrate its performance using synthetic arrival times and observed data from several areas in

  15. Metabolic and clinical assessment of efficacy of cryoablation therapy on skeletal masses by {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and visual analogue scale (VAS): initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masala, Salvatore; Bartolucci, Alberto D.; Mammucari, Matteo; Simonetti, Giovanni [University Hospital Tor Vergata, Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, Rome (Italy); Schillaci, Orazio; Calabria, Ferdinando [University Hospital Tor Vergata, Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, Rome (Italy); I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neuroradiology, Pozzilli (Italy); Policlinico Tor Vegata, Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, Rome (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    Various therapy modalities have been proposed as standard treatments in management of bone metastases. Radiation therapy remains the standard of care for patients with localized bone pain, but up to 30% of them do not experience notable pain relief. Percutaneous cryoablation is a minimally invasive technique that induces necrosis by alternately freezing and thawing a target tissue. This technique is successfully used to treat a variety of malignant and benign diseases in different sites. {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) is a single technique of imaging that provides in a ''single step'' both morphological and metabolic features of neoplastic lesions of the bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the cryosurgical technique on secondary musculoskeletal masses according to semi-quantitative PET analysis and clinical-test evaluation with the visual analogue scale (VAS). We enrolled 20 patients with painful bone lesions (score pain that exceeded 4 on the VAS) that were non-responsive to treatment; one lesion per patient was treated. All patients underwent a PET-CT evaluation before and 8 weeks after cryotherapy; maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) was measured before and after treatment for metabolic assessment of response to therapy. After treatment, 18 patients (90%) showed considerable reduction in SUV{sub max} value (>50%) suggestive of response to treatment; only 2 patients did not show meaningful reduction in metabolic activity. Our preliminary study demonstrates that quantitative analysis provided by PET correlates with response to cryoablation therapy as assessed by CT data and clinical VAS evaluation. (orig.)

  16. Clinical impact of computed tomography-based image-guided brachytherapy for cervix cancer using the tandem-ring applicator - the Addenbrooke's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L T; Coles, C E; Hart, C; Tait, E

    2009-04-01

    We report our initial 3-year experience of chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer with computed tomography-based image-guided high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using the tandem-ring applicator. Twenty-eight patients were treated between February 2005 and December 2007. All patients received initial external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by HDR brachytherapy (planned dose 21 Gy to point A in three fractions over 8 days). For each insertion, a computed tomography scan was obtained with the brachytherapy applicator in situ. The cervix, uterus and organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on the computed tomography images to create an individualised dosimetry plan. The D(90) (the dose delivered to 90% of the tumour target), V(100) (the percentage of tumour target volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose) and the minimum dose in the most exposed 2 cm(3) volume (D(2 cc)) of rectum, bladder and bowel were recorded. The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions delivered by EBRT and brachytherapy was calculated. The 3-year cancer-specific survival was 81%, with a pelvic control rate of 96%. In 24 patients, a D(90)>or=74 Gy (alpha/beta10) was achieved. The only patient with local recurrence had a D(90) of 63.8 Gy(alpha/beta10). The overall actuarial risk of serious late morbidity was 14%. Seventeen patients had satisfactory OAR doses using the standard loading pattern. Seven patients had modifications to reduce the risk of toxicity, whereas two had modifications to improve the tumour dose. Comparison with a previous cohort of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy and a conventionally planned low dose rate triple source brachytherapy technique showed an improvement in local pelvic control of 20% (P=0.04). The implementation of a computed tomography-based tandem-ring HDR brachytherapy technique in conjunction with individual dose adaptation has resulted in a significant improvement in local control at Addenbrooke's without increasing the risk of serious toxicity, and with little

  17. Experimental adaptive process tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelov, I. A.; Struchalin, G. I.; Straupe, S. S.; Radchenko, I. V.; Kravtsov, K. S.; Kulik, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive measurements were recently shown to significantly improve the performance of quantum state tomography. Utilizing information about the system for the online choice of optimal measurements allows one to reach the ultimate bounds of precision for state reconstruction. In this article we generalize an adaptive Bayesian approach to the case of process tomography and experimentally show its superiority in the task of learning unknown quantum operations. Our experiments with photonic polarization qubits cover all types of single-qubit channels. We also discuss instrumental errors and the criteria for evaluation of the ultimate achievable precision in an experiment. It turns out that adaptive tomography provides a lower noise floor in the presence of strong technical noise.

  18. Increased (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in benign, nonphysiologic lesions found on whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT): accumulated data from four years of experience with PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metser, Ur; Even-Sapir, Einat

    2007-05-01

    The use of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) in the field of oncology is rapidly evolving; however, (18)F-FDG is not tumor specific. Aside from physiological uptake (18)F-FDG also may accumulate in benign processes. Knowledge of these (18)F-FDG-avid nonmalignant lesions is essential for accurate PET interpretation in oncologic patients to avoid a false-positive interpretation. Through the systematic review of the reports of PET/computed tomography (CT) studies performed in oncologic patients during a 6-month period, we found benign nonphysiological uptake of (18)F-FDG in more than 25% of studies. In half of these, (18)F-FDG uptake was moderate or marked in intensity, similar to that of malignant sites. A total of 73% of benign lesions were inflammatory in nature, with post-traumatic bone and soft-tissue abnormalities (including iatrogenic injury) and benign tumors accounting for the remainder. The differentiation of benign from malignant uptake of (18)F-FDG on PET alone may be particularly challenging as a result of the low anatomical resolution of PET and paucity of anatomical landmarks. Fusion imaging, namely PET/CT, has been shown to improve not only the sensitivity of PET interpretation but also its specificity. Aside from better anatomical localization of lesions on PET/CT, morphological characterization of lesions on CT often may improve the diagnostic accuracy of nonspecific (18)F-FDG uptake. Correlation with CT on fused PET/CT data may obviate the need for further evaluation or biopsy in more than one-third of scintigraphic equivocal lesions. Familiarity with (18)F-FDG-avid nonmalignant lesions also may extend the use of (18)F-FDG-PET imaging beyond the field of oncology. We have tabulated our experience with benign entities associated with increased (18)F-FDG uptake on whole-body PET/CT from 12,000 whole-body (18)F-FDG-PET/CT studies performed during a 4-year period.

  19. Volume-based quantification using dual-energy computed tomography in the differentiation of thymic epithelial tumours: an initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Suyon; Hur, Jin; Im, Dong Jin; Suh, Young Joo; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyunghwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Joon; Lee, Chang Young [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ha Young [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    To investigate the diagnostic value of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in differentiating between low- and high-risk thymomas and thymic carcinomas. Our institutional review board approved this study, and patients provided informed consent. We prospectively enrolled 37 patients (20 males, mean age: 55.6 years) with thymic epithelial tumour. All patients underwent DECT. For quantitative analysis, two reviewers measured the following tumour parameters: CT attenuation value in contrast Hounsfield units (CHU), iodine-related HU and iodine concentration (mg/ml). Pathological results confirmed the final diagnosis. Of the 37 thymic tumours, 23 (62.2 %) were low-risk thymomas, five (13.5 %) were high-risk thymomas and nine (24.3 %) were thymic carcinomas. According to quantitative analysis, iodine-related HU and iodine concentration were significantly different among low-risk thymomas, high-risk thymomas and thymic carcinomas (median: 29.78 HU vs. 14.55 HU vs. 19.95 HU, p = 0.001 and 1.92 mg/ml vs. 0.99 mg/ml vs. 1.18 mg/ml, p < 0.001, respectively). DECT using a quantitative analytical method based on iodine concentration measurement can be used to differentiate among thymic epithelial tumours using single-phase scanning. (orig.)

  20. Localization of parathyroid enlargement: experience with technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile and thallium-201 scintigraphy, ultrasonography and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geatti, O. (Ist. di Medicina Nucleare, Ospedale Civile, Udine (Italy)); Shapiro, B. (Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Orsolon, P.G. (Ist. di Medicina Nucleare, Ospedale Civile, Udine (Italy)); Proto, G. (Endocrinologia, Ospedale Civile, Udine (Italy)); Guerra, U.P. (Ist. di Medicina Nucleare, Ospedale Civile, Udine (Italy)); Antonucci, F. (Nefrologia, Ospedale Civile, Udine (Italy)); Gasparini, D. (Ist. di Radiologia 2, Ospedale Civile, Udine (Italy))

    1994-01-01

    Technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI), like thallium-201, has recently been introduced as a myocardial perfusion agent and is now also showing very promising results in parathyroid scintigrapy. The results of [sup 201]Tl/[sup 99m]Tc-pertechnetate and [sup 99m]Tc/MIBI/[sup 99m]Tc-pertechnetate subtraction scintigraphy, ultrasonography and computed tomography are presented in a series of 43 patients operated on for hyperparathyroidism. All four imaging modalities were confirmed to be reliable, scintigraphy being the most accurate. Sensitivities ranged from 81% to 95%, that of [sup 99m]Tc-MIBI being the highest. Moreover this tracer, which has more favourable physical and also biochemical properties, yielded images of superior quality. This allowed localization of the lesion by visual inspection only is as many as 86% of the patients with positive [sup 99m]Tc-MIBI/n9[sup 9m]Tc-pertechnetate subtraction scintigraphy. We believe that the higher sensitivity, superior image quality and lower cost of [sup 99m]Tc-MIBI imaging will make [sup 99m]Tc-MIBI the new radiopharmaceutical of choice for parathyroid scintigraphy (when one takes into account) the stability of labelling with large activities it is possible to perform three or four cardiac studies together with one parathyroid scintigraphic examination using one lyophililzed vial. (orig.)

  1. Management benefits and safety of computed tomography in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy: experience of a single centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepson, S.L., E-mail: steven.jepson@uhl-tr.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester (United Kingdom); Harvey, C. [Heart Link ECMO Centre, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester (United Kingdom); Entwisle, J.J. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester (United Kingdom); Peek, G.J. [Heart Link ECMO Centre, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    Aim: To evaluate the benefits and logistical safety of computed tomography (CT) imaging in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy in a single institution. Materials and methods: Over a period of 25 months, 134 patients (80 neonates, 19 children, and 35 adults) underwent ECMO therapy at this institution. The imaging of these patients was reviewed to identify patients who had undergone CT imaging whilst on ECMO. Patient notes were retrospectively reviewed. CT findings and subsequent decisions were analysed to assess the benefit of CT imaging. Complications arising due to the logistics of performing the scan were analysed to assess the safety of performing CT in ECMO patients. Results: Of 134 patients, 14 (10%) had a total of 15 CT examinations whilst undergoing ECMO therapy. Indications for CT included new neurology, increased respiratory demand, and increasing requirement for high ECMO flows. There were no major complications and two minor complications associated with the logistics of performing a CT examination on an ECMO patient. Significant findings resulted from 73.3% (11/15) of the CT examinations, and in all 15 examinations information was provided that was used in making further management decisions, including, in some cases, withdrawal of ECMO therapy. Conclusion: With an experienced team, CT imaging of patients on ECMO can be performed safely. CT provides valuable information for subsequent management of patients undergoing ECMO therapy.

  2. Cancer and diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon. Differentiation with computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging - Preliminary experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeistaemoe, Emma; Hjern, Fredrik; Abraham-Nordling, Mirna [Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Div. of Surgery, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)], e-mail: mirna.abraham.nordling@ki.se; Blomqvist, Lennart [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery Karolinska Univ. Hospital Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Von Heijne, Anders [Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Div. of Radiology, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Both colon cancer and diverticular disease are common in the Western world. A challenge when patients present with clinical findings is that both diseases can present with symptoms that may mimic the other. Purpose: To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be helpful to differentiate between diverticulitis and cancer of the sigmoid colon compared to the differentiation offered by evaluation of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in a clinical situation. Material and Methods: Thirty patients were consecutively included. Fifteen patients were under work-up for a recently diagnosed sigmoid cancer and 15 patients had recently been treated in hospital due to first-time acute sigmoid diverticulitis. All patients underwent CT, T2- weighted MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI. Anonymized examinations were retrospectively presented in random order to one experienced radiologist. Results: With contrast-enhanced CT, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of cancer and diverticulitis were 66.7% (10/15) and 93.3% (14/15), respectively. Using T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MR images, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of cancer and diverticulitis were 100% (14/14) and 100% (14/14), respectively. Conclusion: MRI provides information that may contribute to improve the differentiation between sigmoid cancer and diverticulitis that is offered by CT. These encouraging results need to be confirmed in a larger study.

  3. Comparison of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the discrimination of intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal rectal cancer: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelli, Matteo; Paparo, Francesco; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Puppo, Cristina; Furnari, Manuele; Conforti, Cristina; Binda, Gian Andrea; Savarino, Edoardo; Risso, Davide; Rollandi, Gian Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To compare computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of intraperitoneal/extraperitoneal location of rectal cancers. We assessed the identification of the anterior peritoneal reflection (APR) and the distance from the inferior edge of tumors to the anal verge and from the APR to the anal verge. Distances obtained with CT and MRI showed a strong correlation [Spearman's coefficient of rank correlation (rho): 0.995; PMagnetic resonance showed sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 89.62-100.00%), specificity of 75% (95% CI: 20.34-95.88%), positive predictive value (PPV) of 97.14% (95% CI: 85.03-99.52%), and negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% (95% CI: 30.48-100.00%). CT showed a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 89.32-100.00%), specificity of 60% (95% CI: 15.40-93.51%), PPV of 94.29% (95% CI: 80.81-99.13%), and NPV of 100% (95% CI: 30.48-100.00%). CT demonstrated a potential supporting role in the evaluation of rectal cancer, showing a strong correlation with MRI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychotic reactivity to daily life stress and the dopamine system: a study combining experience sampling and [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernaus, Dennis; Collip, Dina; Lataster, Johan; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Myin, Erik; Ceccarini, Jenny; Van Laere, Koen; van Os, Jim; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2015-02-01

    Stressful life events increase the risk for psychosis, and the subjective experience of stress related to daily life activities drives moment-to-moment variation in psychotic intensity. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies suggest that dopaminergic (DAergic) activity mediates the behavioral response to an experimental stressor. However, it is not known how alterations in this DAergic stress response relate to the subjective experience of stress in real life situations assessed in momentary assessment studies. This study combined [18F]fallypride PET with an Experience Sampling ambulatory assessment approach to examine the association between the prefrontal DAergic response to experimentally induced stress and real life psychotic reactivity to the subjective experience of stress in daily life. Healthy first-degree relatives of individuals with a psychotic disorder (N = 14) and healthy controls (N = 11) participated in (a) a psychosocial [18F]fallypride PET stress paradigm and (b) an experience sampling study, using a structured diary approach. Mixed multilevel random intercept models revealed that stress-induced [18F]fallypride displacement, indicative of DAergic activity, in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) was associated with psychotic reactivity to daily life stress in the entire sample. Lower levels of [18F]fallypride displacement to stress predicted increased psychotic reactivity to daily life stress. This study combined PET neuroimaging with real life behavioral assessments in the investigation of psychotic symptoms; we showed decreased [18F]fallypride displacement to stress in VMPFC to be associated with increased psychotic reactivity to daily life stress. The preliminary evidence in this study demonstrates that it is possible to acquire a grasp on how brain function is associated with contextualized experience, which has relevance for neuroimaging studies in general.

  5. Influence of the adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D algorithm on the detectability of low-contrast lesions and radiation dose repeatability in abdominal computed tomography: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jeong Min; Hur, Bo Yun; Baek, Jeehyun; Shim, Hackjoon; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the influence of the adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) algorithm on the detectability of low-contrast focal liver lesions (FLLs) and the radiation dose repeatability of automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) in abdominal CT scans using anthropomorphic phantoms. Three different sizes of anthropomorphic phantoms, each with 4 low-contrast FLLs, were scanned on a 320-channel CT scanner using the ATCM technique and AIDR 3D, at different radiation doses: full-dose, half-dose, and quarter-dose. Scans were repeated three times and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and AIDR 3D. Radiation dose repeatability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Image noise, quality, and lesion conspicuity were assessed by four reviewers and the number of invisible FLLs was compared among different radiation doses and reconstruction methods. ICCs of radiation dose among the three CT scans were excellent in all phantoms (0.99). Image noise, quality, and lesion conspicuity in the half-dose group were comparable with full-dose FBP after applying AIDR 3D in all phantoms. In small phantoms, the half-dose group reconstructed with AIDR 3D showed similar sensitivity in visualizing low-contrast FLLs compared to full-dose FBP (P = 0.77-0.84). In medium and large phantoms, AIDR 3D reduced the number of missing low-contrast FLLs [3.1% (9/288), 11.5% (33/288), respectively], compared to FBP [10.4% (30/288), 21.9% (63/288), respectively] in the full-dose group. By applying AIDR 3D, half-dose CT scans may be achievable in small-sized patients without hampering diagnostic performance, while it may improve diagnostic performance in medium- and large-sized patients without increasing the radiation dose.

  6. Optical Tomography in Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evseev, Vadim

    . JQSRT 113 (2012) 2222, 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.07.015] included in the PhD thesis as an attachment. The knowledge and experience gained in the PhD project is the first important step towards introducing the advanced optical tomography methods of combustion diagnostics developed in the project to future...

  7. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  8. Cardiac output measurement in newborn infants using the ultrasonic cardiac output monitor: an assessment of agreement with conventional echocardiography, repeatability and new user experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neil; Dodsworth, Melissa; Mills, John F

    2011-05-01

    To assess (1) agreement between the ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) 1A device for measurement of cardiac output in newborn infants and conventional echocardiography (ECHO), (2) repeatability of USCOM measurements and (3) agreement between novice and expert users of the USCOM. A prospective observational study. The Neonatal Unit at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. 56 term and near-term infants, with no evidence of structural or functional cardiovascular disease, or haemodynamic shunts. Agreement between ECHO and USCOM was assessed by paired measurements of ventricular outputs by a single experienced user. Repeatability was assessed using five repeated measurements in 10 infants. Agreement between five novices and one expert user was assessed by paired USCOM measurements over 30 training measurements. Agreement between USCOM and ECHO for left ventricular output (LVO) was (bias, ±limits of agreement, mean % error): 14, ±108 ml/kg/min, 43%, and for right ventricular output (RVO): -59, ±160, ml/kg/min, 57%. Intra-observer repeatability was 6.7% for USCOM LVO and 3.6% for ECHO LVO. After five training measurements, the mean difference between USCOM measures of LVO by novice and expert users was less than 50 ml/kg/min, but with variability. Repeatability of USCOM measures is high in newborn infants. New users can be trained quickly, but with high inter-user variability. Agreement between USCOM and conventional ECHO is broad, and worse for RVO and LVO. Further studies are required to assess the ability of the device to detect clinically significant changes in infant cardiac output.

  9. Motion analysis of total cervical disc replacements using computed tomography: Preliminary experience with nine patients and a model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svedmark, Per (Div. of Orthopedics, Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Stockholm Spine Center, Lowenstromska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)), email: per.svedmark@spinecenter.se; Lundh, Fredrik; Olivecrona, Henrik (Div. of Orthopedics, Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)); Nemeth, Gunnar (Capio group, Stockholm (Sweden)); Noz, Marilyn E. (Dept. of Radiology, New York Univ. School of Medicine, New York (United States)); Maguire Jr, Gerald Q. (School of Information and Communication Technology, Royal Inst. of Technology, Kista (Sweden)); Zeleznik, Michael P. (Saya Systems Inc., Salt Lake City (United States))

    2011-12-15

    Background. Cervical total disc replacement (CTDR) is an alternative to anterior fusion. Therefore, it is desirable to have an accurate in vivo measurement of prosthetic kinematics and assessment of implant stability relative to the adjacent vertebrae. Purpose. To devise an in vivo CT-based method to analyze the kinematics of cervical total disc replacements (CTDR), specifically of two prosthetic components between two CT scans obtained under different conditions. Material and Methods. Nine patients with CTDR were scanned in flexion and extension of the cervical spine using a clinical CT scanner with a routine low-dose protocol. The flexion and extension CT volume data were spatially registered, and the prosthetic kinematics of two prosthetic components, an upper and a lower, was calculated and expressed in Euler angles and orthogonal linear translations relative to the upper component. For accuracy analysis, a cervical spine model incorporating the same disc replacement as used in the patients was also scanned and processed in the same manner. Results. Analysis of both the model and patients showed good repeatability, i.e. within 2 standard deviations of the mean using the 95% limits of agreement with no overlapping confidence intervals. The accuracy analysis showed that the median error was close to zero. Conclusion. The mobility of the cervical spine after total disc replacement can be effectively measured in vivo using CT. This method requires an appropriate patient positioning and scan parameters to achieve suitable image quality

  10. The Place of Computed Tomography as a Guidance Modality in Percutaneous Nephrostomy: Analysis of a 10-Year Single-Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egilmez, H.; Oztoprak, I.; Atalar, M.; Cetin, A.; Gumus, C.; Gultekin, Y.; Bulut, S.; Arslan, M.; Solak, O. [Depts. of Radiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Urology, Cumhuriyet Univ. School of Medicine, Sivas (Turkey)

    2007-09-15

    Background: Percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) has been established as an effective technique for urinary decompression or diversion. This procedure may be performed with the guidance of fluoroscopy, ultrasonography, a combination of fluoroscopy and ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging. Purpose: To retrospectively review experience with CT-guided PCN over a 10-year period in a single center. Material and Methods: All CT-guided PCN procedures performed in adults at our institution between 1995 and 2005 were evaluated. In 882 patients, 1113 nephrostomy catheters were inserted. Interventional radiologists or radiology residents under direct attending supervision inserted all catheters. During the PCN procedure, bleeding, sepsis, and injuries to adjacent organs were regarded as major complications. Clinical events requiring nominal therapy with no sequelae were regarded as minor complications. Results: PCN procedures were performed via 1-3 punctures in patients with grades 0-1 and 2 hydronephrosis, and via 1-2 punctures in patients with grade 3 hydronephrosis. They were carried out with a procedure time ranging from 9 to 26 min. All PCNs were considered as technically successful, and no major complications were observed. There were minor complications including transient macroscopic hematuria (28.6%, 19.9%, and 4.9% in patients with hydronephrosis grades 0-1, 2, and 3, respectively) and perirenal hematomas in a total of eight patients. No patient required additional intervention secondary to complications of the PCN procedure. Conclusion: CT-guided PCN is an efficient and safe procedure with major and minor complication rates below the accepted thresholds. It can be used for the management of patients requiring nephrostomy insertion in inpatient settings, and might be a preferable procedure in patients with minimal or no dilatation of the renal pelvis. Keywords: Computed tomography; percutaneous nephrostomy; urinary obstruction.

  11. Computed tomography-guided needle aspiration and biopsy of pulmonary lesions - A single-center experience in 1000 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulou, Loukia S.; Tsagouli, Paraskevi; Thanos, Loukas [Dept. of Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' , Athens (Greece)], e-mail: ploukia@hotmail.com; Ziakas, Panayiotis D. [Program of Outcomes Research, Div. of Infectious Diseases, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown Univ., RI, and Div. of Infectious Diseases, Rhode Island Hospital, Rhode Island (United States); Politi, Dimitra [Dept. of Cythopathology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' Athens (Greece); Trigidou, Rodoula [Dept. of Pathology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' Athens (Greece)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Computed tomography (CT)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) and biopsies are well-established, minimally invasive diagnostic tools for pulmonary lesions. Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of 1000 consecutive lung CT-guided FNA and/or core needle biopsies (CNB), the main outcome measures being diagnostic yield, and complication rates. Material and Methods: Patients considered eligible were those referred to our department for lung lesions. The choice of FNA, CNB, or both was based upon the radiologist's judgment. Diagnostic yield was defined as the probability of having a definite result by cytology/histology. Results: The study included 733 male patients and 267 female patients, with a mean (SD) age of 66.4 (11.4) years. The mean (SD) lesion size was 3.7 (2.4) cm in maximal diameter. Six hundred and forty-one (64%) patients underwent an FNA procedure, 245 (25%) a CNB, and 114 (11%) had been subjected to both. The diagnostic yield was 960/994 (96.6%); this decreased significantly with the use of CNB only (odds ratio [OR] 0.32; 95% CI 0.12 - 0.88; P = 0.03), while it increased with lesion size (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.03 - 1.79; P = 0.03 per cm increase). In 506 patients (52.7%), a malignant process was diagnosed by cytopathology/histology. The complication rate reached 97/1000 (9.7%); complications included: hemorrhage, 62 (6.2%); pneumothorax, 28 (2.8%); hemorrhage and pneumothorax, 5 (0.5%); and hemoptysis, 2 (0.2%). It was not significantly affected by the type of procedure or localization of the lesion. The overall risk for complications was three times higher for lesions <4 cm (OR 3.26; 95% CI 1.96 - 5.42; P < 0.001). Conclusion: CT-guided lung biopsy has a high diagnostic yield using FNA, CNB, or both. The CNB procedure alone will not suffice. Complication rates were acceptable and correlated inversely with lesion size, not localization or type of procedure.

  12. Preliminary Results From the CAUGHT Experiment: Investigation of the North Central Andes Subsurface Using Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2011-12-01

    Altiplano and portions of the Eastern Cordillera, and at approximately 40 under the sub-Andes and westernmost edge of the Beni basin. Unlike previous studies farther south, we do not see an increased crustal thickness beneath the Eastern Cordillera. The CAUGHT station coverage is also ideal for Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) to investigate the seismic shear wave velocities in the upper crust (McQuarrie, N., Barnes, J., and Ehlers, T.A., 2008, Geometric, kinematic and erosional history of the central Andean Plateau (15-17°S), northern Bolivia: Tectonics, v. 27, TC3007, doi:10.1029/2006TC002054.

  13. Using computed tomography enterography to evaluate patients with Crohn's disease: what impact does examiner experience have on the reproducibility of the method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlin, Stênio; Favaro, Larissa Rossini; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Taniguchi, Lincoln Seiji; Loch, Ana Paula; Argollo, Marjorie Costa; Ambrogini Junior, Orlando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact that examiner experience has on the reproducibility and accuracy of computed tomography (CT) enterography in the detection of radiological signs in patients with Crohn's disease. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective, cross-sectional observational study involving the analysis of CT enterography scans of 20 patients with Crohn's disease. The exams were analyzed independently by two radiologists in their last year of residence (duo I) and by two abdominal imaging specialists (duo II). The interobserver agreement of each pair of examiners in identifying the main radiological signs was calculated with the kappa test. The accuracy of the examiners with less experience was quantified by using the consensus among three experienced examiners as a reference. Results Duo I and duo II obtained a similar interobserver agreement, with a moderate to good correlation, for mural hyperenhancement, parietal thickening, mural stratification, fat densification, and comb sign (kappa: 0.45-0.64). The less experienced examiners showed an accuracy > 80% for all signs, except for lymph nodes and fistula, for which it ranged from 60% to 75%. Conclusion Less experienced examiners have a tendency to present a level of interobserver agreement similar to that of experienced examiners in evaluating Crohn's disease through CT enterography, as well as showing satisfactory accuracy in identifying most radiological signs of the disease. PMID:28298727

  14. Using computed tomography enterography to evaluate patients with Crohn's disease: what impact does examiner experience have on the reproducibility of the method?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlin, Stenio; Favaro, Larissa Rossini; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Taniguchi, Lincoln Seiji; Argollo, Marjorie Costa; Ambrogini Junior, Orlando; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: stenioburlin@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Loch, Ana Paula [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2017-01-15

    Objective: To assess the impact that examiner experience has on the reproducibility and accuracy of computed tomography (CT) enterography in the detection of radiological signs in patients with Crohn's disease. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, cross-sectional observational study involving the analysis of CT enterography scans of 20 patients with Crohn's disease. The exams were analyzed independently by two radiologists in their last year of residence (duo I) and by two abdominal imaging specialists (duo II). The interobserver agreement of each pair of examiners in identifying the main radiological signs was calculated with the kappa test. The accuracy of the examiners with less experience was quantified by using the consensus among three experienced examiners as a reference. Results: Duo I and duo II obtained a similar interobserver agreement, with a moderate to good correlation, for mural hyper enhancement, parietal thickening, mural stratification, fat densification, and comb sign (kappa: 0.45 - 0.64). The less experienced examiners showed an accuracy > 80% for all signs, except for lymph nodes and fistula, for which it ranged from 60% to 75%. Conclusion: Less experienced examiners have a tendency to present a level of interobserver agreement similar to that of experienced examiners in evaluating Crohn's disease through CT enterography, as well as showing satisfactory accuracy in identifying most radiological signs of the disease. (author)

  15. Early experience with multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-targeted biopsies under visual transrectal ultrasound guidance in patients suspicious for prostate cancer undergoing repeated biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Noergaard, Nis; Chabanova, Elizaveta

    2015-01-01

    -RADS) and Likert classification. All underwent repeated TRUS-bx (10 cores) and mp-MRI-bx under visual TRUS guidance of any mp-MRI-suspicious lesion not targeted by systematic TRUS-bx. RESULTS: PCa was found in 39 out of 83 patients (47%) and mp-MRI identified at least one lesion with some degree of suspicion...... in all 39 patients. Both PI-RADS and Likert scoring showed a high correlation between suspicion of malignancy and biopsy results (p

  16. Application of 2-D geoelectrical resistivity tomography for mountain permafrost detection in sporadic permafrost environments: Experiences from Eastern Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Mountain permafrost covers some 2000 km² of the Austrian Alps which is less than 2.5% of the national territory. Delineating the altitudinal lower limit of permafrost in the mountains of Austria is difficult due the complex topography, the rather sparseness of field verification data and the lack of long-term permafrost monitoring data. Such monitoring data should cover different slope aspects, different elevations, different substrates and different mountain regions of Austria. In this study it was attempted to delineate the lower limit of permafrost at two study sites in the Tauern Range, Austria, applying two-dimensional geoelectrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In addition, multi-annual ground temperature data collected by miniature temperature datalogger (MDT) were used to validate the results. At the study site Hochreichart (maximum elevation 2416 m asl), located in the Seckauer Tauern Range, 14 ERT profiles (lengths 48-196 m; electrode spacing 2, 2.5 or 4 m) were measured at elevations between 1805 and 2416 m asl. Measurements were carried out at two cirques (Reichart, Schöneben) and at the summit plateau of Hochreichart. Results at this site indicate that permafrost lenses are detectable at elevations down to c.1900 m asl at radiation-sheltered sites. Furthermore, at the summit plateau permafrost only occurs as rather small lenses. The ERT-based permafrost pattern is generally confirmed by the MTD data with negative mean annual ground temperature values at only a few monitoring sites. However, the possibility of air-filled cavities causing higher resistive zones faking permafrost existence cannot be excluded because coarse-grained sediments (i.e. relict rock glaciers and autochthonous block fields) are widespread at this study site. At the second study site Kögele Cirque (maximum elevation 3030 m asl) located in the Schober Mountains 12 ERT profiles (lengths 48 m; electrode spacing 2 m) were measured at elevations between 2631 and 2740 m asl. Spatially

  17. Within-session effect of repeated stress exposure on extinction circuitry function in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åhs, Fredrik; Gingnell, Malin; Furmark, Tomas; Fredrikson, Mats

    2017-03-30

    Anxiety reduction following repeated exposure to stressful experiences is generally held to depend on neural processes involved in extinction of conditioned fear. We predicted that repeated exposure to stressful experiences would change activity throughout the circuitry serving extinction, including ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), the hippocampus and the amygdala. To test this prediction, 36 participants diagnosed with SAD performed two successive speeches in front of an observing audience while regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was recorded using positron emission tomography. To control for non-anxiolytic effects of repeated exposure, rCBF was also measured during repeated presentations of neutral and angry facial expressions. Results showed that anxiety ratings and heart rate decreased from the first to the second speech, indicating an anxiolytic effect of repeated exposure. Exposure attenuated rCBF in the amygdala whereas no change in rCBF was observed in the vmPFC or hippocampus. The rCBF-reductions in the amygdala were greater following repetition of the speech task than repetition of face exposure indicating that they were specific to anxiety attenuation and not due to a reduced novelty. Our findings suggest that amygdala-related attenuation processes are key to understanding the working mechanisms of exposure therapy.

  18. In vivo fluorescence lifetime tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, Ralph E.; Patwardhan, Sachin V.; Akers, Walter; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.

    2009-03-01

    Local molecular and physiological processes can be imaged in vivo through perturbations in the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) of optical imaging agents. In addition to providing functional information, FLT methods can quantify specific molecular events and multiplex diagnostic and prognostic information. We have developed a fluorescence lifetime diffuse optical tomography (DOT) system for in vivo preclinical imaging. Data is captured using a time-resolved intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) system to measure fluorescence excitation and emission in the time domain. Data is then converted to the frequency domain, and we simultaneously reconstruct images of yield and lifetime using an extension to the normalized Born approach. By using differential phase measurements, we demonstrate DOT imaging of short lifetimes (from 350 ps) with high precision (+/-5 ps). Furthermore, this system retains the efficiency, speed, and flexibility of transmission geometry DOT. We demonstrate feasibility of FLT-DOT through a progressive series of experiments. Lifetime range and repeatability are first measured in phantoms. Imaging of subcutaneous implants then verifies the FLT-DOT approach in vivo in the presence of inhomogeneous optical properties. Use in a common research scenario is ultimately demonstrated by imaging accumulation of a targeted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent-labeled peptide probe (cypate-RGD) in a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor.

  19. Doppler Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, T R

    2000-01-01

    I review the method of Doppler tomography which translates binary-star line profiles taken at a series of orbital phases into a distribution of emission over the binary. I begin with a discussion of the basic principles behind Doppler tomography, including a comparison of the relative merits of maximum entropy regularisation versus filtered back-projection for implementing the inversion. Following this I discuss the issue of noise in Doppler images and possible methods for coping with it. Then I move on to look at the results of Doppler Tomography applied to cataclysmic variable stars. Outstanding successes to date are the discovery of two-arm spiral shocks in cataclysmic variable accretion discs and the probing of the stream/magnetospheric interaction in magnetic cataclysmic variable stars. Doppler tomography has also told us much about the stream/disc interaction in non-magnetic systems and the irradiation of the secondary star in all systems. The latter indirectly reveals such effects as shadowing by the a...

  20. Low-dose head computed tomography in children: a single institutional experience in pediatric radiation risk reduction: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Ryan P; Reynolds, Renee M; Ramakrishna, Rohan; Levitt, Michael R; Hopper, Richard A; Lee, Amy; Browd, Samuel R

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the authors describe their experience with a low-dose head CT protocol for a preselected neurosurgical population at a dedicated pediatric hospital (Seattle Children's Hospital), the largest number of patients with this protocol reported to date. All low-dose head CT scans between October 2011 and November 2012 were reviewed. Two different low-dose radiation dosages were used, at one-half or one-quarter the dose of a standard head CT scan, based on patient characteristics agreed upon by the neurosurgery and radiology departments. Patient information was also recorded, including diagnosis and indication for CT scan. Six hundred twenty-four low-dose head CT procedures were performed within the 12-month study period. Although indications for the CT scans varied, the most common reason was to evaluate the ventricles and catheter placement in hydrocephalic patients with shunts (70%), followed by postoperative craniosynostosis imaging (12%). These scans provided adequate diagnostic imaging, and no patient required a follow-up full-dose CT scan as a result of poor image quality on a low-dose CT scan. Overall physician comfort and satisfaction with interpretation of the images was high. An additional 2150 full-dose head CT scans were performed during the same 12-month time period, making the total number of CT scans 2774. This value compares to 3730 full-dose head CT scans obtained during the year prior to the study when low-dose CT and rapid-sequence MRI was not a reliable option at Seattle Children's Hospital. Thus, over a 1-year period, 22% of the total CT scans were able to be converted to low-dose scans, and full-dose CT scans were able to be reduced by 42%. The implementation of a low-dose head CT protocol substantially reduced the amount of ionizing radiation exposure in a preselected population of pediatric neurosurgical patients. Image quality and diagnostic utility were not significantly compromised.

  1. Characterization of an alluvial aquifer with thermal tracer tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter

    2017-04-01

    In the summer of 2015, a series of thermal tracer tests was performed at the Widen field site in northeast Switzerland. At this site numerous hydraulic, tracer, geophysical and hydrogeophysical field tests have been conducted in the past to investigate a shallow alluvial aquifer. The goals of the campaign in 2015 were to design a cost-effective thermal tracer tomography setup and to validate the concept of travel time-based thermal tracer tomography under field conditions. Thermal tracer tomography uses repeated thermal tracer injections with different injection depths and distributed temperature measurements to map the hydraulic conductivity distribution of a heterogeneous aquifer. The tracer application was designed with minimal experimental time and cost. Water was heated in inflatable swimming pools using direct sunlight of the warm summer days, and it was injected as low temperature pulses in a well. Because of the small amount of injected heat, no long recovery times were required between the repeated heat tracer injections and every test started from natural thermal conditions. At Widen, four thermal tracer tests were performed during a period of three days. Temperatures were measured in one downgradient well using a distributed temperature measurement system installed at seven depth points. Totally 12 temperature breakthrough curves were collected. Travel time based tomographic inversion assumes that thermal transport is dominated by advection and the travel time of the thermal tracer can be related to the hydraulic conductivities of the aquifer. This assumption is valid in many shallow porous aquifers where the groundwater flow is fast. In our application, the travel time problem was treated by a tomographic solver, analogous to seismic tomography, to derive the hydraulic conductivity distribution. At the test site, a two-dimensional cross-well hydraulic conductivity profile was reconstructed with the travel time based inversion. The reconstructed profile

  2. Reimplantation and Repeat Infection After Cardiac-Implantable Electronic Device Infections: Experience From the MEDIC (Multicenter Electrophysiologic Device Infection Cohort) Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Thomas A; Uslan, Daniel Z; Prutkin, Jordan M; Greenspon, Arnold J; Baddour, Larry M; Danik, Stephan B; Tolosana, Jose M; Le, Katherine; Miro, Jose M; Peacock, James; Sohail, Muhammad R; Vikram, Holenarasipur R; Carrillo, Roger G

    2017-03-01

    Infection is a serious complication of cardiovascular-implantable electronic device implantation and necessitates removal of all hardware for optimal treatment. Strategies for reimplanting hardware after infection vary widely and have not previously been analyzed using a large, multicenter study. The MEDIC (Multicenter Electrophysiologic Device Infection Cohort) prospectively enrolled subjects with cardiovascular-implantable electronic device infections at multiple institutions in the United States and abroad between 2009 and 2012. Reimplantation strategies were evaluated overall, and every patient who relapsed within 6 months was individually examined for clinical information that could help explain the negative outcome. Overall, 434 patients with cardiovascular-implantable electronic device infections were prospectively enrolled at participating centers. During the initial course of therapy, complete device removal was done in 381 patients (87.8%), and 220 of them (57.7%) were ultimately reimplanted with new devices. Overall, the median time between removal and reimplantation was 10 days, with an interquartile range of 6 to 19 days. Eleven of the 434 patients had another infection within 6 months, but only 4 of them were managed with cardiovascular-implantable electronic device removal and reimplantation during the initial infection. Thus, the repeat infection rate was low (1.8%) in those who were reimplanted. Patients who retained original hardware had a 11.3% repeat infection rate. Our study findings confirm that a broad range of reimplant strategies are used in clinical practice. They suggest that it is safe to reimplant cardiac devices after extraction of previously infected hardware and that the risk of a second infection is low, regardless of reimplant timing. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of pediatric cancer: Preliminary experience and comparison with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomogra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian S Pugmire; Alexander R Guimaraes; Ruth Lim; Alison M Friedmann; Mary Huang; David Ebb; Howard Weinstein; Onofrio A Catalano; Umar Mahmood; Ciprian Catana; Michael S Gee

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe our preliminary experience with simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose(18F-FDG)positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging(PET-MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric oncology patients.METHODS: This prospective, observational, singlecenter study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, and institutional review board approved. To be eligible, a patient was required to:(1) have a known or suspected cancer diagnosis;(2) be under the care of a pediatric hematologist/oncologist; and(3) be scheduled for clinically indicated 18F-FDG PETCT examination at our institution. Patients underwent PET-CT followed by PET-MRI on the same day. PET-CT examinations were performed using standard department protocols. PET-MRI studies were acquired with an integrated 3 Tesla PET-MRI scanner using whole body T1 Dixon, T2 HASTE, EPI diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI) and STIR sequences. No additional radiotracer was given for the PET-MRI examination. Both PET-CT and PETMRI examinations were reviewed by consensus by two study personnel. Test performance characteristics of PETMRI, for the detection of malignant lesions, including FDG maximum standardized uptake value(SUVmax) and minimum apparent diffusion coefficient(ADCmin), were calculated on a per lesion basis using PET-CT as a reference standard.RESULTS: A total of 10 whole body PET-MRI exams were performed in 7 pediatric oncology patients. The mean patient age was 16.1 years(range 12-19 years) including 6 males and 1 female. A total of 20 malignant and 21 benign lesions were identified on PET-CT. PET-MRI SUVmax had excellent correlation with PET-CT SUVmax for both benign and malignant lesions(R = 0.93). PETMRI SUVmax > 2.5 had 100% accuracy for discriminating benign from malignant lesions using PET-computed tomography(CT) reference. Whole body DWI was also evaluated: the mean ADCmin of malignant lesions(780.2 + 326.6) was significantly

  4. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy ablation of breast cancer liver metastases: initial experience with 80 lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collettini, Federico; Golenia, Mascha; Schnapauff, Dirk; Poellinger, Alexander; Denecke, Timm; Wust, Peter; Riess, Hanno; Hamm, Bernd; Gebauer, Bernhard

    2012-05-01

    To analyze initial experience with computed tomography-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of breast cancer liver metastases (BCLM). Between January 2008 and December 2010, 37 consecutive women with 80 liver metastases were treated with CT-HDRBT in 56 sessions. Mean age was 58.6 years (range, 34-83 y). Treatment was performed by CT-guided applicator placement and high-dose-rate brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source. The mean radiation dose was 18.57 Gy (standard deviation 2.27). Tumor response was evaluated by gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed before treatment, 6 weeks after treatment, and every 3 months thereafter. Two patients were lost to follow-up; the remaining 35 patients were available for MR imaging evaluation for a mean follow-up time of 11.6 months (range 3-32 mo). Mean tumor diameter was 25.5 mm (range 8-74 mm). Two (2.6%) local recurrences were observed after local tumor control for 10 months and 12 months. Both local progressions were successfully retreated. Distant tumor progression (new metastases or enlargement of nontreated metastases) occurred during the follow-up period in 11 (31.4%) patients. Seven (20%) patients died during the follow-up period. Overall survival ranged from 3-39 months (median 18 months). CT-HDRBT is a safe and effective ablative therapy, providing a high rate of local tumor control in patients with BCLM. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Seismic velocity anisotropy and heterogeneity beneath the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography Experiment (MELT) region of the East Pacific Rise from analysis of P and S body waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, W.C.; Toomey, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    We use teleseismic P and S delay times and shear wave splitting measurements to constrain isotropic and anisotropic heterogeneity in the mantle beneath the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR). The data comprise 462 P and S delay times and 18 shear wave splitting observations recorded during the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) Experiment. We estimate the mantle melt content (F) and temperature (T) variation from the isotropic velocity variation. Our results indicate that the maximum variation in F beneath our array is between zero and ???1.2%, and maximum variation in T is between zero and ???100 K. We favor an explanation having partial contributions from both T and F. We approximate the seismic anisotropy of the upper mantle with hexagonal symmetry, consistent with the assumption of two dimensionality of mantle flow. Our new tomographic technique uses a nonlinear inversion of P and slow S polarization delay times to simultaneously solve for coupled VP and VS heterogeneity throughout the model and for the magnitude of anisotropy within discrete domains. The domain dimensions and the dip of the anisotropy are fixed for each inversion but are varied in a grid search, obtaining the misfit of the models to the body wave delay data and to split times of vertically propagating S waves. The data misfit and the isotropic heterogeneity are sensitive to domain dimensions and dip of anisotropy. In a region centered beneath the SEPR the best average dip of the hexagonal symmetry axis is horizontal or dipping shallowly (<30??) west. Given the resolution of our data, a subaxial region characterized by vertically aligned symmetry axes may exist but is limited to be <80 km deep. We infer that the mantle flow beneath the SEPR is consistent with shallow asthenospheric return flow from the direction of the South Pacific superswell.

  6. Repeatability & Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2009

    KAUST Repository

    Manegold, Stefan

    2010-12-15

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters\\' programs against their data to verify the repeatability of the experiments published [1]. Given the positive feedback concerning the SIGMOD 2008 repeatability initiative, SIGMOD 2009 modified and expanded the initiative with a workability assessment.

  7. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  8. Wide field of view computed tomography and mid carpal instability: The value of the sagittal radius–lunate–capitate axis – Preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repse, Stephen E., E-mail: stephrep@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Monash Health, VIC (Australia); Koulouris, George, E-mail: GeorgeK@melbourneradiology.com.au [Melbourne Radiology Clinic, Ground Floor, 3-6/100 Victoria Parade, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Centre for Orthopaedic Research, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Troupis, John M., E-mail: john.troupis@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging & Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Monash Health and Department of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences, Monash University, VIC (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Unique insight into the assessment of mid carpal instability. • 4D CT using sagittal reconstructions along the radius–lunate–capitate axis. • 4D CT observations of vacuum phenomenon, trigger lunate and capitate subluxation. • Earlier recognition of mid carpal instability. - Abstract: Purpose: Dynamic four dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has recently emerged as a practical method for evaluating complex functional abnormality of joints. We retrospectively analysed 4D CT studies undertaken as part of the clinical management of hand and wrist symptoms. We present our initial experience of 4D CT in the assessment of functional abnormalities of the wrist in a group of patients with mid carpal instability (MCI), specifically carpal instability non-dissociative. We aim to highlight unique features in assessment of the radius–lunate–capitate (RLC) axis which allows insight and understanding of abnormalities in function, not just morphology, which may be contributing to symptoms. Materials and methods: Wide field of view multi-detector CT scanner (320 slices, 0.5 mm detector thickness) was used to acquire bilateral continuous motion assessment in hand flexion and extension. A maximum z-axis coverage of 16 cm was available for each acquisition, and a large field of view (FOV) was used. Due to the volume acquisition during motion, reconstructions at multiple time points were undertaken. Dynamic and anatomically targeted multi-planar-reconstructions (MPRs) were then used to establish the kinematic functionality of the joint. Results: Our initial cohort of 20 patients was reviewed. Three findings were identified which were present either in isolation or in combination. These are vacuum phenomenon, triggering of the lunate and capitate subluxation. We provide 4D CT representations of each and highlight features considered of clinical importance and their significance. We also briefly discuss how the current classifications of dynamic wrist

  9. Stepped mirrored structures for generating true time delays in stationary optical delay line proof-of-principle experiments for application to optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansz, Paul Vernon; Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Conventional time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) relies on the detection of an interference pattern generated by the interference of backscattered light from the sample and a reference Optical Delay Line (ODL). By referencing the sample interference with the scan depth of the ODL, constructive interference indicates depth in the sample of a reflecting structure. Conventional ODLs used in time domain OCT require some physical movement of a mirror to scan a given depth range. This movement results in instrument degradation. Also in some situations it is necessary to have no moving parts. Stationary ODLs (SODLs) include dual Reflective Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) systems (Type I) and single Transmissive SLM with match-arrayed-waveguide systems (Type II). In this paper, the method of fabrication and characterisation of a number of Stepped Mirrored Structures (SMS) is presented. These structures are intended for later use in proof-of-principle experiments that demonstrate Type II SODL: a six step, 2 mm step depth macro-SMS, an eight step 150 um deep micro-SMS with glue between steps, and a six step 150 um deep micro-SMS with no glue between steps. These SMS are characterized in terms of their fabrication, step alignment and step height increment precision. The degree of alignment of each step was verified using half of a bulk Michelson interferometer. Step height was gauged using a pair of vernier callipers measuring each individual step. A change in notch frequency using an in-fibre Mach-Zhender interferometer was used to gauge the average step height and the result compared to the vernier calliper results. The best aligned SMS was the micro-SMS prepared by method B with no glue between steps. It demonstrated a 95% confidence interval variation of 1% in reflected intensity, with the least variation in intensity within steps. This SMS also had the least absolute variation in step height increment: less than 8 um. Though less variation would be ideal, for

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  11. Functional Doppler optical coherence tomography for cortical blood flow imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Liu, Gangjun; Nguyen, Elaine; Choi, Bernard; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    Optical methods have been widely used in basic neuroscience research to study the cerebral blood flow dynamics in order to overcome the low spatial resolution associated with magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. Although laser Doppler imaging and laser speckle imaging can map out en face cortical hemodynamics and columns, depth resolution is not available. Two-photon microscopy has been used for mapping cortical activity. However, flow measurement requires fluorescent dye injection, which can be problematic. The noninvasive and high resolution tomographic capabilities of optical coherence tomography make it a promising technique for mapping depth resolved cortical blood flow. Here, we present a functional Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging modality for quantitative evaluation of cortical blood flow in a mouse model. Fast, repeated, Doppler OCT scans across a vessel of interest were performed to record flow dynamic information with a high temporal resolution of the cardiac cycles. Spectral Doppler analysis of continuous Doppler images demonstrates how the velocity components and longitudinally projected flow-volume-rate change over time, thereby providing complementary temporal flow information to the spatially distributed flow information of Doppler OCT. The proposed functional Doppler OCT imaging modality can be used to diagnose vessel stenosis/blockage or monitor blood flow changes due to pharmacological agents/neuronal activities. Non-invasive in-vivo mice experiments were performed to verify the capabilities of function Doppler OCT.

  12. Preliminary investigations on high energy electron beam tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baertling, Yves; Hoppe, Dietrich; Hampel, Uwe

    2010-12-15

    In computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional images of the attenuation distribution within a slice are created by scanning radiographic projections of an object with a rotating X-ray source detector compound and subsequent reconstruction of the images from these projection data on a computer. CT can be made very fast by employing a scanned electron beam instead of a mechanically moving X-ray source. Now this principle was extended towards high-energy electron beam tomography with an electrostatic accelerator. Therefore a dedicated experimental campaign was planned and carried out at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk. There we investigated the capabilities of BINP's accelerators as an electron beam generating and scanning unit of a potential high-energy electron beam tomography device. The setup based on a 1 MeV ELV-6 (BINP) electron accelerator and a single detector. Besides tomographic measurements with different phantoms, further experiments were carried out concerning the focal spot size and repeat accuracy of the electron beam as well as the detector's response time and signal to noise ratio. (orig.)

  13. Repeatability and Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    SIGMOD has offered, since 2008, to verify the experiments published in the papers accepted at the conference. This year, we have been in charge of reproducing the experiments provided by the authors (repeatability), and exploring changes to experiment parameters (workability). In this paper, we a...... find that most experiments are distributed as Linux packages accompanied by instructions on how to setup and run the experiments. We are still far from the vision of executable papers...

  14. Repeatability and Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    SIGMOD has offered, since 2008, to verify the experiments published in the papers accepted at the conference. This year, we have been in charge of reproducing the experiments provided by the authors (repeatability), and exploring changes to experiment parameters (workability). In this paper, we a...... find that most experiments are distributed as Linux packages accompanied by instructions on how to setup and run the experiments. We are still far from the vision of executable papers...

  15. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  16. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  17. Neutron tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, James C., III; Richards, Wade J.; Shields, Kevin C.

    1995-07-01

    The McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center's (MNRC) staff in conjunction with a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRDA) with the U.C. Santa Barbara facility has developed a system that can be used for aircraft inspection of jet engine blades. The problem was to develop an inspection system that can detect very low concentrations of hydrogen (i.e., greater than 100 ppm) in metal matricies. Specifically in Titanium alloy jet engine blades. Entrapment and precipitation of hydrogen in metals is an undesirable phenomenon which occurs in many alloys of steel and titanium. In general, metals suffer a loss of mechanical properties after long exposures to hydrogen, especially at high temperatures and pressures, thereby becoming embrittled. Neutron radiography has been used as a nondestructive testing technique for many years. Neutrons, because of their unique interactions with materials, are especially useful in the detection of hydrogen. They have an extremely high interaction cross section for low atomic number nuclei (i.e., hydrogen). Thus hydrogen in a metal matrix can be visualized using neutrons. Traditional radiography is sensitive to the total attenuation integrated over the path of radiation through the material. Increased sensitivity and quantitative cross section resolution can be obtained using three-dimensional volumetric imaging techniques such as tomography. The solution used to solve the problem was to develop a neutron tomography system. The neutron source is the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center's 1 MW TRIGA reactor. This paper describes the hardware used in the system as well as some of the preliminary results.

  18. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  19. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Advances in neutron tomography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W Treimer

    2008-11-01

    In the last decade neutron radiography (NR) and tomography (NCT) have experienced a number of improvements, due to the well-known properties of neutrons interacting with matter, i.e. the low attenuation by many materials, the strong attenuation by hydrogenous constituent in samples, the wavelength-dependent attenuation in the neighbourhood of Bragg edges and due to better 2D neutron detectors. So NR and NCT were improved by sophisticated techniques that are based on the attenuation of neutrons or on phase changes of the associated neutron waves if they pass through structured materials. Up to now the interaction of the neutron spin with magnetic fields in samples has not been applied to imaging techniques despite the fact that it was proposed many years ago. About ten years ago neutron depolarization as imaging signal for neutron radiography or tomography was demonstrated and in principle it works. Now one can present much improved test experiments using polarized neutrons for radiographic imaging. For this purpose the CONRAD instrument of the HMI was equipped with polarizing and analysing benders very similar to conventional scattering experiments using polarized neutrons. Magnetic fields in different coils and in samples (superconductors) at low temperatures could be visualized. In this lecture a summary about standard signals (attenuation) and the more `sophisticated' imaging signals as refraction, small angle scattering and polarized neutrons will be given.

  1. 肝硬化上消化道出血患者反复入院体验的质性研究%Qualitative research on repeated hospitalization experiences in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟园; 牛小霞; 李亚; 王乔敏; 皮红英

    2016-01-01

    目的:了解肝硬化上消化道出血患者的反复入院体验,分析其影响因素。方法采用质性研究中的现象学研究方法,对某三级甲等传染病医院10例有反复入院经历的肝硬化上消化道出血患者进行访谈,采用Colaizzi 7步分析法对资料进行分析、归纳、提炼。结果通过对资料的分析、归纳、提炼,得出以下5个主题:疾病反复发作是导致患者反复入院的主要原因,其他还包括:对疾病的认知存在不足,疾病的管理压力大,需要强大的社会支持系统,反复住院造成心理压力加大。结论医护人员应提高业务素质的培养,加强对肝硬化上消化道出血患者的健康宣教及院外生活方式的干预,给予有针对性的心理护理,提高患者对疾病的认知程度和自我管理能力,减轻患者的疾病管理压力,从而减少患者的再入院率。%Objective To understand the experiences of repeated hospitalization in liver cirrhosis patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and analyze its influencing factors. Methods By using the qualitative phenomenological research methodology,10 patients who had liver cirrhosis with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and had experiences of repeated hospitalization were selected and the in-depth interview were conducted. The results were analyzed, concluded and refined with Colaizzz′s seven steps of phenomenological analysis. Results By means of analysis, induction and distilling, 5 themes were addressed including recurrent disease causing as the main reasons for repeated hospitalization, cognitive shortcomings of disease, high pressure of the management of the disease, needing a strong social support system, and repeated hospitalization causing psychological pressure increase. Conclusions Medical staff should improve the cultivation of professional quality, strengthen the intervention on health education and outside the hospital way of life in liver

  2. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  3. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  4. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  5. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  6. Small-angle scattering computed tomography (SAS-CT) using a Talbot-Lau interferometerand a rotating anode x-ray tube:theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Qi, Zhihua

    2010-06-01

    X-ray differential phase contrast imaging methods, including projection imaging and the corresponding computed tomography (CT), have been implemented using a Talbot interferometer and either a synchrotron beam line or a low brilliance x-ray source generated by a stationary-anode x-ray tube. From small-angle scattering events which occur as an x-ray propagates through a medium, a signal intensity loss can be recorded and analyzed for an understanding of the micro-structures in an image object. This has been demonstrated using a Talbot-Lau interferometer and a stationary-anode x-ray tube. In this paper, theoretical principles and an experimental implementation of the corresponding CT imaging method are presented. First, a line integral is derived from analyzing the cross section of the small-angle scattering events. This method is referred to as small-angle scattering computed tomography (SAS-CT). Next, a Talbot-Lau interferometer and a rotating-anode x-ray tube were used to implement SAS-CT. A physical phantom and human breast tissue sample were used to demonstrate the reconstructed SAS-CT image volumes.

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  10. Compressed sensing electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, Rowan, E-mail: rkl26@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Holland, Daniel J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    The recent mathematical concept of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that a small number of well-chosen measurements can suffice to reconstruct signals that are amenable to sparse or compressible representation. In addition to powerful theoretical results, the principles of CS are being exploited increasingly across a range of experiments to yield substantial performance gains relative to conventional approaches. In this work we describe the application of CS to electron tomography (ET) reconstruction and demonstrate the efficacy of CS–ET with several example studies. Artefacts present in conventional ET reconstructions such as streaking, blurring of object boundaries and elongation are markedly reduced, and robust reconstruction is shown to be possible from far fewer projections than are normally used. The CS–ET approach enables more reliable quantitative analysis of the reconstructions as well as novel 3D studies from extremely limited data. - Highlights: • Compressed sensing (CS) theory and its application to electron tomography (ET) is described. • The practical implementation of CS–ET is outlined and its efficacy demonstrated with examples. • High fidelity tomographic reconstruction is possible from a small number of images. • The CS–ET reconstructions can be more reliably segmented and analysed quantitatively. • CS–ET is applicable to different image content by choice of an appropriate sparsifying transform.

  11. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  12. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous trephine removal of the nidus in osteoid osteoma patients: experience of a single center in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrilli, Marcelo; Senerchia, Andreza Almeida; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Garcia Filho, Reynaldo Jesus, E-mail: andrezasenerchia@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Oncologia Pediatrica

    2015-07-15

    Objective: to report the results of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous resection of the nidus in 18 cases of osteoid osteoma. Materials and methods: the medical records of 18 cases of osteoid osteoma in children, adolescents and young adults, who underwent CT-guided removal of the nidus between November, 2004 and March, 2009 were reviewed retrospectively for demographic data, lesion site, clinical outcome and complications after procedure. Results: clinical follow-up was available for all cases at a median of 29 months (range 6-60 months). No persistence of pre-procedural pain was noted on 17 patients. Only one patient experienced recurrence of symptoms 12 months after percutaneous resection, and was successfully retreated by the same technique, resulting in a secondary success rate of 18/18 (100%). Conclusion: CT-guided removal or destruction of the nidus is a safe and effective alternative to surgical resection of the osteoid osteoma nidus. (author)

  13. Influence of image acquisition settings on radiation dose and image quality in coronary angiography by 320-detector volume computed tomography: the CORE320 pilot experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Arbab-Zadeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of image acquisition settings and patients’ characteristics on image quality and radiation dose for coronary angiography by 320-row computed tomography (CT. CORE320 is a prospective study to investigate the diagnostic performance of 320-detector CT for detecting coronary artery disease and associated myocardial ischemia. A run-in phase in 65 subjects was conducted to test the adequacy of the computed tomography angiography (CTA acquisition protocol. Tube current, exposure window, and number of cardiac beats per acquisition were adjusted according to subjects’ gender, heart rate, and body mass index (BMI. Main outcome measures were image quality, assessed by contrast/noise measurements and qualitatively on a 4-point scale, and radiation dose, estimated by the dose-length-product. Average heart rate at image acquisition was 55.0±7.3 bpm. Median Agatston calcium score was 27.0 (interquartile range 1-330. All scans were prospectively triggered. Single heart beat image acquisition was obtained in 61 of 65 studies (94%. Sixty-one studies (94% and 437 of 455 arterial segments (96% were of diagnostic image quality. Estimated radiation dose was significantly greater in obese (5.3±0.4 mSv than normal weight (4.6±0.3 mSv or overweight (4.7±0.3 mSv subjects (P<0.001. BMI was the strongest factor influencing image quality (odds ratio=1.457, P=0.005. The CORE320 CTA image acquisition protocol achieved a good balance between image quality and radiation dose for a 320-detector CT system. However, image quality in obese subjects was reduced compared to normal weight subjects, possibly due to tube voltage/current restrictions mandated by the study protocol.

  14. The Choroid and Optical Coherence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Taha Sezer; Muhammet Altınışık; İbrahim Arif Koytak

    2016-01-01

    The choroid is the most vascular tissue in the eye and it plays an important role in the pathophysiology of various common chorioretinal diseases such as central serous retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and degenerative myopia. Quantitative assessment of the choroid has been quite challenging with traditional imaging modalities such as indocyanine green angiography and ultrasonography due to limited resolution and repeatability. With the advent of optical coherence tomography (OCT...

  15. The Physical Experiment Research in Laboratory of Cross-hole Electric Resistivity Tomography for Detecting Boulders%探测孤石高阻体的跨孔电阻率CT水槽物理模拟实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊超; 师学明; 万方方; 徐子东

    2012-01-01

    采用重庆奔腾数控技术研究所的WDJD-3型多功能数字直流激电仪,在电法实验室水槽内布设了探测孤石高阻体的跨孔电阻率CT法观测系统,进行了物理模型实验。物理模拟实验采用多种观测装置(二极、三极和四极装置),对采集到的数据进行反演成像,得到如下结论:①二极装置电阻率CT反演成像结果不能反映出高阻体的位置与大小;②三极装置CT反演成像结果能较好反映孤石高阻体的位置与大小;③四极装置电阻率CT反演成像也能反映出孤石高阻体的位置与规模,效果与三极装置基本相同。物理模拟实验结果表明:三极或四极装置的跨孔电阻率CT法可用于探测高阻体,它具有采集方式灵活、数据稳定可靠、成像结果直观清晰的优点。基于物理模拟实验的结果,采用电阻率CT法对地铁盾构隧道洞身范围内的孤石高阻体探测具有一定的指导意义。对孤石体的三维电阻率CT法物理模拟实验正在进一步研究中。%Using the WDJD-3 multi-functional digital DC instrument produced by Chongqing Bunting Digital Control Technical Institute, we design the observing system of cross-hole resistivity tomography to detect boulders in the laboratory, and take series of physical simulation experiments. Many arrays(cross-hole pole-pole, pole-bipole and bipole-bipole) are used in physical simulation experiments. The collected data is inversed by RES2DINV software and we get the following conclusions:(1) imaging results of pole-pole can’t reflect the position and size of high resistance body; (2) both imaging results of pole-dipole and dipole-dipole in standalone mode can clearly reflect the position and size of the high resistance body. The results of physical simulation experiments indicate that cross-hole resistivity tomography can be used to detect high-impedance body. The survey method is flexible acquisition, obtaining stable and reliable data

  16. Meaning of Interior Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The classic imaging geometry for computed tomography is for collection of un-truncated projections and reconstruction of a global image, with the Fourier transform as the theoretical foundation that is intrinsically non-local. Recently, interior tomography research has led to theoretically exact relationships between localities in the projection and image spaces and practically promising reconstruction algorithms. Initially, interior tomography was developed for x-ray computed tomography. Then, it has been elevated as a general imaging principle. Finally, a novel framework known as omni-tomography is being developed for grand fusion of multiple imaging modalities, allowing tomographic synchrony of diversified features.

  17. Radiation dose and imaging quality of abdominal computed tomography before and scan protocol adjustment: Single-institution experience in three years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hwi Young; Choi, Joon Il; Jung, Seung Eun; Rha, Seong Eun; Oh, Nam Soon; Lee, Young Joon; Byun, Jae Young [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To compare radiation dose and image quality of abdominal CT for patients who underwent repeated CT examinations before and after adjustment of scan protocol. We compared radiation dose and image quality of repeated abdominal CT scans (at three-year-interval) of 50 patients with chronic liver disease, 50 patients with early gastric cancer, and 50 patients with uterine cancer. To reduce radiation dose, we optimized CT protocols by omitting unnecessary pre-contrast phase, reducing kVp, and setting higher noise index. Data of dose reports were collected. Objective image quality was evaluated for noise level, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and contrast noise ratio (CNR). For subjective image quality, we evaluated image noise, contrast, and overall diagnostic acceptability. The mean values of dose length product of 2011 CT scans compared to those of 2008 CT scans were 27.6% to 45.7%. The image noise level, SNR, and CNR were significantly (p < 0.05) worse in 2011 CT scans compared to 2008 CT scans. For subjective image quality, image noise was also significantly (p < 0.05) worse in 2011. However, CNR and diagnostic acceptability showed variable results. No CT scans were considered as unacceptable image.We modified abdominal CT protocols to reduce radiation exposure while trying to maintain diagnostic acceptability.

  18. Experimental study of A0 Lamb wave tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seher, Matthias, E-mail: m.lowe@imperial.ac.uk; Huthwaite, Peter, E-mail: m.lowe@imperial.ac.uk; Lowe, Michael, E-mail: m.lowe@imperial.ac.uk; Cawley, Peter, E-mail: m.lowe@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-31

    Corrosion damage in inaccessible regions presents a significant challenge to the petrochemical industry, and determining the remaining wall thickness is important to establish the remaining service life. Guided wave tomography is one solution and involves transmitting Lamb waves through the area of interest and using the received signals to reconstruct the remaining wall thickness. This avoids the need to access all points on the surface, making the technique well suited to inspection beneath supports. For this purpose a tomography system for pipe inspections is developed using low frequency A0 Lamb waves that are excited and detected with two arrays of electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs). Two different defect depths are considered with different contrasts relative to the nominal wall thickness and in a first step, the repeatability of the measurements is demonstrated. Due to the limited view array configuration, the maximum depth of the reconstruction underestimates the true depth. In a second experimental study, the influence of a pipe clamp on the thickness reconstruction is considered, representing an inspection problem with restricted access. Preliminary results have shown that the maximum defect depth is further underestimated when compared to the thickness reconstructions without the clamp. However, it is possible to detect the defect underneath the clamp for all conducted experiments.

  19. SU-E-I-52: Validation of Multi-Frequency Electrical Impedance Tomography Using Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohli, K; Liu, F; Krishnan, K [BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, BC (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Multi-frequency EIT has been reported to be a potential tool in distinguishing a tissue anomaly from background. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of acquiring functional information by comparing multi-frequency EIT images in reference to the structural information from the CT image through fusion. Methods: EIT data was acquired from a slice of winter melon using sixteen electrodes around the phantom, injecting a current of 0.4mA at 100, 66, 24.8 and 9.9 kHz. Differential EIT images were generated by considering different combinations of pair frequencies, one serving as reference data and the other as test data. The experiment was repeated after creating an anomaly in the form of an off-centered cavity of diameter 4.5 cm inside the melon. All EIT images were reconstructed using Electrical Impedance Tomography and Diffuse Optical Tomography Reconstruction Software (EIDORS) package in 2-D differential imaging mode using one-step Gaussian Newton minimization solver. CT image of the melon was obtained using a Phillips CT Scanner. A segmented binary mask image was generated based on the reference electrode position and the CT image to define the regions of interest. The region selected by the user was fused with the CT image through logical indexing. Results: Differential images based on the reference and test signal frequencies were reconstructed from EIT data. Result illustrated distinct structural inhomogeneity in seeded region compared to fruit flesh. The seeded region was seen as a higherimpedance region if the test frequency was lower than the base frequency in the differential EIT reconstruction. When the test frequency was higher than the base frequency, the signal experienced less electrical impedance in the seeded region during the EIT data acquisition. Conclusion: Frequency-based differential EIT imaging can be explored to provide additional functional information along with structural information from CT for identifying different tissues.

  20. Interaction between short fatigue cracks and grain boundaries. Systematic experiments with focussed ion beam microscope and microstructural tomography; Ueber die Wechselwirkung kurzer Ermuedungsrisse mit Korngrenzen. Systematische Experimente mit Focussed Ion Beam Microscope und mikrostruktureller Tomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaef, Wolfgang

    2011-04-15

    Increasing the microstructural resistance of metallic materials to short fatigue crack growth is a major task of today's materials science. In this regard, grain boundaries and precipitates are well known to decelerate short cracks, but a quantitative understanding of the blocking effect is still missing. This is due to the fact that crack deceleration is influenced by many parameters: cyclic load, crack length, distance to obstacles, orientations of grains and obstacles. Even the examination of a huge number of short cracks would not be sufficient to identify the effect of these parameters independently, especially since fatigue crack growth is a 3D problem and investigations of the sub surface orientation of cracks and grain boundaries are scarce. The Focused Ion Beam Microscope (FIB) offers new methods for systematic experiments and 3D-investigation of short fatigue cracks that will help to quantify the microstructural impact on short fatigue crack growth. The ion beam is used to cut micro notches in selected grains on the surface of samples characterised by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). Plane fatigue cracks initiate under cyclic loading in defined distances to the grain boundaries. By this technique it is possible for the first time to present quantitative data to describe the effect of grain boundaries on short fatigue cracks in nickel based superalloys (CMSX-4) as well as in mild steels.

  1. Remarkable selective constraints on exonic dinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2014-09-01

    Long dinucleotide repeats found in exons present a substantial mutational hazard: mutations at these loci occur often and generate frameshifts. Here, we provide clear and compelling evidence that exonic dinucleotides experience strong selective constraint. In humans, only 18 exonic dinucleotides have repeat lengths greater than six, which contrasts sharply with the genome-wide distribution of dinucleotides. We genotyped each of these dinucleotides in 200 humans from eight 1000 Genomes Project populations and found a near-absence of polymorphism. More remarkably, divergence data demonstrate that repeat lengths have been conserved across the primate phylogeny in spite of what is likely considerable mutational pressure. Coalescent simulations show that even a very low mutation rate at these loci fails to explain the anomalous patterns of polymorphism and divergence. Our data support two related selective constraints on the evolution of exonic dinucleotides: a short-term intolerance for any change to repeat length and a long-term prevention of increases to repeat length. In general, our results implicate purifying selection as the force that eliminates new, deleterious mutants at exonic dinucleotides. We briefly discuss the evolution of the longest exonic dinucleotide in the human genome--a 10 x CA repeat in fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1)--that should possess a considerably greater mutation rate than any other exonic dinucleotide and therefore generate a large number of deleterious variants. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  3. Sensitivity of endoscopic ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in the diagnosis of pancreas divisum: a tertiary center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vladimir M; Wani, Sachin B; Fowler, Kathryn; Menias, Christine; Varma, Rakesh; Narra, Vamsi; Hovis, Christine; Murad, Faris M; Mullady, Daniel K; Jonnalagadda, Sreenivasa S; Early, Dayna S; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Azar, Riad R

    2013-04-01

    There are limited data comparing imaging modalities in the diagnosis of pancreas divisum. We aimed to: (1) evaluate the sensitivity of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for pancreas divisum; and (2) assess interobserver agreement (IOA) among expert radiologists for detecting pancreas divisum on MDCT and MRCP. For this retrospective cohort study, we identified 45 consecutive patients with pancreaticobiliary symptoms and pancreas divisum established by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography who underwent EUS and cross-sectional imaging. The control group was composed of patients without pancreas divisum who underwent endoscopic retrograde pancreatography and cross-sectional imaging. The sensitivity of EUS for pancreas divisum was 86.7%, significantly higher than the sensitivity reported in the medical records for MDCT (15.5%) or MRCP (60%) (P pancreas divisum; IOA was moderate (κ = 0.43). Endoscopic ultrasound is a sensitive test for diagnosing pancreas divisum and is superior to MDCT and MRCP. Review of MDCT studies by expert radiologists substantially raises its sensitivity for pancreas divisum.

  4. SENSITIVITY OF ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND, MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTER TOMOGRAPHY AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE CHOLANGIOPANCREATOGRAPHY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF PANCREAS DIVISUM: A TERTIARY CENTER EXPERIENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vladimir M.; Wani, Sachin B.; Fowler, Kathryn; Menias, Christine; Varma, Rakesh; Narra, Vamsi; Hovis, Christine; Murad, Faris; Mullady, Daniel; Jonnalagadda, Sreenivasa S.; Early, Dayna S.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Azar, Riad R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES There are limited data comparing imaging modalities in the diagnosis of pancreas divisum. We aimed to: 1. Evaluate the sensitivity of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) for pancreas divisum. 2. Assess interobserver agreement (IOA) among expert radiologists for detecting pancreas divisum on MDCT and MRCP. METHODS For this retrospective cohort study, we identified 45 consecutive patients with pancreaticobiliary symptoms and pancreas divisum established by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) who underwent EUS and cross-sectional imaging. The control group was composed of patients without pancreas divisum who underwent ERP and cross-sectional imaging. RESULTS The sensitivity of EUS for pancreas divisum was 86.7%, significantly higher than sensitivity reported in the medical records for MDCT (15.5%) or MRCP (60%) [ppancreas divisum; IOA was moderate (қ=0.43). CONCLUSIONS EUS is a sensitive test for diagnosing pancreas divisum and is superior to MDCT and MRCP. Review of MDCT studies by expert radiologists substantially raises its sensitivity for pancreas divisum. PMID:23211370

  5. Multi-Electrode Resistivity Probe for Investigation of Local Temperature Inside Metal Shell Battery Cells via Resistivity: Experiments and Evaluation of Electrical Resistance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct Current (DC electrical resistivity is a material property that is sensitive to temperature changes. In this paper, the relationship between resistivity and local temperature inside steel shell battery cells (two commercial 10 Ah and 4.5 Ah lithium-ion cells is innovatively studied by Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT. The Schlumberger configuration in ERT is applied to divide the cell body into several blocks distributed in different levels, where the apparent resistivities are measured by multi-electrode surface probes. The investigated temperature ranges from −20 to 80 °C. Experimental results have shown that the resistivities mainly depend on temperature changes in each block of the two cells used and the function of the resistivity and temperature can be fitted to the ERT-measurement results in the logistical-plot. Subsequently, the dependence of resistivity on the state of charge (SOC is investigated, and the SOC range of 70%–100% has a remarkable impact on the resistivity at low temperatures. The proposed approach under a thermal cool down regime is demonstrated to monitor the local transient temperature.

  6. Unenhanced Computed Tomography to Visualize Hollow Viscera and/or Mesenteric Injury After Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Single-Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-Yang; Wei, Ming-Tian; Jin, Cheng-Wu; Wang, Meng; Wang, Zi-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    To identify and describe the major features of unenhanced computed tomography (CT) images of blunt hollow viscera and/or mesenteric injury (BHVI/MI) and to determine the value of unenhanced CT in the diagnosis of BHVI/MI. This retrospective study included 151 patients who underwent unenhanced CT before laparotomy for blunt abdominal trauma between January 2011 and December 2013. According to surgical observations, patients were classified as having BHVI/MI (n = 73) or not (n = 78). Sensitivity, specificity, P values, and likelihood ratios were calculated by comparing CT findings between the 2 groups. Six significant CT findings (P < 0.05) for BHVI/MI were identified and their sensitivity and specificity values determined, as follows: bowel wall thickening (39.7%, 96.2%), mesentery thickening (46.6%, 88.5%), mesenteric fat infiltration (12.3%, 98.7%), peritoneal fat infiltration (31.5%, 87.1%), parietal peritoneum thickening (30.1%, 85.9%), and intra- or retro-peritoneal air (34.2%, 96.2%). Unenhanced CT scan was useful as an initial assessment tool for BHVI/MI after blunt abdominal trauma. Six key features on CT were correlated with BHVI/MI.

  7. Evaluation of the accuracy and repeatability of the dual channel dual focus optical coherence tomography for the whole eye%双通道双焦点光学相干断层扫描仪的研制及其准确性和重复性检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨璇; 杨顺海; 冯旺强; 查屹; 郑海华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a custom-buih dual channel dual focus spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) instrument for imaging the whole eye in vivo,to demonstrate the feasibility and repeatability of this OCT instrument to measure anterior chamber depth and axial length compared to the IOLMaster.Methods In a cross-sectional self-control study,21 volunteers (39 eyes) without a history of ocular disease were enrolled.The anterior chamber depth (ACD) and total axial length (AL) were measured by the custom-built dual channel dual focus OCT and IOLMaster on the first day,and then by the OCT on the second day.The measurements of the two instruments were compared and the measurements with the OCT were compared for the 2 days.A paired t test,Pearson correlation analysis and Bland-Altman analysis were used for data analysis.Results The ocular surfaces from the cornea to the retina could be assessed with this newly built dual channel dual focus spectral domain OCT in real time.The mean and standard deviation of the real anterior chamber depth and total axial length measured by the OCT system were 3.09±0.20 mm and 25.34±0.64 mm,respectively.No significant differences were found in the measurements with OCT taken on different days (t=-1.648,1.129; P>0.05).The mean and standard deviation of the anterior chamber depth and total axial length measured by IOLMaster were 3.58±0.21 mm and 25.24±0.65 mm,respectively.The mean and standard deviation of the anterior chamber depth by OCT was 3.64±0.20 mm.There was a significant difference in measuring the anterior chamber depth and total axial length with the OCT and IOLMaster (t=12.942,8.984,P<0.05).There was a high correlation in anterior chamber depth (r=0.990,P<0.01) and total axial length (r=0.997,P<0.01) measurements by the 2 devices.The 95% LoA (limits of agreement) were +0.001 mm to +0.119 mm and-0.018 mm to +0.178 mm for measurements of ACD and AL by the OCT and IOLMaster.Conclusion Real-time whole eye

  8. Turbocharging Quantum Tomography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin J; Gamble, John King,; Nielsen, Erik; Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Scholten, Travis L.; Rudinger, Kenneth Michael

    2015-01-01

    Quantum tomography is used to characterize quantum operations implemented in quantum information processing (QIP) hardware. Traditionally, state tomography has been used to characterize the quantum state prepared in an initialization procedure, while quantum process tomography is used to characterize dynamical operations on a QIP system. As such, tomography is critical to the development of QIP hardware (since it is necessary both for debugging and validating as-built devices, and its results are used to influence the next generation of devices). But tomography su %7C ers from several critical drawbacks. In this report, we present new research that resolves several of these flaws. We describe a new form of tomography called gate set tomography (GST), which unifies state and process tomography, avoids prior methods critical reliance on precalibrated operations that are not generally available, and can achieve unprecedented accuracies. We report on theory and experimental development of adaptive tomography protocols that achieve far higher fidelity in state reconstruction than non-adaptive methods. Finally, we present a new theoretical and experimental analysis of process tomography on multispin systems, and demonstrate how to more e %7C ectively detect and characterize quantum noise using carefully tailored ensembles of input states.

  9. Turbocharging Quantum Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gamble, John King [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nielsen, Erik [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scholten, Travis L. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rudinger, Kenneth Michael [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Quantum tomography is used to characterize quantum operations implemented in quantum information processing (QIP) hardware. Traditionally, state tomography has been used to characterize the quantum state prepared in an initialization procedure, while quantum process tomography is used to characterize dynamical operations on a QIP system. As such, tomography is critical to the development of QIP hardware (since it is necessary both for debugging and validating as-built devices, and its results are used to influence the next generation of devices). But tomography suffers from several critical drawbacks. In this report, we present new research that resolves several of these flaws. We describe a new form of tomography called gate set tomography (GST), which unifies state and process tomography, avoids prior methods critical reliance on precalibrated operations that are not generally available, and can achieve unprecedented accuracies. We report on theory and experimental development of adaptive tomography protocols that achieve far higher fidelity in state reconstruction than non-adaptive methods. Finally, we present a new theoretical and experimental analysis of process tomography on multispin systems, and demonstrate how to more effectively detect and characterize quantum noise using carefully tailored ensembles of input states.

  10. Initial experience of using an iron-containing fiducial marker for radiotherapy of prostate cancer: Advantages in the visualization of markers in Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Iida, Takayoshi; Komeda, Hisao; Tamaki, Masayoshi; Seike, Kensaku; Kato, Daiki; Yokoyama, Takamasa; Hirose, Shigeki; Kawaguchi, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    Visualization of markers is critical for imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the size of the marker varies according to the imaging technique. While a large-sized marker is more useful for visualization in MRI, it results in artifacts on CT and causes substantial pain on administration. In contrast, a small-sized marker reduces the artifacts on CT but hampers MRI detection. Herein, we report a new ironcontaining marker and compare its utility with that of non-iron-containing markers. Five patients underwent CT/MRI fusion-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and the markers were placed by urologists. A Gold Anchor™ (GA; diameter, 0.28 mm; length, 10 mm) was placed using a 22G needle on the right side of the prostate. A VISICOIL™ (VIS; diameter, 0.35 mm; length, 10 mm) was placed using a 19G needle on the left side. MRI was performed using T2*-weighted imaging. Three observers evaluated and scored the visual qualities of the acquired images. The mean score of visualization was almost identical between the GA and VIS in radiography and cone-beam CT (Novalis Tx). The artifacts in planning CT were slightly larger using the GA than using the VIS. The visualization of the marker on MRI using the GA was superior to that using the VIS. In conclusion, the visualization quality of radiography, conebeam CT, and planning CT was roughly equal between the GA and VIS. However, the GA was more strongly visualized than was the VIS on MRI due to iron containing.

  11. Evaluation of a novel Seldinger-needle for computed tomography guided interventions: initial experiences; Evaluierung einer neuen Seldinger-Nadel fuer computertomografisch gesteuerte Interventionen: Erste Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumhans, C.; Mahnken, A.; Iwa, R.; Behrendt, F.F.; Sebastian, K.; Guenther, R.W.; Honnef, D. [Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2009-02-15

    To evaluate a new Seldinger puncture device for computed tomography-guided interventions under difficult conditions, to analyze applicability, and to investigate assets and drawbacks. From November 2007 to March 2008, we performed CT-guided interventions in 16 patients (7 women, 9 men; mean age 62 years old) using a new 20G-Seldinger needle (Sika-Med, Wiehl, Germany). This novel needle serves as a guide for many different interventional devices due to a guide wire welded on the proximal needle end. It allows continuous application of anesthesia via four tiny holes at the distal needle end until the region of interest is reached. Each intervention was subject to difficult interventional conditions. The indications for intervention were drainage (n = 7), Trucut biopsy of tumor (n = 8) and radiofrequency ablation (n = 1). Handling, success, advantages, drawbacks, complications and patient tolerance were noted after each procedure. A pain scale from 1 - 10 was used to grade the pain level during the intervention. All interventions were performed successfully and no severe complications were observed. Patient tolerance was very good resulting in a mean pain score of 2 {+-} 1. Regions with dangerous and difficult access were successfully reached with the new Seldinger needle in 15 of 16 cases by dilatation of the puncture tract and continuous administration of local anesthesia via the system. Furthermore, different devices such as Trucut systems and a drainage catheter were able to be inserted without complication via the needle. With a proximal removable luer-lock connection, liquid material was able to be aspirated in six cases. Under difficult interventional conditions, the use of a Seldinger needle as a reliable technique for CT-guided interventions can provide a safe and successful procedure. (orig.)

  12. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy for diagnosis of mediastinal mass lesions: Experience with 110 cases in two university hospitals in Isfahan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Masoud; Sarrami, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (PCNB) is a diagnostic technique for initial assessment of mediastinal mass lesions. This study was conducted to evaluate its diagnostic yield and its complication rate. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the records of CT-guided PCNB in 110 patients with mediastinal mass lesions performed in Kashani and Alzahra Hospitals, Isfahan, from 2006 to 2012. Gender, age at biopsy, size, and anatomic location of the lesion, number of passes, site of approach, complications, and final diagnosis were extracted. Results: Our series encompasses 52 (47.2%) females and 58 (52/7%) males with mean age of 41 ± 8 years. The most common site of involvement was the anterior mediastinum (91.8% of cases). An average of 3/5 passes per patient has been taken for tissue sampling. Parasternal site was the most frequent approach taken for PCNB (in 78.1% of cases). Diagnostic tissue was obtained in 99 (90%) biopsies while, in 11 (10%) cases, specimen materials were inadequate. Lymphoma (49.5%) and bronchogenic carcinoma (33.3%) were the most frequent lesions in our series. The overall complication rate was 17.2% from which 10.9% was pneumothorax, 5.4% was hemoptysis, and 0.9% was vasovagal reflex. Conclusion: CT-guided PCNB is a safe and reliable procedure that can provide a precise diagnosis for patients with both benign and malignant mediastinal masses, and it is considered the preferred first diagnostic procedure use for this purpose.

  13. Initial multicentre experience of high-speed myocardial perfusion imaging: comparison between high-speed and conventional single-photon emission computed tomography with angiographic validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neill, Johanne [University College London Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Prvulovich, Elizabeth M.; Bomanji, Jamshed B. [University College London Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Fish, Matthews B. [Sacred Heart Medical Center (SHMC), Springfield, OR (United States); Berman, Daniel S.; Slomka, Piotr J. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sharir, Tali [Procardia Maccabi Healthcare Services (PMHS), Tel Aviv (Israel); Martin, William H. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), Nashville, TN (United States); DiCarli, Marcelo F. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital (BWH), Boston, MA (United States); Ziffer, Jack A. [Baptist Hospital of Miami (BHM), Miami, FL (United States); Shiti, Dalia [Spectrum-Dynamics, Caesarea (Israel); Ben-Haim, Simona [University College London Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tel-Hashomer (Israel)

    2013-07-15

    High-speed (HS) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a recently developed solid-state camera shows comparable myocardial perfusion abnormalities to those seen in conventional SPECT. We aimed to compare HS and conventional SPECT images from multiple centres with coronary angiographic findings. The study included 50 patients who had sequential conventional SPECT and HS SPECT myocardial perfusion studies and coronary angiography within 3 months. Stress and rest perfusion images were visually analysed and scored semiquantitatively using a 17-segment model by two experienced blinded readers. Global and coronary territorial summed stress scores (SSS) and summed rest scores (SRS) were calculated. Global SSS {>=}3 or coronary territorial SSS {>=}2 was considered abnormal. In addition the total perfusion deficit (TPD) was automatically derived. TPD >5 % and coronary territorial TPD {>=}3 % were defined as abnormal. Coronary angiograms were analysed for site and severity of coronary stenosis; {>=}50 % was considered significant. Of the 50 patients, 13 (26 %) had no stenosis, 22 (44 %) had single-vessel disease, 6 (12 %) had double-vessel disease and 9 (18 %) had triple-vessel disease. There was a good linear correlation between the visual global SSS and SRS (Spearman's {rho} 0.897 and 0.866, respectively; p < 0.001). In relation to coronary angiography, the sensitivities, specificities and accuracies of HS SPECT and conventional SPECT by visual assessment were 92 % (35/38), 83 % (10/12) and 90 % (45/50) vs. 84 % (32/38), 50 % (6/12) and 76 % (38/50), respectively (p < 0.001). The sensitivities, specificities and accuracies of HS SPECT and conventional SPECT in relation to automated TPD assessment were 89 % (31/35), 57 % (8/14) and 80 % (39/49) vs. 86 % (31/36), 77 % (10/13) and 84 % (41/49), respectively. HS SPECT allows fast acquisition of myocardial perfusion images that correlate well with angiographic findings with overall accuracy by visual

  14. Positron emission tomography with 2-[18F]-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose for initial staging of hodgkin lymphoma: a single center experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Julio Cerci

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 2-[18F]-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (FDG-PET is a well established functional imaging modality for the initial staging of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL in patients from Western Europe and North America. The reliability of FDG-PET in populations of different ethnic groups is unclear, as all investigations published to date have come from developed countries. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of FDG-PET in the initial staging of HL patients in a Brazilian population. METHODS: Eighty-two patients with newly diagnosed HL were prospectively included in the study. All patients were staged with both conventional clinical staging (CCS methods, including computed tomography (CT and whole-body FDG-PET methods. A standard of reference for the nodal regions and the extranodal organs was determined using all available information, including the CCS methods, FDG-PET, the diagnostic histology and the follow-up examinations. The results of the CCS were then compared to the FDG-PET results. RESULTS: The sensitivity of FDG-PET was higher for nodal staging than that of CT (87.8% vs. 61.6%, respectively. FDG-PET was also more sensitive than CT in regard to evaluating the extranodal organs for lymphomatous involvement (96.2% vs. 40.0%, respectively. FDG-PET detected all 16 patients who were characterized by a positive bone marrow biopsy and identified an additional 4 patients with bone marrow disease. The incorporation of FDG-PET coupled with CCS in the staging procedure upstaged 20% (17/82 of the patients and downstaged 11% (9/82 of the patients. As a result of these changes in staging, 15% (13/82 of the patients would have received a different therapeutic regimen. CONCLUSIONS: The FDG-PET method is superior to CT for the detection of nodal and extra-nodal HL. The observation that the FDG-PET method upstaged the disease was the most common result (20% of patients brought about by the addition of PET to the staging algorithm

  15. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  16. Refractive index tomography based on optical coherence tomography and tomographic reconstruction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Takahiro; Nomura, Takanori

    2017-09-01

    Refractive index (RI) tomography based on not quantitative phase imaging (QPI) but optical coherence tomography (OCT) is proposed. In conventional RI tomography, the phase unwrapping process deteriorates measurement accuracy owing to the unwrapping error. To eliminate the unwrapping process, the introduction of OCT is proposed, because OCT directly provides optical thickness. The proposed method can improve measurement accuracy owing to the removal of the phase unwrapping error. The feasibility of the method is confirmed by numerical simulations and optical experiments. These results show that the proposed method can reduce measurement errors even when an object shows phase changes much larger than a wavelength.

  17. Repeated computed tomography scanning in assessing the change of tumor bed volume during whole breast irradiation in early-stage breast cancer after breast conservative surgery%早期乳腺癌保乳术后全乳放疗中瘤床体积变化的CT评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨昭志; 蔡钢; 潘自强; 陈佳艺; 郭小毛; 俞晓立; 章倩; 梅欣; 李炯雁

    2010-01-01

    目的 用重复定位CT评价早期乳腺癌保乳术后放疗中瘤床体积变化规律,分析不同CT上进行瘤床加量计划的剂量学差异.方法 2008-2009年共收集早期乳腺癌保乳术后放疗患者16例,放疗均采用全乳放疗和瘤床加量.患者均接受了3次CT扫描,分别为放疗前(CT1,常规全乳放疗计划CT)、放疗中(CT2)、瘤床加量前(CT3).在3次CT上勾画瘤床.在CT1和CT3上进行三维适形瘤床加量计划并分析剂量体积直方图.结果 CT1、CT2、CT3瘤床平均体积分别为49.5、25.6、22.2 cm3(F=5.63,P=0.007),CT1的>CT2(q=0.03,P=0.010)和CT3的(q=0.01,P=0.004),CT3与CT2的相似(q=1.00,P=0.333).CT3总体积平均下降43.4%,其中下降>20%的占88%(14例)、>50%的占38%(6例).CT1、CT3上患侧乳腺内接受100%处方剂量的平均体积分别为183.5、144.5 cm3(t=3.06,P=0.008).结论 早期乳腺癌保乳术后放疗患者放疗中瘤床体积以放疗后的早期变化显著,在瘤床加量前重新CT扫描进行三维适形瘤床加量计划是合理的.%Objective To determine the change of tumor bed volume during whole breast irradiation by repeated computed tomography scanning and to analyze the dosimetric impact of boost-planning on different CT images. Methods From July 2008 to Jan 2009, sixteen patients with early-stage breast cancer underwent breast conservative surgery (BCS) were enrolled in the study. All patients received whole breast irradiation and tumor bed boost, no adjuvant chemotherapy was given. Two additional CT scans were acquired in addition to the planning CT ( CT1 ), one in the course of radiotherapy ( CT2 ) and the other before the boost (CT3). Tumor beds were contoured in all CT images. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning for tumor bed boost was done on CT1 and CT3 respectively. Results The mean tumor bed volume on CT1, CT2 and CT3 were 49.5 cm3, 25.6 cm3 and 22. 2 cm3 ( F = 5. 63, P = 0. 007 ),respectively. Further analysis found statistically

  18. History repeats itself: genomic divergence in copepods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaut, Sébastien; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie

    2016-04-01

    Press stop, erase everything from now till some arbitrary time in the past and start recording life as it evolves once again. Would you see the same tape of life playing itself over and over, or would a different story unfold every time? The late Steven Jay Gould called this experiment replaying the tape of life and argued that any replay of the tape would lead evolution down a pathway radically different from the road actually taken (Gould 1989). This thought experiment has puzzled evolutionary biologists for a long time: how repeatable are evolutionary events? And if history does indeed repeat itself, what are the factors that may help us predict the path taken? A powerful means to address these questions at a small evolutionary scale is to study closely related populations that have evolved independently, under similar environmental conditions. This is precisely what Pereira et al. (2016) set out to do using marine copepods Tigriopus californicus, and present their results in this issue of Molecular Ecology. They show that evolution can be repeatable and even partly predictable, at least at the molecular level. As expected from theory, patterns of divergence were shaped by natural selection. At the same time, strong genetic drift due to small population sizes also constrained evolution down a similar evolutionary road, and probably contributed to repeatable patterns of genomic divergence.

  19. Tomography of nonclassical states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazrafkan, MR; Man'ko, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    A review of the symplectic tomography method is presented. Superpositions of different types of photon states are considered within the framework of the tomography approach. Such nonclassical photon states as even and odd coherent states, crystallized Schrodinger cat states, and other superposition

  20. Tomography of nonclassical states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazrafkan, MR; Man'ko, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    A review of the symplectic tomography method is presented. Superpositions of different types of photon states are considered within the framework of the tomography approach. Such nonclassical photon states as even and odd coherent states, crystallized Schrodinger cat states, and other superposition

  1. Optical Doppler tomography and spectral Doppler imaging of localized ischemic stroke in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Nguyen, Elaine; Liu, Gangjun; Rao, Bin; Choi, Bernard; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    We present a combined optical Doppler tomography/spectral Doppler imaging modality to quantitatively evaluate the dynamic blood circulation and the artery blockage before and after a localized ischemic stroke in a mouse model. Optical Doppler Tomography (ODT) combines the Doppler principle with optical coherence tomography for noninvasive localization and measurement of particle flow velocity in highly scattering media with micrometer scale spatial resolution. Spectral Doppler imaging (SDI) provides complementary temporal flow information to the spatially distributed flow information of Doppler imaging. Fast, repeated, ODT scans across an entire vessel were performed to record flow dynamic information with high temporal resolution of cardiac cycles. Spectral Doppler analysis of continuous Doppler images demonstrates how the velocity components and longitudinally projected flow-volume-rate change over time for scatters within the imaging volume using spectral Doppler waveforms. Furthermore, vascular conditions can be quantified with various Doppler-angle-independent flow indices. Non-invasive in-vivo mice experiments were performed to evaluate microvascular blood circulation of a localized ischemic stroke mouse model.

  2. It was nice with the brick so now I'll click: The effects of offline and online experience, perceived benefits, and trust on Dutch consumers' online repeat purchase intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beldad, Ardion Daroca; Segers, Mariel; Kurosu, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the factors influencing Dutch consumers’ intention to continue purchasing from a brick-and-click clothes shop’s online channel after an initial commercial exchange. Results on the online survey with 513 respondents reveal that their repeat online purchase intention is

  3. It was nice with the brick so now I'll click: The effects of offline and online experience, perceived benefits, and trust on Dutch consumers' online repeat purchase intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beldad, Ardion; Segers, Mariel; Kurosu, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the factors influencing Dutch consumers’ intention to continue purchasing from a brick-and-click clothes shop’s online channel after an initial commercial exchange. Results on the online survey with 513 respondents reveal that their repeat online purchase intention is

  4. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  5. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  6. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  7. [Diagnosis of toxic lesions of the brain using computerized tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushev, I I; Karpova, M N; Tskhovrebov, T M

    1990-01-01

    X-ray computerized tomography was used to examine the brain in 39 patients aged 14 to 39 years with different experience of using volatile narcotically acting substances. The discovered alterations make it possible to appraise the influence of toxic substances and the degree of brain atrophy, which attests to the diagnostic value of computerized tomography in patients with toxicomanias.

  8. Local electrode atom probe tomography a user's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Larson, David J; Ulfig, Robert M; Geiser, Brian P; Kelly, Thomas F; Humphreys, Professor Sir Colin J

    2014-01-01

    The first single-source reference to all the major features of LEAP tomography, this volume includes a wealth of practical tips and covers all four core aspects of a LEAP tomography experiment from start to finish, as well as the software methods employed.

  9. Repeated vitrification/warming of human sperm gives better results than repeated slow programmable freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teraporn Vutyavanich; Worashorn Lattiwongsakorn; Waraporn Piromlertamorn; Sudarat Samchimchom

    2012-01-01

    In this study,we compared the effects of repeated freezing/thawing of human sperm by our in-house method of rapid freezing with slow programmable freezing.Sperm samples from 11 normozoospermic subjects were processed through density gradients and divided into three aliquots:non-frozen,rapid freezing and slow programmable freezing.Sperm in the rapid freezing group had better motility and viability than those in the slow freezing group (P<O.01) after the first,second and third cycles of freezing/thawing,but there was no difference in morphology.In the second experiment,rapid freezing was repeated three times in 20 subjects.The samples from each thawing cycle were evaluated for DNA fragmentation using the alkaline comet assay.DNA fragmentation began to increase considerably after the second cycle of freezing/thawing,but to a level that was not clinically important.In the third experiment,rapid freezing was done repeatedly in 10 subjects,until no motile sperm were observed after thawing.The median number of repeated freezing/thawing that yielded no motile sperm was seven (range:5-8,mean:6.8).In conclusion,we demonstrated that repeated freezing/thawing of processed semen using our rapid freezing method gave better results than standard slow programmable freezing.This method can help maximize the usage of precious cryopreserved sperm samples in assisted reproduction technology.

  10. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  11. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  12. Coronary computed tomography angiography with 320-row detector and using the AIDR-3D: initial experience; Angiotomografia computadorizada de coronarias com tomografo com 320 fileiras de detectores e utilizando o AIDR-3D: experiencia inicial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasdelli Neto, Roberto; Nomura, Cesar Higa; Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Bianco, Danilo Perussi; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Szarf, Gilberto; Teles, Gustavo Borges da Silva; Shoji, Hamilton; Santana Netto, Pedro Vieira; Passos, Rodrigo Bastos Duarte; Chate, Rodrigo Caruso; Ishikawa, Walther Yoshiharu; Lima, Joao Paulo Bacellar Costa; Rocha, Marcelo Assis; Marcos, Vinicius Neves; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao, E-mail: roberto.neto@einstein.br [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Failla, Bruna Bonaventura [Universidade Metodista de Sao Paulo, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA) is a powerful non-invasive imaging method to evaluate coronary artery disease. Nowadays, coronary CTA estimated effective radiation dose can be dramatically reduced using state-of-the-art scanners, such as 320-row detector CT (320-CT), without changing coronary CTA diagnostic accuracy. To optimize and further reduce the radiation dose, new iterative reconstruction algorithms were released recently by several CT manufacturers, and now they are used routinely in coronary CTA. This paper presents our first experience using coronary CTA with 320-CT and the Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D (AIDR-3D). In addition, we describe the current indications for coronary CTA in our practice as well as the acquisition standard protocols and protocols related to CT application for radiation dose reduction. In conclusion, coronary CTA radiation dose can be dramatically reduced following the 'as low as reasonable achievable' principle by combination of exam indication and well-documented technics for radiation dose reduction, such as beta blockers, low-kV, and also the newest iterative dose reduction software as AIDR-3D. (author)

  13. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  14. Towards Quantum Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisin, Nicolas

    2009-05-01

    The ultimate limit of direct point to point quantum key distribution is around 300-500 km. Longer distances fiber-based quantum communication will require both high-fidelity entanglement swapping and multi-mode quantum memories. A new protocol for an efficient multimode quantum memory based on atomic ensembles has been developed and demonstrated. The rare-earth ions ensemble is ``frozen'' in a crystal inside a cryostat. The protocol, named AFC (Atomic Frequency Comb) is inspired from photon echoes, but avoids any control light pulse after the single-photon(s) is (are) stored in the medium, thus avoiding any noise due to fluorescence. First results on the new protocol for quantum memories in Nd:YVO4 doped crystals demonstrate a quantum light-matter interface at the single-photon level. The coherence of the re-emitted photons is investigated in an interference experiment showing net visibilities above 95%. Further results in Nd:YSO (Geneva), Tm:YAG (Paris) and Pr:YSO (Lund) shall also be presented. Many hundreds of km long quantum communication is a long term objective. Many of the necessary building blocks have been demonstrated, but usually in independent experiments and with insufficient fidelities and specifications to meet the goal. Still, today's the roadmap is relatively clear and a lot of interesting physics shall be found along the journey.

  15. On balanced minimal repeated measurements designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeel Ahmad Mir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated Measurements designs are concerned with scientific experiments in which each experimental unit is assigned more than once to a treatment either different or identical. This class of designs has the property that the unbiased estimators for elementary contrasts among direct and residual effects are obtainable. Afsarinejad (1983 provided a method of constructing balanced Minimal Repeated Measurements designs p < t , when t is an odd or prime power, one or more than one treatment may occur more than once in some sequences and  designs so constructed no longer remain uniform in periods. In this paper an attempt has been made to provide a new method to overcome this drawback. Specifically, two cases have been considered                RM[t,n=t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=1 for balanced minimal repeated measurements designs and  RM[t,n=2t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=2 for balanced  repeated measurements designs. In addition , a method has been provided for constructing              extra-balanced minimal designs for special case RM[t,n=t2/(p-1,p], λ2=1.

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the area of interest to reduce the ... Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the area of interest to reduce the ... Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... contrast materials and a metallic taste in your mouth that lasts for at most a minute or ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... contrast materials and a metallic taste in your mouth that lasts for at most a minute or ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  7. Polarization tomography of metallic nanohole arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altewischer, E.; Genet, C.; Van Exter, M.P.; Woerdman, J.P.; Alkemade, P.F.A.; Van Zuuk, A.; Van der Drift, E.W.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    We report polarization tomography experiments on metallic nanohole arrays with square and hexagonal symmetry. As a main result we find that a fully polarized input beam is partly depolarized after transmission through a nanohole array. This loss of polarization coherence is found to be anisotropic;

  8. 4D Electron Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional (3D) imaging of noncrystalline and crystalline equilibrium structures, as well as elemental volume composition, of materials and biological specimens, including those of viruses and cells. We report the development of 4D electron tomography by integrating the fourth dimension (time resolution) with the 3D spatial resolution obtained from a complete tilt series of 2D projections of an object. The different time frames of tomograms constitute a mov...

  9. Fan tomography of the tropospheric water vapor for the calibration of the Ka band tracking of the Bepi-Colombo spacecraft (MORE experiment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriot, Jean-Pierre; Serafini, Jonathan; Sichoix, Lydie

    2012-07-01

    The radiosciences Bepi-Colombo MORE experiment will use X/X, X/Ka and Ka/Ka band radio links to make accurate measurements of the spacecraft range and range rate. Tropospheric zenith wet delays range from 1.5 cm to 10 cm, with high variability (less than 1000 s) and will impair these accurate measurements. Conditions vary from summer (worse) to winter (better), from day (worse) to night (better). These wet delays cannot be estimated from ground weather measurements and alternative calibration methods should be used in order to cope with the MORE requirements (no more than 3 mm at 1000 s). Due to the Mercury orbit, MORE measurements will be performed by daylight and more frequently in summer than in winter (from Northern hemisphere). Two systems have been considered to calibrate this wet delay: Water Vapour Radiometers (WVRs) and GPS receivers. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a new class of WVRs reaching a 5 percent accuracy for the wet delay calibration (0.75 mm to 5 mm), but these WVRs are expensive to build and operate. GPS receivers are also routinely used for the calibration of data from NASA Deep Space probes, but several studies have shown that GPS receivers can give good calibration (through wet delay mapping functions) for long time variations, but are not accurate enough for short time variations (100 to 1000 s), and that WVRs must be used to efficiently calibrate the wet troposphere delays over such time spans. We think that such a calibration could be done by assimilating data from all the GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou and IRNSS) that will be available at the time of the Bepi-Colombo arrival at Mercury (2021), provided that the underlying physics of the turbulent atmosphere and evapotranspiration processes are properly taken into account at such time scales. This implies to do a tomographic image of the troposphere overlying each Deep Space tracking station at time scales of less than 1000 s. For this purpose, we have

  10. The creation repeated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Chodakowska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Szymon Wróbel’s considerations are situated at the intersection of philosophy, psychoanalysis and politics. The author uses the term “retroactivity” (nachträglich, known from the writings of Freud, to describe the way in which the individual transforms experiences from the past in their memory, reworks them, and gives them a new meaning, congruent with current needs and expectations. This also applies to reading, each of which fits in the project which the reader realises. Lektury retroaktywne (Retroactive readings is a constant and often surprising clash of many different - authors’ concepts, regardless of their origins: a game of questions and answers challenged immediately by new questions. This philosophy must be a dialogue – hence its dramatic nature. Wróbel recalls, confronts and deconstructs the texts of such thinkers as Thucydides, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Nietzsche, Foucault, Levi-Strauss, Chomsky and Piaget. He also acquaints the reader with significant diagnoses of philosophers associated with speculative realism.

  11. Mononucleotide repeats are asymmetrically distributed in fungal genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Graaff Leo H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic analyses of sequence features have resulted in a better characterisation of the organisation of the genome. A previous study in prokaryotes on the distribution of sequence repeats, which are notoriously variable and can disrupt the reading frame in genes, showed that these motifs are skewed towards gene termini, specifically the 5' end of genes. For eukaryotes no such intragenic analysis has been performed, though this could indicate the pervasiveness of this distribution bias, thereby helping to expose the selective pressures causing it. Results In fungal gene repertoires we find a similar 5' bias of intragenic mononucleotide repeats, most notably for Candida spp., whereas e.g. Coccidioides spp. display no such bias. With increasing repeat length, ever larger discrepancies are observed in genome repertoire fractions containing such repeats, with up to an 80-fold difference in gene fractions at repeat lengths of 10 bp and longer. This species-specific difference in gene fractions containing large repeats could be attributed to variations in intragenic repeat tolerance. Furthermore, long transcripts experience an even more prominent bias towards the gene termini, with possibly a more adaptive role for repeat-containing short transcripts. Conclusion Mononucleotide repeats are intragenically biased in numerous fungal genomes, similar to earlier studies on prokaryotes, indicative of a similar selective pressure in gene organization.

  12. Repeat Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonneville, Sarah; Delbrouck, Carine; Renier, Cécile; Devriendt, Daniel; Massager, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gamma Knife (GK) surgery is a recognized treatment option for the management of small to medium-sized vestibular schwannoma (VS) associated with high-tumor control and low morbidity. When a radiosurgical treatment fails to stop tumor growth, repeat GK surgery can be proposed in selected cases. Methods: A series of 27 GK retreatments was performed in 25 patients with VS; 2 patients underwent three procedures. The median time interval between GK treatments was 45 months. The median margin dose used for the first, second, and third GK treatments was 12 Gy, 12 Gy, and 14 Gy, respectively. Six patients (4 patients for the second irradiation and 2 patients for the third irradiation) with partial tumor regrowth were treated only on the growing part of the tumor using a median margin dose of 13 Gy. The median tumor volume was 0.9, 2.3, and 0.7 cc for the first, second, and third treatments, respectively. Stereotactic positron emission tomography (PET) guidance was used for dose planning in 6 cases. Results: Mean follow-up duration was 46 months (range 24–110). At the last follow-up, 85% of schwannomas were controlled. The tumor volume decreased, remained unchanged, or increased after retreatment in 15, 8, and 4 cases, respectively. Four patients had PET during follow-up, and all showed a significant metabolic decrease of the tumor. Hearing was not preserved after retreatment in any patients. New facial or trigeminal palsy did not occur after retreatment. Conclusions: Our results support the long-term efficacy and low morbidity of repeat GK treatment for selected patients with tumor growth after initial treatment. PMID:26500799

  13. Analysis of repeated measures data

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M Ataharul

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad range of statistical techniques to address emerging needs in the field of repeated measures. It also provides a comprehensive overview of extensions of generalized linear models for the bivariate exponential family of distributions, which represent a new development in analysing repeated measures data. The demand for statistical models for correlated outcomes has grown rapidly recently, mainly due to presence of two types of underlying associations: associations between outcomes, and associations between explanatory variables and outcomes. The book systematically addresses key problems arising in the modelling of repeated measures data, bearing in mind those factors that play a major role in estimating the underlying relationships between covariates and outcome variables for correlated outcome data. In addition, it presents new approaches to addressing current challenges in the field of repeated measures and models based on conditional and joint probabilities. Markov models of first...

  14. Learning with repeated-game strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Christos A; Romero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2 × 2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we find that the strategy with the most occurrences is the "Grim-Trigger." In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the "Win-Stay, Lose-Shift" and "Grim-Trigger" strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes.

  15. Learning With Repeated-Game Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Ioannou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2x2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we fi□nd that the strategy with the most occurrences is the Grim-Trigger. In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the Win-Stay, Lose-Shift and Grim-Trigger strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes.

  16. Towards multimodal nonlinear optical tomography - experimental methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, N.; Medyukhina, A.; Latka, I.; Kemper, S.; Böhm, M.; Dietzek, B.; Popp, J.

    2011-08-01

    All-optical microspectroscopic and tomographic tools reveal great potential for clinical dermatologic diagnostics, i.e., investigation of human skin and skin diseases. While optical-coherence tomography has been complemented by two-photon fluorescence tomography and second-harmonic generation tomography, a joint study of various nonlinear optical microspectroscopies, i.e., application of the recently developed multimodal imaging approach, to sizable human-tissue samples has not been evaluated up to now. Here, we present such multimodal approach combining different nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms for imaging, namely two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), second-harmonic generation (SHG), and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) into a joint microscopic experiment. We show the potential of imaging large skin areas and discuss the information obtained in a case study comparing normal skin and keloid tissue.

  17. Tomografia por emissão de pósitrons (PET no tórax: resultados preliminares de uma experiência brasileira Thoracic positron emission tomography: preliminary results of a Brazilian experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÁRIO TERRA FILHO

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Novos métodos não invasivos estão sendo desenvolvidos para a detecção de neoplasias malignas pulmonares. Dentre estes destaca-se a tomografia por emissão de pósitrons (PET, que utiliza como radiotraçador a deoxi-2-D glicose marcada com fluor-18 (FDG. Objetivo: Avaliar os resultados do FDG-PET, realizado em câmara híbrida com circuito de coincidência em pacientes portadores de doenças pleuropulmonares infecciosas ou tumorais. Material e Métodos: Foram avaliados 15 pacientes divididos em: grupo I – 5 portadores de tuberculose pulmonar, e grupo II – 10 pacientes com possíveis neoplasias pleuropulmonares. Após a administração endovenosa de 185MBq de FDG as aquisições foram feitas em câmara de cintilação ADAC Vertex Plus de duas cabeças. Resultados: No grupo I todos os exames foram positivos. No grupo II, após o estabelecimento diagnóstico por toracotomia em nove e mediastinoscopia em um, observaram-se: dois adenocarcinomas, dois granulomas, um hamartoma, um mesotelioma, uma atelectasia redonda, um carcinoma indiferenciado de pequenas células, um carcinoma indiferenciado de grandes células, uma antracose. Os exames foram positivos em seis pacientes (cinco neoplasias malignas e em um caso de granuloma e negativos nos outros quatro. Conclusão: O FDG-PET realizado através de câmara híbrida produz imagens de boa qualidade que permitem a identificação de processos infecciosos em atividade. O FDG-PET associado ao quadro clínico/radiológico pode diferenciar as neoplasias pulmonares malignas das benignas.New non-invasive methods have been developed to detect lung malignancies. One of them is positron emission tomography (PET using 18F 2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG as a radiotracer. Objective: Evaluate the FDG-PET results performed through a hybrid coincidence–gamma camera in patients with pleuropulmonary infectious diseases or lung tumors. Material and methods: Fifteen patients were evaluated, and divided into: group I – five

  18. Investigation of a near-infrared-ray computed tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Satoi, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishii, Tomotaka; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2016-10-01

    In the near-infrared-ray computed tomography (NIR-CT) scanner, NIR rays are produced from a light-emitting diode (LED) and detected using an NIR phototransistor (PT). The wavelengths of the LED peak intensity and the PT high sensitivity in the data table are both 940 nm. The photocurrents flowing through the PTR are converted into voltages using an emitter-follower circuit, and the output voltages are sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter. The NIR projection curves for tomography are obtained by repeated linear scans and rotations of the object, and the scanning is conducted in both directions of its movement.

  19. 4D Electron Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-06-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional (3D) imaging of noncrystalline and crystalline equilibrium structures, as well as elemental volume composition, of materials and biological specimens, including those of viruses and cells. We report the development of 4D electron tomography by integrating the fourth dimension (time resolution) with the 3D spatial resolution obtained from a complete tilt series of 2D projections of an object. The different time frames of tomograms constitute a movie of the object in motion, thus enabling studies of nonequilibrium structures and transient processes. The method was demonstrated using carbon nanotubes of a bracelet-like ring structure for which 4D tomograms display different modes of motion, such as breathing and wiggling, with resonance frequencies up to 30 megahertz. Applications can now make use of the full space-time range with the nanometer-femtosecond resolution of ultrafast electron tomography.

  20. Limited Angle Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Kyung; Cho, Min Kook; Kim, Seong Sik [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In computed tomography (CT), many situations are restricted to obtain enough number of projections or views to avoid artifacts such as streaking and geometrical distortion in the reconstructed images. Speed of motion of an object to be imaged can limit the number of views. Cardiovascular imaging is a representative example. Size of an object can also limit the complete traverse motion or geometrical complexity can obscure to be imaged at certain range of angles. These situations are frequently met in industrial nondestructive testing and evaluation. Dental CT also suffers from similar situation because cervical spine causes less x-ray penetration from some directions such that the available information is not sufficient for standard reconstruction algorithms. The limited angle tomography is now greatly paid attention as a new genre in medical and industrial imaging, popularly known as digital tomosynthesis. In this study, we introduce a modified filtered backprojection method in limited angle tomography and demonstrate its application for the dental imaging.

  1. Practical Bayesian Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Granade, Christopher; Cory, D G

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Bayesian methods have been proposed as a solution to a wide range of issues in quantum state and process tomography. State-of- the-art Bayesian tomography solutions suffer from three problems: numerical intractability, a lack of informative prior distributions, and an inability to track time-dependent processes. Here, we solve all three problems. First, we use modern statistical methods, as pioneered by Husz\\'ar and Houlsby and by Ferrie, to make Bayesian tomography numerically tractable. Our approach allows for practical computation of Bayesian point and region estimators for quantum states and channels. Second, we propose the first informative priors on quantum states and channels. Finally, we develop a method that allows online tracking of time-dependent states and estimates the drift and diffusion processes affecting a state. We provide source code and animated visual examples for our methods.

  2. Exposing Students to Repeat Photography: Increasing Cultural Understanding on a Short-Term Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmons, Kelly K.; Brannstrom, Christian; Hurd, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, repeat photography has been used to analyze land cover change. This paper describes how repeat photography may be used as a tool to enhance the short-term study abroad experience by facilitating cultural interaction and understanding. We present evidence from two cases and suggest a five-step repeat photography method for educators…

  3. Exposing Students to Repeat Photography: Increasing Cultural Understanding on a Short-Term Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmons, Kelly K.; Brannstrom, Christian; Hurd, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, repeat photography has been used to analyze land cover change. This paper describes how repeat photography may be used as a tool to enhance the short-term study abroad experience by facilitating cultural interaction and understanding. We present evidence from two cases and suggest a five-step repeat photography method for educators…

  4. Positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehllehner, Gerd; Karp, Joel S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2006-07-07

    The developments in positron emission tomography (PET) are reviewed with an emphasis on instrumentation for clinical PET imaging. After a brief summary of positron imaging before the advent of computed tomography, various improvements are highlighted including the move from PET scanners with septa to fully 3D scanners, changes in the preferred scintillators, efforts to improve the energy discrimination, and improvements in attenuation correction. Time-of-flight PET imaging is given special attention due to the recent revival of this technique, which promises significant improvement. Besides technical instrumentation efforts, other factors which influenced the acceptance of clinical PET are also discussed. (review)

  5. Atom Probe Tomography 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.; Larson, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In the world of tomographic imaging, atom probe tomography (APT) occupies the high-spatial-resolution end of the spectrum. It is highly complementary to electron tomography and is applicable to a wide range of materials. The current state of APT is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications and data analysis as they apply to many fields of research and development including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and organic materials. We also provide a brief review of the history and the instrumentation associated with APT and an assessment of the existing challenges in the field.

  6. Source coding model for repeated snapshot imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Junhui; Yang, Dongyue; wu, Guohua; Yin, Longfei; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Imaging based on successive repeated snapshot measurement is modeled as a source coding process in information theory. The necessary number of measurement to maintain a certain level of error rate is depicted as the rate-distortion function of the source coding. Quantitative formula of the error rate versus measurement number relation is derived, based on the information capacity of imaging system. Second order fluctuation correlation imaging (SFCI) experiment with pseudo-thermal light verifies this formula, which paves the way for introducing information theory into the study of ghost imaging (GI), both conventional and computational.

  7. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-06-30

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases.

  8. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-06-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases.

  9. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for a recovery period and will be given instructions on any limitations in activity for the day. ... Images related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special x-ray equipment ... period of time. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography ( ... more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special x-ray equipment ... period of time. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless ... table. Other imaging methods such as ultrasound or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can provide pictures of certain areas ...

  17. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  18. Computer processing of tomography data

    OpenAIRE

    Konečný, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Computer processing of tomography data Tomographs are one of the most important diagnostic devices, which are used in every hospital nowadays; they have already been so for a considerable period of time. The different types of tomographs and the processing of tomographic data and imaging of these data are the subject of this thesis. I have described the four most common types of tomography: X-ray Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography and Single Photon E...

  19. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Feng Lin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed.

  20. Holography and tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This session includes a collection of outlines of pertinent information, diagrams, graphs, electron micrographs, and color photographs pertaining to historical aspects and recent advances in the development of X-ray Gabor Holography. Many of the photographs feature or pertain to instrumentation used in holography, tomography, and cryo-holography.

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ... stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, sinuses, and skull or ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ... the best imaging modality for sinusitis. Tell your doctor if there’s a possibility you are pregnant and ...

  3. Underwater Acoustic Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Aatre

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the CAT scanner technique for medical imaging was introduced, the fields of tomography and image reconstruction from slices have been gaining in popularity. Towards the end of the last decade, the application of tomographic method to large scale ocean monitoring was explored. This paper surveys the application of tomographic methods to ocean monitoring and surveiIlance.

  4. Optical Coherence Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides real-time two- and three-dimensional images of scattering samples with micrometer resolution. Mapping the local reflectivity, OCT visualizes the morphology of the sample, in real time or at video rate. In addition...

  5. EAMJ Dec. Repeatability.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... Results:Kappa values for four-week repeatability for the wheeze and asthma questions were 0.61 ... for logistic, cultural and ethical reasons, to use ... individual with baseline forced expiratory volume in .... period is likely to also include the effects of true ... data, the writing of the manuscript or the decision.

  6. Lorentz Force Electrical Impedance Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a method called Lorentz Force Electrical Impedance Tomography. The electrical conductivity of biological tissues can be measured through their sonication in a magnetic field: the vibration of the tissues inside the field induces an electrical current by Lorentz force. This current, detected by electrodes placed around the sample, is proportional to the ultrasonic pressure, to the strength of the magnetic field and to the electrical conductivity gradient along the acoustic axis. By focusing at different places inside the sample, a map of the electrical conductivity gradient can be established. In this study experiments were conducted on a gelatin phantom and on a beef sample, successively placed in a 300 mT magnetic field and sonicated with an ultrasonic transducer focused at 21 cm emitting 500 kHz bursts. Although all interfaces are not visible, in this exploratory study a good correlation is observed between the electrical conductivity image and the ultrasonic image. This method offers...

  7. Feasibility of Simulated Annealing Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Vo, Nghia T; Moser, Herbert O

    2014-01-01

    Simulated annealing tomography (SAT) is a simple iterative image reconstruction technique which can yield a superior reconstruction compared with filtered back-projection (FBP). However, the very high computational cost of iteratively calculating discrete Radon transform (DRT) has limited the feasibility of this technique. In this paper, we propose an approach based on the pre-calculated intersection lengths array (PILA) which helps to remove the step of computing DRT in the simulated annealing procedure and speed up SAT by over 300 times. The enhancement of convergence speed of the reconstruction process using the best of multiple-estimate (BoME) strategy is introduced. The performance of SAT under different conditions and in comparison with other methods is demonstrated by numerical experiments.

  8. Feasibility of flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT) in experimental small animal imaging of osteoporosis - initial experience; Erste Erfahrungen mit einem Flaechendetektor-Volumen-CT (fpVCT) in der experimentellen Osteoporosediagnostik am Kleintiermodell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, R.; Dullin, C.; Herrmann, K.P.; Kluever, I.; Zaroban, A.; Knollmann, F. [Universitaetsklinikum Goettingen (Germany). Abteilung Diagnostische Radiologie, Goettingen; Stuermer, E.K.; Sehmisch, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Goettingen (Germany). Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Plastische und Wiederherstellungschirurgie; Funke, M. [Klinikum Mittelbaden, Baden-Baden (Germany). Radiologische Klinik an der Stadtklinik

    2006-10-15

    Flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT) is a new, noninvasive CT imaging modality with increased isotropic resolution. Technical details, potential applications, and our initial experience with a fpVCT prototype scanner in the imaging of osteoporosis in a rat model are presented. To date, 21 rats have been investigated in vivo with fpVCT. Pharmacologic effects on bone mineral density (BMD) and structure were of special interest. Image evaluation focussed on the second lumbar vertebra and the left femoral bone. To validate measurement results, BMD values calculated with fpVCT were correlated with results of BMD measurements from ashing of the second lumbar vertebra and femoral bones. Our initial results show that fpVCT is capable of detecting differences in BMD between ovariectomized rats treated with estradiol and a control group with high statistical significance (p<0.05), corresponding to ashing as the gold standard. In a rat model, fpVCT imaging is especially useful in longitudinal in vivo investigations of BMD measures. Spatial resolution of up to 150 {mu}m allows imaging of the trabecular structure only in human cadaveric bones. (orig.) [German] Die Flaechendetektor-Volumen-Computertomographie (fpVCT) ist eine neuartige CT-Bildgebungstechnik, die eine gesteigerte isotrope Ortsaufloesung ermoeglicht. In dieser Arbeit wird ueber Technik, Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten und erste Erfahrungen beim Einsatz eines fpVCT-Prototyps in der experimentellen Diagnostik der Osteoporose am Rattenmodell berichtet. Bisher konnten 21 Ratten in vivo am fpVCT untersucht werden. Von besonderem Interesse waren Medikamentenwirkungen auf Knochendichte (''bone mineral density'', BMD) und -struktur. Die Auswertung der gewonnenen Bilddaten fokussierte sich auf den 2. Lendenwirbelkoerper und das linke Femur. Um die Messergebnisse zu ueberpruefen, wurden die mittels fpVCT errechneten BMD-Werte mit den Ergebnissen der Dichtemessung der veraschten 2. LWK und Femora

  9. A new bridge technique for neutron tomography and diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burca, G., E-mail: G.Burca@open.ac.uk [Materials Engineering, Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); James, J.A. [Materials Engineering, Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Kockelmann, W. [ISIS Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Fitzpatrick, M.E. [Materials Engineering, Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Zhang, S.Y. [ISIS Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Hovind, J. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232, Villigen (Switzerland); Langh, R. van [Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Faculty 3mE, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, P.O. Box 74888, 1070 DN Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-09-21

    An attractive feature of neutron techniques is the ability to identify hidden materials and structures inside engineering components and objects of art and archaeology. Bearing this in mind we are investigating a new technique, 'Tomography Driven Diffraction' (TDD), that exploits tomography data to guide diffraction experiments on samples with complex structures and shapes. The technique can be used utilising combinations of individual tomography and diffraction instruments, such as NEUTRA (PSI, CH) and ENGIN-X (ISIS, UK), but is also suitable for new combined imaging and diffraction instruments such as the JEEP synchrotron engineering instrument (DIAMOND, UK) and the proposed IMAT neutron imaging and diffraction instrument (ISIS, UK).

  10. Absorbed and effective dose from spiral and computed tomography for the dental implant planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Beong Hee; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-15

    To evaluate the absorbed and effective doses of spiral and computed tomography for the dental implant planning. For radiographic projection. TLD chips were placed in 22 sites of humanoid phantom to record the exposure to skin and the mean absorbed dose to bone marrow, thyroid, pituitary, parotid and submandibular glands and nesophages. Effective dose was calculated, using the method suggested by Frederiksen at al.. Patient situations of a single tooth gap in upper and lower midline region, edentulous maxilla and mandible were simulated for spiral tomography. 35 axial slices (maxilla) and 40 axial slices (mandible) with low and standard dose setting were used for computed tomography. All the radiographic procedures were repeated three times. The mean effective dose in case of maxilla was 0.865 mSv, 0.452 mSv, 0.136 mSv and 0.025 mSv, in spiral tomography of complete edentulous maxilla, computed tomography with standard mAs, computed tomography with low mAs and spiral tomography of a single tooth gap (p<0.05). That in case of mandible was 0.614 mSv, 0.448 mSv, 0.137 mSv and 0.036 mSv, in spiral tomography of complete edentulous mandible, computed tomography with standard mAs, computed tomography with low mAs and spiral tomography of a single tooth gap (p<0.05). Based on these results, it can be concluded that low mAs computed tomography is recommended instead of spiral tomography for the complete edentulous maxilla and mandible dental implant treatment planning.

  11. Reflection tomography in laterally varying media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrion, Phillip M.; Boehm, Gualtiero; Vesnaver, Aldo

    1993-12-31

    In this paper, we will discuss a separate reconstruction of lateral velocity gradients and reflection interfaces using the method of reflection tomography. We will be limited by inversion of traveltimes. As it is known such inversion may suffer from a significant drawback: ambiguity. This ambiguity is referred to as depth/velocity ambiguity which is especially notable in the case of non-vertical angles of propagation. In tomographic experiments this ambiguity is suppressed by finite angular aperture. The next problem is non-uniqueness. It will be shown that the lateral gradients of velocity and the depths to the reflection points can be uniquely recovered from surface seismic data in the reflection tomography experiments. Reflection data inversion is done via an optimization process which can be formulated either in the physical space of seismic velocities or in the dual space of Lagrangian multipliers. We compare both methods and show the advantages of the dual transform. (author). 4 refs., 8 figs

  12. Computerized tomography in evaluation of hepatic neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, R.F.; Resende, C.; Tishler, J.M.A.; Aldrete, J.S.; Shin, M.S.; Rubin, E.; Rahn, N.H.

    1984-08-01

    The authors reviewed their experience with computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen in 212 patients with histologically documented liver neoplasms seen during a 30-month period. The CT findings in cavernous hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia were specific, and permitted accurate diagnosis of this lesion before biopsy. The CT appearance of all other lesions was variable. CT is useful in providing an accurate evaluation of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic extent of the neoplasm.

  13. Reconstructions in ultrasound modulated optical tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Allmaras, Moritz

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a mathematical model for ultrasound modulated optical tomography and present a simple reconstruction scheme for recovering the spatially varying optical absorption coefficient from scanning measurements with narrowly focused ultrasound signals. Computational results for this model show that the reconstruction of sharp features of the absorption coefficient is possible. A formal linearization of the model leads to an equation with a Fredholm operator, which explains the stability observed in our numerical experiments. © de Gruyter 2011.

  14. Correct use of repeated measures analysis of variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunsik; Cho, Meehye; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2009-02-01

    In biomedical research, researchers frequently use statistical procedures such as the t-test, standard analysis of variance (ANOVA), or the repeated measures ANOVA to compare means between the groups of interest. There are frequently some misuses in applying these procedures since the conditions of the experiments or statistical assumptions necessary to apply these procedures are not fully taken into consideration. In this paper, we demonstrate the correct use of repeated measures ANOVA to prevent or minimize ethical or scientific problems due to its misuse. We also describe the appropriate use of multiple comparison tests for follow-up analysis in repeated measures ANOVA. Finally, we demonstrate the use of repeated measures ANOVA by using real data and the statistical software package SPSS (SPSS Inc., USA).

  15. Directionality switchable gain stabilized linear repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayuki; Ohmachi, Tadashi; Aida, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new approach to realize a bidirectional linear repeater suitable for future optical internet networks and fault location in repeater chain with OTDR. The proposed approach is the linear repeater of simple configuration whose directionality is rearranged dynamically by electrical control signal. The repeater is composed of a magneto-optical switch, a circulator, a dynamically gain stabilized unidirectional EDFA, and control circuits. The repeater directionality is rearranged as fast as 0.1ms by an electrical control pulse. It is experimentally confirmed that OTDR with the directionality switchable repeater is feasible for repeater chain. The detailed design and performance of the repeater are also discussed, including the multi-pass interference (MPI) which may arise in the proposed repeater, the effect of the MPI on SNR degradation of the repeater chain and the feed-forward EDFA gain control circuit.

  16. Mathematical Methods in Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Alfred; Natterer, Frank

    1991-01-01

    The conference was devoted to the discussion of present and future techniques in medical imaging, including 3D x-ray CT, ultrasound and diffraction tomography, and biomagnetic ima- ging. The mathematical models, their theoretical aspects and the development of algorithms were treated. The proceedings contains surveys on reconstruction in inverse obstacle scat- tering, inversion in 3D, and constrained least squares pro- blems.Research papers include besides the mentioned imaging techniques presentations on image reconstruction in Hilbert spaces, singular value decompositions, 3D cone beam recon- struction, diffuse tomography, regularization of ill-posed problems, evaluation reconstruction algorithms and applica- tions in non-medical fields. Contents: Theoretical Aspects: J.Boman: Helgason' s support theorem for Radon transforms-a newproof and a generalization -P.Maass: Singular value de- compositions for Radon transforms- W.R.Madych: Image recon- struction in Hilbert space -R.G.Mukhometov: A problem of in- teg...

  17. Measurement-based quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Zwerger, M; Briegel, H J

    2012-01-01

    We introduce measurement-based quantum repeaters, where small-scale measurement-based quantum processors are used to perform entanglement purification and entanglement swapping in a long-range quantum communication protocol. In the scheme, pre-prepared entangled states stored at intermediate repeater stations are coupled with incoming photons by simple Bell-measurements, without the need of performing additional quantum gates or measurements. We show how to construct the required resource states, and how to minimize their size. We analyze the performance of the scheme under noise and imperfections, with focus on small-scale implementations involving entangled states of few qubits. We find measurement-based purification protocols with significantly improved noise thresholds. Furthermore we show that already resource states of small size suffice to significantly increase the maximal communication distance. We also discuss possible advantages of our scheme for different set-ups.

  18. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  19. Repeatability of Harris Corner Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Lili

    2003-01-01

    Interest point detectors are commonly employed to reduce the amount of data to be processed. The ideal interest point detector would robustly select those features which are most appropriate or salient for the application and data at hand. This paper shows that interest points are geometrically stable under different transformations.This property makes interest points very successful in the context of image matching. To measure this property quantatively, we introduce a evaluation criterion: repeatability rate.

  20. Atom probe tomography today

    OpenAIRE

    Alfred Cerezo; Peter H. Clifton; Mark J. Galtrey; Humphreys, Colin J.; Kelly, Thomas. F.; David J. Larson; Sergio Lozano-Perez; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Gang Sha; Keith Thompson; Mathijs Zandbergen; Roger L. Alvis

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments) but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks) and also...

  1. Transurethral Ultrasound Diffraction Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    results 15. SUBJECT TERMS acoustic inverse scattering, acoustic tomography, Lippmann- Schwinger Equation, conjugate gradient FFT, prostate imaging 16...any ultrasonic inverse scattering algo- rithm. These are: (1) efficient solutions of the Lippmann- Schwinger integral equation of scattering - the so...Fast and efficient codes for the solution of the Lippmann- Schwinger equation were written using CG-FFT. These were checked against ana- lytical benchmark

  2. Tutorial on photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-06-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has become one of the fastest growing fields in biomedical optics. Unlike pure optical imaging, such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, PAT employs acoustic detection to image optical absorption contrast with high-resolution deep into scattering tissue. So far, PAT has been widely used for multiscale anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging of biological tissues. We focus on PAT's basic principles, major implementations, imaging contrasts, and recent applications.

  3. Proton computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciantonio, Martina; Sauli, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a diagnostic method capable of in situ imaging the three-dimensional density distribution in a patient before irradiation with charged particle beams. Proposed long time ago, this technology has been developed by several groups, and may become an essential tool for advanced quality assessment in hadrontherapy. We describe the basic principles of the method, its performance and limitations as well as provide a summary of experimental systems and of results achieved.

  4. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, A., E-mail: king@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette 91192 (France); Reischig, P. [Xnovo Technology ApS, 4600 Køge (Denmark); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft 2628 CD (Netherlands); Adrien, J. [MATEIS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); Peetermans, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ludwig, W. [MATEIS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble 38043 (France)

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  5. Neuroimaging Findings and Repeat Neuroimaging Value in Pediatric Chronic Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Michael S; Chodirker, Bernard N; Bunge, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Chronic ataxia, greater than two months in duration, is encountered relatively commonly in clinical pediatric neurology practise and presents with diagnostic challenges. It is caused by multiple and diverse disorders. Our aims were to describe the neuroimaging features and the value of repeat neuroimaging in pediatric chronic ataxia to ascertain their contribution to the diagnosis and management. A retrospective charts and neuroimaging reports review was undertaken in 177 children with chronic ataxia. Neuroimaging in 130 of 177 patients was also reviewed. Nineteen patients had head computed tomography only, 103 brain magnetic resonance imaging only, and 55 had both. Abnormalities in the cerebellum or other brain regions were associated with ataxia. Neuroimaging was helpful in 73 patients with 30 disorders: It was diagnostic in 9 disorders, narrowed down the diagnostic possibilities in 14 disorders, and revealed important but non-diagnostic abnormalities, e.g. cerebellar atrophy in 7 disorders. Having a normal magnetic resonance imaging scan was mostly seen in genetic diseases or in the early course of ataxia telangiectasia. Repeat neuroimaging, performed in 108 patients, was generally helpful in monitoring disease evolution and in making a diagnosis. Neuroimaging was not directly helpful in 36 patients with 10 disorders or by definition the 55 patients with unknown disease etiology. Normal or abnormal neuroimaging findings and repeat neuroimaging are very valuable in the diagnosis and management of disorders associated with pediatric chronic ataxia.

  6. 磁悬浮飞轮用可重复电磁锁紧装置的设计与试验%Design and Experiment of Repeated Electromagnetic Locking Device for Magnetic Bearing Flywheel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘强; 房建成; 韩邦成; 白国长

    2012-01-01

    According to the repeated electromagnetic locking device based on the self-locking principle for magnetic bearing flywheel, the electromagnetic and mechanics characteristics of primary explicit electromagnet are analyzed. It is concluded that the minimum unlocking residual force is much too large, while the adoption of the implicit electromagnet can get rid of it and increase the unlocking reliability. The equivalent magnetic circuit method is applied to magnetic analysis of implicit electromagnet, and its mechanics model under four statuses including carrying out locking/unlocking and keeping locking/unlocking is got. The electromagnetic numerical analysis method is used for a solid example design for the implicit electromagnet. Additionally, to verify the protective effect of the improved locking device for the flywheel system during satellite launch, the swept-sine vibration and random vibration are carried out The results show that the minimum unlocking residual force of locking device is 0.2S N, far smaller than that of explicit electromagnet about 29.3 N. Moreover, the maximum vibration displacement between the flywheel stator and rotor is 70 urn and its maximum amplitude is 10 urn. Both of them are less than the flywheel system protective gap of 100 um. This indicates that the improved implicit electromagnet can effectively carry out the locking protection function to the flywheel system while raising the unlocking reliability.%针对磁悬浮飞轮用基于机构自锁原理的可重复电磁锁紧装置,分析其原有显式电磁铁执行机构的电磁力学特性,得知其最小解锁残余力过大,若采用隐式电磁铁,可以消除解锁残余力,从而提高锁紧装置解锁可靠性.采用等效磁路法对隐式电磁铁进行磁路分析,并给出该电磁铁在执行锁紧、保持锁紧、执行解锁和保持解锁四种状态下的力学模型.利用电磁场数值分析法,对隐式电磁铁进行实例设计,并通过卫星发射过程

  7. In Vivo Diffuse Optical Tomography and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingze Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT are two attractive imaging techniques for in vivo physiological and psychological research. They have distinct advantages such as non-invasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, high sensitivity and longitudinal monitoring. This paper reviews the key components of DOT and FMT. Light propagation model, mathematical reconstruction algorithm, imaging instrumentation and medical applications are included. Future challenges and perspective on optical tomography are discussed.

  8. Densidade de um planossolo sob sistemas de cultivo avaliada por meio da tomografia computadorizada de raios gama Bulk density of an alfisol under cultivation systems in a long-term experiment evaluated with gamma ray computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Luís Bamberg

    2009-10-01

    lowland soils is based on the use of crop rotation and succession, which are essential for the control of red and black rice. The effects on the soil properties deserve studies, particularly on soil compaction. The objective of this study was to identify compacted layers in an Albaqualf under different cultivation and tillage systems, by evaluating the soil bulk density (Ds with Gamma Ray Computed Tomography (TC. The analysis was carried out in a long-term experiment, from 1985 to 2004, at an experimental station of Embrapa Clima Temperado, Capão do Leão, RS, Brazil, in a random block design with seven treatments, with four replications (T1 - one year rice with conventional tillage followed by two years fallow; T2 - continuous rice under conventional tillage; T4 - rice and soybean (Glycine Max L. rotation under conventional tillage; T5 - rice, soybean and corn (Zea maize L. rotation under conventional tillage; T6 - rice under no-tillage in the summer in succession to rye-grass (Lolium multiflorum L. in the winter; T7 - rice under no-tillage and soybean under conventional tillage rotation; T8 - control: uncultivated soil. The Gamma Ray Computed Tomography method did not identify compacted soil layers under no-tillage rice in succession to rye-grass; two fallow years in the irrigated rice production system did not prevent the formation of a compacted layer at the soil surface; and in the rice, soybean and corn rotation under conventional tillage two compacted layers were identified (0.0 to 1.5 cm and 11 to 14 cm, indicating that they may restrict the agricultural production in this cultivation system on Albaqualf soils.

  9. Origin and fate of repeats in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaz, G; Rocha, E P C; Netter, P; Coissac, E

    2002-07-01

    We investigated 53 complete bacterial chromosomes for intrachromosomal repeats. In previous studies on eukaryote chromosomes, we proposed a model for the dynamics of repeats based on the continuous genesis of tandem repeats, followed by an active process of high deletion rate, counteracted by rearrangement events that may prevent the repeats from being deleted. The present study of long repeats in the genomes of Bacteria and Archaea suggests that our model of interspersed repeats dynamics may apply to them. Thus the duplication process might be a consequence of very ancient mechanisms shared by all three domains. Moreover, we show that there is a strong negative correlation between nucleotide composition bias and the repeat density of genomes. We hypothesise that in highly biased genomes, non-duplicated small repeats arise more frequently by random effects and are used as primers for duplication mechanisms, leading to a higher density of large repeats.

  10. Extending Teach and Repeat to Pivoting Wheelchairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Del Castillo

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper extends the teach-and-repeat paradigm that has been successful for the control of holonomic robots to nonholonomic wheelchairs which may undergo pivoting action over the course of their taught movement. Due to the nonholonomic nature of the vehicle kinematics, estimation is required -- in the example given herein, based upon video detection of wall-mounted cues -- both in the teaching and the tracking events. In order to accommodate motion that approaches pivoting action as well as motion that approaches straight-line action, the estimation equations of the Extended Kalman Filter and the control equations are formulated using two different definitions of a nontemporal independent variable. The paper motivates the need for pivoting action in real-life settings by reporting extensively on the abilities and limitations of estimation-based teach-and-repeat action where pivoting and near-pivoting action is disallowed. Following formulation of the equations in the near-pivot mode, the paper reports upon experiments where taught trajectories which entail a seamless mix of near-straight and near-pivot action are tracked.

  11. The Choroid and Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Sezer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The choroid is the most vascular tissue in the eye and it plays an important role in the pathophysiology of various common chorioretinal diseases such as central serous retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and degenerative myopia. Quantitative assessment of the choroid has been quite challenging with traditional imaging modalities such as indocyanine green angiography and ultrasonography due to limited resolution and repeatability. With the advent of optical coherence tomography (OCT technology, detailed visualization of the choroid in vivo is now possible. Measurements of choroidal thickness have also enabled new directions in research to study normal and pathological processes within the choroid. The aim of the present study is to review the current literature on choroidal imaging using OCT

  12. The Choroid and Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Taha; Altınışık, Muhammet; Koytak, İbrahim Arif; Özdemir, Mehmet Hakan

    2016-01-01

    The choroid is the most vascular tissue in the eye and it plays an important role in the pathophysiology of various common chorioretinal diseases such as central serous retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and degenerative myopia. Quantitative assessment of the choroid has been quite challenging with traditional imaging modalities such as indocyanine green angiography and ultrasonography due to limited resolution and repeatability. With the advent of optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology, detailed visualization of the choroid in vivo is now possible. Measurements of choroidal thickness have also enabled new directions in research to study normal and pathological processes within the choroid. The aim of the present study is to review the current literature on choroidal imaging using OCT. PMID:27800255

  13. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  14. Improving repeatability by improving quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ackers, Mark; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla; Brink, Mundy

    1998-12-31

    Time lapse (4-D) seismic is a promising tool for reservoir characterization and monitoring. The method is apparently simple: to acquire data repeatedly over the same reservoir, process and interpret the data sets, then changes between the data sets indicate changes in the reservoir. A problem with time lapse seismic data is that reservoirs are a relatively small part of the earth and important reservoir changes may cause very small differences to the time lapse data. The challenge is to acquire and process economical time lapse data such that reservoir changes can be detected above the noise of varying acquisition and environment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  16. Tomography and spectroscopy as quantum computations

    CERN Document Server

    Miquel, C; Saraceno, M; Knill, E H; Laflamme, R; Negrevergne, C; Miquel, Cesar; Paz, Juan Pablo; Saraceno, Marcos; Knill, Emmanuel; Laflamme, Raymond; Negrevergne, Camille

    2001-01-01

    Determining the state of a system and measuring properties of its evolution are two of the most important tasks a physicist faces. For the first purpose one can use tomography, a method that after subjecting the system to a number of experiments determines all independent elements of the density matrix. For the second task, one can resort to spectroscopy, a set of techniques used to determine the spectrum of eigenvalues of the evolution operator. In this letter, we show that tomography and spectroscopy can be naturally interpreted as dual forms of quantum computation. We show how to adapt the simplest case of the well-known phase estimation quantum algorithm to perform both tasks, giving it a natural interpretation as a simulated scattering experiment. We show how this algorithm can be used to implement an interesting form of tomography by performing a direct measurement of the Wigner function of a quantum system. We present results of such measurements performed on a system of three qubits using liquid state...

  17. [C-11]raclopride-PET studies of the Huntington's disease rate of progression : Relevance of the trinucleotide repeat length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonini, A; Leenders, KL; Eidelberg, D

    1998-01-01

    We used [C-11]raclopride and positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the relationship between striatal dopamine D2 receptor binding, trinucleotide repeat number (GAG), and subject age in 10 asymptomatic and 8 symptomatic carriers of the Huntington's disease (HD) mutation. In both preclinical an

  18. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  19. Radial Reflection Diffraction Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S K; Norton, S J

    2003-10-10

    We develop a wave-based tomographic imaging algorithm based upon a single rotating radially outward oriented transducer. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, the transducer launches a primary field and collects the backscattered field in a ''pitch/catch'' operation. The hardware configuration, operating mode, and data collection method is identical to that of most medical intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) systems. IVUS systems form images of the medium surrounding the probe based upon ultrasonic B-scans, using a straight-ray model of sound propagation. Our goal is to develop a wave-based imaging algorithm using diffraction tomography techniques. Given the hardware configuration and the imaging method, we refer to this system as ''radial reflection diffraction tomography.'' We consider two hardware configurations: a multimonostatic mode using a single transducer as described above, and a multistatic mode consisting of a single transmitter and an aperture formed by multiple receivers. In this latter case, the entire source/receiver aperture rotates about the fixed radius. Practically, such a probe is mounted at the end of a catheter or snaking tube that can be inserted into a part or medium with the goal of forming images of the plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation. We derive an analytic expression for the multimonostatic inverse but ultimately use the new Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm to construct images using both operating modes. Applications include improved IVUS imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts with existing access holes.

  20. Multiplanner spine computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. K.; Jeon, H. J.; Hong, K. C.; Chung, K. B.; Suh, W. H. [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The computed tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the spine. Recently, the multiplanar spine CT scan is highly superior than usual axial scan, because of easily demonstrable longitudinal dimension, level of spine and spinal canal. We evaluated 62 cases of spine CT, whom complains of spinal symptoms, from July, 1982 to January, 1983. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 45 male and 17 female, ages were from 15 years to 76 years, and sites were 15 cervical spine, 7 thoracic spine, 42 lumbar spine and 21 sacral spine. 2. Sixty two cases of the CT diagnosis were reviewed and shows 19 cases of herniated intervertebral disc, 7 cases of spine fracture, 5 cases of degenerative disease, 4 cases of metastatic cancer, 2 cases of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, 1 case of cord injury and 24 cases of normal. 3. The CT findings of herniated intervertebral disc were protruding disc, obliteration of anterior epidural fat, with or without indentation of dural sac and calcification within posterior disc margin. In cases of trauma, the multiplanar spine CT scan detects more specific extension of the fracture sites, and it is able to demonstrate relationship between fracture fragment and spinal cord, therefore operability can be decided. In case of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, it is easy to demonstrate linear high density along posterior margin of vertebral bodies on sagittal reconstruction scan. 4. The computed tomography is diagnostic in detection of spinal disease. However, multiplanar spine CT is more diagnostic than axial computed tomography such as detecting the longitudinal dimension and demonstration of spinal canal.

  1. Image reconstruction for robot assisted ultrasound tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Zhang, Haichong K.; Rahmim, Arman; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    An investigation of several image reconstruction methods for robot-assisted ultrasound (US) tomography setup is presented. In the robot-assisted setup, an expert moves the US probe to the location of interest, and a robotic arm automatically aligns another US probe with it. The two aligned probes can then transmit and receive US signals which are subsequently used for tomographic reconstruction. This study focuses on reconstruction of the speed of sound. In various simulation evaluations as well as in an experiment with a millimeter-range inaccuracy, we demonstrate that the limited data provided by two probes can be used to reconstruct pixel-wise images differentiating between media with different speeds of sound. Combining the results of this investigation with the developed robot-assisted US tomography setup, we envision feasibility of this setup for tomographic imaging in applications beyond breast imaging, with potentially significant efficacy in cancer diagnosis.

  2. A wavelet phase filter for emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, E.T.; Lin, B. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

    1995-07-01

    The presence of a high level of noise is a characteristic in some tomographic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). Wavelet methods can smooth out noise while preserving significant features of images. Mallat et al. proposed a wavelet based denoising scheme exploiting wavelet modulus maxima, but the scheme is sensitive to noise. In this study, the authors explore the properties of wavelet phase, with a focus on reconstruction of emission tomography images. Specifically, they show that the wavelet phase of regular Poisson noise under a Haar-type wavelet transform converges in distribution to a random variable uniformly distributed on [0, 2{pi}). They then propose three wavelet-phase-based denoising schemes which exploit this property: edge tracking, local phase variance thresholding, and scale phase variation thresholding. Some numerical results are also presented. The numerical experiments indicate that wavelet phase techniques show promise for wavelet based denoising methods.

  3. Repeatability Using Automatic Tracing with Canon OCT- HS100 and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT 5000

    OpenAIRE

    Rune Brautaset; Ulrika Birkeldh; Petra Frehr Alstig; Petra Wikén; Maria Nilsson

    2016-01-01

    Background Optical coherence tomography (OCT), can be used in clinical practice to provide high resolution cross-sectional images of the retina, optic disc and macula structure. These measurements can be useful for early detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment guidance for retinal diseases. Therefore, repeatability of measurements in OCT is of great importance. Methods Macula and optic disc parameters from the right eye of 30 healthy subjects were obtained twice with the Canon OCT-HS10...

  4. Evolution prediction from tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominy, Jason M.; Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Shabani, Alireza; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Quantum process tomography provides a means of measuring the evolution operator for a system at a fixed measurement time t. The problem of using that tomographic snapshot to predict the evolution operator at other times is generally ill-posed since there are, in general, infinitely many distinct and compatible solutions. We describe the prediction, in some "maximal ignorance" sense, of the evolution of a quantum system based on knowledge only of the evolution operator for finitely many times 0evolution at times away from the measurement times. Even if the original evolution is unitary, the predicted evolution is described by a non-unitary, completely positive map.

  5. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  6. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  7. Tomography finds waste sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Susan M.

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT), a remote sensing method, is being developed for hazardous waste site characterization by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tenn., with the support of the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.More accurate assessment of hazardous sites translates into more efficient and less costly cleanup efforts by defining parameters such as waste site boundaries, geophysical site characteristics, buried container leakage, and hazardous material migration. Remote sensing devices eliminate the potential for environmental damage, safety hazards, or high costs associated with intrusive site characterization techniques.

  8. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  9. Atom probe tomography today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cerezo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks and also the atomic-level characterization of interfaces in multilayers, oxide films, and semiconductor materials and devices.

  10. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Padmore, H A; Parkinson, D Y; Pien, J; Schirotzek, A; Yang, C; 10.1117/12.861946

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. In- terference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher con- trast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  11. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease are important to test and optimize new therapeutic interventions. To evaluate the effect of these interventions, sensitive and accurate outcome measures are needed. The most commonly used endpoints are spirometric variables...... are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  12. Hyperspectral optical diffraction tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, JaeHwang; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a novel microscopic technique for measuring wavelength-dependent three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of the refractive indices (RIs) of microscopic samples in the visible wavelengths. Employing 3-D quantitative phase microscopy techniques with a wavelength-swept source, 3-D RI tomograms were obtained in the range of 450 - 700 nm with a spectral resolution of a few nanometers. The capability of the technique was demonstrated by measuring the hyperspectral 3-D RI tomograms of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, and hepatocytes. The results demonstrate the potential for label-free molecular specific 3-D tomography of biological samples.

  13. Stored Luminescence Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The phosphor nanoparticles made of doped semiconductors, pre-excited by well-collimated X-ray radiation, were recently reported for their light emission upon NIR light stimulation. The characteristics of X-ray energy storage and NIR stimulated emission is highly desirable to design targeting probes and improve molecular and cellular imaging. Here we propose stored luminescence computed tomography (SLCT), perform realistic numerical simulation, and demonstrate a much-improved spatial resolution in a preclinical research context. The future opportunities are also discussed along this direction.

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  15. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  16. Crowding by a repeating pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target-flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker.

  17. Automatization and familiarity in repeated checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dek, Eliane C P; van den Hout, Marcel A.; Giele, Catharina L.; Engelhard, Iris M.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated checking paradoxically increases memory uncertainty. This study investigated the underlying mechanism of this effect. We hypothesized that as a result of repeated checking, familiarity with stimuli increases, and automatization of the checking procedure occurs, which should result in decrea

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... file Error processing SSI file Preventing Repeat Teen Births Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... Too many teens, ages 15–19, have repeat births. Nearly 1 in 5 births to teens, ages ...

  19. Expanded complexity of unstable repeat diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Urszula; McIvor, Elizabeth; Dent, Sharon Y.R.; Wells, Robert D.; Napierala, Marek.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable Repeat Diseases (URDs) share a common mutational phenomenon of changes in the copy number of short, tandemly repeated DNA sequences. More than 20 human neurological diseases are caused by instability, predominantly expansion, of microsatellite sequences. Changes in the repeat size initiate a cascade of pathological processes, frequently characteristic of a unique disease or a small subgroup of the URDs. Understanding of both the mechanism of repeat instability and molecular consequen...

  20. Waste inspection tomography (WIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardi, R.T. [Bio-Imaging Research, Inc., Lincolnshire, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting, isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU.

  1. Internal tide oceanic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2016-09-01

    A concept of internal tide oceanic tomography (ITOT) is proposed to monitor ocean warming on a global scale. ITOT is similar to acoustic tomography, but that work waves are internal tides. ITOT detects ocean temperature changes by precisely measuring travel time changes of long-range propagating internal tides. The underlying principle is that upper ocean warming strengthens ocean stratification and thus increases the propagation speed of internal tides. This concept is inspired by recent advances in observing internal tides by satellite altimetry. In particular, a plane wave fit method can separately resolve multiple internal tidal waves and thus accurately determines the phase of each wave. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of ITOT. In the eastern tropical Pacific, the yearly time series of travel time changes of the M2 internal tide is closely correlated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation index. In the North Atlantic, significant interannual variations and bidecadal trends are observed and consistent with the changes in ocean heat content measured by Argo floats. ITOT offers a long-term, cost-effective, environmentally friendly technique for monitoring global ocean warming. Future work is needed to quantify the accuracy of this technique.

  2. Field experiment in jointed rock mass with electro-magnetic tomography. Challenge for 50m energy penetration and an interpretation with additional geological data; Denjiha tomography ni yoru setsurisei ganban no tansa. Kokan kyori 50m no sokutei to chishitsu kaishaku no kokoromi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Koga, K.; Nishiyama, E.; Yamamoto, T. [Kawasaki Geological Engineering, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    With the purpose of extending an exploring distance in electromagnetic tomography, a prototype was made as a device to receive and transmit continuous waves in a borehole, so that a tomographic observation was carried out on a jointed rock mass that had a conventionally short exploring distance. The device consisted of a transmitter, receiver, antenna, cable and surface controller, with a personal computer used for displaying and storing data. The prototype antenna was provided with a size insertable into a VP50 vinyl chloride tube. In order to determine a relative permittivity of a rock, a boring core was shaped and an impedance was measured. The measurement of tomography was carried out at 1m spaces apart in the bore holes with a distance of 50m in between. The received waveforms were stored in a floppy disk built in the personal computer. As a result of the analysis, a tomographic cross-section of the electromagnetic wave velocity was obtained, showing the distribution of sandstone with a high electromagnetic wave velocity and little joints, shale with a low electromagnetic wave velocity, chart with a high electromagnetic wave velocity, etc. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater station. 97.205 Section 97.205... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.205 Repeater station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a repeater. A holder of...

  4. 47 CFR 22.1015 - Repeater operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater operation. 22.1015 Section 22.1015... Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1015 Repeater operation. Offshore central stations may be used as repeater stations provided that the licensee is able to maintain control of the station, and in...

  5. ProtRepeatsDB: a database of amino acid repeats in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Virander S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide and cross species comparisons of amino acid repeats is an intriguing problem in biology mainly due to the highly polymorphic nature and diverse functions of amino acid repeats. Innate protein repeats constitute vital functional and structural regions in proteins. Repeats are of great consequence in evolution of proteins, as evident from analysis of repeats in different organisms. In the post genomic era, availability of protein sequences encoded in different genomes provides a unique opportunity to perform large scale comparative studies of amino acid repeats. ProtRepeatsDB http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/repeats/ is a relational database of perfect and mismatch repeats, access to which is designed as a resource and collection of tools for detection and cross species comparisons of different types of amino acid repeats. Description ProtRepeatsDB (v1.2 consists of perfect as well as mismatch amino acid repeats in the protein sequences of 141 organisms, the genomes of which are now available. The web interface of ProtRepeatsDB consists of different tools to perform repeat s; based on protein IDs, organism name, repeat sequences, and keywords as in FASTA headers, size, frequency, gene ontology (GO annotation IDs and regular expressions (REGEXP describing repeats. These tools also allow formulation of a variety of simple, complex and logical queries to facilitate mining and large-scale cross-species comparisons of amino acid repeats. In addition to this, the database also contains sequence analysis tools to determine repeats in user input sequences. Conclusion ProtRepeatsDB is a multi-organism database of different types of amino acid repeats present in proteins. It integrates useful tools to perform genome wide queries for rapid screening and identification of amino acid repeats and facilitates comparative and evolutionary studies of the repeats. The database is useful for identification of species or organism specific

  6. Metrizamide computed tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, T.; Tamakawa, Y.; Arii, H. (Akita Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Takahashi, M.; Hirota, K.

    1981-11-01

    Serial computed tomography of the cervical cord was performed following metrizamide myelography in five cases of clinically suspected syringomyelia. The syrinx filled with refluxed metrizamide was demonstrated in all of the cases. The reflux of metrizamide into the syrinx was most marked several hours following intrathecal injection of metrizamide. Computed tomography combined with metrizamide myelography is essential in the diagnosis of communicating syringomyelia.

  7. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping, E-mail: zhusp2009@gmail.com; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin [Engineering Research Center of Molecular and Neuro Imaging of Ministry of Education and School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710071 (China)

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  8. Experimental realization of entanglement concentration and a quantum repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi; Yang, Tao; Chen, Yu-Ao; Zhang, An-Ning; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2003-05-23

    We report an experimental realization of entanglement concentration using two polarization-entangled photon pairs produced by pulsed parametric down-conversion. In the meantime, our setup also provides a proof-in-principle demonstration of a quantum repeater. The quality of our procedure is verified by observing a violation of Bell's inequality by more than 5 standard deviations. The high experimental accuracy achieved in the experiment implies that the requirement of tolerable error rate in multistage realization of quantum repeaters can be fulfilled, hence providing a useful toolbox for quantum communication over large distances.

  9. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Small, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins constitute one of the largest protein families in land plants, with more than 400 members in most species. Over the past decade, much has been learned about the molecular functions of these proteins, where they act in the cell, and what physiological roles they play during plant growth and development. A typical PPR protein is targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, binds one or several organellar transcripts, and influences their expression by altering RNA sequence, turnover, processing, or translation. Their combined action has profound effects on organelle biogenesis and function and, consequently, on photosynthesis, respiration, plant development, and environmental responses. Recent breakthroughs in understanding how PPR proteins recognize RNA sequences through modular base-specific contacts will help match proteins to potential binding sites and provide a pathway toward designing synthetic RNA-binding proteins aimed at desired targets.

  10. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  11. General benchmarks for quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Using a technique based on quantum teleportation, we simplify the most general adaptive protocols for key distribution, entanglement distillation and quantum communication over a wide class of quantum channels in arbitrary dimension. Thanks to this method, we bound the ultimate rates for secret key generation and quantum communication through single-mode Gaussian channels and several discrete-variable channels. In particular, we derive exact formulas for the two-way assisted capacities of the bosonic quantum-limited amplifier and the dephasing channel in arbitrary dimension, as well as the secret key capacity of the qubit erasure channel. Our results establish the limits of quantum communication with arbitrary systems and set the most general and precise benchmarks for testing quantum repeaters in both discrete- and continuous-variable settings.

  12. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Kovács

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried out in the morning and afternoon in order to decrease the effect of the distant temporal correction. To further increase the accuracy, on-site dIdD variometer has also been installed near the Aggtelek station, in the Baradla cave, during the survey of the easternmost sites. The paper presents the technical details and the results of our last campaign. The improvement of the accuracy of the temporal reduction by the use of the local variometer is also reported.

  13. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  14. Computerized ionospheric tomography based on geosynchronous SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cheng; Tian, Ye; Dong, Xichao; Wang, Rui; Long, Teng

    2017-02-01

    Computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) based on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an emerging technique to construct the three-dimensional (3-D) image of ionosphere. The current studies are all based on the Low Earth Orbit synthetic aperture radar (LEO SAR) which is limited by long repeat period and small coverage. In this paper, a novel ionospheric 3-D CIT technique based on geosynchronous SAR (GEO SAR) is put forward. First, several influences of complex atmospheric environment on GEO SAR focusing are detailedly analyzed, including background ionosphere and multiple scattering effects (induced by turbulent ionosphere), tropospheric effects, and random noises. Then the corresponding GEO SAR signal model is constructed with consideration of the temporal-variant background ionosphere within the GEO SAR long integration time (typically 100 s to 1000 s level). Concurrently, an accurate total electron content (TEC) retrieval method based on GEO SAR data is put forward through subband division in range and subaperture division in azimuth, obtaining variant TEC value with respect to the azimuth time. The processing steps of GEO SAR CIT are given and discussed. Owing to the short repeat period and large coverage area, GEO SAR CIT has potentials of covering the specific space continuously and completely and resultantly has excellent real-time performance. Finally, the TEC retrieval and GEO SAR CIT construction are performed by employing a numerical study based on the meteorological data. The feasibility and correctness of the proposed methods are verified.

  15. Towards Global Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, E.; Zhu, H.; Peter, D.; Tromp, J.

    2012-04-01

    Adjoint tomography based on 3D wave simulations provides new opportunities to improve tomographic images for the following reasons: 1) the full non-linearity of wave propagation may be taken into account in the forward problem, 2) 3D background models may be used to compute Fréchet kernels and, 3) seismic models may be updated in an iterative scheme. Our aim is to use this technique based on a spectral element method (Komatitsch & Tromp 2002) to obtain a global Earth model, which is becoming feasible with current computational facilities. To this end, we select 255 global CMT events distributed worldwide having moment magnitudes between 5.8 and 7. As a reference earth model, we use 3D transversely isotropic mantle model S362ANI (Kustowski et al. 2008) with 3D crustal model Crust2.0 (Bassin et al. 2000). In numerical simulations, Moho variations in Crust2.0 are honored if crustal thickness is less than 15 km or greater than 35 km to have a better sampling of the crustal model, particularly very thin oceanic crust. Using the advantages of numerical simulations, our strategy is to invert crustal and mantle structure together to avoid any bias introduced into upper-mantle images due to "crustal corrections", which are commonly used in classical tomography. Prior to the structure inversion, we reinvert global CMT solutions by computing Green functions in the 3D reference model to take into account effects of crustal variations on source parameters. Changes in source parameters are modest, but consistent with reported global CMT errors. In general, inversion results of selected earthquakes indicate a decrease in depth, particularly for ridge events, which can be up to 12 km, and a change in scalar moment of less than 30%. Event locations mostly change by less than 5 km. We use the updated CMT solutions to run forward simulations for adjoint tomography and plan to reinvert source parameters whenever we see a significant improvement in our tomographic model. 3D

  16. Computed tomography of bones and joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, J; Sehr, A

    1989-01-01

    The monograph sums up the problem of CT diagnosis of bones and joints making use of predominantly the authors' own experience based on CT tests of more than 45,000 patients examined at the Department of Radiology, Charles University Medical Faculty of Hygiene teaching hospital in Prague in the years 1980-1988. Specific scans of the skeleton were made in 4,500 patients, mostly for suspicion or closer assessment of neoplasms (43.5%), the radicular lumbosacral syndrome (34.5%), and injuries (12%). The opening chapters sum up basic facts about the principle of computed tomography, the apparatus in use, the evaluation of CT images, CT radiation doses, and the patients' preparation for CT scanning. The use of contrast media is discussed with regard to the possible hazards involved and to the need to hear allergological opinion first. For spinal canal visualization non-ionogenic contrast media are used exclusively. The management of side reactions to contrast medium application is also reviewed. Indications for bone and joint computed tomography now comprise a whole series of traumatological, orthopaedic, oncological, rheumatological, neurological and rehabilitation conditions, each of which is discussed in detail in a separate chapter. CT anatomical studies offer the advantage of being applicable even in patients examined for other than bone or articular diseases. The option of simultaneous soft tissue assessment represents another advantage. The authors describe different anatomical structures in terms of CT images, some of them complete with dimensional and density values. The chapter on anomalies and developmental variants stresses the relevance of computed tomography for precise characteristics of clefts of the spinal column and facial bones and for the diagnosis of anomalies and dysplasias of the spinal column and the chest. A rare case of cephalothoracopagus is demonstrated. As for traumatology, computed tomography is found useful in diagnosing fractures of the

  17. Plumb line deflection varied with time obtained by repeated gravimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李辉; 付广裕; 李正心

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the plumb line deflection varied with time (PLV) are calculated with the Vening-Meinesz formula for Xiaguan and Beijing point based on the 28 and 39 campaigns of gravimetry at the local gravity networks in the Western Yunnan Earthquake Prediction Experiment Area and the North China, respectively. Based on the results, we conclude that: ① the maximum of PLV is under 0.12 and amplitudes of interannual variation are under 0.022.②PLV can be determined with the reliability of 0.012 by the modeling based on the precession of repeated gravimetry. This implies that repeated gravimetry could be used to determine the PLV. ③There exist some common and different characteristics for the different places and different components. It may provide a new approach for the study on the local or global geodynamic by using repeated gravimetry.

  18. Optimal evolution models for quantum tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwiński, Artur

    2016-02-01

    The research presented in this article concerns the stroboscopic approach to quantum tomography, which is an area of science where quantum physics and linear algebra overlap. In this article we introduce the algebraic structure of the parametric-dependent quantum channels for 2-level and 3-level systems such that the generator of evolution corresponding with the Kraus operators has no degenerate eigenvalues. In such cases the index of cyclicity of the generator is equal to 1, which physically means that there exists one observable the measurement of which performed a sufficient number of times at distinct instants provides enough data to reconstruct the initial density matrix and, consequently, the trajectory of the state. The necessary conditions for the parameters and relations between them are introduced. The results presented in this paper seem to have considerable potential applications in experiments due to the fact that one can perform quantum tomography by conducting only one kind of measurement. Therefore, the analyzed evolution models can be considered optimal in the context of quantum tomography. Finally, we introduce some remarks concerning optimal evolution models in the case of n-dimensional Hilbert space.

  19. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  20. Amplified Dispersive Optical Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Goda, Keisuke; Jalali, Bahram

    2008-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be a powerful technique for studying tissue morphology in ophthalmology, cardiology, and endomicroscopy. Its performance is limited by the fundamental trade-off between the imaging sensitivity and acquisition speed -- a predicament common in virtually all imaging systems. In this paper, we circumvent this limit by using distributed Raman post-amplification of the reflection from the sample. We combine the amplification with simultaneously performed dispersive Fourier transformation, a process that maps the optical spectrum into an easily measured time-domain waveform. The Raman amplification enables measurement of weak signals which are otherwise buried in noise. It extends the depth range without sacrificing the acquisition speed or causing damage to the sample. As proof of concept, single-shot imaging with 15 dB improvement in sensitivity at an axial scan rate of 36.6 MHz is demonstrated.

  1. Neurovascular photoacoustic tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Hu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurovascular coupling refers to the relationship between neuronal activities and downstream hemodynamic responses. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT, enabling comprehensive label-free imaging of hemodynamic activities with highly scalable penetration and spatial resolution, has great potential in the study of neurovascular coupling. In this review, we first introduce the technical basis of hemodynamic PAT—including label-free quantification of total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygenation, and blood flow—as well as its applications in hemodynamic monitoring. Then, we demonstrate the potential application of PAT in neurovascular imaging by highlighting representative studies on cerebral vascular responses to whisker stimulation and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, potential research directions and associated technical challenges are discussed.

  2. Optical Coherence Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Themstrup, Lotte; Banzhaf, Christina

    2014-01-01

    as the optical analogue to ultrasound. The inherent safety of the technology allows for in vivo use of OCT in patients. The main strength of OCT is the depth resolution. In dermatology, most OCT research has turned on non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and non-invasive monitoring of morphological changes......Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has developed rapidly since its first realisation in medicine and is currently an emerging technology in the diagnosis of skin disease. OCT is an interferometric technique that detects reflected and backscattered light from tissue and is often described...... in a number of skin diseases based on pattern recognition, and studies have found good agreement between OCT images and histopathological architecture. OCT has shown high accuracy in distinguishing lesions from normal skin, which is of great importance in identifying tumour borders or residual neoplastic...

  3. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils.

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? CT exams are ... at most a minute or two. You may experience a sensation like you have to urinate; however, ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? CT exams are ... at most a minute or two. You may experience a sensation like you have to urinate; however, ...

  6. Differential diagnosis in computerized tomography. 2. rev. and enl. ed.; Differenzialdiagnosen in der Computertomografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgener, Francis A.; Meyers, Steven P. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Imaging Sciences; Herzog, Christopher [Rotkreuzklinikum Muenchen (Germany); Zaunbauer, Wolfgang [Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2013-02-01

    The book on differential diagnosis in computerized tomography is aimed to support radiologists and physicians with experience concerning the interpretation of computerized tomography images by detailed descriptions of CT diagnoses. The book covers the following topics: intracranial indications, head and neck, spinal cord, muscle-skeleton system, thorax, abdomen and pelvis.

  7. Filamin repeat segments required for photosensory signalling in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Afsar U

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamin is an actin binding protein which is ubiquitous in eukaryotes and its basic structure is well conserved – an N-terminal actin binding domain followed by a series of repeated segments which vary in number in different organisms. D. discoideum is a well established model organism for the study of signalling pathways and the actin cytoskeleton and as such makes an excellent organism in which to study filamin. Ddfilamin plays a putative role as a scaffolding protein in a photosensory signalling pathway and this role is thought to be mediated by the unusual repeat segments in the rod domain. Results To study the role of filamin in phototaxis, a filamin null mutant, HG1264, was transformed with constructs each of which expressed wild type filamin or a mutant filamin with a deletion of one of the repeat segments. Transformants expressing the full length filamin to wild type levels completely rescued the phototaxis defect in HG1264, however if filamin was expressed at lower than wild type levels the phototaxis defect was not restored. The transformants lacking any one of the repeat segments 2–6 retained defective phototaxis and thermotaxis phenotypes, whereas transformants expressing filaminΔ1 exhibited a range of partial complementation of the phototaxis phenotype which was related to expression levels. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that filamin lacking any of the repeat segments still localised to the same actin rich areas as wild type filamin. Ddfilamin interacts with RasD and IP experiments demonstrated that this interaction did not rely upon any single repeat segment or the actin binding domain. Conclusion This paper demonstrates that wild type levels of filamin expression are essential for the formation of functional photosensory signalling complexes and that each of the repeat segments 2–6 are essential for filamins role in phototaxis. By contrast, repeat segment 1 is not essential provided the mutated

  8. Repeat workers' compensation claims: risk factors, costs and work disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collie Alex

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of our study was to describe factors associated with repeat workers' compensation claims and to compare the work disability arising in workers with single and multiple compensation claims. Methods All initial injury claims lodged by persons of working age during a five year period (1996 to 2000 and any repeat claims were extracted from workers' compensation administrative data in the state of Victoria, Australia. Groups of workers with single and multiple claims were identified. Descriptive analysis of claims by affliction, bodily location, industry segment, occupation, employer and workplace was undertaken. Survival analysis determined the impact of these variables on the time between the claims. The economic impact and duration of work incapacity associated with initial and repeat claims was compared between groups. Results 37% of persons with an initial claim lodged a second claim. This group contained a significantly greater proportion of males, were younger and more likely to be employed in manual occupations and high-risk industries than those with single claims. 78% of repeat claims were for a second injury. Duration between the claims was shortest when the working conditions had not changed. The initial claims of repeat claimants resulted in significantly (p lower costs and work disability than the repeat claims. Conclusions A substantial proportion of injured workers experience a second occupational injury or disease. These workers pose a greater economic burden than those with single claims, and also experience a substantially greater cumulative period of work disability. There is potential to reduce the social, health and economic burden of workplace injury by enacting prevention programs targeted at these workers.

  9. Value of repeat biopsy in lupus nephritis flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greloni, G; Scolnik, M; Marin, J; Lancioni, E; Quiroz, C; Zacariaz, J; De la Iglesia Niveyro, P; Christiansen, S; Pierangelo, M A; Varela, C F; Rosa-Diez, G J; Catoggio, L J; Soriano, E R

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Renal flares are common in lupus nephritis (LN), and class switch is thought to be characteristic. There is no agreement on indications for performing a repeat renal biopsy. Our objective was to retrospectively review patients who had more than one renal biopsy performed on clinical indications, and analyse clinical, pathological and treatment changes after successive biopsies. Methods Forty-five patients with LN and one or more repeat renal biopsies were included, with a total of 116 biopsies. Results Of the 71 repeat biopsies, pathological transition occurred in 39 (54.9%). When having a previous biopsy with a proliferative lesion, class switch occurred in 55.6%, with 24.4% evolving into non-proliferative classes. When previous biopsy was class V, transition to other classes occurred in 58.3% and changes were all into proliferative classes. Conversion from one pure proliferative form to another (class III to class IV or vice versa) happened in 11.3% of the rebiopsies, with 62 rebiopsies (87.3%) leading to a change in the treatment regimen. Conclusions Histological transformations were common, and they occurred when the previous biopsy had non-proliferative lesions as well as when lesions were proliferative. Treatments were modified after repeat renal biopsy in the majority of patients. In this experience, kidney repeat biopsies were useful in guiding treatment of LN flares. PMID:25396056

  10. Age, CAG repeat length, and clinical progression in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Adam; Kumar, Brahma V; Mo, Alisa; Welsh, Claire S; Margolis, Russell L; Ross, Christopher A

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to further explore the effect of CAG repeat length on the rate of clinical progression in patients with Huntington's disease. The dataset included records for 569 subjects followed prospectively at the Baltimore Huntington's Disease Center. Participants were seen for a mean of 7.1 visits, with a mean follow-up of 8.2 years. Subjects were evaluated using the Quantified Neurologic Examination and its Motor Impairment subscale, the Mini-Mental State Examination, and the Huntington's disease Activities of Daily Living Scale. By itself, CAG repeat length showed a statistically significant but small effect on the progression of all clinical measures. Contrary to our previous expectations, controlling for age of onset increased the correlation between CAG repeat length and progression of all variables by 69% to 159%. Graphical models further supported the idea that individuals with smaller triplet expansions experience a more gradual decline. CAG repeat length becomes an important determinant of clinical prognosis when accounting for age of onset. This suggests that the aging process itself influences clinical outcomes in Huntington's disease. Inconsistent results in prior studies examining CAG repeat length and progression may indeed reflect a lack of age adjustment.

  11. Clinico-radiological correlation of Wilson's disease by magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Ken; Sakata, Chigusa; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Fuji; Sunohara, Nobuhiko (National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)); Iio, Masaaki

    1991-02-01

    Five patients with Wilson's disease received repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) examinations at intervals from 6 to 29 months. Four patients, except for asymptomatic one, also underwent positron emission tomography (PET). The significance and limitations of these imaging modalities were examined in the light of their correlation with clinical manifestations and their therapeutic evaluation. The following focal regions, detected on MRI, had a strong positive correlation with clinical manifestations: the lenticular nuclei for dystonia, the brain stem for abnormality of smooth persuit eye movements, and the caudate and lenticular nuclei for severe dysarthria/dysphagia. Follow-up MRI for 3 patients showed an improvement of findings in the lenticular nuclei, lateral part of the putamen, and brain stem, that was in accordance with improved clinical or neurologic manifestations, such as dystonia and cerebellar symptoms. Severe abnormality in the caudate nucleus was associated with poor prognosis. Repeated CT failed to show serial changes in any of the patients. Regional blood flow and oxygen metabolic rate, obtained by PET examinations, were slightly decreased in the thalamus that had normal findings on both MRI and CT, as well as in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. PET was, however, inferior to MRI in detecting fine foci within the basal ganglia. In conclusion, there was a good correlation between MRI findings, particularly foci of the caudate and lenticular nuclei, and clinical manifestations. Repeated MRI examinations were the most useful approach to the evaluation of therapeutic effects and prognosis. (N.K.).

  12. Polarization tomography of metallic nanohole arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Altewischer, E; Van Exter, M P; Woerdman, J P; Alkemade, P F A; Van Zuuk, A; Van der Drift, E

    2004-01-01

    We report polarization tomography experiments on metallic nanohole arrays with square and hexagonal symmetry. As a main result, we find that a fully polarized input beam is partly depolarized after transmission through a nanohole array. This loss of polarization coherence is found to be anisotropic, i.e. it depends on the polarization state of the input beam. The depolarization is ascribed to a combination of two factors: i) the nonlocal response of the array due to surface plasmon propagation, ii) the non-plane wave nature of a practical input beam.

  13. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-04-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, pre-clinical and hybrid scanners (, PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  14. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.

    1985-12-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness.

  15. Investigating Repeater Effects on Chained Equipercentile Equating with Common Anchor Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooyeon; Walker, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of repeat takers of a licensure test on the equating functions in the context of a nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design. Examinees who had taken a new, to-be-equated form of the test were divided into three subgroups according to their previous testing experience: (a) repeaters who previously took…

  16. Repeatability Using Automatic Tracing with Canon OCT- HS100 and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT 5000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Brautaset

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT, can be used in clinical practice to provide high resolution cross-sectional images of the retina, optic disc and macula structure. These measurements can be useful for early detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment guidance for retinal diseases. Therefore, repeatability of measurements in OCT is of great importance.Macula and optic disc parameters from the right eye of 30 healthy subjects were obtained twice with the Canon OCT-HS100 and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT 5000. Repeatability was evaluated by use of the coefficient of repeatability (CR and the coefficient of repeatability as a percentage of the mean (CR%, and the obtained measurements were compared between the instruments.CR% of optic disc parameters ranged between 0.90 and 22.22% and 0.00 and 16.00% with the Canon and Zeiss OCT respectively. For macular parameters CR% ranged between 0.62 and 2.81% and 0.99 and 1.81% with the Canon and Zeiss OCT respectively. No statistical difference could be found when comparing the CR of all macular and disc measurements between the instruments. Compared to our previously published data repeatability has significantly improved with the inclusion of automatic tracking systems with both the Canon and Zeiss OCT.Automatic tracking function improves repeatability in both Canon OCT-HS100 and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT 5000. However, measurements generated by the two instruments are still not interchangeable.

  17. Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated testing with feedback benefits learning compared to rereading of introductory psychology key-concepts in an educational context. The testing effect was examined immediately after practice, after 18 days, and at a five-week delay in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 83). The results revealed that repeated testing with feedback significantly enhanced learning compared to rereading at all delays, demonstrating that repeated retrieval enhances retention compared to repeated encoding in the short- and the long-term. In addition, the effect of repeated testing was beneficial for students irrespectively of working memory capacity. It is argued that teaching methods involving repeated retrieval are important to consider by the educational system.

  18. Preliminary Results on Different Impedance Contrast Agents for Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging with Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Kosobrodov, R.; Barry, M. A.; Chik, W.; Pouliopoulos, J.; Oh, T. I.; Thiagalingam, A.; McEwan, A.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies in animal models suggest that the use of small volume boluses of NaCl as an impedance contrast agent can significantly improve pulmonary perfusion imaging by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). However, these studies used highly concentrated NaCl solution (20%) which may have adverse effects on the patients. In a pilot experiment, we address this problem by comparing a number of different Impedance Contrast Boluses (ICBs). Conductivity changes in the lungs of a sheep after the injection of four different ICBs were compared, including three NaCl-based ICBs and one glucose-based ICB. The following procedure was followed for each ICB. Firstly, ventilation was turned off to provide an apneic window of approximately 40s to image the conductivity changes due to the ICB. Each ICB was then injected through a pig-tail catheter directly into the right atrium. EIT images were acquired throughout the apnea to capture the conductivity change. For each ICB, the experiment was repeated three times. The three NaCl-based ICB exhibited similar behaviour in which following the injection of each of these ICBs, the conductivity of each lung predictably increased. The effect of the ICB of 5% glucose solution was inconclusive. A small decrease in conductivity in the left lung was observed in two out of three cases and none was discernible in the right lung.

  19. Repeat concussions in the national football league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Ira R; Viano, David C; Powell, John W; Pellman, Elliot J

    2011-01-01

    Repeat concussion is an important issue in the National Football League (NFL). An initial description of repeat injuries was published for 6 years (1996-2001). The characteristics and frequency of repeat concussion in the NFL have not changed in the subsequent 6 years (2002-2007). Case control. From 1996 to 2007, concussions were reported using a standardized form documenting signs and symptoms, loss of consciousness and medical action taken. Data on repeat concussions were analyzed for the 12 years and compared between the 2 periods. In 2002-2007, 152 players had repeat concussions (vs 160 in 1996-2001); 44 had 3+ head injuries (vs 52). The positions most often associated with repeat concussion in 2002-2007 were the defensive secondary, kick unit, running back, and linebacker. The odds for repeat concussion were elevated for wide receivers, tight ends, and linebackers but lower than in the earlier period. During 2002-2007, over half of players with repeat concussion were removed from play, and fewer immediately returned (vs 1996-2001). The average duration between concussions was 1.25 years for 2002-2007 and 1.65 years for the 12-year period. Over 12 years, 7.6% of all repeat concussions occurred within 2 weeks of the prior concussion. The defensive secondary, kick unit, running back, and linebacker have the highest incidence of repeat concussion. During 2002-2007, more than half of players with repeat concussion were removed from play, and only a fraction immediately returned. Although concussion was managed more conservatively by team physicians in the recent 6 years, repeat concussions occurred at similar rates during both periods.

  20. Automated quality checks on repeat prescribing.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Jeremy E; Wroe, Christopher J; Roberts, Angus; Swallow, Angela; Stables, David; Cantrill, Judith A; Rector, Alan L.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Good clinical practice in primary care includes periodic review of repeat prescriptions. Markers of prescriptions that may need review have been described, but manually checking all repeat prescriptions against the markers would be impractical. AIM: To investigate the feasibility of computerising the application of repeat prescribing quality checks to electronic patient records in United Kingdom (UK) primary care. DESIGN OF STUDY: Software performance test against benchmark manual...

  1. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  2. [Computed tomography of the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T.S.; Kofoed, K.F.; der, Recke P. von;

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the coronary arteries by multi-detector row computed tomography is a promising new alternative to conventional invasive coronary angiography. This article describes the technical background, methods, limitations and clinical applications and reviews current literature...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... materials and a metallic taste in his/her mouth that lasts for a few minutes. Occasionally, a ...

  5. Electrical Impedance Tomography Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electrical Impendance Tomography (EIT) utilizes a series of electrodes in a circumferential band-like device feeding these signals to a portable computer that...

  6. Use of Computed Tomography Scans for Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Holden, Timothy A.; Brunsden, Barry S.; Finley, Charles C.; Skinner, Margaret W.

    2007-01-01

    While 3-dimensional (3D) imaging by computed tomography has long been desirable for research and treatment of cochlear-implant patients, technical challenges have limited its wide application. Recent developments in scanner hardware and image processing techniques now allow image quality improvements that make clinical applications feasible. Validation experiments were performed to characterize a new methodology and its imaging performance.

  7. Computed tomography of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Engelshoven, J M; Kreel, L

    1979-02-01

    The conventional anatomy of the prostate is reviewed and the computed tomography (CT) anatomy described and illustrated. The results of 55 "normal" cases were analyzed for size and relationship to the symphysis pubis, retropubic space, and bladder, as shown on CT sections correlating the features with age and possible urinary symptoms. Attention is also drawn to the differences between phleboliths and prostatic calcification. Computed tomography is an effective method of demonstrating the prostate and surrounding structures and of assessing prostatic enlargement.

  8. Witness recall across repeated interviews in a case of repeated abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubacher, Sonja P; La Rooy, David

    2014-02-01

    In this illustrative case study we examine the three forensic interviews of a girl who experienced repeated sexual abuse from ages 7 to 11. She disclosed the abuse after watching a serialized television show that contained a storyline similar to her own experience. This triggered an investigation that ended in successful prosecution of the offender. Because this case involved abuse that was repeated on a weekly basis for 4 years we thus investigated the degree to which the child's narrative reflected specific episodes or generic accounts, and both the interviewer's and child's attempts to elicit and provide, respectively, specific details across the 3 interviews collected in a 1 month period. Across the 3 interviews, the child's account was largely generic, yet on a number of occasions she provided details specific to individual incidents (episodic leads) that could have been probed further. As predicted: earlier interviews were characterized more by episodic than generic prompts and the reverse was true for the third interview; the child often responded using the same style of language (episodic or generic) as the interviewer; and open questions yielded narrative information. We discuss the importance of adopting children's words to specify occurrences, and the potential benefits of permitting generic recall in investigative interviews on children's ability to provide episodic leads. Despite the fact that the testimony was characterized by generic information about what usually happened, rather than specific episodic details about individual occurrences, this case resulted in successful prosecution.

  9. Fast dual tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Philip M.

    1990-09-01

    This paper can be considered as a continuation of the work by Carrion and Carneiro (1989), where a generalized approach to linearized inversion of geophysical data was developed. Their method allows one to incorporate virtually any constraints in the inversion and reformulate the problem in the dual space of Langrangian multipliers (see also Carrion, 1989a). The constrained tomography makes traveltime inversion robust: it automatically rejects “bad data” which correspond to solutions beyond the chosen constraints and allows one to start inversion with an arbitrary chosen initial model.In this paper, I will derive basic formulas for constrained tomographic imaging that can be used in such areas of geophysics as global mapping of the earth interior, exploration geophysics, etc. The method is fast: an example that will be shown in the paper took only 6 min. of VAX CPU time. Had the conventional least-squares matrix inversion been used it would have taken more than 10 hours of the CPU time to solve the same problem.

  10. Fast dual tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrion, P.M. (PPPG/UFBA - Campus Universitario da Federacao, Salvador-Bahia (Brazil))

    1990-09-01

    This paper can be considered as a continuation of the work by Carrion and Carneiro (1989), where a generalized approach to linearized inversion of geophysical data was developed. Their method allows one to incorporate virtually any constraints in the inversion and reformulate the problem in the dual space of Langrangian multipliers (see also Carrion, 1989a). The constrained tomography makes traveltime inversion robust: it automatically rejects bad data which correspond to solutions beyond the chosen constraints and allows one to start inversion with an arbitrary chosen initial model. In this paper, the author derives basic formulas for constrained tomographic imaging that can be used in such areas of geophysics as global mapping of the earth interior, exploration geophysics, etc. The method is fast: an example that will be shown in the paper took only 6 min. of VAX CPU time. Had the conventional least-squares matrix inversion been used it would have taken more than 10 hours of the CPU time to solve the same problem.

  11. Multiphoton tomography of astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Pietruszka, Anna; Bückle, Rainer; Gerlach, Nicole; Heinrich, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    Weightlessness may impair the astronaut's health conditions. Skin impairments belong to the most frequent health problems during space missions. Within the Skin B project, skin physiological changes during long duration space flights are currently investigated on three European astronauts that work for nearly half a year at the ISS. Measurements on the hydration, the transepidermal water loss, the surface structure, elasticity and the tissue density by ultrasound are conducted. Furthermore, high-resolution in vivo histology is performed by multiphoton tomography with 300 nm spatial and 200 ps temporal resolution. The mobile certified medical tomograph with a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm is employed to measure two-photon autofluorescence and SHG in the volar forearm of the astronauts. Modification of the tissue architecture and of the fluorescent biomolecules NAD(P)H, keratin, melanin and elastin are detected as well as of SHG-active collagen. Thinning of the vital epidermis, a decrease of the autofluoresence intensity, an increase in the long fluorescence lifetime, and a reduced skin ageing index SAAID based on an increased collagen level in the upper dermis have been found. Current studies focus on recovery effects.

  12. Interventional video tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppe, Michael J.; Pongracz, Ferenc; Ploder, Oliver; Wagner, Arne; Ewers, Rolf

    1995-05-01

    Interventional Video Tomography (IVT) is a new imaging modality for Image Directed Surgery to visualize in real-time intraoperatively the spatial position of surgical instruments relative to the patient's anatomy. The video imaging detector is based on a special camera equipped with an optical viewing and lighting system and electronic 3D sensors. When combined with an endoscope it is used for examining the inside of cavities or hollow organs of the body from many different angles. The surface topography of objects is reconstructed from a sequence of monocular video or endoscopic images. To increase accuracy and speed of the reconstruction the relative movement between objects and endoscope is continuously tracked by electronic sensors. The IVT image sequence represents a 4D data set in stereotactic space and contains image, surface topography and motion data. In ENT surgery an IVT image sequence of the planned and so far accessible surgical path is acquired prior to surgery. To simulate the surgical procedure the cross sectional imaging data is superimposed with the digitally stored IVT image sequence. During surgery the video sequence component of the IVT simulation is substituted by the live video source. The IVT technology makes obsolete the use of 3D digitizing probes for the patient image coordinate transformation. The image fusion of medical imaging data with live video sources is the first practical use of augmented reality in medicine. During surgery a head-up display is used to overlay real-time reformatted cross sectional imaging data with the live video image.

  13. Solar tomography adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhao, Gang

    2014-03-10

    Conventional solar adaptive optics uses one deformable mirror (DM) and one guide star for wave-front sensing, which seriously limits high-resolution imaging over a large field of view (FOV). Recent progress toward multiconjugate adaptive optics indicates that atmosphere turbulence induced wave-front distortion at different altitudes can be reconstructed by using multiple guide stars. To maximize the performance over a large FOV, we propose a solar tomography adaptive optics (TAO) system that uses tomographic wave-front information and uses one DM. We show that by fully taking advantage of the knowledge of three-dimensional wave-front distribution, a classical solar adaptive optics with one DM can provide an extra performance gain for high-resolution imaging over a large FOV in the near infrared. The TAO will allow existing one-deformable-mirror solar adaptive optics to deliver better performance over a large FOV for high-resolution magnetic field investigation, where solar activities occur in a two-dimensional field up to 60'', and where the near infrared is superior to the visible in terms of magnetic field sensitivity.

  14. FIB-SEM tomography in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilyaprak, Caroline; Bittermann, Anne Greet; Daraspe, Jean; Humbel, Bruno M

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional information is much easier to understand than a set of two-dimensional images. Therefore a layman is thrilled by the pseudo-3D image taken in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) while, when seeing a transmission electron micrograph, his imagination is challenged. First approaches to gain insight in the third dimension were to make serial microtome sections of a region of interest (ROI) and then building a model of the object. Serial microtome sectioning is a tedious and skill-demanding work and therefore seldom done. In the last two decades with the increase of computer power, sophisticated display options, and the development of new instruments, an SEM with a built-in microtome as well as a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM), serial sectioning, and 3D analysis has become far easier and faster.Due to the relief like topology of the microtome trimmed block face of resin-embedded tissue, the ROI can be searched in the secondary electron mode, and at the selected spot, the ROI is prepared with the ion beam for 3D analysis. For FIB-SEM tomography, a thin slice is removed with the ion beam and the newly exposed face is imaged with the electron beam, usually by recording the backscattered electrons. The process, also called "slice and view," is repeated until the desired volume is imaged.As FIB-SEM allows 3D imaging of biological fine structure at high resolution of only small volumes, it is crucial to perform slice and view at carefully selected spots. Finding the region of interest is therefore a prerequisite for meaningful imaging. Thin layer plastification of biofilms offers direct access to the original sample surface and allows the selection of an ROI for site-specific FIB-SEM tomography just by its pronounced topographic features.

  15. A measurement plan of gas concentration and temperature distribution reconstruction based on the tunable diode laser absorption tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao-ran; Jin, Xing; Wang, Guang-yu; Song, Jun-ling

    2014-11-01

    Based on the tunable diode laser absorption tomography, gas concentration and temperature two-dimensional distribution reconstruction is realized using algebraic iterative reconstruction technique (ART). A measurement plan is proposed based on the beam splitting lens, and the corresponding beam arrangement is put forward. The beam splitting lenses are used in the plan to making one laser beam cross the measurement area repeatedly. Thus can raise the utilization ratio of laser beam and simplify the structure of measurement platform. A model for H2O vapor concentration and temperature distribution is assumed, and numerical simulation is utilized using two absorption transitions. The feasibility of the measurement plan is proved by the simulation experiment. The influences of initial beam angle, the number of beams and grids on the reconstructed results are analyzed numerically. A concept of phantom description method using in simulation experiments is proposed in order to getting closer to the real experiments. The phantom description method is used in the numerical simulation to evaluating concentration and temperature field reconstruction. Through this method, expected data is sampled from initial data, and reconstructed result is obtained by interpolation. The influence of random errors in projections on distribution reconstruction is also analyzed. The measurement plan can reconstruct the gas concentration and temperature distribution with a simplified measurement platform using beam splitting lenses. The feasibility of the phantom description method is also proved by the simulation experiment.

  16. Technical Note: Wet validation of optical tomography for drinking water discolouration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Floris

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of validation experiments for the reconstruction of a cross-sectional particle concentration field in a transparent pipe filled with a fluid using optical tomography.

  17. Technical Note: Wet validation of optical tomography for drinking water discolouration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Floris

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of validation experiments for the reconstruction of a cross-sectional particle concentration field in a transparent pipe filled with a fluid using optical tomography.

  18. Neutron radiography and tomography facility at IBR-2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlenko, D. P.; Kichanov, S. E.; Lukin, E. V.; Rutkauskas, A. V.; Belushkin, A. V.; Bokuchava, G. D.; Savenko, B. N.

    2016-05-01

    An experimental station for investigations using neutron radiography and tomography was developed at the upgraded high-flux pulsed IBR-2 reactor. The 20 × 20 cm neutron beam is formed by the system of collimators with the characteristic parameter L/D varying from 200 to 2000. The detector system is based on a 6LiF/ZnS scintillation screen; images are recorded using a high-sensitivity video camera based on the high-resolution CCD matrix. The results of the first neutron radiography and tomography experiments at the developed facility are presented.

  19. The potential of micromagnetic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Lennart; Béguin, Annemarieke; Fabian, Karl; Reith, Pim; Rastogi, Ankur; Barnhoorn, Auke; Hilgenkamp, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Methods to derive paleodirections or paleointensities from rocks currently rely on measurements of bulk samples (typically ~10 cc). The process of recording and storing magnetizations as function of temperature, however, differs for grains of various sizes and chemical compositions. Most rocks, by their mere nature, consist of assemblages of grains varying in size, shape, and chemistry. When dealing with lavas, this differing magnetic behaviour often hampers paleointensity experiments; while occasionally a reliable paleodirection is obscured (e.g. Coe et al. (2014)). If we would be able to isolate the contribution of each magnetic grain in a sample to the bulk magnetic moment of that sample, a wealth of opportunities for highly detailed magnetic analysis would be opened, possibly leading to an entirely new approach in retrieving paleomagnetic signals from complex mineralogies. Firstly, the distribution and volume of the remanence carrying grains in the sample must be assessed; this is done using a MicroCT scanner capable of detecting grains >1 micron. Secondly, the magnetic stray field perpendicular to the surface of a thin sample is measured using a high-resolution DC SQUID microscope. A mathematical inversion of these measurements yields the isolated direction and magnitude of the magnetic moment of individual grains in the sample. Here we show the results of inversions on a synthetic sample that was magnetised under different angles with respect to the scanned surface. Computational limitations constrain us to inverting only up to tens of grains at the same time. Besides presenting new results of the first successful non-destructive micromagnetic tomography study, we will discuss the current potential and limitations of this technique.

  20. Recency, repeatability, and reinforcer retrenchment: an experimental analysis of resurgence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieving, Gregory A; Lattal, Kennon A

    2003-09-01

    Four experiments were conducted with pigeons to assess the experimental conditions necessary for the occurrence of resurgence. The general procedure consisted of the following conditions: Condition 1--reinforcement of key pecking; Condition 2--reinforcement of treadle pressing and concurrent extinction of key pecking; and Condition 3--the resurgence condition wherein resurgence was defined as the recovery of key pecking. In Experiments 1 and 2, the resurgence condition was conventional extinction. The effect of recency on resurgence magnitude was examined in Experiment 1 by manipulating the number of sessions of Condition 2, above. Resurgence was not a function of recency with the parameters used. Repeating the three conditions revealed resurgence to be a repeatable effect in Experiment 2. In Experiment 3, a variable-time schedule was in effect for the resurgence condition. Resurgence was not produced by response-independent food delivery. In Experiment 4, the resurgence condition was a variable-interval schedule for treadle pressing that arranged a lower reinforcement rate than in Condition 2 (92% reduction in reinforcers per minute). Resurgence was lower in magnitude relative to conventional extinction, although resurgence was obtained with 2 out of 3 pigeons. The results are discussed in terms of the variables controlling resurgence and the relations between behavioral history, resurgence, and other forms of response recovery.

  1. Preliminary experience on the implementation of computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 source in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalludin, Z.; Min, U. N.; Ishak, W. Z. Wan; Malik, R. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our preliminary work of the computed tomography (CT) image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) implementation on cervical cancer patients. We developed a protocol in which patients undergo two Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examinations; a) prior to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and b) prior to intra-cavitary brachytherapy for tumour identification and delineation during IGBT planning and dosimetry. For each fraction, patients were simulated using CT simulator and images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The HR-CTV, IR-CTV, bladder and rectum were delineated on CT-based contouring for cervical cancer. Plans were optimised to achieve HR-CTV and IR-CTV dose (D90) of total EQD2 80Gy and 60Gy respectively, while limiting the minimum dose to the most irradiated 2cm3 volume (D2cc) of bladder and rectum to total EQD2 90Gy and 75Gy respectively. Data from seven insertions were analysed by comparing the volume-based with traditional point- based doses. Based on our data, there were differences between volume and point doses of HR- CTV, bladder and rectum organs. As the number of patients having the CT-based IGBT increases from day to day in our centre, it is expected that the treatment and dosimetry accuracy will be improved with the implementation.

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which ... that lasts for at most a minute or two. You may experience a sensation like you have ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which ... that lasts for at most a minute or two. You may experience a sensation like you have ...

  4. Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Alberto Testoni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT is an optical imaging modality that performs high-resolution, cross-sectional, subsurface tomographic imaging of the microstructure of tissues. The physical principle of OCT is similar to that of B-mode ultrasound imaging, except that it uses infrared light waves rather than acoustic waves. The in vivo resolution is 10–25 times better (about 10 µm than with high-frequency ultrasound imaging, but the depth of penetration is limited to 1–3 mm, depending on tissue structure, depth of focus of the probe used, and pressure applied to the tissue surface. In the last decade, OCT technology has evolved from an experimental laboratory tool to a new diagnostic imaging modality with a wide spectrum of clinical applications in medical practice, including the gastrointestinal tract and pancreatico-biliary ductal system. OCT imaging from the gastrointestinal tract can be done in humans by using narrow-diameter, catheter-based probes that can be inserted through the accessory channel of either a conventional front-view endoscope, for investigating the epithelial structure of the gastrointestinal tract, or a side-view endoscope, inside a standard transparent ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography catheter, for investigating the pancreatico-biliary ductal system. The esophagus and esophagogastric junction have been the most widely investigated organs so far; more recently, duodenum, colon, and the pancreatico-biliary ductal system have also been extensively investigated. OCT imaging of the gastrointestinal wall structure is characterized by a multiple-layer architecture that permits an accurate evaluation of the mucosa, lamina propria, muscularis mucosae, and part of the submucosa. The technique may therefore be used to identify preneoplastic conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's epithelium and dysplasia, and evaluate the depth of penetration of early-stage neoplastic lesions. OCT imaging

  5. Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, David

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new method for noninvasive cross-sectional imaging in biological systems. In OCT, the longitudinal locations of tissue structures are determined by measuring the time-of-flight delays of light backscattered from these structures. The optical delays are measured by low coherence interferometry. Information on lateral position is provided by transverse scanning of the probe beam. The two dimensional map of optical scattering from internal tissue microstructures is then represented in a false-color or grayscale image. OCT is the optical analog of ultrasonic pulse-echo imaging, but with greatly improved spatial resolutions (a few microns). This thesis describes the development of this new high resolution tomographic imaging technology and the demonstration of its use in a variety of tissues under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. In vitro OCT ranging and imaging studies were performed using human ocular and arterial tissues, two clinically relevant examples of transparent and turbid media, respectively. In the anterior eye, precise measurements of cornea and anterior chamber dimensions were made. In the arterial specimens, the differentiation between fatty -calcified and fibromuscular tissues was demonstrated. In vivo OCT imaging in the retina and optic nerve head in human subjects was also performed. The delineation of retinal layers, which has not been possible with other noninvasive imaging techniques, is demonstrated in these OCT images. OCT has high spatial resolution but limited penetration into turbid tissue. It has potential for diagnostic applications where high resolution is needed and optical access is available, such as in the eye, skin, surgically exposed tissues, and surfaces that can be reached by various catheters and endoscopic probes. In particular, the measurement of fine retinal structures promises improvements in the diagnosis and management of glaucoma, macular edema and other vitreo-retinal diseases

  6. [Tau Positron Emission Tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Makoto

    2017-07-01

    Accumulation of fibrillar tau protein aggregates is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative dementias, including a subgroup of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Visualization of tau lesions in the brains of living subjects enables a pathology-based diagnosis of dementing illnesses in the prodromal stage, and offers objective measures of disease progression and outcomes of disease-modifying therapies. With this rationale, diverse classes of low-molecular-weight chemicals capable of binding to a β-pleated sheet structure have been developed to be used for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) of tau pathologies. Clinical PET studies of AD patients with such tau probes have provided the following insights: (1) Tau fibrils accumulate in the hippocampal formation in an age-dependent manner that is independent of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) pathology; (2) The deposition of Aβ may trigger a spatial expansion of tau pathology, in transition from normal aging to advanced AD; and (3) Tau accumulation is intimately associated with local neuronal loss, leading to cortical atrophy and focal symptoms. In contrast, studies of FTLD have shown a limited performance of first-generation PET probes in capturing non-AD-type tau lesions. New compounds have accordingly been developed and clinically tested, proving to yield a high contrast for tau deposits with high specificity. These second-generation probes are being evaluated primarily by pharmaceutical companies, in line with their growing demands for neuroimaging-based biomarkers serving for clinical trials of anti-Aβ and anti-tau therapies. Meanwhile, a consortium flexibly linking academia and industry to facilitate the utilization of research tools, including tau PET probes, has been established in Japan, for the ultimate purpose of elucidating the molecular etiology of tauopathies and creating diagnostic and therapeutic agents based on such an understanding.

  7. Quantum imaging as an ancilla-assisted process tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalaii, M.; Afsary, M.; Alipour, S.; Rezakhani, A. T.

    2016-10-01

    We show how a recent experiment of quantum imaging with undetected photons can basically be described as an (a partial) ancilla-assisted process tomography in which the object is described by an amplitude-damping quantum channel. We propose a simplified quantum circuit version of this scenario, which also enables one to recast quantum imaging in quantum computation language. Our analogy and analysis may help us to better understand the role of classical and/or quantum correlations in imaging experiments.

  8. Reward modulation of contextual cueing: Repeated context overshadows repeated target location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifian, Fariba; Contier, Oliver; Preuschhof, Claudia; Pollmann, Stefan

    2017-08-07

    Contextual cueing can be enhanced by reward. However, there is a debate if reward is associated with the repeated target-distractor configurations or with the repeated target locations that occur in both repeated and new displays. Based on neuroimaging evidence, we hypothesized that reward becomes associated with the target location only in new displays, but not in repeated displays, where the repeated target location is overshadowed by the more salient repeated target-distractor configuration. To test this hypothesis, we varied the reward value associated with the same target location in repeated and new displays. The results confirmed the overshadowing hypothesis in that search facilitation in repeated target-distractor configurations was modulated by the variable value associated with the target location. This effect was observed mainly in early learning.

  9. UK 2009-2010 repeat station report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J.G. Shanahan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The British Geological Survey is responsible for conducting the UK geomagnetic repeat station programme. Measurements made at the UK repeat station sites are used in conjunction with the three UK magnetic observatories: Hartland, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick, to produce a regional model of the local field each year. The UK network of repeat stations comprises 41 stations which are occupied at approximately 3-4 year intervals. Practices for conducting repeat station measurements continue to evolve as advances are made in survey instrumentation and as the usage of the data continues to change. Here, a summary of the 2009 and 2010 UK repeat station surveys is presented, highlighting the measurement process and techniques, density of network, reduction process and recent results.

  10. Acoustic Travel-Time Tomography of the Atmosphere at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    many outdoor and indoor acoustic tomography experiments have been performed by scientists from the University of Leipzig , Germany, e.g., see [3,4...in outdoor [3] and indoor [4] acoustic tomography experiments carried out by scientists from the University of Leipzig . The results obtained showed...Ilmenauer Fass (Technical Report, Leipzig Institute of Meteorology, Leipzig ). 5. Ostashev, V. E., A. Bedard, S. N. Vecherin, D. K. Wilson, 2009

  11. Muon tomography: Plans for observations in the Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, D.; Beauducel, F.; Déclais, Y.; Lesparre, N.; Marteau, J.; Nicollin, F.; Tarantola, A.

    2010-02-01

    The application of muon tomography to monitor and image the internal structure of volcanoes in the Lesser Antilles is discussed. Particular focus is directed towards the three volcanoes that fall under the responsibility of the Institut de Physique du Globe of Paris, namely La Montagne Pelée in Martinique, La Soufriére in Guadeloupe, and the Soufriére Hills in Montserrat. The technological criteria for the design of portable muon telescopes are presented in detail for both their mechanical and electronic aspects. The detector matrices are constructed with scintillator strips, and their detection characteristics are discussed. The tomography inversion is presented, and its distinctive characteristics are briefly discussed. Details are given on the implementation of muon tomography experiments on La Soufriére in Guadeloupe.

  12. Development of novel emission tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Geng

    . The detector offers the combination of an excellent intrinsic spatial resolution, a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a large active area, and reasonable detection efficiency over the energy range from 27 to 140 keV. Based on I-EMCCD detector we developed a prototype dual-head single photon emission microscope (SPEM) system for mouse imaging. Both phantom and animal imaging experiments have been performed to evaluate system capabilities for ultra-high resolution SPECT imaging. In addition, we have presented a feasibility study of using emission tomography system for synchrotron X-ray fluorescence computer tomography (XFCT). Based on high resolution semiconductor detector and collimation aperture, X-ray fluorescence emission tomography (XFET) can offer more imaging information content by each detected photon and allow less scanning motion, which help to overcome the hurdle for current X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) and improve imaging speed. CCD-based emission tomography system has been set up at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) for phantom and animal imaging. It has demonstrated that XFET is capable of acquiring 3D element distribution with a greatly improved imaging speed. Key words: SPECT, ERPC, I-EMCCD, SPEM, APS, and XFET

  13. Single and repeated elective abortions in Japan: a psychosocial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, T; Toda, M A; Shima, S; Sugawara, M

    1998-09-01

    Despite its social, legal and medical importance, termination of pregnancy (TOP) (induced abortion) has rarely been the focus of psychosocial research. Of a total of 1329 women who consecutively attended the antenatal clinic of a general hospital in Japan, 635 were expecting their first baby. Of these 635 women, 103 (16.2%) had experienced TOP once previously (first aborters), while 47 (7.4%) had experienced TOP two or more times (repeated aborters). Discriminant function analysis was performed using psychosocial variables found to be significantly associated with either first abortion or repeated abortion in bivariate analyses. This revealed that both first and repeated aborters could be predicted by smoking habits and an unwanted current pregnancy while the repeated aborters appear to differ from first aborters in having a longer pre-marital dating period, non-arranged marriages, smoking habits, early maternal loss experience or a low level of maternal care during childhood. These findings suggest that both the frequency of abortion and its repetition have psychosocial origins.

  14. The development of ingroup favoritism in repeated social dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Rachael Dorrough

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In two comprehensive and fully incentivized studies, we investigate the development of ingroup favoritism as one of two aspects of parochial altruism in repeated social dilemmas. Specifically, we test whether ingroup favoritism is a fixed phenomenon that can be observed from the very beginning and remains stable over time, or whether it develops (increases vs. decreases during repeated contact. Ingroup favoritism is assessed through cooperation behavior in a repeated continuous prisoner’s dilemma where participants sequentially interact with ten members of the ingroup (own city and university and subsequently with ten members of the outgroup (other city and university, or vice versa. In none of the experiments do we observe initial differences in cooperation behavior for interaction partners from the ingroup, as compared to outgroup, and we only observe small differences in expectations regarding the interaction partners’ cooperation behavior. After repeated interaction, however, including a change of groups, clear ingroup favoritism can be observed. Instead of being due to gradual and potentially biased updating of expectations, we found that these emerging differences were mainly driven by the change of interaction partners’ group membership that occurred after round 10. This indicates that in social dilemma settings ingroup favoritism is to some degree dynamic in that it is enhanced and sometimes only observable if group membership is activated by thinking about both the interaction with the ingroup and the outgroup.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma ray tomography for image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, Karlos A.N.; Moura, Alex; Dantas, Carlos; Melo, Silvio; Lima, Emerson, E-mail: karlosguedes@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Meric, Ilker [University of Bergen (Norway)

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo simulations of known density and shape object was validate with Gamma Ray Tomography in static experiments. An aluminum half-moon piece placed inside a steel pipe was the MC simulation test object that was also measured by means of gamma ray transmission. Wall effect of the steel pipe due to irradiation geometry in a single pair source-detector tomography was evaluated by comparison with theoretical data. MCNPX code requires a defined geometry to each photon trajectory which practically prevents this usage for tomography reconstruction simulation. The solution was found by writing a program in Delphi language to create input files automation code. Simulations of tomography data by automated MNCPX code were carried out and validated by experimental data. Working in this sequence the produced data needed a databank to be stored. Experimental setup used a Cesium-137 isotopic radioactive source (7.4 × 109 Bq), and NaI(Tl) scintillation detector of (51 × 51) × 10−3 m crystal size coupled to a multichannel analyzer. A stainless steel tubes of 0,154 m internal diameter, 0.014 m thickness wall. The results show that the MCNPX simulation code adapted to automated input file is useful for generating a matrix data M(θ,t), of a computerized gamma ray tomography for any known density and regular shape object. Experimental validation used RMSE from gamma ray paths and from attenuation coefficient data. (author)

  16. Database tomography for commercial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostoff, Ronald N.; Eberhart, Henry J.

    1994-01-01

    Database tomography is a method for extracting themes and their relationships from text. The algorithms, employed begin with word frequency and word proximity analysis and build upon these results. When the word 'database' is used, think of medical or police records, patents, journals, or papers, etc. (any text information that can be computer stored). Database tomography features a full text, user interactive technique enabling the user to identify areas of interest, establish relationships, and map trends for a deeper understanding of an area of interest. Database tomography concepts and applications have been reported in journals and presented at conferences. One important feature of the database tomography algorithm is that it can be used on a database of any size, and will facilitate the users ability to understand the volume of content therein. While employing the process to identify research opportunities it became obvious that this promising technology has potential applications for business, science, engineering, law, and academe. Examples include evaluating marketing trends, strategies, relationships and associations. Also, the database tomography process would be a powerful component in the area of competitive intelligence, national security intelligence and patent analysis. User interests and involvement cannot be overemphasized.

  17. Diffractive molecular-orbital tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Chunyang; Zhu, Xiaosong; Lan, Pengfei; Wang, Feng; He, Lixin; Shi, Wenjing; Li, Yang; Li, Min; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-03-01

    High-order-harmonic generation in the interaction of femtosecond lasers with atoms and molecules opens the path to molecular-orbital tomography and to probe the electronic dynamics with attosecond-Ångström resolutions. Molecular-orbital tomography requires both the amplitude and phase of the high-order harmonics. Yet the measurement of phases requires sophisticated techniques and represents formidable challenges at present. Here we report a scheme, called diffractive molecular-orbital tomography, to retrieve the molecular orbital solely from the amplitude of high-order harmonics without measuring any phase information. We have applied this method to image the molecular orbitals of N2, CO2, and C2H2 . The retrieved orbital is further improved by taking account the correction of Coulomb potential. The diffractive molecular-orbital tomography scheme, removing the roadblock of phase measurement, significantly simplifies the molecular-orbital tomography procedure and paves an efficient and robust way to the imaging of more complex molecules.

  18. Double-Difference Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a double-difference method for the inversion of seismic wavespeed structure by adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model-based predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings, and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding nonuniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby largely canceling out the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and in practice. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher-resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography, a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography, one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  19. Anterior Segment Tomography with the Cirrus Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo B. Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT is an optical acquisition method to examine biological tissues. In recent years, OCT has become an important imaging technology used in diagnosing and following macular pathologies. Further development enabled application of optical coherence tomography in evaluation of the integrity of the nerve fiber layer, optic nerve cupping, anterior chamber angle, or corneal topography. In this manuscript we overview the use of OCT in the clinical practice to enable corneal, iris, ciliary body, and angle evaluation and diagnostics.

  20. Positron emission tomography experience with 2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2-[¹⁸F]FA) in the living human brain of smokers with paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brašić, James Robert; Cascella, Nicola; Kumar, Anil; Zhou, Yun; Hilton, John; Raymont, Vanessa; Crabb, Andrew; Guevara, Maria Rita; Horti, Andrew G; Wong, Dean Foster

    2012-04-01

    Utilizing postmortem data (Breese et al. [2000] Neuropsychopharmacology 23:351-364), we hypothesized that the densities of high-affinity neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain exist in a continuum from highest to lowest as follows: smokers without schizophrenia > smokers with schizophrenia > nonsmokers without schizophrenia > nonsmokers with schizophrenia. Application of the Kruskal-Wallis Test (Statacorp, 2003) to the postmortem data (Breese et al. [2000] Neuropsychopharmacology 23:351-364) confirmed the hypothesized order in the cortex and the hippocampus and attained significance in the caudate and the thalamus. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed for 60 min at 6 h after the intravenous administration of 444 megabequerels [MBq] (12 mCi) 2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2-[¹⁸F]FA), a radiotracer for high-affinity neuronal α4β2 nAChRs, as a bolus plus continuous infusion to 10 adults (seven men and three women) (six smokers including five with paranoid schizophrenia and four nonsmokers) ranging in age from 22 to 56 years (mean 40.1, standard deviation 13.6). The thalamic nondisplaceable binding potential (BP(ND) ) was 1.32 ± 0.19 (mean ± standard deviation) for healthy control nonsmokers; 0.50 ± 0.19 for smokers with paranoid schizophrenia; and 0.51 for the single smoker without paranoid schizophrenia. The thalamic BP(ND) s of nonsmokers were significantly higher than those of smokers who smoked cigarettes a few hours before the scans (P = 0.0105) (StataCorp, 2003), which was likely due to occupancy of nAChRs by inhaled nicotine in smokers. Further research is needed to rule out the effects of confounding variables.

  1. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Experience with 2-[18F]Fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2-[18F]FA) in the Living Human Brain of Smokers with Paranoid Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRAŠIĆ, JAMES ROBERT; CASCELLA, NICOLA; KUMAR, ANIL; ZHOU, YUN; HILTON, JOHN; RAYMONT, VANESSA; CRABB, ANDREW; GUEVARA, MARIA RITA; HORTI, ANDREW G.; WONG, DEAN FOSTER

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing postmortem data (Breese, et al., 2000), we hypothesized that the densities of high-affinity neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain exist in a continuum from highest to lowest as follows: smokers without schizophrenia > smokers with schizophrenia > nonsmokers without schizophrenia > nonsmokers with schizophrenia. Application of the Kruskal-Wallis Test (Stata, 2003) to the postmortem data (Breese, et al., 2000) confirmed the hypothesized order in the cortex and the hippocampus and attained significance in the caudate and the thalamus. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed for 60 minutes at 6 hours after the intravenous administration of 444 megabequerels [MBq] (12 mCi) 2-[18F]fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2-[18F]FA), a radiotracer for high-affinity neuronal α4β2 nAChRs, as a bolus plus continuous infusion to 10 adults (7 men and 3 women) (6 smokers including 5 with paranoid schizophrenia and 4 nonsmokers) ranging in age from 22 to 56 years (mean 40.1, standard deviation 13.6). The thalamic nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND) was 1.32 ± 0.19 (mean ± standard deviation) for healthy control nonsmokers; 0.50 ± 0.19 for smokers with paranoid schizophrenia; and 0.51 for the single smoker without paranoid schizophrenia. The thalamic BPNDs of nonsmokers were significantly higher than those of smokers who smoked cigarettes a few hours before the scans (P = 0.0105) (StataCorp, 2003), which was likely due to occupancy of nAChRs by inhaled nicotine in smokers. Further research is needed to rule out the effects of confounding variables. PMID:22169936

  2. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Experience with (S)-5-[123I]iodo-3-(2-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (5-[123I]IA) in the Living Human Brain of Smokers and Nonsmokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRAŠIĆ, JAMES ROBERT; ZHOU, YUN; MUSACHIO, JOHN L.; HILTON, JOHN; FAN, HONG; CRABB, ANDREW; ENDRES, CHRISTOPHER J.; REINHARDT, MELVIN J.; DOGAN, AHMET S.; ALEXANDER, MOHAB; ROUSSET, OLIVIER; MARIS, MARIKA A.; GALECKI, JEFFREY; NANDI, AYON; WONG, DEAN F.

    2009-01-01

    (S)-5-[123I]iodo-3-(2-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (5-[123I]IA), a novel potent radioligand for high-affinity α4β2* neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), provides a means to evaluate the density and the distribution of nAChRs in the living human brain. We sought in healthy adult smokers and nonsmokers to (1) evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of 5-[123I]IA in an open nonblind trial and (2) to estimate the density and distribution of α4β2* nAChRs in the brain. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed for five hours after the intravenous administration of approximately 0.001 μg/kg (approximately 10 mCi) 5-[123I]IA. Blood pressure, heart rate, and neurobehavioral status were monitored before, during, and after the administration of 5-[123I]IA to twelve healthy adults (8 men and 4 women) (6 smokers and 6 nonsmokers) ranging in age from 19 to 46 years (mean = 28.25, standard deviation = 8.20). High plasma nicotine level was significantly associated with low 5-[123I]IA binding in (1) the caudate head, the cerebellum, the cortex, and the putamen, utilizing both the Sign and Mann-Whitney U tests, (2) the fusiform gyrus, the hippocampus, the parahippocampus, and the pons utilizing the Mann-Whitney U test, and (3)the thalamus utilizing the Sign test. We conclude that 5-[123I]IA is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective pharmacologic agent for human subjects to estimate high-affinity α4/β2 nAChRs in the living human brain. PMID:19140167

  3. Single-Institution Experience in the Treatment of Primary Mediastinal B Cell Lymphoma Treated With Immunochemotherapy in the Setting of Response Assessment by {sup 18}Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnix, Chelsea C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dabaja, Bouthaina, E-mail: bdabaja@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ahmed, Mohamed Amin [Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chuang, Hubert H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Costelloe, Colleen [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wogan, Christine F.; Reed, Valerie [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Romaguera, Jorge E.; Neelapu, Sattva; Oki, Yasuhiro [Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rodriguez, M. Alma [Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Office of Medical Affairs, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fayad, Luis; Hagemeister, Frederick B.; Nastoupil, Loretta; Turturro, Francesco; Fowler, Nathan; Fanale, Michelle A. [Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Nieto, Yago; Khouri, Issa F.; Ahmed, Sairah [Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Excellent outcomes obtained after infusional dose-adjusted etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, and rituximab (R-EPOCH) alone have led some to question the role of consolidative radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL). We reviewed the outcomes in patients treated with 1 of 3 rituximab-containing regimens (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone [R-CHOP]; hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone [R-HCVAD], or R-EPOCH) with or without RT. We also evaluated the ability of positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET-CT) to identify patients at risk of relapse. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 97 patients with diagnoses of stage I/II PMBCL treated at our institution between 2001 and 2013. The clinical characteristics, treatment outcomes, and toxicity were assessed. We analyzed whether postchemotherapy PET-CT could identify patients at risk for progressive disease according to a 5 point scale (5PS) Deauville score assigned. Results: Among 97 patients (median follow-up time, 57 months), the 5-year overall survival rate was 99%. Of patients treated with R-CHOP, 99% received RT; R-HCVAD, 82%; and R-EPOCH, 36%. Of 68 patients with evaluable end-of-chemotherapy PET-CT scans, 62% had a positive scan (avidity above that of the mediastinal blood pool [Deauville 5PS = 3]), but only 9 patients experienced relapse (n=1) or progressive disease (n=8), all with a 5PS of 4 to 5. Of the 25 patients who received R-EPOCH, 4 experienced progression, all with 5PS of 4 to 5; salvage therapy (RT and autologous stem cell transplantation) was successful in all cases. Conclusion: Combined modality immunochemotherapy and RT is well tolerated and effective for treatment of PMBCL. A postchemotherapy 5PS of 4 to 5, rather than 3 to 5, can identify patients at high risk of progression who should be considered for therapy beyond

  4. The child accident repeater: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J G

    1980-04-01

    The child accident repeater is defined as one who has at least three accidents that come to medical attention within a year. The accident situation has features in common with those of the child who has a single accident through simple "bad luck", but other factors predispose him to repeated injury. In the child who has a susceptible personality, a tendency for accident repetition may be due to a breakdown in adjustment to a stressful environment. Prevention of repeat accidents should involve the usual measures considered appropriate for all children as well as an attempt to provide treatment of significant maladjustment and modification of a stressful environment.

  5. Detection of dispersed short tandem repeats using reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tong; Fan, Xiaodan; Li, Qiwei; Li, Shuo-Yen R

    2012-10-01

    Tandem repeats occur frequently in biological sequences. They are important for studying genome evolution and human disease. A number of methods have been designed to detect a single tandem repeat in a sliding window. In this article, we focus on the case that an unknown number of tandem repeat segments of the same pattern are dispersively distributed in a sequence. We construct a probabilistic generative model for the tandem repeats, where the sequence pattern is represented by a motif matrix. A Bayesian approach is adopted to compute this model. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms are used to explore the posterior distribution as an effort to infer both the motif matrix of tandem repeats and the location of repeat segments. Reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithms are used to address the transdimensional model selection problem raised by the variable number of repeat segments. Experiments on both synthetic data and real data show that this new approach is powerful in detecting dispersed short tandem repeats. As far as we know, it is the first work to adopt RJMCMC algorithms in the detection of tandem repeats.

  6. Novel Approach to Repeated Arterial Blood Sampling in Small Animal PET : Application in a Test-Retest Study with the Adenosine A1 Receptor Ligand [C-11]MPDX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbesma, Jürgen W A; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Vállez García, David; Houwertjes, Martin C; Doorduin, Janine; Kwizera, Chantal; Maas, Bram; Meerlo, Peter; Dierckx, Rudi A; Slart, Riemer H J A; Elsinga, Philip H; van Waarde, Aren

    2016-01-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to detect small changes in neuroreceptor availability. This often requires rapid arterial blood sampling. However, current catheterization procedures do not allow repeated blood sampling. We have developed a procedure which allows arterial

  7. Terahertz wide aperture reflection tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Jeremy; Choi, Hyeokho; Mittleman, Daniel M.; White, Jeff; Zimdars, David

    2005-07-01

    We describe a powerful imaging modality for terahertz (THz) radiation, THz wide aperture reflection tomography (WART). Edge maps of an object's cross section are reconstructed from a series of time-domain reflection measurements at different viewing angles. Each measurement corresponds to a parallel line projection of the object's cross section. The filtered backprojection algorithm is applied to recover the image from the projection data. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a reflection computed tomography technique using electromagnetic waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of THz WART by imaging the cross sections of two test objects.

  8. NMF on positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bödvarsson, Bjarni; Hansen, Lars Kai; Svarer, Claus;

    2007-01-01

    In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering....... We propose another method to estimate time-activity curves (TAC) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Since the scaling of the basis curves is lost in the NMF the estimated TAC is scaled by a vector alpha which...

  9. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Robertson, I.M., E-mail: irobertson@wisc.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  10. Uncertainty analysis in seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoc, Bartosz; Majdański, Mariusz

    2017-04-01

    Velocity field from seismic travel time tomography depends on several factors like regularization, inversion path, model parameterization etc. The result also strongly depends on an initial velocity model and precision of travel times picking. In this research we test dependence on starting model in layered tomography and compare it with effect of picking precision. Moreover, in our analysis for manual travel times picking the uncertainty distribution is asymmetric. This effect is shifting the results toward faster velocities. For calculation we are using JIVE3D travel time tomographic code. We used data from geo-engineering and industrial scale investigations, which were collected by our team from IG PAS.

  11. Regional myocardial oxygen consumption estimated by carbon-11 acetate and positron emission tomography before and after repetitive ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, K F; Hansen, P R; Holm, S

    2011-01-01

    Preserved myocardial oxygen consumption estimated by carbon 11-acetate and positron emission tomography (PET) in myocardial regions with chronic but reversibly depressed contractile function in patients with ischemic heart disease have been suggested to be caused by repeated short episodes of acu...

  12. Regional myocardial oxygen consumption estimated by carbon-11 acetate and positron emission tomography before and after repetitive ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, K F; Hansen, P R; Holm, S

    2011-01-01

    Preserved myocardial oxygen consumption estimated by carbon 11-acetate and positron emission tomography (PET) in myocardial regions with chronic but reversibly depressed contractile function in patients with ischemic heart disease have been suggested to be caused by repeated short episodes of acute...

  13. The Moral Maturity of Repeater Delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronio, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Differences in moral development (as conceived by Kohlberg) were examined in a sample of delinquent teenagers. The repeater group was not found, as had been hypothesized, to be lower on moral maturity than those who engaged in less delinquency. (GC)

  14. Music snippet extraction via melody-based repeated pattern discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU JiePing; ZHAO Yang; CHEN Zhe; LIU ZiLi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a complete set of procedures to automatically extract a music snippet, defined as the most representative or the highlighted excerpt of a music clip. We first generate a modified and compact similarity matrix based on selected features and distance metrics, and then several improved techniques for music repeated pattern discovery are utilized because a music snippet is usually a part of the repeated melody, main theme or chorus. During the process, redundant and wrongly detected patterns are discarded, boundaries are corrected using beat information, and final clusters are also further sorted according to the occurrence frequency and energy information. Subsequently, following our methods, we designed a music snippet extraction system which allows users to detect snippets. Experiments performed on the system show the superiority of our proposed approach.

  15. Debiasing egocentrism and optimism biases in repeated competitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Rose

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available When judging their likelihood of success in competitive tasks, people tend to be overoptimistic for easy tasks and overpessimistic for hard tasks (the shared circumstance effect; SCE. Previous research has shown that feedback and experience from repeated-play competitions has a limited impact on SCEs. However, in this paper, we suggest that competitive situations, in which the shared difficulty or easiness of the task is more transparent, will be more amenable to debiasing via repeated play. Pairs of participants competed in, made predictions about, and received feedback on, multiple rounds of a throwing task involving both easy- and hard-to-aim objects. Participants initially showed robust SCEs, but they also showed a significant reduction in bias after only one round of feedback. These and other results support a more positive view (than suggested from past research on the potential for SCEs to be debiased through outcome feedback.

  16. Repeated Witnessing of Conspecifics in Pain: Effects on Emotional Contagion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carrillo

    Full Text Available Witnessing of conspecifics in pain has been shown to elicit socially triggered freezing in rodents. It is unknown how robust this response is to repeated exposure to a cage-mate experiencing painful stimulation. To address this question, shock-experienced Observer rats repeatedly witnessed familiar Demonstrators receive painful footshocks (six sessions. Results confirm that Observers freeze during the first testing session. The occurrence of this behaviour however gradually diminished as the experimental sessions progressed, reaching minimal freezing levels by the end of the experiments. In contrast, the appearance and continuous increase in the frequency of yawning, a behavior that was inhibited by metyrapone (i.e,. a glucocorticoid synthesis blocker, might represent an alternative coping strategy, suggesting that the observer's reduced freezing does not necessarily indicate a disappearance in the affective response to the Demonstrator's distress.

  17. Application of optical longitudinal tomography for dental introscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Gennady G.; Burgansky, Alexander A.; Levandovski, Alexei G.

    1997-08-01

    A new method of dental introscopy in-vitro is suggested by the authors. This method implies the usage of longitudinal tomography techniques and is characterized by non-invasive and non-harmful diagnostics features, as well as interactive regime of image reconstruction which lets an operator (doctor) to control the diagnostics process in real time. He-Ne laser emission is used for obtaining of the projections. By the means of longitudinal tomography, images of different sections of an object (tooth) can be reconstructed. An experiment was held by the authors in which 100 projections of a tooth (premolar) were obtained and images of 10 different sections were reconstructed. These images were later compared to real sections of the tooth. This experiment proved that optical longitudinal tomography can be successfully used for dental introscopy. Authors claim that optical tomographic methods can be used for diagnostics of other biological objects as well. Such objects are characterized by spatial geometrical anisotropy (tubular bones, phalanxes of fingers, penis, etc.). It is especially promising to use this method for children's dentistry. the authors discuss some features of the data acquisition system for optical longitudinal tomography. Reconstruction algorithms are described. The results of experimental reconstruction are presented and advantages of this diagnostics method are discussed.

  18. The application of optical coherence tomography to image subsurface tissue structure of Antarctic krill Euphausia superba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bellini

    Full Text Available Many small open ocean animals, such as Antarctic krill, are an important part of marine ecosystems. To discover what will happen to animals such as krill in a changing ocean, experiments are run in aquaria where conditions can be controlled to simulate water characteristics predicted to occur in the future. The response of individual animals to changing water conditions can be hard to observe, and with current observation techniques it is very difficult to follow the progress of an individual animal through its life. Optical coherence tomography (OCT is an optical imaging technique that allows images at high resolution to be obtained from depths up to a few millimeters inside biological specimens. It is compatible with in vivo imaging and can be used repeatedly on the same specimens. In this work, we show how OCT may be applied to post mortem krill samples and how important physiological data such as shell thickness and estimates of organ volume can be obtained. Using OCT we find an average value for the thickness of krill exoskeleton to be (30±4 µm along a 1 cm length of the animal body. We also show that the technique may be used to provide detailed imagery of the internal structure of a pleopod joint and provide an estimate for the heart volume of (0.73±0.03 mm3.

  19. Computerized axial tomography in clinical pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, D C; Kufta, C; Axelbaum, S P; Schellinger, D

    1977-02-01

    Computerized axial tomography (CAT), a noninvasive radiologie method, provides a new dimension in screening and diagnosis of intracranial pathology. Evaluation of 725 scans in infants and children demonstrates that CAT may be performed with negligible risk, although sedation and restraint are essential to the successful performance of studies in children under 6 years of age. CAT is the preferred initial diagnostic method in suspected hydrocephalls and is accurate in the detection and precise localization of brain tumors. The management of hydrocephalus and brain tumors has been significantly altered by the availability of CAT. Few invasive neuroradiologic procedures are required and pneumography is especially curtailed. Serial scanning is the best available method of monitoring ventricular alterations in hydrocephalus, tumor size during radiotherapy or chemotherapy, and postoperative recurrence of benign neoplasms. Complex intracranial anomalies are detectable with computerized tomography, but complete definition of pathology often requires angiography and air studies. Limited clinical experience in detecting neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage suggests that CAT will be a valuable tool for futlre investigations of that problem.

  20. Spatiotemporal computed tomography of dynamic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Anders; Münch, Beat; Trtik, Pavel; Butler, Les

    2011-12-01

    Modern computed tomography (CT) equipment allowing fast 3-D imaging also makes it possible to monitor dynamic processes by 4-D imaging. Because the acquisition time of various 3-D-CT systems is still in the range of at least milliseconds or even hours, depending on the detector system and the source, the balance of the desired temporal and spatial resolution must be adjusted. Furthermore, motion artifacts will occur, especially at high spatial resolution and longer measuring times. We propose two approaches based on nonsequential projection angle sequences allowing a convenient postacquisition balance of temporal and spatial resolution. Both strategies are compatible with existing instruments, needing only a simple reprograming of the angle list used for projection acquisition and care with the projection order list. Both approaches will reduce the impact of artifacts due to motion. The strategies are applied and validated with cold neutron imaging of water desorption from originally saturated particles during natural air-drying experiments and with x-ray tomography of a polymer blend heated during imaging.

  1. Star repeaters for fiber optic links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, D H; Gravel, R L

    1977-02-01

    A star repeater combines the functions of a passive star coupler and a signal regenerating amplifier. By more effectively utilizing the light power radiated by a light emitting diode, the star repeater can, when used with small diameter channels, couple as much power to all receivers of a multiterminal link as would be coupled to the single receiver of a simple point-to-point link.

  2. Development of a system for neutron radiography and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbauer, Martin J.; Calzada, Elbio; Schillinger, Burkhard

    2005-04-01

    Neutron radiography and tomography are getting more and more popular. Since they use the white thermal neutron spectrum, they are especially feasible even at small neutron sources, where the flux is too low for efficient scattering experiments requiring monochromatization of the beam. High-end tomography systems require the investment of several ten thousand Euros, with the costs often hindering the initiative for a new tomography setup. Based on the experiences gathered at Technische Universitaet Muenchen, we developed a cheaper system based on standard components that cannot compete with the sensitivity of a high-grade system, but is perfectly capable of doing neutron radiography and tomography. The system is meant as a startup construction kit for initiating tomography programs even at small neutron sources. The system is built from scratch, enabling the user to gain an understanding for the influence of each component on the image results. With the experience thus gained, he should be able to design his next and more advanced system by himself. To keep the whole system simple and cheap (the price should reach only a few percent of a high-end system), standard parts are used whenever possible, and all components are designed in such a way that they can be built without special equipment. Public domain and freeware software is used for data processing. Such a system is being built at FRM2 in Garching within the scope of a master thesis. After completion, a website will be installed with descriptions, diagrams and software for building and operating the system. Both hardware and software are discussed.

  3. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors.

  4. Quantum Key Distribution over Probabilistic Quantum Repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Amirloo, Jeyran; Majedi, A Hamed

    2010-01-01

    A feasible route towards implementing long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) systems relies on probabilistic schemes for entanglement distribution and swapping as proposed in the work of Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) [Nature 414, 413 (2001)]. Here, we calculate the conditional throughput and fidelity of entanglement for DLCZ quantum repeaters, by accounting for the DLCZ self-purification property, in the presence of multiple excitations in the ensemble memories as well as loss and other sources of inefficiency in the channel and measurement modules. We then use our results to find the generation rate of secure key bits for QKD systems that rely on DLCZ quantum repeaters. We compare the key generation rate per logical memory employed in the two cases of with and without a repeater node. We find the cross-over distance beyond which the repeater system outperforms the non-repeater one. That provides us with the optimum inter-node distancing in quantum repeater systems. We also find the optimal exci...

  5. Dynamic combinatorial libraries of artificial repeat proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Margarita; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2013-06-15

    Repeat proteins are found in almost all cellular systems, where they are involved in diverse molecular recognition processes. Recent studies have suggested that de novo designed repeat proteins may serve as universal binders, and might potentially be used as practical alternative to antibodies. We describe here a novel chemical methodology for producing small libraries of repeat proteins, and screening in parallel the ligand binding of library members. The first stage of this research involved the total synthesis of a consensus-based three-repeat tetratricopeptide (TPR) protein (~14 kDa), via sequential attachment of the respective peptides. Despite the effectiveness of the synthesis and ligation steps, this method was found to be too demanding for the production of proteins containing variable number of repeats. Additionally, the analysis of binding of the individual proteins was time consuming. Therefore, we designed and prepared novel dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs), and show that their equilibration can facilitate the formation of TPR proteins containing up to eight repeating units. Interestingly, equilibration of the library building blocks in the presence of the biologically relevant ligands, Hsp90 and Hsp70, induced their oligomerization into forming more of the proteins with large recognition surfaces. We suggest that this work presents a novel simple and rapid tool for the simultaneous screening of protein mixtures with variable binding surfaces, and for identifying new binders for ligands of interest.

  6. Repeatability in the assessment of multi-segment foot kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Kevin; Staes, Filip; Bruyninckx, Herman; Busschots, Ellen; Jaspers, Ellen; Atre, Ameya; Desloovere, Kaat

    2012-02-01

    A recently published systematic review on 3D multi-segment foot models has illustrated the lack of repeatability studies providing evidence for appropriate clinical decision making. The aim of the current study was to assess the repeatability of the recently published model developed by Leardini et al. [10]. Foot kinematics of six healthy adults were analyzed through a repeated-measures design including two therapists with different levels of experience and four test sessions. For the majority of the parameters moderate or good repeatability was observed for the within-day and between-day sessions. A trend towards consistently higher within- and between-day variability was observed for the junior compared to the senior clinician. The mean inter-session variability of the relative 3D rotations ranged between 0.9-4.2° and 1.6-5.0° for respectively the senior and junior clinician whereas for the absolute angles this variability increased to respectively 2.0-6.2° and 2.6-7.8°. Mean inter-therapist standard deviations ranged between 2.2° and 6.5° for the relative 3D rotations and between 2.8° and 7.6° for the absolute 3D rotations. The ratio of inter-therapist to inter-trial errors ranged between 1.8 and 5.5 for the relative 3D rotations and between 2.4 and 9.7 for the absolute 3D rotations. Absolute angle representation of the planar angles was found to be more difficult. Observations from the current study indicate that an adequate normative database can be installed in gait laboratories, however, it should be stressed that experience of therapists is important and gait laboratories should therefore be encouraged to put effort in training their clinicians.

  7. Optical tomography with structured illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukic, Vladimir; Markel, Vadim A; Schotland, John C

    2009-04-01

    We consider the image reconstruction problem for optical tomography with structured illumination. A fast image reconstruction algorithm is proposed that reduces the required number of measurements of the optical field compared to methods that utilize point-source illumination. The results are illustrated with numerical simulations.

  8. Computed tomography:the details.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  9. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sensitive to radiation, they should have a CT study only if it is essential for making a diagnosis and should not have repeated CT studies unless absolutely necessary. top of page What are ...

  10. Repeatability of central corneal thickness measurement with the Pentacam HR system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz Simonato Alonso

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the repeatability of central corneal thickness measurement at the geometrical center (Central Corneal Thickness - CCT given by the Pentacam High Resolution (HR Comprehensive Eye Scanner (Oculus, Wetzlar, Germany over time. METHODS: Prospective, single center, observational study. Two separate CCT measurements were taken by the Pentacam corneal tomography exam (CTm 3 to 12 months apart, and compared. RESULTS: One hundred and sixteen eyes (n=116 of 62 health patients were included in this study. Average CCT in first and last visits was 541.6±37 µm and 543.6±36.9 µm respectively. Mean difference between both measurements was 9.2±6.4 µm, and there was no statistically significant difference in CCT measurement between visits, with good correlation between them (P = 0.057, r² = 0,9209. CONCLUSION: Pentacam (HR CTm gives repeatable CCT measurements over time.

  11. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  12. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Levitt, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and in defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.

  13. Automatic processing of multimodal tomography datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Aaron D; Price, Stephen W T; Wadeson, Nicola; Basham, Mark; Beale, Andrew M; Ashton, Alun W; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Quinn, Paul D

    2017-01-01

    With the development of fourth-generation high-brightness synchrotrons on the horizon, the already large volume of data that will be collected on imaging and mapping beamlines is set to increase by orders of magnitude. As such, an easy and accessible way of dealing with such large datasets as quickly as possible is required in order to be able to address the core scientific problems during the experimental data collection. Savu is an accessible and flexible big data processing framework that is able to deal with both the variety and the volume of data of multimodal and multidimensional scientific datasets output such as those from chemical tomography experiments on the I18 microfocus scanning beamline at Diamond Light Source.

  14. Electrical resistance tomography of concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Binley, A.; Henry-Poulter, S. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Environmental Sciences

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility of using Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to nondestructively examine the interior of concrete structures such as bridge pillars and roadways. We report the results of experiments wherein ERT is used to image the two concrete specimens in the laboratory. Each specimen is 5 inches square and 12 inches long and contained steel reinforcing rods along its length. Twenty electrodes were placed on each sample and an-image of electrical resistivity distribution was generated from current and voltage measurements. We found that the images show the general location of the reinforcing steel and, what`s more important, delineate the absence of the steel. The method may therefore be useful for determining if such steel has been destroyed by corrosion, however to make it useful, the technique must have better resolution so that individual reinforcing steel units are resolved.

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography Velocimetry with Complex Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, A.; Waigh, T. A.; Jaradat, S.; Tomlin, R.

    2015-04-01

    We present recent results obtained with an Optical Coherence Tomography Velocimetry technique. An optical interferometer measures the velocity of a sheared fluid at specific depths of the sample using the coherence length of the light source. The technique allows the dynamics of 3 pico liter volumes to be probed inside opaque complex fluids. In a study of opaque starch suspensions, classical bulk rheology experiments show non-linear shear thickening, whereas observations of the velocity profiles as a function of distance across the gap show Newtonian behavior. The ability of the technique to measure velocity fluctuations is also discussed for the case of polyacrylamide samples which were observed to display shear banding behavior. A relationship between the viscoelasticity of the sample and the size of the apparent fluctuations is observed.

  16. Quantitative computed tomography measurements of emphysema for diagnosing asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Xie M; Wang W; Dou S; Cui L; Xiao W

    2016-01-01

    Mengshuang Xie, Wei Wang, Shuang Dou, Liwei Cui, Wei Xiao Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Background: The diagnostic criteria of asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) are controversial. Emphysema is characteristic of COPD and usually does not exist in typical asthma patients. Emphysema in patients with asthma suggests the coexistence of COPD. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) allows repeated evalua...

  17. Relationship of computed tomography perfusion and positron emission tomography to tumour progression in malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, Timothy P C [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Yartsev, Slav [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, Victoria Hospital, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5W9 (Australia); Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph' s Health Care London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4V2 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 3K7 (Canada); He, Wenqing [Department of Statistical and Actuarial Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Fisher, Barbara; VanderSpek, Lauren L [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Macdonald, David [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5A5 (Canada); Bauman, Glenn, E-mail: glenn.bauman@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London Regional Cancer Program, Ontario, Canada, N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This study aimed to explore the potential for computed tomography (CT) perfusion and 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in predicting sites of future progressive tumour on a voxel-by-voxel basis after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: Ten patients underwent pre-radiotherapy magnetic resonance (MR), FDG-PET and CT perfusion near the end of radiotherapy and repeated post-radiotherapy follow-up MR scans. The relationships between these images and tumour progression were assessed using logistic regression. Cross-validation with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the value of these images in predicting sites of tumour progression. Results: Pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour; near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion; CT perfusion blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and permeability-surface area (PS) product; FDG-PET standard uptake value (SUV); and SUV:BF showed significant associations with tumour progression on follow-up MR imaging (P < 0.0001). The mean sensitivity (±standard deviation), specificity and area under the ROC curve (AUC) of PS were 0.64 ± 0.15, 0.74 ± 0.07 and 0.72 ± 0.12 respectively. This mean AUC was higher than that of the pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour and near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion (both AUCs = 0.6 ± 0.1, P ≤ 0.03). The multivariate model using BF, BV, PS and SUV had a mean AUC of 0.8 ± 0.1, but this was not significantly higher than the PS only model. Conclusion: PS is the single best predictor of tumour progression when compared to other parameters, but voxel-based prediction based on logistic regression had modest sensitivity and specificity.

  18. Characteristics of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography: experience from 39 cases%肺外结核39例临床表现与18F-氟脱氧葡萄糖正电子发射计算机断层成像-CT的特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂超; 高硕; 蔡莉; 陈秋松

    2012-01-01

    Objective The clinical manifestations and the imaging features in 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyD-glucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET) of extrapulmonary tuberculosis were not specific and therefore it was difficult to be differentiated from malignancy.This paper tried to analyze the clinical characteristics and findings by 18 F-FDG PET-CT in extrapulmonary tuberculosis,in order to improve the diagnosis of this disease.Methods Thirty-nine patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis underwent 18FFDG PET-CT imaging from 2003 - 2011.The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination in all the cases.There were 11 males and 28 females,aging 20 -67 (60 ± 18) years. A past history of tuberculosis was collected in 5 cases.The PET images were reviewed visually and scored semi-quantitatively with standardized uptake value.The lesions were judged by PET imaging features in conjunction with CT slices and the fused images.Results Fever was present in 13 cases,and night sweating,weakness and malaise in 17 cases.Pleural effusion was found in 7 cases.Abdominal distention and masses were found in 6 cases,while neck mass was present in 2 cases. Laboratory tests showed that hypoalbuminemia,sedimentation rate increase and positive tuberculin tests were present in 15 cases.CA125 was increased in 3 cases.In PET-CT,lymph node tuberculosis manifested as single or multiple enlarged lymph nodes coalesced and calcified with significant FDG uptake,but ring-like FDG-avidity was also found in some of the lymph nodes.Pleural or peritoneal tuberculosis showed heterogeneous or nodular thickening and in a radio-tracer distribution.Bone tuberculosis manifested as osteolytic osseous destruction and paravertebral cold abscess,while focal radio-agent ring-like intense uptake was present in half the cases. In patients with intestinal tuberculosis,ileocecal circumferential or eccentric thickening was observed,with focal or diffuse high FDG activity. Tuberculosis in adrenal gland

  19. Quantification and Reconstruction in Photoacoustic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zijian

    Optical absorption is closely associated with many physiological important parameters, such as the concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAT requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. We demonstrate the method using the optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) and the acoustical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM) in the optical ballistic regime and in the optical diffusive regime, respectively. The data acquisition speed in photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is limited by the laser repetition rate and the number of parallel ultrasound detecting channels. Reconstructing an image with fewer measurements can effectively accelerate the data acquisition and reduce the system cost. We adapted Compressed Sensing (CS) for the reconstruction in PACT. CS-based PACT was implemented as a non-linear conjugate gradient descent algorithm and tested with both phantom and in vivo experiments. Speckles have been considered ubiquitous in all scattering-based coherent imaging technologies. As a coherent imaging modality based on optical absorption, photoacoustic (PA) tomography (PAT) is generally devoid of speckles. PAT suppresses speckles by building up prominent boundary signals, via a mechanism similar to that of specular reflection. When imaging smooth boundary absorbing targets, the speckle visibility in PAT, which is defined as the ratio of the square root of the average power of speckles to that of boundaries, is inversely proportional to the square root of the absorber density. If the surfaces of the absorbing targets have uncorrelated height fluctuations, however, the boundary features may become fully developed speckles. The findings were validated by simulations

  20. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography in acute pulmonary embolism: the effect of a computer-assisted detection prototype used as a concurrent reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Rianne; Peters, Joost F; van den Berk, Inge A H; Freling, Nicole J M; Lely, Rutger; de Hoop, Bartjan; Horsthuis, Karin; Ravesloot, Cécile J; Weber, Michael; Prokop, W Mathias; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M

    2013-09-01

    To assess the effect of computer-assisted detection (CAD) on diagnostic accuracy, reader confidence, and reading time when used as a concurrent reader for the detection of acute pulmonary embolism in computed tomography pulmonary angiography. In this institutional review board-approved retrospective study, 6 observers with varying experience evaluated 158 negative and 38 positive consecutive computed tomography pulmonary angiographies (mean patient age 60 y; 115 women) without and with CAD as a concurrent reader. Readers were asked to determine the presence of pulmonary embolism, assess their diagnostic confidence using a 5-point scale, and document their reading time. Results were compared with an independent standard established by 2 readers, and a third chest radiologist was consulted in case of discordant findings. Using logistic regression for repeated measurements, we found a significant increase in readers' sensitivity (Preader dependent (Preaders' confidence scores using CAD as a concurrent reader (Preader has the potential to increase readers' sensitivity and confidence with a decrease in reading time without loss of specificity. The differences between readers, however, require further evaluation of CAD as a concurrent reader in a larger trial before stronger conclusions can be drawn.

  1. The shadow of the future promotes cooperation in a repeated prisoner’s dilemma for children

    OpenAIRE

    Peter R Blake; David G Rand; Tingley, Dustin; Warneken, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation among genetically unrelated individuals can be supported by direct reciprocity. Theoretical models and experiments with adults show that the possibility of future interactions with the same partner can promote cooperation via conditionally cooperative strategies such as tit-for-tat (TFT). Here, we introduce a novel implementation of the repeated Prisoner’s Dilemma (PD) designed for children to examine whether repeated interactions can successfully promote cooperation in 10 and 11 ...

  2. Mining of simple sequence repeats in the Genome of Gentianaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sathishkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeats (SSRs or short tandem repeats are short repeat motifs that show high level of length polymorphism due to insertion or deletion mutations of one or more repeat types. Here, we present the detection and abundance of microsatellites or SSRs in nucleotide sequences of Gentianaceae family. A total of 545 SSRs were mined in 4698 nucleotide sequences downloaded from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI. Among the SSR sequences, the frequency of repeat type was about 429 -mono repeats, 99 -di repeats, 15 -tri repeats, and 2 --hexa repeats. Mononucleotide repeats were found to be abundant repeat types, about 78%, followed by dinucleotide repeats (18.16% among the SSR sequences. An attempt was made to design primer pairs for 545 identified SSRs but these were found only for 169 sequences.

  3. Evaluation of agreement in corneal thickness measurements obtained using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound technique and determination of its specificity in keratoconus screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunvant, P.; Darner, R.

    2011-03-01

    The aims of the present study are 1) to evaluate inter and intra observer repeatability of optical coherence tomography corneal thickness measurements 2) to investigate the agreement in corneal thickness obtained using an ultrasound pachymeter and the non-contact high resolution optical coherence tomography 3) to evaluate the false positive rate of identifying keratoconic suspects on the basis of standard machine protocol. Measurements were performed on 51 eyes of 51 individuals without any known corneal pathology. Altman and Bland plots were analyzed to determine agreement of corneal thickness measurements obtained using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound pachymeter; linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate its interchangeability. The agreement between the optical coherence tomography and ultrasonic pachymeter measurements was best for the central corneal thickness with a mean bias of 13.4 microns, with optical coherence tomography values being lower than the ultrasound pachymeter. The agreement of measurements in the mid-peripheral cornea was poor, with bias in measurements ranging from 33 to 55 microns. The optical coherence tomography measurements were repeatable with no differences in values between intra and inter observer repeat measurements. Using standard machine protocol for keratoconus screening, utilizing 1 out of 4 criteria gave a specificity of 86% and using 2 of the 4 criteria gave a specificity of 98%.

  4. [Changes in mesenteric microcirculation in rats following repeated skin burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtykhno, Iu M

    1976-07-01

    Acute experiments were conducted on rats; repeated extensive burn of a convalescent who formerly sustained the burn disease was better tolerated, led tono fatal outcome and was accompanied by moderate microcirculatory disturbances. The smae burn was accompanied in intact rats by a severe shock followed by death, intravascular aggregation of erythrocytes and significant microcirculatory disturbances leading to disturbance of tissue nutrition. It is supposed that the results obtained could serve as an indirect proof that toxemia played an important role in the genesis of intravascular aggregation of erythrocytes in burn shock.

  5. Repeated application of organic waste affects soil organic matter composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltre, Clément; Gregorich, Edward G.; Bruun, Sander

    2017-01-01

    of different types of carbon compounds in soil. The objective of this study was to identify and characterise changes in soil organic matter (SOM) composition after repeated applications of organic waste. Soil from the CRUCIAL field experiment in Denmark was sampled after 12 years of annual application...... that there was accumulation in soil of different C compounds for the different types of applied organic waste, which appeared to be related to the degree to which microbial activity was stimulated and the type of microbial communities applied with the wastes or associated with the decomposition of applied wastes...

  6. PolyQ repeat expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS are CAA interrupted repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenming Yu

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastating, rapidly progressive disease leading to paralysis and death. Recently, intermediate length polyglutamine (polyQ repeats of 27-33 in ATAXIN-2 (ATXN2, encoding the ATXN2 protein, were found to increase risk for ALS. In ATXN2, polyQ expansions of ≥ 34, which are pure CAG repeat expansions, cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. However, similar length expansions that are interrupted with other codons, can present atypically with parkinsonism, suggesting that configuration of the repeat sequence plays an important role in disease manifestation in ATXN2 polyQ expansion diseases. Here we determined whether the expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS were pure or interrupted CAG repeats, and defined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs695871 and rs695872 in exon 1 of the gene, to assess haplotype association. We found that the expanded repeat alleles of 40 ALS patients and 9 long-repeat length controls were all interrupted, bearing 1-3 CAA codons within the CAG repeat. 21/21 expanded ALS chromosomes with 3CAA interruptions arose from one haplotype (GT, while 18/19 expanded ALS chromosomes with <3CAA interruptions arose from a different haplotype (CC. Moreover, age of disease onset was significantly earlier in patients bearing 3 interruptions vs fewer, and was distinct between haplotypes. These results indicate that CAG repeat expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS are uniformly interrupted repeats and that the nature of the repeat sequence and haplotype, as well as length of polyQ repeat, may play a role in the neurological effect conferred by expansions in ATXN2.

  7. Acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region for biomedical prototyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meurer, Maria Ines [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. of Pathology]. E-mail: emaninha@gmail.com; Meurer, Eduardo [Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina (UNISUL), Tubarao, SC (Brazil); Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes da; Santa Barbara, Ailton [Centro de Pesquisa Renato Archer (CenPRA), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Nobre, Luiz Felipe [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. of Clinical Practice; Oliveira, Marilia Gerhardt de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery; Silva, Daniela Nascimento [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. of Surgery

    2008-01-15

    Biomedical prototyping has resulted from a merger of rapid prototyping and imaging diagnosis technologies. However, this process is complex, considering the necessity of interaction between biomedical sciences and engineering. Good results are highly dependent on the acquisition of computed tomography images and their subsequent manipulation by means of specific software. The present study describes the experience of a multidisciplinary group of researchers in the acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region aiming at biomedical prototyping for surgical purposes. (author)

  8. First results of micro-neutron tomography by use of a focussing neutron lens

    CERN Document Server

    Masschaele, B; Cauwels, P; Dierick, M; Jolie, J; Mondelaers, W

    2001-01-01

    Since the appearance of high flux neutron beams, scientists experimented with neutron radiography. This high beam flux combined with modern neutron to visible light converters leads to the possibility of performing fast neutron micro-tomography. The first results of cold neutron tomography with a neutron lens are presented in this article. Samples are rotated in the beam and the projections are recorded with a neutron camera. The 3D reconstruction is performed with cone beam reconstruction software.

  9. Repeatability of peripheral aberrations in young emmetropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Karthikeyan; Theagarayan, Baskar; Carius, Staffan; Gustafsson, Jörgen

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the intrasession repeatability of ocular aberration measurements in the peripheral visual field with a commercially available Shack-Hartmann aberrometer (complete ophthalmic analysis system-high definition-vision research). The higher-order off-axis aberrations data in young healthy emmetropic eyes are also reported. The aberrations of the right eye of 18 emmetropes were measured using an aberrometer with an open field of view that allows peripheral measurements. Five repeated measures of ocular aberrations were obtained and assessed in steps of 10° out to ±40° in the horizontal visual field (nasal + and temporal -) and -20° in the inferior visual field. The coefficient of repeatability, coefficient of variation, and the intraclass correlation coefficient were calculated as a measure of intrasession repeatability. In all eccentric angles, the repeatability of the third- and fourth-order aberrations was better than the fifth and sixth order aberrations. The coefficient of variation was coefficient was >0.90 for the third and fourth order but reduced gradually for higher orders. There was no statistical significant difference in variance of total higher-order root mean square between on- and off-axis measurements (p > 0.05). The aberration data in this group of young emmetropes showed that the horizontal coma (C(3)(1)) was most positive at 40° in the temporal field, decreasing linearly toward negative values with increasing off-axis angle into the nasal field, whereas all other higher-order aberrations showed little or no change. The complete ophthalmic analysis system-high definition-vision research provides fast, repeatable, and valid peripheral aberration measurements and can be used efficiently to measure off-axis aberrations in the peripheral visual field.

  10. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Sze, Daniel Y., E-mail: dansze@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51-71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction.

  11. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubuchon, Adam C., E-mail: acaubuchon@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Balamucki, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  12. Evaluation of corrosion of steel embedded in concrete exposed to carbonation AAS using a factorial experiment with repeated measures. Evaluación de la corrosión del acero embebido en concreto AAS, expuesto a carbonatación mediante un experimento factorial con medidas repetidas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Aperador Chaparro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents various techniques for assessing corrosion, the linear polarization resistance and galvanostatic pulse, the analysis was performed using analysis of variance models using a factorial experiment with three factors, one repeated measure, because on the same experimental unit (reinforced concrete, it experienced several samples to be measured in time (0 h=1, 350 h=2, 700 h=3, 1050 h=4, 1700 h=5 y 2600 h=6. This makes the observations are not independent, the other two factors relate to, the binder (ce: 1 = activatedslag [AAS] and 2 = ordinary Portland concrete [OPC] and the exposure condition (ca: 1 = y 2 = environmental exposure accelerated carbonation. These factors were discussed according to the results of the electrochemical properties. Initially performed the statistical processing of each of the variables in relation to the properties and analyzed the interaction between them. Where they established the differences in materials used as coating steel, concrete, OPC and AAS. OPC concrete specimens, exhibited a resting potential, polarization resistance and ohmic (CO2 condition than those obtained for reinforced concrete in AAS.En este artículo se presentan las técnicas de evaluación de la corrosión, tales como potencial de corrosión, resistencia lineal a la polarización y pulso galvanostático a los concretos de activación alcalina (AAS y Portland tipo I (OPC. El estudio se realizó por medio de modelos de análisis de varianza, aplicando un experimento factorial con tres factores, uno de ellos medida repetida, debido a que sobre la misma unidad experimental (concreto armado AAS y OPC se ensayaron varias muestras para medirlas en el tiempo (0 h=1, 350 h=2, 700 h=3, 1050 h=4, 1700 h=5 y 2600 h=6, lo que hace que las observaciones no sean independientes; los otros dos factores corresponden al cementante (ce: 1=escoria activada alcalinamente [AAS] y 2=concreto Portland ordinario [OPC] y la condición de exposici

  13. Thermal Neutron Tomography for Cultural Heritage at INR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Marin; Mandescu, Dragos

    The neutron and gamma imaging facility placed at the tangential channel of the TRIGA-ACPR from INR was used for tomography investigations on a test object with good results and shortly followed its involvement for tomography investigations on prehistoric statues of clay from the Arges County Museum. This activity was performed in connection with a research contract with IAEA with title "The neutron and gamma imaging method combined with neutron-based analytical methods for cultural heritage research", in the frame of a current CRP, that helps curators to reveal the internal structure and composition of the objects. The detector system has been developed based on two interchangeable scintillators, one for thermal neutrons and the other one for gamma radiations, a mirror of float glass coated with aluminum and two interchangeable CCD cameras. Experiments of tomography imaging for two prehistoric statues of clay with CCD STARLIGHT XPRESS SXV-H9 camera with XD-4 type image intensifier are presented in this paper. The tomography reconstructions with Octopus software have shown the potential of good results even for 100 projections/1800. This was a good opportunity for the dissemination of the investigation methods based on neutrons for cultural heritage and beyond this area.

  14. Reconstruction and visualization of nanoparticle composites by transmission electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.Y. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G 2G7 (Canada); Lockwood, R. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada); Malac, M., E-mail: marek.malac@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G 2G7 (Canada); Furukawa, H. [SYSTEM IN FRONTIER INC., 2-8-3, Shinsuzuharu bldg. 4F, Akebono-cho, Tachikawa-shi, Tokyo 190-0012 (Japan); Li, P.; Meldrum, A. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada)

    2012-02-15

    This paper examines the limits of transmission electron tomography reconstruction methods for a nanocomposite object composed of many closely packed nanoparticles. Two commonly used reconstruction methods in TEM tomography were examined and compared, and the sources of various artefacts were explored. Common visualization methods were investigated, and the resulting 'interpretation artefacts' ( i.e., deviations from 'actual' particle sizes and shapes arising from the visualization) were determined. Setting a known or estimated nanoparticle volume fraction as a criterion for thresholding does not in fact give a good visualization. Unexpected effects associated with common built-in image filtering methods were also found. Ultimately, this work set out to establish the common problems and pitfalls associated with electron beam tomographic reconstruction and visualization of samples consisting of closely spaced nanoparticles. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron tomography limits were explored by both experiment and simulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reliable quantitative volumetry using electron tomography is not presently feasible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Volume rendering appears to be better choice for visualization of composite samples.

  15. High resolution imaging with impulse based thermoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Hajiaboli, Amir; Sergiadis, George; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-07-01

    Existing imaging modalities like microwave- or radiofrequency (RF) induced thermoacoustic tomography systems show the potential for resolving structures deep inside tissue due to the high penetration properties of RF. However, one of the major drawbacks of existing thermoacoustic tomography systems with pulse modulated carrier frequency excitation is the compromise between efficient signal generation and attainable spatial resolution. In order to overcome limitations of conventional thermoacoustic imaging methods, we herein present and experimentally validate our novel approach towards high resolution thermoacoustic tomography. Instead of carrier-frequency amplification, we utilize ultrahigh-energy electromagnetic impulses at nanosecond duration with near-field energy coupling, thus maintaining thermoacoustic signal strength without compromising spatial resolution. Preliminary experiments on highly absorbing objects, consisting of copper wires with characteristic sizes of ~100 μm, reveal the resolution performance which yields 160 μm. Furthermore, benefits like its cost effectiveness, simplicity and compactness with the potential application in small animal imaging as well as human body imaging show that thermoacoustic tomography with impulse excitation is a promising imaging modality which has a broad range of applications.

  16. Copy number of tandem direct repeats within the inverted repeats of Marek's disease virus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, A; Nakajima, K; Ikuta, K; Ueda, S; Kato, S; Hirai, K

    1986-12-01

    We previously reported that DNA of the oncogenic strain BC-1 of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1) contains three units of tandem direct repeats with 132 base pair (bp) repeats within the inverted repeats of the long regions of the MDV1 genome, whereas the attenuated, nononcogenic viral DNA contains multiple units of tandem direct repeats (Maotani et al., 1986). In the present study, the difference in the copy numbers of 132 bp repeats of oncogenic and nononcogenic MDV1 DNAs in other strains of MDV1 was investigated by Southern blot hybridization. The main copy numbers in different oncogenic MDV1 strains differed: those of BC-1, JM and highly oncogenic Md5 were 3, 5 to 12 and 2, respectively. The viral DNA population with two units of repeats was small, but detectable, in cells infected with either the oncogenic BC-1 or JM strain. The MDV1 DNA in various MD cell lines contained either two units or both two and three units of repeats. The significance of the copy number of repeats in oncogenicity of MDV1 is discussed.

  17. High-resolution neutron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikerov, V.I. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhitnik, I.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ignat`ev, A.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Isakov, A.I. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Korneev, V.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krutov, V.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzin, S.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Oparin, S.N. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pertsov, A.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Podolyak, E.R. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sobel`man, I.I. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tindo, I.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tukarev, B.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    A neutron tomography technique with a coordinate resolution of several tens of micrometers has been developed. Our results indicate that the technique resolves details with dimensions less than 100 {mu}m and measures a linear attenuation of less than {approx} 0.1 cm{sup -1}. Tomograms can be reconstructed using incomplete data. Limits on the resolution of the restored pattern are analyzed, and ways to improve the sensitivity of the technique are discussed. (orig.).

  18. Photoelastic tomography as hybrid mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Errapart A.; Ainola L.; Aben H.

    2010-01-01

    Photoelastic tomography is a non-destructive method of 3D stress analysis. It permits determination of normal stress distribution in an arbitrary section of a 3D test object. In case of axial symmetry also the shear stress distribution can be determined directly from the measurement data. To determine also the other stress components one can use equations of the theory of elasticity. Such a combined application of experimental measurements and numerical handling of the equations of the ...

  19. Second harmonic optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang,Yi; Tomov, Ivan; Wang, Yimin; Chen, Zhongping

    2004-01-01

    Second harmonic optical coherence tomography, which uses coherence gating of second-order nonlinear optical response of biological tissues for imaging, is described and demonstrated. Femtosecond laser pulses were used to excite second harmonic waves from collagen harvested from rat tail tendon and a reference nonlinear crystal. Second harmonic interference fringe signals were detected and used for image construction. Because of the strong dependence of second harmonic generation on molecular ...

  20. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.