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Sample records for repeated stress-induced alterations

  1. REPEATED ACUTE STRESS INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM IN RAT

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    Nirupama R.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute stress induced alterations in the activity levels of rate limiting enzymes and concentration of intermediates of different pathways of carbohydrate metabolism have been studied. Adult male Wistar rats were restrained (RS for 1 h and after an interval of 4 h they were subjected to forced swimming (FS exercise and appropriate controls were maintained. Five rats were killed before the commencement of the experiment (initial controls, 5 control and equal number of stressed rats were killed 2 h after RS and remaining 5 rats in each group were killed 4 h after FS. There was a significant increase in the adrenal 3β- hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase activity following RS, which showed further increase after FS compared to controls and thereby indicated stress response of rats. There was a significant increase in the blood glucose levels following RS which showed further increase and reached hyperglycemic condition after FS. The hyperglycemic condition due to stress was accompanied by significant increases in the activities of glutamate- pyruvate transaminase, glutamate- oxaloacetate transaminase, glucose -6- phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase and significant decrease in the glucose -6- phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities, whereas pyruvate kinase activity did not show any alteration compared to controls. Further, the glycogen and total protein contents of the liver were decreased whereas those of pyruvate and lactate showed significant increase compared to controls after RS as well as FS.The results put together indicate that acute stress induced hyperglycemia results due to increased gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis without alteration in glycolysis. The study first time reveals that after first acute stress exposure, the subsequent stressful experience augments metabolic stress response leading to hyperglycemia. The results have relevance to human health as human beings are exposed to several stressors in a day and

  2. Repeated stress-induced stimulation of catecholamine response is not followed by altered immune cell redistribution.

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    Imrich, Richard; Tibenska, Elena; Koska, Juraj; Ksinantova, Lucia; Kvetnansky, Richard; Bergendiova-Sedlackova, Katarina; Blazicek, Pavol; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    Stress response is considered an important factor in the modulation of immune function. Neuroendocrine hormones, including catecholamines, affect the process of immune cell redistribution, important for cell-mediated immunity. This longitudinal investigation was aimed at evaluating the effect of repeated stress-induced elevation of catecholamines on immune cell redistribution and expression of adhesive molecules. We assessed the responses of epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), cortisol, changes in lymphocytes subpopulations, and percentages of CD11a+, CD11b+, and CD62L+ lymphocytes to a 20-min treadmill exercise of an intensity equal to 80% of the individual's Vo(2)max. The exercise was performed before and after 6 weeks of endurance training consisting of a 1-h run 4 times a week (ET) and after 5 days of bed rest (HDBR) in 10 healthy males. We did not observe any significant changes in the basal levels of EPI, NE, and cortisol in the plasma, nor in the immune parameters after ET and HDBR. The exercise test led to a significant (P <.001) elevation of EPI and NE levels after both ET and HDBR, a significant elevation (P <.01) of cortisol after HDBR, an increase in the absolute numbers of leukocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ lymphocytes, percentage of CD11a+ and CD11b+ lymphocytes, and to a decrease of CD62L1 before, after ET, and after HDBR. We found comparable changes in all measured immune parameters after ET and HDBR. In conclusion, repeated stress-induced elevation of EPI and NE was not associated with an alteration in immune cell redistribution found in response to the single bout of exercise.

  3. Repeated exposure of adult rats to transient oxidative stress induces various long-lasting alterations in cognitive and behavioral functions.

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    Yoshio Iguchi

    Full Text Available Exposure of neonates to oxidative stress may increase the risk of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia in adulthood. However, the effects of moderate oxidative stress on the adult brain are not completely understood. To address this issue, we systemically administrated 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX to adult rats to transiently reduce glutathione levels. Repeated administration of CHX did not affect the acquisition or motivation of an appetitive instrumental behavior (lever pressing rewarded by a food outcome under a progressive ratio schedule. In addition, response discrimination and reversal learning were not affected. However, acute CHX administration blunted the sensitivity of the instrumental performance to outcome devaluation, and this effect was prolonged in rats with a history of repeated CHX exposure, representing pro-depression-like phenotypes. On the other hand, repeated CHX administration reduced immobility in forced swimming tests and blunted acute cocaine-induced behaviors, implicating antidepressant-like effects. Multivariate analyses segregated a characteristic group of behavioral variables influenced by repeated CHX administration. Taken together, these findings suggest that repeated administration of CHX to adult rats did not cause a specific mental disorder, but it induced long-term alterations in behavioral and cognitive functions, possibly related to specific neural correlates.

  4. Studies on effect of stress preconditioning in restrain stress-induced behavioral alterations.

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    Kaur, Rajneet; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2010-02-01

    Stress preconditioning has been documented to confer on gastroprotective effects on stress-induced gastric ulcerations. However, the effects of prior exposure of stress preconditioning episodes on stress-induced behavioral changes have not been explored yet. Therefore the present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative effects of stress preconditioning in immobilization stress-induced behavioral alterations in rats. The rats were subjected to restrain stress by placing in restrainer (5.5 cm in diameter and 18 cm in length) for 3.5 h. Stress preconditioning was induced by subjecting the rats to two cycles of restraint and restrain-free periods of 15 min each. Furthermore, a similar type of stress preconditioning was induced using different time cycles of 30 and 45 min. The extent and severity of the stress-induced behavioral alterations were assessed using different behavioral tests such as hole-board test, social interaction test, open field test, and actophotometer. Restrain stress resulted in decrease in locomotor activity, frequency of head dips and rearing in hole board, line crossing and rearing in open field, and decreased following and increased avoidance in social interaction test. Stress preconditioning with two cycles of 15, 30 or 45 min respectively, did not attenuate stress-induced behavioral changes to any extent. It may be concluded that stress preconditioning does not seem to confer any protective effect in modulating restrain stress-induced behavioral alterations.

  5. Stress-Induced Permeability Alterations in an Argillaceous Limestone

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    Selvadurai, A. P. S.; Głowacki, A.

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents the results of experiments that were conducted to determine the influence of a triaxial stress state on the evolution of the permeability of an argillaceous limestone. The limestone rock is found in the Ordovician rock formations above the Precambrian basement located in southern Ontario, Canada, which is being considered as a potential host rock for the construction of a deep ground repository for storing low- and intermediate-level nuclear waste. The paper presents the results of an extensive series of hydraulic pulse tests and steady-state tests that were conducted to determine the permeability alterations in zones that can experience levels of damage that can be present in vicinity of an excavated underground opening. A "state-space" relationship is developed to describe permeability evolution with the triaxial stress in the pre-failure regime. The permeability evolution in extensively damaged post-failure states of the rock is also investigated. It is shown that permeability alterations were four orders of magnitude higher as a result of significant damage to the material, which is an important consideration in establishing the efficiency of the host rock formation as a barrier for the long-term containment of radionuclide migration.

  6. Protective effect of Labisia pumila on stress-induced behavioral, biochemical, and immunological alterations.

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    Kour, Kiranjeet; Sharma, Neelam; Chandan, Bal Krishan; Koul, Surrinder; Sangwan, Payare Lal; Bani, Sarang

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antistress potential of LABISIA PUMILA aqueous extract (LPPM/A003) using a battery of tests widely employed in different stressful situations. Pretreatment of experimental animals with LPPM/A003 caused an increase in the swimming endurance and hypoxia time and also showed the recovery of physical stress-induced depletion of neuromuscular coordination and scopolamine induced memory deficit. LPPM/A003 at graded doses reversed the chronic restraint stress (RST), induced depletion of CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T lymphocytes, NK cell population, and corresponding cytokines expression besides downregulating the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone, a major stress hormone. In addition, LPPM/A003 reversed the chronic stress-induced increase in adrenal gland weight, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and hepatic lipid peroxidation (LP) levels and augmented the RST induced decrease in hepatic glutathione (GSH), thymus and spleen weight. Thus, we conclude that LPPM/A003 has the ability to reverse the alterations produced by various stressful stimuli and therefore restores homeostasis.

  7. Dynamic microglial alterations underlie stress-induced depressive-like behavior and suppressed neurogenesis.

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    Kreisel, T; Frank, M G; Licht, T; Reshef, R; Ben-Menachem-Zidon, O; Baratta, M V; Maier, S F; Yirmiya, R

    2014-06-01

    The limited success in understanding the pathophysiology of major depression may result from excessive focus on the dysfunctioning of neurons, as compared with other types of brain cells. Therefore, we examined the role of dynamic alterations in microglia activation status in the development of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)-induced depressive-like condition in rodents. We report that following an initial period (2-3 days) of stress-induced microglial proliferation and activation, some microglia underwent apoptosis, leading to reductions in their numbers within the hippocampus, but not in other brain regions, following 5 weeks of CUS exposure. At that time, microglia displayed reduced expression of activation markers as well as dystrophic morphology. Blockade of the initial stress-induced microglial activation by minocycline or by transgenic interleukin-1 receptor antagonist overexpression rescued the subsequent microglial apoptosis and decline, as well as the CUS-induced depressive-like behavior and suppressed neurogenesis. Similarly, the antidepressant drug imipramine blocked the initial stress-induced microglial activation as well as the CUS-induced microglial decline and depressive-like behavior. Treatment of CUS-exposed mice with either endotoxin, macrophage colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, all of which stimulated hippocampal microglial proliferation, partially or completely reversed the depressive-like behavior and dramatically increased hippocampal neurogenesis, whereas treatment with imipramine or minocycline had minimal or no anti-depressive effects, respectively, in these mice. These findings provide direct causal evidence that disturbances in microglial functioning has an etiological role in chronic stress-induced depression, suggesting that microglia stimulators could serve as fast-acting anti-depressants in some forms of depressive and stress-related conditions.

  8. Stress-induced alteration of left ventricular eccentricity: An additional marker of multivessel CAD.

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    Gimelli, Alessia; Liga, Riccardo; Giorgetti, Assuero; Casagranda, Mirta; Marzullo, Paolo

    2017-03-28

    Abnormal left ventricular (LV) eccentricity index (EI) is a marker of adverse cardiac remodeling. However, the interaction between stress-induced alterations of EI and major cardiac parameters has not been explored. We sought to evaluate the relationship between LV EI and coronary artery disease (CAD) burden in patients submitted to myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Three-hundred and forty-three patients underwent MPI and coronary angiography. LV ejection fraction (EF) and EI were computed from gated stress images as measures of stress-induced functional impairment. One-hundred and thirty-six (40%), 122 (35%), and 85 (25%) patients had normal coronary arteries, single-vessel CAD, and multivessel CAD, respectively. Post-stress EI was lower in patients with multivessel CAD than in those with normal coronary arteries and single-vessel CAD (P = 0.001). This relationship was confirmed only in patients undergoing exercise stress test, where a lower post-stress EI predicted the presence of multivessel CAD (P = 0.039). Post-stress alterations of LV EI on MPI may unmask the presence of multivessel CAD.

  9. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

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    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  10. Renal Oxidative Stress Induced by Long-Term Hyperuricemia Alters Mitochondrial Function and Maintains Systemic Hypertension

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    Magdalena Cristóbal-García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks and short-term (3 weeks effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW, OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water, OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW, or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident.

  11. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence: Effects on stress-induced social alterations and social drinking in adulthood.

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    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Kim, Esther U; Spear, Linda P

    2017-01-01

    We previously observed lasting and sex-specific detrimental consequences of early adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure (AIE), with male, but not female, rats showing social anxiety-like alterations when tested as adults. The present study used Sprague Dawley rats to assess whether social alterations induced by AIE (3.5g/kg, intragastrically, every other day, between postnatal days [P] 25-45) are further exacerbated by stressors later in life. Another aim was to determine whether AIE alone or in combination with stress influenced intake of a sweetened ethanol solution (Experiment 1) or a sweetened solution ("supersac") alone (Experiment 2) under social circumstances. Animals were exposed to restraint on P66-P70 (90min/day) or left nonstressed, with corticosterone (CORT) levels assessed on day 1 and day 5 in Experiment 2. Social anxiety-like behavior emerged after AIE in non-stressed males, but not females, whereas stress-induced social anxiety was evident only in water-exposed males and females. Adult-typical habituation of the CORT response to repeated restraint was not evident in adult animals after AIE, a lack of habituation reminiscent of that normally evident in adolescents. Neither AIE nor stress affected ethanol intake under social circumstances, although AIE and restraint independently increased adolescent-typical play fighting in males during social drinking. Among males, the combination of AIE and restraint suppressed "supersac" intake; this index of depression-like behavior was not seen in females. The results provide experimental evidence associating adolescent alcohol exposure, later stress, anxiety, and depression, with young adolescent males being particularly vulnerable to long-lasting adverse effects of repeated ethanol. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Adolescent plasticity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Protective Effect of Repeatedly Preadministered Brazilian Propolis Ethanol Extract against Stress-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

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    Tadashi Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to clarify the protective effect of Brazilian propolis ethanol extract (BPEE against stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. The protective effect of BPEE against gastric mucosal lesions in male Wistar rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS for 6 h was compared between its repeated preadministration (50 mg/kg/day, 7 days and its single preadministration (50 mg/kg. The repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions and gastric mucosal oxidative stress more largely than the single BPEE preadministration. In addition, the repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated neutrophil infiltration in the gastric mucosa of rats exposed to WIRS. The protective effect of the repeated preadministration of BPEE against WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions was similar to that of a single preadministration of vitamin E (250 mg/kg in terms of the extent and manner of protection. From these findings, it is concluded that BPEE preadministered in a repeated manner protects against gastric mucosal lesions in rats exposed to WIRS more effectively than BPEE preadministered in a single manner possibly through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions.

  13. Baseline and stress-induced glucocorticoid concentrations are not repeatable but covary within individual great tits (Parus major).

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    Baugh, Alexander T; van Oers, Kees; Dingemanse, Niels J; Hau, Michaela

    2014-11-01

    In evolutionary endocrinology, there is a growing interest in the extent and basis of individual variation in endocrine traits, especially circulating concentrations of hormones. This is important because if targeted by selection, such individual differences present the opportunity for an evolutionary response to selection. It is therefore necessary to examine whether hormone traits are repeatable in natural populations. However, research in this area is complicated by the fact that different hormone traits can be correlated. The nature of these trait correlations (i.e., phenotypic, within-, or among-individual) is critically relevant in terms of the evolutionary implications, and these in turn, depend on the repeatability of each hormone trait. By decomposing phenotypic correlations between hormone traits into their within- and among-individual components it is possible to describe the multivariate nature of endocrine traits and generate inferences about their evolution. In the present study, we repeatedly captured individual great tits (Parus major) from a wild population and measured plasma concentrations of corticosterone. Using a mixed-modeling approach, we estimated repeatabilities in both initial (cf. baseline; CORT0) and stress-induced concentrations (CORT30) and the correlations between those traits among- and within-individuals. We found a lack of repeatability in both CORT0 and CORT30. Moreover, we found a strong phenotypic correlation between CORT0 and CORT30, and due to the lack of repeatability for both traits, there was no among-individual correlation between these two traits-i.e., an individual's average concentration of CORT0 was not correlated with its average concentration of CORT30. Instead, the phenotypic correlation was the result of a strong within-individual correlation, which implies that an underlying environmental factor co-modulates changes in initial and stress-induced concentrations within the same individual over time. These results

  14. Ameliorative potential of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid in restraint stress-induced behavioral alterations in rats.

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    Manchanda, Rajneet K; Jaggi, Amteshwar S; Singh, Nirmal

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative effects of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid in acute stress-induced behavioral alterations in rats subjected to restraint stress. The rats were placed in the restrainer (5.5 cm in diameter and 18 cm in length) for 3.5 h. Restraint stress-induced behavioral alterations were assessed using the hole-board, social interactions and open field tests. Restraint stress resulted in a decrease in the frequency of head dips, rearing in the hole board, line crossings and rearings in the open field, and an increase in avoidance behaviors in the social interaction tests. Sodium cromoglycate (25 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, ip), a mast cell stabilizer, and diethyldithiocarbamic acid (75 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg, ip), a selective NF-κB inhibitor, were employed to modulate restraint stress-induced behavioral changes. The administration of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid significantly attenuated the restraint stress-induced behavioral changes. The noted beneficial effects of sodium cromoglycate and diethyldithiocarbamic acid may possibly be attributed to mast cell stabilization and inhibition of NF-κB activity, respectively.

  15. FKBP5 polymorphisms influence pre-learning stress-induced alterations of learning and memory.

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    Zoladz, Phillip R; Dailey, Alison M; Nagle, Hannah E; Fiely, Miranda K; Mosley, Brianne E; Brown, Callie M; Duffy, Tessa J; Scharf, Amanda R; Earley, McKenna B; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2017-03-01

    FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP5) is a co-chaperone of heat shock protein 90 and significantly influences glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FKBP5 gene are associated with altered hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, changes in the structure and function of several cognitive brain areas, and increased susceptibility to post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression, bipolar disorder and suicidal events. The mechanisms underlying these associations are largely unknown, but it has been speculated that the influence of these SNPs on emotional memory systems may play a role. In the present study, 112 participants were exposed to the socially evaluated cold pressor test (stress) or control (no stress) conditions immediately prior to learning a list of 42 words. Participant memory was assessed immediately after learning (free recall) and 24 h later (free recall and recognition). Participants provided a saliva sample that enabled the genotyping of three FKBP5 polymorphisms: rs1360780, rs3800373 and rs9296158. Results showed that stress impaired immediate recall in risk allele carriers. More importantly, stress enhanced long-term recall and recognition memory in non-carriers of the risk alleles, effects that were completely absent in risk allele carriers. Follow-up analyses revealed that memory performance was correlated with salivary cortisol levels in non-carriers, but not in carriers. These findings suggest that FKBP5 risk allele carriers may possess a sensitized stress response system, perhaps specifically for stress-induced changes in corticosteroid levels, which might aid our understanding of how SNPs in the FKBP5 gene confer increased risk for stress-related psychological disorders and their related phenotypes.

  16. Stress induced alterations in pre-pubertal ovarian follicular development in rat

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    Yajurvedi H.N.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to find out whether stress experienced during neo-natal period alters the timing of formation of pre-antral and antral follicles and if so, whether pre-treatment with CRH receptor antagonist prevents these effects in rats. New born rat pups (n= 15 were exposed to maternal separation (6 hours/ day from post-natal day (PND 1 to 7 and were killed on PND 8, 11 and 15. The time of exposure was randomly changed every day during light phase (7Am to 7Pm of the day to avoid habituation. There was a significant increase in serum corticosterone levels on PND 8 and 11 in stress group rats compared to controls indicating stress response in these pups. The ovary of both control and stressed rats contained oocytes and primary follicles on PND 8 and 11 and in showed progress of follicular development upto to pre-antral and early antral follicle formation on PND 11 and 15. However, mean number of healthy oocytes and all categories of follicles at all ages studied were significantly lower in stressed rats compared to controls. Concomitant with these changes, number of atreatic follicles showed an increase over control values in stressed rats. The increase in atresia of follicles was due to apoptosis as shown by increase in the percentage of granulosa cells showing TUNEL positive staining and caspase 3 activity. On the other hand, pre-treatment with CRH- receptor antagonist (CRH 9-41 2ng/ 0.1 ml/ rat prior to undergoing stress regime on PND 1 to 7, prevented alterations in pre- pubertal follicular development thereby indicating that the ovarian changes were due to effects of stress induced activation of HPA axis. The results indicate that, stress during neonatal phase, though does not affect timing of formation of pre-antral and antral follicles, it does enhance atresia of follicles of all categories, including follicular reserve, which may affect the reproductive potential of adults. The results, for the first time reveal that CRF

  17. Individual differences and repeatability in vocal production: stress-induced calling exposes a songbird's personality

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    Guillette, Lauren M.; Sturdy, Christopher B.

    2011-11-01

    Recent research in songbirds has demonstrated that male singing behavior varies systematically with personality traits such as exploration and risk taking. Here we examine whether the production of bird calls, in addition to bird songs, is repeatable and related to exploratory behavior, using the black-capped chickadee ( Poecile atricapillus) as a model. We assessed the exploratory behavior of individual birds in a novel environment task. We then recorded the vocalizations and accompanying motor behavior of both male and female chickadees, over the course of several days, in two different contexts: a control condition with no playback and a stressful condition where chick-a-dee mobbing calls were played to individual birds. We found that several vocalizations and behaviors were repeatable within both a control and a stressful context, and across contexts. While there was no relationship between vocal output and exploratory behavior in the control context, production of alarm and chick-a-dee calls in the stressful condition was positively associated with exploratory behavior. These findings are important because they show that bird calls, in addition to bird song, are an aspect of personality, in that calls are consistent both within and across contexts, and covary with other personality measures (exploration).

  18. Systemic and Local Responses to Repeated HL Stress-Induced Retrograde Signaling in Arabidopsis.

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    Gordon, Matthew J; Carmody, Melanie; Albrecht, Verónica; Pogson, Barry

    2012-01-01

    CHLOROPLASTS OF LEAVES UNDER HIGH LIGHT STRESS INITIATE SIGNALS TO THE NUCLEI OF BOTH EXPOSED AND DISTAL LEAVES IN ORDER TO ACCLIMATE AGAINST THE POTENTIAL THREAT OF OXIDATIVE DAMAGE: a process known as high light systemic acquired acclimation (HL SAA). This study explores the nature of HL SAA, synergistic interactions with other environmental stresses, and the impact of repeated HL stress on the acclimation response of exposed and distal leaves. This necessitated the development of novel experimental systems to investigate the initiation, perception, and response to HL SAA. These systems were used to investigate the HL SAA response by monitoring the induction of mRNA in distal leaves not exposed to the HL stress. Acclimation to HL is induced within minutes and the response is proportionally dependent on the quality and quantity of light. HL SAA treatments in conjunction with variations in temperature and humidity reveal HL SAA is influenced by fluctuations in humidity. These treatments also result in changes in auxin accumulation and auxin-responsive genes. A key question in retrograde signaling is the extent to which transient changes in light intensity result in a "memory" of the event leading to acclimation responses. Repeated exposure to short term HL resulted in acclimation of the exposed tissue and that of emerging and young leaves (but not older leaves) to HL and oxidative stress.

  19. Stress-induced Premature Promotes Prostate Cancer Growth and Metastasis through Alteration of Microenvironment

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    2012-01-01

    cancer. J Clin Invest 120: 290-302. Araki S, Israel S, Leskov KS, Criswell TL, Beman M, Klokov DY et al (2005). Clusterin proteins: stress-inducible...Cells Dev 20: 1199-1212. Cardona-Gomez GP, Mendez P, DonCarlos LL, Azcoitia I, Garcia -Segura LM (2001). Interactions of estrogens and insulin-like...telomeres in ageing research. J Pathol 2007; 211: 114-123. 17. Ramirez RD, Sheridan S, Girard L, et al. Immortalization of human bronchial epithelial

  20. Effect of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum treatment on restraint stress-induced behavioral and biochemical alteration in mice

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    Prakash Atish K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A stressful stimulus is a crucial determinant of health and disease. Antidepressants are used to manage stress and their related effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum in restraint stress-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations in mice. Methods Animals were immobilized for a period of 6 hr. St. John's Wort (50 and 100 mg/kg was administered 30 minutes before the animals were subjecting to acute immobilized stress. Various behavioral tests parameters for anxiety, locomotor activity and nociceptive threshold were assessed followed by biochemical assessments (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein subsequently. Results 6-hr acute restraint stress caused severe anxiety like behavior, antinociception and impaired locomotor activity as compared to unstressed animals. Biochemical analyses revealed an increase in malondialdehyde, nitrites concentration, depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity as compared to unstressed animal brain. Five days St. John's Wort treatment in a dose of 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg significantly attenuated restraint stress-induced behavioral (improved locomotor activity, reduced tail flick latency and antianxiety like effect and oxidative damage as compared to control (restraint stress. Conclusion Present study highlights the modest activity of St. John's Wort against acute restraint stress induced modification.

  1. β-carotene treatment alters the cellular death process in oxidative stress-induced K562 cells.

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    Akçakaya, Handan; Tok, Sabiha; Dal, Fulya; Cinar, Suzan Adin; Nurten, Rustem

    2017-03-01

    Oxidizing agents (e.g., H2 O2 ) cause structural and functional disruptions of molecules by affecting lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. As a result, cellular mechanisms related to disrupted macro molecules are affected and cell death is induced. Oxidative damage can be prevented at a certain point by antioxidants or the damage can be reversed. In this work, we studied the cellular response against oxidative stress induced by H2 O2 and antioxidant-oxidant (β-carotene-H2 O2 ) interactions in terms of time, concentration, and treatment method (pre-, co-, and post) in K562 cells. We showed that co- or post-treatment with β-carotene did not protect cells from the damage of oxidative stress furthermore co- and post-β-carotene-treated oxidative stress induced cells showed similar results with only H2 O2 treated cells. However, β-carotene pre-treatment prevented oxidative damage induced by H2 O2 at concentrations lower than 1,000 μM compared with only H2 O2 -treated and co- and post-β-carotene-treated oxidative stress-induced cells in terms of studied cellular parameters (mitochondrial membrane potential [Δψm ], cell cycle and apoptosis). Prevention effect of β-carotene pre-treatment was lost at concentrations higher than 1,000 μM H2 O2 (2-10 mM). These findings suggest that β-carotene pre-treatment alters the effects of oxidative damage induced by H2 O2 and cell death processes in K562 cells.

  2. Maternal chewing during prenatal stress ameliorates stress-induced hypomyelination, synaptic alterations, and learning impairment in mouse offspring.

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    Suzuki, Ayumi; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Hayashi, Sakurako; Sato, Yuichi; Azuma, Kagaku; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2016-11-15

    Maternal chewing during prenatal stress attenuates both the development of stress-induced learning deficits and decreased cell proliferation in mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus. Hippocampal myelination affects spatial memory and the synaptic structure is a key mediator of neuronal communication. We investigated whether maternal chewing during prenatal stress ameliorates stress-induced alterations of hippocampal myelin and synapses, and impaired development of spatial memory in adult offspring. Pregnant mice were divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube, and was initiated on day 12 of pregnancy and continued until delivery. Mice in the stress/chewing group were given a wooden stick to chew during restraint. In 1-month-old pups, spatial memory was assessed in the Morris water maze, and hippocampal oligodendrocytes and synapses in CA1 were assayed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Prenatal stress led to impaired learning ability, and decreased immunoreactivity of myelin basic protein (MBP) and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) in the hippocampal CA1 in adult offspring. Numerous myelin sheath abnormalities were observed. The G-ratio [axonal diameter to axonal fiber diameter (axon plus myelin sheath)] was increased and postsynaptic density length was decreased in the hippocampal CA1 region. Maternal chewing during stress attenuated the prenatal stress-induced impairment of spatial memory, and the decreased MBP and CNPase immunoreactivity, increased G-ratios, and decreased postsynaptic-density length in the hippocampal CA1 region. These findings suggest that chewing during prenatal stress in dams could be an effective coping strategy to prevent hippocampal behavioral and morphologic impairments in their offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbiota alteration is associated with the development of stress-induced despair behavior

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    Marin, Ioana A.; Goertz, Jennifer E.; Ren, Tiantian; Rich, Stephen S.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Farber, Emily; Wu, Martin; Overall, Christopher C.; Kipnis, Jonathan; Gaultier, Alban

    2017-01-01

    Depressive disorders often run in families, which, in addition to the genetic component, may point to the microbiome as a causative agent. Here, we employed a combination of behavioral, molecular and computational techniques to test the role of the microbiota in mediating despair behavior. In chronically stressed mice displaying despair behavior, we found that the microbiota composition and the metabolic signature dramatically change. Specifically, we observed reduced Lactobacillus and increased circulating kynurenine levels as the most prominent changes in stressed mice. Restoring intestinal Lactobacillus levels was sufficient to improve the metabolic alterations and behavioral abnormalities. Mechanistically, we identified that Lactobacillus-derived reactive oxygen species may suppress host kynurenine metabolism, by inhibiting the expression of the metabolizing enzyme, IDO1, in the intestine. Moreover, maintaining elevated kynurenine levels during Lactobacillus supplementation diminished the treatment benefits. Collectively, our data provide a mechanistic scenario for how a microbiota player (Lactobacillus) may contribute to regulating metabolism and resilience during stress. PMID:28266612

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces different molecular structural alterations in human dilated and ischemic cardiomyopathy.

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    Ana Ortega

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a multifunctional organelle responsible for the synthesis and folding of proteins as well as for signalling and calcium storage, that has been linked to the contraction-relaxation process. Perturbations of its homeostasis activate a stress response in diseases such as heart failure (HF. To elucidate the alterations in ER molecular components, we analyze the levels of ER stress and structure proteins in human dilated (DCM and ischemic (ICM cardiomyopathies, and its relationship with patient's functional status. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined 52 explanted human hearts from DCM (n = 21 and ICM (n = 21 subjects and 10 non-failing hearts as controls. Our results showed specific changes in stress (IRE1, p<0.05; p-IRE1, p<0.05 and structural (Reticulon 1, p<0.01 protein levels. The stress proteins GRP78, XBP1 and ATF6 as well as the structural proteins RRBP1, kinectin, and Nogo A and B, were upregulated in both DCM and ICM patients. Immunofluorescence results were concordant with quantified Western blot levels. Moreover, we show a novel relationship between stress and structural proteins. RRBP1, involved in procollagen synthesis and remodeling, was related with left ventricular function. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, we report the existence of alterations in ER stress response and shaping proteins. We show a plausible effect of the ER stress on ER structure in a suitable sample of DCM and ICM subjects. Patients with higher values of RRBP1 had worse left ventricular function.

  5. Shear Stress-Induced Alteration of Epithelial Organization in Human Renal Tubular Cells.

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    Damien Maggiorani

    Full Text Available Tubular epithelial cells in the kidney are continuously exposed to urinary fluid shear stress (FSS generated by urine movement and recent in vitro studies suggest that changes of FSS could contribute to kidney injury. However it is unclear whether FSS alters the epithelial characteristics of the renal tubule. Here, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo the influence of FSS on epithelial characteristics of renal proximal tubular cells taking the organization of junctional complexes and the presence of the primary cilium as markers of epithelial phenotype. Human tubular cells (HK-2 were subjected to FSS (0.5 Pa for 48 h. Control cells were maintained under static conditions. Markers of tight junctions (Claudin-2, ZO-1, Par polarity complex (Pard6, adherens junctions (E-Cadherin, β-Catenin and the primary cilium (α-acetylated Tubulin were analysed by quantitative PCR, Western blot or immunocytochemistry. In response to FSS, Claudin-2 disappeared and ZO-1 displayed punctuated and discontinuous staining in the plasma membrane. Expression of Pard6 was also decreased. Moreover, E-Cadherin abundance was decreased, while its major repressors Snail1 and Snail2 were overexpressed, and β-Catenin staining was disrupted along the cell periphery. Finally, FSS subjected-cells exhibited disappeared primary cilium. Results were confirmed in vivo in a uninephrectomy (8 months mouse model where increased FSS induced by adaptive hyperfiltration in remnant kidney was accompanied by both decreased epithelial gene expression including ZO-1, E-cadherin and β-Catenin and disappearance of tubular cilia. In conclusion, these results show that proximal tubular cells lose an important number of their epithelial characteristics after long term exposure to FSS both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the changes in urinary FSS associated with nephropathies should be considered as potential insults for tubular cells leading to disorganization of the tubular epithelium.

  6. Alteration of hepatic structure and oxidative stress induced by intravenous nanoceria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Michael T., E-mail: mttsen01@louisville.edu [Dept of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Lu, Xiaoqin, E-mail: x0lu0003@louisville.edu [Dept of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Duan, Xiaoxian, E-mail: x0duan02@louisville.edu [Dept of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Hardas, Sarita S., E-mail: sarita.hardas@uky.edu [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Sultana, Rukhsana, E-mail: rsult2@uky.edu [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Wu, Peng, E-mail: peng.wu@uky.edu [Dept of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Unrine, Jason M., E-mail: jason.unrine@uky.edu [Dept of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Graham, Uschi, E-mail: graham@caer.uky.edu [Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Butterfield, D. Allan, E-mail: dabcns@uky.edu [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Grulke, Eric A., E-mail: eric.grulke@uky.edu [Dept of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Yokel, Robert A., E-mail: ryokel@email.uky.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Beyond the traditional use of ceria as an abrasive, the scope of nanoceria applications now extends into fuel cell manufacturing, diesel fuel additives, and for therapeutic intervention as a putative antioxidant. However, the biological effects of nanoceria exposure have yet to be fully defined, which gave us the impetus to examine its systemic biodistribution and biological responses. An extensively characterized nanoceria (5 nm) dispersion was vascularly infused into rats, which were terminated 1 h, 20 h or 30 days later. Light and electron microscopic tissue characterization was conducted and hepatic oxidative stress parameters determined. We observed acute ceria nanoparticle sequestration by Kupffer cells with subsequent bioretention in parenchymal cells as well. The internalized ceria nanoparticles appeared as spherical agglomerates of varying dimension without specific organelle penetration. In hepatocytes, the agglomerated nanoceria frequently localized to the plasma membrane facing bile canaliculi. Hepatic stellate cells also sequestered nanoceria. Within the sinusoids, sustained nanoceria bioretention was associated with granuloma formations comprised of Kupffer cells and intermingling CD3{sup +} T cells. A statistically significant elevation of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level was seen at 1 and 20 h, but subsided by 30 days after ceria administration. Further, elevated apoptosis was observed on day 30. These findings, together with increased hepatic protein carbonyl levels on day 30, indicate ceria-induced hepatic injury and oxidative stress, respectively. Such observations suggest a single vascular infusion of nanoceria can lead to persistent hepatic retention of particles with possible implications for occupational and therapeutic exposures. -- Highlights: ► Time course study on nanoceria induced hepatic alterations in rats. ► Serum AST elevation indicated acute hepatotoxicity. ► Ceria is retained for up to 30 days in Kupffer cells

  7. Early life stress-induced alterations in rat brain structures measured with high resolution MRI.

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    Sarabdjitsingh, R Angela; Loi, Manila; Joëls, Marian; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; van der Toorn, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Adverse experiences early in life impair cognitive function both in rodents and humans. In humans this increases the vulnerability to develop mental illnesses while in the rodent brain early life stress (ELS) abnormalities are associated with changes in synaptic plasticity, excitability and microstructure. Detailed information on the effects of ELS on rodent brain structural integrity at large and connectivity within the brain is currently lacking; this information is highly relevant for understanding the mechanism by which early life stress predisposes to mental illnesses. Here, we exposed rats to 24 hours of maternal deprivation (MD) at postnatal day 3, a paradigm known to increase corticosterone levels and thereby activate glucocorticoid receptors in the brain. Using structural magnetic resonance imaging we examined: i) volumetric changes and white/grey matter properties of the whole cerebrum and of specific brain areas; and ii) whether potential alterations could be normalized by blocking glucocorticoid receptors with mifepristone during the critical developmental window of early adolescence, i.e. between postnatal days 26 and 28. The results show that MD caused a volumetric reduction of the prefrontal cortex, particularly the ventromedial part, and the orbitofrontal cortex. Within the whole cerebrum, white (relative to grey) matter volume was decreased and region-specifically in prefrontal cortex and dorsomedial striatum following MD. A trend was found for the hippocampus. Grey matter fractions were not affected. Treatment with mifepristone did not normalize these changes. This study indicates that early life stress in rodents has long lasting consequences for the volume and structural integrity of the brain. However, changes were relatively modest and-unlike behavior- not mitigated by blockade of glucocorticoid receptors during a critical developmental period.

  8. Stress-induced alterations in 5-HT1A receptor transcriptional modulators NUDR and Freud-1.

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    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Kotarska, Katarzyna; Daigle, Mireille; Misztak, Paulina; Sowa-Kucma, Magdalena; Rafalo, Anna; Curzytek, Katarzyna; Kubera, Marta; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Nowak, Gabriel; Albert, Paul R

    2014-11-01

    The effect of stress on the mRNA and protein level of the 5-HT1A receptor and two of its key transcriptional modulators, NUDR and Freud-1, was examined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (Hp) using rodent models: olfactory bulbectomy (OB) and prenatal stress (PS) in male and female rats; chronic mild stress in male rats (CMS) and pregnancy stress. In PFC, CMS induced the most widespread changes, with significant reduction in both mRNA and protein levels of NUDR, 5-HT1A receptor and in Freud-1 mRNA; while in Hp 5-HT1A receptor and Freud-1 protein levels were also decreased. In male, but not female OB rats PFC Freud-1 and 5-HT1A receptor protein levels were reduced, while in Hp 5-HT1A receptor, Freud-1 and NUDR mRNA's but not protein were reduced. In PS rats PFC 5-HT1A receptor protein was reduced more in females than males; while in Hp Freud-1 protein was increased in females. In pregnancy stress, PFC NUDR, Freud-1 and 5-HT1A protein receptor levels were reduced, and in HP 5-HT1A receptor protein levels were also reduced; in HP only NUDR and Freud-1 mRNA levels were reduced. Overall, CMS and stress during pregnancy produced the most salient changes in 5-HT1A receptor and transcription factor expression, suggesting a primary role for altered transcription factor expression in chronic regulation of 5-HT1A receptor expression. By contrast, OB (in males) and PS (in females) produced gender-specific reductions in PFC 5-HT1A receptor protein levels, suggesting a role for post-transcriptional regulation. These and previous data suggest that chronic stress might be a key regulator of NUDR/Freud-1 gene expression.

  9. Stress induces altered CRE/CREB pathway activity and BDNF expression in the hippocampus of glucocorticoid receptor-impaired mice.

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    Alboni, Silvia; Tascedda, Fabio; Corsini, Daniela; Benatti, Cristina; Caggia, Federica; Capone, Giacomo; Barden, Nicholas; Blom, Joan M C; Brunello, Nicoletta

    2011-06-01

    The gene coding for the neurotrophin Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a stress-responsive gene. Changes in its expression may underlie some of the pathological effects of stress-related disorders like depression. Data on the stress-induced regulation of the expression of BDNF in pathological conditions are rare because often research is conducted using healthy animals. In our experiments, we used transgenic mice with glucocorticoid receptor impaired (GR-i) expression in the hypothalamus created as a tool to study the neuroendocrine changes occurring in stress-related disorders. First, under basal condition, GR-i mice displayed lower levels of BDNF exons IX and IV and decreased CRE(BDNF) binding activity with respect to wild-type (WT) mice in the hippocampus. Then, we exposed GR-i and WT mice to an acute restraint stress (ARS) to test the hypothesis that GR-i mice display: 1] different ARS induced expression of BDNF, and 2] altered activation of signaling pathways implicated in regulating BDNF gene expression in the hippocampus with respect to WT mice. Results indicate that ARS enhanced BDNF mRNA expression mainly in the CA3 hippocampal sub-region of GR-i mice in the presence of enhanced levels of pro-BDNF protein, while no effect was observed in WT mice. Moreover, ARS reduced CREB signaling and binding to the BDNF promoter in GR-i mice but enhanced signaling and binding, possibly through ERK1/2 activation, in WT mice. Thus, life-long central GR dysfunction resulted in an altered sensitivity at the transcriptional level that may underlie an impaired response to an acute psycho-physical stress. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'.

  10. Chronic noise stress-induced alterations of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their metabolism in the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amajad Iqbal Kazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress induces neurochemical changes that include neurotransmitter imbalance in the brain. Noise is an environmental factor inducing stress. Chronic noise stress affects monoamine neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system. The effect on other excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is not known. The aim was to study the role of chronic noise stress on the glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic systems of the brain. Female Wistar rats (155 ± 5 g were unintentionally exposed to noise due to construction (75-95 db, 3-4 hours/day, 5 days a week for 7-8 weeks in the vicinity of the animal care facility. Glutamate/GABA levels and their metabolic enzymes were evaluated in different rat brain regions (cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum and compared with age and gender matched nonexposed rats. Chronic noise stress decreased glutamate levels and glutaminase activity 27% and 33% in the cortex, 15% and 24% in the cerebellum. Glutamate levels increased 10% in the hippocampus, 28% in striatum and glutaminase activity 15% in striatum. Glutamine synthetase activity increased significantly in all brain regions studied, that is, cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum (P < 0.05. Noise stress-increased GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity 20% and 45% in the cortex, 13% and 28% in the hippocampus respectively. GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity decreased 15% and 14%, respectively in the striatum. GABA transaminase activity was significantly reduced in the cortex (55%, hippocampus (17%, and cerebellum (33%. Chronic noise stress differentially affected glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems in the rat brain, which may alter glutamate and GABA neurotransmission.

  11. Effects of exercise training on stress-induced vascular reactivity alterations: role of nitric oxide and prostanoids

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    Thiago Bruder-Nascimento

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical exercise may modify biologic stress responses. Objective: To investigate the impact of exercise training on vascular alterations induced by acute stress, focusing on nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase pathways. Method: Wistar rats were separated into: sedentary, trained (60-min swimming, 5 days/week during 8 weeks, carrying a 5% body-weight load, stressed (2 h-immobilization, and trained/stressed. Response curves for noradrenaline, in the absence and presence of L-NAME or indomethacin, were obtained in intact and denuded aortas (n=7-10. Results: None of the procedures altered the denuded aorta reactivity. Intact aortas from stressed, trained, and trained/stressed rats showed similar reduction in noradrenaline maximal responses (sedentary 3.54±0.15, stressed 2.80±0.10*, trained 2.82±0.11*, trained/stressed 2.97± 0.21*, *P<0.05 relate to sedentary. Endothelium removal and L-NAME abolished this hyporeactivity in all experimental groups, except in trained/stressed rats that showed a partial aorta reactivity recovery in L-NAME presence (L-NAME: sedentary 5.23±0,26#, stressed 5.55±0.38#, trained 5.28±0.30#, trained/stressed 4.42±0.41, #P<0.05 related to trained/stressed. Indomethacin determined a decrease in sensitivity (EC50 in intact aortas of trained rats without abolishing the aortal hyporeactivity in trained, stressed, and trained/stressed rats. Conclusions: Exercise-induced vascular adaptive response involved an increase in endothelial vasodilator prostaglandins and nitric oxide. Stress-induced vascular adaptive response involved an increase in endothelial nitric oxide. Beside the involvement of the endothelial nitric oxide pathway, the vascular response of trained/stressed rats involved an additional mechanism yet to be elucidated. These findings advance on the understanding of the vascular processes after exercise and stress alone and in combination.

  12. Permanent relief from intermittent cold stress-induced fibromyalgia-like abnormal pain by repeated intrathecal administration of antidepressants

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    Mukae Takehiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is characterized by chronic widespread pain, which is often refractory to conventional painkillers. Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated that antidepressants are effective in treating FM pain. We previously established a mouse model of FM-like pain, induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS. Results In this study, we find that ICS exposure causes a transient increase in plasma corticosterone concentration, but not in anxiety or depression-like behaviors. A single intrathecal injection of an antidepressant, such as milnacipran, amitriptyline, mianserin or paroxetine, had an acute analgesic effect on ICS-induced thermal hyperalgesia at post-stress day 1 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, repeated daily antidepressant treatments during post-stress days 1-5 gradually reversed the reduction in thermal pain threshold, and this recovery was maintained for at least 7 days after the final treatment. In addition, relief from mechanical allodynia, induced by ICS exposure, was also observed at day 9 after the cessation of antidepressant treatment. In contrast, the intravenous administration of these antidepressants at conventional doses failed to provide relief. Conclusions These results suggest that the repetitive intrathecal administration of antidepressants permanently cures ICS-induced FM pain in mice.

  13. Structural and functional alterations in the colonic microbiome of the rat in a model of stress induced irritable bowel syndrome.

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    Fourie, Nicolaas H; Wang, Dan; Abey, Sarah K; Creekmore, Amy L; Hong, Shuangsong; Martin, Christiana G; Wiley, John W; Henderson, Wendy A

    2017-01-02

    Stress is known to perturb the microbiome and exacerbate irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) associated symptoms. Characterizing structural and functional changes in the microbiome is necessary to understand how alterations affect the biomolecular environment of the gut in IBS. Repeated water avoidance (WA) stress was used to induce IBS-like symptoms in rats. The colon-mucosa associated microbiome was characterized in 13 stressed and control animals by 16S sequencing. In silico analysis of the functional domains of microbial communities was done by inferring metagenomic profiles from 16S data. Microbial communities and functional profiles were compared between conditions. WA animals exhibited higher α-diversity and moderate divergence in community structure (β-diversity) compared with controls. Specific clades and taxa were consistently and significantly modified in the WA animals. The WA microbiome was particularly enriched in Proteobacteria and depleted in several beneficial taxa. A decreased capacity in metabolic domains, including energy- and lipid-metabolism, and an increased capacity for fatty acid and sulfur metabolism was inferred for the WA microbiome. The stressed condition favored the proliferation of a greater diversity of microbes that appear to be functionally similar, resulting in a functionally poorer microbiome with implications for epithelial health. Taxa, with known beneficial effects, were found to be depleted, which supports their relevance as therapeutic agents to restore microbial health. Microbial sulfur metabolism may form a key component of visceral nerve sensitization pathways and is therefore of interest as a target metabolic domain in microbial ecological restoration.

  14. Differential stress-induced alterations of colonic corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in the Wistar Kyoto rat.

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    o'malley, D; Julio-Pieper, M; Gibney, S M; Gosselin, R D; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2010-03-01

    BACKGROUND A growing body of data implicates increased life stresses with the initiation, persistence and severity of symptoms associated with functional gut disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Activation of central and peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors is key to stress-induced changes in gastrointestinal (GI) function. METHODS This study utilised immunofluorescent and Western blotting techniques to investigate colonic expression of CRF receptors in stress-sensitive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and control Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. KEY RESULTS No intra-strain differences were observed in the numbers of colonic CRFR1 and CRFR2 positive cells. Protein expression of functional CRFR1 was found to be comparable in control proximal and distal colon samples. Sham levels of CRFR1 were also similar in the proximal colon but significantly higher in WKY distal colons (SD: 0.38 +/- 0.14, WKY: 2.06 +/- 0.52, P CRF receptor expression and further support a role for local colonic CRF signalling in stress-induced changes in GI function.

  15. Adaptogenic potential of curcumin in experimental chronic stress and chronic unpredictable stress-induced memory deficits and alterations in functional homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Nitish; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal; Anand, Preet; Dhawan, Ravi

    2011-07-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of curcumin in chronic stress and chronic unpredictable stress-induced memory deficits and alteration of functional homeostasis in mice. Chronic stress was induced by immobilizing the animal for 2 h daily for 10 days, whereas chronic unpredictable stress was induced by employing a battery of stressors of variable magnitude and time for 10 days. Curcumin was administered to drug-treated mice prior to induction of stress. Body weight, adrenal gland weight, ulcer index and biochemical levels of glucose, creatine kinase, cholesterol, corticosterone, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were evaluated to assess stress-induced functional changes. Memory deficits were evaluated using the elevated plus maze (EPM) model. Chronic stress and chronic unpredictable stress significantly increased the levels of corticosterone, glucose and creatine kinase and decreased cholesterol levels. Moreover, chronic stress and chronic unpredictable stress resulted in severe memory deficits along with adrenal hypertrophy, weight loss and gastric ulceration. Chronic stress and chronic unpredictable stress also increased oxidative stress assessed in terms of increase in TBARS and decrease in GSH levels. Pretreatment with curcumin (25 and 50 mg/kg p.o.) attenuated chronic stress and chronic unpredictable stress-associated memory deficits, biochemical alterations, pathological outcomes and oxidative stress. It may be concluded that curcumin-mediated antioxidant actions and decrease in corticosterone secretion are responsible for its adaptogenic and memory restorative actions in chronic and chronic unpredictable stress.

  16. Beneficial Effects of Tianeptine on Hippocampus-Dependent Long-Term Memory and Stress-Induced Alterations of Brain Structure and Function

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    Carmen Muñoz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Tianeptine is a well-described antidepressant which has been shown to prevent stress from producing deleterious effects on brain structure and function. Preclinical studies have shown that tianeptine blocks stress-induced alterations of neuronal morphology and synaptic plasticity. Moreover, tianeptine prevents stress from impairing learning and memory, and, importantly, demonstrates memory-enhancing properties in the absence of stress. Recent research has indicated that tianeptine works by normalizing glutamatergic neurotransmission, a mechanism of action that may underlie its effectiveness as an antidepressant. These findings emphasize the value in focusing on the mechanisms of action of tianeptine, and specifically, the glutamatergic system, in the development of novel pharmacotherapeutic strategies in the treatment of depression.

  17. Chronic stress induces structural alterations in splenic lymphoid tissue that are associated with changes in corticosterone levels in wistar-kyoto rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, María Eugenia; Martinez-Mota, Lucia; Salinas, Citlaltepetl; Marquez-Velasco, Ricardo; Hernandez-Chan, Nancy G; Morales-Montor, Jorge; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Streber, María L; Granados-Camacho, Ivonne; Becerril, Enrique; Javier, Baquera-Heredia; Pavón, Lenin

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder patients present chronic stress and decreased immunity. The Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY) is a strain in which the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is overactivated. To determine whether chronic stress induces changes in corticosterone levels and splenic lymphoid tissue, 9-week-old male rats were subject to restraint stress (3 h daily), chemical stress (hydrocortisone treatment, 50 mg/Kg weight), mixed stress (restraint plus hydrocortisone), or control treatment (without stress) for 1, 4, and 7 weeks. The serum corticosterone levels by RIA and spleens morphology were analyzed. Corticosterone levels as did the structure, size of the follicles and morphology of the parenchyma (increase in red pulp) in the spleen, varied depending on time and type of stressor. These changes indicate that chronic stress alters the immune response in the spleen in WKY rats by inducing morphological changes, explaining in part the impaired immunity that develops in organisms that are exposed to chronic stress.

  18. Medial prefrontal cortex neuronal activation and synaptic alterations after stress-induced reinstatement of palatable food seeking: a study using c-fos-GFP transgenic female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifani, Carlo; Koya, Eisuke; Navarre, Brittany M; Calu, Donna J; Baumann, Michael H; Marchant, Nathan J; Liu, Qing-Rong; Khuc, Thi; Pickel, James; Lupica, Carl R; Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T

    2012-06-20

    Relapse to maladaptive eating habits during dieting is often provoked by stress and there is evidence for a role of ovarian hormones in stress responses and feeding. We studied the role of these hormones in stress-induced reinstatement of food seeking and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neuronal activation in c-fos-GFP transgenic female rats, which express GFP in strongly activated neurons. Food-restricted ovariectomized or sham-operated c-fos-GFP rats were trained to lever-press for palatable food pellets. Subsequently, lever-pressing was extinguished and reinstatement of food seeking and mPFC neuronal activation was assessed after injections of the pharmacological stressor yohimbine (0.5-2 mg/kg) or pellet priming (1-4 noncontingent pellets). Estrous cycle effects on reinstatement were also assessed in wild-type rats. Yohimbine- and pellet-priming-induced reinstatement was associated with Fos and GFP induction in mPFC; both reinstatement and neuronal activation were minimally affected by ovarian hormones in both c-fos-GFP and wild-type rats. c-fos-GFP transgenic rats were then used to assess glutamatergic synaptic alterations within activated GFP-positive and nonactivated GFP-negative mPFC neurons following yohimbine-induced reinstatement of food seeking. This reinstatement was associated with reduced AMPA receptor/NMDA receptor current ratios and increased paired-pulse facilitation in activated GFP-positive but not GFP-negative neurons. While ovarian hormones do not appear to play a role in stress-induced relapse of food seeking in our rat model, this reinstatement was associated with unique synaptic alterations in strongly activated mPFC neurons. Our paper introduces the c-fos-GFP transgenic rat as a new tool to study unique synaptic changes in activated neurons during behavior.

  19. Mechanical Alterations Associated with Repeated Treadmill Sprinting under Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocherie, Franck; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Racinais, Sébastien; Millet, Grégoire P.; Périard, Julien D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Examine the mechanical alterations associated with repeated treadmill sprinting performed in HOT (38°C) and CON (25°C) conditions. Methods Eleven recreationally active males performed a 30-min warm-up followed by three sets of five 5-s sprints with 25-s recovery and 3-min between sets in each environment. Constant-velocity running for 1-min at 10 and 20 km.h-1 was also performed prior to and following sprinting. Results Mean skin (37.2±0.7 vs. 32.7±0.8°C; P<0.001) and core (38.9±0.2 vs. 38.8±0.3°C; P<0.05) temperatures, together with thermal comfort (P<0.001) were higher following repeated sprinting in HOT vs. CON. Step frequency and vertical stiffness were lower (-2.6±1.6% and -5.5±5.5%; both P<0.001) and contact time (+3.2±2.4%; P<0.01) higher in HOT for the mean of sets 1–3 compared to CON. Running distance per sprint decreased from set 1 to 3 (-7.0±6.4%; P<0.001), with a tendency for shorter distance covered in HOT vs. CON (-2.7±3.4%; P = 0.06). Mean vertical (-2.6±5.5%; P<0.01), horizontal (-9.1±4.4%; P<0.001) and resultant ground reaction forces (-3.0±2.8%; P<0.01) along with vertical stiffness (-12.9±2.3%; P<0.001) and leg stiffness (-8.4±2.7%; P<0.01) decreased from set 1 to 3, independently of conditions. Propulsive power decreased from set 1 to 3 (-16.9±2.4%; P<0.001), with lower propulsive power values in set 2 (-6.6%; P<0.05) in HOT vs. CON. No changes in constant-velocity running patterns occurred between conditions, or from pre-to-post repeated-sprint exercise. Conclusions Thermal strain alters step frequency and vertical stiffness during repeated sprinting; however without exacerbating mechanical alterations. The absence of changes in constant-velocity running patterns suggests a strong link between fatigue-induced velocity decrements during sprinting and mechanical alterations. PMID:28146582

  20. Does stress induce bowel dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ming; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Kao, John Y

    2014-08-01

    Psychological stress is known to induce somatic symptoms. Classically, many gut physiological responses to stress are mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is, however, a growing body of evidence of stress-induced corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) release causing bowel dysfunction through multiple pathways, either through the HPA axis, the autonomic nervous systems, or directly on the bowel itself. In addition, recent findings of CRF influencing the composition of gut microbiota lend support for the use of probiotics, antibiotics, and other microbiota-altering agents as potential therapeutic measures in stress-induced bowel dysfunction.

  1. Chronic unpredicted mild stress-induced depression alter saxagliptin pharmacokinetics and CYP450 activity in GK rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengchao Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was to explore the pharmacokinetics of saxagliptin (Sax in Goto–Kakizaki (GK rats complicated with depression induced by chronic unpredicted mild stress (CUMS. The comorbidity of diabetic patients with depression is becoming more and more epidemic. Whether depression mental disorder alters the pharmacokinetics of hypoglycemic drugs in diabetes patients is not clear.Methods. Five-week-old male GK rats were kept in the cage for 7 weeks in a specific pathogen free (SPF-grade lab until the emergence of diabetes and were then divided into two groups: control group and depression model group. Rats in the CUMS-induced depression group were exposed to a series of stressors for 8 weeks. Plasma serotonin and dopamine levels and behavior of open-field test were used to confirm the establishment of the depression model. All rats were given 0.5 mg/kg Sax orally after 8 weeks and blood samples were collected at different time points. The Sax concentration was assayed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS. The CYP450 activity of the liver microsomes was determined by using cocktails of probe drugs in which the activities of CYP enzymes were assessed through the determination of the production of the probe drugs.Results. Statistically significant differences in Sax pharmacokinetics were observed for area under curve, clearance, peak concentration, peak time and mean residence time between the depression rats and the control rats, while no statistical differences were observed for half-time and distribution volume by HPLC-MS/MS analysis. The CYP450 activity had different changes in the depression group.Conclusions. These results indicated that CUMS-induced depression alters the drug metabolic process of Sax and CYP450 activity of the liver microsomal enzymes in GK rats.

  2. Repeated Raking of Pine Plantations Alters Soil Arthropod Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly K. Ober

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial arthropods in forests are engaged in vital ecosystem functions that ultimately help maintain soil productivity. Repeated disturbance can cause abrupt and irreversible changes in arthropod community composition and thereby alter trophic interactions among soil fauna. An increasingly popular means of generating income from pine plantations in the Southeastern U.S. is annual raking to collect pine litter. We raked litter once per year for three consecutive years in the pine plantations of three different species (loblolly, Pinus taeda; longleaf, P. palustris; and slash, P. elliottii. We sampled arthropods quarterly for three years in raked and un-raked pine stands to assess temporal shifts in abundance among dominant orders of arthropods. Effects varied greatly among orders of arthropods, among timber types, and among years. Distinct trends over time were apparent among orders that occupied both high trophic positions (predators and low trophic positions (fungivores, detritivores. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that raking caused stronger shifts in arthropod community composition in longleaf and loblolly than slash pine stands. Results highlight the role of pine litter in shaping terrestrial arthropod communities, and imply that repeated removal of pine straw during consecutive years is likely to have unintended consequences on arthropod communities that exacerbate over time.

  3. Chronic Stress Induces Structural Alterations in Splenic Lymphoid Tissue That Are Associated with Changes in Corticosterone Levels in Wistar-Kyoto Rats

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    María Eugenia Hernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder patients present chronic stress and decreased immunity. The Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY is a strain in which the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is overactivated. To determine whether chronic stress induces changes in corticosterone levels and splenic lymphoid tissue, 9-week-old male rats were subject to restraint stress (3 h daily, chemical stress (hydrocortisone treatment, 50 mg/Kg weight, mixed stress (restraint plus hydrocortisone, or control treatment (without stress for 1, 4, and 7 weeks. The serum corticosterone levels by RIA and spleens morphology were analyzed. Corticosterone levels as did the structure, size of the follicles and morphology of the parenchyma (increase in red pulp in the spleen, varied depending on time and type of stressor. These changes indicate that chronic stress alters the immune response in the spleen in WKY rats by inducing morphological changes, explaining in part the impaired immunity that develops in organisms that are exposed to chronic stress.

  4. Chronic Stress Induces Structural Alterations in Splenic Lymphoid Tissue That Are Associated with Changes in Corticosterone Levels in Wistar-Kyoto Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, María Eugenia; Martinez-Mota, Lucia; Salinas, Citlaltepetl; Marquez-Velasco, Ricardo; Hernandez-Chan, Nancy G.; Morales-Montor, Jorge; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Streber, María L.; Granados-Camacho, Ivonne; Becerril, Enrique; Javier, Baquera-Heredia; Pavón, Lenin

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder patients present chronic stress and decreased immunity. The Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY) is a strain in which the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is overactivated. To determine whether chronic stress induces changes in corticosterone levels and splenic lymphoid tissue, 9-week-old male rats were subject to restraint stress (3 h daily), chemical stress (hydrocortisone treatment, 50 mg/Kg weight), mixed stress (restraint plus hydrocortisone), or control treatment (without stress) for 1, 4, and 7 weeks. The serum corticosterone levels by RIA and spleens morphology were analyzed. Corticosterone levels as did the structure, size of the follicles and morphology of the parenchyma (increase in red pulp) in the spleen, varied depending on time and type of stressor. These changes indicate that chronic stress alters the immune response in the spleen in WKY rats by inducing morphological changes, explaining in part the impaired immunity that develops in organisms that are exposed to chronic stress. PMID:23533999

  5. Orbitofrontal cortex 5-HT2A receptor mediates chronic stress-induced depressive-like behaviors and alterations of spine density and Kalirin7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Ma, Xin-Ming; Chen, Hui-Bin; Zhou, Meng-He; Qiao, Hui; An, Shu-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Neuroimaging studies show that patients with major depression have reduced volume of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Although the serotonin (5-HT) 2A receptor, which is abundant in the OFC, has been implicated in depression, the underlying mechanisms in the development of stress-induced depression remain unclear. Kalirin-7 (Kal7) is an essential component of mature excitatory synapses for maintaining dendritic spines density, size and synaptic functions. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of orbitofrontal 5-HT and 5-HT2A receptors in depressive-like behaviors and their associations with Kal7 and dendritic spines using chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), an established animal model of depression. CUMS had no effect on the levels of 5-HT or the 5-HT2A receptor in the OFC. However, CUMS or microinjection of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist (±)-1-(2, 5-Dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)- 2-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI, 5 μg/0.5 μL) into the OFC induced depressive-like behaviors, including anhedonia in the sucrose preference test and behavioral despair in the tail suspension test, a significant reduction in body weight gain and locomotor activity in the open field test, which were accompanied by decreased expression of Kal7 and PSD95 as well as decreased density of dendritic spines in the OFC. These alterations induced by CUMS were reversed by pretreatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Ketanserin (Ket, 5 μg/0.5 μL into the OFC). These results suggest that CUMS alters structural plasticity through activation of the orbital 5-HT2A receptor and is associated with decreased expression of Kal7, thereby resulting in depressive-like behaviors in rats, suggesting an important role of Kal7 in the OFC in depression.

  6. Medial prefrontal cortex neuronal activation and synaptic alterations after stress-induced reinstatement of palatable food seeking: a study using c-fos-GFP transgenic female rats

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Relapse to maladaptive eating habits during dieting is often provoked by stress and there is evidence for a role of ovarian hormones in stress responses and feeding. We studied the role of these hormones in stress-induced reinstatement of food seeking and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neuronal activation in c-fos-GFP transgenic female rats, which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in strongly activated neurons. Food-restricted ovariectomized or sham-operated c-fos-GFP rats were trained...

  7. Social defeat stress induces depression-like behavior and alters spine morphology in the hippocampus of adolescent male C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio D. Iñiguez

    2016-12-01

    Hippocampi were then dissected and Western blots were conducted to quantify protein levels for various markers important for synaptic plasticity including protein kinase M zeta (PKMζ, protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ, the dopamine-1 (D1 receptor, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, and the dopamine transporter (DAT. Furthermore, we examined the presence of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA-receptor subunit GluA2 as well as colocalization with the post-synaptic density 95 (PSD95 protein, within different spine subtypes (filopodia, stubby, long-thin, mushroom using an immunohistochemistry and Golgi-Cox staining technique. The results revealed that social defeat induced a depression-like behavioral profile, as inferred from decreased social interaction levels, increased immobility on the tail suspension test, and decreases in body weight. Whole hippocampal immunoblots revealed decreases in GluA2, with a concomitant increase in DAT and TH levels in the stressed group. Spine morphology analyses further showed that defeated mice displayed a significant decrease in stubby spines, and an increase in long-thin spines within the CA1 stratum radiatum. Further evaluation of GluA2/PSD95 containing-spines demonstrated a decrease of these markers within long-thin and mushroom spine types. Together, these results indicate that juvenile social stress induces GluA2- and dopamine-associated dysregulation in the hippocampus – a neurobiological mechanism potentially underlying the development of mood-related syndromes as a consequence of adolescent bullying.

  8. Altered ERK1/2 Signaling in the Brain of Learned Helpless Rats: Relevance in Vulnerability to Developing Stress-Induced Depression

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    Yogesh Dwivedi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2- (ERK1/2- mediated cellular signaling plays a major role in synaptic and structural plasticity. Although ERK1/2 signaling has been shown to be involved in stress and depression, whether vulnerability to develop depression is associated with abnormalities in ERK1/2 signaling is not clearly known. The present study examined ERK1/2 signaling in frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats that showed vulnerability (learned helplessness, (LH or resiliency (non-learned helplessness, (non-LH to developing stress-induced depression. In frontal cortex and hippocampus of LH rats, we found that mRNA and protein expressions of ERK1 and ERK2 were significantly reduced, which was associated with their reduced activation and phosphorylation in cytosolic and nuclear fractions, where ERK1 and ERK2 target their substrates. In addition, ERK1/2-mediated catalytic activities and phosphorylation of downstream substrates RSK1 (cytosolic and nuclear and MSK1 (nuclear were also lower in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of LH rats without any change in their mRNA or protein expression. None of these changes were evident in non-LH rats. Our study indicates that ERK1/2 signaling is differentially regulated in LH and non-LH rats and suggests that abnormalities in ERK1/2 signaling may be crucial in the vulnerability to developing depression.

  9. Comparison of stress-induced and LPS-induced depressive-like behaviors and the alterations of central proinflammatory cytokines mRNA in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xi-Ting; Lin, Wen-Juan; Tang, Ming-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Although proinflammatory cytokine changes in depression have been studied widely, few investigations have searched for specific and common changes in cytokines. In the present study, two animal models of depression were compared: a chronic stress model using forced swim stress and an immune activation model using repeated central lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 mRNA were examined in the brain regions of the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It was found that both chronic swim stress and repeated central LPS infusion induced depressive-like behaviors, including decreased body weight, reduced saccharin preference, and increased immobility time or shortened latency of immobility in the tail suspension test. Central TNF-α mRNA expression was elevated in both models and central IL-6 mRNA expression was unchanged in both models. Central IL-1β mRNA expression was increased only in the chronic immune activation model. The findings from this study suggest that TNF-α may be a common risk factor for inflammation in depressive disorders.

  10. Changes in the structural composition and reactivity of Acer rubrum leaf litter tannins exposed to warming and altered precipitation: climatic stress-induced tannins are more reactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharayil, Nishanth; Suseela, Vidya; Triebwasser, Daniella J; Preston, Caroline M; Gerard, Patrick D; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2011-07-01

    • Climate change could increase the frequency with which plants experience abiotic stresses, leading to changes in their metabolic pathways. These stresses may induce the production of compounds that are structurally and biologically different from constitutive compounds. • We studied how warming and altered precipitation affected the composition, structure, and biological reactivity of leaf litter tannins in Acer rubrum at the Boston-Area Climate Experiment, in Massachusetts, USA. • Warmer and drier climatic conditions led to higher concentrations of protective compounds, including flavonoids and cutin. The abundance and structure of leaf tannins also responded consistently to climatic treatments. Drought and warming in combination doubled the concentration of total tannins, which reached 30% of leaf-litter DW. This treatment also produced condensed tannins with lower polymerization and a greater proportion of procyanidin units, which in turn reduced sequestration of tannins by litter fiber. Furthermore, because of the structural flexibility of these tannins, litter from this treatment exhibited five times more enzyme (β-glucosidase) complexation capacity on a per-weight basis. Warmer and wetter conditions decreased the amount of foliar condensed tannins. • Our finding that warming and drought result in the production of highly reactive tannins is novel, and highly relevant to climate change research as these tannins, by immobilizing microbial enzymes, could slow litter decomposition and thus carbon and nutrient cycling in a warmer, drier world.

  11. Ectopic expression of a stress-inducible glycosyltransferase from saffron enhances salt and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis while alters anchor root formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrazem, Oussama; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Trapero-Mozos, Almudena; Climent, María Fernanda López; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes

    2015-05-01

    Glycosyltransferases play diverse roles in cellular metabolism by modifying the activities of regulatory metabolites. Three stress-regulated UDP-glucosyltransferase-encoding genes have been isolated from the stigmas of saffron, UGT85U1, UGT85U2 and UGT85V1, which belong to the UGT85 family that includes members associated with stress responses and cell cycle regulation. Arabidopsis constitutively expressing UGT85U1 exhibited and increased anchor root development. No differences were observed in the timing of root emergence, in leaf, stem and flower morphology or flowering time. However, salt and oxidative stress tolerance was enhanced in these plants. Levels of glycosylated compounds were measured in these plants and showed changes in the composition of several indole-derivatives. Moreover, auxin levels in the roots were higher compared to wild type. The expression of several key genes related to root development and auxin homeostasis, including CDKB2.1, CDKB2.2, PIN2, 3 and 4; TIR1, SHR, and CYCD6, were differentially regulated with an increase of expression level of SHR, CYCD6, CDKB2.1 and PIN2. The obtained results showed that UGT85U1 takes part in root growth regulation via auxin signal alteration and the modified expression of cell cycle-related genes, resulting in significantly improved survival during oxidative and salt stress treatments.

  12. Altered methylation and expression of ER-associated degradation factors in long-term alcohol and constitutive ER stress-induced murine hepatic tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eHan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mortality from liver cancer in humans is increasingly attributable to heavy or long-term alcohol consumption. The mechanisms by which alcohol exerts its carcinogenic effect are not well understood. In this study, the role of alcohol-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response in liver cancer development was investigated using an animal model with a liver knockout of the chaperone BiP and under constitutive hepatic ER stress. Long-term alcohol and high fat diet (HFD feeding resulted in higher levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT, impaired ER stress response, and higher incidence of liver tumor in older (aged 16 months knockout females than in either middle-aged (6 months knockouts or older (aged 16 months wild type females. In the older knockout females, stronger effects of the alcohol on methylation of CpG islands at promoter regions of genes involved in the ER associated degradation (ERAD were also detected. Altered expression of ERAD factors including derlin 3, Creld2 (cysteine-rich with EGF-like domains 2, Herpud1 (ubiquitin-like domain member, Wfs1 (wolfram syndrome gene, and Yod1 (deubiquinating enzyme 1 was co-present with decreased proteasome activities, increased estrogen receptor alpha variant (ERa36, and enhanced phosphorylations of ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 and STAT3 (the signal transducers and activators of transcription in the older knockout female fed alcohol. Our results suggest that long-term alcohol consumption and ageing may promote liver tumorigenesis in females through interfering with DNA methylation and expression of genes involved in the ER associated degradation.

  13. Mouse social stress induces increased fear conditioning, helplessness and fatigue to physical challenge together with markers of altered immune and dopamine function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzinnari, Damiano; Sigrist, Hannes; Staehli, Simon; Palme, Rupert; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Leparc, German; Hengerer, Bastian; Seifritz, Erich; Pryce, Christopher R

    2014-10-01

    In neuropsychiatry, animal studies demonstrating causal effects of environmental manipulations relevant to human aetiology on behaviours relevant to human psychopathologies are valuable. Such valid models can improve understanding of aetio-pathophysiology and preclinical discovery and development of new treatments. In depression, specific uncontrollable stressful life events are major aetiological factors, and subsequent generalized increases in fearfulness, helplessness and fatigue are core symptoms or features. Here we exposed adult male C57BL/6 mice to 15-day psychosocial stress with loss of social control but minimal physical wounding. One cohort was assessed in a 3-day test paradigm of motor activity, fear conditioning and 2-way avoid-escape behaviour on days 16-18, and a second cohort was assessed in a treadmill fatigue paradigm on days 19 and 29, followed by the 3-day paradigm on days 30-32. All tests used a physical aversive stimulus, namely mild, brief electroshocks. Socially stressed mice displayed decreased motor activity, increased fear acquisition, decreased 2-way avoid-escape responding (increased helplessness) and increased fatigue. They also displayed increased plasma TNF and spleen hypertrophy, and adrenal hypertrophy without hyper-corticoidism. In a third cohort, psychosocial stress effects on brain gene expression were assessed using next generation sequencing. Gene expression was altered in pathways of inflammation and G-protein coupled receptors in prefrontal cortex and amygdala; in the latter, expression of genes important in dopamine function were de-regulated including down-regulated Drd2, Adora2a and Darpp-32. This model can be applied to identify targets for treating psychopathologies such as helplessness or fatigue, and to screen compounds/biologics developed to act at these targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prenatal Stress Induced Gender-specific Alterations of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Subunit Expression and Response to Aβ in Offspring Hippocampal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuan; Li, Hui; Chang, Lirong; Song, Yizhi; Ma, Longhui; Lu, Liying; Du, Zunshu; Li, Yan; Liu, Jinping; Wu, Yan

    2017-08-27

    Prenatal stress (PS) is one of adverse life events during pregnancy, which may increase vulnerability to cognitive impairment in adult offspring. Aβ synaptotoxicity is one important pathological factor for cognitive impairment, and PS-induced cognitive disorder is closely associated with N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR), which acts as a key mediator of Aβ synaptotoxicity. In the present study, we tried to explore whether PS affects offspring's Aβ levels and NMDAR subunit expression in a gender-specific manner in hippocampal CA and DG subregions, and whether PS affects synaptic proteins and NMDAR subunit expression in cultured offspring hippocampal cells exposed to Aβ. Pregnant SD rats with restraint stress from gestation day 8 to 20 were used as PS model. Morris water maze, ELISA, immunofluorescence and western blot were tested on postnatal day 90 in male and female PS offspring. Our results showed that female offspring is more vulnerable to PS-induced cognitive impairment. Surprisingly, PS enhanced Aβ1-40 levels in the hippocampal DG subregion of male offspring. Furthermore, WB results implied that the decreased GluN2A in CA of female may contribute to the PS-induced cognitive impairment, while in DG, the increased GluN2A and decreased GluN2B contributed to protective effects against Aβ. Interestingly, we found PS could alleviate Aβ synaptotoxicity in male offspring's hippocampal cells. Overall, our results provided a fundamental understanding of PS-induced gender-specific alterations of NMDAR subunit expression and the susceptibility to Aβ, and paved the road for the development of timely preventive interventions on cognitive disorders of PS offspring. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Mild stress induces brain region-specific alterations of selective ER stress markers' mRNA expression in Wfs1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altperery, A; Raud, S; Sütt, S; Reimets, R; Visnapuu, T; Toots, M; Vasar, E

    2017-09-26

    In this work, the effect of mild stress (elevated plus maze test, EPM) on the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers in different brain areas of wild type (WT) and Wfs1-deficient (Wfs1KO) mice was investigated. The following ER stress markers were studied: activating transcription factor 6α (Atf6α), protein kinase-like ER kinase (Perk), X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1) and its spliced form (Xbp1s), 78-kilodalton glucose regulated protein (Grp78), 94-kilodalton glucose regulated protein (Grp94), C/EBP homologous protein (Chop). Wfs1KO and WT mice, not exposed to EPM, had similar patterns of ER stress markers in the studied brain areas. The exploratory activity of Wfs1KO mice in the EPM was inhibited compared to WT mice, probably reflecting increased anxiety in genetically modified mice. In response to the EPM, activation of inositol-requiring transmembrane kinase and endonuclease 1α (Ire1α) ER stress pathway was seen in both genotypes, but in different brain areas. Such a brain region-specific Ire1α activation was linked with dominant behavioural trends in these mice as more anxious, neophobic Wfs1KO mice had increased ER stress markers expression in the temporal lobe, the brain region related to anxiety, and more curious WT mice had ER stress markers increased in the ventral striatum which is related to the exploratory drive. The molecular mechanism triggering respective changes in ER stress markers in these brain regions is likely related to altered levels of monoamine neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine) in Wfs1KO mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Infantile Repeated Hyperglycemia on Behavioral Alterations in Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Moghadami

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety symptoms have been reported to be present in many patients with diabetes mellitus. However, little is known about the effects of hyperglycemia in critical periods of the central nervous system development. We assessed locomotive, exploratory, and anxiety behaviors in adult rats that remained from infantile repeated hyperglycemia by the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Our findings showed significant hypo activity, reduced locomotive/exploratory activities, increased fear related behaviors, and anxiety state between hyperglycemic and control adult males and the same differences were observed among females. In addition, no significant behavioral alterations between male and female animals were observed. This study determined that repeated increments in daily blood sugar levels in newborns may affect neuronal functions and provide behavioral abnormalities in adults.

  17. Early repeated maternal separation induces alterations of hippocampus reelin expression in rats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianlong Zhang; Lina Qin; Hu Zhao

    2013-03-01

    The long-term effects of repeated maternal separation (MS) during early postnatal life on reelin expression in the hippocampus of developing rats were investigated in the present study. MS was carried out by separating Wistar rat pups singly from their mothers for 3 h a day during postnatal days (PND) 2–14. Reelin mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus were determined using qRT-PCR and Western blotting, at PND 22, PND 60 and PND 90. MS resulted in the loss of body weight in the developing rats, and reelin mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus generally were down-regulated over the developing period, but the reelin mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus of 90-day-old male rats were up-regulated. These findings suggest that the long-term effects of MS on the expression levels of hippocampal reelin mRNA and protein depends on the age at which the stressed rats’ brains were collected; reelin had important implications for the maternal-neonate interaction needed for normal brain development. In conclusion, repeated MS occurring during early postnatal life may cause the alterations of hippocampal reelin expression with the increasing age of developing rats.

  18. Alteration in metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen upon repeated administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun J; Lee, Min Y; Kwon, Do Y; Kim, Sung Y; Kim, Young C

    2009-10-01

    Our previous studies showed that administration of a subtoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) to female rats increased generation of carbon monoxide from dichloromethane, a metabolic reaction catalyzed mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1. In this study we examined the changes in metabolism and toxicity of APAP upon repeated administration. An intraperitoneal dose of APAP (500 mg/kg) alone did not increase aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, or sorbitol dehydrogenase activity in serum, but was significantly hepatotoxic when the rats had been pretreated with an identical dose of APAP 18 h earlier. The concentrations and disappearance of APAP and its metabolites in plasma were monitored for 8 h after the treatment. APAP pretreatment reduced the elevation of APAP-sulfate, but increased APAP-cysteine concentrations in plasma. APAP or APAP-glucuronide concentrations were not altered. Administration of a single dose of APAP 18 h before sacrifice increased microsomal CYP activities measured with p-nitrophenol, p-nitroanisole, and aminopyrine as probes. Expression of CYP2E1, CYP3A, and CYP1A proteins in the liver was also elevated significantly. The results suggest that administration of APAP at a subtoxic dose may result in an induction of hepatic CYP enzymes, thereby altering metabolism and toxicological consequences of various chemical substances that are substrates for the same enzyme system.

  19. Altering Work to Rest Ratios Differentially Influences Fatigue Indices During Repeated Sprint Ability Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Monica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Beyer, Kyle S; Hoffman, Mattan W; Miramonti, Amelia A; Riffe, Josh J; Baker, Kayla M; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the influence of recovery time on fatigue indices, performance (total work [TW], peak power [PP], and mean power [MP]), and oxygen consumption during repeated sprint ability (RSA) on a cycle ergometer. Eight recreationally-trained men performed 3 RSA protocols consisting of 10 × 6 s sprints with 12 s, 18 s, and 24 s rest intervals between each sprint. Fatigue indices were determined as percent decrement (%Dec) and rate of decline using either a log transform method or standard slope approach for TW, PP, and MP during respective RSA protocols. The maximal VO2 value in response to given sprint intervals and the minimal VO2 value in response to given rest periods (VO2 work and VO2 rest, respectively) were recorded. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to analyze all variables. Average VO2 work was not different among rest interval trials. Average VO2 rest with 12 s rest was greater than 18 s and 24 s (2.16 ± 0.17 L · min(-1), 1.91 ± 0.18 L · min(-1), 1.72 ± 0.15 L · min(-1), respectively), while 18 s was greater than 24 s. Average TW and MP were greater with 24 s rest than 12 s (4,604.44 ± 915.98 J vs. 4,305.46 ± 727.17 J, respectively), with no differences between RSA protocols for PP. No differences in %Dec were observed. Both methods of calculating rates of decline per sprint for PP and TW were greater during 12 s than 18 s or 24 s. Since changes were only noted between the 12 s and 24 s protocols, a 6 s differential in rest intervals may not be enough to elicit alterations in TW, PP, MP, or %Dec in RSA performance. Rate of decline may be a more sensitive measure of fatigue than %Dec.

  20. Repeated dexamphetamine treatment alters the dopaminergic system and increases the phMRI response to methylphenidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrantee, Anouk; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena; Bouet, Valentine; Hesseling, Peter; Meerhoff, Gideon F.; de Bruin, Kora M.; Koeleman, Jan; Freret, Thomas; Boulouard, Michel; Desfosses, Emilie; Galineau, Laurent; Gozzi, Alessandro; Dauphin, François; Gsell, Willy; Booij, Jan; Lucassen, Paul J.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2017-01-01

    Dexamphetamine (AMPH) is a psychostimulant drug that is used both recreationally and as medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that repeated exposure to AMPH can induce damage to nerve terminals of dopamine (DA) neurons. We here assessed the underlying neurobiological changes in the DA system following repeated AMPH exposure and pre-treated rats with AMPH or saline (4 times 5 mg/kg s.c., 2 hours apart), followed by a 1-week washout period. We then used pharmacological MRI (phMRI) with a methylphenidate (MPH) challenge, as a sensitive and non-invasive in-vivo measure of DAergic function. We subsequently validated the DA-ergic changes post-mortem, using a.o. high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and autoradiography. In the AMPH pre-treated group, we observed a significantly larger BOLD response to the MPH challenge, particularly in DA-ergic brain areas and their downstream projections. Subsequent autoradiography studies showed that AMPH pre-treatment significantly reduced DA transporter (DAT) density in the caudate-putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens, whereas HPLC analysis revealed increases in the DA metabolite homovanillic acid in the CPu. Our results suggest that AMPH pre-treatment alters DAergic responsivity, a change that can be detected with phMRI in rats. These phMRI changes likely reflect increased DA release together with reduced DAT binding. The ability to assess subtle synaptic changes using phMRI is promising for both preclinical studies of drug discovery, and for clinical studies where phMRI can be a useful tool to non-invasively investigate DA abnormalities, e.g. in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28241065

  1. Repeated drought alters resistance of seed bank regeneration in baldcypress swamps of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ting; Middleton, Beth A.

    2017-01-01

    Recurring drying and wetting events are likely to increase in frequency and intensity in predicted future droughts in the central USA and alter the regeneration potential of species. We explored the resistance of seed banks to successive droughts in 53 sites across the nine locations in baldcypress swamps in the southeastern USA. Along the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley and northern Gulf of Mexico, we investigated the capacity of seed banks to retain viable seeds after successive periods of drying and wetting in a greenhouse study. Mean differences in species richness and seed density were compared to examine the interactions of successive droughts, geographical location and water regime. The results showed that both species richness and total density of germinating seedlings decreased over repeated drought trials. These responses were more pronounced in geographical areas with higher annual mean temperature. In seed banks across the southeastern swamp region, most species were exhausted after Trial 2 or 3, except for semiaquatic species in Illinois and Tennessee, and aquatic species in Texas. Distinct geographical trends in seed bank resistance to drought demonstrate that climate-induced drying of baldcypress swamps could influence the regeneration of species differently across their ranges. Despite the health of adult individuals, lack of regeneration may push ecosystems into a relict status. Seed bank depletion by germination without replenishment may be a major conservation threat in a future with recurring droughts far less severe than megadrought. Nevertheless, the protection of moist refugia might aid conservation.

  2. Cold stress induces lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Cold stress as a result of whole-body cooling at low environmental temperatures exacerbates lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary urgency, nocturia and residual urine. We established a model system using healthy conscious rats to explore the mechanisms of cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In this review, we summarize the basic findings shown by this model. Rats that were quickly transferred from room temperature (27 ± 2°C) to low temperature (4 ± 2°C) showed detrusor overactivity including increased basal pressure and decreased voiding interval, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. The cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity is mediated through a resiniferatoxin-sensitve C-fiber sensory nerve pathway involving α1-adrenergic receptors. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channels, which are sensitive to thermal changes below 25-28°C, also play an important role in mediating the cold stress responses. Additionally, the sympathetic nervous system is associated with transient hypertension and decreases of skin surface temperature that are closely correlated with the detrusor overactivity. With this cold stress model, we showed that α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists have the potential to treat cold stress-exacerbated lower urinary tract symptoms. In addition, we showed that traditional Japanese herbal mixtures composed of Hachimijiogan act, in part, by increasing skin temperature and reducing the number of cold sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the skin. The effects of herbal mixtures have the potential to treat and/or prevent the exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms by providing resistance to the cold stress responses. Our model provides new opportunities for utilizing animal disease models with altered lower urinary tract functions to explore the effects of novel therapeutic drugs.

  3. Alteraciones del desarrollo embrionario, poliaminas y estrés oxidativo inducidos por plaguicidas organofosforados en Rhinella Arenarum Alterations in embryonic development, polyamines and oxidative stress induced by organophosphates in Rhinella arenarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Inés Lascano

    2009-07-01

    use an amphibian embryonic model (Rhinella arenarum in order to assess the mechanisms by which the OP pesticides azinphos methyl (AM and chlorpyrifos (CP could cause teratogenesis. The embryos were developed in different concentrations of AM or CP until they reached the stage of complete operculum (CO. We analyzed malformations, histology, reduced gluthatione content (GSH and activity of antioxidant enzymes, polyamine content, ornithine decarboxilase (ODC and protein kinase C (PKC activities. Both OP pesticides caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in the number of malformations, reaching 100% teratogenesis in late embryonic development at the highest OP concentrations used. Malformations assessed include exogastrulation, caudal fin curvature, axial shortening, edema, and gill atrophy. Increasing evidence of oxidative stress was observed: GSH dependent enzymes (S- transferase, GST; peroxidase and reductase were early induced in embryos exposed to low concentrations of the OP pesticides, but their activities were inhibited in the stage of CO at high concentrations of OP. These changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in GSH content (62% in embryos exposed to AM. Besides, AM significantly increased (18X ODC activity in the stage of CO, along with putrescine levels (60% of increase but spermidine and spermine levels were significantly decreased (56% and 100%, respectively. The OP pesticide CP caused and early decrease in ODC activity and polyamine levels. The decrease in polyamine levels could be due to an increase in their degradation by polyamine oxidase, contributing to the oxidative stress induced by OP. This, in turn, would cause the decline in GSH levels and the activation of PKC in the embryonic stage of CO (55%, which is involved in the positive feedback of GST and ODC. Finally, the oxidative stress and the decrease in PA levels could be the cause of the observed embryonic alterations.

  4. Shear stress-induced improvement of red blood cell deformability

    OpenAIRE

    Meram, Ece; Yılmaz, Bahar D.; Bas, Ceren; Atac, Nazlı; Yalçın, Ö.; Başkurt, Oguz K.; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Classically, it is known that red blood cell (RBC) deformability is determined by the geometric and material properties of these cells. Experimental evidence accumulated during the last decade has introduced the concept of active regulation of RBC deformability. This regulation is mainly related to altered associations between membrane skeletal proteins and integral proteins, with the latter serving to anchor the skeleton to the lipid matrix. It has been hypothesized that shear stress induces...

  5. A Low Protein Diet Alters Bone Material Level Properties and the Response to In Vitro Repeated Mechanical Loading

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    Victor Dubois-Ferrière

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low protein intake is associated with an alteration of bone microstructure and material level properties. However, it remains unknown whether these alterations of bone tissue could influence the response to repeated mechanical loading. The authors investigated the in vitro effect of repeated loading on bone strength in humeri collected from 20 6-month-old female rats pair-fed with a control (15% casein or an isocaloric low protein (2.5% casein diet for 10 weeks. Bone specimens were cyclically loaded in three-point bending under load control for 2000 cycles. Humeri were then monotonically loaded to failure. The load-displacement curve of the in vitro cyclically loaded humerus was compared to the contralateral noncyclically loaded humerus and the influence of both protein diets. Material level properties were also evaluated through a nanoindentation test. Cyclic loading decreased postyield load and plastic deflection in rats fed a low protein diet, but not in those on a regular diet. Bone material level properties were altered in rats fed a low protein diet. This suggests that bone biomechanical alterations consequent to cyclic loading are more likely to occur in rats fed a low protein diet than in control animals subjected to the same in vitro cyclic loading regimen.

  6. ALTERED HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND AMYGDALAR NEURONAL ACTIVITY IN ADULT MICE WITH REPEATED EXPERIENCE OF AGGRESSION

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    Dmitriy eSmagin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The repeated experience of winning in a social conflict setting elevates levels of aggression and may lead to violent behavioral patterns. Here we use a paradigm of repeated aggression and fighting deprivation to examine changes in behavior, neurogenesis, and neuronal activity in mice with positive fighting experience. We show that for males, repeated positive fighting experience induces persistent demonstration of aggression and stereotypic behaviors in daily agonistic interactions, enhances aggressive motivation, and elevates levels of anxiety. When winning males are deprived of opportunities to engage in further fights, they demonstrate increased levels of aggressiveness. Positive fighting experience results in increased levels of progenitor cell proliferation and production of young neurons in the hippocampus. This increase is not diminished after a fighting deprivation period. Furthermore, repeated winning experience decreases the number of activated (c-fos positive cells in the basolateral amygdala and increases the number of activated cells in the hippocampus; a subsequent no-fight period restores the number of c-fos-positive cells. Our results indicate that extended positive fighting experience in a social conflict heightens aggression, increases proliferation of neuronal progenitors and production of young neurons in the hippocampus, and decreases neuronal activity in the amygdala; these changes can be modified by depriving the winners of the opportunity for further fights.

  7. Brexpiprazole Alters Monoaminergic Systems following Repeated Administration: an in Vivo Electrophysiological Study

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterhof, Chris A.; Mansari, Mostafa El; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Blier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brexpiprazole was recently approved as adjunctive therapy for depression and treatment of schizophrenia in adults. To complement results from a previous study in which its acute effects were characterized, the present study assessed the effect of repeated brexpiprazole administration on monoaminergic systems. Methods: Brexpiprazole (1mg/kg, subcutaneous) or vehicle was administered once daily for 2 and 14 days. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from noradrenaline neurons...

  8. Repeated methamphetamine administration differentially alters fos expression in caudate-putamen patch and matrix compartments and nucleus accumbens.

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    Jakub P Jedynak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The repeated administration of psychostimulant drugs produces a persistent and long-lasting increase ("sensitization" in their psychomotor effects, which is thought to be due to changes in the neural circuitry that mediate these behaviors. One index of neuronal activation used to identify brain regions altered by repeated exposure to drugs involves their ability to induce immediate early genes, such as c-fos. Numerous reports have demonstrated that past drug experience alters the ability of drugs to induce c-fos in the striatum, but very few have examined Fos protein expression in the two major compartments in the striatum--the so-called patch/striosome and matrix. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the effects of pretreatment with methamphetamine on the ability of a subsequent methamphetamine challenge to induce Fos protein expression in the patch and matrix compartments of the dorsolateral and dorsomedial caudate-putamen and in the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens. Animals pretreated with methamphetamine developed robust psychomotor sensitization. A methamphetamine challenge increased the number of Fos-positive cells in all areas of the dorsal and ventral striatum. However, methamphetamine challenge induced Fos expression in more cells in the patch than in the matrix compartment in the dorsolateral and dorsomedial caudate-putamen. Furthermore, past experience with methamphetamine increased the number of methamphetamine-induced Fos positive cells in the patch compartment of the dorsal caudate putamen, but not in the matrix or in the core or shell of the nucleus accumbens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that drug-induced alterations in the patch compartment of the dorsal caudate-putamen may preferentially contribute to some of the enduring changes in brain activity and behavior produced by repeated treatment with methamphetamine.

  9. Possibility of enhanced risk of retinal neovascularization in repeated blood donors: blood donation and retinal alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastmanesh R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reza RastmaneshDepartment of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Tehran, IranAbstract: Repeated blood donors manifest clinical, subclinical, and biochemical signs of iron deficiency anemia, have significantly higher erythropoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF concentrations, and decreased tissue oxygen saturation, oxygenated tissue hemoglobin, and regional cerebral oxygen saturation. Erythropoietin and VEGF are potent retinal angiogenic factors which may initiate and promote the retinal angiogenesis process independently or simultaneously. Increases in circulating levels of erythropoietin and VEGF are proportionate to the levels of hematocrit, hypoxemia, and tissue hypoxia. It is suggested that higher erythropoietin production following iron deficiency anemia-induced chronic hypoxemia/hypoxia may, hypothetically, enhance the risk of retinal angiogenesis and/or neovascularization, possibly by inducing hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha, which consequently upregulates genes stimulating angiogenesis, resulting in formation of a new vasculature, possibly by modulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling in the retina. Implications of this hypothesis cover erythropoietin doping, chronic hypoxia, and hypoxemic situations, such as angiogenesis-related cardiac and pulmonary diseases.Keywords: repeated blood donation, erythropoietin, retinal neovascularization, vascular endothelial growth factor, hypoxia

  10. Wheel-running behavior is altered following withdrawal from repeated cocaine in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Anthony C; Hernandez, Lizandra; Caba, Julissa

    2008-04-01

    The residual effects on open-field habituation and self-generated wheel running following withdrawal from repeated cocaine (COC; 30 mg/kg for 7 days) were examined in adult male rats. Control subjects received equivolumetric injections of saline (SAL) and were either allowed to feed ad libitum or pair-fed matched (PF SAL) to COC subjects to control for the drug's potential anorexic effect. Following 10 days of withdrawal, all subjects were examined twice on each of the two assessment instruments. Results indicated that COC subjects over the two test sessions failed to increase their wheel-running rates and did not show the expected habituation in the open field. However, because both COC and PF SAL groups yielded similar effects in the open field, conclusions about cocaine's consequences on habituation could not be established independent of the drug's anorexic effect. These data provide evidence for the view that repeated cocaine impairs motivational processes responsible for engaging in self-generated naturally rewarding behaviors. Speculation concerning the neurobiobehavioral substrates for this effect is presented.

  11. Stress induced phase transitions in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnitzki, M.; Kuna, M.

    2016-10-01

    Silicon has a tremendous importance as an electronic, structural and optical material. Modeling the interaction of a silicon surface with a pointed asperity at room temperature is a major step towards the understanding of various phenomena related to brittle as well as ductile regime machining of this semiconductor. If subjected to pressure or contact loading, silicon undergoes a series of stress-driven phase transitions accompanied by large volume changes. In order to understand the material's response for complex non-hydrostatic loading situations, dedicated constitutive models are required. While a significant body of literature exists for the dislocation dominated high-temperature deformation regime, the constitutive laws used for the technologically relevant rapid low-temperature loading have severe limitations, as they do not account for the relevant phase transitions. We developed a novel finite deformation constitutive model set within the framework of thermodynamics with internal variables that captures the stress induced semiconductor-to-metal (cd-Si → β-Si), metal-to-amorphous (β-Si → a-Si) as well as amorphous-to-amorphous (a-Si → hda-Si, hda-Si → a-Si) transitions. The model parameters were identified in part directly from diamond anvil cell data and in part from instrumented indentation by the solution of an inverse problem. The constitutive model was verified by successfully predicting the transformation stress under uniaxial compression and load-displacement curves for different indenters for single loading-unloading cycles as well as repeated indentation. To the authors' knowledge this is the first constitutive model that is able to adequately describe cyclic indentation in silicon.

  12. Stress-induced changes in wheat grain composition and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, M

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, waterlogging, and high temperature cause a myriad of changes in the metabolism of plants, and there is a lot of overlap in these changes in plants in response to different stresses such as drought and salinity. These stress-induced metabolic changes cause impaired crop growth thereby resulting in poor yield. The metabolic changes taking place in several plant species due to a particular abiotic stress have been revealed from the whole plant to the molecular level by researchers, but most studies have focused on organs such as leaf, stem, and root. Information on such stress-induced changes in seed or grains is infrequent in the literature. From the information that is available, it is now evident that abiotic stress can induce considerable changes in the composition and quality of cereal grains including those of wheat, the premier staple food crop in the world. Thus, the present review discusses how far different types of stresses, mainly salinity, drought, high temperature, and waterlogging, can alter the wheat grain composition and quality. By fully uncovering the stress-induced changes in the nutritional values of wheat grains it would be possible to establish whether balanced supplies of essential nutrients are available to the human population from the wheat crop grown on stress-affected areas.

  13. Sex alters impact of repeated bouts of sprint exercise on neuromuscular activity in trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Smith, Kurt

    2009-08-01

    This study characterized the effect of sex on neuromuscular activity during repeated bouts of sprint exercise. Thirty-three healthy male and female athletes performed twenty 5-s cycle sprints separated by 25 s of rest. Mechanical work and integrated electromyograhs (iEMG) of 4 muscles of the dominant lower limb were calculated in every sprint. The iEMG signals from individual muscles were summed to represent overall electrical activity of these muscles (sum-iEMG). Neuromuscular efficiency (NME) was calculated as the ratio of mechanical work and sum-iEMG for every sprint. Arterial oxygen saturation was estimated (SpO2) with pulse oximetry throughout the protocol. The sprint-induced work decrement (18.9% vs. 29.6%; p women than for the men. However, the sprints decreased NME (10.1%; p men, R2 = 0.87; women, R2 = 0.91; all p sprint exercise is not likely to be explained by a difference in muscle contractility impairment in men and women, but may be due to a sex difference in muscle recruitment strategy. We speculate that women would be less sensitive to arterial O2 desaturation than men, which may trigger lower neuromuscular adjustments to exhaustive exercise.

  14. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles do not alter the biomechanical properties of fibular allograft bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joshua M; Hunter, Shawn A; Gayton, J Christopher; Boivin, Gregory P; Prayson, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Allograft tissues can undergo several freeze-thaw cycles between donor tissue recovery and final use by surgeons. However, there are currently no standards indicating the number of reasonable freeze-thaw cycles for allograft bone and it is unclear how much a graft may be degraded with multiple cycles. We therefore asked whether (1) the mechanical properties of fibular allograft bone would remain unchanged with increasing numbers of freeze-thaw cycles and (2) histologic alterations from increased numbers of freeze-thaw cycles would correspond to any mechanical changes. Fibular allograft segments were subjected to two, four, and eight freeze-thaw cycles and compared biomechanically and histologically with a control group (one freeze-thaw cycle). Two freeze-dried treatments, one after being subjected to one freeze-thaw cycle and the other after being subjected to three freeze-thaw cycles, also were compared with the control group. For all segments, the average ultimate stress was 174 MPa, average modulus was 289 MPa, average energy was 2.00 J, and the average stiffness was 1320 N/mm. The material properties of the freeze-thaw treatment groups were similar to those of the control group: ultimate stress and modulus were a maximum of 16% and 70% different, respectively. Both freeze-dried treatments showed increased stiffness (maximum 53% ± 71%) and energy to failure (maximum 117% ± 137%) but did not exhibit morphologic differences. There were no alterations in the histologic appearance of the bone sections in any group. Fibular allograft segments can be refrozen safely up to eight times without affecting the biomechanical or morphologic properties. Freeze-dried treatments require further study to determine whether the detected differences are caused by the processing. Cryopreserved cortical allografts are thawed by surgeons in preparation for procedures and then occasionally discarded when not used. Refreezing allograft tissues can result in a cost savings because of a

  15. Saikokaryukotsuboreito, a herbal medicine, prevents chronic stress-induced anxiety in rats: comparison with diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Ikeda, Ryuji; Shoji, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Yayoi; Jin, Xue-Long; Kase, Yoshio; Takeda, Shuichi; Maruyama, Wakako; Tabira, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety is frequently observed in several neuropsychiatric disorders, and stress is thought to precipitate or exacerbate anxiety. In this study, the anxiolytic action of a herbal medicine, saikokaryukotsuboreito, (SRBT) was examined in normal healthy rats using the elevated plus-maze test. Moreover, the improving effect of SRBT on chronic stress-induced anxiety was also examined. Single administration of SRBT did not have anxiolytic action in normal rats. Repeated administration of SRBT significantly improved chronic stress-induced anxiety. On the other hand, single administration of a typical anxiolytic, diazepam, had anxiolytic action in normal rats but repeated administration did not improve chronic stress-induced anxiety. These results suggest that SRBT does not have anxiolytic activity equivalent to that of diazepam but has potency for improving stress-related anxiety. This finding provides information important for the treatment of anxiety.

  16. Repeated dose oral toxicity of inorganic mercury in wistar rats: biochemical and morphological alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Jegoda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was conducted to find out the possible toxic effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 at the histological, biochemical, and haematological levels in the wistar rats for 28 days. Materials and Methods: The biochemical and hematological alteration were estimated in four groups of rat (each group contain ten animals, which were treated with 0 (control, 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg body weight of HgCl2 through oral gavage. At the end of study all rats were sacrificed and subjected for histopathology. Result: A significantly (P < 0.05 higher level of serum alanine amino transferase (ALT, gamma Glutamyle Transferase, and creatinine were recorded in treatment groups, while the level of alkaline phosphtase (ALP was significantly decreased as compared to the control group. The toxic effect on hematoclogical parameter was characterized by significant decrease in hemoglobin, packed cell volume, total erythrocytes count, and total leukocyte count. Gross morphological changes include congestion, severe haemorrhage, necrosis, degenerative changes in kidneys, depletion of lymphocyte in spleen, decrease in concentration of mature spermatocyte, and edema in testis. It was notable that kidney was the most affected organ. Conclusion: Mercuric chloride (HgCl caused dose-dependent toxic effects on blood parameters and kidney. [Vet World 2013; 6(8.000: 563-567

  17. High altitude increases alteration in maximal torque but not in rapid torque development in knee extensors after repeated treadmill sprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier eGIRARD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We assessed knee extensor neuromuscular adjustments following repeated treadmill sprints in different normobaric hypoxia conditions, with special reference to rapid muscle torque production capacity. Thirteen team- and racquet-sport athletes undertook 8 x 5-s all-out sprints (passive recovery = 25 s on a non-motorized treadmill in normoxia (NM; FiO2 = 20.9%, at low (LA; FiO2 = 16.6% and high (HA; FiO2 = 13.3% normobaric hypoxia (simulated altitudes of ~1800 m and ~3600 m, respectively. Explosive (∼1 s; fast instruction and maximal (∼5 s; hard instruction voluntary isometric contractions (MVC of the knee extensors, with concurrent electromyographic (EMG activity recordings of the vastus lateralis (VL and rectus femoris (RF muscles, were performed before and 1-min post-exercise. Rate of torque development (RTD and EMG (i.e., Root Mean Square or RMS rise from 0 to 30, -50, -100 and -200 ms were recorded, and were also normalized to maximal torque and EMG values, respectively. Distance covered during the first 5-s sprint was similar (P>0.05 in all conditions. A larger (P0.05. Irrespectively of condition (P>0.05, peak RTD (-6±11%; P0.05, whereas it increased (P<0.05 for RF muscle during all epochs post-exercise, independently of the conditions. In summary, alteration in repeated-sprint ability and post-exercise MVC decrease were greater at high altitude than in normoxia or at low altitude. However, the post-exercise alterations in RTD were similar between normoxia and low-to-high hypoxia.

  18. Stress-induced osteolysis of distal clavicle: imaging patterns and treatment using CT-guided injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopov, V.; Groshar, D. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Technion-Israel Inst. of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Fuchs, D. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Technion-Israel Inst. of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Bar-Meir, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Technion-Israel Inst. of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2001-02-01

    Osteolysis of distal clavicle (ODC) may occur in patients who experience repeated stress or microtrauma to the shoulder. This entity has clinical and radiological findings similar to post-traumatic ODC. We describe a case of successful treatment of stress-induced ODC with CT-guided injection of corticosteroid and anesthetic drug into the acromioclavicular joint. (orig.)

  19. Salt stress induced lipid accumulation in heterotrophic culture cells of Chlorella protothecoides: Mechanisms based on the multi-level analysis of oxidative response, key enzyme activity and biochemical alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Ge, Haiyan; Liu, Tingting; Tian, Xiwei; Wang, Zejian; Guo, Meijin; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping

    2016-06-20

    Salt stress as an effective stress factor that could improve the lipid content and lipid yield of glucose in the heterotrophic culture cells of Chlorella protothecoides was demonstrated in this study. The highest lipid content of 41.2% and lipid yield of 185.8mg/g were obtained when C. protothecoides was stressed under 30g/L NaCl condition at its late logarithmic growth phase. Moreover, the effects of salt and osmotic stress on lipid accumulation were comparatively analyzed, and it was found that the effects of NaCl and KCl stress had no significant differences at the same osmolarity level of 1150mOsm/kg with lipid contents of 41.7 and 40.8% as well as lipid yields of 192.9 and 186.8mg/g, respectively, whereas these results were obviously higher than those obtained under the iso-osmotic glycerol and sorbitol stresses. Furthermore, basing on the multi-level analysis of oxidative response, key enzyme activity and biochemical alteration, the superior performance of salt stress driving lipid over-synthesis was probably ascribed to the more ROS production as a result of additional ion effect besides the osmotic effect, subsequently mediating the alteration from carbohydrate storage to lipid accumulation in signal transduction process of C. protothecoides.

  20. Alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the mouse hippocampus following acute but not repeated benzodiazepine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Licata

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines (BZs are safe drugs for treating anxiety, sleep, and seizure disorders, but their use also results in unwanted effects including memory impairment, abuse, and dependence. The present study aimed to reveal the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the effects of BZs in the hippocampus (HIP, an area involved in drug-related plasticity, by investigating the regulation of immediate early genes following BZ administration. Previous studies have demonstrated that both brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and c-Fos contribute to memory- and abuse-related processes that occur within the HIP, and their expression is altered in response to BZ exposure. In the current study, mice received acute or repeated administration of BZs and HIP tissue was analyzed for alterations in BDNF and c-Fos expression. Although no significant changes in BDNF or c-Fos were observed in response to twice-daily intraperitoneal (i.p. injections of diazepam (10 mg/kg + 5 mg/kg or zolpidem (ZP; 2.5 mg/kg + 2.5 mg/kg, acute i.p. administration of both triazolam (0.03 mg/kg and ZP (1.0 mg/kg decreased BDNF protein levels within the HIP relative to vehicle, without any effect on c-Fos. ZP specifically reduced exon IV-containing BDNF transcripts with a concomitant increase in the association of methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 with BDNF promoter IV, suggesting that MeCP2 activity at this promoter may represent a ZP-specific mechanism for reducing BDNF expression. ZP also increased the association of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB with BDNF promoter I. Future work should examine the interaction between ZP and DNA as the cause for altered gene expression in the HIP, given that BZs can enter the nucleus and intercalate into DNA directly.

  1. High Altitude Increases Alteration in Maximal Torque but Not in Rapid Torque Development in Knee Extensors after Repeated Treadmill Sprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier; Brocherie, Franck; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed knee extensor neuromuscular adjustments following repeated treadmill sprints in different normobaric hypoxia conditions, with special reference to rapid muscle torque production capacity. Thirteen team- and racquet-sport athletes undertook 8 × 5-s “all-out” sprints (passive recovery = 25 s) on a non-motorized treadmill in normoxia (NM; FiO2 = 20.9%), at low (LA; FiO2 = 16.8%) and high (HA; FiO2 = 13.3%) normobaric hypoxia (simulated altitudes of ~1800 m and ~3600 m, respectively). Explosive (~1 s; “fast” instruction) and maximal (~5 s; “hard” instruction) voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE), with concurrent electromyographic (EMG) activity recordings of the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles, were performed before and 1-min post-exercise. Rate of torque development (RTD) and EMG (i.e., Root Mean Square or RMS) rise from 0 to 30, −50, −100, and −200 ms were recorded, and were also normalized to maximal torque and EMG values, respectively. Distance covered during the first 5-s sprint was similar (P > 0.05) in all conditions. A larger (P sprint decrement score and a shorter (P sprints occurred in HA (−8 ± 4% and 178 ± 11 m) but not in LA (−7 ± 3% and 181 ± 10 m) compared to NM (−5 ± 2% and 183 ± 9 m). Compared to NM (−9 ± 7%), a larger (P 0.05). Irrespectively of condition (P > 0.05), peak RTD (−6 ± 11%; P 0.05), whereas it increased (P repeated-sprint ability and post-exercise MVC decrease were greater at high altitude than in normoxia or at low altitude. However, the post-exercise alterations in RTD were similar between normoxia and low-to-high hypoxia. PMID:27014095

  2. Alterations in Cardiac Deformation, Timing of Contraction and Relaxation, and Early Myocardial Fibrosis Accompany the Apparent Recovery of Acute Stress-Induced (Takotsubo) Cardiomyopathy: An End to the Concept of Transience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Konstantin; Ahearn, Trevor; Srinivasan, Janaki; Neil, Christopher J; Scally, Caroline; Rudd, Amelia; Jagpal, Baljit; Frenneaux, Michael P; Pislaru, Cristina; Horowitz, John D; Dawson, Dana K

    2017-08-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is an increasingly recognized cause of chest pain and occasionally of cardiogenic shock. Despite rapid improvement of the left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, recent registry data raise concerns about long-term prognosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that restoration of normal ejection fraction after acute takotsubo syndrome is not equivalent to full functional recovery. Fifty-two patients with takotsubo syndrome (according to the Mayo Clinic criteria plus cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to exclude myocardial infarction) and 44 healthy control subjects of the same age, gender, and cardiovascular comorbidity distribution were prospectively recruited. The focus of the investigation was on patients with takotsubo syndrome presenting with ST-segment elevation-type electrocardiographic findings or malignant arrhythmias and with LV apical ballooning variant, and a 4-month recovery endpoint was assessed. Patients underwent echocardiographic assessment of LV myocardial deformation (global longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain; LV twist, torsion, and untwist; and time to peak twist and untwist) and assessment of LV myocardial structure by pre- and post-contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance by T1 mapping acutely and at 4-month follow-up. Control subjects underwent a single-time-point investigation. Data were analyzed using paired or unpaired tests, as appropriate for their distribution, and corrected for multiple comparisons. The patients' mean age was 66 years (range, 28-87 years), and 92% were women. All abnormal echocardiographic indices observed acutely in patients with takotsubo syndrome improved (but did not necessarily normalize) at follow-up. Significant mechanotemporal alterations characterizing both systole (global longitudinal strain and apical circumferential strain, P takotsubo cardiomyopathy, regional LV systolic and diastolic deformation abnormalities persist beyond the acute event, despite

  3. [Stress-induced cellular adaptive mutagenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linjiang; Li, Qi

    2014-04-01

    The adaptive mutations exist widely in the evolution of cells, such as antibiotic resistance mutations of pathogenic bacteria, adaptive evolution of industrial strains, and cancerization of human somatic cells. However, how these adaptive mutations are generated is still controversial. Based on the mutational analysis models under the nonlethal selection conditions, stress-induced cellular adaptive mutagenesis is proposed as a new evolutionary viewpoint. The hypothetic pathway of stress-induced mutagenesis involves several intracellular physiological responses, including DNA damages caused by accumulation of intracellular toxic chemicals, limitation of DNA MMR (mismatch repair) activity, upregulation of general stress response and activation of SOS response. These responses directly affect the accuracy of DNA replication from a high-fidelity manner to an error-prone one. The state changes of cell physiology significantly increase intracellular mutation rate and recombination activity. In addition, gene transcription under stress condition increases the instability of genome in response to DNA damage, resulting in transcription-associated DNA mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize these two molecular mechanisms of stress-induced mutagenesis and transcription-associated DNA mutagenesis to help better understand the mechanisms of adaptive mutagenesis.

  4. Attenuation of stress induced memory deficits by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in rats: Role of antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emad, Shaista; Qadeer, Sara; Sadaf, Sana; Batool, Zehra; Haider, Saida; Perveen, Tahira

    2017-04-01

    Repeated stress paradigms have been shown to cause devastating alterations on memory functions. Stress is linked with inflammation. Psychological and certain physical stressors could lead to neuroinflammation. Inflammatory process may occur by release of mediators and stimulate the production of prostaglandins through cyclooxygenase (COX). Treatment with COX inhibitors, which restrain prostaglandin production, has enhanced memory in a number of neuroinflammatory states showing a potential function for raised prostaglandins in these memory shortfalls. In the present study, potential therapeutic effects of indomethacin and diclofenac sodium on memory in both unrestraint and restraint rats were observed. Two components, long term memory and short term memory were examined by Morris water maze (MWM) and elevated plus maze (EPM) respectively. The present study also demonstrated the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on lipid peroxidation (LPO) and activities of antioxidant enzymes along with the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Results of MWM and EPM showed significant effects of drugs in both unrestraint and restraint rats as escape latency and transfer latency, in respective behavioral models were decreased as compared to that of control. This study also showed NSAIDs administration decreased LPO and increased antioxidant enzymes activity and decreased AChE activity in rats exposed to repeated stress. In conclusion this study suggests a therapeutic potential of indomethacin and diclofenac against repeated stress-induced memory deficits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  5. Imipramine attenuates neuroinflammatory signaling and reverses stress-induced social avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Karol; Shea, Daniel T; McKim, Daniel B; Reader, Brenda F; Sheridan, John F

    2015-05-01

    Psychosocial stress is associated with altered immunity, anxiety and depression. Previously we showed that repeated social defeat (RSD) promoted microglia activation and social avoidance behavior that persisted for 24days after cessation of RSD. The aim of the present study was to determine if imipramine (a tricyclic antidepressant) would reverse RSD-inducedsocial avoidance and ameliorate neuroinflammatory responses. To test this, C57BL/6 mice were divided into treatment groups. One group from RSD and controls received daily injections of imipramine for 24days, following 6 cycles of RSD. Two other groups were treated with saline. RSD mice spent significantly less time in the interaction zone when an aggressor was present in the cage. Administration of imipramine reversed social avoidance behavior, significantly increasing the interaction time, so that it was similar to that of control mice. Moreover, 24days of imipramine treatment in RSD mice significantly decreased stress-induced mRNA levels for IL-6 in brain microglia. Following ex vivo LPS stimulation, microglia from mice exposed to RSD, had higher mRNA expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β, and this was reversed by imipramine treatment. In a second experiment, imipramine was added to drinking water confirming the reversal of social avoidant behavior and decrease in mRNA expression of IL-6 in microglia. These data suggest that the antidepressant imipramine may exert its effect, in part, by down-regulating microglial activation.

  6. Individual differences in the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system: Relevance to stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christopher S; Valentino, Rita J; Wood, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Repeated exposure to psychosocial stress is a robust sympathomimetic stressor and as such has adverse effects on cardiovascular health. While the neurocircuitry involved remains unclear, the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system suggest that it is poised to contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability. A major theme throughout is to review studies that shed light on the role that the LC may play in individual differences in vulnerability to social stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. Recent findings are discussed that support a unique plasticity in afferent regulation of the LC, resulting in either excitatory or inhibitory input to the LC during establishment of different stress coping strategies. This contrasting regulation of the LC by either afferent regulation, or distinct differences in stress-induced neuroinflammation would translate to differences in cardiovascular regulation and may serve as the basis for individual differences in the cardiopathological consequences of social stress. The goal of this review is to highlight recent developments in the interplay between the LC-NE and cardiovascular systems during repeated stress in an effort to advance therapeutic treatments for the development of stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

  7. (-)Epigallocatechin-3-gallate decreases the stress-induced impairment of learning and memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soung, Hung-Sheng; Wang, Mao-Hsien; Tseng, Hsiang-Chien; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Chang, Kuo-Chi

    2015-08-18

    Stress induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes alterations in brain cytoarchitecture and cognition. Green tea has potent antioxidative properties especially the tea catechin (-) epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). These powerful antioxidative properties are able to protect against various oxidative damages. In this study we investigated the impact of stress on rats' locomotor activity, learning and memory. Many tea catechins, including EGCG, were examined for their possible therapeutic effects in treating stress-induced impairment. Our results indicated that locomotor activity was decreased, and the learning and memory were impaired in stressed rats (SRs). EGCG treatment was able to prevent the decreased locomotor activity as well as improve the learning and memory in SRs. EGCG treatment was also able to reduce the increased oxidative status in SRs' hippocampi. The above results suggest a therapeutic effect of EGCG in treating stress-induced impairment of learning and memory, most likely by means of its powerful antioxidative properties.

  8. 柚皮苷改善束缚性应激引起的小鼠生化指标及行为变化的一氧化氮调节机制%Amelioration of immobilization stress-induced biochemical and behavioral alterations and mitochondrial dysfunction by naringin in mice: possible mechanism of nitric oxide modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gollapalle L.Viswanatha; Hanumanthappa Shylaja; K.Sadashiva Sandeep Rao; Yathiraj Ashwini; V. Ramaiah Santhosh Kumar; C. Gangadharaiah Mohan; Venkate Gowda Sunil; M. Venkateshappa Sarvesh Kumar; Subbanna Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Objective:The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of naringin on immobilization stress-induced biochemical-behavioral changes and mitochondrial dysfunction in mice.Methods:Mice were randomized and grouped based on body weights.Respective drug treatments were given for 14 d,and on the 15th day all the animals were subjected to a 6-hour immobilization stress; then all the animals were subjected to various behavioral paradigms and were sacrificed.Various biochemical parameters and mitochondrial functions were analyzed using brain homogenate.Results:The 6-hour acute immobilization stress significantly altered the behavioral (anxiety and memory) and biochemical parameters coupled with mitochondrial dysfunction in mice.Fourteen days pretreatment with naringin (50 and 100 mg/kg,per oral) significantly inhibited the behavioral and biochemical alterations and mitochondrial dysfunction caused by acute immobilization stress (P<0.05).Further,pretreatment with L-arginine (50 mg/kg,intraperitoneally),a nitric oxide precursor,reversed the protective effect of naringin (P<0.05).In addition,pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (5 mg/kg,intraperitoneally) caused potentiation in the protective effect of naringin.Conclusion:These results suggest the possible involvement of nitrergic pathway in the protective effect of naringin against immobilization stress-induced behavioral,biochemical and mitochondrial dysfunctions in mice.%目的:研究柚皮苷对束缚性应激引起的小鼠生化指标改变、行为变化及线粒体功能紊乱的影响.方法:将小鼠按照体质量随机分组,分别给予不同药物治疗14 d.在第15天让所有小鼠接受束缚性应激刺激6h,然后在接受各种不同的行为测试后处死.取小鼠的大脑匀浆进行各种生化指标测量和线粒体功能分析.结果:6h的急性束缚性应激刺激能显著改变小鼠的行为(焦虑和记忆),引起生化指标变化和线粒体功

  9. Sequestration of DROSHA and DGCR8 by Expanded CGG RNA Repeats Alters MicroRNA Processing in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Sellier

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of 55–200 CGG repeats in the 5′ UTR of FMR1. These expanded CGG repeats are transcribed and accumulate in nuclear RNA aggregates that sequester one or more RNA-binding proteins, thus impairing their functions. Here, we have identified that the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 binds to expanded CGG repeats, resulting in the partial sequestration of DGCR8 and its partner, DROSHA, within CGG RNA aggregates. Consequently, the processing of microRNAs (miRNAs is reduced, resulting in decreased levels of mature miRNAs in neuronal cells expressing expanded CGG repeats and in brain tissue from patients with FXTAS. Finally, overexpression of DGCR8 rescues the neuronal cell death induced by expression of expanded CGG repeats. These results support a model in which a human neurodegenerative disease originates from the alteration, in trans, of the miRNA-processing machinery.

  10. Sequestration of DROSHA and DGCR8 by expanded CGG RNA repeats alters microRNA processing in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, Chantal; Freyermuth, Fernande; Tabet, Ricardos; Tran, Tuan; He, Fang; Ruffenach, Frank; Alunni, Violaine; Moine, Herve; Thibault, Christelle; Page, Adeline; Tassone, Flora; Willemsen, Rob; Disney, Matthew D; Hagerman, Paul J; Todd, Peter K; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2013-03-28

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of 55-200 CGG repeats in the 5' UTR of FMR1. These expanded CGG repeats are transcribed and accumulate in nuclear RNA aggregates that sequester one or more RNA-binding proteins, thus impairing their functions. Here, we have identified that the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 binds to expanded CGG repeats, resulting in the partial sequestration of DGCR8 and its partner, DROSHA, within CGG RNA aggregates. Consequently, the processing of microRNAs (miRNAs) is reduced, resulting in decreased levels of mature miRNAs in neuronal cells expressing expanded CGG repeats and in brain tissue from patients with FXTAS. Finally, overexpression of DGCR8 rescues the neuronal cell death induced by expression of expanded CGG repeats. These results support a model in which a human neurodegenerative disease originates from the alteration, in trans, of the miRNA-processing machinery.

  11. Repeated cocaine enhances ventral hippocampal-stimulated dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens and alters ventral hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeffrey L; Forster, Gina L; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2014-08-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is important for various reward-related cognitive processes including reinforcement learning. Repeated cocaine enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and phasic elevations of accumbal dopamine evoked by unconditioned stimuli are dependent on impulse flow from the ventral hippocampus. Therefore, sensitized hippocampal activity may be one mechanism by which drugs of abuse enhance limbic dopaminergic activity. In this study, in vivo microdialysis in freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was used to investigate the effect of repeated cocaine on ventral hippocampus-mediated dopaminergic transmission within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens. Following seven daily injections of saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg, ip), unilateral infusion of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 0.5 μg) into the ventral hippocampus transiently increased both motoric activity and ipsilateral dopamine efflux in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens, and this effect was greater in rats that received repeated cocaine compared to controls that received repeated saline. In addition, repeated cocaine altered NMDA receptor subunit expression in the ventral hippocampus, reducing the NR2A : NR2B subunit ratio. Together, these results suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine produces maladaptive ventral hippocampal-nucleus accumbens communication, in part through changes in glutamate receptor composition. A behaviorally sensitizing regimen of cocaine (20 mg/kg, ip 7 days) also sensitized ventral hippocampus (hipp)-mediated dopaminergic transmission within the nucleus accumbens (Nac) to NMDA stimulation (bolts). This was associated with reduced ventral hippocampal NR2A:NR2B subunit ratio, suggesting that repeated exposure to cocaine produces changes in hippocampal NMDA receptor composition that lead to enhanced ventral hippocampus-nucleus accumbens communication.

  12. Treatment with Caffeic Acid and Resveratrol Alleviates Oxidative Stress Induced Neurotoxicity in Cell and Drosophila Models of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ling; Chang, Jui-Chih; Lin, Wei-Yong; Li, Chien-Chun; Hsieh, Mingli; Chen, Haw-Wen; Wang, Tsu-Shing; Liu, Chin-San; Liu, Kai-Li

    2017-09-14

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat in the protein ataxin-3 which is involved in susceptibility to mild oxidative stress induced neuronal death. Here we show that caffeic acid (CA) and resveratrol (Res) decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS), mutant ataxin-3 and apoptosis and increased autophagy in the pro-oxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH)-treated SK-N-SH-MJD78 cells containing mutant ataxin-3. Furthermore, CA and Res improved survival and locomotor activity and decreased mutant ataxin-3 and ROS levels in tBH-treated SCA3 Drosophila. CA and Res also altered p53 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and expression in tBH-treated cell and fly models of SCA3, respectively. Blockade of NF-κB activation annulled the protective effects of CA and Res on apoptosis, ROS, and p53 activation in tBH-treated SK-N-SH-MJD78 cells, which suggests the importance of restoring NF-κB activity by CA and Res. Our findings suggest that CA and Res may be useful in the management of oxidative stress induced neuronal apoptosis in SCA3.

  13. Investigations into mild electric foot shock stress-induced cognitive enhancement: possible role of angiotensin neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2013-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of angiotensin neuropeptides in mild electric foot shock stress-induced cognitive enhancement in mice. Mild stress was induced by applying mild electric foot shocks of 0.15 mA intensity for 0.5 s. The stress-induced alteration in cognition was assessed using a Morris water maze test. The animals were subjected to mild electric foot shocks 5 min before we recorded escape latency time (ELT), an index of learning, during the first 4 days of a 5-day trial in the Morris water maze. The time spent in target quadrant (TSTQ), an index of retrieval, was noted on the fifth day without prior administration of electric foot shock. The angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor lisinopril (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg), and telmisartan (1, 2 and 5 mg/kg), an angiotensin II receptor blocker, were employed to assess the role of angiotensin neuropeptides. The application of mild electric shocks significantly decreased ELT and increased TSTQ, indicating enhancement in stress-induced learning and memory. However, administration of lisinopril and telmisartan significantly attenuated the stress-induced decrease in ELT and increase in TSTQ. It may be concluded that mild electric foot shock-induced stress triggers the release of angiotensin neuropeptides that may be responsible for memory enhancement.

  14. Acute stress-induced cortisol elevations mediate reward system activity during subconscious processing of sexual stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Oei, Nicole Y. L.; Both, Stephanie; van Heemst, Diana; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Stress is thought to alter motivational processes by increasing dopamine (DA) secretion in the brain’s ‘‘reward system’’, and its key region, the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). However, stress studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), mainly found evidence for stress-induced decreases in NAcc responsiveness toward reward cues. Results from both animal and human PETstudies indicate that the stress hormone cortisol may be crucial in the interaction between st...

  15. Alterations in Whole-Body Insulin Sensitivity Resulting From Repeated Eccentric Exercise of a Single Muscle Group: A Pilot Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Javier T; Barwood, Martin J; Goodall, Stuart; Thomas, Kevin; Howatson, Glyn

    2015-08-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise using large muscle groups elicits soreness, decrements in physical function and impairs markers of whole-body insulin sensitivity; although these effects are attenuated with a repeated exposure. Eccentric exercise of a small muscle group (elbow flexors) displays similar soreness and damage profiles in response to repeated exposure. However, it is unknown whether damage to small muscle groups impacts upon whole-body insulin sensitivity. This pilot investigation aimed to characterize whole-body insulin sensitivity in response to repeated bouts of eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors. Nine healthy males completed two bouts of eccentric exercise separated by 2 weeks. Insulin resistance (updated homeostasis model of insulin resistance, HOMA2-IR) and muscle damage profiles (soreness and physical function) were assessed before, and 48 h after exercise. Matsuda insulin sensitivity indices (ISI Matsuda) were also determined in 6 participants at the same time points as HOMA2-IR. Soreness was elevated, and physical function impaired, by both bouts of exercise (both p Eccentric exercise decreased ISI Matsuda after the first but not the second bout of eccentric exercise (time x bout interaction p Eccentric exercise performed with an isolated upper limb impairs whole-body insulin sensitivity after the first, but not the second, bout.

  16. Glutamatergic mechanisms associated with stress-induced amygdala excitability and anxiety-related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masneuf, Sophie; Lowery-Gionta, Emily; Colacicco, Giovanni; Pleil, Kristen E; Li, Chia; Crowley, Nicole; Flynn, Shaun; Holmes, Andrew; Kash, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The neural factors underlying individual differences in susceptibility to chronic stress remain poorly understood. Preclinical studies demonstrate that mouse strains vary greatly in anxiety-related responses to chronic stress in a manner paralleled by differential stress-induced changes in glutamatergic signaling in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Previous work has also shown that alterations in the amygdala gene expression of the GluN1 NMDA and the GluK1 kainate receptors are associated with stress-induced alterations in anxiety-like behavior in the C57BL/6J mouse strain. Using in vivo behavioral pharmacological and ex vivo physiological approaches, the aim of the current study was to further elucidate changes in glutamate neurotransmission in the BLA caused by stress and to test the functional roles of GluN1 and GluK1 in mediating stress-related changes in behavior. Results showed that stress-induced alterations in anxiety-like behavior (light/dark exploration test) were absent following bilateral infusion of the GluK1 agonist ATPA into the BLA. Intra-BLA infusion of the competitive NMDA antagonist AP5 produced a generalized behavioral disinhibition/locomotor hyperactivity, irrespective of stress. Slice electrophysiological recordings showed that ATPA augmented BLA GABAergic neurotransmission and that stress increased the amplitude of network-dependent spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and amplitude of GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in BLA. These findings could indicate stress-induced BLA glutamatergic neuronal network hyperexcitability and a compensatory increase in GABAergic neurotransmission, suggesting that GluK1 agonism augmented GABAergic inhibition to prevent behavioral sequelae of stress. Current data could have implications for developing novel therapeutic approaches, including GluK1 agonists, for stress-related anxiety disorders.

  17. Prognostic significance of telomeric repeat length alterations in pathological stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, T; Komiya, T; Nitta, T; Takada, Y; Kobayashi, M; Masuda, N; Matui, K; Takada, M; Kikui, M; Yasumitu, T; Ohno, A; Nakagawa, K; Fukuoka, M; Kawase, I

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the prognostic significance of alteration in telomere length in pathological stage (p-stage) I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Paired cancer and normal lung tissues were obtained from 72 patients with histologically confirmed p-stage I-IIIA NSCLC. Terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length, which indicates telomere length, was measured by Southern blot analysis. Tumor telomerase activity was also assayed by non-radioactive PCR-ELISA in 55 patients. TRF length (mean +/- SD) in normal tissue was 6.2 +/- 1.1 Kb. Therefore, upper and lower limits of normal range in TRF length was set at 8.4 (mean + 2SD) Kb and 4.0 (mean-2SD) Kb, respectively. A tumor showing TRF length over normal range was defined as positive for the alteration. In 72 patients, 25 (34.7%) with alteration in TRF length had significantly shorter survival durations than those of the others. Telomerase activity did not correlate with survival duration. In multivariate analysis, alteration in TRF length (P = 0.0033) was second to p-stage (P = 0.0004) in importance among the various parameters.

  18. Differential response of A 68930 and sulpiride in stress-induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Naila; Ahmad, Ausaf; Singh, Neetu; Singh, Pratibha; Mishra, Vaibhav; Banu, Naheed; Lohani, Mohtashim; Sharma, Sharad; Palit, Gautam

    2010-09-15

    Dopamine is linked to gastrointestinal functions. However, its exact nature in stress-induced gastric pathology is still not clear. In the present study, an attempt has been made to identify the effects of dopamine in stress-induced gastric ulcers, and concurrent alterations in various ulcer-influencing factors such as plasma corticosterone levels, gastric mucosal PGE(2) content and proton pump activity. The dopamine D(1) receptor agonist (A 68930) and antagonist (SCH 23390), and D(2) receptor agonist (quinpirole) and antagonist (sulpiride) were used to evaluate their effects on acute stress (single immobilization for 150 min) and chronic unpredictable stress (two different types of stressors for 7 days) induced gastric ulcers in rats. Acute and chronic unpredictable stress significantly increased the gastric ulcer severity, adrenal hypertrophy and corticosterone levels, while gastric mucosal dopamine levels were decreased. Pretreatment of sulpiride (60 mg/kg) significantly reverted the acute stress-induced alterations, while A 68930 (0.25mg/kg) significantly restored the acute and chronic unpredictable stress-induced alterations. In contrast, administration of SCH 23390 (0.1-0.5mg/kg) and quinpirole (0.1-0.5mg/kg) failed to alter acute stress-induced alterations. Further, A 68930 and sulpiride showed different response on proton pump inhibition under in-vitro condition. A 68930 (10-50 microg/ml) inhibited the gastric H(+) K(+)-ATPase activity comparable to positive control omeprazole, while sulpiride (10-50 microg/ml) had no effect. A 68930 also normalized the decreased gastric PGE2 content observed during chronic unpredictable stress. The histopathological evaluation of gastric mucosal tissue supported the observations regarding the gastroprotective effect of sulpiride during acute stress and of A 68930 during both acute and chronic unpredictable stress conditions. Our results provide important insights into the mechanism of dopamine-regulated pathways, which

  19. Effects of Kombucha on oxidative stress induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharib Ola

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trichloroethylene (TCE may induce oxidative stress which generates free radicals and alters antioxidants or oxygen-free radical scavenging enzymes. Methods Twenty male albino rats were divided into four groups: (1 the control group treated with vehicle, (2 Kombucha (KT-treated group, (3 TCE-treated group and (4 KT/TCE-treated group. Kidney lipid peroxidation, glutathione content, nitric oxide (NO and total blood free radical concentrations were evaluated. Serum urea, creatinine level, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activities were also measured. Results TCE administration increased the malondiahyde (MDA and NO contents in kidney, urea and creatinine concentrations in serum, total free radical level in blood and GGT and LDH activities in serum, whereas it decreased the glutathione (GSH level in kidney homogenate. KT administration significantly improved lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress induced by TCE. Conclusion The present study indicates that Kombucha may repair damage caused by environmental pollutants such as TCE and may be beneficial to patient suffering from renal impairment.

  20. The APP intracellular domain (AICD) potentiates ER stress-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögel, Donat; Concannon, Caoimhín G; Müller, Thorsten; König, Hildegard; Bonner, Caroline; Poeschel, Simone; Chang, Steffi; Egensperger, Rupert; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2012-09-01

    Here we employed human SHEP neuroblastoma cells either stably or inducibly expressing the amyloid precursor protein (APP) intracellular domain (AICD) to investigate its ability to modulate stress-induced cell death. Analysis of effector caspase activation revealed that AICD overexpression was specifically associated with an increased sensitivity to apoptosis induced by the 2 endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressors thapsigargin and tunicamycin, but not by staurosporine (STS). Basal and ER stress-induced expression of Bip/Grp78 and C/EBP-homologous protein/GADD153 were not altered by AICD implying that AICD potentiated cell death downstream or independent of the conserved unfolded protein response (UPR). Interestingly, quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and reporter gene assays revealed that AICD significantly downregulated messenger RNA levels of the Alzheimer's disease susceptibility gene ApoJ/clusterin, indicating transcriptional repression. Knockdown of ApoJ/clusterin mimicked the effect of AICD on ER stress-induced apoptosis, but had no discernible effect on staurosporine-induced cell death. Our data suggest that altered levels of AICD may abolish the prosurvival function of ApoJ/clusterin and increase the susceptibility of neurons to ER stress-mediated cell death, a pathway that may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. D1 and D2 dopamine receptor antagonists decrease behavioral bout duration, without altering the bout's repeated behavioral components, in a naturalistic model of repetitive and compulsive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Kurt L; Rueda Morales, Rafael I

    2012-04-21

    Nest building behavior in the pregnant female rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a model for compulsive behavior in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). This behavior comprises a cycle of repeated, stereotyped components (collecting straw, entering nest box and depositing the straw there, returning to collect more straw), which itself is repeated 80+ times in a single bout that lasts approximately 50min. The bout, in turn, is repeated if necessary, according to the rabbit's perception of whether or not the nest is finished. We administered SCH23390 (5-100μg/kg; D1/D5 antagonist) or raclopride (0.05-1.0mg/kg; D2/D3 antagonist), subcutaneously to day 28 pregnant female rabbits, 30 or 60min before placing straw inside their home cage. At doses that minimally affected ambulatory behavior in open field (5-12.5μg/kg SCH23390, 0.5-1.0mg/kg raclopride), both antagonists dramatically reduced bout duration while not significantly affecting the initiation of straw carrying behavior, the sequential performance of the individual cycle components, maximum cycle frequency, or the total number of bouts performed. These results point to an important role for dopamine neurotransmission for the prolonged expression of a normal, repetitive and compulsive-like behavior. Moreover, the finding that dopamine receptor antagonists decrease the time spent engaged in repetitive behavior (without significantly altering the form of the repetitive behavior itself) suggests a possible explanation for why neuroleptics can be clinically effective for treating OCD.

  2. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevents stress-induced modulation of multiple memory systems in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Lars; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver; Wolf, Oliver T

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that stress may orchestrate the engagement of multiple memory systems in the brain. In particular, stress is thought to favor dorsal striatum-dependent procedural over hippocampus-dependent declarative memory. However, the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying these modulatory effects of stress remain elusive, especially in humans. Here, we targeted the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the stress-induced modulation of dorsal striatal and hippocampal memory systems in the human brain using a combination of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacologic blockade of the MR. Eighty healthy participants received the MR antagonist spironolactone (300 mg) or a placebo and underwent a stressor or control manipulation before they performed, in the scanner, a classification task that can be supported by the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. Stress after placebo did not affect learning performance but reduced explicit task knowledge and led to a relative increase in the use of more procedural learning strategies. At the neural level, stress promoted striatum-based learning at the expense of hippocampus-based learning. Functional connectivity analyses showed that this shift was associated with altered coupling of the amygdala with the hippocampus and dorsal striatum. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade before stress prevented the stress-induced shift toward dorsal striatal procedural learning, same as the stress-induced alterations of amygdala connectivity with hippocampus and dorsal striatum, but resulted in significantly impaired performance. Our findings indicate that the stress-induced shift from hippocampal to dorsal striatal memory systems is mediated by the amygdala, required to preserve performance after stress, and dependent on the MR. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  3. Effect of drought stress induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of drought stress induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) on germination indices in corn ( Zea mays L.) hybrids. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... and success in this stage is dependent on moisture content of soil at time of planting.

  4. Repeated sprint ability and stride kinematics are altered following an official match in national-level basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delextrat, A; Baliqi, F; Clarke, N

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of playing an official national-level basketball match on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and stride kinematics. Nine male starting basketball players (22.8±2.2 years old, 191.3±5.8 cm, 88±10.3 kg, 12.3±4.6% body fat) volunteered to take part. Six repetitions of maximal 4-s sprints were performed on a non-motorised treadmill, separated by 21-s of passive recovery, before and immediately after playing an official match. Fluid loss, playing time, and the frequencies of the main match activities were recorded. The peak, mean, and performance decrement for average and maximal speed, acceleration, power, vertical and horizontal forces, and stride parameters were calculated over the six sprints. Differences between pre- and post-match were assessed by student t-tests. Significant differences between pre- and post-tests were observed in mean speed (-3.3%), peak and mean horizontal forces (-4.3% and -17.4%), peak and mean vertical forces (-3.4% and -3.7%), contact time (+7.3%), stride duration (+4.6%) and stride frequency (-4.0%), (Psprint, jump and shuffle frequencies (Prepeated sprint ability depends on the specific activities performed, and that replacing fluid loss through sweating during a match is crucial.

  5. The Glt1 glutamate receptor mediates the establishment and perpetuation of chronic visceral pain in an animal model of stress-induced bladder hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, A Lenore; Jellison, Forrest C; Lee, Una J; Bradesi, Sylvie; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2016-04-01

    Psychological stress exacerbates interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), a lower urinary tract pain disorder characterized by increased urinary frequency and bladder pain. Glutamate (Glu) is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter modulating nociceptive networks. Glt1, an astrocytic transporter responsible for Glu clearance, is critical in pain signaling termination. We sought to examine the role of Glt1 in stress-induced bladder hyperalgesia and urinary frequency. In a model of stress-induced bladder hyperalgesia with high construct validity to human IC/BPS, female Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were subjected to 10-day water avoidance stress (WAS). Referred hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia were assessed after WAS with von Frey filaments. After behavioral testing, we assessed Glt1 expression in the spinal cord by immunoblotting. We also examined the influence of dihydrokainate (DHK) and ceftriaxone (CTX), which downregulate and upregulate Glt1, respectively, on pain development. Rats exposed to WAS demonstrated increased voiding frequency, increased colonic motility, anxiety-like behaviors, and enhanced visceral hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia. This behavioral phenotype correlated with decreases in spinal Glt1 expression. Exogenous Glt1 downregulation by DHK resulted in hyperalgesia similar to that following WAS. Exogenous Glt1 upregulation via intraperitoneal CTX injection inhibited the development of and reversed preexisting pain and voiding dysfunction induced by WAS. Repeated psychological stress results in voiding dysfunction and hyperalgesia that correlate with altered central nervous system glutamate processing. Manipulation of Glu handling altered the allodynia developing after psychological stress, implicating Glu neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of bladder hyperalgesia in the WAS model of IC/BPS. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Stress-induced core temperature changes in pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Myla de Aguiar; Melleu, Fernando Falkenburger; Marino-Neto, José

    2015-02-01

    Changes in body temperature are significant physiological consequences of stressful stimuli in mammals and birds. Pigeons (Columba livia) prosper in (potentially) stressful urban environments and are common subjects in neurobehavioral studies; however, the thermal responses to stress stimuli by pigeons are poorly known. Here, we describe acute changes in the telemetrically recorded celomatic (core) temperature (Tc) in pigeons given a variety of potentially stressful stimuli, including transfer to a novel cage (ExC) leading to visual isolation from conspecifics, the presence of the experimenter (ExpR), gentle handling (H), sham intracelomatic injections (SI), and the induction of the tonic immobility (TI) response. Transfer to the ExC cage provoked short-lived hyperthermia (10-20 min) followed by a long-lasting and substantial decrease in Tc, which returned to baseline levels 2 h after the start of the test. After a 2-hour stay in the ExC, the other potentially stressful stimuli evoked only weak, marginally significant hyperthermic (ExpR, IT) or hypothermic (SI) responses. Stimuli delivered 26 h after transfer to the ExC induced definite and intense increases in Tc (ExpR, H) or hypothermic responses (SI). These Tc changes appear to be unrelated to modifications in general activity (as measured via telemetrically recorded actimetric data). Repeated testing failed to affect the hypothermic responses to the transference to the ExC, even after nine trials and at 1- or 8-day intervals, suggesting that the social (visual) isolation from conspecifics may be a strong and poorly controllable stimulus in this species. The present data indicated that stress-induced changes in Tc may be a consistent and reliable physiological parameter of stress but that they may also show stressor type-, direction- and species-specific attributes.

  7. The cumulative impacts of repeated heavy rainfall, flooding and altered water quality on the high-latitude coral reefs of Hervey Bay, Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, I R; Sommer, B; Zann, M; Zhao, J-X; Pandolfi, J M

    2015-07-15

    Terrestrial runoff and flooding have resulted in major impacts on coral communities worldwide, but we lack detailed understanding of flood plume conditions and their ecological effects. Over the course of repeated flooding between 2010 and 2013, we measured coral cover and water quality on the high-latitude coral reefs of Hervey Bay, Queensland, Australia. In 2013, salinity, total suspended solids, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were altered for up to six months post-flooding. Submarine groundwater caused hypo-saline conditions for a further four months. Despite the greater magnitude of flooding in 2013, declines in coral abundance (∼28%) from these floods were lower than the 2011 flood (∼40%), which occurred immediately after a decade of severe drought. There was an overall cumulative decrease of coral by ∼56% from 2010 to 2013. Our study highlights the need for local scale monitoring and research to facilitate informed management and conservation of catchments and marine environments.

  8. Artificially inserting a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of Marek's disease virus (MDV) alters expression of nearby MDV genes.

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    Kim, Taejoong; Mays, Jody; Fadly, Aly; Silva, Robert F

    2011-06-01

    Researchers reported that co-cultivating the JM/102W strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV) with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in an REV long terminal repeat (LTR) being inserted into the internal repeat short (IRS) region of JM/102W. When the resulting recombinant virus was serially passed in cell culture, the initial LTR was duplicated and a second LTR spontaneously appeared in the terminal repeat short (TRS) region of the MDV genome. The virus, designated RM1, was significantly attenuated but still induced severe bursal and thymic atrophy (Isfort et al. PNAS 89:991-995). To determine whether the altered phenotype was due solely to the LTR, we cloned the LTR from the RM1 IRS region and inserted it into the IRS region of a very virulent bacterial artificial clone (BAC) of the Md5 strain of MDV, which we designated rMd5-RM1-LTR. During blind passage in duck embryo fibroblast cultures, the initial LTR in the rMd5-RM1-LTR was also duplicated, with LTRs appearing in both IRS and TRS regions of the MDV genome. The inserted LTR sequences and transcripts associated with the MDV open reading frames MDV085, MDV086, SORF2, US1, and US10 were molecularly characterized. The parental Md5 BAC contains a family of transcripts of 3, 2, and 1 kb that all terminate at the end of the US10 gene. The rMd5-RM1-LTR and RM1 viruses both express an additional 4 kb transcript that originates in the LTR and also terminates after US10. Collectively, the data suggest that our engineered rMd5-RM1-LTR virus very closely resembles the RM1 virus in its structure and transcription patterns.

  9. Tumoral Environment Triggers Transcript Anomalies in Established Tumors: Induction of Altered Gene Expression and of Aberrant, Truncated and B2 Repeat-Containing Gene Transcripts

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    Pieter Rottiers

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to eugenetic changes, cancerous cells exhibit extensive modifications in the expression levels of a variety of genes. The phenotypic switch observed after inoculation of T lymphoma cells into syngenic mice illustrates the active participation of tumoral environment in the induction of an aberrant gene expression pattern. To further substantiate this contribution, we performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based subtraction suppression hybridization (SSH to identify genes that are differentially expressed in tumor-derived EL4/13.3 cells compared to the same cells isolated from cultures. Besides a number of unknown genes, the subtracted library contained several known genes that have been reported to be expressed at increased levels in tumors and/or to contribute to carcinogenesis. Apart from clones representing translated transcripts, the subtracted library also contained a high number of clones representing B2 repeat elements, viz. short interspersed repetitive elements that are transcribed by RNA polymerase III. Northern blotting confirmed the induction of B2 transcripts in tumor tissue and also revealed induction of chimeric, B2 repeat-containing mRNA. The appearance of chimeric transcripts was accompanied by aberrant, shorter-than-full-length transcripts, specifically from upregulated genes. Accordingly, in addition to altered gene expression, tumoral environmental triggers constitute a potent mechanism to create an epigenetic diversity in cancers by inducing extensive transcript anomalies.

  10. Repeated exposure to corticosterone increases depression-like behavior in two different versions of the forced swim test without altering nonspecific locomotor activity or muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Wendie; Fournier, Neil M; Kalynchuk, Lisa E

    2009-08-01

    We have recently shown that repeated high dose injections of corticosterone (CORT) reliably increase depression-like behavior on a modified one-day version of the forced swim test. The main purpose of this experiment was to compare the effect of these CORT injections on our one-day version of the forced swim test and the more traditional two-day version of the test. A second purpose was to determine whether altered behavior in the forced swim test could be due to nonspecific changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength. Separate groups of rats received a high dose CORT injection (40 mg/kg) or a vehicle injection once per day for 21 consecutive days. Then, half the rats from each group were exposed to the traditional two-day forced swim test and the other half were exposed to our one-day forced swim test. After the forced swim testing, all the rats were tested in an open field and in a wire suspension grip strength test. The CORT injections significantly increased the time spent immobile and decreased the time spent swimming in both versions of the forced swim test. However, they had no significant effect on activity in the open field or grip strength in the wire suspension test. These results show that repeated CORT injections increase depression-like behavior regardless of the specific parameters of forced swim testing, and that these effects are independent of changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength.

  11. Oxidative stress-induced epigenetic changes associated with malignant transformation of human kidney epithelial cells.

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    Mahalingaiah, Prathap Kumar S; Ponnusamy, Logeswari; Singh, Kamaleshwar P

    2016-09-17

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) in humans is positively influenced by oxidative stress status in kidneys. We recently reported that adaptive response to low level of chronic oxidative stress induces malignant transformation of immortalized human renal tubular epithelial cells. Epigenetic alterations in human RCC are well documented, but its role in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of kidney cells is not known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the potential role of epigenetic changes in chronic oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation of HK-2, human renal tubular epithelial cells. The results revealed aberrant expression of epigenetic regulatory genes involved in DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3a and MBD4) and histone modifications (HDAC1, HMT1 and HAT1) in HK-2 cells malignantly transformed by chronic oxidative stress. Additionally, both in vitro soft agar assay and in vivo nude mice study showing decreased tumorigenic potential of malignantly transformed HK-2 cells following treatment with DNA de-methylating agent 5-aza 2' dC further confirmed the crucial role of DNA hypermethyaltion in oxidative stress-induced malignant transformation. Changes observed in global histone H3 acetylation (H3K9, H3K18, H3K27 and H3K14) and decrease in phospho-H2AX (Ser139) also suggest potential role of histone modifications in increased survival and malignant transformation of HK-2 cells by oxidative stress. In summary, the results of this study suggest that epigenetic reprogramming induced by low levels of oxidative stress act as driver for malignant transformation of kidney epithelial cells. Findings of this study are highly relevant in potential clinical application of epigenetic-based therapeutics for treatments of kidney cancers.

  12. Possible Biomarkers of Chronic Stress Induced Exhaustion - A Longitudinal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Wallensten

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, epidermal growth factor (EGF and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 have previously been suggested to be potential biomarkers for chronic stress induced exhaustion. The knowledge about VEGF has increased during the last decades and supports the contention that VEGF plays an important role in stress and depression. There is scarce knowledge on the possible relationship of EGF and MCP-1 in chronic stress and depression. This study further examines the role of VEGF, EGF and MCP-1 in women with chronic stress induced exhaustion and healthy women during a follow-up period of two years.Blood samples were collected from 105 women with chronic stress induced exhaustion on at least 50% sick leave for at least three months, at inclusion (T0, after 12 months (T12 and after 24 months (T24. Blood samples were collected at inclusion (T0 in 116 physically and psychiatrically healthy women. The plasma levels of VEGF, EGF and MCP-1 were analyzed using Biochip Array Technology. Women with chronic stress induced exhaustion had significantly higher plasma levels of VEGF and EGF compared to healthy women at baseline, T12 and at T24. There was no significant difference in plasma levels of MCP-1. Plasma levels of VEGF and EGF decreased significantly in women with chronic stress induced exhaustion during the two years follow-up.The replicated findings of elevated levels of VEGF and EGF in women with chronic stress induced exhaustion and decreasing plasma levels of VEGF and EGF during the two years follow-up add important knowledge to the pathophysiology of chronic stress induced exhaustion.

  13. Repeated post-exercise administration with a mixture of leucine and glucose alters the plasma amino acid profile in Standardbred trotters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nostell Katarina EA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The branched chain amino acid leucine is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion. Used in combination with glucose it can increase the insulin response and the post exercise re-synthesis of glycogen in man. Decreased plasma amino acid concentrations have been reported after intravenous or per oral administration of leucine in man as well as after a single per oral dose in horses. In man, a negative correlation between the insulin response and the concentrations of isoleucine, valine and methionine have been shown but results from horses are lacking. This study aims to determine the effect of repeated per oral administration with a mixture of glucose and leucine on the free amino acid profile and the insulin response in horses after glycogen-depleting exercise. Methods In a crossover design, after a glycogen depleting exercise, twelve Standardbred trotters received either repeated oral boluses of glucose, 1 g/kg body weight (BW at 0, 2 and 4 h with addition of leucine 0.1 g/kg BW at 0 and 4 h (GLU+LEU, or repeated boluses of water at 0, 2 and 4 h (CON. Blood samples for analysis of glucose, insulin and amino acid concentrations were collected prior to exercise and over a 6 h post-exercise period. A mixed model approach was used for the statistical analyses. Results Plasma leucine, isoleucine, valine, tyrosine and phenylalanine concentrations increased after exercise. Post-exercise serum glucose and plasma insulin response were significantly higher in the GLU+LEU treatment compared to the CON treatment. Plasma leucine concentrations increased after supplementation. During the post-exercise period isoleucine, valine and methionine concentrations decreased in both treatments but were significantly lower in the GLU+LEU treatment. There was no correlation between the insulin response and the response in plasma leucine, isoleucine, valine and methionine. Conclusions Repeated post-exercise administration with a mixture of leucine

  14. Repeated, Intermittent Social Defeat across the Entire Juvenile Period Resulted in Behavioral, Physiological, Hormonal, Immunological, and Neurochemical Alterations in Young Adult Male Golden Hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Chun; Liu, Ching-Yi; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is vulnerable to social defeat during the juvenile period. As complements of human studies, animal models of social defeat provide a straightforward approach to investigating the functional and neurobiological consequences of social defeats. Taking advantage of agonist behavior and social defeat in male golden hamster, a set of 6 experiments was conducted to investigate the consequences at multiple levels in young adulthood resulting from repeated, intermittent social defeats or "social threats" across the entire juvenile period. Male hamsters at postnatal day 28 (P28) were randomly assigned to either the social defeat, "social threat", or arena control group, and they correspondingly received a series of nine social interaction trials (i.e., either social defeat, "social threat", or arena control conditions) from P33 to P66. At the behavioral level (Experiment 1), we found that repeated social defeats (but not "social threats") significantly impacted locomotor activity in the familiar context and social interaction in the familiar/unfamiliar social contexts. At the physiological and hormonal levels (Experiments 2 and 3), repeated social defeat significantly enhanced the cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations in blood. Enlargement of the spleen was also found in the social defeat and "social threat" groups. At the immunological level (Experiment 4), the social defeat group showed lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hypothalamus and hippocampus but higher concentration of IL-6 in the striatum compared to the other two groups. At the neurochemical level (Experiment 5), the socially defeated hamsters mainly displayed reductions of dopamine, dopamine metabolites, and 5-HT levels in the striatum and decreased level of 5-HT in the hippocampus. In Experiment 6, an increase in the spine density of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was specifically observed in the "social threat" group. Collectively, our findings indicate that repeated

  15. Tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen mediate stress-induced decline of neuronal and cognitive functions in the mouse hippocampus.

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    Pawlak, Robert; Rao, B S Shankaranarayana; Melchor, Jerry P; Chattarji, Sumantra; McEwen, Bruce; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-12-13

    Repeated stress can impair function in the hippocampus, a brain structure essential for learning and memory. Although behavioral evidence suggests that severe stress triggers cognitive impairment, as seen in major depression or posttraumatic stress disorder, little is known about the molecular mediators of these functional deficits in the hippocampus. We report here both pre- and postsynaptic effects of chronic stress, manifested as a reduction in the number of NMDA receptors, dendritic spines, and expression of growth-associated protein-43 in the cornu ammonis 1 region. Strikingly, the stress-induced decrease in NMDA receptors coincides spatially with sites of plasminogen activation, thereby predicting a role for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in this form of stress-induced plasticity. Consistent with this possibility, tPA-/- and plasminogen-/- mice are protected from stress-induced decrease in NMDA receptors and reduction in dendritic spines. At the behavioral level, these synaptic and molecular signatures of stress-induced plasticity are accompanied by impaired acquisition, but not retrieval, of hippocampal-dependent spatial learning, a deficit that is not exhibited by the tPA-/- and plasminogen-/- mice. These findings establish the tPA/plasmin system as an important mediator of the debilitating effects of prolonged stress on hippocampal function at multiple levels of neural organization.

  16. TRH and TRH receptor system in the basolateral amygdala mediate stress-induced depression-like behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Juli; Kim, Ji-eun; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hannah; Lee, Eun-Hwa; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2015-10-01

    Chronic stress is a potent risk factor for depression, but the mechanism by which stress causes depression is not fully understood. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying stress-induced depression, C57BL/6 inbred mice were treated with repeated restraint to induce lasting depressive behavioral changes. Behavioral states of individual animals were evaluated using the forced swim test, which measures psychomotor withdrawals, and the U-field test, which measures sociability. From these behavioral analyses, individual mice that showed depression-like behaviors in both psychomotor withdrawal and sociability tests, and individuals that showed a resiliency to stress-induced depression in both tests were selected. Among the neuropeptides expressed in the amygdala, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was identified as being persistently up-regulated in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in individuals exhibiting severe depressive behaviors in the two behavior tests, but not in individuals displaying a stress resiliency. Activation of TRH receptors by local injection of TRH in the BLA in normal mice produced depressive behaviors, mimicking chronic stress effects, whereas siRNA-mediated suppression of either TRH or TRHR1 in the BLA completely blocked stress-induced depressive symptoms. The TRHR1 agonist, taltirelin, injection in the BLA increased the level of p-ERK, which mimicked the increased p-ERK level in the BLA that was induced by treatment with repeated stress. Stereotaxic injection of U0126, a potent inhibitor of the ERK pathway, within the BLA blocked stress-induced behavioral depression. These results suggest that repeated stress produces lasting depression-like behaviors via the up-regulation of TRH and TRH receptors in the BLA.

  17. Repeated exposure to amphetamine during adolescence alters inhibitory tone in the medial prefrontal cortex following drug re-exposure in adulthood

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    Cox, Charles L.; Gulley, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization following repeated amphetamine (AMPH) exposure is associated with changes in GABA function in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In rats exposed to AMPH during adolescence compared to adulthood, there are unique patterns of sensitization that may reflect age-dependent differences in drug effects on prefrontal GABAergic function. In the current study, we used a sensitizing regimen of repeated AMPH exposure in adolescent and adult rats to determine if a post-withdrawal AMPH challenge would alter inhibitory transmission in the mPFC in a manner that depends on age of exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with saline or 3 mg/kg AMPH (i.p.) during adolescence [postnatal day (P) 27 to P45] or adulthood (P85 to P103) and were sacrificed either at similar ages in adulthood (~P133; Experiment 1) or after similar withdrawal times (3-4 weeks; Experiment 2). Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) were recorded in vitro from deep layer pyramidal cells in the mPFC using the whole-cell configuration. We found no effect of AMPH pre-exposure on baseline sIPSC frequency. Subsequent application of AMPH (25 μM) produced a stable increase in sIPSC frequency in controls, suggesting that AMPH increases inhibitory tone in the mPFC. However, AMPH failed to increase sIPSCs in adolescent- or adult-exposed rats. In Experiment 2, where withdrawal period was kept similar for both exposure groups, AMPH induced a suppression of sIPSC activity in adolescent-exposed rats. These results suggest that sensitizing treatment with AMPH during adolescence or adulthood dampens inhibitory influences on mPFC pyramidal cells, but potentially through different mechanisms. PMID:27085589

  18. Repeated morphine treatment alters polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule, glutamate decarboxylase-67 expression and cell proliferation in the adult rat hippocampus.

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    Kahn, Laëtitia; Alonso, Gérard; Normand, Elisabeth; Manzoni, Olivier J

    2005-01-01

    Altered synaptic transmission and plasticity in brain areas involved in reward and learning are thought to underlie the long-lasting effects of addictive drugs. In support of this idea, opiates reduce neurogenesis [A.J. Eisch et al. (2000) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 97, 7579-7584] and enhance long-term potentiation in adult rodent hippocampus [J.M. Harrison et al. (2002) Journal of Neurophysiology, 87, 2464-2470], a key structure of learning and memory processes. Here we studied how repeated morphine treatment and withdrawal affect cell proliferation and neuronal phenotypes in the dentate gyrus-CA3 region of the adult rat hippocampus. Our data showed a strong reduction of cellular proliferation in morphine-dependent animals (54% of control) that was followed by a rebound increase after 1 week withdrawal and a return to normal after 2 weeks withdrawal. Morphine dependence was also associated with a drastic reduction in the expression levels of the polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule (68% of control), an adhesion molecule expressed by newly generated neurons and involved in cell migration and structural plasticity. Polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule levels quickly returned to normal following withdrawal. In morphine-dependent rats, we found a significant increase of glutamate decarboxylase-67 mRNA transcription (170% of control) in dentate gyrus granular cells which was followed by a marked rebound decrease after 1 week withdrawal and a return to normal after 4 weeks withdrawal. Together, the results show, for the first time, that, in addition to reducing cell proliferation and neurogenesis, chronic exposure to morphine dramatically alters neuronal phenotypes in the dentate gyrus-CA3 region of the adult rat hippocampus.

  19. Knockdown of interleukin-1 receptor type-1 on endothelial cells attenuated stress-induced neuroinflammation and prevented anxiety-like behavior.

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    Wohleb, Eric S; Patterson, Jenna M; Sharma, Vikram; Quan, Ning; Godbout, Jonathan P; Sheridan, John F

    2014-02-12

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is an inflammatory cytokine that plays a prominent role in stress-induced behavioral changes. In a model of repeated social defeat (RSD), elevated IL-1β expression in the brain was associated with recruitment of primed macrophages that were necessary for development of anxiety-like behavior. Moreover, microglia activation and anxiety-like behavior associated with RSD did not occur in IL-1 receptor type-1 knock-out (IL-1R1(KO)) mice. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the role of IL-1 signaling in RSD-induced macrophage trafficking to the brain and anxiety-like behavior. Initial studies revealed that RSD did not increase circulating myeloid cells in IL-1R1(KO) mice, resulting in limited macrophage trafficking to the brain. In addition, IL-1R1(KO) bone marrow-chimera mice showed that IL-1R1 expression was essential for macrophage trafficking into the brain. To differentiate cellular mediators of stress-induced IL-1 signaling, endothelial-specific IL-1R1 knock-down (eIL-1R1kd) mice were used. Both wild-type (WT) and eIL-1R1kd mice had increased circulating monocytes, recruitment of macrophages to the brain, and altered microglia activation after RSD. Nonetheless, RSD-induced expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 mRNA in brain CD11b(+) cells was attenuated in eIL-1R1kd mice compared with WT. Moreover, anxiety-like behavior did not develop in eIL-1R1kd mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that there was limited RSD-induced priming of myeloid cells in IL-1R1(KO) mice and disrupted propagation of neuroinflammatory signals in the brain of eIL-1R1kd mice. Furthermore, these data showed that transduction of IL-1 signaling by endothelial cells potentiates stress-induced neuroinflammation and promotes anxiety-like behavior.

  20. Hyperosmotic Stress-induced ATF-2 Activation through Polo-like Kinase 3 in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Payton, Reid; Dai, Wei; Lu, Luo

    2011-01-01

    Elevated extracellular solute concentration (hyperosmotic stress) perturbs cell function and stimulates cell responses by evoking MAPK cascades and activating AP-1 transcription complex resulting in alterations of gene expression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. The results presented here demonstrate that hyperosmotic stress elicited increases in ATF-2 phosphorylation through a novel Polo-like kinase 3 (Plk3) pathway in human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells. We found in hyperosmotic stress-induced HCE cells that Plk3 transferred to the nuclear compartment and was colocalized with ATF-2 in nuclei. Kinase activity of Plk3 was significantly activated by hyperosmotic stimulation. Further downstream, active Plk3 phosphorylated ATF-2 at the Thr-71 site in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of Plk3 and its mutants enhanced hyperosmotic stress-induced ATF-2 phosphorylation. In contrast, suppression of Plk3 by knocking down Plk3 mRNA effectively diminished the effect of hyperosmotic stress-induced ATF-2 phosphorylation. The effect of hyperosmotic stress-induced activation of Plk3 on ATF-2 transcription factor function was also examined in CRE reporter-overexpressed HCE cells. Our results for the first time reveal that hyperosmotic stress can activate the Plk3 signaling pathway that subsequently regulates the AP-1 complex by directly phosphorylating ATF-2 independent from the effects of JNK and p38 activation. PMID:21098032

  1. Hyperosmotic stress-induced ATF-2 activation through Polo-like kinase 3 in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Payton, Reid; Dai, Wei; Lu, Luo

    2011-01-21

    Elevated extracellular solute concentration (hyperosmotic stress) perturbs cell function and stimulates cell responses by evoking MAPK cascades and activating AP-1 transcription complex resulting in alterations of gene expression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. The results presented here demonstrate that hyperosmotic stress elicited increases in ATF-2 phosphorylation through a novel Polo-like kinase 3 (Plk3) pathway in human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells. We found in hyperosmotic stress-induced HCE cells that Plk3 transferred to the nuclear compartment and was colocalized with ATF-2 in nuclei. Kinase activity of Plk3 was significantly activated by hyperosmotic stimulation. Further downstream, active Plk3 phosphorylated ATF-2 at the Thr-71 site in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of Plk3 and its mutants enhanced hyperosmotic stress-induced ATF-2 phosphorylation. In contrast, suppression of Plk3 by knocking down Plk3 mRNA effectively diminished the effect of hyperosmotic stress-induced ATF-2 phosphorylation. The effect of hyperosmotic stress-induced activation of Plk3 on ATF-2 transcription factor function was also examined in CRE reporter-overexpressed HCE cells. Our results for the first time reveal that hyperosmotic stress can activate the Plk3 signaling pathway that subsequently regulates the AP-1 complex by directly phosphorylating ATF-2 independent from the effects of JNK and p38 activation.

  2. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were ap...

  3. Implication of snail in metabolic stress-induced necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Hee Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Necrosis, a type of cell death accompanied by the rupture of the plasma membrane, promotes tumor progression and aggressiveness by releasing the pro-inflammatory and angiogenic cytokine high mobility group box 1. It is commonly found in the core region of solid tumors due to hypoxia and glucose depletion (GD resulting from insufficient vascularization. Thus, metabolic stress-induced necrosis has important clinical implications for tumor development; however, its regulatory mechanisms have been poorly investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that the transcription factor Snail, a key regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is induced in a reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent manner in both two-dimensional culture of cancer cells, including A549, HepG2, and MDA-MB-231, in response to GD and the inner regions of a multicellular tumor spheroid system, an in vitro model of solid tumors and of human tumors. Snail short hairpin (sh RNA inhibited metabolic stress-induced necrosis in two-dimensional cell culture and in multicellular tumor spheroid system. Snail shRNA-mediated necrosis inhibition appeared to be linked to its ability to suppress metabolic stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition, which are the primary events that trigger necrosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Snail is implicated in metabolic stress-induced necrosis, providing a new function for Snail in tumor progression.

  4. Reproductive stage and modulation of stress-induced tau phosphorylation in female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Danielle; Ramos, Eugenia; Campbell, Shannon N.; Morales, Teresa; Rissman, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is implicated as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. While the specific mechanisms linking stress exposure and AD vulnerability have yet to be fully elucidated, our lab and others have shown that acute and repeated restraint stress in rodents leads to an increase in hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) and tau insolubility, a critical component of tau pathology in AD. Tau phosphorylation induced by a psychological stressor is reversible and is thought to be dependent on intact signaling through the type 1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor, but how sex steroids or other modulators may also modulate this effect are unknown. A naturally occurring attenuation of stress response is observed in female rats at the end of pregnancy and throughout lactation. To test the hypothesis that decreased sensitivity to stress during lactation modulates stress-induced tau-P, cohorts of virgin, lactating, and weaned female rats were subjected to 30 minutes of restraint stress or no stress (control), and were sacrificed at 20 minutes or 24 hours after the episode. Exposure to restraint stress induced a significant decrease in tau-P in the hippocampus of lactating rats sacrificed 20 minutes after stress compared to lactating controls and virgins subjected to stress treatment. Lactating rats sacrificed 24 hours after exposure to restraint stress showed a significant increase in tau-P compared to the restraint-stressed lactating rats sacrificed only 20 minutes after stress exposure, expressing phosphorylation levels similar to control animals. Further, GSK3-α levels were significantly decreased in stressed lactating animals at both timepoints. This suggests a steep, yet transient stress-induced dephosphorylation of tau, influenced by GSK3, in the hippocampus of lactating rats. PMID:26510116

  5. Stress-induced cortisol secretion impairs detection performance in x-ray baggage screening for hidden weapons by screening novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Livia; Schwaninger, Adrian; Heimgartner, Nadja; Hedinger, Patrik; Hofer, Franziska; Ehlert, Ulrike; Wirtz, Petra H

    2014-09-01

    Aviation security strongly depends on screeners' performance in the detection of threat objects in x-ray images of passenger bags. We examined for the first time the effects of stress and stress-induced cortisol increases on detection performance of hidden weapons in an x-ray baggage screening task. We randomly assigned 48 participants either to a stress or a nonstress group. The stress group was exposed to a standardized psychosocial stress test (TSST). Before and after stress/nonstress, participants had to detect threat objects in a computer-based object recognition test (X-ray ORT). We repeatedly measured salivary cortisol and X-ray ORT performance before and after stress/nonstress. Cortisol increases in reaction to psychosocial stress induction but not to nonstress independently impaired x-ray detection performance. Our results suggest that stress-induced cortisol increases at peak reactivity impair x-ray screening performance. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  6. Melatonin attenuates stress-induced defecation: lesson from a rat model of stress-induced gut dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, G H; Gwee, K A; Moochhala, S M; Ho, K Y

    2005-10-01

    Melatonin is known to alleviate stress and modulate gut motility. We investigated the modulating effects of melatonin on stress-induced gut dysfunction. One hundred Wistar rats were randomly assigned to five equal groups, receiving intraperitoneal injections of 0, 1, 10, 100 or 1000 microg kg(-1) melatonin, respectively. Fifteen minutes later, each group was divided again into four subgroups receiving no treatment, 0.25 mg luzindole (a non-selective melatonin receptor antagonist) intraperitoneally, wrap-restraint stress, and 10 mg kg(-1) serotonin intraperitoneally, respectively. Two hours later, serum serotonin, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and melatonin levels, and faecal output were recorded. Results showed that intraperitoneal melatonin increased faecal output, but this effect was abolished by luzindole. In wrap-restraint group, prior intraperitoneal melatonin at doses of 100 or 1000 microg kg(-1) significantly inhibited stress-induced defecation. This effect was associated with corresponding reductions in serum serotonin and CRF concentrations. In serotonin-treated group, serotonin-induced defecation was also inhibited by melatonin. In conclusion, melatonin exhibited an excitatory effect on bowel output in rats placed under resting state, while attenuated defecation in those subjected to wrap-restraint stress or serotonin treatment. The inhibitory effects of melatonin on stress-induced defecation may stem from its antagonistic effect on stress-induced enhancement of serotonin and CRF secretion.

  7. Stress-Induced Premature Senescence or Stress-Induced Senescence-Like Phenotype: One In Vivo Reality, Two Possible Definitions?

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    Olivier Toussaint

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available No consensus exists so far on the definition of cellular senescence. The narrowest definition of senescence is irreversible growth arrest triggered by telomere shortening counting cell generations (definition 1. Other authors gave an enlarged functional definition encompassing any kind of irreversible arrest of proliferative cell types induced by damaging agents or cell cycle deregulations after overexpression of proto-oncogenes (definition 2. As stress increases, the proportion of cells in “stress-induced premature senescence-like phenotype” according to definition 1 or “stress-induced premature senescence,” according to definition 2, should increase when a culture reaches growth arrest, and the proportion of cells that reached telomere-dependent replicative senescence due to the end-replication problem should decrease. Stress-induced premature senescence-like phenotype and telomere-dependent replicatively senescent cells share basic similarities such as irreversible growth arrest and resistance to apoptosis, which may appear through different pathways. Irreversible growth arrest after exposure to oxidative stress and generation of DNA damage could be as efficient in avoiding immortalisation as “telomere-dependent” replicative senescence. Probabilities are higher that the senescent cells (according to definition 2 appearing in vivo are in stress-induced premature senescence rather than in telomere-dependent replicative senescence. Examples are given suggesting these cells affect in vivo tissue (pathophysiology and aging.

  8. Effect of water deprivation on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels in the Children's python (Antaresia childreni).

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    Dupoué, Andréaz; Angelier, Frédéric; Lourdais, Olivier; Bonnet, Xavier; Brischoux, François

    2014-02-01

    Corticosterone (CORT) secretion is influenced by endogenous factors (e.g., physiological status) and environmental stressors (e.g., ambient temperature). Heretofore, the impact of water deprivation on CORT plasma levels has not been thoroughly investigated. However, both baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT are expected to respond to water deprivation not only because of hydric stress per se, but also because CORT is an important mineralocorticoid in vertebrates. We assessed the effects of water deprivation on baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT, in Children's pythons (Antaresia childreni), a species that experiences seasonal droughts in natural conditions. We imposed a 52-day water deprivation on a group of unfed Children's pythons (i.e., water-deprived treatment) and provided water ad libitum to another group (i.e., control treatment). We examined body mass variations throughout the experiment, and baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT at the end of the treatments. Relative body mass loss averaged ~10% in pythons without water, a value 2 to 4 times higher compared to control snakes. Following re-exposition to water, pythons from the water-deprived treatment drank readily and abundantly and attained a body mass similar to pythons from the control treatment. Together, these results suggest a substantial dehydration as a consequence of water deprivation. Interestingly, stress-induced but not baseline CORT level was significantly higher in water-deprived snakes, suggesting that baseline CORT might not respond to this degree of dehydration. Therefore, possible mineralocorticoid role of CORT needs to be clarified in snakes. Because dehydration usually induces adjustments (reduced movements, lowered body temperature) to limit water loss, and decreases locomotor performances, elevated stress-induced CORT in water-deprived snakes might therefore compensate for altered locomotor performances. Future studies should test this hypothesis.

  9. GAD65 haplodeficiency conveys resilience in animal models of stress-induced psychopathology

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    Iris eMüller

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic mechanisms are critically involved in the control of fear and anxiety, but their role in the development of stress-induced psychopathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and mood disorders is not sufficiently understood. We studied these functions in two established mouse models of risk factors for stress-induced psychopathologies employing variable juvenile stress and/or social isolation. A battery of emotional tests in adulthood revealed the induction of contextually generalized fear, anxiety, hyperarousal and depression-like symptoms in these paradigms. These reflect the multitude and complexity of stress effects in human PTSD patients. With factor analysis we were able to identify parameters that reflect these different behavioral domains in stressed animals and thus provide a basis for an integrated scoring of affectedness more closely resembling the clinical situation than isolated parameters. To test the applicability of these models to genetic approaches we further tested the role of GABA using heterozygous mice with targeted mutation of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD65 (GAD65+/- mice, which show a delayed postnatal increase in tissue GABA content in limbic and cortical brain areas. Unexpectedly, GAD65(+/- mice did not show changes in exploratory activity regardless of the stressor type and were after the variable juvenile stress procedure protected from the development of contextual generalization in an auditory fear conditioning experiment. Our data demonstrate the complex nature of behavioral alterations in rodent models of stress-related psychopathologies and suggest that GAD65 haplodeficiency, likely through its effect on the postnatal maturation of GABAergic transmission, conveys resilience to some of these stress-induced effects.

  10. Calcium channel blocker prevents stress-induced activation of renin and aldosterone in conscious pig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceremuzynski, L.K.; Klos, J.; Barcikowski, B.; Herbaczynska-Cedro, K. (Department of Cardiology, Postgraduate Medical School, Warsaw (Poland))

    1991-06-01

    A considerable amount of data suggest the involvement of calcium-mediated processes in the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAA) cascade. To investigate the effect of calcium-channel inhibition on the RAA system, the authors studied 21 conscious pigs. Blood renin and aldosterone levels increased by subjecting animals to 24 hours of immobilization stress. Renin and aldosterone levels were repeatedly measured by radioimmunoassay in blood samples taken periodically over 24 hours from a chronically implanted arterial cannula. Pretreatment of the animals (N = 11) with nisoldipine, 2 {times} 20 mg p.o. daily for 2 days before and on the day of immobilization, transiently attenuated the stress-induced increase of plasma renin activity and completely prevented the rise of aldosterone, as compared to nontreated controls (N = 10). The finding that nisoldipine suppresses RAA activation induced by a nonpharmacologic stimulus in the conscious intact animal may have clinical implications.

  11. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy in the absence of complaints

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    N. M. Butkevich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced cardiomyopathy or Takotsubo cardiomyopathy that generally runs with the clinical manifestations of acute coronary syndrome and left ventricular asynergy, which are caused by emotional, psychological, or physical stress, is most frequently encountered among the unclassified cardiomyopathies. A clinical case of this myocardial lesion without clinical manifestations, but with transient electrocardiographic changes and evident impairment of left ventricular contraction is described.

  12. Stress-induced neuroinflammation: mechanisms and new pharmacological targets

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    C.D. Munhoz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress is triggered by numerous unexpected environmental, social or pathological stimuli occurring during the life of animals, including humans, which determine changes in all of their systems. Although acute stress is essential for survival, chronic, long-lasting stress can be detrimental. In this review, we present data supporting the hypothesis that stress-related events are characterized by modifications of oxidative/nitrosative pathways in the brain in response to the activation of inflammatory mediators. Recent findings indicate a key role for nitric oxide (NO and an excess of pro-oxidants in various brain areas as responsible for both neuronal functional impairment and structural damage. Similarly, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, another known source of oxidants, may account for stress-induced brain damage. Interestingly, some of the COX-2-derived mediators, such as the prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 and its peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptor PPARγ, are activated in the brain in response to stress, constituting a possible endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanism of defense against excessive inflammation. The stress-induced activation of both biochemical pathways depends on the activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA glutamate receptor and on the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB. In the case of inducible NO synthase (iNOS, release of the cytokine TNF-α also accounts for its expression. Different pharmacological strategies directed towards different sites in iNOS or COX-2 pathways have been shown to be neuroprotective in stress-induced brain damage: NMDA receptor blockers, inhibitors of TNF-α activation and release, inhibitors of NFκB, specific inhibitors of iNOS and COX-2 activities and PPARγ agonists. This article reviews recent contributions to this area addressing possible new pharmacological targets for the treatment of stress-induced neuropsychiatric disorders.

  13. Calnexin deficiency and endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppini, Anna; Groenendyk, Jody; Cormack, Lori A; Shore, Gordon; Opas, Michal; Bleackley, R Chris; Michalak, Marek

    2002-02-26

    In this study, we used calnexin-deficient cells to investigate the role of this protein in ER stress-induced apoptosis. We found that calnexin-deficient cells are relatively resistant to ER stress-induced apoptosis. However, caspase 3 and 8 cleavage and cytochrome c release were unchanged in these cells, indicating that ER to mitochondria "communication" during apoptotic stimulation is not affected in the absence of calnexin. The Bcl-2:Bax ratio was also not significantly changed in calnexin-deficient cells regardless of whether the ER stress was induced with thapsigargin or not. Ca(2+) homeostasis and ER morphology were unaffected by the lack of calnexin, but ER stress-induced Bap31 cleavage was significantly inhibited. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Bap31 forms complexes with calnexin, which may play a role in apoptosis. The results suggest that calnexin may not play a role in the initiation of the ER stress but that the protein has an effect on later apoptotic events via its influence on Bap31 function.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibition abolishes stress-induced spatial memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-López, Viviana; Lamprea, Marisol R; Múnera, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    Acute stress induced before spatial training impairs memory consolidation. Although non-epigenetic underpinning of such effect has been described, the epigenetic mechanisms involved have not yet been studied. Since spatial training and intense stress have opposite effects on histone acetylation balance, it is conceivable that disruption of such balance may underlie acute stress-induced spatial memory consolidation impairment and that inhibiting histone deacetylases prevents such effect. Trichostatin-A (TSA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor) was used to test its effectiveness in preventing stress' deleterious effect on memory. Male Wistar rats were trained in a spatial task in the Barnes maze; 1-h movement restraint was applied to half of them before training. Immediately after training, stressed and non-stressed animals were randomly assigned to receive either TSA (1mg/kg) or vehicle intraperitoneal injection. Twenty-four hours after training, long-term spatial memory was tested; plasma and brain tissue were collected immediately after the memory test to evaluate corticosterone levels and histone H3 acetylation in several brain areas. Stressed animals receiving vehicle displayed memory impairment, increased plasma corticosterone levels and markedly reduced histone H3 acetylation in prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Such effects did not occur in stressed animals treated with TSA. The aforementioned results support the hypothesis that acute stress induced-memory impairment is related to histone deacetylation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

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    Faiza Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98% on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  16. Chronic psychosocial stress induces visceral hyperalgesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramullas, Mónica; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2012-05-01

    Experimental and clinical evidence has shown that chronic stress plays an important role in the onset and/or exacerbation of symptoms of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Here, we aimed to investigate whether exposure to a chronic and temporally unpredictable psychosocial stressor alters visceral and somatic nociception as well as anxiety-related behaviour. In male C57BL/6J mice, chronic stress was induced by repeated exposure to social defeat (SD, 2 h) and overcrowding (OC, 24 h) during 19 consecutive days. Visceral and somatic nociception was evaluated by colorectal distension and a hot plate, respectively. The social interaction test was used to assess social anxiety. Mice exposed to psychosocial stress developed visceral hyperalgesia and somatic hypoalgesia 24 h following the last stress session. SD/OC mice also exhibited social anxiety-like behaviour. All these changes were also associated with physiological alterations, measured as a decreased faecal pellet output and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis disruption. Taken together, these data confirm that this mouse model of chronic psychosocial stress may be useful for studies on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying such stress-associated disorders and to further test potential therapies.

  17. Reno-protective effect of garlic extract against immobilization stress induced changes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed; Kashif; Zaidi; Shakeel; Ahmed; Ansari; Ghulam; Md.Ashraf; Mohammad; Alam; Jafri; Shams; Tabrez; Naheed; Banu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine immobilization stress-induced antioxidant defense alterations in rat kidney and the antioxidant effects of aqueous garlic extract in pre and post stress extract treatments. Methods: Albino rats were treated with aqueous extract of garlic both before and 6 h of immobilization stress. Pro-oxidant eminence of rat kidney was assessed by determining the levels of glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, glucose, uric acid, alkaline phosphatase and antioxidant enzymes activities. Results: In response to 6 h of immobilization stress, a significant rise in the level of kidney enzymes was recorded. However, antioxidant enzyme activities showed a sharp decline. Conclusions: The extract treatment before and after the stress reverted the activities of above mentioned enzymes towards their control values. Hence, garlic extract can be given as nutritional supplement for scavenging the free radicals generated in rat kidney.

  18. Evidence of stress-induced hydrogen ordering in zirconium hydrides

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    Steuwer, A. [FaME38 at the ESRF-ILL, 6 rue J Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); ESS Scandinavia, University of Lund, Stora Algatan 4, 22350 Lund (Sweden)], E-mail: steuwer@ill.fr; Santisteban, J.R. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, CNEA, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Preuss, M. [University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Peel, M.J.; Buslaps, T. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue J Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Harada, M. [R and D Section, Chofu-Kita Plant, Kobe Special Tube Co, Shimonoseki 752-0953 (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    The formation of hydrides in zirconium alloys significantly affects their mechanical properties and is considered to play a critical role in their failure mechanisms, yet relatively little is known about the micromechanical behavior of hydrides in the bulk. This paper presents the result of in situ uniaxial mechanical tensioning experiments on hydrided zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 specimens using energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction, which suggests that a stress-induced transformation of the {delta}-hydride to {gamma}-hydride via ordering of the hydrogen atoms occurs, akin to a Snoek-type relaxation. Subsequent annealing was found to reverse the ordering phenomenon.

  19. STRESS INDUCED NITROGEN DIFFUSION IN NITRITED CoCr ALLOY

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    AKVILĖ PETRAITIENĖ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the nitrogen transport mechanism in plasma nitrited CoCr alloy at moderate temperature ( 400ºC is explained by non-Fickian diffusion model. This mechanism is considered by stress induced diffusion model. The model involves diffusion of nitrogen induced by internal stresses created during nitriding process. The model considers the diffusion of nitrogen in the presence of  internal stresses gradient induced by penetrating nitrogen as the next driving force of diffusion after concentration gradient. This model is commonly used for analysis of stainless steel nitriding, however, in this work it is shown that the same nitrogen penetration mechanism takes place in CoCr alloy. For mathematical description of stress induced diffusion process the equation of baro-diffusion is used which involves concentration dependant baro-diffusion concentration. For calculation of stress gradient it is assumed that stress depth profile linearly relates with nitrogen concentration depth profile. The fitting is done using experimental curves of nitrogen depth profiles for medical grade CoCr alloy (ISO 5831-12 nitrited at 400 ºC temperature. The experimental curves are taken from literature. The nitriding duration was 2h, 6h, 20h. Calculated nitrogen depth profiles in CoCr alloy are in good agreement with experimental nitrogen depth profiles.  The diffusion coefficient D is found from fitting of experimental data.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5711

  20. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo – broken heart and mind?

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    Redfors B

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Björn Redfors, Yangzhen Shao, Elmir Omerovic Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract: Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by severe but potentially reversible regional left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, ie, akinesia, in the absence of explanatory angiographic evidence of a coronary occlusion. The typical pattern is that of an akinetic apex with preserved contractions in the base, but other variants are also common, including basal or midmyocardial akinesia with preserved apical function. The pathophysiology of SIC remains largely unknown but catecholamines are believed to play a pivotal role. The diverse array of triggering events that have been linked to SIC are arbitrarily categorized as either emotional or somatic stressors. These categories can be considered as different elements of a continuous spectrum, linked through the interface of neurology and psychiatry. This paper reviews our current knowledge of SIC, with focus on the intimate relationship between the brain and the heart. Keywords: stress-induced cardiomyopathy, takotsubo cardiomyopathy, catecholamine, cerebral injury, emotional stress, somatic stress

  1. Cellular and Molecular Basis for Stress-Induced Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji-Seon; Wei, Jing; Qin, Luye; Kim, Yong; Yan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress plays a crucial role in the development of psychiatric diseases, such as anxiety and depression. Dysfunction of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been linked to the cognitive and emotional deficits induced by stress. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular determinants in mPFC for stress-associated mental disorders. Here we show that chronic restraint stress induces the selective loss of p11 (also known as annexin II light chain, S100A10), a multifunctional protein binding to 5-HT receptors, in layer II/III neurons of the prelimbic cortex (PrL), as well as depression-like behaviors, both of which are reversed by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the tricyclic class of antidepressant (TCA) agents. In layer II/III of the PrL, p11 is highly concentrated in dopamine D2 receptor-expressing (D2+) glutamatergic neurons. Viral expression of p11 in D2+ PrL neurons alleviates the depression-like behaviors exhibited by genetically manipulated mice with D2+ neuron-specific or global deletion of p11. In stressed animals, overexpression of p11 in D2+ PrL neurons rescues depression-like behaviors by restoring glutamatergic transmission. Our results have identified p11 as a key molecule in a specific cell type that regulates stress-induced depression, which provides a framework for the development of new strategies to treat stress-associated mental illnesses. PMID:27457815

  2. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, Sophie [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); ED515 UPMC, 4 place Jussieu 75005 Paris (France); Sliwa, Dominika [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Rustin, Pierre [Inserm, U676, Physiopathology and Therapy of Mitochondrial Disease Laboratory, 75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Faculte de Medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Camadro, Jean-Michel [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Santos, Renata, E-mail: santos.renata@ijm.univ-paris-diderot.fr [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  3. Neuromodulator and Emotion Biomarker for Stress Induced Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeng Gu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective disorders are a leading cause of disabilities worldwide, and the etiology of these many affective disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder is due to hormone changes, which includes hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the peripheral nervous system and neuromodulators in the central nervous system. Consistent with pharmacological studies indicating that medical treatment acts by increasing the concentration of catecholamine, the locus coeruleus (LC/norepinephrine (NE system is regarded as a critical part of the central “stress circuitry,” whose major function is to induce “fight or flight” behavior and fear and anger emotion. Despite the intensive studies, there is still controversy about NE with fear and anger. For example, the rats with LC ablation were more reluctant to leave a familiar place and took longer to consume the food pellets in an unfamiliar place (neophobia, i.e., fear in response to novelty. The reason for this discrepancy might be that NE is not only for flight (fear, but also for fight (anger. Here, we try to review recent literatures about NE with stress induced emotions and their relations with mental disorders. We propose that stress induced NE release can induce both fear and anger. “Adrenaline rush or norepinephrine rush” and fear and anger emotion might act as biomarkers for mental disorders.

  4. Inheritance of stress-induced, ATF-2-dependent epigenetic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Ki-Hyeon; Li, Dong; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2011-06-24

    Atf1, the fission yeast homolog of activation transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), contributes to heterochromatin formation. However, the role of ATF-2 in chromatin assembly in higher organisms remains unknown. This study reveals that Drosophila ATF-2 (dATF-2) is required for heterochromatin assembly, whereas the stress-induced phosphorylation of dATF-2, via Mekk1-p38, disrupts heterochromatin. The dATF-2 protein colocalized with HP1, not only on heterochromatin but also at specific loci in euchromatin. Heat shock or osmotic stress induced phosphorylation of dATF-2 and resulted in its release from heterochromatin. This heterochromatic disruption was an epigenetic event that was transmitted to the next generation in a non-Mendelian fashion. When embryos were exposed to heat stress over multiple generations, the defective chromatin state was maintained over multiple successive generations, though it gradually returned to the normal state. The results suggest a mechanism by which the effects of stress are inherited epigenetically via the regulation of a tight chromatin structure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. L -sulpiride, at antidepressant dosage, prevents conditioned-fear stress-induced gastric lesions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, A; De Pol A; Poggioli, R; Cavazzuti, E; Arletti, R; Bertolini, A; Vergoni, A V

    2000-08-01

    It has been previously shown that long-term treatment with low doses of l-sulpiride is highly effective in rat models of depression and of anticipatory anxiety/panic behavior. The present study was aimed at investigating whether the same treatment can prevent the ulcerogenic effect of repeated inescapable stresses. In adult rats, the repeated (7 consecutive days) exposure to an uncontrollable stressful condition (inescapable 2.5 mA scrambled shock for 60 s) produced the development of gastric lesions (multiple punctiform telangiectasias in all rats, with superficial erosions or more severe ulcerations in 10 out 13 rats; score 4.67 +/- 0.44). l-sulpiride, intraperitoneally injected once a day at an antidepressant dose level (4 mg kg(-1) per day), starting 21 days before the beginning of the 7-day sequence of inescapable punishments ( = 28 daily treatments), almost completely prevented the stress-induced gastric injury (score 1.67 +/- 0.29; Psulpiride prevents the development of gastric lesions induced by chronic exposure to uncontrollable stress.

  6. Basolateral amygdala bidirectionally modulates stress-induced hippocampal learning and memory deficits through a p25/Cdk5-dependent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rei, Damien; Mason, Xenos; Seo, Jinsoo; Gräff, Johannes; Rudenko, Andrii; Wang, Jun; Rueda, Richard; Siegert, Sandra; Cho, Sukhee; Canter, Rebecca G.; Mungenast, Alison E.; Deisseroth, Karl; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Repeated stress has been suggested to underlie learning and memory deficits via the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and the hippocampus; however, the functional contribution of BLA inputs to the hippocampus and their molecular repercussions are not well understood. Here we show that repeated stress is accompanied by generation of the Cdk5 (cyclin-dependent kinase 5)-activator p25, up-regulation and phosphorylation of glucocorticoid receptors, increased HDAC2 expression, and reduced expression of memory-related genes in the hippocampus. A combination of optogenetic and pharmacosynthetic approaches shows that BLA activation is both necessary and sufficient for stress-associated molecular changes and memory impairments. Furthermore, we show that this effect relies on direct glutamatergic projections from the BLA to the dorsal hippocampus. Finally, we show that p25 generation is necessary for the stress-induced memory dysfunction. Taken together, our data provide a neural circuit model for stress-induced hippocampal memory deficits through BLA activity-dependent p25 generation. PMID:25995364

  7. Artifically inserting a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of Marek's disease virus (MDV) alters expression of nearby MDV genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) was inserted into the very virulent Marek’s disease virus (MDV) Md5 bacterial artificial chromosome clone. The insertion site was nearly identical to the REV LTR that was naturally inserted into the JM/102W strain of MDV fo...

  8. Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of a very virulent Marek's disease virus alters its pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co-cultivation of strain JM/102W of Marek’s disease virus (MDV) with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in the generation of a recombinant MDV containing REV long terminal repeat (LTR) named RM1 strain of MDV; a strain that was highly attenuated for oncogenicity, but induced severe bursal an...

  9. Antidepressant imipramine diminishes stress-induced inflammation in the periphery and central nervous system and related anxiety- and depressive- like behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Karol; Sheridan, John F

    2016-10-01

    In order to relieve anxiety and depression accompanying stress, physicians resort to tricyclic antidepressants, such as imipramine. We had previously shown that imipramine reversed stress-induced social avoidance behavior, and down-regulated microglial activation 24days after stress cessation. To further characterize the effects of imipramine on stress induced neuroimmune dysregulation and associated changes in behavior, the aims of this study were to determine if imipramine 1) ameliorated stress-induced inflammation in the periphery and central nervous system, and 2) prevented stress related anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. C57BL/6 mice were treated with imipramine (15mg/kg) in their drinking water, and exposed to repeated social defeat (RSD). Imipramine attenuated stress-induced corticosterone and IL-6 responses in plasma. Imipramine decreased the percentage of monocytes and granulocytes in the bone marrow and circulation. However, imipramine did not prevent splenomegaly, stress-related increased percentage of granulocytes in this organ, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the spleen, following RSD. Moreover, imipramine abrogated the accumulation of macrophages in the brain in mice exposed to RSD. Imipramine blocked neuroinflammatory signaling and prevented stress-related anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. These data support the notion that pharmacomodulation of the monoaminergic system, besides exerting anxiolytic and antidepressant effects, may have therapeutic effects as a neuroimmunomodulator during stress.

  10. Identification of 30 protein species involved in replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierick, Jean François; Kalume, Dário E; Wenders, Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of human proliferative cells to subcytotoxic stress triggers stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) which is characterized by many biomarkers of replicative senescence. Proteomic comparison of replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence indicates that, at the level....... These changes affect different cell functions, including energy metabolism, defense systems, maintenance of the redox potential, cell morphology and transduction pathways.......Exposure of human proliferative cells to subcytotoxic stress triggers stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) which is characterized by many biomarkers of replicative senescence. Proteomic comparison of replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence indicates that, at the level...... of protein expression, stress-induced premature senescence and replicative senescence are different phenotypes sharing however similarities. In this study, we identified 30 proteins showing changes of expression level specific or common to replicative senescence and/or stress-induced premature senescence...

  11. Acute stress-induced cortisol elevations mediate reward system activity during subconscious processing of sexual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, Nicole Y L; Both, Stephanie; van Heemst, Diana; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Stress is thought to alter motivational processes by increasing dopamine (DA) secretion in the brain's "reward system", and its key region, the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). However, stress studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), mainly found evidence for stress-induced decreases in NAcc responsiveness toward reward cues. Results from both animal and human PET studies indicate that the stress hormone cortisol may be crucial in the interaction between stress and dopaminergic actions. In the present study we therefore investigated whether cortisol mediated the effect of stress on DA-related responses to -subliminal-presentation of reward cues using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), which is known to reliably enhance cortisol levels. Young healthy males (n = 37) were randomly assigned to the TSST or control condition. After stress induction, brain activation was assessed using fMRI during a backward-masking paradigm in which potentially rewarding (sexual), emotionally negative and neutral stimuli were presented subliminally, masked by pictures of inanimate objects. A region of interest analysis showed that stress decreased activation in the NAcc in response to masked sexual cues (voxel-corrected, pcortisol levels were related to stronger NAcc activation, showing that cortisol acted as a suppressor variable in the negative relation between stress and NAcc activation. The present findings indicate that cortisol is crucially involved in the relation between stress and the responsiveness of the reward system. Although generally stress decreases activation in the NAcc in response to rewarding stimuli, high stress-induced cortisol levels suppress this relation, and are associated with stronger NAcc activation. Individuals with a high cortisol response to stress might on one hand be protected against reductions in reward sensitivity, which has been linked to anhedonia and depression, but they may ultimately be more vulnerable to increased reward

  12. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebhard, Catherine; Staehli, Barbara E. [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Shi, Yi; Camici, Giovanni G.; Akhmedov, Alexander; Hoegger, Lisa; Lohmann, Christine [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Matter, Christian M. [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Malinski, Tadeusz [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Luescher, Thomas F. [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear enzyme PARP-1 is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARP-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated through inhibition of vasoconstrictor prostanoid production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, PARP-1 may play a protective role as antioxidant defense mechanism. -- Abstract: Background: Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key feature of vascular disease. Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Methods: PARP-1(-/-) and PARP-1(+/+) mice were injected with paraquat (PQ; 10 mg/kg i.p.) to induce intracellular oxidative stress. Aortic rings were suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording to analyze vascular function. Results: PQ treatment markedly impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-), but not PARP-1(+/+) mice (p < 0.0001). Maximal relaxation was 45% in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice compared to 79% in PARP-1(+/+) mice. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not altered. After PQ treatment, L-NAME enhanced contractions to norepinephrine by 2.0-fold in PARP-1(-/-) mice, and those to acetylcholine by 3.3-fold, respectively, as compared to PARP-1(+/+) mice. PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PEG-catalase prevented the effect of PQ on endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+) mice. Indomethacin restored endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.05 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+). Conclusion: PARP-1 protects from acute intracellular oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting ROS induced production of vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  13. Heart rate variability and DNA methylation levels are altered after short-term metal fume exposure among occupational welders: a repeated-measures panel study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: In occupational settings, boilermakers are exposed to high levels of metallic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated during the welding process. The effect of welding PM2.5 on heart rate variability (HRV) has been described, but the relationship between PM2.5, DNA methylation, and HRV is not known. Methods: In this repeated-measures panel study, we recorded resting HRV and measured DNA methylation levels in transposable elements Alu and long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE...

  14. Repeated Social Defeat Causes Increased Anxiety-Like Behavior and Alters Splenocyte Function in C57BL/6 and CD-1 Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kinsey, Steven G.; Bailey, Michael T.; Sheridan, John F.; Padgett, David A.; Avitsur, Ronit

    2006-01-01

    The experimental model, social disruption (SDR), is a model of social stress in which mice are repeatedly attacked and defeated in their home cage by an aggressive conspecific. In terms of the impact of this stressor on the immune response, SDR has been reported to cause hyperinflammation and glucocorticoid insensitivity. To this point however, the behavioral consequences of SDR have not been thoroughly characterized. Because social defeat has been reported to cause anxiety- and depressive-li...

  15. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo)--broken heart and mind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfors, Björn; Shao, Yangzhen; Omerovic, Elmir

    2013-01-01

    Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC), also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by severe but potentially reversible regional left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, ie, akinesia, in the absence of explanatory angiographic evidence of a coronary occlusion. The typical pattern is that of an akinetic apex with preserved contractions in the base, but other variants are also common, including basal or midmyocardial akinesia with preserved apical function. The pathophysiology of SIC remains largely unknown but catecholamines are believed to play a pivotal role. The diverse array of triggering events that have been linked to SIC are arbitrarily categorized as either emotional or somatic stressors. These categories can be considered as different elements of a continuous spectrum, linked through the interface of neurology and psychiatry. This paper reviews our current knowledge of SIC, with focus on the intimate relationship between the brain and the heart.

  16. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaviya, Rama [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  17. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    ) antagonist WAY-100635 (WAY) had no effect. The OT response to restraint stress was inhibited by WAY, KET and LY but not by ICS. KET and LY inhibited OT response to dehydration, and LY inhibited OT response to hemorrhage. Neither of the antagonists affected AVP responses to dehydration or hemorrhage, nor......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were...... applied after pretreatment with intracerebroventricular infusion of saline or different 5-HT antagonists. RESULTS: Restraint stress (5 min), hypotensive hemorrhage or dehydration for 24 h increased AVP secretion fivefold and OT secretion threefold. Swim stress for 3 min had no effect on AVP secretion...

  18. Stress-induced obesity and the emotional nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallman, Mary F

    2010-03-01

    Stress and emotional brain networks foster eating behaviors that can lead to obesity. The neural networks underlying the complex interactions among stressors, body, brain and food intake are now better understood. Stressors, by activating a neural stress-response network, bias cognition toward increased emotional activity and degraded executive function. This causes formed habits to be used rather than a cognitive appraisal of responses. Stress also induces secretion of glucocorticoids, which increases motivation for food, and insulin, which promotes food intake and obesity. Pleasurable feeding then reduces activity in the stress-response network, reinforcing the feeding habit. These effects of stressors emphasize the importance of teaching mental reappraisal techniques to restore responses from habitual to thoughtful, thus battling stress-induced obesity.

  19. Neurobiology of Stress-Induced Reproductive Dysfunction In Female Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Centeno, Maria Luisa; Cameron, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    It is now well accepted that stress can precipitate mental and physical illness. However, it is becoming clear that given the same stress, some individuals are very vulnerable and will succumb to illness while others are more resilient and cope effectively, rather than becoming ill. This difference between individuals is called stress sensitivity. Stress-sensitivity of an individual appears to be influenced by genetically inherited factors, early life (even prenatal) stress, and by the presence or absence of factors that provide protection from stress. In comparison to other stress-related diseases, the concept of sensitivity versus resilience to stress-induced reproductive dysfunction has received relatively little attention. The studies presented herein were undertaken to begin to identify stable characteristics and the neural underpinnings of individuals with sensitivity to stress-induced reproductive dysfunction. Female cynomolgus macaques with normal menstrual cycles either stop ovulating (Stress Sensitive) or to continue to ovulate (Stress Resilient) upon exposure to a combined metabolic and psychosocial stress. However, even in the absence of stress, the stress sensitive animals have lower secretion of the ovarian steroids, estrogen and progesterone, have higher heart rates, have lower serotonin function, have fewer serotonin neurons and lower expression of pivotal serotonin-related genes, have lower expression of 5HT2A and 2C genes in the hypothalamus, have higher gene expression of GAD67 and CRH in the hypothalamus and have reduced GnRH transport to the anterior pituitary. Altogether, the results suggest that the neurobiology of reproductive circuits in stress sensitive individuals is compromised. We speculate that with the application of stress, the dysfunction of these neural systems becomes exacerbated and reproductive function ceases. PMID:18931961

  20. STRESS INDUCED OBESITY: LESSONS FROM RODENT MODELS OF STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Robert Patterson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress is defined as the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc., these endogenous stress systems are stimulated in order to generate a fight-or-flight response, and manage the stressful situation. As such, an organism is forced to liberate energy resources in attempt to meet the energetic demands posed by the stressor. A change in the energy homeostatic balance is thus required to exploit an appropriate resource and deliver useable energy to the target muscles and tissues involved in the stress response. Acutely, this change in energy homeostasis and the liberation of energy is considered advantageous, as it is required for the survival of the organism. However, when an organism is subjected to a prolonged stressor, as is the case during chronic stress, a continuous irregularity in energy homeostasis is considered detrimental and may lead to the development of metabolic disturbances such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. This concept has been studied extensively using animal models, and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress induced metabolic disorders are beginning to surface. However, different animal models of stress continue to produce divergent metabolic phenotypes wherein some animals become anorexic and loose body mass while others increase food intake and body mass and become vulnerable to the development of metabolic disturbances. It remains unclear exactly what factors associated with stress models can be used to predict the metabolic outcome of the organism. This review will explore a variety of rodent stress models and discuss the elements that influence the metabolic outcome in order to further our understanding of stress-induced

  1. Stress-induced outer membrane vesicle production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Ian A; Kuehn, Meta J

    2013-07-01

    As an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa must be able to adapt and survive changes and stressors in its environment during the course of infection. To aid survival in the hostile host environment, P. aeruginosa has evolved defense mechanisms, including the production of an exopolysaccharide capsule and the secretion of a myriad of degradative proteases and lipases. The production of outer membrane-derived vesicles (OMVs) serves as a secretion mechanism for virulence factors as well as a general bacterial response to envelope-acting stressors. This study investigated the effect of sublethal physiological stressors on OMV production by P. aeruginosa and whether the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) and the MucD periplasmic protease are critical mechanistic factors in this response. Exposure to some environmental stressors was determined to increase the level of OMV production as well as the activity of AlgU, the sigma factor that controls MucD expression. Overexpression of AlgU was shown to be sufficient to induce OMV production; however, stress-induced OMV production was not dependent on activation of AlgU, since stress caused increased vesiculation in strains lacking algU. We further determined that MucD levels were not an indicator of OMV production under acute stress, and PQS was not required for OMV production under stress or unstressed conditions. Finally, an investigation of the response of P. aeruginosa to oxidative stress revealed that peroxide-induced OMV production requires the presence of B-band but not A-band lipopolysaccharide. Together, these results demonstrate that distinct mechanisms exist for stress-induced OMV production in P. aeruginosa.

  2. Divergent Stress-Induced Neuroendocrine and Behavioral Responses Prior to Puberty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Patina; Padow, Victoria A.; Franco, Daly; Hall, Baila S.; Park, Brian; Klein, Zoe A.; Romeo, Russell D.

    2012-01-01

    Following an acute stressor, pre-adolescent rats exhibit a protracted hormonal response compared to adults, while after repeated exposure to the same stressor (i.e., homotypic stress) prepubertal males fail to habituate like adults. Though the neurobehavioral implications of these changes are unknown, studying pubertal shifts in stress reactivity may help elucidate the mechanisms that underlie the increase in stress-related psychological and physiological disorders often observed during adolescence. Here, we investigated hormonal, behavioral, and neural responses of prepubertal (30d) and adult (77d) male rats before, during, or after acute stress (restraint), homotypic stress (repeated restraint) or heterotypic stress (repeated cold exposure followed by restraint). We found that prepubertal males exhibit prolonged corticosterone responses following acute and heterotypic stress, and higher adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone responses after homotypic stress, compared to adults. Despite these significant age-dependent changes in hormonal responsiveness, we found struggling behavior during restraint was similar at both ages, such that both prepubertal and adult animals exposed to homotypic stress struggled less than animals exposed to either acute or heterotypic stress. Across these different stress paradigms, we found greater neural activation, as indexed by FOS immunostaining, in the prepubertal compared to adult paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, a nucleus integral for initiating the hormonal stress response. Interestingly, however, we did not find any influence of pubertal development on stress-induced activation of the posterior paraventricular thalamic nucleus, a brain region involved in experience-dependent changes in stress reactivity. Collectively, our data indicate prepubertal and adult males display divergent hormonal, behavioral, and neural responses following a variety of stressful experiences, as well as a distinct dissociation

  3. Chronic stress induces ageing-associated degeneration in rat Leydig cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei-Fei Wang; Qian Wang; Yong Chen; Qiang Lin; Hui-Bao Gao; Ping Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that stress and ageing exert inhibitory effects on rat Leydig cells.In a pattern similar to the normal process of Leydig cell ageing,stress-mediated increases in glucocorticoid levels inhibit steroidogenic enzyme expression that then results in decreased testosterone secretion.We hypothesized that chronic stress accelerates the degenerative changes associated with ageing in Leydig cells.To test this hypothesis,we established a model of chronic stress to evaluate stress-induced morphological and functional alterations in Brown Norway rat Leydig cells; additionally,intracellular lipofuscin levels,reactive oxygen species (ROS)levels and DNA damage were assessed.The results showed that chronic stress accelerated ageing-related changes:ultrastructural alterations associated with ageing,cellular lipofuscin accumulation,increased ROS levels and more extensive DNA damage were observed.Additionally,testosterone levels were decreased.This study sheds new light on the idea that chronic stress contributes to the degenerative changes associated with ageing in rat Leydig cells in vivo.

  4. Public speaking stress-induced neuroendocrine responses and circulating immune cell redistribution in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Lucas, Ayscha; Holtmann, Gerald; Haag, Sebastian; Gerken, Guido; Riemenschneider, Natalie; Langhorst, Jost; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2006-10-01

    Augmented neuroendocrine stress responses and altered immune functions may play a role in the manifestation of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We tested the hypothesis that IBS patients would demonstrate enhanced psychological and endocrine responses, as well as altered stress-induced redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocytes, in response to an acute psychosocial stressor when compared with healthy controls. Responses to public speaking stress were analyzed in N = 17 IBS patients without concurrent psychiatric conditions and N = 12 healthy controls. At baseline, immediately following public speaking, and after a recovery period, state anxiety, acute GI symptoms, cardiovascular responses, serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were measured, and numbers of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Public speaking led to significant cardiovascular activation, a significant increase in ACTH, and a redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations, including significant increases in natural killer cells and cytotoxic/suppressor T cells. IBS patients demonstrated significantly greater state anxiety both at baseline and following public speaking. However, cardiovascular and endocrine responses, as well as the redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations after public speaking stress, did not differ for IBS patients compared with controls. In IBS patients without psychiatric comorbidity, the endocrine response as well as the circulation pattern of leukocyte subpopulations to acute psychosocial stress do not differ from healthy controls in spite of enhanced emotional responses. Future studies should discern the role of psychopathology in psychological and biological stress responses in IBS.

  5. Capsaicin ameliorates stress-induced Alzheimer's disease-like pathological and cognitive impairments in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xia; Jia, Lin-Wei; Li, Xiao-Hong; Cheng, Xiang-Shu; Xie, Jia-Zhao; Ma, Zhi-Wei; Xu, Wei-Jie; Liu, Yue; Yao, Yun; Du, Lai-Ling; Zhou, Xin-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylated tau aggregated into neurofibrillary tangles is a hallmark lesion of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is linked to synaptic and cognitive impairments. In animal models, cold water stress (CWS) can cause cognitive disorder and tau hyperphosphorylation. Capsaicin (CAP), a specific TRPV1 agonist, is neuroprotective against stress-induced impairment, but the detailed mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we investigated whether CAP mitigates CWS-induced cognitive and AD-like pathological alterations in rats. The animals were administered CAP (10 mg/kg in 0.2 ml, 0.1% ethanol) or a control (0.2 ml normal saline, 0.1% ethanol) by intragastric infusion 1 h before CWS treatment. Our results showed that CAP significantly attenuated CWS-induced spatial memory impairment and suppression of PP-DG long-term potentiation; CAP abolished CWS-induced dendritic regression and enhanced several memory-associated proteins decreased by CWS, such as synapsin I and PSD93; CAP also prevented CWS-induced tau hyperphosphorylation by abolishing inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A. Taken together, this study demonstrated that activation of TRPV1 can mitigate CWS-induced AD-like neuropathological alterations and cognitive impairment and may be a promising target for therapeutic intervention in AD.

  6. Mutations that alter a repeated ACCA element located at the 5' end of the Potato virus X genome affect RNA accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Ri; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Choi, Hong-Soo; Hemenway, Cynthia L; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2008-08-15

    The repeated ACCA or AC-rich sequence and structural (SL1) elements in the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of the Potato virus X (PVX) RNA play vital roles in the PVX life cycle by controlling translation, RNA replication, movement, and assembly. It has already been shown that the repeated ACCA or AC-rich sequence affect both gRNA and sgRNA accumulation, while not affecting minus-strand RNA accumulation, and are also required for host protein binding. The functional significance of the repeated ACCA sequence elements in the 5' NTR region was investigated by analyzing the effects of deletion and site-directed mutations on PVX replication in Nicotiana benthamiana plants and NT1 protoplasts. Substitution (ACCA into AAAA or UUUU) mutations introduced in the first (nt 10-13) element in the 5' NTR of the PVX RNA significantly affected viral replication, while mutations introduced in the second (nt 17-20) and third (nt 20-23) elements did not. The fourth (nt 29-32) ACCA element weakly affected virus replication, whereas mutations in the fifth (nt 38-41) significantly reduced virus replication due to the structure disruption of SL1 by AAAA and/or UUUU substitutions. Further characterization of the first ACCA element indicated that duplication of ACCA at nt 10-13 (nt 10-17, ACCAACCA) caused severe symptom development as compared to that of wild type, while deletion of the single element (nt 10-13), DeltaACCA) or tripling of this element caused reduced symptom development. Single- and double-nucleotide substitutions introduced into the first ACCA element revealed the importance of CC located at nt positions 11 and 12. Altogether, these results indicate that the first ACCA element is important for PVX replication.

  7. Regulation of calnexin sub-cellular localization modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delom, Frédéric; Fessart, Delphine; Chevet, Eric

    2007-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the cellular compartment where proteins enter the secretory pathway, undergo post-translational modifications and acquire a correct conformation. If these functions are chronically altered, specific ER stress signals are triggered to promote cell death through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Here, we show that tunicamycin causes significant alteration of calnexin sub-cellular distribution in MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, this correlates with the absence of both tunicamycin-induced calnexin phosphorylation as well as tunicamycin-induced cell death. Under these conditions, calnexin-associated Bap31, an ER integral membrane protein, is subjected to a caspase-8 cleavage pattern within a specific sub-compartment of the ER. These results suggest that MCF-7 resistance to ER stress-induced apoptosis is partially mediated by the expression level of calnexin which in turn controls its sub-cellular localization, and its association with Bap31. These data may delineate a resistance mechanism to the ER stress-induced intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  8. Reduction of spinal PGE2 concentrations prevents swim stress-induced thermal hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Coram; Fernandez, Ana Cristina; Cardenas, Ricardo; Suarez-Roca, Heberto

    2015-03-30

    We evaluated the association between spinal PGE2 and thermal hyperalgesia following repeated stress. Thermal nociception was determined in male Sprague-Dawley rats using the hot-plate test, before and after forced-swimming; non-conditioned rats served as controls. Animals were pretreated with ketoprofen or meloxicam, preferential COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors, respectively. After the second hot-plate test, we measured serum corticosterone (stress marker), and lumbar spinal PGE2 (neuroinflammation marker) under peripheral inflammation (1% formalin plantar injection). Stressed rats displayed response latencies 40% shorter and inflammatory spinal PGE2 levels 95% higher than controls. Pretreatment with ketoprofen or meloxicam prevented hyperalgesia and elevation of spinal PGE2, increasing the escape behavior time during forced swimming 95% respect to saline-treated rats. Corticosterone levels in stressed rats were 97% higher than controls; COX inhibitors reduced them by 84%. PGE2 could participate in stress-induced hyperalgesia, learned helplessness, and corticosterone production, supporting the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for persistent pain associated with chronic stress and depression.

  9. Specific alteration of rhythm in temperature-stressed rats possess features of abdominal pain in IBS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Itomi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is known that specific alteration of rhythm in temperature (SART stress produces somatic pain. However, it remains to be investigated whether SART stress induces visceral pain. In this study, we investigated the visceral hypersensitivity in the SART stress model by pharmacological tools and heterotopical nociception. Four-week-old Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to repeated cold stress. Visceral pain was measured by visceromotor response to colorectal distension, and the effects of alosetron and duloxetine on visceral pain were investigated in SART rats. Heterotopical nociception was given by capsaicin injection into the left forepaw to induce diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC. SART stress induced visceral hypersensitivity that was sustained at minimum for one week. In pharmacological analysis, alosetron and duloxetine improved SART stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Heterotopical nociception induced DNIC in normal conditions, but was disrupted in SART rats. On the other hand, RMCP-II mRNA in distal colon was not affected by SART stress. In conclusion, SART rats exhibit several features of visceral pain in IBS, and may be a useful model for investigating the central modification of pain control in IBS.

  10. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and chronic stress-induced modulations of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, Marie; Champeil-Potokar, Gaëlle; Lavialle, Monique; Vancassel, Sylvie; Denis, Isabelle

    2014-02-01

    Chronic stress causes the release of glucocorticoids, which greatly influence cerebral function, especially glutamatergic transmission. These stress-induced changes in neurotransmission could be counteracted by increasing the dietary intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs). Numerous studies have described the capacity of n-3 PUFAs to help protect glutamatergic neurotransmission from damage induced by stress and glucocorticoids, possibly preventing the development of stress-related disorders such as depression or anxiety. The hippocampus contains glucocorticoid receptors and is involved in learning and memory. This makes it particularly sensitive to stress, which alters certain aspects of hippocampal function. In this review, the various ways in which n-3 PUFAs may prevent the harmful effects of chronic stress, particularly the alteration of glutamatergic synapses in the hippocampus, are summarized.

  11. Stress inducible proteomic changes in Capsicum annuum leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Neha S; Mishra, Manasi; Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-01-01

    Herbivore attack induces defense responses in plants, activating several signaling cascades. As a result, molecules deterrent to the herbivores are produced and accumulated in plants. Expression of defense mechanism/traits requires reorganization of the plant metabolism, redirecting the resources otherwise meant for growth. In the present work, protein profile of Capsicum annuum leaves was examined after herbivore attack/induction. Majority of proteins identified as differentially accumulated, were having roles in redox metabolism and photosynthesis. For example, superoxide dismutase and NADP oxidoreductase were upregulated by 10- and 6-fold while carbonic anhydrase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase were downregulated by 9- and 4-fold, respectively. Also, superoxide dismutase, NADPH quinone oxidoreductase and NADP dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase transcripts showed a higher accumulation in induced leaf tissues at early time points. In general, proteins having role in defense and damage repair were upregulated while those involved in photosynthesis appeared downregulated. Thus metabolic reconfiguration to balance defense and tolerance was evident in the stress-induced leaves.

  12. Tomato leaf spatial expression of stress-induced Asr genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskin, Laura; Maldonado, Sara; Iusem, Norberto D

    2008-12-01

    Asr1 and Asr2 are water stress-inducible genes belonging to the Asr gene family, which transcriptionally regulate a sugar transporter gene, at least in grape. Using an in situ RNA hybridization methodology, we determined that, in basal conditions, expression of Asr2 in tomato leaves is detected in the phloem tissue, particularly in companion phloem cells. When plants are exposed to water stress, Asr2 expression is contained in companion cells but expands occasionally to mesophyll cells. In contrast, Asr1 transcript localization seems to be sparse in leaf vascular tissue under both non-stress and stress conditions. The occurrence of Asr transcripts precisely in companion cells is in accordance with the cell type specificity reported for hexose-transporter protein molecules in grape encoded by the only Asr-target gene known to date. The results are discussed in light of the reported scarcity of plasmodesmata between companion cells and the rest of leaf tissue in the family Solanaceae.

  13. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  14. ER stress induced by ionising radiation in IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yan; Pang, Xueli; Su, Yongping; Ai, Guoping; Wang, Tao

    2010-06-01

    Ionising radiation (IR) can evoke a series of biochemical events inside the cell. However, whether IR can directly induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is not clear. In our previous study, we found that there might be a causative link between IR and ER stress. In this study, we further characterised the type of ER stress induced by IR. Rat intestinal epithelial cells IEC-6 were irradiated at a dose of 10 Gy, and total RNA and proteins were harvested at indicated time points. The mRNA and protein expression of immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) and glucose regulated protein 94 (GRP94) was detected along with proteins associated with ER stress signal pathways. Our results indicated that IR induced up-regulation of ER stress marker including BiP and GRP94 at protein and mRNA levels in IEC-6 cells. Increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha) and induced mRNA splicing of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) suggested that PERK (interferon-induced double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PRKR) -like endoplasmic reticulum kinase) and IRE1 (inositol requirement 1) signal transduction pathways were involved in this kind of ER stress. However, the active form of activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) did not change significantly in irradiated cells, which suggested that the ATF6 pathway was not involved. Thus, we concluded that IR could induce moderate ER stress directly in IEC-6 cells.

  15. ADRA2B deletion variant selectively predicts stress-induced enhancement of long-term memory in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Kalchik, Andrea E; Hoffman, Mackenzie M; Aufdenkampe, Rachael L; Lyle, Sarah M; Peters, David M; Brown, Callie M; Cadle, Chelsea E; Scharf, Amanda R; Dailey, Alison M; Wolters, Nicholas E; Talbot, Jeffery N; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2014-10-01

    Clarifying the mechanisms that underlie stress-induced alterations of learning and memory may lend important insight into susceptibility factors governing the development of stress-related psychological disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Previous work has shown that carriers of the ADRA2B Glu(301)-Glu(303) deletion variant exhibit enhanced emotional memory, greater amygdala responses to emotional stimuli and greater intrusiveness of traumatic memories. We speculated that carriers of this deletion variant might also be more vulnerable to stress-induced enhancements of long-term memory, which would implicate the variant as a possible susceptibility factor for traumatic memory formation. One hundred and twenty participants (72 males, 48 females) submerged their hand in ice cold (stress) or warm (no stress) water for 3min. Immediately afterwards, they studied a list of 42 words varying in emotional valence and arousal and then completed an immediate free recall test. Twenty-four hours later, participants' memory for the word list was examined via free recall and recognition assessments. Stressed participants exhibiting greater heart rate responses to the stressor had enhanced recall on the 24-h assessment. Importantly, this enhancement was independent of the emotional nature of the learned information. In contrast to previous work, we did not observe a general enhancement of memory for emotional information in ADRA2B deletion carriers. However, stressed female ADRA2B deletion carriers, particularly those exhibiting greater heart rate responses to the stressor, did demonstrate greater recognition memory than all other groups. Collectively, these findings implicate autonomic mechanisms in the pre-learning stress-induced enhancement of long-term memory and suggest that the ADRA2B deletion variant may selectively predict stress effects on memory in females. Such findings lend important insight into the physiological mechanisms underlying stress

  16. Hypothermia enhances bcl-2 expression and protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slikker, W; Desai, V G; Duhart, H; Feuers, R; Imam, S Z

    2001-08-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major causes of cellular injury. Various reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species such as superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite, and nitric oxide are involved in the manifestations of different types of organ toxicity and the resultant syndromes, symptoms, or diseases. Hypothermic conditions have been reported to reduce the oxidative stress in various in vitro and in vivo studies. In the present study, we sought to determine the effect of lowered temperatures on oxidative stress-induced cell death in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We also investigated the oxidative stress-induced alterations in the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2, in CHO cells at lowered temperatures. CHO cells were incubated at four different temperatures of 30, 32, 35, and 37 degrees C (control temperature) from 1 to 4 d. In another set, the cells were incubated with 100 microM hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) for 30 min before harvesting at different time points. The cells were harvested at 1, 2, 3, and 4 d. Cell survival was significantly higher at 30 degrees C as compared to 37 degrees C over 4 d of incubation. In cells incubated with H(2)O(2), significantly higher cell viability was observed at lower temperatures as compared to the cells incubated at 37 degrees C. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) also increased significantly at lower temperatures. Lowered temperature also provided a significant increase in the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2 after 4 d of incubation. These data suggest that hypothermic conditions lowers the risk of oxidative stress-induced cellular damage and programmed cell death by increasing the activity of GSH-Px and by the induction in the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2.

  17. TAL effector specificity for base 0 of the DNA target is altered in a complex, effector- and assay-dependent manner by substitutions for the tryptophan in cryptic repeat -1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L Doyle

    Full Text Available TAL effectors are re-targetable transcription factors used for tailored gene regulation and, as TAL effector-nuclease fusions (TALENs, for genome engineering. Their hallmark feature is a customizable central string of polymorphic amino acid repeats that interact one-to-one with individual DNA bases to specify the target. Sequences targeted by TAL effector repeats in nature are nearly all directly preceded by a thymine (T that is required for maximal activity, and target sites for custom TAL effector constructs have typically been selected with this constraint. Multiple crystal structures suggest that this requirement for T at base 0 is encoded by a tryptophan residue (W232 in a cryptic repeat N-terminal to the central repeats that exhibits energetically favorable van der Waals contacts with the T. We generated variants based on TAL effector PthXo1 with all single amino acid substitutions for W232. In a transcriptional activation assay, many substitutions altered or relaxed the specificity for T and a few were as active as wild type. Some showed higher activity. However, when replicated in a different TAL effector, the effects of the substitutions differed. Further, the effects differed when tested in the context of a TALEN in a DNA cleavage assay, and in a TAL effector-DNA binding assay. Substitution of the N-terminal region of the PthXo1 construct with that of one of the TAL effector-like proteins of Ralstonia solanacearum, which have arginine in place of the tryptophan, resulted in specificity for guanine as the 5' base but low activity, and several substitutions for the arginine, including tryptophan, destroyed activity altogether. Thus, the effects on specificity and activity generated by substitutions at the W232 (or equivalent position are complex and context dependent. Generating TAL effector scaffolds with high activity that robustly accommodate sites without a T at position 0 may require larger scale re-engineering.

  18. Alteration of hepatic structure and oxidative stress induced by intravenous nanoceria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Michael T; Lu, Xiaoqin; Duan, Xiaoxian; Hardas, Sarita S; Sultana, Rukhsana; Wu, Peng; Unrine, Jason M; Graham, Uschi; Butterfield, D Allan; Grulke, Eric A; Yokel, Robert A

    2012-04-15

    Beyond the traditional use of ceria as an abrasive, the scope of nanoceria applications now extends into fuel cell manufacturing, diesel fuel additives, and for therapeutic intervention as a putative antioxidant. However, the biological effects of nanoceria exposure have yet to be fully defined, which gave us the impetus to examine its systemic biodistribution and biological responses. An extensively characterized nanoceria (5 nm) dispersion was vascularly infused into rats, which were terminated 1 h, 20 h or 30 days later. Light and electron microscopic tissue characterization was conducted and hepatic oxidative stress parameters determined. We observed acute ceria nanoparticle sequestration by Kupffer cells with subsequent bioretention in parenchymal cells as well. The internalized ceria nanoparticles appeared as spherical agglomerates of varying dimension without specific organelle penetration. In hepatocytes, the agglomerated nanoceria frequently localized to the plasma membrane facing bile canaliculi. Hepatic stellate cells also sequestered nanoceria. Within the sinusoids, sustained nanoceria bioretention was associated with granuloma formations comprised of Kupffer cells and intermingling CD3⁺ T cells. A statistically significant elevation of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level was seen at 1 and 20 h, but subsided by 30 days after ceria administration. Further, elevated apoptosis was observed on day 30. These findings, together with increased hepatic protein carbonyl levels on day 30, indicate ceria-induced hepatic injury and oxidative stress, respectively. Such observations suggest a single vascular infusion of nanoceria can lead to persistent hepatic retention of particles with possible implications for occupational and therapeutic exposures.

  19. Oxidative stress-induced proteome alterations target different cellular pathways in human myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martin A; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina;

    2011-01-01

    , and α-enolase were shifted to a more acidic isoelectric point upon oxidative stress, indicating posttranslational modifications. Oxidized proteins were evidenced by immunodetection of derivatized carbonyl groups followed by identification by mass spectrometry. The carbonylated proteins identified...

  20. Alteration of brain levels of neurotransmitters and amino acids in male F344 rats induced by three-week repeated inhalation exposure to 1-bromopropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Megumi; Honma, Takeshi; Miyagawa, Muneyuki; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2008-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of 1-bromopropane (1BP) on brain neuroactive substances of rats to determine the extent of its toxicity to the central nervous system (CNS). We measured the changes in neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, catecholamine, serotonin and amino acids) and their metabolites or precursors in eight brain regions after inhalation exposure to 1BP at 50 to 1,000 ppm for 8 h per day for 7 d per week for 3 wk. Rats were sacrificed at 2 h (Case 1), or at 19 h (Case 2) after the end of exposure. In Case 1, the level of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) was lowered in some brain regions by 1BP exposure. The decrease of 5HIAA in the frontal cortex was statistically significant at 50 ppm 1BP exposure. In Case 2, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) and taurine were decreased in many brain regions of exposed rats, and a significant decrease of taurine in the midbrain occurred at 50 ppm 1BP exposure. In both cases of 2-h and 19-h intervals from the end of exposure to sacrifice, aspartate and glutamine levels were elevated in many brain regions, but the acetylcholine level did not change in any brain region. Three-week repeated exposure to 1BP produced significantly changes in amino acid contents of rat brains, particularly at 1,000 ppm.

  1. Repeated social defeat causes increased anxiety-like behavior and alters splenocyte function in C57BL/6 and CD-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, Steven G; Bailey, Michael T; Sheridan, John F; Padgett, David A; Avitsur, Ronit

    2007-05-01

    The experimental model, social disruption (SDR), is a model of social stress in which mice are repeatedly attacked and defeated in their home cage by an aggressive conspecific. In terms of the impact of this stressor on the immune response, SDR has been reported to cause hyperinflammation and glucocorticoid insensitivity. To this point however, the behavioral consequences of SDR have not been thoroughly characterized. Because social defeat has been reported to cause anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, the current study was designed to assess whether SDR also causes anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. Using the light/dark preference test and the open field test as tools to measure behaviors characteristic of anxiety, the data showed that C57BL/6 and CD-1 male mice subjected to SDR displayed increased anxiety-like behavior. The increase in anxiety-like behaviors persisted for at least 1 week after the cessation of the stressor. In contrast, depressive-like behaviors were not elicited by SDR as assessed by the forced swim test or the tail suspension test. These data indicate that social disruption stress causes an increase in anxiety-like behaviors, but not depressive-like behaviors.

  2. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: Implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis. PMID:25245072

  3. Stress-induced endocrine response and anxiety: the effects of comfort food in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolani, Daniela; Garcia, Márcia Carvalho; Melo-Thomas, Liana; Spadari-Bratfisch, Regina Celia

    2014-05-01

    The long-term effects of comfort food in an anxiogenic model of stress have yet to be analyzed. Here, we evaluated behavioral, endocrine and metabolic parameters in rats submitted or not to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), with access to commercial chow alone or to commercial chow and comfort food. Stress did not alter the preference for comfort food but decreased food intake. In the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test, stressed rats were less likely to enter/remain in the open arms, as well as being more likely to enter/remain in the closed arms, than were control rats, both conditions being more pronounced in the rats given access to comfort food. In the open field test, stress decreased the time spent in the centre, independent of diet; neither stress nor diet affected the number of crossing, rearing or grooming episodes. The stress-induced increase in serum corticosterone was attenuated in rats given access to comfort food. Serum concentration of triglycerides were unaffected by stress or diet, although access to comfort food increased total cholesterol and glucose. It is concluded that CUMS has an anorexigenic effect. Chronic stress and comfort food ingestion induced an anxiogenic profile although comfort food attenuated the endocrine stress response. The present data indicate that the combination of stress and access to comfort food, common aspects of modern life, may constitute a link among stress, feeding behavior and anxiety.

  4. Analytical Modeling of Surface Roughness, Hardness and Residual Stress Induced by Deep Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Frederico C.; Abrão, Alexandre M.; Denkena, Berend; Breidenstein, Bernd; Mörke, Tobias

    2016-12-01

    Deep rolling is a mechanical surface treatment that can significantly alter the features of metallic components and despite the fact that it has been used for a long time, to date the influence of the interaction among the principal process parameters has not been thoroughly understood. Aiming to fulfill this gap, this work addresses the effect of deep rolling on surface finish and mechanical properties from the analytical and experimental viewpoints. More specifically, the influence of deep rolling pressure and number of passes on surface roughness, hardness and residual stress induced on AISI 1060 steel is investigated. The findings indicate that the surface roughness after deep rolling is closely related to the yield strength of the work material and the available models can satisfactorily predict the former parameter. Better agreement between the mathematical and experimental hardness values is achieved when a single deep rolling pass is employed, as well as when the yield strength of the work material increases. Compressive residual stress is generally induced after deep rolling, irrespectively of the selected heat treatment and deep rolling parameters. Finally, the model proposed to predict residual stress provides results closest to the experimental data especially when the annealed material is considered.

  5. Stress Induced Effects for Advanced Polarization Control in Silicon Photonics Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Waldron

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the use of the oxide cladding stress-induced photoelastic effect to modify the polarization dependent properties in silicon-on-insulator (SOI waveguide components, and highlight characteristics particular to this high index contrast (HIC systems. The birefringence in SOI waveguides has its origin in the electromagnetic boundary conditions at the waveguide boundaries, and can be further modified by the presence of stress in the waveguiding materials. With typical stress levels in SiO2 films, which are often used as the upper cladding, the waveguide effective index can be altered anisotropically up to the order of 10−3 for ridges with heights ranging from 1 μm to 5 μm. This effect can be used effectively to counter the waveguide geometrical birefringence, allowing the waveguide cross-section profiles to be optimized for design criteria other than null geometrical birefringence. Design strategies are developed for using stress engineering to achieve a variety of functions. Polarization insensitive arrayed waveguide gratings (AWGs, polarization insensitive ring resonators, and polarization splitters and filters are demonstrated using these design principles.

  6. JNK interaction with Sab mediates ER stress induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, S; Than, T A; Fernandez-Checa, J C; Kaplowitz, N

    2014-01-09

    Our aim was to better understand the mechanism and importance of sustained c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and effects of ER stress on mitochondria by determining the role of mitochondrial JNK binding protein, Sab. Tunicamycin or brefeldin A induced a rapid and marked decline in basal mitochondrial respiration and reserve-capacity followed by delayed mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of mitochondrial Sab prevented ER stress-induced sustained JNK activation, impaired respiration, and apoptosis, but did not alter the magnitude or time course of activation of ER stress pathways. P-JNK plus adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) added to isolated liver mitochondria promoted superoxide production, which was amplified by addition of calcium and inhibited by a blocking peptide corresponding to the JNK binding site on Sab (KIM1). This peptide also blocked tunicamycin-induced inhibition of cellular respiration. In conclusion, ER stress triggers an interaction of JNK with mitochondrial Sab, which leads to impaired respiration and increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, sustaining JNK activation culminating in apoptosis.

  7. Arabidopsis FORGETTER1 mediates stress-induced chromatin memory through nucleosome remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinka, Krzysztof; Altmann, Simone; Czesnick, Hjördis; Nicolas, Philippe; Gorka, Michal; Benke, Eileen; Kabelitz, Tina; Jähne, Felix; Graf, Alexander; Kappel, Christian; Bäurle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Plants as sessile organisms can adapt to environmental stress to mitigate its adverse effects. As part of such adaptation they maintain an active memory of heat stress for several days that promotes a more efficient response to recurring stress. We show that this heat stress memory requires the activity of the FORGETTER1 (FGT1) locus, with fgt1 mutants displaying reduced maintenance of heat-induced gene expression. FGT1 encodes the Arabidopsis thaliana orthologue of Strawberry notch (Sno), and the protein globally associates with the promoter regions of actively expressed genes in a heat-dependent fashion. FGT1 interacts with chromatin remodelers of the SWI/SNF and ISWI families, which also display reduced heat stress memory. Genomic targets of the BRM remodeler overlap significantly with FGT1 targets. Accordingly, nucleosome dynamics at loci with altered maintenance of heat-induced expression are affected in fgt1. Together, our results suggest that by modulating nucleosome occupancy, FGT1 mediates stress-induced chromatin memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17061.001 PMID:27680998

  8. Tau Deletion Prevents Stress-Induced Dendritic Atrophy in Prefrontal Cortex: Role of Synaptic Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Sofia; Teplytska, Larysa; Vaz-Silva, Joao; Dioli, Chrysoula; Trindade, Rita; Morais, Monica; Webhofer, Christian; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Almeida, Osborne F X; Turck, Christoph W; Sousa, Nuno; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis; Filiou, Michaela D

    2016-04-12

    Tau protein in dendrites and synapses has been recently implicated in synaptic degeneration and neuronal malfunction. Chronic stress, a well-known inducer of neuronal/synaptic atrophy, triggers hyperphosphorylation of Tau protein and cognitive deficits. However, the cause-effect relationship between these events remains to be established. To test the involvement of Tau in stress-induced impairments of cognition, we investigated the impact of stress on cognitive behavior, neuronal structure, and the synaptic proteome in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of Tau knock-out (Tau-KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Whereas exposure to chronic stress resulted in atrophy of apical dendrites and spine loss in PFC neurons as well as significant impairments in working memory in WT mice, such changes were absent in Tau-KO animals. Quantitative proteomic analysis of PFC synaptosomal fractions, combined with transmission electron microscopy analysis, suggested a prominent role for mitochondria in the regulation of the effects of stress. Specifically, chronically stressed animals exhibit Tau-dependent alterations in the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial transport and oxidative phosphorylation as well as in the synaptic localization of mitochondria in PFC. These findings provide evidence for a causal role of Tau in mediating stress-elicited neuronal atrophy and cognitive impairment and indicate that Tau may exert its effects through synaptic mitochondria.

  9. Stress-induced visceral pain: toward animal models of irritable-bowel syndrome and associated comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Rachel D; O'Mahony, Siobhain M; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2015-01-01

    Visceral pain is a global term used to describe pain originating from the internal organs, which is distinct from somatic pain. It is a hallmark of functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable-bowel syndrome (IBS). Currently, the treatment strategies targeting visceral pain are unsatisfactory, with development of novel therapeutics hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Stress has long been implicated in the pathophysiology of visceral pain in both preclinical and clinical studies. Here, we discuss the complex etiology of visceral pain reviewing our current understanding in the context of the role of stress, gender, gut microbiota alterations, and immune functioning. Furthermore, we review the role of glutamate, GABA, and epigenetic mechanisms as possible therapeutic strategies for the treatment of visceral pain for which there is an unmet medical need. Moreover, we discuss the most widely described rodent models used to model visceral pain in the preclinical setting. The theory behind, and application of, animal models is key for both the understanding of underlying mechanisms and design of future therapeutic interventions. Taken together, it is apparent that stress-induced visceral pain and its psychiatric comorbidities, as typified by IBS, has a multifaceted etiology. Moreover, treatment strategies still lag far behind when compared to other pain modalities. The development of novel, effective, and specific therapeutics for the treatment of visceral pain has never been more pertinent.

  10. Minimal-invasive magnetic heating of tumors does not alter intra-tumoral nanoparticle accumulation, allowing for repeated therapy sessions: an in vivo study in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettering, Melanie; Richter, Heike; Wiekhorst, Frank; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Trahms, Lutz; Alois Kaiser, Werner; Hilger, Ingrid

    2011-12-01

    Localized magnetic heating treatments (hyperthermia, thermal ablation) using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) continue to be an active area of cancer research. For generating the appropriate heat to sufficiently target cell destruction, adequate MNP concentrations need to be accumulated into tumors. Furthermore, the knowledge of MNP bio-distribution after application and additionally after heating is significant, firstly because of the possibility of repeated heating treatments if MNPs remain at the target region and secondly to study potential adverse effects dealing with MNP dilution from the target region over time. In this context, little is known about the behavior of MNPs after intra-tumoral application and magnetic heating. Therefore, the present in vivo study on the bio-distribution of intra-tumorally injected MNPs in mice focused on MNP long term monitoring of pre and post therapy over seven days using multi-channel magnetorelaxometry (MRX). Subsequently, single-channel MRX was adopted to study the bio-distribution of MNPs in internal organs and tumors of sacrificed animals. We found no distinct change of total MNP amounts in vivo during long term monitoring. Most of the MNP amounts remained in the tumors; only a few MNPs were detected in liver and spleen and less than 1% of totally injected MNPs were excreted. Apparently, the application of magnetic heating and the induction of apoptosis did not affect MNP accumulation. Our results indicate that MNP mainly remained within the injection side after magnetic heating over a seven-days-observation and therefore not affecting healthy tissue. As a consequence, localized magnetic heating therapy of tumors might be applied periodically for a better therapeutic outcome.

  11. Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of a very virulent Marek's disease virus alters its pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Jody K; Silva, Robert F; Kim, Taejoong; Fadly, Aly

    2012-01-01

    Co-cultivation of the JM/102W strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV) with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in the generation of a recombinant MDV containing the REV long terminal repeat (LTR) named the RM1 strain of MDV, a strain that was highly attenuated for oncogenicity but induced severe bursal and thymic atrophy. We hypothesize that the phenotypic changes were solely due to the LTR insertion. Furthermore, we hypothesize that insertion of REV LTR into an analogous location in a different MDV would result in a similar phenotypic change. To test these hypotheses, we inserted the REV LTR into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of a very virulent strain of MDV, Md5, and designated the virus rMd5-RM1-LTR. The rMd5-RM1-LTR virus and the rMd5 virus were passaged in duck embryo fibroblast cells for up to 40 passages before pathogenicity studies. Susceptible chickens were inoculated intra-abdominally at hatch with the viruses rMd5-RM1-LTR, rMd5 BAC parental virus, wild-type strain Md5, or strain RM1 of MDV. The rMd5-RM1-LTR virus was attenuated at cell culture passage 40, whereas the rMd5 BAC without RM1 LTR retained its pathogenicity at cell culture passage 40. Using polymerase chain analysis, the RM1 LTR insert was detected in MDV isolated from buffy coat cells collected from chickens inoculated with rMd5-RM1-LTR, but only at 1 week post inoculation. The data suggest that the presence of the RM1 LTR insert within MDV genome for 1 week post inoculation with virus at hatch is sufficient to cause a reduction in pathogenicity of strain Md5 of MDV.

  12. Targeted induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress induces cartilage pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Helen Rajpar

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathologies caused by mutations in extracellular matrix proteins are generally considered to result from the synthesis of extracellular matrices that are defective. Mutations in type X collagen cause metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Schmid (MCDS, a disorder characterised by dwarfism and an expanded growth plate hypertrophic zone. We generated a knock-in mouse model of an MCDS-causing mutation (COL10A1 p.Asn617Lys to investigate pathogenic mechanisms linking genotype and phenotype. Mice expressing the collagen X mutation had shortened limbs and an expanded hypertrophic zone. Chondrocytes in the hypertrophic zone exhibited endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and a robust unfolded protein response (UPR due to intracellular retention of mutant protein. Hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation and osteoclast recruitment were significantly reduced indicating that the hypertrophic zone was expanded due to a decreased rate of VEGF-mediated vascular invasion of the growth plate. To test directly the role of ER stress and UPR in generating the MCDS phenotype, we produced transgenic mouse lines that used the collagen X promoter to drive expression of an ER stress-inducing protein (the cog mutant of thyroglobulin in hypertrophic chondrocytes. The hypertrophic chondrocytes in this mouse exhibited ER stress with a characteristic UPR response. In addition, the hypertrophic zone was expanded, gene expression patterns were disrupted, osteoclast recruitment to the vascular invasion front was reduced, and long bone growth decreased. Our data demonstrate that triggering ER stress per se in hypertrophic chondrocytes is sufficient to induce the essential features of the cartilage pathology associated with MCDS and confirm that ER stress is a central pathogenic factor in the disease mechanism. These findings support the contention that ER stress may play a direct role in the pathogenesis of many connective tissue disorders associated with the expression of mutant

  13. Effect of Celastrus paniculatus seed oil (Jyothismati oil on acute and chronic immobilization stress induced in swiss albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Lekha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress alters the homeostasis and is produced by several factors. Immobilization stress induced due to reduced floor area provided for the mobility results in the imbalance of oxidant and antioxidant status. The modern computer savvy world decreases human mobility in the working environment, leading to the formation of oxygen free radicals and if left untreated might result in severe health problems like hypertension, cardiovascular disease, premature aging and brain dysfunction. Hence, modern medicines rely upon the medicinal plants for some drugs with zero side effects. In this context, Jyothismati oil (JO, extracted from Celastrus paniculatus seeds, was used to treat acute and chronic immobilization induced experimentally. C. paniculatus plant is considered to be rich in antioxidant content and so the seed oil extract′s efficacy was tested against immobilization stress in albino mice. The animals were kept in a restrainer for short and long durations, grouped separately and fed with the drug. Animals were sacrificed and the samples were analyzed. The antioxidant enzyme levels of the animals regained and markedly increased in the acute and chronic immobilized groups, respectively. The results suggested that the extract of C. paniculatus seed was highly efficacious in reducing the stress induced by least mobility for hours.

  14. Unpredictable chronic stress-induced reproductive suppression associated with the decrease of kisspeptin immunoreactivity in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Omotehara, Takuya; Tatsumi, Atsutoshi; Hashimoto, Rie; Umemura, Yuria; Nagahara, Daichi; Mantani, Youhei; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko

    2014-09-01

    Environmental stress affects various parts of mammals typically through the circulation of stress hormones. It has been identified as one of the possible reasons for male reproductive difficulties, but the complex mechanisms responsible for stress-induced reproductive suppression are poorly understood. Here, we examined the relationship between chronic environmental stress and hypothalamic kisspeptin, a recently discovered upstream regulator of the reproductive endocrine feedback system. We studied male mice under an unpredictable chronic stress procedure to replicate the situation of animals under chronic stress. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed focusing on kisspeptin neurons in the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (ARC) and DNA fragmented cells in seminiferous tubules. Although the ARC was not morphologically altered in either the stressed or non-stressed group, granular kisspeptin immunoreactivities decreased slightly in the stress group. In the testes of the stress group, several signs of testicular degeneration were observed, including increased numbers of ssDNA-positive cells per seminiferous tubule, thinning, vacuoled seminiferous epithelia and multinucleated giant cells. The decreases in kisspeptin in the stress group might be due to other hypothalamic peptides, such as corticotropin-releasing hormone and leptin, whose receptors are known to coexpress in the ARC. In addition, environmental stress directly and indirectly affects testicular function through stress hormones and gonadotropins. In summary, our findings enhance the understanding of stress-induced reproductive suppression possibly mediated by kisspeptin in the ARC.

  15. The shear stress-induced transcription factor KLF2 affects dynamics and angiopoietin-2 content of Weibel-Palade bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen L van Agtmaal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The shear-stress induced transcription factor KLF2 has been shown to induce an atheroprotective phenotype in endothelial cells (EC that are exposed to prolonged laminar shear. In this study we characterized the effect of the shear stress-induced transcription factor KLF2 on regulation and composition of Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs using peripheral blood derived ECs. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Lentiviral expression of KLF2 resulted in a 4.5 fold increase in the number of WPBs per cell when compared to mock-transduced endothelial cells. Unexpectedly, the average length of WPBs was significantly reduced: in mock-transduced endothelial cells WPBs had an average length of 1.7 µm versus 1.3 µm in KLF2 expressing cells. Expression of KLF2 abolished the perinuclear clustering of WPBs observed following stimulation with cAMP-raising agonists such as epinephrine. Immunocytochemistry revealed that WPBs of KLF2 expressing ECs were positive for IL-6 and IL-8 (after their upregulation with IL-1β but lacked angiopoietin-2 (Ang2, a regular component of WPBs. Stimulus-induced secretion of Ang2 in KLF2 expressing ECs was greatly reduced and IL-8 secretion was significantly lower. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that KLF2 expression leads to a change in size and composition of the regulated secretory compartment of endothelial cells and alters its response to physiological stimuli.

  16. Stress-induced changes of neurosteroid profiles in rat brain and plasma under immobilized condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myeong Hyeon; Rehman, Shaheed Ur; Kim, In Sook; Choi, Min Sun; Yoo, Hye Hyun

    2017-05-10

    In this study, various neurosteroids in brain and plasma were simultaneously determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and their profile changes in a stress-induced rats were investigated. The investigated neurosteroids are as follows: progesterone (P4), 5α-dihydroprogesterone (5α-DHP), 5β-dihydroprogesterone, estrone, androstenedione (AE), cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone (CORT), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), pregnanolone (3α,5β-THP), allopregnanolone (ALLO), 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), 11-deoxycortisol, pregnenolone (PREG), and 5α/5β-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (5α/5β-THDOC). Brain and plasma samples were processed using solid-phase extraction with methanol and acetic acid (99:1), and derivatized with a hydroxylamine reagent. Separation was achieved within 13min at a flow rate of 0.4mL/min with a C18 column (3.0×50mm, 2.7μm). The triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was operated in the positive electrospray ionization mode. Using this method, the neurosteroid level variation was quantitated and investigated in the brain and plasma upon immobilization stress in rats. As a result, AE, CORT, DOC, P4, 5α-DHP, 5α/5β-THDOC, DHEA, 3α,5β-THP, ALLO, and PREG levels were significantly altered in both the brain and plasma samples when stress was induced. These findings demonstrated that stress leads to the alteration of the GABAergic neurosteroid profile. The present results will be helpful for furthering an understanding of the role of neurosteroids in stressed conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Personality traits in rats predict vulnerability and resilience to developing stress-induced depression-like behaviors, HPA axis hyper-reactivity and brain changes in pERK1/2 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Jorge E; Diessler, Shanaz; Varea, Emilio; Márquez, Cristina; Larsen, Marianne H; Cordero, M Isabel; Sandi, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that certain behavioral traits, such as anxiety, are associated with the development of depression-like behaviors after exposure to chronic stress. However, single traits do not explain the wide variability in vulnerability to stress observed in outbred populations. We hypothesized that a combination of behavioral traits might provide a better characterization of an individual's vulnerability to prolonged stress. Here, we sought to determine whether the characterization of relevant behavioral traits in rats could aid in identifying individuals with different vulnerabilities to developing stress-induced depression-like behavioral alterations. We also investigated whether behavioral traits would be related to the development of alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and in brain activity - as measured through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2)--in response to an acute stressor following either sub-chronic (2 weeks) or chronic (4 weeks) unpredictable stress (CUS). Sprague-Dawley rats were characterized using a battery of behavioral tasks, and three principal traits were identified: anxiety, exploration and activity. When combined, the first two traits were found to explain the variability in the stress responses. Our findings confirm the increased risk of animals with high anxiety developing certain depression-like behaviors (e.g., increased floating time in the forced swim test) when progressively exposed to stress. In contrast, the behavioral profile based on combined low anxiety and low exploration was resistant to alterations related to social behaviors, while the high anxiety and low exploration profile displayed a particularly vulnerable pattern of physiological and neurobiological responses after sub-chronic stress exposure. Our findings indicate important differences in animals' vulnerability and/or resilience to the effects of repeated stress, particularly during initial or

  18. Repeated exposure to conditioned fear stress increases anxiety and delays sleep recovery following exposure to an acute traumatic stressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin N Greenwood

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated stressor exposure can sensitize physiological responses to novel stressors and facilitate the development of stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety. Disruptions in diurnal rhythms of sleep-wake behavior accompany stress-related psychiatric disorders and could contribute to their development. Complex stressors that include fear-eliciting stimuli can be a component of repeated stress experienced by humans, but whether exposure to repeated fear can prime the development of anxiety and sleep disturbances is unknown. In the current study, adult male F344 rats were exposed to either control conditions or repeated contextual fear conditioning for 22 days followed by exposure to either no, mild (10, or severe (100 acute uncontrollable tail shock stress. Exposure to acute stress produced anxiety-like behavior as measured by a reduction in juvenile social exploration and exaggerated shock-elicited freezing in a novel context. Prior exposure to repeated fear enhanced anxiety-like behavior as measured by shock-elicited freezing, but did not alter social exploratory behavior. The potentiation of anxiety produced by prior repeated fear was temporary; exaggerated fear was present 1 day but not 4 days following acute stress. Interestingly, exposure to acute stress reduced REM and NREM sleep during the hours immediately following acute stress. This initial reduction in sleep was followed by robust REM rebound and diurnal rhythm flattening of sleep / wake behavior. Prior repeated fear extended the acute stress-induced REM and NREM sleep loss, impaired REM rebound, and prolonged the flattening of the diurnal rhythm of NREM sleep following acute stressor exposure. These data suggest that impaired recovery of sleep / wake behavior following acute stress could contribute to the mechanisms by which a history of prior repeated stress increases vulnerability to subsequent novel stressors and stress-related disorders.

  19. Consumption of mixed fruit-juice drink and vitamin C reduces postprandial stress induced by a high fat meal in healthy overweight subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Ilaria; Villano, Debora V; Roberts, Susan A; Cesqui, Eleonora; Raguzzini, Anna; Borges, Gina; Crozier, Alan; Catasta, Giovina; Toti, Elisabetta; Serafini, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Postprandial stress induced by acute consumption of meals with a high fat content results in an increase of markers of cardiometabolic risk. Repeated acute dietary stress may induce a persistent low-grade inflammation, playing a role in the pathogenesis of functional gut diseases. This may cause an impairment of the complex immune response of the gastrointestinal mucosa, which results in a breakdown of oral tolerance. We investigated the effect of ingestion of a fruit-juice drink (FJD) composed by multiple fruit juice and extracts, green tea extracts and vitamin C on postprandial stress induced by a High Fat Meal (HFM) in healthy overweight subjects. Following a double blind, placebo controlled, cross-over design, 15 healthy overweight subjects were randomized to a HFM providing 1334 Kcal (55% fat, 30% carbohydrates and 15% proteins) in combination with 500 mL of a placebo drink (HFM-P) or a fruit-juice drink (HFM-FJD). Ingestion of HFM-P led to an increase in circulating levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, TNF-α and IL-6. Ingestion of HFM-FJD significantly reduced plasma levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, decreasing inflammatory response mediated by TNF-α and IL-6. Ingestion of a fruit-juice drink reduce markers of postprandial stress induced by a HFM.

  20. Phase Stability and Stress-Induced Transformations in Beta Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, R. Prakash; Joost, William J.; Ankem, Sreeramamurthy

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we provide a brief review of the recent developments related to the relationship between phase stability and stress-induced transformations in metastable body-centered-cubic β-phase titanium alloys. Stress-induced transformations occur during tensile, compressive, and creep loading and influence the mechanical response. These transformations are not fully understood and increased understanding of these mechanisms will permit future development of improved alloys for aerospace, biomedical, and energy applications. In the first part of this article, we review phase stability and discuss a few recent developments. In the second section, we discuss the current status of understanding stress-induced transformations and several areas that require further study. We also provide our perspective on the direction of future research efforts. Additionally, we address the occurrence of the hcp ω-phase and the orthorhombic α″-martensite phase stress-induced transformations.

  1. Catalase activity as a biomarker for mild-stress-induced robustness in Bacillus weihenstephanensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besten, den H.M.W.; Effraimidou, S.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to survive and grow in changing environments by activating stress adaptation mechanisms which may enhance bacterial robustness. Stress-induced enhanced robustness complicates the predictability of microbial inactivation. Using psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis strai

  2. Adolescent personality: associations with Basal, awakening, and stress-induced cortisol responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceulle, Odilia M; Nederhof, Esther; van Aken, Marcel A G; Ormel, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the associations between personality facets and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning. Previous studies have mainly focussed on stress-induced HPA-axis activation. We hypothesized that other characteristics of HPA-axis functioning would have a stronger association with personality based on the neuroendocrine literature. Data (n = 343) were used from the TRacking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS), a large prospective cohort study of Dutch adolescents. We studied the association between facets of Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Conscientiousness and basal cortisol, the cortisol awakening response (CAR), and four measures of stress-induced HPA-axis activity. Basal cortisol levels were related to facets of all three personality traits. The CAR and stress-induced cortisol were not related to personality. Possibly due to its more trait-like nature, basal cortisol seems more informative than stress-induced cortisol when investigating trait-like characteristics such as personality facets.

  3. Effect of bromazepam on stress-induced gastric ulcer in rats and its relation to brain neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, S F; Agha, A M; Amrin, A el-N

    2001-12-01

    The possible antiulcer potential of bromazepam was investigated in relation to its effect on the levels of central neurotransmitters in rats. Peptic ulcer was induced by cold-restraint stress, by immobilizing the animals in open wire restraint cages placed for 2 h at 4 degrees C. Bromazepam (1 and 2 mg x kg(-1), i.p.) was given as prophylactic regimens, either as a single (2 h before ulcer induction) or repeated (twice daily for 15 days) administration. Results revealed that single (1 mg x kg(-1)) and repeated (1 and 2 mg x kg(-1)) dose regimens of bromazepam succeeded in preventing gastric ulceration, without significant effects on the protein-bound hexose content of gastric mucus. Increases in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations in almost all tested brain regions were observed in bromazepam-treated groups, as compared to the control stressed group. Cortical dopamine (D) concentrations were reduced following single (2 mg x kg(-1)) as well as repeated administration of bromazepam. Similarly, norepinephrine (NE) concentrations were decreased in the cerebral cortex and thalamus/hypothalamus by repeated doses of bromazepam. Cortical 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) was elevated by single (1 mg x kg(-1)) and repeated (1 mg x kg(-1)) doses of the drug. It could be concluded that bromazepam affords a good gastroprotective potential against cold-restraint stress-induced gastric ulceration and the possible mechanisms might involve an increase in the inhibitory GABA and a suppression of the stimulatory NE and D in central regions, especially the cerebral cortex and/or thalamus/hypothalamus. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. Post-training reward partially restores chronic stress induced effects in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Dalm

    Full Text Available Reduced responsiveness to positive stimuli is a core symptom of depression, known as anhedonia. In the present study, we assessed the expression of anhedonia in our chronic stress mouse model using a subset of read-out parameters. In line with this, we investigated in how far chronic stress would affect the facilitating effect of post-training self-administration of sugar, as we previously observed in naïve mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were repeatedly and at unpredictable times exposed to rats (no physical contact over the course of two weeks. Following novelty exploration, (non- spatial learning and memory processes with and without post-training sugar acting as reinforcer, emotionality, reward sensitivity and corticosterone levels were determined. We found that (1 the effects of chronic stress persisted beyond the period of the actual rat exposure. (2 Post-training self-administration of sugar as reinforcer improved spatial performance in naïve mice, whereas (3 in stressed mice sugar partially "normalized" the impaired performance to the level of controls without sugar. Chronic stress (4 increased behavioral inhibition in response to novelty; (5 induced dynamic changes in the pattern of circadian corticosterone secretion during the first week after rat stress and (6 increased the intake of sucrose and water. (7 Chronic stress and sugar consumed during spatial training facilitated the memory for the location of the sucrose bottle weeks later. Concluding, our chronic stress paradigm induces the expression of anhedonia in mice, at different levels of behavior. The behavioral inhibition appears to be long lasting in stressed mice. Interestingly, sugar consumed in close context with spatial learning partially rescued the stress-induced emotional and cognitive impairments. This suggests that reward can ameliorate part of the negative consequences of chronic stress on memory.

  5. Electrical-stress-induced transport and surface potential characterizations of metal/ TiO 2/metal planar junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haeri; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2011-03-01

    Electric-field-induced resistive switching (RS) phenomena in metal oxides have attracted considerable research interest due to their potential use in nonvolatile memory device applications. Intensive investigations have revealed that coupled electron ion dynamics play a key role the RS mechanism. Metal/single crystal junction can be an ideal model system to study how the ionic drift and diffusion can affect the resistance. We investigated transport and local electrical properties of Pt/ Ti O2 single crystal/Ti planar junctions with micron- sized gaps between the electrodes. Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) showed that negative (positive) electrical stress to the Pt electrodes significantly reduced (hardly affected) the Pt/ Ti O2 contact resistance. The SKPM results also revealed that the electrical stress caused alteration of the local work function of Ti O2 . The comparative investigations of the transport and SKPM results suggested that the electrical stress induced redistribution of ions, resulting in the change of the junction resistance.

  6. Physiological Stress-Induced Drug Resistance and its Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    resistance but does shift the dose response curve . • Demonstrate that p53 status does not alter sensitization to drug by NFkB inhibitors such as PGA1...Figure 13). The presence of p53 (ON) shifts the dose response curve to the right but the response remains the same. PGA1 pretreatment, sensitizes...shift the dose response curve . • Demonstrate that p53 status does not alter sensitization to drug by NFkB inhibitors such as PGA1. • Demonstrated that

  7. Translational profiling of stress-induced neuroplasticity in the CA3 pyramidal neurons of BDNF Val66Met mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J D; Rubin, T G; Kogan, J F; Marrocco, J; Weidmann, J; Lindkvist, S; Lee, F S; Schmidt, E F; McEwen, B S

    2016-12-13

    Genetic susceptibility and environmental factors (such as stress) can interact to affect the likelihood of developing a mood disorder. Stress-induced changes in the hippocampus have been implicated in mood disorders, and mutations in several genes have now been associated with increased risk, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The hippocampus has important anatomical subdivisions, and pyramidal neurons of the vulnerable CA3 region show significant remodeling after chronic stress, but the mechanisms underlying their unique plasticity remain unknown. This study characterizes stress-induced changes in the in vivo translating mRNA of this cell population using a CA3-specific enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter fused to the L10a large ribosomal subunit (EGFPL10a). RNA-sequencing after isolation of polysome-bound mRNAs allows for cell-type-specific, genome-wide characterization of translational changes after stress. The data demonstrate that acute and chronic stress produce unique translational profiles and that the stress history of the animal can alter future reactivity of CA3 neurons. CA3-specific EGFPL10a mice were then crossed to the stress-susceptible BDNF Val66Met mouse line to characterize how a known genetic susceptibility alters both baseline translational profiles and the reactivity of CA3 neurons to stress. Not only do Met allele carriers exhibit distinct levels of baseline translation in genes implicated in ion channel function and cytoskeletal regulation, but they also activate a stress response profile that is highly dissimilar from wild-type mice. Closer examination of genes implicated in the mechanisms of neuroplasticity, such as the NMDA and AMPA subunits and the BDNF pathway, reveal how wild-type mice upregulate many of these genes in response to stress, but Met allele carriers fail to do so. These profiles provide a roadmap of stress-induced changes in a genetically homogenous population of hippocampal neurons and

  8. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  9. Apoplastic reactive oxygen species transiently decrease auxin signaling and cause stress-induced morphogenic response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomster, Tiina; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Sipari, Nina; Brosché, Mikael; Ahlfors, Reetta; Keinänen, Markku; Overmyer, Kirk; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2011-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are ubiquitous signaling molecules in plant stress and development. To gain further insight into the plant transcriptional response to apoplastic ROS, the phytotoxic atmospheric pollutant ozone was used as a model ROS inducer in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and gene expression was analyzed with microarrays. In contrast to the increase in signaling via the stress hormones salicylic acid, abscisic acid, jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene, ROS treatment caused auxin signaling to be transiently suppressed, which was confirmed with a DR5-uidA auxin reporter construct. Transcriptomic data revealed that various aspects of auxin homeostasis and signaling were modified by apoplastic ROS. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of auxin signaling showed that transcripts of several auxin receptors and Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional repressors were reduced in response to apoplastic ROS. The ROS-derived changes in the expression of auxin signaling genes partially overlapped with abiotic stress, pathogen responses, and salicylic acid signaling. Several mechanisms known to suppress auxin signaling during biotic stress were excluded, indicating that ROS regulated auxin responses via a novel mechanism. Using mutants defective in various auxin (axr1, nit1, aux1, tir1 afb2, iaa28-1, iaa28-2) and JA (axr1, coi1-16) responses, ROS-induced cell death was found to be regulated by JA but not by auxin. Chronic ROS treatment resulted in altered leaf morphology, a stress response known as "stress-induced morphogenic response." Altered leaf shape of tir1 afb2 suggests that auxin was a negative regulator of stress-induced morphogenic response in the rosette.

  10. Influence of Stress-Induced Catecholamines on Macrophage Phagocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    levels of adenosine-3’, 5"-cyclic monophosphate on phagocytosis: effects on macrophage- Trypanosoma cruzi interaction. J. Immunol. 129:2757. 11 7. Lima...decreased phagocytosis of Trgpanosoma cruzi (6) and IgG-coated erythrocytes (7,B) by mouse macrophages. Alterations in cAMP concentrations influence

  11. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel by iptakalim normalizes stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behaviour by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Jie; Zhao, Zhan; Yang, Dan-Dan; Cao, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Ling; Ji, Juan; Gu, Jun; Huang, Ji-Ye; Sun, Xiu-Lan

    2017-02-01

    Stress-induced disturbance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is strongly implicated in incidence of mood disorders. A heightened neuroinflammatory response and oxidative stress play a fundamental role in the dysfunction of the HPA axis. We have previously demonstrated that iptakalim (Ipt), a new ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channel opener, could prevent oxidative injury and neuroinflammation against multiple stimuli-induced brain injury. The present study was to demonstrate the impacts of Ipt in stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behavior. We employed 2 stress paradigms: 8 weeks of continuous restraint stress (chronic restraint stress, CRS) and 2h of restraint stress (acute restraint stress, ARS), to mimic both chronic stress and severe acute stress. Prolonged (4 weeks) and short-term (a single injection) Ipt treatment was administered 30min before each stress paradigm. We found that HPA axis was altered after stress, with different responses to CRS (lower ACTH and CORT, higher AVP, but normal CRH) and ARS (higher CRH, ACTH and CORT, but normal AVP). Both prolonged and short-term Ipt treatment normalized stress-induced HPA axis disorders and abnormal behaviors in mice. CRS and ARS up-regulated mRNA levels of inflammation-related molecules (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and TLR4) and oxidative stress molecules (gp91phox, iNOS and Nrf2) in the mouse hypothalamus. Double immunofluorescence showed CRS and ARS increased microglia activation (CD11b and TNFα) and oxidative stress in neurons (NeuN and gp91phox), which were alleviated by Ipt. Therefore, the present study reveals that Ipt could prevent against stress-induced HPA axis disorders and depressive behavior by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in the hypothalamus.

  12. Fenton reaction induced cancer in wild type rats recapitulates genomic alterations observed in human cancer.

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    Shinya Akatsuka

    Full Text Available Iron overload has been associated with carcinogenesis in humans. Intraperitoneal administration of ferric nitrilotriacetate initiates a Fenton reaction in renal proximal tubules of rodents that ultimately leads to a high incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC after repeated treatments. We performed high-resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridization to identify characteristics in the genomic profiles of this oxidative stress-induced rat RCCs. The results revealed extensive large-scale genomic alterations with a preference for deletions. Deletions and amplifications were numerous and sometimes fragmented, demonstrating that a Fenton reaction is a cause of such genomic alterations in vivo. Frequency plotting indicated that two of the most commonly altered loci corresponded to a Cdkn2a/2b deletion and a Met amplification. Tumor sizes were proportionally associated with Met expression and/or amplification, and clustering analysis confirmed our results. Furthermore, we developed a procedure to compare whole genomic patterns of the copy number alterations among different species based on chromosomal syntenic relationship. Patterns of the rat RCCs showed the strongest similarity to the human RCCs among five types of human cancers, followed by human malignant mesothelioma, an iron overload-associated cancer. Therefore, an iron-dependent Fenton chemical reaction causes large-scale genomic alterations during carcinogenesis, which may result in distinct genomic profiles. Based on the characteristics of extensive genome alterations in human cancer, our results suggest that this chemical reaction may play a major role during human carcinogenesis.

  13. Restraint stress-induced morphological changes at the blood-brain barrier in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eSántha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is well known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognised in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3 and 21 days were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occludin and glucose transporter-1 and astroglia (GFAP. Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, one-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5 and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes

  14. Raman spectroscopic study of acute oxidative stress induced changes in mice skeletal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Alimova, Alexandra; Chakraverty, Rahul; Katz, A.; Gayen, S. K.; Larsson, L.; Savage, H. E.; Alfano, R. R.

    2008-02-01

    The oxidative stress due to free radicals is implicated in the pathogenesis of tissue damage in diseases such as muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer dementia, diabetes mellitus, and mitochrondrial myopathies. In this study, the acute oxidative stress induced changes in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in mouse skeletal muscles are studied in vitro using Raman spectroscopy. Mammalian skeletal muscles are rich in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides in both reduced (NADH) and oxidized (NAD) states, as they are sites of aerobic and anaerobic respiration. The relative levels of NAD and NADH are altered in certain physiological and pathological conditions of skeletal muscles. In this study, near infrared Raman spectroscopy is used to identify the molecular fingerprints of NAD and NADH in five-week-old mice biceps femoris muscles. A Raman vibrational mode of NADH is identified in fresh skeletal muscle samples suspended in buffered normal saline. In the same samples, when treated with 1% H IIO II for 5 minutes and 15 minutes, the Raman spectrum shows molecular fingerprints specific to NAD and the disappearance of NADH vibrational bands. The NAD bands after 15 minutes were more intense than after 5 minutes. Since NADH fluoresces and NAD does not, fluorescence spectroscopy is used to confirm the results of the Raman measurements. Fluorescence spectra exhibit an emission peak at 460 nm, corresponding to NADH emission wavelength in fresh muscle samples; while the H IIO II treated muscle samples do not exhibit NADH fluorescence. Raman spectroscopy may be used to develop a minimally invasive, in vivo optical biopsy method to measure the relative NAD and NADH levels in muscle tissues. This may help to detect diseases of muscle, including mitochondrial myopathies and muscular dystrophies.

  15. Desiccation stress induces developmental heterochrony in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LEENA THORAT; DASHARATH P OULKAR; KAUSHIK BANERJEE; BIMALENDU B NATH

    2016-09-01

    Stressful environments are known to perturb developmental patterns in insects. In the purview of desiccation as astressor, relatively little is known about the developmental consequences linked with desiccation tolerance. In thisstudy, we have particularly focused on the exploration of the temporal profile of postembryonic development inresponse to desiccation exposure in Drosophila melanogaster and the associated trade-offs. We document a correlationbetween variations in 20-hydroxyecdysone levels and the altered timing of metamorphic events during the lifecycle. Following desiccation, we observed an extension in the larval longevity whereas the duration of the pupal andadult stages was significantly shortened. Alternately, feeding of 20-hydroxyecdysone apparently led to the restorationof the normal temporal pattern of development in the desiccated group. In spite of the desiccation-responsiveheterochronic shifts in development, the overall lifespan post recovery remained almost unaltered among thedesiccated and undesiccated groups suggesting plasticity in developmental control. This observation reminisces ‘canalization-like’ phenomenon that buffers alterations in the overall lifespan. We thus identified a desiccation responsiveperiod in the lifespan of D. melanogaster during which variations in ecdysone levels are capable to alter thetemporal course of development.

  16. A Deletion Variant of the α2b-Adrenoceptor Modulates the Stress-Induced Shift from "Cognitive" to "Habit" Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Lisa; Wacker, Jan; Felten, Andrea; Reuter, Martin; Schwabe, Lars

    2017-02-22

    Stress induces a shift from hippocampus-based "cognitive" toward dorsal striatum-based "habitual" learning and memory. This shift is thought to have important implications for stress-related psychopathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, there is large individual variability in the stress-induced bias toward habit memory, and the factors underlying this variability are completely unknown. Here we hypothesized that a functional deletion variant of the gene encoding the α2b-adrenoceptor (ADRA2B), which has been linked to emotional memory processes and increased PTSD risk, modulates the stress-induced shift from cognitive toward habit memory. In two independent experimental studies, healthy humans were genotyped for the ADRA2B deletion variant. After a stress or control manipulation, participants completed a dual-solution learning task while electroencephalographic (Study I) or fMRI measurements (Study II) were taken. Carriers compared with noncarriers of the ADRA2B deletion variant exhibited a significantly reduced bias toward habit memory after stress. fMRI results indicated that, whereas noncarriers of the ADRA2B deletion variant showed increased functional connectivity between amygdala and putamen after stress, this increase in connectivity was absent in carriers of the deletion variant, who instead showed overall enhanced connectivity between amygdala and entorhinal cortex. Our results indicate that a common genetic variation of the noradrenergic system modulates the impact of stress on the balance between cognitive and habitual memory systems, most likely via altered amygdala orchestration of these systems.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Stressful events have a powerful effect on human learning and memory. Specifically, accumulating evidence suggests that stress favors more rigid dorsal striatum-dependent habit memory, at the expense of flexible hippocampus-dependent cognitive memory. Although this shift may have important implications for

  17. Possible Involvement of µ Opioid Receptor in the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Shuyu Formula in Restraint Stress-Induced Depression-Like Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-rong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently μ opioid receptor (MOR has been shown to be closely associated with depression. Here we investigated the action of Shuyu, a Chinese herbal prescription, on repeated restraint stress induced depression-like rats, with specific attention to the role of MOR and the related signal cascade. Our results showed that repeated restraint stress caused significant depressive-like behaviors, as evidenced by reduced body weight gain, prolonged duration of immobility in forced swimming test, and decreased number of square-crossings and rearings in open field test. The stress-induced depression-like behaviors were relieved by Shuyu, which was accompanied by decreased expression of MOR in hippocampus. Furthermore, Shuyu upregulated BDNF protein expression, restored the activity of CREB, and stimulated MEK and ERK phosphorylation in hippocampus of stressed rats. More importantly, MOR is involved in the effects of Shuyu on these depression-related signals, as they can be strengthened by MOR antagonist CTAP. Collectively, these data indicated that the antidepressant-like properties of Shuyu are associated with MOR and the corresponding CREB, BDNF, MEK, and ERK signal pathway. Our study supports clinical use of Shuyu as an effective treatment of depression and also suggests that MOR might be a target for treatment of depression and developing novel antidepressants.

  18. Tianeptine, olanzapine and fluoxetine show similar restoring effects on stress induced molecular changes in mice brain: An FT-IR study

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    Türker-Kaya, Sevgi; Mutlu, Oğuz; Çelikyurt, İpek K.; Akar, Furuzan; Ulak, Güner

    2016-05-01

    Chronic stress which can cause a variety of disorders and illness ranging from metabolic and cardiovascular to mental leads to alterations in content, structure and dynamics of biomolecules in brain. The determination of stress-induced changes along with the effects of antidepressant treatment on these parameters might bring about more effective therapeutic strategies. In the present study, we investigated unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS)-induced changes in biomolecules in mouse brain and the restoring effects of tianeptine (TIA), olanzapine (OLZ) and fluoxetine (FLX) on these variations, by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The results revealed that chronic stress causes different membrane packing and an increase in lipid peroxidation, membrane fluidity. A significant increment for lipid/protein, Cdbnd O/lipid, CH3/lipid, CH2/lipid, PO-2/lipid, COO-/lipid and RNA/protein ratios but a significant decrease for lipid/protein ratios were also obtained. Additionally, altered protein secondary structure components were estimated, such as increment in random coils and beta structures. The administration of TIA, OLZ and FLX drugs restored these stress-induced variations except for alterations in protein structure and RNA/protein ratio. This may suggest that these drugs have similar restoring effects on the consequences of stress activity in brain, in spite of the differences in their action mechanisms. All findings might have importance in understanding molecular mechanisms underlying chronic stress and contribute to studies aimed for drug development.

  19. Oxidative-stress-induced epigenetic changes in chronic diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Biao; Ruiz, Michael Anthony; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2013-03-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development and progression of chronic diabetic complications. Diabetes causes mitochondrial superoxide overproduction in the endothelial cells of both large and small vessels. This increased superoxide production causes the activation of several signal pathways involved in the pathogenesis of chronic complications. In particular, endothelial cells are major targets of glucose-induced oxidative damage in the target organs. Oxidative stress activates cellular signaling pathways and transcription factors in endothelial cells including protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), forkhead box O (FOXO), and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB). Oxidative stress also causes DNA damage and activates DNA nucleotide excision repair enzymes including the excision repair cross complimenting 1(ERCC1), ERCC4, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Augmented production of histone acetyltransferase p300, and alterations of histone deacetylases, including class III deacetylases sirtuins, are also involved in this process. Recent research has found that small noncoding RNAs, like microRNA, are a new kind of regulator associated with chronic diabetic complications. There are extensive and complicated interactions and among these molecules. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the role of oxidative stress in the development of diabetic complications in relation to epigenetic changes such as acetylation and microRNA alterations.

  20. BDNF and VEGF in the pathogenesis of stress-induced affective diseases: an insight from experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacka, Marta; Obuchowicz, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Stress is known to play an important role in etiology, development and progression of affective diseases. Especially, chronic stress, by initiating changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA), neurotransmission and the immune system, acts as a trigger for affective diseases. It has been reported that the rise in the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines and persistent up-regulation of glucocorticoid expression in the brain and periphery increases the excitotoxic effect on CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus resulting in dendritic atrophy, apoptosis of neurons and possibly inhibition of neurogenesis in adult brain. Stress was observed to disrupt neuroplasticity in the brain, and growing evidence demonstrates its role in the pathomechanism of affective disorders. Experimental studies indicate that a well-known brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which have recently focused increasing attention of neuroscientists, promote cell survival, positively modulate neuroplasticity and hippocampal neurogenesis. In this paper, we review the alterations in BDNF and VEGF pathways induced by chronic and acute stress, and their relationships with HPA axis activity. Moreover, behavioral effects evoked in rodents by both above-mentioned factors and the effects consequent to their deficit are presented. Biochemical as well as behavioral findings suggest that BDNF and VEGF play an important role as components of cascade of changes in the pathomechanism of stress-induced affective diseases. Further studies on the mechanisms regulating their expression in stress conditions are needed to better understand the significance of trophic hypothesis of stress-induced affective diseases.

  1. Structure-dependent behavior of stress-induced voiding in Cu interconnects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Zhenyu, E-mail: wuzhenyu@xidian.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Yang Yintang; Chai Changchun; Li Yuejin; Wang Jiayou; Li Bin; Liu Jing [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2010-05-03

    Stress modeling and cross-section failure analysis by focused-ion-beam have been used to investigate stress-induced voiding phenomena in Cu interconnects. The voiding mechanism and the effect of the interconnect structure on the stress migration have been studied. The results show that the most concentrated tensile stress appears and voids form at corners of vias on top surfaces of Cu M1 lines. A simple model of stress induced voiding in which vacancies arise due to the increase of the chemical potential under tensile stress and diffuse under the force of stress gradient along the main diffusing path indicates that stress gradient rather than stress itself determines the voiding rate. Cu interconnects with larger vias show less resistance to stress-induced voiding due to larger stress gradient at corners of vias.

  2. Magnetic indication of the stress-induced martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic Ni-Mn-Ga alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heczko, O. [Laboratory of Materials Science, Helsinki University of Technology, Vuorimiehentie 2A, P.O. Box 6200, FIN-02015 TKK, Espoo (Finland); L' vov, V.A. [Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko University, Glushkov str. 2, build. 5, 03022 Kiev (Ukraine); Straka, L. [Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, Rakentajanaukio 2C, P.O. Box 2200, FIN-02015, Espoo (Finland)]. E-mail: ladislav.straka@hut.fi; Hannula, S.-P. [Laboratory of Materials Science, Helsinki University of Technology, Vuorimiehentie 2A, P.O. Box 6200, FIN-02015 TKK, Espoo (Finland)

    2006-07-15

    A quantitative study of the stress-induced martensitic transformation in Ni{sub 49.7}Mn{sub 29.1}Ga{sub 21.2} magnetic shape memory alloy has been carried out in two different ways: the first way is based on the measurements of saturation magnetization under variable mechanical stress and the second one is founded on the quantitative theoretical treatment of experimental stress-strain loops. A functional dependence between the volume fraction of transformed martensite and applied stress has been determined from both magnetization and strain values. A quantitative agreement between the functions determined in two different ways has been observed, and hence, the effectiveness of the magnetic indication of the stress-induced martensitic transformations has been proved. This method can be used to monitor stress-induced transformations in martensitic films, needles and small specimens.

  3. Magnetic indication of the stress-induced martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic Ni Mn Ga alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heczko, O.; L'vov, V. A.; Straka, L.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2006-07-01

    A quantitative study of the stress-induced martensitic transformation in Ni 49.7Mn 29.1Ga 21.2 magnetic shape memory alloy has been carried out in two different ways: the first way is based on the measurements of saturation magnetization under variable mechanical stress and the second one is founded on the quantitative theoretical treatment of experimental stress-strain loops. A functional dependence between the volume fraction of transformed martensite and applied stress has been determined from both magnetization and strain values. A quantitative agreement between the functions determined in two different ways has been observed, and hence, the effectiveness of the magnetic indication of the stress-induced martensitic transformations has been proved. This method can be used to monitor stress-induced transformations in martensitic films, needles and small specimens.

  4. Low dose effects of a Withania somnifera extract on altered marble burying behavior in stressed mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Amitabha; Chatterjee, Shyam Sunder; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Withania somnifera root (WSR) extracts are often used in traditionally known Indian systems of medicine for prevention and cure of psychosomatic disorders. The reported experiment was designed to test whether low daily oral doses of such extracts are also effective in suppressing marble burying behavior in stressed mice or not. Materials and Methods: Groups of mice treated with 10, 20, or 40 mg/kg daily oral doses of WSR were subjected to a foot shock stress-induced hyperthermia test on the 1st, 5th, 7th, and 10th day of the experiment. On the 11th and 12th treatment days, they were subjected to marble burying tests. Stress response suppressing effects of low dose WSR were estimated by its effects on body weight and basal core temperature of animals during the course of the experiment. Results: Alterations in bodyweight and basal core temperature triggered by repeated exposures to foot shock stress were absent even in the 10 mg/kg/day WSR treated group, whereas the effectiveness of the extract in foot shock stress-induced hyperthermia and marble burying tests increased with its increasing daily dose. Conclusion: Marble burying test in stressed mice is well suited for identifying bioactive constituents of W. somnifera like medicinal plants with adaptogenic, anxiolytic and antidepressant activities, or for quantifying pharmacological interactions between them. PMID:27366354

  5. Chronic stress-induced hippocampal vulnerability: the glucocorticoid vulnerability hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Cheryl D

    2008-01-01

    The hippocampus, a limbic structure important in learning and memory, is particularly sensitive to chronic stress and to glucocorticoids. While glucocorticoids are essential for an effective stress response, their oversecretion was originally hypothesized to contribute to age-related hippocampal degeneration. However, conflicting findings were reported on whether prolonged exposure to elevated glucocorticoids endangered the hippocampus and whether the primate hippocampus even responded to glucocorticoids as the rodent hippocampus did. This review discusses the seemingly inconsistent findings about the effects of elevated and prolonged glucocorticoids on hippocampal health and proposes that a chronic stress history, which includes repeated elevation of glucocorticoids, may make the hippocampus vulnerable to potential injury. Studies are described to show that chronic stress or prolonged exposure to glucocorticoids can compromise the hippocampus by producing dendritic retraction, a reversible form of plasticity that includes dendritic restructuring without irreversible cell death. Conditions that produce dendritic retraction are hypothesized to make the hippocampus vulnerable to neurotoxic or metabolic challenges. Of particular interest is the finding that the hippocampus can recover from dendritic retraction without any noticeable cell loss. When conditions surrounding dendritic retraction are present, the potential for harm is increased because dendritic retraction may persist for weeks, months or even years, thereby broadening the window of time during which the hippocampus is vulnerable to harm, called the 'glucocorticoid vulnerability hypothesis'. The relevance of these findings is discussed with regard to conditions exhibiting parallels in hippocampal plasticity, including Cushing's disease, major depressive disorder (MDD), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  6. Fluoxetine and diazepam acutely modulate stress induced-behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, Ana Cristina V V; Abreu, Murilo S; Giacomini, Luidia V; Siebel, Anna M; Zimerman, Fernanda F; Rambo, Cassiano L; Mocelin, Ricieri; Bonan, Carla D; Piato, Angelo L; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    Drug residue contamination in aquatic ecosystems has been studied extensively, but the behavioral effects exerted by the presence of these drugs are not well known. Here, we investigated the effects of acute stress on anxiety, memory, social interaction, and aggressiveness in zebrafish exposed to fluoxetine and diazepam at concentrations that disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis. Stress increased the locomotor activity and time spent in the bottom area of the tank (novel tank). Fluoxetine and diazepam prevented these behaviors. We also observed that stress and fluoxetine and diazepam exposures decreased social interaction. Stress also increased aggressive behavior, which was not reversed by fluoxetine or diazepam. These data suggest that the presence of these drugs in aquatic ecosystems causes significant behavioral alterations in fish.

  7. The stress-inducible displacement detected through RSA in non-migrating UKR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragonzoni, Laura; Russo, Alessandro; Loreti, Ivano; Montagna, Luisa; Visani, Andrea; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2005-08-01

    Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) under stress conditions was used to investigate possible stress-inducible displacement of the tibial component of unicompartmental knee prostheses (UKR) in which the stability was previously assessed by radiographic evaluation and standard supine RSA examinations. Sixteen patients, implanted with Duracon UNI(R) prosthesis, were selected for this study. The RSA protocol included examinations in plain upright standing posture and during execution of stress-inducing tasks in weight-bearing stance. The first follow-up was performed at an average of 14 months, and the second one at 26 months. The results showed non-negligible stress-induced rotations of the prosthetic tibial component in all the patients in most of the stress tasks performed. Rotational stress tasks and squatting turned out to be the stress conditions in which induced displacement reached the most significant values (p<0.05). These micromotions occurred mainly around the transverse axis of the knee joint and in one examination around the sagittal axis. Stress-induced translations were negligible in all the examinations. Moreover, we focused our attention on two patients suffering from inexplicable pain, and we observed a significant difference in the inducible rotation around the x-axis between these patients and the remaining fourteen. Stress-inducible displacement is a common finding in knee prostheses, but we observed that in patients with inexplicable pain, these micromotions reached values greater than the median calculated on patients without any pain. This result suggests the introduction of the stress-inducible displacement as a new parameter to be taken into consideration when analyzing the outcome of patients treated by UKR.

  8. Cardioprotective effect of amlodipine in oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhira Begum

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether the administration of amlodipine ameliorates oxidative stress induced by experimental myocardial infarction in rats. Adrenaline was administered and myocardial damage was evaluated biochemically [significantly increased serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and malondialdehyde (MDA levels of myocardial tissue] and histologically (morphological changes of myocardium. Amlodipine was administered as pretreatment for 14 days in adrenaline treated rats. Statistically significant amelioration in all the biochemical parameters supported by significantly improved myocardial morphology was observed in amlodipine pretreatment. It was concluded that amlodipine afforded cardioprotection by reducing oxidative stress induced in experimental myocardial infarction of catecholamine assault.

  9. Stress-induced traveltime variations at SAFOD revealed by continuous cross-well active source monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Niu, F.; Daley, T. M.; Taira, T.

    2016-12-01

    The time-varying stress/strain field at seismogenic depths is arguable the single most important property controlling the sequencing and nucleation of seismic events. The measurement of stress, however, is notoriously difficult, particularly at seismogenic depths. Seismic imaging, in principle, has the capability to provide this critical depth component. Numerous laboratory studies over the last few decades have shown that the elastic properties of crustal rocks clearly exhibit stress dependence. Such dependence is attributed to the opening/closing of fluid-filled cracks in response to changes in the stress normal to the crack surface. Temporal changes in stress are thus, in principle, measurable through seismic imaging of changes in elastic properties, such as seismic velocity field. We have been conducting continuous cross-well active source experiments utilizing the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) pilot and main holes to develop a seismic stress meter to monitor the subsurface stress field by exploring the velocity-stress sensitivity. In a two-month period in 2005-2006, we found a 0.3% change in the average S-wave velocity, which shows a good correlation with barometric pressure, corresponding to a stress sensitivity of 2.4x10-7Pa-1. We also observed two large excursions in the delay time measurement, corresponding to 0.55% and 0.15% decreases of seismic velocity, that are coincident with two earthquakes that are among those predicted to produce the largest coseismic stress changes. The two excursions started approximately 10 and 2 hours before the events, respectively, suggesting that they may be related to pre-rupture stress induced changes in crack properties, as observed in early laboratory studies. We repeated the experiment in early 2010 with a slightly different experiment configuration, and collected 40-days data. The new data confirmed the negative correlation between traveltime and barometric pressure. The estimated stress sensitivity is

  10. Central serotonin depletion modulates the behavioural, endocrine and physiological responses to repeated social stress and subsequent c-fos expression in the brains of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, K K; Martinez, M; Herbert, J

    1999-01-01

    Intraspecific confrontation has been used to study effect of depleting central serotonin on the adaptation of male rats to repeated social stress (social defeat). Four groups of adult male rats were used (serotonin depletion/sham: stressed; serotonin depletion/sham: non-stressed). Central serotonin was reduced (by 59-97%) by a single infusion of the neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxtryptamine (150 microg) into the cerebral ventricles; levels of dopamine and noradrenaline were unaltered (rats received appropriate uptake blockers prior to neurotoxic infusions). Sham-operated animals received solute only. Rats were then either exposed daily for 10 days to a second larger aggressive male in the latter's home cage, or simply transferred to an empty cage (control procedure). Rats with reduced serotonin failed to show the increased freezing behaviour during the pre-defeat phase of the social interaction test characteristic of sham animals. There was no change in the residents' behaviour. Core temperature increased during aggressive interaction in sham rats, and this did not adapt with repeated stress. By contrast, stress-induced hyperthermia was accentuated in serotonin-reduced rats as the number of defeat sessions increased. Basal core temperature was unaffected by serotonin depletion. Heart rate increased during social defeat, but this did not adapt with repeated stress; serotonin depletion had no effect on this cardiovascular response. Basal corticosterone was increased in serotonin-depleted rats, but the progressive reduction in stress response over days was not altered. C-fos expression in the brain was not altered in control (non-stressed) rats by serotonin reduction in the areas examined, but there was increased expression after repeated social stress in the medial amygdala of 5-HT depleted rats. These experiments show that reduction of serotonin alters responses to repeated social stress in male rats, and suggests a role for serotonin in the adaptive process.

  11. [Biological consequences of oxidative stress induced by pesticides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosicka-Maciąg, Emilia

    2011-06-17

    Pesticides are used to protect plants and numerous plant products. They are also utilized in several industrial branches. These compounds are highly toxic to living organisms. In spite of close supervision in the use of pesticides there is a serious risk that these agents are able to spread into the environment and contaminate water, soil, food, and feedstuffs. Recently, more and more studies have been focused on understanding the toxic mechanisms of pesticide actions. The data indicate that the toxic action of pesticides may include the induction of oxidative stress and accumulation of free radicals in the cell. Long-lasting or acute oxidative stress disturbs cell metabolism and is able to produce permanent changes in the structure of proteins, lipids, and DNA. The proteins that are oxidized may lose or enhance their activity. Moreover, the proteins oxidized are able to form aggregates that inhibit the systems responsible for protein degradation and lead to alterations of proteins in the cell. Once oxidized, lipids have the capacity to damage and depolarize cytoplasmic membranes. Free oxygen radicals are harmful to DNA including damage to single nitric bases, DNA strand breaks and adduct production. Many studies indicate that oxidative stress may accelerate development of numerous diseases including cancer and neurodegenerative ones such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease and may also be responsible for infertility.

  12. Stress inducible proteinase inhibitor diversity in Capsicum annuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Manasi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wound-inducible Pin-II Proteinase inhibitors (PIs are one of the important plant serine PIs which have been studied extensively for their structural and functional diversity and relevance in plant defense against insect pests. To explore the functional specialization of an array of Capsicum annuum (L. proteinase inhibitor (CanPIs genes, we studied their expression, processing and tissue-specific distribution under steady-state and induced conditions. Inductions were performed by subjecting C. annuum leaves to various treatments, namely aphid infestation or mechanical wounding followed by treatment with either oral secretion (OS of Helicoverpa armigera or water. Results The elicitation treatments regulated the accumulation of CanPIs corresponding to 4-, 3-, and 2-inhibitory repeat domains (IRDs. Fourty seven different CanPI genes composed of 28 unique IRDs were identified in total along with those reported earlier. The CanPI gene pool either from uninduced or induced leaves was dominated by 3-IRD PIs and trypsin inhibitory domains. Also a major contribution by 4-IRD CanPI genes possessing trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor domains was specifically revealed in wounded leaves treated with OS. Wounding displayed the highest number of unique CanPIs while wounding with OS treatment resulted in the high accumulation of specifically CanPI-4, -7 and −10. Characterization of the PI protein activity through two dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed tissue and induction specific patterns. Consistent with transcript abundance, wound plus OS or water treated C. annuum leaves exhibited significantly higher PI activity and isoform diversity contributed by 3- and 4-IRD CanPIs. CanPI accumulation and activity was weakly elicited by aphid infestation yet resulted in the higher expression of CanPI-26, -41 and −43. Conclusions Plants can differentially perceive various kinds of insect attacks and respond appropriately through activating

  13. Lactobacillus plantarum attenuates anxiety-related behavior and protects against stress-induced dysbiosis in adult zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel J.; Doerr, Holly M.; Grzelak, Agata K.; Busi, Susheel B.; Jasarevic, Eldin; Ericsson, Aaron C.; Bryda, Elizabeth C.

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of probiotics has become increasingly popular as a means to try to improve health and well-being. Not only are probiotics considered beneficial to digestive health, but increasing evidence suggests direct and indirect interactions between gut microbiota (GM) and the central nervous system (CNS). Here, adult zebrafish were supplemented with Lactobacillus plantarum to determine the effects of probiotic treatment on structural and functional changes of the GM, as well as host neurological and behavioral changes. L. plantarum administration altered the β-diversity of the GM while leaving the major core architecture intact. These minor structural changes were accompanied by significant enrichment of several predicted metabolic pathways. In addition to GM modifications, L. plantarum treatment also significantly reduced anxiety-related behavior and altered GABAergic and serotonergic signaling in the brain. Lastly, L. plantarum supplementation provided protection against stress-induced dysbiosis of the GM. These results underscore the influence commensal microbes have on physiological function in the host, and demonstrate bidirectional communication between the GM and the host. PMID:27641717

  14. Rat dams exposed repeatedly to a daily brief separation from the pups exhibit increased maternal behavior, decreased anxiety and altered levels of receptors for estrogens (ERα, ERβ), oxytocin and serotonin (5-HT1A) in their brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakis, Antonios; Kalpachidou, Theodora; Raftogianni, Androniki; Zografou, Efstratia; Tzanou, Athanasia; Pondiki, Stavroula; Stylianopoulou, Fotini

    2015-02-01

    In the present study we investigated the neurobiological mechanisms underlying expression of maternal behavior. Increased maternal behavior was experimentally induced by a brief 15-min separation between the mother and the pups during postnatal days 1 to 22. On postnatal days (PND) 12 and 22, we determined in experimental and control dams levels of anxiety in the elevated plus maze (EPM) as well as the levels of receptors for estrogens (ERα, ERβ), oxytocin (OTR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR) in areas of the limbic system (prefrontal cortex-PFC, hippocampus, lateral septum-SL, medial preoptic area-MPOA, shell of nucleus accumbens-nAc-Sh, central-CeA and basolateral-BLA amygdala), involved in the regulation of maternal behavior. Experimental dams, which showed increased maternal behavior towards their offspring, displayed reduced anxiety in the EPM on both PND12 and PND22. These behavioral differences could be attributed to neurochemical alterations in their brain: On both PND12 and PND22, experimental mothers had higher levels of ERα and OTRs in the PFC, hippocampus, CeA, SL, MPOA and nAc-Sh. The experimental manipulation-induced increase in ERβ levels was less widespread, being localized in PFC, the hippocampal CA2 area, MPOA and nAc-Sh. In addition, 5-HT1ARs were reduced in the PFC, hippocampus, CeA, MPOA and nAc-Sh of the experimental mothers. Our results show that the experience of the daily repeated brief separation from the pups results in increased brain ERs and OTRs, as well as decreased 5-HT1ARs in the dam's brain; these neurochemical changes could underlie the observed increase in maternal behavior and the reduction of anxiety.

  15. Role of bed nucleus of the stria terminalis corticotrophin-releasing factor receptors in frustration stress-induced binge-like palatable food consumption in female rats with a history of food restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Romano, Adele; Bossert, Jennifer M; Rice, Kenner C; Ubaldi, Massimo; St Laurent, Robyn; Gaetani, Silvana; Massi, Maurizio; Shaham, Yavin; Cifani, Carlo

    2014-08-20

    We developed recently a binge-eating model in which female rats with a history of intermittent food restriction show binge-like palatable food consumption after 15 min exposure to the sight of the palatable food. This "frustration stress" manipulation also activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis. Here, we determined the role of the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in stress-induced binge eating in our model. We also assessed the role of CRF receptors in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a brain region implicated in stress responses and stress-induced drug seeking, in stress-induced binge eating. We used four groups that were first exposed or not exposed to repeated intermittent cycles of regular chow food restriction during which they were also given intermittent access to high-caloric palatable food. On the test day, we either exposed or did not expose the rats to the sight of the palatable food for 15 min (frustration stress) before assessing food consumption for 2 h. We found that systemic injections of the CRF1 receptor antagonist R121919 (2,5-dimethyl-3-(6-dimethyl-4-methylpyridin-3-yl)-7 dipropylamino pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine) (10-20 mg/kg) and BNST (25-50 ng/side) or ventricular (1000 ng) injections of the nonselective CRF receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41) decreased frustration stress-induced binge eating in rats with a history of food restriction. Frustration stress also increased Fos (a neuronal activity marker) expression in ventral and dorsal BNST. Results demonstrate a critical role of CRF receptors in BNST in stress-induced binge eating in our rat model. CRF1 receptor antagonists may represent a novel pharmacological treatment for bingeing-related eating disorders.

  16. Homeobox gene Dlx-2 is implicated in metabolic stress-induced necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Sung-Chul

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to tumor-suppressive apoptosis and autophagic cell death, necrosis promotes tumor progression by releasing the pro-inflammatory and tumor-promoting cytokine high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, and its presence in tumor patients is associated with poor prognosis. Thus, necrosis has important clinical implications in tumor development; however, its molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. Results In the present study, we show that Distal-less 2 (Dlx-2, a homeobox gene of the Dlx family that is involved in embryonic development, is induced in cancer cell lines dependently of reactive oxygen species (ROS in response to glucose deprivation (GD, one of the metabolic stresses occurring in solid tumors. Increased Dlx-2 expression was also detected in the inner regions, which experience metabolic stress, of human tumors and of a multicellular tumor spheroid, an in vitro model of solid tumors. Dlx-2 short hairpin RNA (shRNA inhibited metabolic stress-induced increase in propidium iodide-positive cell population and HMGB1 and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, indicating the important role(s of Dlx-2 in metabolic stress-induced necrosis. Dlx-2 shRNA appeared to exert its anti-necrotic effects by preventing metabolic stress-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS, which are responsible for triggering necrosis. Conclusions These results suggest that Dlx-2 may be involved in tumor progression via the regulation of metabolic stress-induced necrosis.

  17. Stress-induced activation of brown adipose tissue prevents obesity in conditions of low adaptive thermogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Razzoli

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that thermogenesis and BAT function are determinant of the resilience or vulnerability to stress-induced obesity. Our data support a model in which adrenergic and purinergic pathways exert complementary/synergistic functions in BAT, thus suggesting an alternative to βARs agonists for the activation of human BAT.

  18. C. elegans Stress-Induced Sleep Emerges from the Collective Action of Multiple Neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Ravi D; Chow, Elly S; Wang, Han; Schwarz, Erich M; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-09-26

    The genetic basis of sleep regulation remains poorly understood. In C. elegans, cellular stress induces sleep through epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent activation of the EGF receptor in the ALA neuron. The downstream mechanism by which this neuron promotes sleep is unknown. Single-cell RNA sequencing of ALA reveals that the most highly expressed, ALA-enriched genes encode neuropeptides. Here we have systematically investigated the four most highly enriched neuropeptides: flp-7, nlp-8, flp-24, and flp-13. When individually removed by null mutation, these peptides had little or no effect on stress-induced sleep. However, stress-induced sleep was abolished in nlp-8; flp-24; flp-13 triple-mutant animals, indicating that these neuropeptides work collectively in controlling stress-induced sleep. We tested the effect of overexpression of these neuropeptide genes on five behaviors modulated during sleep-pharyngeal pumping, defecation, locomotion, head movement, and avoidance response to an aversive stimulus-and we found that, if individually overexpressed, each of three neuropeptides (nlp-8, flp-24, or flp-13) induced a different suite of sleep-associated behaviors. These overexpression results raise the possibility that individual components of sleep might be specified by individual neuropeptides or combinations of neuropeptides.

  19. Adolescent Personality : Associations With Basal, Awakening, and Stress-Induced Cortisol Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laceulle, Odilia M.; Nederhof, Esther; van Aken, Marcel A. G.; Ormel, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the associations between personality facets and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning. Previous studies have mainly focussed on stress-induced HPA-axis activation. We hypothesized that other characteristics of HPA-axis functioning w

  20. GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex ligands and stress-induced hyperthermia in singly housed mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, B.; Bouwknecht, J.A.; Pattij, T.; Leahy, C.; Oorschot, R. van; Zethof, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) in singly housed mice, in which the rectal temperature of a mouse is measured twice with a 10-min interval, enables to study the effects of a drug on the basal (T(1)) and on the stress-enhanced temperature (T(2)), 10 min later, using the rectal procedure as stressor

  1. Dopamine D1 receptors are responsible for stress-induced emotional memory deficit in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfu; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Bi; Li, Chaocui; Cai, Jing-Xia

    2012-03-01

    It is established that stress impairs spatial learning and memory via the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis response. Dopamine D1 receptors were also shown to be responsible for a stress-induced deficit of working memory. However, whether stress affects the subsequent emotional learning and memory is not elucidated yet. Here, we employed the well-established one-trial step-through task to study the effect of an acute psychological stress (induced by tail hanging for 5, 10, or 20 min) on emotional learning and memory, and the possible mechanisms as well. We demonstrated that tail hanging induced an obvious stress response. Either an acute tail-hanging stress or a single dose of intraperitoneally injected dopamine D1 receptor antagonist (SCH23390) significantly decreased the step-through latency in the one-trial step-through task. However, SCH23390 prevented the acute tail-hanging stress-induced decrease in the step-through latency. In addition, the effects of tail-hanging stress and/or SCH23390 on the changes in step-through latency were not through non-memory factors such as nociceptive perception and motor function. Our data indicate that the hyperactivation of dopamine D1 receptors mediated the stress-induced deficit of emotional learning and memory. This study may have clinical significance given that psychological stress is considered to play a role in susceptibility to some mental diseases such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

  2. Central anandamide deficiency predicts stress-induced anxiety: behavioral reversal through endocannabinoid augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluett, R J; Gamble-George, J C; Hermanson, D J; Hartley, N D; Marnett, L J; Patel, S

    2014-07-08

    Stress is a major risk factor for the development of mood and anxiety disorders; elucidation of novel approaches to mitigate the deleterious effects of stress could have broad clinical applications. Pharmacological augmentation of central endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) signaling may be an effective therapeutic strategy to mitigate the adverse behavioral and physiological consequences of stress. Here we show that acute foot-shock stress induces a transient anxiety state measured 24 h later using the light-dark box assay and novelty-induced hypophagia test. Acute pharmacological inhibition of the anandamide-degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), reverses the stress-induced anxiety state in a cannabinoid receptor-dependent manner. FAAH inhibition does not significantly affect anxiety-like behaviors in non-stressed mice. Moreover, whole brain anandamide levels are reduced 24 h after acute foot-shock stress and are negatively correlated with anxiety-like behavioral measures in the light-dark box test. These data indicate that central anandamide levels predict acute stress-induced anxiety, and that reversal of stress-induced anandamide deficiency is a key mechanism subserving the therapeutic effects of FAAH inhibition. These studies provide further support that eCB-augmentation is a viable pharmacological strategy for the treatment of stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  3. Voluntary exercise protects against stress-induced decreases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlard, P A; Cotman, C W

    2004-01-01

    Exercise is increasingly recognized as an intervention that can reduce CNS dysfunctions such as cognitive decline, depression and stress. Previously we have demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is increased in the hippocampus following exercise. In this study we tested the hypothesis that exercise can counteract a reduction in hippocampal BDNF protein caused by acute immobilization stress. Since BDNF expression is suppressed by corticosterone (CORT), circulating CORT levels were also monitored. In animals subjected to 2 h immobilization stress, CORT was elevated immediately following, and at 1 h after the cessation of stress, but remained unchanged from baseline up to 24 h post-stress. The stress protocol resulted in a reduction in BDNF protein at 5 and 10 h post-stress that returned to baseline at 24 h. To determine if exercise could prevent this stress-induced reduction in BDNF protein, animals were given voluntary access to running wheels for 3 weeks prior to the stress. Stressed animals, in the absence of exercise, again demonstrated an initial elevation in CORT (at 0 h) and a subsequent decrease in hippocampal BDNF at the 10 h time point. Exercising animals, both non-stressed and stressed, demonstrated circulating CORT and hippocampal BDNF protein levels that were significantly elevated above control values at both time points examined (0 and 10 h post-stress). Thus, the persistently high CORT levels in exercised animals did not affect the induction of BDNF with exercise, and the effect of immobilization stress on BDNF protein was overcome. To examine the role of CORT in the stress-related regulation of BDNF protein, experiments were carried out in adrenalectomized (ADX) animals. BDNF protein was not downregulated as a result of immobilization stress in ADX animals, while there continued to be an exercise-induced upregulation of BDNF. This study demonstrates that CORT modulates stress-related alterations in BDNF protein. Further, exercise

  4. Role of TFF in healing of stress-induced gastric lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Nan Nie; Hai-Chen Sun; Zhao-Shen Li; Xiao-Ming Qian; Xue-Hao Wu; Shi-Yu Yang; Wen-Jie Tang; Bao-Hua Xu; Fang Huang; Xin Lin; Dong-Yan Sun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the changes of pS2 and ITF of TFF expression in gastric mucosa and the effect on ulcer healing of pS2, ITF to Water-immersion and restraint stress (WRS)in rats.METHODS: Wistar rats were exposed to single or repeated WRS for 4 h every other day for up to 6 days. Gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) was measured by LDF-3 flowmeter and the extent of gastric mucosal lesions were evaluated grossly and histologically. Expression of pS2 and ITF mRNA was determined by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was used to further detect the expression of pS2 and ITF.RESULTS: WRS applied once produced numerous gastric mucosal erosions, but the number of these lesions gradually declined and GMBF restored at 2, 4, 8 h after stress. The area of gastric mucosal lesion was reduced by 64.9 % and GMBF was increased by 89.8 % at 8 h. The healing of stress-induced ulcerations was accompanied by increased expression of pS2 (0.51±0.14 vs0.77±0.11, P<0.01) and ITF (0.022±0.001 vs 0.177±0.010, P<0.01). The results were demonstrated further by immunohistochemistry of pS2(0.95±0.11 vs1.41±0.04, P<0.01) and ITF (0.134±0.001 vs 0.253±0.01,P<0.01). With repeated WRS, adaptation to this WRS developed, the area of gastric mucosal lesions was reduced by 22.0 % after four consecutive WRS. This adaptation to WRS was accompanied by increased GMBF (being increased by 94.2 %), active cell proliferation in the neck region of gastric glands, and increased expression of pS2 (0.37±0.02 vs 0.77±0.01, P<0.01) and ITF (0.040±0.001 vs0.372±0.010, P<0.01). The result was demonstrated further by immunohistochemistry of pS2 (0.55±0.04 vs 2.46±0.08, P<0.01) and ITF (0.134±0.001 vs0.354±0.070,P<0.01).CONCLUSION: TFF may not only participate in the early phase of epithelial repair known as restitution(maked by increased cell migration),but also play an important role in the subsequent, protracted phase of glandular renewal(made by cell proliferation).

  5. Rapid stress-induced corticosterone rise in the hippocampus reverses serial memory retrieval pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, F; Tronche, C; Piérard, C; Liscia, P; Drouet, I; Coutan, M; Béracochéa, D

    2010-01-01

    We previously showed that an acute stress (electric footshocks) induced both a rapid plasma corticosterone rise and a reversal of serial memory retrieval pattern in a contextual serial discrimination (CSD) task. This study is aimed at determining (i) if the rapid stress effects on CSD performance are mediated by the hippocampus; (ii) if hippocampal corticosterone membrane receptor activation is involved in the rapid stress effects on CSD performance. In experiment 1, microdialysis in the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC) was used to measure the stress-induced corticosterone rise; in parallel, the effect of acute stress on CSD performance was evaluated. In addition, the functional involvement of corticosterone in the behavioral effects of stress was assessed by administering metyrapone, a corticosterone synthesis inhibitor, before stress. In experiment 2, the involvement of hippocampal corticosterone membrane receptors in the stress-induced reversal of CSD performance was studied by injecting corticosterone-bovine serum albumin (BSA) (a membrane-impermeable complex) in the dHPC in non stressed mice. Results showed that (i) the acute stress induced a rapid (15 min) and transitory (90 min) corticosterone rise into the hippocampus dHPC, and a reversal of serial memory retrieval pattern; (ii) both the endocrinal and memory stress-induced effects were blocked by metyrapone; (iii) corticosterone-BSA injection into the dHPC in non stressed mice mimicked the effects of stress on serial retrieval pattern. Overall, our study is first to show that (i) a rapid stress-induced corticosterone rise into the dHPC transitorily reverses serial memory retrieval pattern and (ii) hippocampal corticosterone membrane receptors activation is involved in the rapid effects of acute stress on serial memory retrieval.

  6. Influenza a virus host shutoff disables antiviral stress-induced translation arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys A Khaperskyy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV polymerase complexes function in the nucleus of infected cells, generating mRNAs that bear 5' caps and poly(A tails, and which are exported to the cytoplasm and translated by host machinery. Host antiviral defences include mechanisms that detect the stress of virus infection and arrest cap-dependent mRNA translation, which normally results in the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates of translationally stalled mRNA-protein complexes known as stress granules (SGs. It remains unclear how IAV ensures preferential translation of viral gene products while evading stress-induced translation arrest. Here, we demonstrate that at early stages of infection both viral and host mRNAs are sensitive to drug-induced translation arrest and SG formation. By contrast, at later stages of infection, IAV becomes partially resistant to stress-induced translation arrest, thereby maintaining ongoing translation of viral gene products. To this end, the virus deploys multiple proteins that block stress-induced SG formation: 1 non-structural protein 1 (NS1 inactivates the antiviral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-activated kinase PKR, thereby preventing eIF2α phosphorylation and SG formation; 2 nucleoprotein (NP inhibits SG formation without affecting eIF2α phosphorylation; 3 host-shutoff protein polymerase-acidic protein-X (PA-X strongly inhibits SG formation concomitant with dramatic depletion of cytoplasmic poly(A RNA and nuclear accumulation of poly(A-binding protein. Recombinant viruses with disrupted PA-X host shutoff function fail to effectively inhibit stress-induced SG formation. The existence of three distinct mechanisms of IAV-mediated SG blockade reveals the magnitude of the threat of stress-induced translation arrest during viral replication.

  7. Influenza a virus host shutoff disables antiviral stress-induced translation arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaperskyy, Denys A; Emara, Mohamed M; Johnston, Benjamin P; Anderson, Paul; Hatchette, Todd F; McCormick, Craig

    2014-07-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) polymerase complexes function in the nucleus of infected cells, generating mRNAs that bear 5' caps and poly(A) tails, and which are exported to the cytoplasm and translated by host machinery. Host antiviral defences include mechanisms that detect the stress of virus infection and arrest cap-dependent mRNA translation, which normally results in the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates of translationally stalled mRNA-protein complexes known as stress granules (SGs). It remains unclear how IAV ensures preferential translation of viral gene products while evading stress-induced translation arrest. Here, we demonstrate that at early stages of infection both viral and host mRNAs are sensitive to drug-induced translation arrest and SG formation. By contrast, at later stages of infection, IAV becomes partially resistant to stress-induced translation arrest, thereby maintaining ongoing translation of viral gene products. To this end, the virus deploys multiple proteins that block stress-induced SG formation: 1) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) inactivates the antiviral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated kinase PKR, thereby preventing eIF2α phosphorylation and SG formation; 2) nucleoprotein (NP) inhibits SG formation without affecting eIF2α phosphorylation; 3) host-shutoff protein polymerase-acidic protein-X (PA-X) strongly inhibits SG formation concomitant with dramatic depletion of cytoplasmic poly(A) RNA and nuclear accumulation of poly(A)-binding protein. Recombinant viruses with disrupted PA-X host shutoff function fail to effectively inhibit stress-induced SG formation. The existence of three distinct mechanisms of IAV-mediated SG blockade reveals the magnitude of the threat of stress-induced translation arrest during viral replication.

  8. Mental stress-induced left ventricular dysfunction and adverse outcome in ischemic heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Julia L; Boyle, Stephen H; Samad, Zainab; Babyak, Michael A; Wilson, Jennifer L; Kuhn, Cynthia; Becker, Richard C; Ortel, Thomas L; Williams, Redford B; Rogers, Joseph G; O'Connor, Christopher M; Velazquez, Eric J; Jiang, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Aims Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) occurs in up to 70% of patients with clinically stable ischemic heart disease and is associated with increased risk of adverse prognosis. We aimed to examine the prognostic value of indices of MSIMI and exercise stress-induced myocardial ischemia (ESIMI) in a population of ischemic heart disease patients that was not confined by having a recent positive physical stress test. Methods and results The Responses of Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia to Escitalopram Treatment (REMIT) study enrolled 310 subjects who underwent mental and exercise stress testing and were followed annually for a median of four years. Study endpoints included time to first and total rate of major adverse cardiovascular events, defined as all-cause mortality and hospitalizations for cardiovascular causes. Cox and negative binomial regression adjusting for age, sex, resting left ventricular ejection fraction, and heart failure status were used to examine associations of indices of MSIMI and ESIMI with study endpoints. The continuous variable of mental stress-induced left ventricular ejection fraction change was significantly associated with both endpoints (all p values mental stress, patients had a 5% increase in the probability of a major adverse cardiovascular event at the median follow-up time and a 20% increase in the number of major adverse cardiovascular events endured over the follow-up period of six years. Indices of ESIMI did not predict endpoints ( ps > 0.05). Conclusion In patients with stable ischemic heart disease, mental, but not exercise, stress-induced left ventricular ejection fraction change significantly predicts risk of future adverse cardiovascular events.

  9. Reduced tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus contributes to chronic stress-induced impairments in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vallent; MacKenzie, Georgina; Hooper, Andrew; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that stress impacts the underlying processes of learning and memory. The effects of stress on memory are thought to involve, at least in part, effects on the hippocampus, which is particularly vulnerable to stress. Chronic stress induces hippocampal alterations, including but not limited to dendritic atrophy and decreased neurogenesis, which are thought to contribute to chronic stress-induced hippocampal dysfunction and deficits in learning and memory. Changes in synaptic transmission, including changes in GABAergic inhibition, have been documented following chronic stress. Recently, our laboratory demonstrated shifts in EGABA in CA1 pyramidal neurons following chronic stress, compromising GABAergic transmission and increasing excitability of these neurons. Interestingly, here we demonstrate that these alterations are unique to CA1 pyramidal neurons, since we do not observe shifts in EGABA following chronic stress in dentate gyrus granule cells. Following chronic stress, there is a decrease in the expression of the GABAA receptor (GABAA R) δ subunit and tonic GABAergic inhibition in dentate gyrus granule cells, whereas there is an increase in the phasic component of GABAergic inhibition, evident by an increase in the peak amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs). Given the numerous changes observed in the hippocampus following stress, it is difficult to pinpoint the pertinent contributing pathophysiological factors. Here we directly assess the impact of a reduction in tonic GABAergic inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells on learning and memory using a mouse model with a decrease in GABAA R δ subunit expression specifically in dentate gyrus granule cells (Gabrd/Pomc mice). Reduced GABAA R δ subunit expression and function in dentate gyrus granule cells is sufficient to induce deficits in learning and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that the reduction in GABAA R δ subunit-mediated tonic inhibition

  10. Dissecting the Mechanisms of Doxorubicin and Oxidative Stress-Induced Cytotoxicity: The Involvement of Actin Cytoskeleton and ROCK1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lei; Surma, Michelle; Gough, Gina; Shi, Stephanie; Lambert-Cheatham, Nathan; Chang, Jiang; Shi, Jianjian

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that ROCK1 deficiency in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) has superior anti-apoptotic and pro-survival effects than antioxidants against doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic drug. Although oxidative stress is the most widely accepted mechanism, our studies suggest that ROCK1-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling plays a more important role in mediating doxorubicin cytotoxicity on MEFs. To further explore the contributions of ROCK1-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling in response to stress, this study investigates the mechanistic differences between the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin versus hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), with a focus on cytoskeleton alterations, apoptosis and necrosis induction. We found that both types of stress induce caspase activation but with different temporal patterns and magnitudes in MEFs: H2O2 induces the maximal levels (2 to 4-fold) of activation of caspases 3, 8, and 9 within 4 h, while doxorubicin induces much higher maximal levels (15 to 25-fold) of caspases activation at later time points (16–24 h). In addition, necrosis induced by H2O2 reaches maximal levels within 4 h while doxorubicin-induced necrosis largely occurs at 16–24 h secondary to apoptosis. Moreover, both types of stress induce actin cytoskeleton remodeling but with different characteristics: H2O2 induces disruption of stress fibers associated with cytosolic translocation of phosphorylated myosin light chain (p-MLC) from stress fibers, while doxorubicin induces cortical F-actin formation associated with cortical translocation of p-MLC from central stress fibers. Furthermore, N-acetylcysteine (an antioxidant) is a potent suppressor for H2O2-induced cytotoxic effects including caspase activation, necrosis, and cell detachment, but shows a much reduced inhibition on doxorubicin-induced changes. On the other hand, ROCK1 deficiency is a more potent suppressor for the cytotoxic effects induced by doxorubicin than by H2O2. These results support the

  11. Stress-Induced Locomotor Sensitization to Amphetamine in Adult, but not in Adolescent Rats, Is Associated with Increased Expression of ΔFosB in the Nucleus Accumbens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro de Oliveira, Paulo E.; Leão, Rodrigo M.; Bianchi, Paula C.; Marin, Marcelo T.; Planeta, Cleopatra da Silva; Cruz, Fábio C.

    2016-01-01

    While clinical and pre-clinical evidence suggests that adolescence is a risk period for the development of addiction, the underlying neural mechanisms are largely unknown. Stress during adolescence has a huge influence on drug addiction. However, little is known about the mechanisms related to the interaction among stress, adolescence and addiction. Studies point to ΔFosB as a possible target for this phenomenon. In the present study, adolescent and adult rats (postnatal day 28 and 60, respectively) were restrained for 2 h once a day for 7 days. Three days after their last exposure to stress, the animals were challenged with saline or amphetamine (1.0 mg/kg i.p.) and amphetamine-induced locomotion was recorded. Immediately after the behavioral tests, rats were decapitated and the nucleus accumbens was dissected to measure ΔFosB protein levels. We found that repeated restraint stress increased amphetamine-induced locomotion in both the adult and adolescent rats. Furthermore, in adult rats, stress-induced locomotor sensitization was associated with increased expression of ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens. Our data suggest that ΔFosB may be involved in some of the neuronal plasticity changes associated with stress induced-cross sensitization with amphetamine in adult rats. PMID:27672362

  12. Stress-induced locomotor sensitization to amphetamine in adult, but not in adolescent rats, is associated with increased expression of ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Eduardo Carneiro de Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available While clinical and pre-clinical evidence suggests that adolescence is a risk period for the development of addiction, the underlying neural mechanisms are largely unknown. Stress during adolescence has a huge influence on drug addiction. However, little is known about the mechanisms related to the interaction among stress, adolescence and addiction. Studies point to ΔFosB as a possible target for this phenomenon. In the present study, adolescent and adult rats (postnatal day 28 and 60, respectively were restrained for 2 hours once a day for 7 days. Three days after their last exposure to stress, the animals were challenged with saline or amphetamine (1.0 mg/kg i.p. and amphetamine-induced locomotion was recorded. Immediately after the behavioral tests, rats were decapitated and the nucleus accumbens was dissected to measure ΔFosB protein levels. We found that repeated restraint stress increased amphetamine-induced locomotion in both adult and adolescent rats. Furthermore, in adult rats, stress-induced locomotor sensitization was associated with increased expression of ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens. Our data suggest that ΔFosB may be involved in some of the neuronal plasticity changes associated with stress induced-cross sensitization with amphetamine in adult rats.

  13. Chronic Restraint Stress Induces an Isoform-Specific Regulation on the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touyarot, K.; Sandi, C.

    2002-01-01

    Existing evidence indicates that 21-days exposure of rats to restraint stress induces dendritic atrophy in pyramidal cells of the hippocampus. This phenomenon has been related to altered performance in hippocampal-dependent learning tasks. Prior studies have shown that hippocampal expression of cell adhesion molecules is modified by such stress treatment, with the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) decreasing and L1 increasing, their expression, at both the mRNA and protein levels. Given that NCAM comprises several isoforms, we investigated here whether chronic stress might differentially affect the expression of the three major isoforms (NCAM-120, NCAM-140, NCAM-180) in the hippocampus. In addition, as glucocorticoids have been implicated in the deleterious effects induced by chronic stress, we also evaluated plasma corticosterone levels and the hippocampal expression of the corticosteroid mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The results showed that the protein concentration of the NCAM-140 isoform decreased in the hippoampus of stressed rats. This effect was isoform-specific, because NCAM-120 and NCAM-180 levels were not significantly modified. In addition, whereas basal levels of plasma corticosterone tended to be increased, MR and GR concentrations were not significantly altered. Although possible changes in NCAM-120, NCAM-180 and corticosteroid receptors at earlier time points of the stress period cannot be ignored; this study suggests that a down-regulation of NCAM-140 might be implicated in the structural alterations consistently shown to be induced in the hippocampus by chronic stress exposure. As NCAM-140 is involved in cell-cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth, these findings suggest that this molecule might be one of the molecular mechanisms involved in the complex interactions among neurodegeneration-related events. PMID:12757368

  14. The Effects of Acute Stress-Induced Sleep Disturbance on Acoustic Trauma-Induced Tinnitus in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic tinnitus is a debilitating condition and often accompanied by anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. It has been suggested that sleep disturbance, such as insomnia, may be a risk factor/predictor for tinnitus-related distress and the two conditions may share common neurobiological mechanisms. This study investigated whether acute stress-induced sleep disturbance could increase the susceptibility to acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats. The animals were exposed to unilateral acoustic trauma 24 h before sleep disturbance being induced using the cage exchange method. Tinnitus perception was assessed behaviourally using a conditioned lick suppression paradigm 3 weeks after the acoustic trauma. Changes in the orexin system in the hypothalamus, which plays an important role in maintaining long-lasting arousal, were also examined using immunohistochemistry. Cage exchange resulted in a significant reduction in the number of sleep episodes and acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus with acoustic features similar to a 32 kHz tone at 100 dB. However, sleep disturbance did not exacerbate the perception of tinnitus in rats. Neither tinnitus alone nor tinnitus plus sleep disturbance altered the number of orexin-expressing neurons. The results suggest that acute sleep disturbance does not cause long-term changes in the number of orexin neurons and does not change the perception of tinnitus induced by acoustic trauma in rats.

  15. Chronic early postnatal scream sound stress induces learning deficits and NMDA receptor changes in the hippocampus of adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lili; Han, Bo; Zhao, Xiaoge; Mi, Lihua; Song, Qiang; Wang, Jue; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2016-04-13

    Chronic scream sounds during adulthood affect spatial learning and memory, both of which are sexually dimorphic. The long-term effects of chronic early postnatal scream sound stress (SSS) during postnatal days 1-21 (P1-P21) on spatial learning and memory in adult mice as well as whether or not these effects are sexually dimorphic are unknown. Therefore, the present study examines the performance of adult male and female mice in the Morris water maze following exposure to chronic early postnatal SSS. Hippocampal NR2A and NR2B levels as well as NR2A/NR2B subunit ratios were tested using immunohistochemistry. In the Morris water maze, stress males showed greater impairment in spatial learning and memory than background males; by contrast, stress and background females performed equally well. NR2B levels in CA1 and CA3 were upregulated, whereas NR2A/NR2B ratios were downregulated in stressed males, but not in females. These data suggest that chronic early postnatal SSS influences spatial learning and memory ability, levels of hippocampal NR2B, and NR2A/NR2B ratios in adult males. Moreover, chronic early stress-induced alterations exert long-lasting effects and appear to affect performance in a sex-specific manner.

  16. Effects of olive leave extract on metabolic disorders and oxidative stress induced by 2.45 GHz WIFI signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Myriam Ben; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Abderraba, Manef

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the effect of olive leaves extract administration on glucose metabolism and oxidative response in liver and kidneys of rats exposed to radio frequency (RF). The exposure of rats to RF (2.45 GHz, 1h/day during 21 consecutive days) induced a diabetes-like status. Moreover, RF decreased the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx, -33.33% and -49.40%) catalase (CAT, -43.39% and -39.62%) and the superoxide dismutase (SOD, -59.29% and -68.53%) and groups thiol amount (-62.68% and -34.85%), respectively in liver and kidneys. Indeed, exposure to RF increased the malondialdehyde (MDA, 29.69% and 51.35%) concentration respectively in liver and kidneys. Olive leaves extract administration (100 mg/kg, ip) in RF-exposed rats prevented glucose metabolism disruption and restored the activities of GPx, CAT and SOD and thiol group amount in liver and kidneys. Moreover, olive leave extract administration was able to bring down the elevated levels of MDA in liver but not in kidneys. Our investigations suggested that RF exposure induced a diabetes-like status through alteration of oxidative response. Olive leaves extract was able to correct glucose metabolism disorder by minimizing oxidative stress induced by RF in rat tissues.

  17. A study on anti-stress property of Nardostachys jatamamsi on stress induced Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpashree R.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a feeling that’s created when we react to particular events. It s the body’s way of rising to a challenge and preparing to meet a tough situation with focus, strength, stamina, and heightened alertness. As a result of the stress immune system can be suppressed by chronic stress opening to increased infections and increasing the risk of autoimmune diseases. So one has to learn away to overcome stress. Here is an attempt made to overcome the stress induced in Drosophila melanogaster a model organism, in this study. Methotrexate is used to induce the stress at different concentration taking different group of flies and a Nardostachys jatamamsi plant extract having antistress property is used to relieve the stress induced. This stress relieve measured by the various stress related enzymes like catalase and Superoxide dismutase by this antistress property of the plant Nardostachys jatamamsi was shown.

  18. Stress-induced glucocorticoids as a neuroendocrine alarm signal of danger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthew G; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F

    2013-10-01

    A considerable number of studies demonstrate that acute and chronic stressors prime CNS innate immune responses to subsequent pro-inflammatory challenges and that glucocorticoids mediate, in part, stress-induced sensitization of pro-inflammatory immune responses. Here, we explore the notion that GCs produce a persisting sensitization of CNS innate immune effectors (e.g. microglia) so that they will generate a potentiated pro-inflammatory response after the GC rise has dissipated, thereby enhancing the sickness response to infection or injury and maximizing the animal's ability to neutralize danger. The stress-induced GC response is conceptualized here as an neuroendocrine warning signal or alarmin to the innate immune system, which prepares or sensitizes the innate immune response to potential danger. Thus, a new understanding of the stress response and its function (priming CNS innate immune responses to infection or injury during a fight/flight emergency) would be suggested.

  19. Stress-induced cardiac autonomic reactivity and preclinical atherosclerosis: does arterial elasticity modify the association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumaeva, Nadja; Hintsanen, Mirka; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Merjonen, Päivi; Elovainio, Marko; Hintsa, Taina; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acute mental stress on atherosclerosis can be estimated using arterial elasticity measured by carotid artery distensibility (Cdist). We examined the interactive effect of acute stress-induced cardiac reactivity and Cdist to preclinical atherosclerosis assessed by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in 58 healthy adults aged 24-39 years participated in the epidemiological Young Finns Study. Cdist and IMT were measured ultrasonographically. Impedance electrocardiography was used to measure acute mental stress-induced cardiac autonomic responses: heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia and pre-ejection period after the mental arithmetic and the public speaking tasks. Interactions between HR reactivity and Cdist in relation to preclinical atherosclerosis were found. The results imply that elevated HR reactivity to acute mental stress is related to less atherosclerosis among healthy participants with higher arterial elasticity. Possibly, increased cardiac reactivity in response to challenging tasks is an adaptive reaction related to better cardiovascular health.

  20. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Attenuates the Oxidative Stress-Induced Decrease of CD33 Expression in Human Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Guzmán-Beltrán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs. Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H2O2 in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20 μM attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H2O2. These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy determines the susceptibility of melanoma cells to dabrafenib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chao; Zhang, Ziping; Chen, Lihong; Zhou, Kunli; Li, Dongjun; Wang, Ping; Huang, Shuying; Gong, Ting; Cheng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers and accounts for most skin-related deaths due to strong resistance to chemotherapy drugs. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of dabrafenib-induced drug resistance in human melanoma cell lines A375 and MEL624. Our studies support that both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy were induced in the melanoma cells after the treatment with dabrafenib. In addition, ER stress-induced autophagy protects melanoma cells from the toxicity of dabrafenib. Moreover, inhibition of both ER stress and autophagy promote the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. Taken together, the data suggest that ER stress-induced autophagy determines the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. These results provide us with promising evidence that the inhibition of autophagy and ER stress could serve a therapeutic effect for the conventional dabrafenib chemotherapy. PMID:27536070

  2. A Method for Psychosocial Stress-Induced Reinstatement of Cocaine Seeking in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manvich, Daniel F; Stowe, Taylor A; Godfrey, Jodi R; Weinshenker, David

    2016-06-01

    We describe a novel preclinical model of stress-induced relapse to cocaine use in rats using social defeat stress, an ethologically valid psychosocial stressor in rodents that closely resembles stressors that promote craving and relapse in humans. Rats self-administered cocaine for 20 days. On days 11, 14, 17, and 20, animals were subjected to social defeat stress or a nonstressful control condition following the session, with discrete environmental stimuli signaling the impending event. After extinction training, reinstatement was assessed following re-exposure to these discrete cues. Animals re-exposed to psychosocial stress-predictive cues exhibited increased serum corticosterone and significantly greater reinstatement of cocaine seeking than the control group, and active coping behaviors during social defeat episodes were associated with subsequent reinstatement magnitude. These studies are the first to describe an operant model of psychosocial stress-induced relapse in rodents and lay the foundation for future work investigating its neurobiological underpinnings.

  3. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter protein MCU is involved in oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yajin; Hao, Yumin; Chen, Hong; He, Qing; Yuan, Zengqiang; Cheng, Jinbo

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is a conserved Ca(2+) transporter at mitochondrial in eukaryotic cells. However, the role of MCU protein in oxidative stress-induced cell death remains unclear. Here, we showed that ectopically expressed MCU is mitochondrial localized in both HeLa and primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Knockdown of endogenous MCU decreases mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake following histamine stimulation and attenuates cell death induced by oxidative stress in both HeLa cells and CGNs. We also found MCU interacts with VDAC1 and mediates VDAC1 overexpression-induced cell death in CGNs. This finding demonstrates that MCU-VDAC1 complex regulates mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, which might represent therapeutic targets for oxidative stress related diseases.

  4. Order-disorder phase transition and stress-induced diffusion in Au-Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, John; Mari, Daniele; Schaller, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Isothermal mechanical spectroscopy by means of a forced torsion pendulum (measuring internal friction/mechanical loss) was used to study the interplay of long-range atomic order and stress-induced diffusion (Zener relaxation) in Au57%Cu43% . Our results show that the relaxation strength of stress-induced diffusion exhibits the typical Curie-Weiss-type behavior in the disordered solid solution and then gradually goes to zero below the critical temperature marking the phase transition to the long-range-ordered AuCu II phase. The breakdown of the relaxation peak reflects the kinetics of the ordering process. The diffusion data were used to establish the transformation time vs temperature (TTT) diagram of the phase transformation.

  5. Opioid and nonopioid interactions in two forms of stress-induced analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisel, J E; Fleshner, M; Watkins, L R; Maier, S F

    1993-05-01

    Stressful environmental events activate endogenous mechanisms of pain inhibition. Under some circumstances the analgesia is blocked by naloxone/naltrexone ("opioid"), while under others it is not ("nonopioid"). The existence of these two categories of analgesia leads to the question of how they are related. In a collateral inhibition model proposed by Kirshgessner, Bodnar, and Pasternak (1982), opiate and nonopiate mechanisms were viewed as acting in a mutually inhibitory fashion. In the present experiments, rats were exposed to either of two environmental stressors that produce a nonopioid stress-induced analgesia (SIA) following injections of the opiate antagonist naltrexone or agonist morphine. In the presence of naltrexone, SIA produced by either cold water swim (CWS) or social defeat was enhanced. These same SIAs were found to attenuate the analgesic effect of morphine, demonstrating that an activation of opioid systems can inhibit nonopioid analgesias. These results support an inhibitory interaction of opioid and nonopioid mechanisms in some forms of stress-induced analgesia.

  6. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid attenuates the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Gonzalez-Reyes, Susana; Hernández-Sánchez, Fernando; Juarez-Figueroa, Ulises E; Gonzalez, Yolanda; Bobadilla, Karen; Torres, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs). Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA) or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H(2)O(2) in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20  μ M) attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H(2)O(2). These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs.

  7. Regulatory effect of heat shock protein 70 in stress-induced rat intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevie Struiksma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychological stress is one of the factors associated with many human diseases; the mechanisms need to be further understood. Methods: Rats were subjected to chronic water avoid stress. Intestinal epithelial heat shock protein (HSP 70 was evaluated. The intestinal epithelial permeability was examined with Ussing chamber technique. Results: HSP70 was detected in normal intestinal epithelial cells. Psychological stress decreased HSP70 in the intestinal epithelial cells that correlated with the stress-induced intestinal epithelial hyperpermeability. Pretreatment with HSP70 abrogated stress-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Conclusions: Chronic stress inhibits HSP70 activity in rat intestinal epithelial layer that is associated with intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, which can be prevented by pretreatment with HSP70 protein.

  8. Proteome oxidative carbonylation during oxidative stress-induced premature senescence of WI-38 human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Boulch, Marine; Ahmed, Emad K; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidatively damaged proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal ageing, and is also a phenotypic feature shared by both replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence of human fibroblasts. Moreover, proteins that are building up as oxidized (i.e. the "Oxi......-proteome") during ageing and age-related diseases represent a restricted set of cellular proteins, indicating that certain proteins are more prone to oxidative carbonylation and subsequent intracellular accumulation. The occurrence of specific carbonylated proteins upon oxidative stress induced premature senescence...... of WI-38 human fibroblasts and their follow-up identification have been addressed in this study. Indeed, it was expected that the identification of these proteins would give insights into the mechanisms by which oxidatively damaged proteins could affect cellular function. Among these proteins, some...

  9. Opto-Electronically Efficient Conjugated Polymers by Stress-Induced Molecular Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Final Report for AOARD Grant FA2386-11-1-4055 Opto-Electronically Efficient Conjugated Polymers by Stress-Induced Molecular Constraints... polymers . The effects of molecular flows triggered in thin film dewetting were further studied to reveal the mechanisms of chain stretching...to increase. Finally, the efficiency enhancement can be produced in solid films of conjugated polymers using simple imprints under good control

  10. Stress-induced Nuclear Bodies Are Sites of Accumulation of Pre-mRNA Processing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegri, Marco; Chiodi, Ilaria; Corioni, Margherita; Cobianchi, Fabio; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) HAP (hnRNP A1 interacting protein) is a multifunctional protein with roles in RNA metabolism, transcription, and nuclear structure. After stress treatments, HAP is recruited to a small number of nuclear bodies, usually adjacent to the nucleoli, which consist of clusters of perichromatin granules and are depots of transcripts synthesized before stress. In this article we show that HAP bodies are sites of accumulation for a subset of RNA processing factors and are related to Sam68 nuclear bodies (SNBs) detectable in unstressed cells. Indeed, HAP and Sam68 are both present in SNBs and in HAP bodies, that we rename “stress-induced SNBs.” The determinants required for the redistribution of HAP lie between residue 580 and 788. Different portions of this region direct the recruitment of the green fluorescent protein to stress-induced SNBs, suggesting an interaction of HAP with different components of the bodies. With the use of the 580–725 region as bait in a two-hybrid screening, we have selected SRp30c and 9G8, two members of the SR family of splicing factors. Splicing factors are differentially affected by heat shock: SRp30c and SF2/ASF are efficiently recruited to stress-induced SNBs, whereas the distribution of SC35 is not perturbed. We propose that the differential sequestration of splicing factors could affect processing of specific transcripts. Accordingly, the formation of stress-induced SNBs is accompanied by a change in the splicing pattern of the adenovirus E1A transcripts. PMID:11694584

  11. Differential Effects of Stress-induced Cortisol Responses on Recollection and Familiarity-based Recognition Memory

    OpenAIRE

    McCullough, Andrew M.; Ritchey, Maureen; Ranganath, Charan; Yonelinas, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Stress-induced changes in cortisol can impact memory in various ways. However, the precise relationship between cortisol and recognition memory is still poorly understood. For instance, there is reason to believe that stress could differentially affect recollection-based memory, which depends on the hippocampus, and familiarity-based recognition, which can be supported by neocortical areas alone. Accordingly, in the current study we examined the effects of stress-related changes in cortisol o...

  12. Bias-stress-induced instability of polymer thin-film transistor based on poly(3-hexylthiophene)

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, YR; Liao, R.; Lai, PT; Yao, RH

    2012-01-01

    A polymer thin-film transistor (PTFT) based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) is fabricated by a spin-coating process and characterized. Its bias-stress-induced instability during operation is investigated as a function of time and temperature. For negative gate-bias stress, the carrier mobility remains unchanged, the off-state current decreases, and the threshold voltage shifts toward the negative direction. On the other hand, for negative drain-bias stress, the carrier mobility decreases sli...

  13. EVALUATION OF ANXIOLYTIC POTENTIAL OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACT HYPERICUM HOOKERIANUM IN STRESS INDUCED SWISS ALBINO MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Subakanmani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is evaluate to Anxiolytic profile of Hypericum hookerianum in stress induced Swiss albino mice. The study was carried out using Swiss albino mice (25- 30 g. The Anxiolytic effect of aerial parts of ethanolic extract of Hypericum hookerianum was evaluated by using behavioral analysis like Elevated plus maze (EPM test, Open Field Test (OFT, Hole Board Test (HBT, Light dark exploration Test (LDE in restraint stress induced animals. Behavioral test parameters for anxiety were assessed followed by biochemical parameters (lipid per oxidation, super oxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione per oxidase, reduced glutathione, etc. and Diazepam 1 mg/kg served as a standard Anxiolytic drug, administered intraperitonealy. The results were shown that, ethanolic extract of H.hookerianum (Hh 100mg/kg and Hh 200 mg/kg, p.o. significantly increased the percentage of time spent and number of entries in open arm in EPM. In LDE, the extract produced significant increase in time spent, number of crossing and decrease in the duration of immobility in light box. In OFT, the extract showed significant increase in number of rearings, assisted rearings and number of square crossed, all of which are demonstrations of exploratory behavior. Biochemical analyses revealed an increase in lipid per oxidation, depletion of super oxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, catalase activity and glutathione per oxidase in stress induced animals as compared to unstressed animal. Six days treatment of Hh (100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg comparable with Diazepam, significantly attenuated restraint stress-induced behavioral and oxidative damage. The results of the present study suggest that an ethanolic extract of H.hookerianum may possess Anxiolytic activity in stressed animals and provide a scientific evidence for its traditional claim.

  14. Effects of L-citrulline diet on stress-induced cold hypersensitivity in mice

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    Yoshinori Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: L-citrulline is an amino acid discovered in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus, Cucurbitaceae and is a known component of the nitric oxide (NO cycle that plays an important role in adjusting blood circulation and supplying NO and a key component of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor. Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of L-citrulline on a newly established stress-induced cold hypersensitivity mouse model. Materials and Methods: When normal mice were forced to swim in water at 25°C for 15 min, their core body temperature dropped to 28.9°C, and then quickly recovered to normal temperature after the mice were transferred to a dry cage at room temperature (25°C. A 1-h immobilization before swimming caused the core body temperature to drop to ca. 24.1°C (4.8°C lower than normal mice, and the speed of core body temperature recovery dropped to 57% of the normal control. We considered this delay in recovery from hypothermia to be a sign of stress-induced cold hypersensitivity. Similar cold hypersensitivity was induced by administration of 50 mM L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester, a NO synthesis inhibitor. Results: In this study, we showed that recovery speed from the stress-induced hypothermia remarkably improved in mice fed a 1% L-citrulline-containing diet for 20 days. Furthermore, the nonfasting blood level of L-arginine and L-citrulline increased significantly in the L-citrulline diet group, and higher serum nitrogen oxide levels were observed during recovery from the cold. Conclusions: These results suggested that oral L-citrulline supplementation strengthens vascular endothelium function and attenuates stress-induced cold hypersensitivity by improving blood circulation.

  15. Epigenetic regulation of genes that modulate chronic stress-induced visceral pain in the peripheral nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Shuangsong; Zheng, Gen; Wiley, John W

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, increases gut motility, and increases the perception of visceral pain. We investigated whether epigenetic mechanisms regulate chronic stress-induced visceral pain in the peripheral nervous systems of rats. Male rats were subjected to 1 hour of water avoidance stress each day, or given daily subcutaneous injections of corticosterone, for 10 consecutive days. L4-L5 and L6-S2 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were collected and compared between stressed and control rats (placed for 1 hour each day in a tank without water). Levels of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1), DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), and EP300 were knocked down in DRG neurons in situ with small interfering RNAs. We measured DNA methylation and histone acetylation at genes encoding the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), CNR1, and TRPV1. Visceral pain was measured in response to colorectal distention. Chronic stress was associated with increased methylation of the Nr3c1 promoter and reduced expression of this gene in L6-S2, but not L4-L5, DRGs. Stress also was associated with up-regulation in DNMT1-associated methylation of the Cnr1 promoter and down-regulation of glucocorticoid-receptor-mediated expression of CNR1 in L6-S2, but not L4-L5, DRGs. Concurrently, chronic stress increased expression of the histone acetyltransferase EP300 and increased histone acetylation at the Trpv1 promoter and expression of the TRPV1 receptor in L6-S2 DRG neurons. Knockdown of DNMT1 and EP300 in L6-S2 DRG neurons of rats reduced DNA methylation and histone acetylation, respectively, and prevented chronic stress-induced increases in visceral pain. Chronic stress increases DNA methylation and histone acetylation of genes that regulate visceral pain sensation in the peripheral nervous system of rats. Blocking epigenetic regulatory pathways in specific regions of the spinal cord might be developed to treat

  16. Chronic stress induces upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and integrin alpha5 expression in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino-Subiabre, Alexies; Zepeda-Carreño, Rodrigo; Díaz-Véliz, Gabriela; Mora, Sergio; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2006-05-01

    Chronic stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses. These alterations have been related with the development of cognitive deficits in major depression. Moreover, stress induces deleterious actions on the epithalamic pineal organ, a gland involved in a wide range of physiological functions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the stress effects on the pineal gland are related with changes in the expression of neurotrophic factors and cell adhesion molecules. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, we analyzed the effect of chronic immobilization stress on the BDNF mRNA and integrin alpha5 expression in the rat pineal gland. We found that BDNF is produced in situ in the pineal gland. Chronic immobilization stress induced upregulation of BDNF mRNA and integrin alpha5 expression in the rat pineal gland but did not produce changes in beta-actin mRNA or in GAPDH expression. Stressed animals also evidenced an increase in anxiety-like behavior and acute gastric lesions. These results suggest that BDNF and integrin alpha5 may have a counteracting effect to the deleterious actions of immobilization stress on functionally stimulated pinealocytes. Furthermore, this study proposes that the pineal gland may be a target of glucocorticoid damage during stress.

  17. Stress-induced structural remodeling in hippocampus: Prevention by lithium treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Gwendolyn E.; Young, L. Trevor; Reagan, Lawrence P.; Chen, Biao; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2004-03-01

    Chronic restraint stress, psychosocial stress, as well as systemic or oral administration of the stress-hormone corticosterone induces a morphological reorganization in the rat hippocampus, in which adrenal steroids and excitatory amino acids mediate a reversible remodeling of apical dendrites on CA3 pyramidal cell neurons of the hippocampus. This stress-induced neuronal remodeling is accompanied also by behavioral changes, some of which can be prevented with selective antidepressant and anticonvulsive drug treatments. Lithium is an effective treatment for mood disorders and has neuroprotective effects, which may contribute to its therapeutic properties. Thus, we wanted to determine whether lithium treatment could prevent the effects of chronic stress on CA3 pyramidal cell neuroarchitecture and the associated molecular and behavioral measures. Chronic lithium treatment prevented the stress-induced decrease in dendritic length, as well as the stress-induced increase in glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) mRNA expression and the phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding in the hippocampus. Lithium treatment, however, did not prevent stress effects on behavior in the open field or the plus-maze. These data demonstrate that chronic treatment with lithium can protect the hippocampus from potentially deleterious effects of chronic stress on glutamatergic activation, which may be relevant to its therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder.

  18. Secondary aerosol formation from stress-induced biogenic emissions and possible climate feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. F. Mentel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols impact climate by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and by acting as ice and cloud condensation nuclei. Biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOAs comprise an important component of atmospheric aerosols. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs emitted by vegetation are the source of BSOAs. Pathogens and insect attacks, heat waves and droughts can induce stress to plants that may impact their BVOC emissions, and hence the yield and type of formed BSOAs, and possibly their climatic effects. This raises questions of whether stress-induced changes in BSOA formation may attenuate or amplify effects of climate change. In this study we assess the potential impact of stress-induced BVOC emissions on BSOA formation for tree species typical for mixed deciduous and Boreal Eurasian forests. We studied the photochemical BSOA formation for plants infested by aphids in a laboratory setup under well-controlled conditions and applied in addition heat and drought stress. The results indicate that stress conditions substantially modify BSOA formation and yield. Stress-induced emissions of sesquiterpenes, methyl salicylate, and C17-BVOCs increase BSOA yields. Mixtures including these compounds exhibit BSOA yields between 17 and 33%, significantly higher than mixtures containing mainly monoterpenes (4–6% yield. Green leaf volatiles suppress SOA formation, presumably by scavenging OH, similar to isoprene. By classifying emission types, stressors and BSOA formation potential, we discuss possible climatic feedbacks regarding aerosol effects. We conclude that stress situations for plants due to climate change should be considered in climate–vegetation feedback mechanisms.

  19. Cordyceps militaris Extract Protects Human Dermal Fibroblasts against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis and Premature Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Myoung Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS is the major cause of degenerative disorders including aging and disease. In this study, we investigated whether Cordyceps militaris extract (CME has in vitro protective effects on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs. Our results showed that the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity of CME was increased in a dose-dependent manner. We found that hydrogen peroxide treatment in HDFs increased ROS generation and cell death as compared with the control. However, CME improved the survival of HDFs against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress via inhibition of intracellular ROS production. CME treatment inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptotic cell death and apoptotic nuclear condensation in HDFs. In addition, CME prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced SA-β-gal-positive cells suggesting CME could inhibit oxidative stress-induced premature senescence. Therefore, these results suggest that CME might have protective effects against oxidative stress-induced premature senescence via scavenging ROS.

  20. Stress-induced enhancement of leukocyte trafficking into sites of surgery or immune activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kavitha; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.

    2005-04-01

    Effective immunoprotection requires rapid recruitment of leukocytes into sites of surgery, wounding, infection, or vaccination. In contrast to immunosuppressive chronic stressors, short-term acute stressors have immunoenhancing effects. Here, we quantify leukocyte infiltration within a surgical sponge to elucidate the kinetics, magnitude, subpopulation, and chemoattractant specificity of an acute stress-induced increase in leukocyte trafficking to a site of immune activation. Mice acutely stressed before sponge implantation showed 200-300% higher neutrophil, macrophage, natural killer cell, and T cell infiltration than did nonstressed animals. We also quantified the effects of acute stress on lymphotactin- (LTN; a predominantly lymphocyte-specific chemokine), and TNF-- (a proinflammatory cytokine) stimulated leukocyte infiltration. An additional stress-induced increase in infiltration was observed for neutrophils, in response to TNF-, macrophages, in response to TNF- and LTN, and natural killer cells and T cells in response to LTN. These results show that acute stress initially increases trafficking of all major leukocyte subpopulations to a site of immune activation. Tissue damage-, antigen-, or pathogen-driven chemoattractants subsequently determine which subpopulations are recruited more vigorously. Such stress-induced increases in leukocyte trafficking may enhance immunoprotection during surgery, vaccination, or infection, but may also exacerbate immunopathology during inflammatory (cardiovascular disease or gingivitis) or autoimmune (psoriasis, arthritis, or multiple sclerosis) diseases. chemokine | psychophysiological stress | surgical sponge | wound healing | lymphotactin

  1. Stress Induces a Shift Towards Striatum-Dependent Stimulus-Response Learning via the Mineralocorticoid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Susanne; Klumpers, Floris; Schröder, Tobias Navarro; Oplaat, Krista T; Krugers, Harm J; Oitzl, Melly S; Joëls, Marian; Doeller, Christian F; Fernández, Guillén

    2016-12-21

    Stress is assumed to cause a shift from flexible 'cognitive' memory to more rigid 'habit' memory. In the spatial memory domain, stress impairs place learning depending on the hippocampus whereas stimulus-response learning based on the striatum appears to be improved. While the neural basis of this shift is still unclear, previous evidence in rodents points towards cortisol interacting with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) to affect amygdala functioning. The amygdala is in turn assumed to orchestrate the stress-induced shift in memory processing. However, an integrative study testing these mechanisms in humans is lacking. Therefore, we combined functional neuroimaging of a spatial memory task, stress-induction, and administration of an MR-antagonist in a full-factorial, randomized, placebo-controlled between-subjects design in 101 healthy males. We demonstrate that stress-induced increases in cortisol lead to enhanced stimulus-response learning, accompanied by increased amygdala activity and connectivity to the striatum. Importantly, this shift was prevented by an acute administration of the MR-antagonist spironolactone. Our findings support a model in which the MR and the amygdala play an important role in the stress-induced shift towards habit memory systems, revealing a fundamental mechanism of adaptively allocating neural resources that may have implications for stress-related mental disorders.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 21 December 2016; doi:10.1038/npp.2016.262.

  2. Oxidative Stress Induces Endothelial Cell Senescence via Downregulation of Sirt6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has shown that diabetes accelerates aging and endothelial cell senescence is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, including diabetic retinopathy. Oxidative stress is recognized as a key factor in the induction of endothelial senescence and diabetic retinopathy. However, specific mechanisms involved in oxidative stress-induced endothelial senescence have not been elucidated. We hypothesized that Sirt6, which is a nuclear, chromatin-bound protein critically involved in many pathophysiologic processes such as aging and inflammation, may have a role in oxidative stress-induced vascular cell senescence. Measurement of Sirt6 expression in human endothelial cells revealed that H2O2 treatment significantly reduced Sirt6 protein. The loss of Sirt6 was associated with an induction of a senescence phenotype in endothelial cells, including decreased cell growth, proliferation and angiogenic ability, and increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Additionally, H2O2 treatment reduced eNOS expression, enhanced p21 expression, and dephosphorylated (activated retinoblastoma (Rb protein. All of these alternations were attenuated by overexpression of Sirt6, while partial knockdown of Sirt6 expression by siRNA mimicked the effect of H2O2. In conclusion, these results suggest that Sirt6 is a critical regulator of endothelial senescence and oxidative stress-induced downregulation of Sirt6 is likely involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy.

  3. Cordyceps militaris Extract Protects Human Dermal Fibroblasts against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis and Premature Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Myoung; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Ki Rim; Ha, Suk-Jin; Hong, Eock Kee

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the major cause of degenerative disorders including aging and disease. In this study, we investigated whether Cordyceps militaris extract (CME) has in vitro protective effects on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Our results showed that the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of CME was increased in a dose-dependent manner. We found that hydrogen peroxide treatment in HDFs increased ROS generation and cell death as compared with the control. However, CME improved the survival of HDFs against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress via inhibition of intracellular ROS production. CME treatment inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptotic cell death and apoptotic nuclear condensation in HDFs. In addition, CME prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced SA-β-gal-positive cells suggesting CME could inhibit oxidative stress-induced premature senescence. Therefore, these results suggest that CME might have protective effects against oxidative stress-induced premature senescence via scavenging ROS. PMID:25230212

  4. Knockdown of hypothalamic RFRP3 prevents chronic stress-induced infertility and embryo resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Anna C; Muroy, Sandra E; Zhao, Sheng; Bentley, George E; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-12

    Whereas it is well established that chronic stress induces female reproductive dysfunction, whether stress negatively impacts fertility and fecundity when applied prior to mating and pregnancy has not been explored. In this study, we show that stress that concludes 4 days prior to mating results in persistent and marked reproductive dysfunction, with fewer successful copulation events, fewer pregnancies in those that successfully mated, and increased embryo resorption. Chronic stress exposure led to elevated expression of the hypothalamic inhibitory peptide, RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP3), in regularly cycling females. Remarkably, genetic silencing of RFRP3 during stress using an inducible-targeted shRNA completely alleviates stress-induced infertility in female rats, resulting in mating and pregnancy success rates indistinguishable from non-stress controls. We show that chronic stress has long-term effects on pregnancy success, even post-stressor, that are mediated by RFRP3. This points to RFRP3 as a potential clinically relevant single target for stress-induced infertility.

  5. Evolution of morphological integration. I. Functional units channel stress-induced variation in shrew mandibles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badyaev, Alexander V; Foresman, Kerry R

    2004-06-01

    Stress-induced deviations from normal development are often assumed to be random, yet their accumulation and expression can be influenced by patterns of morphological integration within an organism. We studied within-individual developmental variation (fluctuating asymmetry) in the mandible of four shrew species raised under normal and extreme environments. Patterns of among-individual variation and fluctuating asymmetry were strongly concordant in traits that were involved in the attachment of the same muscles (i.e., functionally integrated traits), and fluctuating asymmetry was closely integrated among these traits, implying direct developmental interactions among traits involved in the same function. Stress-induced variation was largely confined to the directions delimited by functionally integrated groups of traits in the pattern that was concordant with species divergence--species differed most in the same traits that were most sensitive to stress within each species. These results reveal a strong effect of functional complexes on directing and incorporating stress-induced variation during development and might explain the historical persistence of sets of traits involved in the same function in shrew jaws despite their high sensitivity to environmental variation.

  6. [Opioid μ receptors mediate the stress-induced spatial reference memory impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lan-Qin; Wen, Jie; Liu, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-04-25

    Learning/memory impairment is one of the most serious problems induced by stress, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Opiates and opioid receptors are implicated in multiple physiological functions including learning and memory. However, there is no clear evidence whether the endogenous opioid system is involved in the formation of the stress-induced spatial reference memory impairment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of μ opioid receptor in the stress-induced spatial reference memory impairment by means of Morris water maze (MWM) test in a mouse elevated platform stress model. The mice were trained in the MWM for four trials a session for 4 consecutive days after receiving the elevated platform stress, and intracerebroventricular injection of μ opioid receptor agonist DAMGO, antagonist CTAP or saline. Retention of the spatial training was assessed 24 h after the last training session with a 60-s free-swim probe trial using a new starting position. The results showed that intracerebroventricular injection of μ opioid receptor agonist DAMGO but not antagonist CTAP before MWM training impaired the memory retrieval of mice. Elevated platform stress before MWM training also impaired memory retrieval, which could be reversed by pre-injection of CTAP, and aggravated by DAMGO. These results suggest that endogenous opioid system may play a crucial role in the formation of the stress-induced memory impairment.

  7. Transcranial Stimulation of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Prevents Stress-Induced Working Memory Deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Mario; Schwabe, Lars

    2016-01-27

    Stress is known to impair working memory performance. This disruptive effect of stress on working memory has been linked to a decrease in the activity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). In the present experiment, we tested whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the dlPFC can prevent stress-induced working memory impairments. We tested 120 healthy participants in a 2 d, sham-controlled, double-blind between-subjects design. Participants completed a test of their individual baseline working memory capacity on day 1. On day 2, participants were exposed to either a stressor or a control manipulation before they performed a visuospatial and a verbal working memory task. While participants completed the tasks, anodal, cathodal, or sham tDCS was applied over the right dlPFC. Stress impaired working memory performance in both tasks, albeit to a lesser extent in the verbal compared with the visuospatial working memory task. This stress-induced working memory impairment was prevented by anodal, but not sham or cathodal, stimulation of the dlPFC. Compared with sham or cathodal stimulation, anodal tDCS led to significantly better working memory performance in both tasks after stress. Our findings indicate a causal role of the dlPFC in working memory impairments after acute stress and point to anodal tDCS as a promising tool to reduce cognitive deficits related to working memory in stress-related mental disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Working memory deficits are prominent in stress-related mental disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Similar working memory impairments have been observed in healthy individuals exposed to acute stress. So far, attempts to prevent such stress-induced working memory deficits focused mainly on pharmacological interventions. Here, we tested the idea that transcranial direct current stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal

  8. Modeling and inversion of stress-induced multicomponent seismic time shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven Shawn

    Subsurface pressure and temperature variations can alter rock properties both near and relatively far from the disturbance, causing detectable changes in seismic traveltimes. In this thesis, I first use traveltime variations to study velocity changes around a heated prototype nuclear waste storage tunnel. Then I model and invert compaction-induced multicomponent time shifts from depressurizing petroleum reservoirs. Heaters inside the tunnel replicate the thermal output of decaying radioactive waste, heating the tunnel over two years and maintaining a constant temperature for another two years. Time-lapse velocity models were constructed using temperature-dependent velocity data for granite and thermal profiles from boreholes in the tunnel wall. Matching check-shot and modeled waveforms indicate that the tunnel temperature can be monitored using seismic data. Further, the smooth, unperturbed velocity field lacks spatial perturbations, suggesting that no fluid or steam was present around the tunnel near the receiver array during the experiment. However, the combination of changing velocities and non-elastic, stress-induced acoustic emissions near the tunnel crown suggest that damage to the rock may occur. To study time shifts around a compacting reservoir, I employ geomechanical modeling of the compaction-induced stress/strain fields. Strain-dependent stiffness perturbations are obtained from the nonlinear theory of elasticity. Then full-waveform multicomponent seismic data are generated by finite-differences and used to estimate the time shifts of P-, S-, and PS-waves. P-wave time shifts are strongly influenced by compaction-induced velocity anisotropy around the reservoir. S-wave anisotropy is almost negligible, but S-wave shifts are 2-3 times larger than those of P-waves. PS-wave time-shift behavior significantly varies with the reflection point. Spatial time-shift distributions are exploited to study the sensitivity of each wave type to reservoir pressure ( Delta

  9. Influence of Momordica charantia on oxidative stress-induced perturbations in brain monoamines and plasma corticosterone in albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Naga Kavitha

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: This study reveals the antistress activity of MC as it significantly reverted the stress-induced changes, and the activity might be attributed to its antioxidant activity since stress is known to involve several oxidative mechanisms.

  10. Neural Correlates of Stress-Induced and Cue-Induced Drug Craving: Influences of Sex and Cocaine Dependence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Potenza, Marc N; Hong, Kwang-ik Adam; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Fulbright, Robert K; Tuit, Keri L; Sinha, Rajita

    2012-01-01

    .... Objective:Although stress and drug cue exposure each increase drug craving and contribute to relapse in cocaine dependence, no previous research has directly examined the neural correlates of stress-induced...

  11. Lanthanum Prevents Salt Stress-induced Programmed Cell Death in Rice Root Tip Cells by Controlling Early Induction Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, a salt stress-induced programmed cell death (PCD) model was established in rice root tip cells. Here,by using Wuyunjing 8th rice seedlings, the effects of lanthanum on salt stress-induced PCD early events were studied. The peroxidase (APX). Imidazole (20 mmol/L), the inhibitor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH oxidase), could alleviate the occurrence of PCD obviously, and such alleviation could be enhanced by the addition of La3+,indicating the involvement of NADPH oxidase in the salt stress-induced PCD process. Taken together, lanthanum could prevent salt stress-induced PCD occurrence in the rice root tip cells by blocking the calcium influx under stress, which was followed by inhibiting calcium-dependent NADPH oxidase activity to prevent O2·-production and, enhancing the cytosolic antioxidative enzyme activities to scavenge the reactive oxygen species.

  12. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  13. Stress-induced decrease of uterine blood flow in sheep is mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreiling, Michelle; Bischoff, Sabine; Schiffner, Rene; Rupprecht, Sven; Kiehntopf, Michael; Schubert, Harald; Witte, Otto W; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Schwab, Matthias; Rakers, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal maternal stress can be transferred to the fetus via a catecholamine-dependent decrease of uterine blood flow (UBF). However, it is unclear which group of adrenergic receptors mediates this mechanism of maternal-fetal stress transfer. We hypothesized that in sheep, alpha 1-adrenergic receptors may play a key role in catecholamine mediated UBF decrease, as these receptors are mainly involved in peripheral vasoconstriction and are present in significant number in the uterine vasculature. After chronic instrumentation at 125 ± 1 days of gestation (dGA; term 150 dGA), nine pregnant sheep were exposed at 130 ± 1 dGA to acute isolation stress for one hour without visual, tactile, or auditory contact with their flockmates. UBF, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), stress hormones, and blood gases were determined before and during this isolation challenge. Twenty-four hours later, experiments were repeated during alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockage induced by a continuous intravenous infusion of urapidil. In both experiments, ewes reacted to isolation with an increase in serum norepinephrine, cortisol, BP, and HR as typical signs of activation of sympatho-adrenal and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Stress-induced UBF decrease was prevented by alpha 1-adrenergic receptor blockage. We conclude that UBF decrease induced by maternal stress in sheep is mediated by alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. Future studies investigating prevention strategies of impact of prenatal maternal stress on fetal health should consider selective blockage of alpha 1-receptors to interrupt maternal-fetal stress transfer mediated by utero-placental malperfusion.

  14. “Cumulative Stress”: The Effects of Maternal and Neonatal Oxidative Stress and Oxidative Stress-Inducible Genes on Programming of Atopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Gabriella; Cuppari, Caterina; Cusumano, Erika; Arrigo, Teresa; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    Although extensive epidemiological and laboratory studies have been performed to identify the environmental and immunological causes of atopy, genetic predisposition seems to be the biggest risk factor for allergic diseases. The onset of atopic diseases may be the result of heritable changes of gene expression, without any alteration in DNA sequences occurring in response to early environmental stimuli. Findings suggest that the establishment of a peculiar epigenetic pattern may also be generated by oxidative stress (OS) and perpetuated by the activation of OS-related genes. Analyzing the role of maternal and neonatal oxidative stress and oxidative stress-inducible genes, the purpose of this review was to summarize what is known about the relationship between maternal and neonatal OS-related genes and the development of atopic diseases. PMID:27504149

  15. An animal model of stress-induced cardiomyopathy utilizing the social defeat paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, Cyrilla H; Cierniak, Kayla H; Sweet, Wendy E; Moravec, Christine S; Murphy, Helen M

    2013-08-15

    Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC) is a form of acute heart disease triggered by extreme psychological stress. In patients who develop SIC, the outward symptoms are almost indistinguishable from acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, some important criteria differentiate patients with SIC from those with AMI. Patients with SIC: (1) experience some form of extreme psychological stress from minutes to hours before developing heart disease, (2) do not suffer from atherosclerosis or coronary artery obstruction, and 3) exhibit abnormal ballooning of the left ventricle. In the present study, the resident-intruder (RI) social defeat test was investigated as a potential rat model for stressed-induced cardiomyopathy. Adult Long-Evans rats were implanted with a biotelemetry transmitter for ECG recordings and habituated for two weeks. An intruder rat was placed in the cage of a resident rat behind a wire-mesh partition for 5 min. The partition was then removed for 5 min to allow direct contact between the intruder and resident rats. After this interval, the wire-mesh partition was replaced and the intruder rat remained behind the partition for an additional 50 min. Behavioral responses were noted and ECG recordings were collected during the entire 60-min testing period. Upon completion of the test, the intruder rat was removed from the cage of the resident rat and sacrificed. The heart was examined and blood was collected. Heart weight/body weight ratio, left ventricle/body weight ratio, heart length, plasma corticosterone levels, and plasma troponin I levels of intruder rats were significantly higher as compared to control rats. Intruder rats significantly increased their heart rate during the first 5 min of the RI test. It is concluded that the RI test to induce social defeat is a novel rodent paradigm for modeling stress-induced cardiomyopathy in the human.

  16. Notochordal cell-derived conditioned medium protects human nucleus pulposus cells from stress-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrkens, Arne; Matta, Ajay; Karim, Muhammad Zia; Kim, Sarah; Fehlings, Michael G; Schaeren, Stefan; Mark Erwin, William

    2017-04-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) remains without an effective therapy and presents a costly burden to society. Based upon prior reports concerning the effects of notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) on disc cells, we performed a proof of principle study to determine whether NCCM could reduce cytotoxic stress-induced apoptosis in human disc nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. This is an "in vitro" fundamental or basic science study. Nucleus pulpous cells derived from 15 patients undergoing spinal surgery were treated with interleukin (IL)-1β and Fas ligand or etoposide in the presence of NCCM. We determined pro- or antiapoptotic events using activated caspase assays and determined genomic regulation of apoptosis using polymerase chain reaction arrays validated using Western blotting methods. We interrogated cellular apoptotic regulation using JC-1 dye and flow cytometry and performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to evaluate NP inflammatory cytokine secretion. Notochordal cell-conditioned medium inhibits cytotoxic stress-induced caspase-9 and -3/7 activities and maintains the mitochondrial membrane potential in human NP cells, thereby suppressing the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Gene expression analysis revealed the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein as a key player responsible for evading etoposide-induced apoptosis in the presence of NCCM, and we verified these data using Western blotting. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results revealed distinct differences in IL-6 and IL-8 secretions by NP cells in response to etoposide in the presence of NCCM. Here we demonstrate for the first time that NCCM reduces cytotoxic stress-induced apoptosis in human NP cells. Soluble factors present in NCCM could be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of DDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pattern of Stress-Induced Hyperglycemia according to Type of Diabetes: A Predator Stress Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Sun Chang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe aimed to quantify stress-induced hyperglycemia and differentiate the glucose response between normal animals and those with diabetes. We also examined the pattern in glucose fluctuation induced by stress according to type of diabetes.MethodsTo load psychological stress on animal models, we used a predator stress model by exposing rats to a cat for 60 minutes and measured glucose level from the beginning to the end of the test to monitor glucose fluctuation. We induced type 1 diabetes model (T1D for ten Sprague-Dawley rats using streptozotocin and used five Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats as obese type 2 diabetes model (OT2D and 10 Goto-Kakizaki rats as nonobese type 2 diabetes model (NOT2D. We performed the stress loading test in both the normal and diabetic states and compared patterns of glucose fluctuation among the three models. We classified the pattern of glucose fluctuation into A, B, and C types according to speed of change in glucose level.ResultsIncrease in glucose, total amount of hyperglycemic exposure, time of stress-induced hyperglycemia, and speed of glucose increase were significantly increased in all models compared to the normal state. While the early increase in glucose after exposure to stress was higher in T1D and NOT2D, it was slower in OT2D. The rate of speed of the decrease in glucose level was highest in NOT2D and lowest in OT2D.ConclusionThe diabetic state was more vulnerable to stress compared to the normal state in all models, and the pattern of glucose fluctuation differed among the three types of diabetes. The study provides basic evidence for stress-induced hyperglycemia patterns and characteristics used for the management of diabetes patients.

  18. Glucocorticoids mediate stress-induced impairment of retrieval of stimulus-response memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsak, Piray; Guenzel, Friederike M; Kantar-Gok, Deniz; Zalachoras, Ioannis; Yargicoglu, Piraye; Meijer, Onno C; Quirarte, Gina L; Wolf, Oliver T; Schwabe, Lars; Roozendaal, Benno

    2016-05-01

    Acute stress and elevated glucocorticoid hormone levels are well known to impair the retrieval of hippocampus-dependent 'declarative' memory. Recent findings suggest that stress might also impair the retrieval of non-hippocampal memories. In particular, stress shortly before retention testing was shown to impair the retrieval of striatal stimulus-response associations in humans. However, the mechanism underlying this stress-induced retrieval impairment of non-hippocampal stimulus-response memory remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated whether an acute elevation in glucocorticoid levels mediates the impairing effects of stress on retrieval of stimulus-response memory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on a stimulus-response task in an eight-arm radial maze until they learned to associate a stimulus, i.e., cue, with a food reward in one of the arms. Twenty-four hours after successful acquisition, they received a systemic injection of vehicle, corticosterone (1mg/kg), the corticosterone-synthesis inhibitor metyrapone (35mg/kg) or were left untreated 1h before retention testing. We found that the corticosterone injection impaired the retrieval of stimulus-response memory. We further found that the systemic injection procedure per se was stressful as the vehicle administration also increased plasma corticosterone levels and impaired the retrieval of stimulus-response memory. However, memory retrieval was not impaired when rats were tested 2min after the systemic vehicle injection, before any stress-induced elevation in corticosterone levels had occurred. Moreover, metyrapone treatment blocked the effect of injection stress on both plasma corticosterone levels and memory retrieval impairment, indicating that the endogenous corticosterone response mediates the stress-induced memory retrieval impairment. None of the treatments affected rats' locomotor activity or motivation to search for the food reward within the maze. These findings show that stress

  19. Differential effects of stress-induced cortisol responses on recollection and familiarity-based recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Andrew M; Ritchey, Maureen; Ranganath, Charan; Yonelinas, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Stress-induced changes in cortisol can impact memory in various ways. However, the precise relationship between cortisol and recognition memory is still poorly understood. For instance, there is reason to believe that stress could differentially affect recollection-based memory, which depends on the hippocampus, and familiarity-based recognition, which can be supported by neocortical areas alone. Accordingly, in the current study we examined the effects of stress-related changes in cortisol on the processes underlying recognition memory. Stress was induced with a cold-pressor test after incidental encoding of emotional and neutral pictures, and recollection and familiarity-based recognition memory were measured one day later. The relationship between stress-induced cortisol responses and recollection was non-monotonic, such that subjects with moderate stress-related increases in cortisol had the highest levels of recollection. In contrast, stress-related cortisol responses were linearly related to increases in familiarity. In addition, measures of cortisol taken at the onset of the experiment showed that individuals with higher levels of pre-learning cortisol had lower levels of both recollection and familiarity. The results are consistent with the proposition that hippocampal-dependent memory processes such as recollection function optimally under moderate levels of stress, whereas more cortically-based processes such as familiarity are enhanced even with higher levels of stress. These results indicate that whether post-encoding stress improves or disrupts recognition memory depends on the specific memory process examined as well as the magnitude of the stress-induced cortisol response.

  20. Stress-induced inflammatory responses in women: effects of race and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Lisa M; Glaser, Ronald; Porter, Kyle; Iams, Jay D

    2013-09-01

    African Americans experience preterm birth at nearly twice the rate of whites. Chronic stress associated with minority status is implicated in this disparity. Inflammation is a key biological pathway by which stress may affect birth outcomes. This study examined the effects of race and pregnancy on stress-induced inflammatory responses. Thirty-nine women in the second trimester of pregnancy (19 African American, 20 white) and 39 demographically similar nonpregnant women completed an acute stressor (Trier Social Stress Test). Psychosocial characteristics, health behaviors, and affective responses were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL)-6 was measured at baseline, 45 minutes, and 120 minutes poststressor. IL-6 responses at 120 minutes poststressor were 46% higher in African Americans versus whites (95% confidence interval = 8%-81%, t(72) = 3.51, p = .001). This effect was present in pregnancy and nonpregnancy. IL-6 responses at 120 minutes poststressor tended to be lower (15%) in pregnant versus nonpregnant women (95% confidence interval = -5%-32%, p = .14). Racial differences in inflammatory responses were not accounted for by demographics, psychological characteristics, health behaviors, or differences in salivary cortisol. Pregnant whites showed lower negative affective responses than did nonpregnant women of either race (p values ≤ .007). This study provides novel evidence that stress-induced inflammatory responses are more robust among African American women versus whites during pregnancy and nonpregnancy. The ultimate impact of stress on health is a function of stressor exposure and physiological responses. Individual differences in stress-induced inflammatory responses represent a clear target for continued research efforts in racial disparities in health during pregnancy and nonpregnancy.

  1. Pharmacological evaluation of the stress-induced social avoidance model of anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveleki, Cs; Sziray, N; Levay, G; Barsvári, B; Soproni, K; Mikics, E; Haller, J

    2006-03-31

    We have shown earlier that mild electric shocks induce a lasting social avoidance in male rats. Here we investigated whether shock-induced social avoidance can be developed into a laboratory model of stress-induced anxiety. The putative new model would assess sub-chronic, stress-induced anxiety (as opposed to tests based on natural fear) in a heterologous context (as opposed to classical fear conditioning). A single exposure to mild electric shocks induced a robust social avoidance that lasted more than 5 days. Low doses of chlordiazepoxide (0.5, 1 mg/kg), diazepam (0.5, 1, 5 mg/kg), buspirone (0.3, 1 mg/kg), and fluoxetine (1, 3, 5 mg/kg) abolished this effect, whereas the anxiogenic compound m-chlorophenylpiperazine (0.5-3 mg/kg) induced social avoidance in unshocked rats. These effects were produced at doses that did not affect locomotion in the open field. Haloperidol (0.05, 0.1, 1, 5 mg/kg) influenced social avoidance at sedative doses only. The sensitivity of the model to anxiolytic agents was compromised at high (sedating) doses. Taken conjointly, these data show that shock-induced social avoidance can be used to assess the anxiolytic potential of compounds. In addition to predictive validity, the model appears to show construct and face validity as well: stress is among the etiological factors of, whereas social avoidance simulates the social deficits seen in, a variety of anxiety disorders. The model may be used to study the effects of anxiolytics on sub-chronic states of stress-induced anxiety.

  2. Hippocampal signaling pathways are involved in stress-induced impairment of memory formation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardari, Maryam; Rezayof, Ameneh; Khodagholi, Fariba

    2015-11-02

    Stress is a potent modulator of hippocampal-dependent memory formation. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of hippocampal signaling pathways in stress-induced memory impairment in male Wistar rats. The animals were exposed to acute elevated platform (EP) stress and memory formation was measured by a step-through type passive avoidance task. The results indicated that post-training or pre-test exposure to EP stress impaired memory consolidation or retrieval respectively. Using western blot analysis, it was found that memory retrieval was associated with the increase in the levels of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein (P-CREB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets in the hippocampus. In contrast, the stress exposure decreased the hippocampal levels of these proteins. In addition, stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation or retrieval was associated with the decrease in the P-CREB/CREB ratio and the PGC-1α level in the hippocampus. On the other hand, the hippocampal level of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) which are the master regulators of defense system were decreased by the stress exposure. The increased hippocampal levels of Nrf2 and it׳s downstream was observed during memory retrieval, while stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation or retrieval inhibited this hippocampal signaling pathway. Overall, these findings suggest that down-regulation of CREB/PGC-1α signaling cascade and Nrf2 antioxidant pathways in the hippocampus may be associated with memory impairment induced by stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ketamine as a Prophylactic Against Stress-Induced Depressive-like Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachman, Rebecca A; McGowan, Josephine C; Perusini, Jennifer N; Lim, Sean C; Pham, Thu Ha; Faye, Charlene; Gardier, Alain M; Mendez-David, Indira; David, Denis J; Hen, René; Denny, Christine A

    2016-05-01

    Stress exposure is one of the greatest risk factors for psychiatric illnesses like major depressive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. However, not all individuals exposed to stress develop affective disorders. Stress resilience, the ability to experience stress without developing persistent psychopathology, varies from individual to individual. Enhancing stress resilience in at-risk populations could potentially protect against stress-induced psychiatric disorders. Despite this fact, no resilience-enhancing pharmaceuticals have been identified. Using a chronic social defeat (SD) stress model, learned helplessness (LH), and a chronic corticosterone (CORT) model in mice, we tested if ketamine could protect against depressive-like behavior. Mice were administered a single dose of saline or ketamine and then 1 week later were subjected to 2 weeks of SD, LH training, or 3 weeks of CORT. SD robustly and reliably induced depressive-like behavior in control mice. Mice treated with prophylactic ketamine were protected against the deleterious effects of SD in the forced swim test and in the dominant interaction test. We confirmed these effects in LH and the CORT model. In the LH model, latency to escape was increased following training, and this effect was prevented by ketamine. In the CORT model, a single dose of ketamine blocked stress-induced behavior in the forced swim test, novelty suppressed feeding paradigm, and the sucrose splash test. These data show that ketamine can induce persistent stress resilience and, therefore, may be useful in protecting against stress-induced disorders. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Overlapping mechanisms of stress-induced relapse to opioid use disorder and chronic pain: Clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udi E Ghitza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, a steeply growing number of persons with chronic non-cancer pain have been using opioid analgesics chronically to treat it, accompanied by a markedly increased prevalence of individuals with opioid-related misuse, opioid use disorders, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, admissions to drug treatment programs, and drug overdose deaths. This opioid misuse and overdose epidemic calls for well-designed randomized-controlled clinical trials into more skillful and appropriate pain management and for developing effective analgesics which have lower abuse liability and are protective against stress induced by chronic non-cancer pain. However, incomplete knowledge regarding effective approaches to treat various types of pain has been worsened by an under-appreciation of overlapping neurobiological mechanisms of stress, stress-induced relapse to opioid use, and chronic non-cancer pain in patients presenting for care for these conditions. This insufficient knowledge base has unfortunately encouraged common prescription of conveniently-available opioid pain-relieving drugs with abuse liability, as opposed to treating underlying problems using team-based multidisciplinary, patient-centered, collaborative-care approaches for addressing pain and co-occurring stress and risk for opioid use disorder. This paper reviews recent neurobiological findings regarding overlapping mechanisms of stress-induced relapse to opioid misuse and chronic non-cancer pain, and then discusses these in the context of key outstanding evidence gaps and clinical-treatment research directions which may be pursued to fill these gaps. Such research directions, if conducted through well-designed randomized controlled trials, may substantively inform clinical practice in general medical settings on how to effectively care for patients presenting with pain-related distress and these common co-occurring conditions.

  5. Thermal stress induced dislocation distribution in directional solidification of Si for PV application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiptner, Karolin; Gao, Bing; Harada, Hirofumi; Miyamura, Yoshiji; Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kakimoto, Koichi; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the limitation of the cast technique for silicon growth and the obstacle to reduce the dislocation density below 103 cm-2. The thermal stress induced dislocation density, independent of other dislocation sources, is determined and the result suggests that local dislocation densities as high as 104 cm-2 are readily introduced alone in the cooling period of the crystal growth. Areas of high residual strain and dislocation densities are identified and presented. The experimental results are correlated with numerical simulation based on a three-dimensional Haasen-Alexander-Sumino (HAS) model. The dislocation introduction is caused by an activation of different slip systems in different ingot areas.

  6. Thermal Stress-Induced Birefringence in Borate Glass Irradiated by Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Ye; YU Bing-Kun; LU Bo; QIU Jian-Rong; YAN Xiao-Na; JIANG Xiong-Wei; ZHU Cong-Shan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Thermal stress-induced birefringence in borate glass which has been irradiated by 800-nm femtosecond laser pulses is observed under cross-polarized light. Due to the high temperature and pressure formed in the focal volume, the material at the edge of the micro-modified region is compressed between the expanding region and the unheated one, then stress emerges. Raman spectroscopy is used to investigate the stress distribution in the micro-modified region and indicates the redistributions of density and refractive index by Raman peak shift. We suggest that this technique can develop waveguide polarizers and Fresnel zone plates in integrated optics.

  7. Stress-Induced Phase Transformation in Incompressible Materials and Stability of Multi-Phase Deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The stress-induced phase transformation in incompressible materials and the interfacial stability of multi-phase deformation were studied. The existence of multi-phase deformation was determined through exploring whether the material would lose the strong ellipticity at some deformation gradient.Then, according to the stability criterion which is based on a quasi-static approach, the stability of the multi-phase deformation in incompressible materials was investigated by studying the growth/decay behaviour of the interface in the undeformed configuration when it is perturbed. At last, the way to define multi-phase deformation in incompressible materials was concluded and testified by a corresponding numerical example.

  8. Angiotensin II receptor blocker ameliorates stress-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoharu Hayashi

    Full Text Available A strong causal link exists between psychological stress and insulin resistance as well with hypertension. Meanwhile, stress-related responses play critical roles in glucose metabolism in hypertensive patients. As clinical trials suggest that angiotensin-receptor blocker delays the onset of diabetes in hypertensive patients, we investigated the effects of irbesartan on stress-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 2-week intermittent restraint stress and orally treated with vehicle, 3 and 10 mg/kg/day irbesartan. The plasma concentrations of lipid and proinflammatory cytokines [Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6] were assessed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Monocyte/macrophage accumulation in inguinal white adipose tissue (WAT was observed with CD11b-positive cell counts and mRNA expressions of CD68 and F4/80 using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR methods respectively. The mRNA levels of angiotensinogen, proinflammatory cytokines shown above, and adiponectin in WAT were also assessed with RT-PCR method. Glucose metabolism was assessed by glucose tolerance tests (GTTs and insulin tolerance tests, and mRNA expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 in WAT. Restraint stress increased monocyte accumulation, plasma free fatty acids, expression of angiotensinogen and proinflammatory cytokines including MCP-1, and reduced adiponectin. Irbesartan reduced stress-induced monocyte accumulation in WAT in a dose dependent manner. Irbesartan treatment also suppressed induction of adipose angiotensinogen and proinflammatory cytokines in WAT and blood, and reversed changes in adiponectin expression. Notably, irbesartan suppressed stress-induced reduction in adipose tissue weight and free fatty acid release, and improved insulin tolerance with restoration of IRS-1 and GLUT4 mRNA expressions in WAT. The results

  9. Permanent lesion in rostral ventromedial medulla potentiates swim stress-induced analgesia in formalin test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shamsizadeh

    2014-03-01

    Results: In the unstressed rats, permanent lesion of the RVM by R-SKF38393 decreased formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors in phase 1, while in stressed rats, injection of R-SKF38393 into the RVM potentiated swim stress-induced antinociception in phase 1 and interphase, phase 2A of formalin test. Furthermore, R-SKF38393 had pronociceptive effects in phase2B whereas injections of R-SKF38393 resulted in significant difference in nociceptive bahaviours in all phases of formalin test (P

  10. Renal and endocrine changes in rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension (ISIAH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstislavsky, Sergej; Welker, Pia; Frühauf, Jan-Henning

    2006-01-01

    Hypertensive inbred rats (ISIAH; inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension) present with baseline hypertension (>170 mmHg in adult rats), but attain substantially higher values upon mild emotional stress. We aimed to characterize key parameters related to hypertension in ISIAH. Kidneys...... channel-alpha; 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2) were increased. These data suggest enhanced volume conservation by the kidney. Our data define ISIAH as an attractive model for the renal components determining salt and water homeostasis in hypertension. The specific condition of a basally...

  11. Chronic stress induces sex-specific alterations in methylation and expression of corticotropin-releasing factor gene in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Sterrenburg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the higher prevalence of depression in women than in men is well known, the neuronal basis of this sex difference is largely elusive. METHODS: Male and female rats were exposed to chronic variable mild stress (CVMS after which immediate early gene products, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF mRNA and peptide, various epigenetic-associated enzymes and DNA methylation of the Crf gene were determined in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, oval (BSTov and fusiform (BSTfu parts of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and central amygdala (CeA. RESULTS: CVMS induced site-specific changes in Crf gene methylation in all brain centers studied in female rats and in the male BST and CeA, whereas the histone acetyltransferase, CREB-binding protein was increased in the female BST and the histone-deacetylase-5 decreased in the male CeA. These changes were accompanied by an increased amount of c-Fos in the PVN, BSTfu and CeA in males, and of FosB in the PVN of both sexes and in the male BSTov and BSTfu. In the PVN, CVMS increased CRF mRNA in males and CRF peptide decreased in females. CONCLUSIONS: The data confirm our hypothesis that chronic stress affects gene expression and CRF transcriptional, translational and secretory activities in the PVN, BSTov, BSTfu and CeA, in a brain center-specific and sex-specific manner. Brain region-specific and sex-specific changes in epigenetic activity and neuronal activation may play, too, an important role in the sex specificity of the stress response and the susceptibility to depression.

  12. The Role of Oxidative Stress-Induced Epigenetic Alterations in Amyloid-β Production in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies have proposed a strong correlation between reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced oxidative stress (OS and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. With over five million people diagnosed in the United States alone, AD is the most common type of dementia worldwide. AD includes progressive neurodegeneration, followed by memory loss and reduced cognitive ability. Characterized by the formation of amyloid-beta (Aβ plaques as a hallmark, the connection between ROS and AD is compelling. Analyzing the ROS response of essential proteins in the amyloidogenic pathway, such as amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP and beta-secretase (BACE1, along with influential signaling programs of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, has helped visualize the path between OS and Aβ overproduction. In this review, attention will be paid to significant advances in the area of OS, epigenetics, and their influence on Aβ plaque assembly. Additionally, we aim to discuss available treatment options for AD that include antioxidant supplements, Asian traditional medicines, metal-protein-attenuating compounds, and histone modifying inhibitors.

  13. The critical role of spinal 5-HT7 receptors in opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilyurt, Ozgur; Seyrek, Melik; Tasdemir, Serdar; Kahraman, Serdar; Deveci, Mehmet Salih; Karakus, Emre; Halici, Zekai; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2015-09-05

    The opioid and non-opioid types of stress-induced analgesia have been well defined. One of the non-opioid type involve the endocannabinoid system. We previously reported that the spinal serotonin 7 receptor (5-HT7) blockers inhibit both morphine and cannabinoid-induced analgesia, thus we hypothesized that descending serotonergic pathways-spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop might contribute to stress-induced analgesia. Stress-induced analgesia was induced with warm (32°C) or cold (20°C) water swim stress in male Balb-C mice. The effects of intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB 269970, of the denervation of serotonergic neurons by intrathecal administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) and of lesions of the dorsolateral funiculus on opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia were evaluated with the tail-flick and hot plate tests. The expression of 5-HT7 receptors mRNA in the dorsal lumbar region of spinal cord were analyzed by RT-PCR following spinal serotonin depletion or dorsolateral funiculus lesion. The effects of the selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists LP 44 and AS 19 were tested on nociception. Intrathecal SB 269970 blocked both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. Dorsolateral funiculus lesion or denervation of the spinal serotonergic neurons resulted in a marked decrease in 5-HT7 receptor expression in the dorsal lumbar spinal cord, accompanied by inhibition of opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. However, the systemic or intrathecal LP 44 and AS 19 alone did not produce analgesia in unstressed mice. These results indicate that descending serotonergic pathways and the spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop play a crucial role in mediating both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

  14. Mutability and importance of a hypermutable cell subpopulation that produces stress-induced mutants in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Gonzalez

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In bacterial, yeast, and human cells, stress-induced mutation mechanisms are induced in growth-limiting environments and produce non-adaptive and adaptive mutations. These mechanisms may accelerate evolution specifically when cells are maladapted to their environments, i.e., when they are are stressed. One mechanism of stress-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli occurs by error-prone DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. This mechanism was linked previously to a differentiated subpopulation of cells with a transiently elevated mutation rate, a hypermutable cell subpopulation (HMS. The HMS could be important, producing essentially all stress-induced mutants. Alternatively, the HMS was proposed to produce only a minority of stress-induced mutants, i.e., it was proposed to be peripheral. We characterize three aspects of the HMS. First, using improved mutation-detection methods, we estimate the number of mutations per genome of HMS-derived cells and find that it is compatible with fitness after the HMS state. This implies that these mutants are not necessarily an evolutionary dead end, and could contribute to adaptive evolution. Second, we show that stress-induced Lac(+ mutants, with and without evidence of descent from the HMS, have similar Lac(+ mutation sequences. This provides evidence that HMS-descended and most stress-induced mutants form via a common mechanism. Third, mutation-stimulating DSBs introduced via I-SceI endonuclease in vivo do not promote Lac(+ mutation independently of the HMS. This and the previous finding support the hypothesis that the HMS underlies most stress-induced mutants, not just a minority of them, i.e., it is important. We consider a model in which HMS differentiation is controlled by stress responses. Differentiation of an HMS potentially limits the risks of mutagenesis in cell clones.

  15. Environmental enrichment and gut inflammation modify stress-induced c-Fos expression in the mouse corticolimbic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Florian; Painsipp, Evelin; Holzer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) has a beneficial effect on rodent behaviour, neuronal plasticity and brain function. Although it may also improve stress coping, it is not known whether EE influences the brain response to an external (psychological) stressor such as water avoidance stress (WAS) or an internal (systemic) stressor such as gastrointestinal inflammation. This study hence explored whether EE modifies WAS-induced activation of the mouse corticolimbic system and whether this stress response is altered by gastritis or colitis. Male C67BL/6N mice were housed under standard or enriched environment for 9 weeks, after which they were subjected to a 1-week treatment with oral iodoacetamide to induce gastritis or oral dextran sulfate sodium to induce colitis. Following exposure to WAS the expression of c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, was measured by immunocytochemistry. EE aggravated experimentally induced colitis, but not gastritis, as shown by an increase in the disease activity score and the colonic myeloperoxidase content. In the brain, EE enhanced the WAS-induced activation of the dentate gyrus and unmasked an inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression within this part of the hippocampus. Conversely, EE inhibited the WAS-evoked activation of the central amygdala and prevented the inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression in this region. EE, in addition, blunted the WAS-induced activation of the infralimbic cortex and attenuated the inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression in this area. These data reveal that EE has a region-specific effect on stress-induced c-Fos expression in the corticolimbic system, which is likely to improve stress resilience. The response of the prefrontal cortex - amygdala - hippocampus circuitry to psychological stress is also modified by the systemic stress of gut inflammation, and this interaction between external and internal

  16. Environmental enrichment and gut inflammation modify stress-induced c-Fos expression in the mouse corticolimbic system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Reichmann

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment (EE has a beneficial effect on rodent behaviour, neuronal plasticity and brain function. Although it may also improve stress coping, it is not known whether EE influences the brain response to an external (psychological stressor such as water avoidance stress (WAS or an internal (systemic stressor such as gastrointestinal inflammation. This study hence explored whether EE modifies WAS-induced activation of the mouse corticolimbic system and whether this stress response is altered by gastritis or colitis. Male C67BL/6N mice were housed under standard or enriched environment for 9 weeks, after which they were subjected to a 1-week treatment with oral iodoacetamide to induce gastritis or oral dextran sulfate sodium to induce colitis. Following exposure to WAS the expression of c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, was measured by immunocytochemistry. EE aggravated experimentally induced colitis, but not gastritis, as shown by an increase in the disease activity score and the colonic myeloperoxidase content. In the brain, EE enhanced the WAS-induced activation of the dentate gyrus and unmasked an inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression within this part of the hippocampus. Conversely, EE inhibited the WAS-evoked activation of the central amygdala and prevented the inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression in this region. EE, in addition, blunted the WAS-induced activation of the infralimbic cortex and attenuated the inhibitory effect of gastritis and colitis on WAS-evoked c-Fos expression in this area. These data reveal that EE has a region-specific effect on stress-induced c-Fos expression in the corticolimbic system, which is likely to improve stress resilience. The response of the prefrontal cortex - amygdala - hippocampus circuitry to psychological stress is also modified by the systemic stress of gut inflammation, and this interaction between external

  17. Genome-wide transcriptional response of the Arctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. A2 to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xuezheng; WANG Zhen; LI Yang; LI Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major challenges faced by Arctic marine bacteria due to the high oxygen concentration of seawater, low temperatures and UV radiations. Transcriptome sequencing was performed to obtain the key functional genes involved in the adaptation to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide in the Arctic bacteriumPseudoalteromonas sp. A2. Exposure to 1 mmol/L H2O2 resulted in large alterations of the transcriptome profile, including significant up-regulation of 109 genes and significant down-regulation of 174 genes. COG functional classification revealed that among the significantly regulated genes with known function categories, more genes belonging to posttranslational modification, protein turnover and chaperones were significantly up-regulated, and more genes affiliated with chaperones and amino acid transport and metabolism were significantly down-regulated. It was notable that the expressions of eighteen genes affiliated with flagella and four genes affiliated with heat shock proteins were significantly up-regulated. Meanwhile, the expression of nine genes belonging to cytochrome and cytochrome oxidase, and five genes belonging to TonB-dependent receptor, were significantly down-regulated. Among the eighteen genes with antioxidant activity categorized by GO analysis, the expression of one gene was significantly up-regulated; however, the expressions of two genes were significantly down-regulated. Briefly, RNA-Seq indicated that, except for the classical anti-oxidative genes and stress proteins, genes affiliated with flagella and function unknown played important roles in coping with oxidative stress inPseudoalteromonas sp. A2. This overall survey of transcriptome and oxidative stress-relevant genes can contribute to understand the adaptive mechanism of Arctic bacteria.

  18. Role of Glia in Stress-Induced Enhancement and Impairment of Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-Leary, Jiah; Osborne, Danielle Maria; McNay, Ewan C.

    2016-01-01

    Both acute and chronic stress profoundly affect hippocampally-dependent learning and memory: moderate stress generally enhances, while chronic or extreme stress can impair, neural and cognitive processes. Within the brain, stress elevates both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids, and both affect several genomic and signaling cascades responsible for modulating memory strength. Memories formed at times of stress can be extremely strong, yet stress can also impair memory to the point of amnesia. Often overlooked in consideration of the impact of stress on cognitive processes, and specifically memory, is the important contribution of glia as a target for stress-induced changes. Astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes all have unique contributions to learning and memory. Furthermore, these three types of glia express receptors for both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids and are hence immediate targets of stress hormone actions. It is becoming increasingly clear that inflammatory cytokines and immunomodulatory molecules released by glia during stress may promote many of the behavioral effects of acute and chronic stress. In this review, the role of traditional genomic and rapid hormonal mechanisms working in concert with glia to affect stress-induced learning and memory will be emphasized. PMID:26793072

  19. Stress-induced crack path in Aji granite under tensile stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yozo; Sano, Osam; Murashige, Naokuni; Mizuta, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Koji

    1992-12-01

    The double-torsion test using Aji granite was carried out to investigate the interaction between stress-induced crack path and mineral grains. Crack velocities were controlled at range 10-7 m/s to 10-1 m/s. After the stressed specimens were dyed, we checked the crack path by thin section analysis, using an optical microscope. The stress-induced crack path was divided into two types, transgranular and intergranular cracks, and each path was subdivided with respect to mineral grains. In spite of the extensive range of crack velocities, the ratios between the transgranular and intergranular crack lengths did not change. The crack paths were all jagged, and often showed detour around the grain boundary when faced with obstacles like hard grains or preexisting cracks. That is to say, quartz grain played an important role as an obstacle. Feldspar grain could change the crack path because of its cleavage plane. Biolite grain had a serious effect on the path even if its constitution ratio is very small. Fractal dimensions of the crack paths were calculated by three methods, as indicators of surface roughness. The fractal dimensions were shown in a slight trend with the change of crack velocity. This trend can be explained from the point of limited cracking rate in stress corrosion.

  20. Melissa Officinalis L. Extracts Protect Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeung, In Cheul; Jee, Donghyun; Rho, Chang-Rae; Kang, Seungbum

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the protective effect of ALS-L1023, an extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). ARPE-19 cells were incubated with ALS-L1023 for 24 h and then treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by flow cytometry. Caspase-3/7 activation and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were measured to investigate the protective role of ALS-L1023 against apoptosis. The protective effect of ALS-L1023 against oxidative stress through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. ALS-L1023 clearly reduced H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular production of ROS. H2O2-induced oxidative stress increased caspase-3/7 activity and apoptotic PARP cleavage, which were significantly inhibited by ALS-L1023. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway was associated with the protective effect of ALS-L1023 on ARPE-19 cells. ALS-L1023 protected human RPE cells against oxidative damage. This suggests that ALS-L1023 has therapeutic potential for the prevention of dry age-related macular degeneration.

  1. Novel targets for endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in B-CLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Emanuela; Sabatini, Rita; Rampino, Giuliana; De Falco, Filomena; Di Ianni, Mauro; Falzetti, Franca; Fettucciari, Katia; Bartoli, Andrea; Screpanti, Isabella; Marconi, Pierfrancesco

    2010-10-14

    A better understanding of apoptotic signaling in B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells may help to define new therapeutic strategies. This study investigated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling in spontaneous apoptosis of B-CLL cells and whether manipulating ER stress increases their apoptosis. Results show that a novel ER stress-triggered caspase cascade, initiated by caspase-4 and involving caspase-8 and -3, plays an important role in spontaneous B-CLL cell apoptosis. ER stress-induced apoptosis in B-CLL cells also involves CHOP/GADD153 up-regulation, increased JNK1/2 phosphorylation, and caspase-8-mediated cleavage of Bap31 to Bap20, known to propagate apoptotic signals from ER to mitochondria. In ex vivo B-CLL cells, some apoptotic events associated with mitochondrial pathway also occur, including mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9 processing. However, pharmacologic inhibition studies show that caspase-9 plays a minor role in B-CLL cell apoptosis. ER stress also triggers survival signals in B-CLL cells by increasing BiP/GRP78 expression. Manipulating ER signaling by siRNA down-regulation of BiP/GRP78 or treating B-CLL cells with 2 well-known ER stress-inducers, tunicamycin and thapsigargin, increases their apoptosis. Overall, our findings show that ER triggers an essential pathway for B-CLL cell apoptosis and suggest that genetic and pharmacologic manipulation of ER signaling could represent an important therapeutic strategy.

  2. Solcoseryl in prevention of stress-induced gastric lesions and healing of chronic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, S J; Drozdowicz, D; Pytko-Polonczyk, J; Brzozowski, T; Bielański, W

    1991-03-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract of calf blood, protects the gastric mucosa against various topical irritants and enhances the healing of chronic gastric ulcerations but the mechanisms of these effects have been little studied. This study was designed to elucidate the active principle in Solcoseryl and to determine the role of prostaglandins (PG) and polyamines in the antiulcer properties of this agent. Using both, the radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay, EGF-like material was detected in Solcoseryl preparation. Solcoseryl given s.c. prevented the formation of stress-induced gastric lesions and this was accompanied by an increase in the generation of PGE2 in the gastric mucosa. Similar effects were obtained with EGF. Pretreatment with indomethacin, to suppress mucosal generation of prostaglandins (PG), greatly augmented stress-induced gastric ulcerations and antagonized the protection exerted by both Solcoseryl and EGF. Solcoseryl, like EGF, enhanced the healing of chronic gastro-duodenal ulcerations. This effect was abolished by the pretreatment with difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines. The healing effects of Solcoseryl and EGF was also reduced by prednisolone which decreased the angiogenesis in the granulation tissue in the ulcer area. These results indicate that Solcoseryl 1. contains EGF-like material, 2. displays the protective and ulcer healing effects similar to those of EGF and involving both PG and polyamines and 3. acts via similar mechanism as does EGF.

  3. Stress-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steels: Effect on fatigue crack growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Z.; Ahmed, M.

    1996-04-01

    This paper addresses the influence of cyclic stress-induced martensitic transformation on fatigue crack growth rates in metastable austenitic stainless steels. At low applied stress and mean stress values in AISI type 301 stainless steel, fatigue crack growth rate is substantially retarded due to a cyclic stress-induced γ-α' and γ-ɛ martensitic transformation occurring at the crack-tip plastic zone. It is suggested that the transformation products produce a compressive residual stress at the tip of the fatigue crack, which essentially lowers the effective stress intensity and hence retards the fatigue crack growth rate. At high applied stress or mean stress values, fatigue crack growth rates in AISI type 301 steels become almost equal to those of stable AISI type 302 alloy. As the amount of transformed products increases (with an increase in applied or mean stress), the strain-hardening effect brought about by the transformed martensite phase appears to accelerate fatigue crack growth, offsetting the contribution from the compressive residual stress produced by the positive volume change of γ → α' or ɛ transformation.

  4. Effects of (-)-Sesamin on Chronic Stress-Induced Anxiety Disorders in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting Ting; Shin, Keon Sung; Park, Hyun Jin; Yi, Bo Ram; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Myung Koo

    2016-12-19

    This study investigated the effects of (-)-sesamin on chronic electric footshock (EF) stress-induced anxiety disorders in mice. Mice were treated with (-)-sesamin (25 and 50 mg/kg) orally once a day for 21 days prior to exposure to EF stress (0.6 mA, 1 s every 5 s, 3 min). Mice treated with (-)-sesamin (25 and 50 mg/kg) exhibited less severe decreases in the number of open arm entries and time spent on open arms in the elevated plus-maze test and the distance traveled in the open field test following exposure to chronic EF stress. Similarly, mice treated with (-)-sesamin exhibited significantly less severe decreases in brain levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin following exposure to chronic EF stress. Increases in serum levels of corticosterone and expression of c-Fos were also less pronounced in mice treated with (-)-sesamin (25 and 50 mg/kg). These results suggest that (-)-sesamin may protect against the effects of chronic EF stress-induced anxiety disorders by modulating dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin levels, c-Fos expression, and corticosterone levels.

  5. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung Ar [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Sil [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Ho [Department of Pathology, Pochon CHA University, College of Medicine, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jung, E-mail: khj57@yuhs.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young Do, E-mail: ydy1130@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  6. Thermal Stress-Induced Depolarization Loss in Conventional and Panda-Shaped Photonic Crystal Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Laleh; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    We report on the modeling of the depolarization loss in the conventional and panda-shaped photonic crystal fiber lasers (PCFLs) due to the self-heating of the fiber, which we call it thermal stress-induced depolarization loss (TSIDL). We first calculated the temperature distribution over the fiber cross sections and then calculated the thermal stresses/strains as a function of heat load per meter. Thermal stress-induced birefringence (TSIB), which is defined as | n x - n y |, in the core and cladding regions was calculated. Finally, TSIDL was calculated for the conventional and panda-shaped PCFLs as a function of fiber length and, respectively, saturated values of 22 and 25 % were obtained which were independent of heat load per meter. For panda-shaped PCFLs, prior to being saturated, an oscillating and damping behavior against the fiber length was seen where in some lengths reached 35 %. The results are close to an experimental value of 30 % reported for a pulsed PCFL (Limpert et al., Opt Express 12:1313-1319, 2004) where the authors reported a degree of polarization of 70 % (i.e., a depolarization of 30 %). The most important result of this work is a saturation behavior of TSIDL at long-enough lengths of the fiber laser which is independent of heat load per meter. To our knowledge, this the first report of TSIBL for PCFLs.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Stress-Induced Increases in Fear Memory Consolidation within the Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, Antonio V; Serrano, Peter A; Burghardt, Nesha S

    2016-01-01

    Stress can significantly impact brain function and increase the risk for developing various psychiatric disorders. Many of the brain regions that are implicated in psychiatric disorders and are vulnerable to the effects of stress are also involved in mediating emotional learning. Emotional learning has been a subject of intense investigation for the past 30 years, with the vast majority of studies focusing on the amygdala and its role in associative fear learning. However, the mechanisms by which stress affects the amygdala and amygdala-dependent fear memories remain unclear. Here we review the literature on the enhancing effects of acute and chronic stress on the acquisition and/or consolidation of a fear memory, as measured by auditory Pavlovian fear conditioning, and discuss potential mechanisms by which these changes occur in the amygdala. We hypothesize that stress-mediated activation of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) and norepinephrine release within the amygdala leads to the mobilization of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors to the synapse, which underlies stress-induced increases in fear memory. We discuss the implications of this hypothesis for evaluating the effects of stress on extinction and for developing treatments for anxiety disorders. Understanding how stress-induced changes in glucocorticoid and norepinephrine signaling might converge to affect emotional learning by increasing the trafficking of AMPA receptors and enhancing amygdala excitability is a promising area for future research.

  8. Role of Glia in Stress-Induced Enhancement and Impairment of Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-Leary, Jiah; Osborne, Danielle Maria; McNay, Ewan C

    2015-01-01

    Both acute and chronic stress profoundly affect hippocampally-dependent learning and memory: moderate stress generally enhances, while chronic or extreme stress can impair, neural and cognitive processes. Within the brain, stress elevates both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids, and both affect several genomic and signaling cascades responsible for modulating memory strength. Memories formed at times of stress can be extremely strong, yet stress can also impair memory to the point of amnesia. Often overlooked in consideration of the impact of stress on cognitive processes, and specifically memory, is the important contribution of glia as a target for stress-induced changes. Astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes all have unique contributions to learning and memory. Furthermore, these three types of glia express receptors for both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids and are hence immediate targets of stress hormone actions. It is becoming increasingly clear that inflammatory cytokines and immunomodulatory molecules released by glia during stress may promote many of the behavioral effects of acute and chronic stress. In this review, the role of traditional genomic and rapid hormonal mechanisms working in concert with glia to affect stress-induced learning and memory will be emphasized.

  9. Mitofusin-2 protects against cold stress-induced cell injury in HEK293 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Yaomin; Yang, Qun; Che, Honglei; Chen, Xiangjun; Yao, Ting; Zhao, Fang; Liu, Mingchao; Ke, Tao [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Chen, Jingyuan, E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Luo, Wenjing, E-mail: luowenj@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondrial impairment is hypothesized to contribute to cell injury during cold stress. Mitochondria fission and fusion are closely related in the function of the mitochondria, but the precise mechanisms whereby these processes regulate cell injury during cold stress remain to be determined. HEK293 cells were cultured in a cold environment (4.0 {+-} 0.1 {sup o}C) for 2, 4, 8, or 12 h. Western blot analyses showed that these cells expressed decreased fission-related protein Drp1 and increased fusion-related protein Mfn2 at 4 h; meanwhile, electron microscopy analysis revealed large and long mitochondrial morphology within these cells, indicating increased mitochondrial fusion. With silencing of Mfn2 but not of Mfn1 by siRNA promoted cold-stress-induced cell death with decreased ATP production in HEK293 cells. Our results show that increased expression of Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are important for mitochondrial function as well as cell survival during cold stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial fusion and fission in cold-stress-induced cell injury.

  10. Role of glia in stress-induced enhancement and impairment of memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiah ePearson-Leary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Both acute and chronic stress profoundly affects hippocampally-dependent learning and memory: moderate stress generally enhances, while chronic or extreme stress can impair, neural and cognitive processes. Within the brain, stress elevates both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids, and both affect several genomic and signaling cascades responsible for modulating memory strength. Memories formed at times of stress can be extremely strong, yet stress can also impair memory to the point of amnesia. Often overlooked in consideration of the impact of stress on cognitive processes, and specifically memory, is the important contribution of glia as a target for stress-induced changes. Astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes all have unique contributions to learning and memory. Furthermore, these three types of glia express receptors for both norepinephrine and glucocorticoids and are hence immediate targets of stress hormone actions. It is becoming increasingly clear that inflammatory cytokines and immunomodulatory molecules released by glia during stress may promote many of the behavioral effects of acute and chronic stress. In this review, the role of traditional genomic and rapid hormonal mechanisms working in concert with glia to affect stress-induced learning and memory will be emphasized.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Stress-Induced Increases in Fear Memory Consolidation Within the Amygdala

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    Antonio Aubry

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress can significantly impact brain function and increase the risk for developing various psychiatric disorders. Many of the brain regions that are implicated in psychiatric disorders and are vulnerable to the effects of stress are also involved in mediating emotional learning. Emotional learning has been a subject of intense investigation for the past 30 years, with the vast majority of studies focusing on the amygdala and its role in associative fear learning. However, the mechanisms by which stress affects the amygdala and amygdala-dependent fear memories remain unclear. Here we review the literature on the enhancing effects of acute and chronic stress on the acquisition and/or consolidation of a fear memory, as measured by auditory Pavlovian fear conditioning, and discuss potential mechanisms by which these changes occur in the amygdala. We hypothesize that stress-mediated activation of glucocorticoid receptors (GR and norepinephrine release within the amygdala leads to the mobilization of AMPA receptors to the synapse, which underlies stress-induced increases in fear memory. We discuss the implications of this hypothesis for evaluating the effects of stress on extinction and for developing treatments for anxiety disorders. Understanding how stress-induced changes in glucocorticoid and norepinephrine signaling might converge to affect emotional learning by increasing the trafficking of AMPA receptors and enhancing amygdala excitability is a promising area for future research.

  12. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K; Bergman, Heidi A; Himanen, Samu V; Kallio, Marko J; Roos-Mattjus, Pia; Sistonen, Lea

    2014-09-15

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis.

  13. Transgenerational inheritance or resetting of stress-induced epigenetic modifications: two sides of the same coin.

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    Penny J Tricker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The transgenerational inheritance of stress-induced epigenetic modifications is still controversial. Despite several examples of defence ‘priming’ and induced genetic rearrangements, the involvement and persistence of transgenerational epigenetic modifications is not known to be general. Here I argue that non-transmission of epigenetic marks through meiosis may be regarded as an epigenetic modification in itself, and that we should understand the implications for plant evolution in the context of both selection for and selection against transgenerational epigenetic memory. Recent data suggest that both epigenetic inheritance and resetting are mechanistically directed and targeted. Stress-induced epigenetic modifications may buffer against DNA sequence-based evolution to maintain plasticity, or may form part of plasticity’s adaptive potential. To date we have tended to concentrate on the question of whether and for how long epigenetic memory persists. I argue that we should now re-direct our question to investigate the differences between where it persists and where it does not, to understand the higher order evolutionary methods in play and their contribution.

  14. A new murine model of stress-induced complex atherosclerotic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir H. Najafi

    2013-03-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ApoE−/− mice, when subjected to chronic stress, exhibit lesions characteristic of human vulnerable plaque and, if so, to determine the time course of such changes. We found that the lesions were remarkably similar to human vulnerable plaque, and that the time course of lesion progression raised interesting insights into the process of plaque development. Lard-fed mixed-background ApoE−/− mice exposed to chronic stress develop lesions with large necrotic core, thin fibrous cap and a high degree of inflammation. Neovascularization and intraplaque hemorrhage are observed in over 80% of stressed animals at 20 weeks of age. Previously described models report a prevalence of only 13% for neovascularization observed at a much later time point, between 36 and 60 weeks of age. Thus, our new stress-induced model of advanced atherosclerotic plaque provides an improvement over what is currently available. This model offers a tool to further investigate progression of plaque phenotype to a more vulnerable phenotype in humans. Our findings also suggest a possible use of this stress-induced model to determine whether therapeutic interventions have effects not only on plaque burden, but also, and importantly, on plaque vulnerability.

  15. Peripheral and central CB1 cannabinoid receptors control stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Gomis-González, Maria; Srivastava, Raj Kamal; Cutando, Laura; Ortega-Alvaro, Antonio; Ruehle, Sabine; Remmers, Floortje; Bindila, Laura; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni; Lutz, Beat; Maldonado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Stressful events can generate emotional memories linked to the traumatic incident, but they also can impair the formation of nonemotional memories. Although the impact of stress on emotional memories is well studied, much less is known about the influence of the emotional state on the formation of nonemotional memories. We used the novel object-recognition task as a model of nonemotional memory in mice to investigate the underlying mechanism of the deleterious effect of stress on memory consolidation. Systemic, hippocampal, and peripheral blockade of cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors abolished the stress-induced memory impairment. Genetic deletion and rescue of CB1 receptors in specific cell types revealed that the CB1 receptor population specifically in dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH)-expressing cells is both necessary and sufficient for stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation, but CB1 receptors present in other neuronal populations are not involved. Strikingly, pharmacological manipulations in mice expressing CB1 receptors exclusively in DBH+ cells revealed that both hippocampal and peripheral receptors mediate the impact of stress on memory consolidation. Thus, CB1 receptors on adrenergic and noradrenergic cells provide previously unrecognized cross-talk between central and peripheral mechanisms in the stress-dependent regulation of nonemotional memory consolidation, suggesting new potential avenues for the treatment of cognitive aspects on stress-related disorders. PMID:27528659

  16. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  17. Stress-induced Skeletal Muscle Gadd45a Expression Reprograms Myonuclei and Causes Muscle Atrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Bullard, Steven A.; Bongers, Kale S.; Fox, Daniel K.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Foster, Eric D.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Diverse stresses including starvation and muscle disuse cause skeletal muscle atrophy. However, the molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy are complex and not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45a protein (Gadd45a) is a critical mediator of muscle atrophy. We identified Gadd45a through an unbiased search for potential downstream mediators of the stress-inducible, pro-atrophy transcription factor ATF4. We show that Gadd45a is required for skeletal muscle atrophy induced by three distinct skeletal muscle stresses: fasting, muscle immobilization, and muscle denervation. Conversely, forced expression of Gadd45a in muscle or cultured myotubes induces atrophy in the absence of upstream stress. We show that muscle-specific ATF4 knock-out mice have a reduced capacity to induce Gadd45a mRNA in response to stress, and as a result, they undergo less atrophy in response to fasting or muscle immobilization. Interestingly, Gadd45a is a myonuclear protein that induces myonuclear remodeling and a comprehensive program for muscle atrophy. Gadd45a represses genes involved in anabolic signaling and energy production, and it induces pro-atrophy genes. As a result, Gadd45a reduces multiple barriers to muscle atrophy (including PGC-1α, Akt activity, and protein synthesis) and stimulates pro-atrophy mechanisms (including autophagy and caspase-mediated proteolysis). These results elucidate a critical stress-induced pathway that reprograms muscle gene expression to cause atrophy. PMID:22692209

  18. Involvement of Protein Phosphorylation in Water Stress-induced Antioxidant Defense in Maize Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-cheng Xu; Hai-dong Ding; Feng-xia Su; A-ying Zhang; Ming-yi Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, the role of protein phosphorylation and the interrelationship between water stress-enhanced kinase activity, antioxidant enzyme activity, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation and endogenous abscisic acid in maize (Zea mays L.) leaves were investigated. Water-stress upregulated the activities of total protein phosphorylation and Ca2+ -dependent protein kinase, and the upregulation was blocked in abscisic acid-deficient vp5 mutant. Furthermore, pretreatments with a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor and a scavenger of H2O2 significantly reduced the increased activities of total protein kinase and Ca2+-dependent protein kinase in maize leaves exposed to water stress. Pretreatments with different protein kinase inhibitors also reduced the water stress-induced H2O2 production and the water stress-enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase. The data suggest that protein phosphorylation and H2O2 generation are required for water stress-induced antioxidant defense in maize leaves and that crosstalk between protein phosphorylation and H2O2 generation may occur.

  19. The different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Juan Zhu

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS - nitric oxide (NO pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression.

  20. Metformin prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis through AMPK-PI3K-c-Jun NH2 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, T.W.; Lee, M.W.; Lee, Y.-J.; Kim, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is thought to be partially associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress toxicity on pancreatic beta cells and the result of decreased insulin synthesis and secretion. In this study, we showed that a well-known insulin sensitizer, metformin, directly protects against dysfunction and death of ER stress-induced NIT-1 cells (a mouse pancreatic beta cell line) via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI3) kinase activation. We also showed that exposure of NIT-1 cells to metformin (5mM) increases cellular resistance against ER stress-induced NIT-1 cell dysfunction and death. AMPK and PI3 kinase inhibitors abolished the effect of metformin on cell function and death. Metformin-mediated protective effects on ER stress-induced apoptosis were not a result of an unfolded protein response or the induced inhibitors of apoptotic proteins. In addition, we showed that exposure of ER stressed-induced NIT-1 cells to metformin decreases the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH(2) terminal kinase (JNK). These data suggest that metformin is an important determinant of ER stress-induced apoptosis in NIT-1 cells and may have implications for ER stress-mediated pancreatic beta cell destruction via regulation of the AMPK-PI3 kinase-JNK pathway.

  1. The different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Juan; Liu, Meng-Ying; Li, Huan; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Han, Zhou; Wu, Hai-Yin; Jing, Xing; Zhou, Hai-Hui; Suh, Hoonkyo; Zhu, Dong-Ya; Zhou, Qi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hyperactivity is observed in many patients suffering from depression and the mechanism underling the dysfunction of HPA axis is not well understood. Chronic stress has a causal relationship with the hyperactivity of HPA axis. Stress induces the over-synthesis of glucocorticoids, which will arrive at all the body containing the brain. It is still complicated whether glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity and in which part of the brain the glucocorticoids account for chronic stress-induced HPA axis hyperactivity. Here, we demonstrated that glucocorticoids were indispensable and sufficient for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Although acute glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus and hypothalamus exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis, we found that chronic glucocorticoids elevation in the hippocampus but not in the hypothalamus accounted for chronic stress-induced hyperactivity of HPA axis. Chronic glucocorticoids exposure in the hypothalamus still exerted a negative regulation of HPA axis activity. More importantly, we found mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) - neuronal nitric oxide synthesis enzyme (nNOS) - nitric oxide (NO) pathway mediated the different roles of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus and hypothalamus in regulating HPA axis activity. This study suggests that the glucocorticoids in the hippocampus play an important role in the development of HPA axis hyperactivity and the glucocorticoids in the hypothalamus can't induce hyperactivity of HPA axis, revealing new insights into understanding the mechanism of depression.

  2. Stress-Induced Anxiety- and Depressive-Like Phenotype Associated with Transient Reduction in Neurogenesis in Adult Nestin-CreERT2/Diphtheria Toxin Fragment A Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sanghee; Donovan, Michael H; Ross, Michele N; Richardson, Devon R; Reister, Robin; Farnbauch, Laure A; Fischer, Stephanie J; Riethmacher, Dieter; Gershenfeld, Howard K; Lagace, Diane C; Eisch, Amelia J

    2016-01-01

    Depression and anxiety involve hippocampal dysfunction, but the specific relationship between these mood disorders and adult hippocampal dentate gyrus neurogenesis remains unclear. In both humans with MDD and rodent models of depression, administration of antidepressants increases DG progenitor and granule cell number, yet rodents with induced ablation of DG neurogenesis typically do not demonstrate depressive- or anxiety-like behaviors. The conflicting data may be explained by the varied duration and degree to which adult neurogenesis is reduced in different rodent neurogenesis ablation models. In order to test this hypothesis we examined how a transient-rather than permanent-inducible reduction in neurogenesis would alter depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Transgenic Nestin-CreERT2/floxed diphtheria toxin fragment A (DTA) mice (Cre+DTA+) and littermates (Cre+DTA-; control) were given tamoxifen (TAM) to induce recombination and decrease nestin-expressing stem cells and their progeny. The decreased neurogenesis was transient: 12 days post-TAM Cre+DTA+ mice had fewer DG proliferating Ki67+ cells and fewer DCX+ neuroblasts/immature neurons relative to control, but 30 days post-TAM Cre+DTA+ mice had the same DCX+ cell number as control. This ability of DG neurogenesis to recover after partial ablation also correlated with changes in behavior. Relative to control, Cre+DTA+ mice tested between 12-30 days post-TAM displayed indices of a stress-induced anxiety phenotype-longer latency to consume highly palatable food in the unfamiliar cage in the novelty-induced hypophagia test, and a depression phenotype-longer time of immobility in the tail suspension test, but Cre+DTA+ mice tested after 30 days post-TAM did not. These findings suggest a functional association between adult neurogenesis and stress induced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, where induced reduction in DCX+ cells at the time of behavioral testing is coupled with stress-induced anxiety and a

  3. Stress-Induced Anxiety- and Depressive-Like Phenotype Associated with Transient Reduction in Neurogenesis in Adult Nestin-CreERT2/Diphtheria Toxin Fragment A Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghee Yun

    Full Text Available Depression and anxiety involve hippocampal dysfunction, but the specific relationship between these mood disorders and adult hippocampal dentate gyrus neurogenesis remains unclear. In both humans with MDD and rodent models of depression, administration of antidepressants increases DG progenitor and granule cell number, yet rodents with induced ablation of DG neurogenesis typically do not demonstrate depressive- or anxiety-like behaviors. The conflicting data may be explained by the varied duration and degree to which adult neurogenesis is reduced in different rodent neurogenesis ablation models. In order to test this hypothesis we examined how a transient-rather than permanent-inducible reduction in neurogenesis would alter depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Transgenic Nestin-CreERT2/floxed diphtheria toxin fragment A (DTA mice (Cre+DTA+ and littermates (Cre+DTA-; control were given tamoxifen (TAM to induce recombination and decrease nestin-expressing stem cells and their progeny. The decreased neurogenesis was transient: 12 days post-TAM Cre+DTA+ mice had fewer DG proliferating Ki67+ cells and fewer DCX+ neuroblasts/immature neurons relative to control, but 30 days post-TAM Cre+DTA+ mice had the same DCX+ cell number as control. This ability of DG neurogenesis to recover after partial ablation also correlated with changes in behavior. Relative to control, Cre+DTA+ mice tested between 12-30 days post-TAM displayed indices of a stress-induced anxiety phenotype-longer latency to consume highly palatable food in the unfamiliar cage in the novelty-induced hypophagia test, and a depression phenotype-longer time of immobility in the tail suspension test, but Cre+DTA+ mice tested after 30 days post-TAM did not. These findings suggest a functional association between adult neurogenesis and stress induced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, where induced reduction in DCX+ cells at the time of behavioral testing is coupled with stress-induced

  4. Prenatal stress induces depressive-like behavior in a sex-specific manner; impact of familiar versus novel environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle Mark; Arentzen, Tine S; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard

    stress (PS) incl. increased helplessness and altered anxiety response. Our purpose was to investigate behavioral depression indices following PS and potential differences between male and female offspring. To this end, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to repeated variable stress on days 13...... plus maze, EPM), and sleep behavior (via EEG recordings) was assessed in male and female offspring. In addition, half of PS and control animals, respectively, were exposed to an acute stressor prior to the behavioral tests. Weight gain during the last part of the pregnancy was significantly reduced...

  5. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and adenosine triphosphate (ATP significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, glutathione S-transferase (GST, super oxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT. These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and

  6. Protective role of metallothionein in stress-induced gastric ulcer in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Jiang; Lin Chang; Chun-Shui Pan; Yong-Fen Qi; Chao-Shu Tang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To illustrate the pathophysiological role of metallothionein (MT) in gastric ulcer induced by stress. METHODS: Wistar rats underwent water-immersionrestraint (WIR) stress, ZnSO4 (an MT inducer) treatment, WIR+ZnSO4 or WIR+MT, and the ulcer index (UI) was estimated in excised stomach and liver tissues. The mRNA level of gastric MT was determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The MT content in gastric and hepatic tissues was determined by Cd/hemoglobin affinity assay. The lipid peroxidation products malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes (CD) were estimated by use of thiobarbituric acid reactive species and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. RESULTS: WIR stress induced severe gastric mucosal lesions in rats. Compared with control rats, stressed rats had increased lipid peroxide content in serum and stomach and liver tissues. MDA content was increased by 34%, 21% and 29% and CD level by 270%, 83% and 28%, respectively. MT content in the stomach and liver was increased by 0.74- and 1.8-fold, and the MT-mRNA level in the stomach was increased by 26%. Pretreatment with ZnSO4 prevented gastric lesion development (the UI was 87% lower than that without pretreatment), and the MDA and CD content in serum and tissues was lower. The MT content in the liver was double in rats that were not pretreated, and the MT mRNA level in the stomach was 35% higher. MT administration 1 h before the WIR stress prevented gastric lesion development (the UI decreased by 47% compared with that in rats not pretreated), and the MDA and CD content in serum and tissues was significantly lower. CONCLUSION: In WIR-stressed rats, the MT level was increased in serum and in stomach and liver tissues. Pre-administration of exogenous MT or pre-induction of endogenous MT can protect the gastric mucosa against stress-induced ulcers and inhibits the formation of stressinduced lipid peroxide. MT could have a gastroprotective effect and might be a new interventive and therapeutic target in stress-induced

  7. Inhibitory effects of myricitrin on oxidative stress-induced endothelial damage and early atherosclerosis in ApoE −/− mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Gui-bo; Qin, Meng [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 100193, Beijing (China); Ye, Jing-xue [Jilin Agricultural University, No. 2888, Xincheng Street, Changchun, 130118 Jilin (China); Pan, Rui-le; Meng, Xiang-bao; Wang, Min; Luo, Yun; Li, Zong-yang [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 100193, Beijing (China); Wang, Hong-wei, E-mail: hwang@nju.edu.cn [Center for Translational Medicine and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China); Sun, Xiao-bo, E-mail: sunsubmit@163.com [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 100193, Beijing (China)

    2013-08-15

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is a state of heightened oxidative stress characterized by lipid and protein oxidation in vascular walls. Oxidative stress-induced vascular endothelial cell (VEC) injury is a major factor in the pathogenesis of AS. Myricitrin, a natural flavonoid isolated from the root bark of Myrica cerifera, was recently found to have a strong antioxidative effect. However, its use for treating cardiovascular diseases, especially AS is still unreported. Consequently, we evaluated the cytoprotective effect of myricitrin on AS by assessing oxidative stress-induced VEC damage. The in vivo study using an ApoE −/− mouse model of AS demonstrated that myricitrin treatment protects against VEC damage and inhibits early AS plaque formation. This effect is associated with the antioxidative effect of myricitrin, as observed in a hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced rat model of artery endothelial injury and primary cultured human VECs. Myricitrin treatment also prevents and attenuates H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced endothelial injury. Further investigation of the cytoprotective effects of myricitrin demonstrated that myricitrin exerts its function by scavenging for reactive oxygen species, as well as reducing lipid peroxidation, blocking NO release, and maintaining mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Myricitrin treatment also significantly decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis in VECs, which was associated with significant inhibition of p53 gene expression, activation of caspase-3 and the MAPK signaling pathway, and alteration of the patterns of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic gene expression. The resulting significantly increased bcl-2/bax ratio indicates that myricitrin may prevent the apoptosis induced by oxidative stress injury. - Highlights: • Myricitrin prevents early atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice. • Myricitrin protects endothelial cell from H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induced injury in rat and HUVECs. • Myricitrin enhanced NO release and up

  8. Inactivation of basolateral amygdala prevents chronic immobilization stress-induced memory impairment and associated changes in corticosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sunil Jamuna; Chakraborty, Suwarna; Srikumar, B N; Raju, T R; Shankaranarayana Rao, B S

    2017-07-01

    Chronic stress causes detrimental effects on various forms of learning and memory. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) not only plays a crucial role in mediating certain forms of memory, but also in the modulation of the effects of stress. Chronic immobilization stress (CIS) results in hypertrophy of the BLA, which is believed to be one of the underlying causes for stress' effects on learning. Thus, it is plausible that preventing the effects of CIS on amygdala would preclude its deleterious cognitive effects. Accordingly, in the first part, we evaluated the effect of excitotoxic lesion of the BLA on chronic stress-induced hippocampal-dependent spatial learning using a partially baited radial arm maze task. The BLA was ablated bilaterally using ibotenic acid prior to CIS. Chronically stressed rats showed impairment in spatial learning with decreased percentage correct choice and increased reference memory errors. Excitotoxic lesion of the BLA prevented the impairment in spatial learning and reference memory. In the retention test, lesion of the BLA was able to rescue the chronic stress-induced impairment. Interestingly, stress-induced enhanced plasma corticosterone levels were partially prevented by the lesion of BLA. These results motivated us to evaluate if the same effects can be observed with temporary inactivation of BLA, only during stress. We found that chronic stress-induced spatial learning deficits were also prevented by temporary inactivation of the BLA. Additionally, temporary inactivation of BLA partially precluded the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone levels. Thus, inactivation of BLA precludes stress-induced spatial learning deficits, and enhanced plasma corticosterone levels. It is speculated that BLA inactivation-induced reduction in corticosterone levels during stress, might be crucial in restoring spatial learning impairments. Our study provides evidence that amygdalar modulation during stress might be beneficial for strategic

  9. A Detailed Observation on Successive Stress-Induced Martensite Transformation in CuAlMnZnZr Alloy Polycrystalline Above Af

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhou; Wang Ming-pu; Tang Wang; Guo Ming-xing

    2004-01-01

    The successive stress-induced martensite morphologies and mechanisms in polycrystalline CuAlMnZnZr samples have been examined. By applying stress to the uniform β1 matrix, two or more orientation plates of M18R martensite are stress-induced in a grain. With further increasing stress, one orientation plate depletes the other and coalesces into a single region in some view field. The mechanisms by which these are developed have been ascertained, and include variant-variant coalescence, stress-induced martensite to martensite transformation and the complicated cross-like stress-induced martensite formation.

  10. Inheritance and memory of stress-induced epigenome change: roles played by the ATF-2 family of transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Ki-Hyeon; Maekawa, Toshio; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2012-01-01

    Data on the inheritance-of-stress effect have been accumulating and some mechanistic insights, such as epigenetic regulation, have also been suggested. In particular, the modern view of Lamarckian inheritance appears to be affected by the finding that stress-induced epigenetic changes can be inherited. This review summarizes the current data on the inheritance of stress effect and possible mechanisms involved in this process. In particular, we focus on the stress-induced epigenetic changes mediated by the ATF-2 family of transcription factors. PMID:22380515

  11. Heat stress induced changes in metabolic regulators of donkeys from arid tracts in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataria N.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available To find out heat stress induced changes in metabolic regulators of donkeys from arid tracts in India, blood samples were collected to harvest the serum during moderate and extreme hot ambiences. The metabolic enzymes determined were sorbitol dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, ornithine carbamoyl transferase, gammaglutamayl transferase, 5’nucleotidase, glucose-6-phosphatase, arginase, and aldolase. The mean values of all the serum enzymes increased significantly (p≤0.05 during hot ambience as compared to respective values during moderate ambience. It was concluded that increased activity of all the enzymes in the serum was due to modulation of metabolic reactions to combat the effect of hot ambience on the animals. Activation of gluconeogenesis along with hexose monophosphate shunt and urea cycle probably helped the animals to combat the heat stress.

  12. Inflammatory cytokines protect retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative stress-induced death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Helene B; Faber, Carsten; Svendsen, Signe Goul

    2013-01-01

    expression of anti-oxidative enzymes, and protein expression was validated by immunoblotting. RESULTS: Viability of RPE cells was reduced by exposure to inflammatory agents (PCM, IFNγ+/-TNFα) or to oxidative agents (H2O2 or NaIO3). Unexpectedly, cells treated with either H2O2 or NaIO3 were partially......-cultured with activated T cells, or treated with cytokines showed increased expression of anti-oxidative genes, with upregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 protein following PCM treatment. CONCLUSION: Oxidative stress-induced cell death was reduced by concomitant inflammatory stress. This is likely due to the cytokine......-mediated induction of the anti-oxidative stress response, upregulating protective anti-oxidant pathway(s). These findings suggest caution for the clinical use of anti-inflammatory agents in the management of immune-associated eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration....

  13. Impaired Functional Connectivity in the Prefrontal Cortex: A Mechanism for Chronic Stress-Induced Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrón-Oyarzo, Ignacio; Aboitiz, Francisco; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress-related psychiatric diseases, such as major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia, are characterized by a maladaptive organization of behavioral responses that strongly affect the well-being of patients. Current evidence suggests that a functional impairment of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is implicated in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Therefore, chronic stress may impair PFC functions required for the adaptive orchestration of behavioral responses. In the present review, we integrate evidence obtained from cognitive neuroscience with neurophysiological research with animal models, to put forward a hypothesis that addresses stress-induced behavioral dysfunctions observed in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. We propose that chronic stress impairs mechanisms involved in neuronal functional connectivity in the PFC that are required for the formation of adaptive representations for the execution of adaptive behavioral responses. These considerations could be particularly relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of chronic stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26904302

  14. Inhibition of stress induced hyperglucagonemia by administration of glucose in normal and alloxan-diabetic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimes, I; Jurcovicová, J; Németh, S; Jezová, D; Vigas, M

    1981-01-01

    The increase in plasma pancreatic glucagon which is known to occur under several stress conditions was confirmed in fed and 18 h prefasted rats subjected to a low, "stress producing" dose of the Noble-collip drum procedure (400 revolutions per 400 s). A single dose of exogenous glucose ( 1 g kg-1) injected 3 min and 20 s before stress into the jugular vein of intact fasted or fed animals anesthetized with pentobarbital 930 mg kg-1) completely abolished their hyperglucagonemic response in stress. In alloxan-diabetic hyperglycemic rats the stress-hyperglucagonemia was exaggerated, but was also suppressible by exogenous glucose. It was concluded that: 1. the stress induced hyperglucagonemic response of both intact and alloxan-diabetic rats was completely suppressible by administration of i.v. bolus of exogenous glucose; 2. the site inhibiting effect of glucose might be located either at the level of A cell or at the level of "'glucoreceptors" in hypothalamus.

  15. Protective Effect of Strawberry Extract against Inflammatory Stress Induced in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Gasparrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A protracted pro-inflammatory state is a major contributing factor in the development, progression and complication of the most common chronic pathologies. Fruit and vegetables represent the main sources of dietary antioxidants and their consumption can be considered an efficient tool to counteract inflammatory states. In this context an evaluation of the protective effects of strawberry extracts on inflammatory stress induced by E. coli LPS on human dermal fibroblast cells was performed in terms of viability assays, ROS and nitrite production and biomarkers of oxidative damage of the main biological macromolecules. The results demonstrated that strawberry extracts exerted an anti-inflammatory effect on LPS-treated cells, through an increase in cell viability, and the reduction of ROS and nitrite levels, and lipid, protein and DNA damage. This work showed for the first time the potential health benefits of strawberry extract against inflammatory and oxidative stress in LPS-treated human dermal fibroblast cells.

  16. Impaired Functional Connectivity in the Prefrontal Cortex: A Mechanism for Chronic Stress-Induced Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Negrón-Oyarzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress-related psychiatric diseases, such as major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia, are characterized by a maladaptive organization of behavioral responses that strongly affect the well-being of patients. Current evidence suggests that a functional impairment of the prefrontal cortex (PFC is implicated in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Therefore, chronic stress may impair PFC functions required for the adaptive orchestration of behavioral responses. In the present review, we integrate evidence obtained from cognitive neuroscience with neurophysiological research with animal models, to put forward a hypothesis that addresses stress-induced behavioral dysfunctions observed in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. We propose that chronic stress impairs mechanisms involved in neuronal functional connectivity in the PFC that are required for the formation of adaptive representations for the execution of adaptive behavioral responses. These considerations could be particularly relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of chronic stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  17. Resistance of LaCl3 to Oxidative Stress Induced by 2, 4-Dichlorophenoxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Yanxia; Gao Yongsheng; Zeng Fuli

    2005-01-01

    Cucumber seedlings were sprayed with different concentrations of LaCl3 for 3 d continuously. After 7 d of this treatment, the plants were treated with 1200 mg·L-1 2,4-dichlorophennoxy(2,4-D) for 24 h. The leaves were harvested and rinsed with 5 mmol · L-1 EDTA. The concentrations of photosynthetic pigments, soluble protein and metabolites related to oxidative stress and the activities of antioxidant enzymes in leaves were assayed. The results show that the treatment with appropriate concentration of LaCl3 has resistant effect on oxidative stress induced by 2, 4-D. Proper concentration of LaCl3 promotes the activity of antioxidant system in plants and alleviates the damage caused by 2, 4-D.

  18. Cellular energy stress induces AMPK-mediated regulation of YAP and the Hippo pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jung-Soon; Meng, Zhipeng; Kim, Young Chul; Park, Hyun Woo; Hansen, Carsten Gram; Kim, Soohyun; Lim, Dae-Sik; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-04-01

    YAP (Yes-associated protein) is a transcription co-activator in the Hippo tumour suppressor pathway and controls cell growth, tissue homeostasis and organ size. YAP is inhibited by the kinase Lats, which phosphorylates YAP to induce its cytoplasmic localization and proteasomal degradation. YAP induces gene expression by binding to the TEAD family transcription factors. Dysregulation of the Hippo-YAP pathway is frequently observed in human cancers. Here we show that cellular energy stress induces YAP phosphorylation, in part due to AMPK-dependent Lats activation, thereby inhibiting YAP activity. Moreover, AMPK directly phosphorylates YAP Ser 94, a residue essential for the interaction with TEAD, thus disrupting the YAP-TEAD interaction. AMPK-induced YAP inhibition can suppress oncogenic transformation of Lats-null cells with high YAP activity. Our study establishes a molecular mechanism and functional significance of AMPK in linking cellular energy status to the Hippo-YAP pathway.

  19. Lysosome dysfunction enhances oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through ubiquitinated protein accumulation in Hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunyan; Huang, Xiaowei; Xu, Ye; Li, Hongyan; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jiateng; Kang, Jinsong; Liu, Yuhe; Sun, Liankun

    2013-01-01

    The role of lysosomal system in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cancer cells is not fully understood. Menadione is frequently used as oxidative stress model. It is indicated that menadione could induce autophagy in Hela cells. In the present study, we examined whether the lysosomal inhibitor, ammonium chloride (NH(4)Cl) could prevent the autophagy flux by inhibiting the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes and enhance apoptosis induced by menadione via mitochondrial pathway. The results demonstrated generation and accumulation of reactive oxygen species and increased levels of ubiquitinated proteins and GRP78 in cells treated with both menadione and NH(4)Cl. Our data indicates that lysosomal system through autophagy plays an important role in preventing menadione-induced apoptosis in Hela cells by clearing misfolded proteins, which alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  20. CHARACTERISTICS OF STRESS-INDUCED TRANSFORMATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION IN Cu-BASED SMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Peng; Xingyao Wang; Yongzhong Huo

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of shape memory alloys (SMAs) is closely related to the formation and evolution of its microstructures. Through theoretical analysis and experimental ob-servations, it was found that the stress-induced martensitic transformation process of single crys-tal Cu-based SMA under uniaxial tension condition consisted of three periods: nucleation, mixed nucleation and growth, and merging due to growth. During the nucleation, the stress dropped rapidly and the number of interfaces increased very fast while the phase fraction increased slowly.In the second period, both the stress and the interface number changed slightly but the phase fraction increased dramatically. Finally, the stress and the phase fraction changed slowly while the number of interfaces decreased quickly. Moreover, it was found that the transformation could be of multi-stage: sharp stress drops at several strains and correspondingly, the nucleation and growth process occurred quasi-independently in several parts of the sample.

  1. Deep-Trap Stress Induced Leakage Current Model for Nominal and Weak Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamohara, Shiro; Hu, Chenming; Okumura, Tsugunori

    2008-08-01

    We have developed a model of the stress-induced leakage current (SILC) based on the inelastic trap-assisted tunneling (ITAT) by introducing a trap with a deep energy level of 3.6 eV from the bottom of the conduction band. This model can explain both of two field dependencies, i.e., a field dependence of the direct tunneling (DT) for A-mode SILC and that of the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling for B-mode SILC by analytical equations of a common form. For simple analytical equations, we introduce the most favorable trap position (MFTP), which gives the largest contribution to the leakage current. The trap area density for A-mode SILC of around 1×1010 cm-2 and the area density of the leakage paths for B-mode SILC of 1×102 cm-2 were obtained by comparisons between the experimental results and the present model.

  2. Restoration of hippocampal growth hormone reverses stress-induced hippocampal impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin M. Vander Weele

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Though growth hormone (GH is synthesized by hippocampal neurons, where its expression is influenced by stress exposure, its function is poorly characterized. Here, we show that a regimen of chronic stress that impairs hippocampal function in rats also leads to a profound decrease in hippocampal GH levels. Restoration of hippocampal GH in the dorsal hippocampus via viral-mediated gene transfer completely reversed stress-related impairment of two hippocampus-dependent behavioral tasks, auditory trace fear conditioning and contextual fear conditioning, without affecting hippocampal function in unstressed control rats. GH overexpression reversed stress-induced decrements in both fear acquisition and long-term fear memory. These results suggest that loss of hippocampal GH contributes to hippocampal dysfunction following prolonged stress and demonstrate that restoring hippocampal GH levels following stress can promote stress resilience.

  3. Stress induced martensite at the crack tip in NiTi alloys during fatigue loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sgambitterra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Crack tip stress-induced phase transformation mechanisms in nickel-titanium alloys (NiTi were analyzed by Digital Image Correlation (DIC, under fatigue loads. In particular, Single Edge Crack (SEC specimens, obtained from a commercial pseudoelastic NiTi sheet, and an ad-hoc experimental setup were used, for direct measurements of the near crack tip displacement field by the DIC technique. Furthermore, a fitting procedure was developed to calculate the mode I Stress Intensity Factor (SIF, starting from the measured displacement field. Finally, cyclic tensile tests were performed at different operating temperature, in the range 298-338 K, and the evolution of the SIF was studied, which revealed a marked temperature dependence.

  4. Nutritional stress induces exchange of cell material and energetic coupling between bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benomar, Saida; Ranava, David; Cárdenas, María Luz; Trably, Eric; Rafrafi, Yan; Ducret, Adrien; Hamelin, Jérôme; Lojou, Elisabeth; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse

    2015-02-23

    Knowledge of the behaviour of bacterial communities is crucial for understanding biogeochemical cycles and developing environmental biotechnology. Here we demonstrate the formation of an artificial consortium between two anaerobic bacteria, Clostridium acetobutylicum (Gram-positive) and Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (Gram-negative, sulfate-reducing) in which physical interactions between the two partners induce emergent properties. Molecular and cellular approaches show that tight cell-cell interactions are associated with an exchange of molecules, including proteins, which allows the growth of one partner (D. vulgaris) in spite of the shortage of nutrients. This physical interaction induces changes in expression of two genes encoding enzymes at the pyruvate crossroads, with concomitant changes in the distribution of metabolic fluxes, and allows a substantial increase in hydrogen production without requiring genetic engineering. The stress induced by the shortage of nutrients of D. vulgaris appears to trigger the interaction.

  5. Renin system of the kidney in ISIAH rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseeva, L A; Dymshits, G M; Markel, A L; Jakobson, G S

    2009-02-01

    The renal renin system was studied in ISIAH rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension. The expression of genes for renin (Ren1) and cyclooxygenase (Cox-2) was evaluated in renal tissue of ISIAH and WAG rats (normotensive control). Basal gene expression for Ren1 and Cox-2 in ISIAH rats was much lower than in WAG rats. Water deprivation for 11 h was followed by a 4-fold increase in Cox-2 gene expression in ISIAH rats. The increase in gene expression was insignificant in WAG rats (by 30%). Renin gene expression in renal tissue of ISIAH and WAG rats remained practically unchanged after water deprivation. We conclude that a change in Cox-2 gene expression after short-term water deprivation serves as a reliable criterion for functional strain of the renal renin system in hypertensive ISIAH rats.

  6. Effect of loading speed on the stress-induced magnetic behavior of ferromagnetic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Sheng; Gu, Yibin; Fu, Meili; Zhang, Da; Hu, Shengnan

    2017-02-01

    The primary goal of this research is to investigate the effect of loading speed on the stress-induced magnetic behavior of a ferromagnetic steel. Uniaxial tension tests on Q235 steel were carried out with various stress levels under different loading speeds. The variation of the magnetic signals surrounding the tested specimen was detected by a fluxgate magnetometer. The results indicated that the magnetic signal variations depended not only on the tensile load level but on the loading speed during the test. The magnetic field amplitude seemed to decrease gradually with the increase in loading speed at the same tensile load level. Furthermore, the evolution of the magnetic reversals is also related to the loading speed. Accordingly, the loading speed should be considered as one of the influencing variables in the Jies-Atherton model theory of the magnetomechanical effect.

  7. Stress-induced hemorrhagic gastric ulcer after successful Helicobacter pylori eradication: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyamoto Mitsuaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of gastric ulcers, and Helicobacter pylori eradication drastically reduces ulcer recurrence. It has been reported, however, that severe physical stress is closely associated with gastric ulceration even in Helicobacter pylori -negative patients. Case presentation We report the cases of a 47-year-old Japanese man and a 69-year-old Japanese man who developed psychological stress-induced hemorrhagic gastric ulcers, in both of whom Helicobacter pylori had been successfully eradicated. Conclusion Our cases strongly suggest that not only physical but also psychological stress is still an important pathogenic factor for peptic ulceration and accordingly that physicians should pay attention to the possible presence of psychological stress in the management of patients with peptic ulcers.

  8. Developmentally and stress-induced small heat shock proteins in cork oak somatic embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigderrajols, Pere; Jofré, Anna; Mir, Gisela; Pla, Maria; Verdaguer, Dolors; Huguet, Gemma; Molinas, Marisa

    2002-06-01

    The timing and tissue localization of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) during cork oak somatic embryo development was investigated under normal growing culture conditions and in response to stress. Western blot analyses using polyclonal antibodies raised against cork oak recombinant HSP17 showed a transient accumulation of class I sHSPs during somatic embryo maturation and germination. Moreover, the amount of protein increased at all stages of embryo development in response to exogenous stress. The developmentally accumulated proteins localized to early differentiating, but not the highly dividing, regions of the root and shoot apical meristems. By contrast, these highly dividing regions were strongly immunostained after heat stress. Findings support the hypothesis of a distinct control for developmentally and stress-induced accumulation of class I sHSPs. The possible role of sHSPs is discussed in relation to their tissue specific localization.

  9. PUMA mediates ER stress-induced apoptosis in portal hypertensive gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S; Wei, X; Song, M; Tao, J; Yang, Y; Khatoon, S; Liu, H; Jiang, J; Wu, B

    2014-03-13

    Mucosal apoptosis has been demonstrated to be an essential pathological feature in portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG). p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) was identified as a BH3-only Bcl-2 family protein that has an essential role in apoptosis induced by a variety of stimuli, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, whether PUMA is involved in mucosal apoptosis in PHG remains unclear, and whether PUMA induces PHG by mediating ER stress remains unknown. The aim of the study is to investigate whether PUMA is involved in PHG by mediating ER stress apoptotic signaling. To identify whether PUMA is involved in PHG by mediating ER stress, gastric mucosal injury and apoptosis were studied in both PHG patients and PHG animal models using PUMA knockout (PUMA-KO) and PUMA wild-type (PUMA-WT) mice. The induction of PUMA expression and ER stress signaling were investigated, and the mechanisms of PUMA-mediated apoptosis were analyzed. GES-1 and SGC7901 cell lines were used to further identify whether PUMA-mediated apoptosis was induced by ER stress in vitro. Epithelial apoptosis and PUMA were markedly induced in the gastric mucosa of PHG patients and mouse PHG models. ER stress had a potent role in the induction of PUMA and apoptosis in PHG models, and the apoptosis was obviously attenuated in PUMA-KO mice. Although the targeted deletion of PUMA did not affect ER stress, mitochondrial apoptotic signaling was downregulated in mice. Meanwhile, PUMA knockdown significantly ameliorated ER stress-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in vitro. These results indicate that PUMA mediates ER stress-induced mucosal epithelial apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in PHG, and that PUMA is a potentially therapeutic target for PHG.

  10. Hepcidin is an antibacterial, stress-inducible peptide of the biliary system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Strnad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Hepcidin (gene name HAMP, an IL-6-inducible acute phase peptide with antimicrobial properties, is the key negative regulator of iron metabolism. Liver is the primary source of HAMP synthesis, but it is also produced by other tissues such as kidney or heart and is found in body fluids such as urine or cerebrospinal fluid. While the role of hepcidin in biliary system is unknown, a recent study demonstrated that conditional gp130-knockout mice display diminished hepcidin levels and increased rate of biliary infections. METHODS: Expression and localization of HAMP in biliary system was analyzed by real time RT-PCR, in-situ hybridization, immunostaining and -blotting, while prohepcidin levels in human bile were determined by ELISA. RESULTS: Hepcidin was detected in mouse/human gallbladder and bile duct epithelia. Biliary HAMP is stress-inducible, in that it is increased in biliary cell lines upon IL-6 stimulation and in gallbladder mucosa of patients with acute cholecystitis. Hepcidin is also present in the bile and elevated prohepcidin levels were observed in bile of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC patients with concurrent bacterial cholangitis compared to PSC subjects without bacterial infection (median values 22.3 vs. 8.9; p = 0.03. In PSC-cholangitis subjects, bile prohepcidin levels positively correlated with C-reactive protein and bilirubin levels (r = 0.48 and r = 0.71, respectively. In vitro, hepcidin enhanced the antimicrobial capacity of human bile (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Hepcidin is a stress-inducible peptide of the biliary epithelia and a potential marker of biliary stress. In the bile, hepcidin may serve local functions such as protection from bacterial infections.

  11. Effects of cerebrolysin administration on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in lymphocytes from CADASIL patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formichi, Patrizia; Radi, Elena; Battisti, Carla; Di Maio, Giuseppe; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Muresanu, Dafin; Federico, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Cerebrolysin (Cere) is a peptidergic nootropic drug with neurotrophic properties which has been used to treat dementia and sequelae of stroke. Use of Cere prevents nuclear structural changes typical of apoptosis and significantly reduces the number of apoptotic cells after several apoptotic stimuli. Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a hereditary disease caused by mutations of the Notch3 gene encoding the Notch3 protein. Notch3 is involved in the regulation of apoptosis, modulating Fas-Ligand (Fas-L)- induced apoptosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro protective effects of Cere against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cells from CADASIL patients. We used peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from 15 CADASIL patients (age range 34-70 years); 2-deoxy-D-ribose (dRib), a highly reducing sugar, was used as paradigm pro-apoptotic stimulus. Apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Administration of Cere to PBLs from CADASIL patients cultured under standard conditions had no effect on the percentage of apoptotic cells. Administration of Cere to PBLs cultured with dRib caused a significant decrease in apoptosis after 48 h of culture in only 5 patients, whereas in the other 10 patients, Cere treatment was not associated with any significant difference in the percentage of apoptosis. This result showed a protective effect of Cere against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis only in 30 % of the CADASIL patients, suggesting that the Notch3 gene probably does not influence the anti-apoptotic properties of Cere in vitro.

  12. Depressive symptoms are associated with mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia after acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingkai Wei

    Full Text Available Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI, and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI.We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men age 38-60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task, and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS, obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores.There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30, p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56, p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress.Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological stress.

  13. Sweet food improves chronic stress-induced irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Sang-Gyun; Kim, Yong Sung; Choi, Suck Chei; Lee, Moon Young

    2014-03-07

    To investigate whether palatable sweet foods have a beneficial effect on chronic stress-induced colonic motility and inflammatory cytokines. Adult male rats were divided into 3 groups: control (CON, n = 5), chronic variable stress with chow (CVS-A, n = 6), and chronic variable stress with chow and sweet food (CVS-B, n = 6). The rats were fed standard rodent chow as the chow food and/or AIN-76A as the sweet food. A food preference test for AIN-76A was performed in another group of normal rats (n = 10) for twelve days. Fecal pellet output (FPO) was measured for 6 wk during water bedding stress in the CVS groups. The weight of the adrenal glands, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels in plasma were measured. The expression levels of transforming growth factor-β, interleukin (IL)-2, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) were measured in the distal part of colonic tissues and plasma using Western blot analysis. In sweet preference test, all rats initially preferred sweet food to chow food. However, the consumption rate of sweet food gradually decreased and reduced to below 50% of total intake eight days after sweet food feeding. Accumulated FPO was higher in the CVS-A group compared with the CVS-B group over time. All stress groups showed significant increases in the adrenal to body weight ratio (CVS-A, 0.14 ± 0.01; CVS-B, 0.14 ± 0.01) compared with the control group (0.12 ± 0.01, P colon compared to the control group, whereas this effect was significantly attenuated in the CVS-B group. These results suggest that concurrent sweet food ingestion during CVS might have an effect on the reduction of stress-induced colonic hyper-motility and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in rats.

  14. Dispositional optimism and stress-induced changes in immunity and negative mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydon, Lena; Walker, Cicely; Wawrzyniak, Andrew J; Chart, Henrik; Steptoe, Andrew

    2009-08-01

    Evidence suggests that optimism may be protective for health during times of heightened stress, yet the mechanisms involved remain unclear. In a double-blind placebo-controlled study, we recently showed that acute psychological stress and an immune stimulus (Typhim-Vi typhoid vaccine) synergistically increased serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and negative mood in 59 healthy men. Here we carried out further analysis of this sample to investigate the relationship between dispositional optimism and stress-induced changes in immunity and mood. Volunteers were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions in which they received either typhoid vaccine or saline placebo, and then rested or completed two mental tasks. In the stress condition, optimism was inversely related to IL-6 responses, independent of age, BMI, trait CES-D depression and baseline IL-6. This relationship was present across both stress groups (combining vaccine and placebo) and was not present in the vaccine/stress group alone, suggesting that optimism protects against the inflammatory effects of stress rather than vaccine per se. Typhoid vaccine induced a significant increase in participants' circulating anti-Vi antibody levels. Stress had no effect on antibody responses overall. However, in the vaccine/stress group, there was a strong positive association between optimism and antibody responses, indicating that stress accentuated the antibody response to vaccine in optimists. Across the complete sample, more optimistic individuals had smaller increases in negative mood and less reduction in mental vigour. Together these findings suggest that optimism may promote health, by counteracting stress-induced increases in inflammation and boosting the adjuvant effects of acute stress.

  15. Dissecting the roles of ROCK isoforms in stress-induced cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianjian; Surma, Michelle; Zhang, Lumin; Wei, Lei

    2013-05-15

    The homologous Rho kinases, ROCK1 and ROCK2, are involved in stress fiber assembly and cell adhesion and are assumed to be functionally redundant. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from ROCK1(-/-) and ROCK2(-/-) mice, we have recently reported that they play different roles in regulating doxorubicin-induced stress fiber disassembly and cell detachment: ROCK1 is involved in destabilizing the actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment, whereas ROCK2 is required for stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion. Here, we present additional insights into the roles of ROCK1 and ROCK2 in regulating stress-induced impairment of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion. In response to doxorubicin, ROCK1(-/-) MEFs showed significant preservation of both focal adhesions and adherens junctions, while ROCK2(-/-) MEFs exhibited impaired focal adhesions but preserved adherens junctions compared with the wild-type MEFs. Additionally, inhibition of focal adhesion or adherens junction formations by chemical inhibitors abolished the anti-detachment effects of ROCK1 deletion. Finally, ROCK1(-/-) MEFs, but not ROCK2(-/-) MEFs, also exhibited preserved central stress fibers and reduced cell detachment in response to serum starvation. These results add new insights into a novel mechanism underlying the anti-detachment effects of ROCK1 deletion mediated by reduced peripheral actomyosin contraction and increased actin stabilization to promote cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. Our studies further support the differential roles of ROCK isoforms in regulating stress-induced loss of central stress fibers and focal adhesions as well as cell detachment.

  16. Toll-like receptor 4 regulates chronic stress-induced visceral pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramullas, Monica; Finger, Beate C; Moloney, Rachel D; Golubeva, Anna V; Moloney, Gerard; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2014-08-15

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders, which have visceral hypersensitivity as a core symptom, are frequently comorbid with stress-related psychiatric disorders. Increasing evidence points to a key role for toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in chronic pain states of somatic origin. However, the central contribution of TLR4 in visceral pain sensation remains elusive. With pharmacological and genetic approaches, we investigated the involvement of TLR4 in the modulation of visceral pain. The TLR4-deficient and wild-type mice were exposed to chronic stress. Visceral pain was evaluated with colorectal distension. Protein expression levels for TLR4, Cd11b, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cells markers) were quantified in the lumbar region of the spinal cord, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and hippocampus. To evaluate the effect of blocking TLR4 on visceral nociception, TAK-242, a selective TLR4 antagonist, was administered peripherally (intravenous) and centrally (intracerebroventricular and intra-PFC) (n = 10-12/experimental group). The TLR4 deficiency reduced visceral pain and prevented the development of chronic psychosocial stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Increased expression of TLR4 coupled with enhanced glia activation in the PFC and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines were observed after chronic stress in wild-type mice. Administration of a TLR4 specific antagonist, TAK-242, attenuated visceral pain sensation in animals with functional TLR4 when administrated centrally and peripherally. Moreover, intra-PFC TAK-242 administration also counteracted chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Our results reveal a novel role for TLR4 within the PFC in the modulation of visceral nociception and point to TLR4 as a potential therapeutic target for the development of drugs to treat visceral hypersensitivity. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry All rights reserved.

  17. Repeated forced swim stress differentially affects formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour and the endocannabinoid system in stress normo-responsive and stress hyper-responsive rat strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Elaine M; Okine, Bright N; Olango, Weredeselam M; Roche, Michelle; Finn, David P

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to a homotypic stressor such as forced swimming enhances nociceptive responding in rats. However, the influence of genetic background on this stress-induced hyperalgesia is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of repeated forced swim stress on nociceptive responding in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats versus the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat strain, a genetic background that is susceptible to stress, negative affect and hyperalgesia. Given the well-documented role of the endocannabinoid system in stress and pain, we investigated associated alterations in endocannabinoid signalling in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and amygdala. In SD rats, repeated forced swim stress for 10 days was associated with enhanced late phase formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour, compared with naive, non-stressed SD controls. In contrast, WKY rats exposed to 10 days of swim stress displayed reduced late phase formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour. Swim stress increased levels of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) mRNA in the ipsilateral side of the dorsal spinal cord of SD rats, an effect not observed in WKY rats. In the amygdala, swim stress reduced anandamide (AEA) levels in the contralateral amygdala of SD rats, but not WKY rats. Additional within-strain differences in levels of CB1 receptor and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) mRNA and levels of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) were observed between the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the dorsal horn and/or amygdala. These data indicate that the effects of repeated stress on inflammatory pain-related behaviour are different in two rat strains that differ with respect to stress responsivity and affective state and implicate the endocannabinoid system in the spinal cord and amygdala in these differences.

  18. Expression of human telomerase (hTERT) does not prevent stress-induced senescence in normal human fibroblasts but protects the cells from stress-induced apoptosis and necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Pereira-Smith, Olivia M

    2002-10-11

    Cells subjected to sub-lethal doses of stress such as irradiation or oxidative damage enter a state that closely resembles replicative senescence. What triggers stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) and how similar this mechanism is to replicative senescence are not well understood. It has been suggested that stress-induced senescence is caused by rapid telomere shortening resulting from DNA damage. In order to test this hypothesis directly, we examined whether overexpression of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT) can protect cells from SIPS. We therefore analyzed the response of four different lines of normal human fibroblasts with and without hTERT to stress induced by UV, gamma-irradiation, and H(2)O(2). SIPS was induced with the same efficiency in normal and hTERT-immortalized cells. This suggests that SIPS is not triggered by telomere shortening and that nonspecific DNA damage serves as a signal for induction of SIPS. Although telomerase did not protect cells from SIPS, fibroblasts expressing hTERT were more resistant to stress-induced apoptosis and necrosis. We hypothesize that healing of DNA breaks by telomerase inhibits the induction of cell death, but because healing does not provide legitimate DNA repair, it does not protect cells from SIPS.

  19. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  20. Expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 protein in the hippocampus in rats exhibiting chronic stress-induced depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gonglin Hou; Mingming Tang

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that the expression of members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) protein family is altered in post-mortem brains of humans suffering from major depressive disorder. The present study examined whether the expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) protein is altered following chronic stress in an animal model. Rats were exposed to 35 days of chronic unpredictable mild stress, and then tested using open-field and sucrose consumption tests. Compared with the control group, rats in the chronic stress group exhibited obvious depressive-like behaviors, including anhedonia, anxiety and decreased mobility. The results of western blot analysis and immunohistochemical analysis revealed a downregulation of the expression of FGF2 and FGFR1 in the hippocampus of rats, particularly in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus. This decreased expression is in accord with the results of post-mortem studies in humans with major depressive disorder. These findings suggest that FGF2 and FGFR1 proteins participate in the pathophysiology of depressive-like behavior, and may play an important role in the mechanism of chronic stress-induced depression.

  1. Different molecular mechanisms involved in spontaneous and oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial fragmentation in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP-1)-deficient fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beersel, Guillaume; Tihon, Eliane; Demine, Stéphane; Hamer, Isabelle; Jadot, Michel; Arnould, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    NCLs (neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses) form a group of eight inherited autosomal recessive diseases characterized by the intralysosomal accumulation of autofluorescent pigments, called ceroids. Recent data suggest that the pathogenesis of NCL is associated with the appearance of fragmented mitochondria with altered functions. However, even if an impairement in the autophagic pathway has often been evoked, the molecular mechanisms leading to mitochondrial fragmentation in response to a lysosomal dysfunction are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that fibroblasts that are deficient for the TPP-1 (tripeptidyl peptidase-1), a lysosomal hydrolase encoded by the gene mutated in the LINCL (late infantile NCL, CLN2 form) also exhibit a fragmented mitochondrial network. This morphological alteration is accompanied by an increase in the expression of the protein BNIP3 (Bcl2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein 3) as well as a decrease in the abundance of mitofusins 1 and 2, two proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion. Using RNAi (RNA interference) and quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial morphology, we show that the inhibition of BNIP3 expression does not result in an increase in the reticulation of the mitochondrial population in LINCL cells. However, this protein seems to play a key role in cell response to mitochondrial oxidative stress as it sensitizes mitochondria to antimycin A-induced fragmentation. To our knowledge, our results bring the first evidence of a mechanism that links TPP-1 deficiency and oxidative stress-induced changes in mitochondrial morphology. PMID:23249249

  2. Repeated whole cigarette smoke exposure alters cell differentiation and augments secretion of inflammatory mediators in air-liquid interface three-dimensional co-culture model of human bronchial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shinkichi; Ito, Shigeaki

    2017-02-01

    In vitro models of human bronchial epithelium are useful for toxicological testing because of their resemblance to in vivo tissue. We constructed a model of human bronchial tissue which has a fibroblast layer embedded in a collagen matrix directly below a fully-differentiated epithelial cell layer. The model was applied to whole cigarette smoke (CS) exposure repeatedly from an air-liquid interface culture while bronchial epithelial cells were differentiating. The effects of CS exposure on differentiation were determined by histological and gene expression analyses on culture day 21. We found a decrease in ciliated cells and perturbation of goblet cell differentiation. We also analyzed the effects of CS exposure on the inflammatory response, and observed a significant increase in secretion of IL-8, GRO-α, IL-1β, and GM-CSF. Interestingly, secretion of these mediators was augmented with repetition of whole CS exposure. Our data demonstrate the usefulness of our bronchial tissue model for in vitro testing and the importance of exposure repetition in perturbing the differentiation and inflammation processes.

  3. Blocking the mineralocorticoid receptor in humans prevents the stress-induced enhancement of centromedial amygdala connectivity with the dorsal striatum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S.; Klumpers, F.; Krugers, H.J.; Fang, Z.; Oplaat, K.T.; Oitzl, M.S.; Joels, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2015-01-01

    Two research lines argue for rapid stress-induced reallocations of neural network activity involving the amygdala. One focuses on the role of norepinephrine (NE) in mediating a shift towards the salience network and improving vigilance processing, whereas the other focuses on the role of cortisol in

  4. Interindividual differences in stress sensitivity: basal and stress-induced cortisol levels differentially predict neural vigilance processing under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckens, Marloes J A G; Klumpers, Floris; Everaerd, Daphne; Kooijman, Sabine C; van Wingen, Guido A; Fernández, Guillén

    2016-04-01

    Stress exposure is known to precipitate psychological disorders. However, large differences exist in how individuals respond to stressful situations. A major marker for stress sensitivity is hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis function. Here, we studied how interindividual variance in both basal cortisol levels and stress-induced cortisol responses predicts differences in neural vigilance processing during stress exposure. Implementing a randomized, counterbalanced, crossover design, 120 healthy male participants were exposed to a stress-induction and control procedure, followed by an emotional perception task (viewing fearful and happy faces) during fMRI scanning. Stress sensitivity was assessed using physiological (salivary cortisol levels) and psychological measures (trait questionnaires). High stress-induced cortisol responses were associated with increased stress sensitivity as assessed by psychological questionnaires, a stronger stress-induced increase in medial temporal activity and greater differential amygdala responses to fearful as opposed to happy faces under control conditions. In contrast, high basal cortisol levels were related to relative stress resilience as reflected by higher extraversion scores, a lower stress-induced increase in amygdala activity and enhanced differential processing of fearful compared with happy faces under stress. These findings seem to reflect a critical role for HPA-axis signaling in stress coping; higher basal levels indicate stress resilience, whereas higher cortisol responsivity to stress might facilitate recovery in those individuals prone to react sensitively to stress. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Effect of "rose essential oil" inhalation on stress-induced skin-barrier disruption in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Mika; Kano, Eri; Miyoshi, Michio; Komaki, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2012-05-01

    In stressed animals, several brain regions (e.g., hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus [PVN]) exhibit neuronal activation, which increases plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and glucocorticoids. We previously reported that so-called "green odor" inhibits stress-induced activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA axis) and thereby prevents the chronic stress-induced disruption of the skin barrier. Here, we investigated whether rose essential oil, another sedative odorant, inhibits the stress-induced 1) increases in PVN neuronal activity in rats and plasma glucocorticoids (corticosterone [CORT] in rats and cortisol in humans) and 2) skin-barrier disruption in rats and humans. The results showed that in rats subjected to acute restraint stress, rose essential oil inhalation significantly inhibited the increase in plasma CORT and reduced the increases in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in PVN. Inhalation of rose essential oil significantly inhibited the following effects of chronic stress: 1) the elevation of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), an index of the disruption of skin-barrier function, in both rats and humans and 2) the increase in the salivary concentration of cortisol in humans. These results suggest that in rats and humans, chronic stress-induced disruption of the skin barrier can be limited or prevented by rose essential oil inhalation, possibly through its inhibitory effect on the HPA axis.

  6. Estrogen receptor-a in the medial amygdala prevents stress-induced elevations in blood pressure in females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychological stress contributes to the development of hypertension in humans. The ovarian hormone, estrogen, has been shown to prevent stress-induced pressor responses in females by unknown mechanisms. Here, we showed that the antihypertensive effects of estrogen during stress were blunted in femal...

  7. Time and dose dependent effects of oxidative stress induced by cumene hydroperoxide in neuronal excitability of rat motor cortex neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardillo-Díaz, R; Carrascal, L; Muñoz, M F; Ayala, A; Nunez-Abades, P

    2016-03-01

    It has been claimed that oxidative stress and the production of reactive oxygen radicals can contribute to neuron degeneration and might be one factor in the development of different neurological diseases. In our study, we have attempted to clarify how oxidative damage induces dose dependent changes in functional membrane properties of neurons by means of whole cell patch clamp techniques in brain slices from young adult rats. Our research demonstrates physiological changes in membrane properties of pyramidal motor cortex neurons exposed to 3 concentrations of cumene hydroperoxide (CH; 1, 10 and 100μM) during 30min. Results show that oxidative stress induced by CH evokes important changes, in a concentration and time dependent manner, in the neuronal excitability of motor cortex neurons of the rat: (i) Low concentration of the drug (1μM) already blocks inward rectifications (sag) and decreases action potential amplitude and gain, a drug concentration which has no effects on other neuronal populations, (ii) 10μM of CH depresses the excitability of pyramidal motor cortex neurons by decreasing input resistance, amplitude of the action potential, and gain and maximum frequency of the repetitive firing discharge, and (iii) 100μM completely blocks the capability to produce repetitive discharge of action potentials in all cells. Both larger drug concentrations and/or longer times of exposure to CH narrow the current working range. This happens because of the increase in the rheobase, and the reduction of the cancelation current. The effects caused by oxidative stress, including those produced by the level of lipid peroxidation, are practically irreversible and, this, therefore, indicates that neuroprotective agents should be administered at the first symptoms of alterations to membrane properties. In fact, the pre-treatment with melatonin, acting as an antioxidant, prevented the lipid peroxidation and the physiological changes induced by CH. Larger cells (as estimated

  8. Dependence of stress-induced omega transition and mechanical twinning on phase stability in metastable β Ti–V alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.L.; Li, L.; Mei, W.; Wang, W.L.; Sun, J., E-mail: jsun@sjtu.edu.cn

    2015-09-15

    Tensile properties and deformation microstructures of a series of binary β Ti–16–22V alloys have been investigated. The results show that the plastic deformation mode changes from the plate-like stress-induced ω phase transformation with a special habit plane of (− 5052){sub ω}//(3 − 3 − 2){sub β} to (332)<113> type deformation twinning with increasing the content of vanadium in the β Ti–16–22 wt.% V alloys. The plate-like stress-induced ω phase has a special orientation relationship with the β phase matrix, i.e., [110]{sub β}//[− 12 − 10]{sub ω}, (3 − 3 − 2){sub β}//(− 5052){sub ω} and (− 55 − 4){sub β}//(30 − 31){sub ω}. The alloys plastically deformed by stress-induced ω phase transformation exhibit relatively higher yield strength than those deformed via (332)<113> type deformation twinning. It can be concluded that the stability of β phase plays a significant role in plastic deformation mode, i.e., stress-induced ω phase transformation or (332)<113> type deformation twinning, which governs the mechanical property of the β Ti–16–22 wt.% V alloys. - Highlights: • Tensile properties and deformed microstructures of β Ti–16–22V alloys were studied. • Stress-induced ω phase transformation and (332)<113> twinning occur in the alloys. • Stability of β phase plays a significant role in plastic deformation mode. • Plastic deformation mode governs the mechanical property of the alloys.

  9. A critical role for the melanocortin 4 receptor in stress-induced relapse to nicotine seeking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaoli; Yamada, Hidetaka; Corrie, Lu W; Ji, Yue; Bauzo, Rayna M; Alexander, Jon C; Bruijnzeel, Adrie W

    2015-03-01

    Tobacco addiction is characterized by a lack of control over smoking and relapse after periods of abstinence. Smoking cessation leads to a dysphoric state that contributes to relapse to smoking. After the acute withdrawal phase, exposure to stressors increases the risk for relapse. Blockade of melanocortin 4 (MC4 ) receptors has anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects in animal models. The aim of these studies was to investigate the role of MC4 receptors in the dysphoria associated with nicotine withdrawal and stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. To study stress-induced reinstatement, rats self-administered nicotine for 16 days and then nicotine seeking was extinguished by substituting saline for nicotine. Nicotine seeking was reinstated by intermittent footshock stress. The intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure was used to assess the negative mood state associated with nicotine withdrawal. Elevations in the ICSS thresholds are indicative of a dysphoric state. The selective MC4 receptor antagonists HS014 and HS024 prevented stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished nicotine seeking. Drug doses that prevented stress-induced relapse did not affect responding for food pellets, which indicates that the drugs did not induce sedation or motor impairments. In the ICSS experiments, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine elevated the ICSS thresholds of the nicotine-dependent rats. Pre-treatment with HS014 or HS024 did not prevent the elevations in ICSS thresholds. These studies indicate that MC4 receptors play a critical role in stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking, but these receptors may not play a role in the dysphoria associated with acute nicotine withdrawal.

  10. Short-term repeated corticosterone administration enhances glutamatergic but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Joanna; Blasiak, Anna; Czerw, Anna; Tylko, Grzegorz; Sowa, Joanna; Hess, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that stress impairs performance of skilled reaching and walking tasks in rats due to the action of glucocorticoids involved in the stress response. Skilled reaching and walking are controlled by the primary motor cortex (M1); however, it is not known whether stress-related impairments in skilled motor tasks are related to functional and/or structural alterations within the M1. We studied the effects of single and repeated injections of corticosterone (twice daily for 7 days) on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) recorded from layer II/III pyramidal neurons in ex vivo slices of the M1, prepared 2 days after the last administration of the hormone. We also measured the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal cells and the protein levels of selected subunits of AMPA, NMDA, and GABAA receptors after repeated corticosterone administration. Repeatedly administered corticosterone induced an increase in the frequency but not in the amplitude of sEPSCs, while a single administration had no effect on the recorded excitatory currents. The frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs as well as the excitability of pyramidal cells were changed neither after single nor after repeated corticosterone administration. Treatment with corticosterone for 7 days did not modify the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal neurons. Corticosterone influenced neither the protein levels of GluA1, GluA2, GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B subunits of glutamate receptors nor those of α1, β2, and γ2 subunits of the GABAA receptor. The increase in sEPSCs frequency induced by repeated corticosterone administration faded out within 7 days. These data indicate that prolonged administration of exogenous corticosterone selectively and reversibly enhances glutamatergic, but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex. Our results suggest that corticosterone treatment results in an enhancement of spontaneous glutamate release from presynaptic

  11. Effects of Gladiolus dalenii on the Stress-Induced Behavioral, Neurochemical, and Reproductive Changes in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fotsing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gladiolus dalenii is a plant commonly used in many regions of Cameroon as a cure for various diseases like headaches, epilepsy, schizophrenia, and mood disorders. Recent studies have revealed that the aqueous extract of G. dalenii (AEGD exhibited antidepressant-like properties in rats. Therefore, we hypothesized that the AEGD could protect from the stress-induced behavioral, neurochemical, and reproductive changes in rats. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the effect of the AEGD on behavioral, neurochemical, and reproductive characteristics, using female rats subjected to chronic immobilization stress. The chronic immobilization stress (3 h per day for 28 days was applied to induce female reproductive and behavioral impairments in rats. The immobilization stress was provoked in rats by putting them separately inside cylindrical restrainers with ventilated doors at ambient temperature. The plant extract was given to rats orally everyday during 28 days, 5 min before induction of stress. On a daily basis, a vaginal smear was made to assess the duration of the different phases of the estrous cycle and at the end of the 28 days of chronic immobilization stress, the rat’s behavior was assessed in the elevated plus maze. They were sacrificed by cervical disruption. The organs were weighed, the ovary histology done, and the biochemical parameters assessed. The findings of this research revealed that G. dalenii increased the entries and the time of open arm exploration in the elevated plus maze. Evaluation of the biochemical parameters levels indicated that there was a significant reduction in the corticosterone, progesterone, and prolactin levels in the G. dalenii aqueous extract treated rats compared to stressed rats whereas the levels of serotonin, triglycerides, adrenaline, cholesterol, glucose estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone were significantly increased in the stressed rats treated with, G. dalenii

  12. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  13. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  14. Antistress property of Glycyrrhiza glabra (Athimadhura on stress induced Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya M.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress is defined as a condition that disturbs the normal function of the biological system or a condition that decreases fitness. The present study was to evaluate the antistress property of Glycyrrhiza glabra (Athimadura. Here the Antistress property was experimented on Drosophila melanogaster. Stress was induced by adding methotrixate (MTX to the media. The 4 groups of Drosophila melanogaster were cultured in the laboratory. In the first group only control flies. In the second group MTX induced flies, in the third group MTX along with plant powder induced flies. In the fourth group only plant powder induced flies were cultured. Stress related enzymes like Catalase (CAT and Super Oxide Dismutase (SOD are most widely used paradigm for the evaluation of enzyme activity . SOD and CAT Activity in Stress induced flies was increased compared to that of normal flies. After incorporation of the plant powder to the media fed for Drosophila melanogaster, both SOD and CAT Activity was decreased indicating the reduction in Stress by the plant powder. Thus Glycyrrhiza glabra may have Antistress property, as it has reduced stress in Drosophila melanogaster induced by MTX at different concentration.

  15. Lithium modulates the chronic stress-induced effect on blood glucose level of male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Nataša

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we examined gross changes in the mass of whole adrenal glands and that of the adrenal cortex, as well as the serum corticosterone and glucose level of mature male Wistar rats subjected to three different treatments: animals subjected to chronic restraint-stress, animals injected with lithium (Li and chronically stressed rats treated with Li. Under all three conditions we observed hypertrophy of whole adrenals, as well as the adrenal cortices. Chronic restraint stress, solely or in combination with Li treatment, significantly elevated the corticosterone level, but did not change the blood glucose level. Animals treated only with Li exhibited an elevated serum corticosterone level and blood glucose level. The aim of our study was to investigate the modulation of the chronic stress-induced effect on the blood glucose level by lithium, as a possible mechanism of avoiding the damage caused by chronic stress. Our results showed that lithium is an agent of choice which may help to reduce stress-elevated corticosterone and replenish exhausted glucose storages in an organism.

  16. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain JB-1 reverses restraint stress-induced gut dysmotility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C; Wu, R Y; Wong, A; Stanisz, A M; Yan, R; Min, K K; Pasyk, M; McVey Neufeld, K-A; Karamat, M I; Foster, J A; Bienenstock, J; Forsythe, P; Kunze, W A

    2017-01-01

    Environmental stress affects the gut with dysmotility being a common consequence. Although a variety of microbes or molecules may prevent the dysmotility, none reverse the dysmotility. We have used a 1 hour restraint stress mouse model to test for treatment effects of the neuroactive microbe, L. rhamnosus JB-1(™) . Motility of fluid-filled ex vivo gut segments in a perfusion organ bath was recorded by video and migrating motor complexes measured using spatiotemporal maps of diameter changes. Stress reduced jejunal and increased colonic propagating contractile cluster velocities and frequencies, while increasing contraction amplitudes for both. Luminal application of 10E8 cfu/mL JB-1 restored motor complex variables to unstressed levels within minutes of application. L. salivarius or Na.acetate had no treatment effects, while Na.butyrate partially reversed stress effects on colonic frequency and amplitude. Na.propionate reversed the stress effects for jejunum and colon except on jejunal amplitude. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a potential for certain beneficial microbes as treatment of stress-induced intestinal dysmotility and that the mechanism for restoration of function occurs within the intestine via a rapid drug-like action on the enteric nervous system. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Blockade of Drp1 rescues oxidative stress-induced osteoblast dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Xueqi; Huang, Shengbin; Yu, Qing [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Higuchi Bioscience Center, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, 66047 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 (China); Yu, Haiyang [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041 (China); Yan, Shirley ShiDu, E-mail: shidu@ku.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Higuchi Bioscience Center, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, 66047 (United States)

    2015-12-25

    Osteoblast dysfunction, induced by oxidative stress, plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of osteoporosis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclarified. Imbalance of mitochondrial dynamics has been closely linked to oxidative stress. Here, we reveal an unexplored role of dynamic related protein 1(Drp1), the major regulator in mitochondrial fission, in the oxidative stress-induced osteoblast injury model. We demonstrate that levels of phosphorylation and expression of Drp1 significantly increased under oxidative stress. Blockade of Drp1, through pharmaceutical inhibitor or gene knockdown, significantly protected against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced osteoblast dysfunction, as shown by increased cell viability, improved cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization and restored mitochondrial function. The protective effects of blocking Drp1 in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced osteoblast dysfunction were evidenced by increased mitochondrial function and suppressed production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These findings provide new insights into the role of the Drp1-dependent mitochondrial pathway in the pathology of osteoporosis, indicating that the Drp1 pathway may be targetable for the development of new therapeutic approaches in the prevention and the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress is an early pathological event in osteoporosis. • Imbalance of mitochondrial dynamics are linked to oxidative stress in osteoporosis. • The role of the Drp1-dependent mitochondrial pathway in osteoporosis.

  18. Moesin and stress-induced phosphoprotein-1 are possible sero-diagnostic markers of psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Maejima

    Full Text Available To identify diagnostic markers for psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis, autoantibodies in sera from psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis patients were screened by two-dimensional immunoblotting (2D-IB. Based on 2D-IB and MADLI TOF/TOF-MS analyses, eleven proteins each in psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis were identified as autoantigens. Furthermore, serum levels of moesin, keratin 17 (K17, annexin A1 (ANXA1, and stress-induced phophoprotein-1 (STIP1, which were detected as autoantigens, were studied by dot blot analysis with psoriasis patients and healthy controls. The levels of moesin and STIP1 were significantly higher in sera from patients with psoriasis vulgaris than in the controls (moesin: P<0.05, STIP1: P<0.005. The area under the curve (AUC for moesin and STIP1 between patients with psoraisis vulgaris and controls was 0.747 and 0.792, respectively. STIP1 and K17 levels were significantly higher in sera from patients with psoriatic arthritis than in those with psoriasis vulgaris (P<0.05 each. The AUC for STIP1 and K17 between patients with psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis vulgaris was 0.69 and 0.72, respectively. The STIP1 or moesin, CK17 serum level was not correlated with disease activity of psoriasis patients. These data suggest that STIP1 and moesin may be novel and differential sero-diagnostic markers for psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis.

  19. Antioxidant effect of pomegranate against streptozotocin-nicotinamide generated oxidative stress induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Aboonabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress attributes a crucial role in chronic complication of diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine the most effective part of pomegranate on oxidative stress markers and antioxidant enzyme activities against streptozotocin-nicotinamide (STZ-NA-induced diabetic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups. Experimental diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection (i.p, 15 min after the i.p administration of NA. Diabetic rats showed significant increase in plasma glucose level, and the significant decrease in plasma insulin level. The activities of antioxidant enzymes such as total antioxidant status (TAS, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT reduced while the levels of biomarkers of oxidative stress such as gamma-glutamyle transferase (GGT, and malondialdehyde (MDA increased in diabetic control rats as compared to normal control rats. Oral treatment with pomegranate seed-juice for 21 days demonstrated significant protective effects on all the biochemical parameters studied. Besides, biochemical findings were supported by histopathological study. These results revealed that pomegranate has potential protective effect against oxidative stress induced diabetic rats.

  20. ROS-mediated abiotic stress-induced programmed cell death in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselin ePetrov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available During the course of their ontogenesis, plants are continuously exposed to a large variety of abiotic stress factors which can damage tissues and jeopardize the survival of the organism unless properly countered. While animals can simply escape and thus evade stressors, plants as sessile organisms have developed complex strategies to withstand them. When the intensity of a detrimental factor is high, one of the defense programs employed by plants is the induction of programmed cell death (PCD. This is an active, genetically controlled process which is initiated to isolate and remove damaged tissues thereby ensuring the survival of the organism. The mechanism of PCD induction usually includes an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS which are utilized as mediators of the stress signal. Abiotic stress-induced PCD is not only a process of fundamental biological importance, but also of considerable interest to agricultural practice as it has the potential to significantly influence crop yield. Therefore, numerous scientific enterprises have focused on elucidating the mechanisms leading to and controlling PCD in response to adverse conditions in plants. This knowledge may help to develop novel strategies to obtain more resilient crop varieties with improved tolerance and enhanced productivity. The aim of the present review is to summarize the recent advances in research on ROS-induced PCD related to abiotic stress and the role of the organelles in the process.

  1. Cerebrolysin administration reduces oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in lymphocytes from healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formichi, Patrizia; Radi, Elena; Battisti, Carla; Di Maio, Giuseppe; Muresanu, Dafin; Federico, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Cerebrolysin is the only drug available for clinical use containing active fragments of some important neurotrophic factors obtained from purified porcine brain proteins, which has long been used for the treatment of dementia and stroke sequels. Cerebrolysin has growth factor-like activities and promotes neuronal survival and sprouting, however, its molecular mechanism still needs to be determined. It has been shown that Cerebrolysin may interact with proteolytic pathways linked to apoptosis. Administration of Cerebrolysin significantly reduces the number of apoptotic neurons after glutamate exposure. Furthermore, it has been reported that Cerebrolysin inhibits free radicals formation and lipid peroxidation. In vitro we evaluated the protective effects of Cerebrolysin towards spontaneous and induced apoptotic death in cells from healthy individuals. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from 10 individuals were used as cell model; 2-deoxy-D-ribose (dRib), a highly reducing sugar, was used as paradigm pro-apoptotic stimulus. Apoptosis was analysed using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Our results showed that Cerebrolysin significantly reduced the number of apoptotic PBLs after dRib treatment, although it had no significative effects on cells cultured in standard conditions. Our work showed a protective effect of Cerebrolysin on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and suggested that PBLs can be used as an easy obtainable and handy cell model to verify Cerebrolysin effects in neurodegenerative pathologies.

  2. Evaluation of Stress-Inducing Factors of Educational Environment in Hamadan Dentistry School’s Students

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    M. Dalband

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction & Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate stressor factors of educational environment in Hamadan dental school’s students in year 2002.Materials & Methods: The study design was descriptive, cross-sectional and it was accomplished using a questionnaire which was taken from DES (dental environment stress questionnaire. According to restricted number of statistical population all members of population (154 students were evaluated as samples and this study was a survey one. Results: The results of this study indicated that most stressfull factors in dental students has been related to class work with mean score 3.18±0.83 and faculty-student relationship with mean score 3.05±0.83. Female students showed more total stress than male students (2.73 vs. 2.44. The fourth-year students had the most stress rate in all students of different years (3.05 and preclinical and clinical factors were the most stress-inducing factors of these students (3.63.Conclusion: It is concluded that the environment of Hamadan dental school and the process of education in the field of dentistry is potentially stressful. Also there is a reverse relationship between level of stress in students and their academic efficiencies.

  3. Binary Stress Induces an Increase in Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus

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    Wei eZhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant, which produces a variety of indole alkaloids of significant pharmaceutical relevance. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential stress-induced increase of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus using proteomic technique. The contents of the detectable alkaloids ajmalicine, vindoline, catharanthine, and strictosidine in C. roseus were significantly increased under binary stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that the abundance of proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle and cell wall was largely increased; while, that of proteins related to tetrapyrrole synthesis and photosynthesis was decreased. Of note, 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of indole alkaloid was two-fold more abundant in treated group compared to that in control. In addition, mRNA expression levels of genes involved in the indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway indicated an up-regulation in their transcription in C. roseus under UV-B irradiation. These results suggest that binary stress might negatively affect the process of photosynthesis in C. roseus. In addition, the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis appears to be responsive to binary stress.

  4. Effects of (-)-sesamin on chronic stress-induced memory deficits in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting Ting; Shin, Keon Sung; Park, Hyun Jin; Kim, Kyung Sook; Lee, Kung Eun; Cho, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Myung Koo

    2016-11-10

    This study investigated the effects of (-)-sesamin on memory deficits induced by chronic electric footshock (EF)-induced stress in mice. Mice were treated with (-)-sesamin (25 and 50mg/kg, p.o., daily for 21day) prior to chronic EF stress (0.6mA, 1s every 5s for 3min, daily for 21day). Transfer retention latencies in the elevated plus maze test and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (type 1) phosphorylation in the hippocampus increased with chronic EF stress, and they were reduced by treatment with (-)-sesamin at both doses. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), which were reduced by chronic EF stress, were increased by treatment with (-)-sesamin. Retention latencies in the passive avoidance test and dopamine levels in the substantia nigra-striatum were also reduced by chronic EF stress, and similarly recovered with (-)-sesamin treatment. These results suggest that (-)-sesamin ameliorates the effects of chronic EF stress-induced spatial and habit learning memory deficits by modulating both NMDA receptor and dopaminergic neuronal systems.

  5. Saffron (Crocus sativus) aqueous extract and its constituent crocin reduces stress-induced anorexia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halataei, Bahar-al-Sadat; Khosravi, Maryam; Arbabian, Sedigheh; Sahraei, Hedayat; Golmanesh, Leila; Zardooz, Homeira; Jalili, Cyrus; Ghoshooni, Hassan

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, the effects of an ethanol and aqueous extract of saffron Crocus sativus and its constituents safranal and crocin on the stress-induced reduction in food intake, weight gain and anorexic time in mice were investigated. Male albino mice (20-25 g) were irregularly exposed to a trial of electroshock stress for 7 days. Then, the anorexic time as well as the animal's food intake and weight were recorded. In addition, blood samples were obtained on days 1 and 7 for corticosterone determination. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of the aqueous but not the ethanol extract (10, 50 and 100 mg/kg) significantly reduced the anorexic time. The results were similar for crocin (1, 5 and 10 mg/kg; i.p.). In addition, a reduction in weight gain was observed in the controls as well as in the groups that received alcohol extract or safranal. However, this was not observed in animals treated with aqueous extract or crocin. The plasma corticosterone level did not increase in the aqueous extract and crocin treated animals. It can be concluded that the saffron aqueous extract and its constituent crocin reduce side effects of electroshock stress in mice.

  6. Stress-Induced CDK5 Activation Disrupts Axonal Transport via Lis1/Ndel1/Dynein

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    Eva Klinman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport is essential for neuronal function, and defects in transport are associated with multiple neurodegenerative diseases. Aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5 activity, driven by the stress-induced activator p25, also is observed in these diseases. Here we show that elevated CDK5 activity increases the frequency of nonprocessive events for a range of organelles, including lysosomes, autophagosomes, mitochondria, and signaling endosomes. Transport disruption induced by aberrant CDK5 activation depends on the Lis1/Ndel1 complex, which directly regulates dynein activity. CDK5 phosphorylation of Ndel1 favors a high affinity Lis1/Ndel/dynein complex that blocks the ATP-dependent release of dynein from microtubules, inhibiting processive motility of dynein-driven cargo. Similar transport defects observed in neurons from a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are rescued by CDK5 inhibition. Together, these studies identify CDK5 as a Lis1/Ndel1-dependent regulator of transport in stressed neurons, and suggest that dysregulated CDK5 activity contributes to the transport deficits observed during neurodegeneration.

  7. Exposure to HT-2 toxin causes oxidative stress induced apoptosis/autophagy in porcine oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Han, Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Cheng; Tang, Feng; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2016-01-01

    T-2 toxin is a main type A trichothecene mycotoxin which is the most toxic trichothecence. T-2 toxin has posed various toxic effects on human and animals in vigorous cell proliferation tissues like lymphoid, hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues, while HT-2 toxin is the major metabolite which is deacetylated by T-2 toxin. In this study, we focused on the toxic effects of HT-2 on porcine oocyte maturation. We treated the porcine oocyte with HT-2 toxin in vitro, and we first found that HT-2 treatment inhibited porcine oocyte polar body extrusion and cumulus cell expansion. We observed the disrupted meiotic spindle morphology after treatment, which might be due to the reduced p-MAPK protein level. Actin distribution was also disturbed, indicating that HT-2 affects cytoskeleton of porcine oocytes. We next explored the causes for the failure of oocyte maturation after HT-2 treatment. We found that HT-2 treated oocytes showed the increased ROS level, which indicated that oxidative stress had occurred. We also detected autophagy as well as early apoptosis in the treatment oocytes. Due to the fact that oxidative stress could induced apoptosis, our results indicated that HT-2 toxin caused oxidative stress induced apoptosis and autophagy, which further affected porcine oocyte maturation. PMID:27658477

  8. The RFamide receptor DMSR-1 regulates stress-induced sleep in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannacone, Michael J; Beets, Isabel; Lopes, Lindsey E; Churgin, Matthew A; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Nelson, Matthew D; Schoofs, Liliane; Raizen, David M

    2017-01-01

    In response to environments that cause cellular stress, animals engage in sleep behavior that facilitates recovery from the stress. In Caenorhabditis elegans, stress-induced sleep(SIS) is regulated by cytokine activation of the ALA neuron, which releases FLP-13 neuropeptides characterized by an amidated arginine-phenylalanine (RFamide) C-terminus motif. By performing an unbiased genetic screen for mutants that impair the somnogenic effects of FLP-13 neuropeptides, we identified the gene dmsr-1, which encodes a G-protein coupled receptor similar to an insect RFamide receptor. DMSR-1 is activated by FLP-13 peptides in cell culture, is required for SIS in vivo, is expressed non-synaptically in several wake-promoting neurons, and likely couples to a Gi/o heterotrimeric G-protein. Our data expand our understanding of how a single neuroendocrine cell coordinates an organism-wide behavioral response, and suggest that similar signaling principles may function in other organisms to regulate sleep during sickness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19837.001 PMID:28094002

  9. Chronic stress induces anxiety via an amygdalar intracellular cascade that impairs endocannabinoid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhaohong; Zhou, Xun; Pandey, Nihar R; Vecchiarelli, Haley A; Stewart, Chloe A; Zhang, Xia; Lagace, Diane C; Brunel, Jean Michel; Béïque, Jean-Claude; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Hill, Matthew N; Chen, Hsiao-Huei

    2015-03-18

    Collapse of endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling in the amygdala contributes to stress-induced anxiety, but the mechanisms of this effect remain unclear. eCB production is tied to the function of the glutamate receptor mGluR5, itself dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation. Herein, we identify a novel pathway linking eCB regulation of anxiety through phosphorylation of mGluR5. Mice lacking LMO4, an endogenous inhibitor of the tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, display reduced mGluR5 phosphorylation, eCB signaling, and profound anxiety that is reversed by genetic or pharmacological suppression of amygdalar PTP1B. Chronically stressed mice exhibited elevated plasma corticosterone, decreased LMO4 palmitoylation, elevated PTP1B activity, reduced amygdalar eCB levels, and anxiety behaviors that were restored by PTP1B inhibition or by glucocorticoid receptor antagonism. Consistently, corticosterone decreased palmitoylation of LMO4 and its inhibition of PTP1B in neuronal cells. Collectively, these data reveal a stress-responsive corticosterone-LMO4-PTP1B-mGluR5 cascade that impairs amygdalar eCB signaling and contributes to the development of anxiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Although abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. Numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, have been applied to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. Here we briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. In the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentation studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.

  11. A Study on Stress-induced Hydrogen Diffusion in Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin-Ho; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Yong-Soo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This study was conducted to confirm whether the hydrogen can diffuse induced by stress gradient in the isothermal conditions. So far the following conclusions were drawn: Hydrogen can be diffused by stress gradient in the isothermal conditions and Certain threshold condition may exist on hydrogen diffusion. The absorbed hydrogen precipitates into a hydride platelet which is considered as one of the limiting factor threatening the integrity of spent nuclear fuel during dry storage. Thus, it is important to understand thoroughly the behavior of hydrogen in the zirconium. In particular, hydrogen diffusion is known to be affected by gradient of temperature, hydrogen, and stress. The influence of temperature and concentration is well known as Soret effect and Fick's law, respectively. However, the effect of stress gradient on hydrogen diffusion is unclear so far. For this reason, understanding of delayed hydride cracking (DHC), which is a time-dependent crack growth mechanism, continues to be a controversial issue. Currently, there are two major models to explain the process of DHC. Puls claims it is driven by diffusion of hydrogen towards crack tip due to chemical potential difference which is generated by stress gradient between the crack tip and bulk region. In contrast, Kim explains that the first step of DHC is stress-induced precipitation of supersaturated hydrogen at the crack tip. Then hydrogen migrates towards crack tip due to concentration gradient between the two regions.

  12. Analysis of thermal stresses induced in silicon during xenon arc lamp flash annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentini, G. G.; Correra, L.

    1983-04-01

    Evaluation of thermal stresses induced on silicon wafers during flash annealing with incoherent light from a xenon lamp has been performed. The thermally induced stresses have been computed taking into account that the slip planes, in silicon crystal, are {111} and the slip directions in the plane are . The computed stresses have been compared with the yield stress of the material, to determine the threshold of damage introduction by the annealing process. For the light flash durations shorter than 500 μsec, a preheating of the sample is necessary to obtain a good annealing of a 1000 Å implanted layer without defects introduction. A relationship among flash duration, preheating temperature and flash energy density has been established allowing the identification of the best annealing conditions. The computed results have been compared with experimental annealing data obtained on silicon, phosphorus implanted at 10 keV, 1.5×1015 at/cm2 and irradiated with an original flash annealing system set up in our laboratory.

  13. A method for tracking subsurface fronts of stress-induced permeability enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    The coupled interactions in fractured geological media between thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) and chemical effects are expected to be important in many engineering applications including CO2 sequestration, geothermal energy production, oil and gas production, nuclear waste isolation, and arctic permafrost. Large changes in pressures, temperatures, and saturations can result due to injection/withdrawal of fluids or emplaced heat sources. Phase changes or rock failure often occur in an abrupt fashion, characterized by a sharp front of discontinuity with relatively small changes in properties on either side of the front. These changes can modify the formation permeability in a manner that can often be approximated by a step-function-like dependence. Such behavior has motivated us to use an analogy to the classical Stefan problem; we construct evolution equations for the fluid pore pressure on both sides of a propagating stress induced damage front for the case of planar front geometry. Closed form expressions are derived for the position of the damage front and the observable surface mass flow rate as functions of time for planar, spherical, and cylindrical damage front geometries. Isothermal, pressure induced damage is discussed as well as damage dominated by thermal effects. Model predictions are shown to agree with those of a less general fracture model as well as with field data consisting of measured mass flow rates over a two week period. Finally, we discuss extensions of the basic model to more complex damage front geometries.

  14. The oxidative stress-inducible cystine/glutamate antiporter, system x (c) (-) : cystine supplier and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Marcus; Sato, Hideyo

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative stress-inducible cystine/glutamate exchange system, system x (c) (-) , transports one molecule of cystine, the oxidized form of cysteine, into cells and thereby releases one molecule of glutamate into the extracellular space. It consists of two protein components, the 4F2 heavy chain, necessary for membrane location of the heterodimer, and the xCT protein, responsible for transport activity. Previously, system x (c) (-) has been regarded to be a mere supplier of cysteine to cells for the synthesis of proteins and the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). In that sense, oxygen, electrophilic agents, and bacterial lipopolysaccharide trigger xCT expression to accommodate with increased oxidative stress by stimulating GSH biosynthesis. However, emerging evidence established that system x (c) (-) may act on its own as a GSH-independent redox system by sustaining a redox cycle over the plasma membrane. Hallmarks of this cycle are cystine uptake, intracellular reduction to cysteine and secretion of the surplus of cysteine into the extracellular space. Consequently, increased levels of extracellular cysteine provide a reducing microenvironment required for proper cell signaling and communication, e.g. as already shown for the mechanism of T cell activation. By contrast, the enhanced release of glutamate in exchange with cystine may trigger neurodegeneration due to glutamate-induced cytotoxic processes. This review aims to provide a comprehensive picture from the early days of system x (c) (-) research up to now.

  15. Genome wide transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to stress-induced perturbations

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    Hilal eTaymaz-Nikerel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cells respond to environmental and/or genetic perturbations in order to survive and proliferate. Characterization of the changes after various stimuli at different -omics levels is crucial to comprehend the adaptation of cells to changing conditions. Genome wide quantification and analysis of transcript levels, the genes affected by perturbations, extends our understanding of cellular metabolism by pointing out the mechanisms that play role in sensing the stress caused by those perturbations and related signaling pathways, and in this way guides us to achieve endeavors such as rational engineering of cells or interpretation of disease mechanisms. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system has been studied in response to different perturbations and corresponding transcriptional profiles were followed either statically or/and dynamically, short- and long- term. This review focuses on response of yeast cells to diverse stress inducing perturbations including nutritional changes, ionic stress, salt stress, oxidative stress, osmotic shock, as well as to genetic interventions such as deletion and over-expression of genes. It is aimed to conclude on common regulatory phenomena that allow yeast to organize its transcriptomic response after any perturbation under different external conditions.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of stress-induced gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chookhuan Nithiwathanapong; Sanit Reungrongrat; Nuthapong Ukarapol

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the frequency and the risk factors of stress-induced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in children admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).METHODS: The medical records of children aged between 1 month and 15 years admitted to the PICU between January 2002 and December 2002 were reviewed.Demographic data, indications for PICU admission, principle diagnosis, and basic laboratory investigations were recorded. Previously described factors for stress ulcer bleeding (mechanical ventilation, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, renal insufficiency, coagulopathy,thrombocytopenia, and intracranial pathology) were used as independent variables in a multivariate analysis.RESULTS: One hundred and seventy of two hundred and five medical records were eligible for review. The most common indication for PICU admission was respiratory failure (48.8%). Twenty-five children received stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis with ranitidine. The incidence of stress ulcer bleeding was 43.5%, in which 5.3% were clinically significant bleeding. Only mechanical ventilation and thrombocytopenia were significantly associated with stress ulcer bleeding using the univariate analysis.The odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were 5.13(1.86-14.12) and 2.26 (1.07-4.74), respectively. However, the logistic regression analysis showed that mechanicai ventilation was the only significant risk factor with the odds ratio of 14.1.CONCLUSION: The incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding was high in critically ill children. Mechanical ventilation was an important risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Biochemical changes and oxidative stress induced by zearalenone in the liver of pregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C; Zhang, Y; Yin, S; Jia, Z; Shan, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to examine the toxic influence of different doses of zearalenone (ZEN) on the liver, especially oxidative stress induced by ZEN on the liver. A total of 48 pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into 4 treatments groups with 12 animals in each. The rats were fed with a normal diet treated with 0 mg/kg (control), 50 mg/kg (treatment 1), 100 mg/kg (treatment 2), or 150 mg/kg (treatment 3) ZEN in feed on gestation days (GDs) 0-7 and then all the rats were fed with a normal diet on GDs 8-20. The experimental period lasted 21 days. The results showed that exposure to ZEN induced increase in aspartate amino transferase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase activities and decrease in total protein and albumin content in a dose-dependent manner and also induce decrease in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities and increase in malondialdehyde content in a dose-dependent manner in the serum and the liver. The increased transcription of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) was detected in the liver after exposure to ZEN. These results suggested that ZEN not only caused damage in the liver of pregnant rats in a dose-dependent manner but also induced the messenger RNA expression of CYP2E1 in the liver. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Anesthetic ketamine counteracts repetitive mechanical stress-induced learning and memory impairment in developing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sheng; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hua; Ren, Bingxu; Zhang, Jiannan

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, had an influence on learning and memory in developing mice. Fifty Kunming mice aged 21 days were randomly divided into 5 subgroups (n = 10 for each) to receive intraperitoneal injection of equal volume of saline (S group) or ketamine (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg of body weight/day) for 7 consecutive days, or to be left untreated (C group). A step-down passive avoidance test was performed to evaluate learning and memory in these mice on days 8 and 9. Additionally, the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus was determined. Rats receiving saline or sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine (25 mg/kg) showed significantly decreased abilities of learning and memory and reduced expression of BDNF, compared to the normal controls (P learning and memory and expression of BDNF were found for anesthetic doses of ketamine (50 or 100 mg/kg)-treated rats and controls (P > 0.05). Repetitive mechanical stress impairs learning and memory performance in developing mice, which may be associated with decreased BDNF expression. The stress-induced learning and memory impairment can be prevented by anesthetic doses of ketamine.

  19. Collectin-11 detects stress-induced L-fucose pattern to trigger renal epithelial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Conrad A; Tran, David; Li, Ke; Wu, Weiju; Peng, Qi; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Zhou, Wuding; Sacks, Steven H

    2016-05-01

    Physiochemical stress induces tissue injury as a result of the detection of abnormal molecular patterns by sensory molecules of the innate immune system. Here, we have described how the recently discovered C-type lectin collectin-11 (CL-11, also known as CL-K1 and encoded by COLEC11) recognizes an abnormal pattern of L-fucose on postischemic renal tubule cells and activates a destructive inflammatory response. We found that intrarenal expression of CL-11 rapidly increases in the postischemic period and colocalizes with complement deposited along the basolateral surface of the proximal renal tubule in association with L-fucose, the potential binding ligand for CL-11. Mice with either generalized or kidney-specific deficiency of CL-11 were strongly protected against loss of renal function and tubule injury due to reduced complement deposition. Ex vivo renal tubule cells showed a marked capacity for CL-11 binding that was induced by cell stress under hypoxic or hypothermic conditions and prevented by specific removal of L-fucose. Further analysis revealed that cell-bound CL-11 required the lectin complement pathway-associated protease MASP-2 to trigger complement deposition. Given these results, we conclude that lectin complement pathway activation triggered by ligand-CL-11 interaction in postischemic tissue is a potent source of acute kidney injury and is amenable to sugar-specific blockade.

  20. Micromechanical modeling of stress-induced strain in polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga by directional solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuping, E-mail: zhuyuping@126.com [Seismic Observation and Geophysical Imaging Laboratory, Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing 100081 (China); Shi, Tao; Teng, Yao [Faculty of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A micromechanical model of directional solidification Ni–Mn–Ga is developed. • The stress–strain curves in different directions are tested. • The martensite Young’s moduli in different directions are predicted. • The macro reorientation strains in different directions are investigated. - Abstract: Polycrystalline ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni–Mn–Ga produced by directional solidification possess unique properties. Its compressive stress–strain behaviors in loading–unloading cycle show nonlinear and anisotropic. Based on the self-consistent theory and thermodynamics principle, a micromechanical constitutive model of polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga by directional solidification is developed considering the generating mechanism of the macroscopic strain and anisotropy. Then, the stress induced strains at different angles to solidification direction are calculated, and the results agree well with the experimental data. The predictive curves of martensite Young’s modulus and macro reorientation strain in different directions are investigated. It may provide theoretical guidance for the design and use of ferromagnetic shape memory alloy.

  1. The effect of beta blockade on stress-induced cognitive dysfunction in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigel, H C

    1991-07-01

    Test anxiety is severely disabling to students whose fear of examinations causes cognitive dysfunction that paralyzes their thinking the way stage fright impairs actors ability to act. In studies using subjective evaluations among actors and musicians, beta-blockade relieved stage fright and has been used informally to treat test anxiety in students without objective measures of effectiveness. The Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) was chosen as an objective test instrument to confirm the effect of beta-blockade on test anxiety and performance. Thirty-two high school students who had already taken the SAT before enrolling in this study and who had stress-induced cognitive dysfunction on exams were given 40 mg of propranolol one hour before they retook those tests. Mean SAT scores with beta-blockade were 130 points higher than on the initial SAT done before entering the study without medication (p = less than .01). A single dose of propranolol immediately before the SAT permitted improved performance in students prone to cognitive dysfunction due to test anxiety.

  2. Inhibition of cortisol production with metyrapone prevents mental stress-induced endothelial dysfunction and baroreflex impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadley, Andrew J M; Korszun, Ania; Abdelaal, Eltigani; Moskvina, Valentina; Jones, Christopher J H; Nash, Gerard B; Ray, Clare; Deanfield, John; Frenneaux, Michael P

    2005-07-19

    This study was designed to investigate the role of cortisol in stress-induced endothelial dysfunction and impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) by blocking cortisol production with metyrapone before subjecting healthy volunteers to mental stress. Mental stress raises cortisol levels and is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality, especially from sudden cardiac death. It also causes endothelial dysfunction and impaired BRS. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of endothelial function, and BRS in 36 subjects without CHD risk factors who were then randomized in a double-blind fashion to oral metyrapone 750 mg x 2 or placebo. Five hours later we subjected subjects to mental stress and then remeasured endothelial function and BRS. Prestress cortisol levels were significantly higher in the placebo group at 270.5 (30.9) nmol/l versus 89.1 (11.8) nmol/l (p = 0.01), and the increase with stress was higher at 57.9 (17.9) nmol/l versus 11.2 (2.2) nmol/l (p Analysis of covariation showed a significant effect of metyrapone on change in both FMD (p = 0.009) and BRS (p = 0.024). Stress-related endothelial dysfunction and BRS impairment can be prevented by blocking cortisol production with metyrapone, demonstrating a direct or facilitative role for cortisol in these phenomena and suggesting mechanisms by which stress contributes to CHD and sudden cardiac death.

  3. Salt Stress-induced Programmed Cell Death in Rice Root Tip Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-You Li; Ai-Liang Jiang; Wei Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Salt stressed rice root tips were used to investigate the changes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant enzymes at the early stages of programmed cell death (PCD). The results indicated that 500 mmol/L NaCl treatment could lead to specific features of PCD in root tips, such as DNA ladder, nuclear condense and deformation, and transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling positive reaction, which were initiated at 4 h of treatment and progressed thereafter. Cytochrome c release from mitochondria into cytoplasm was also observed, which occurred at 2 h and was earlier than the above nuclear events. In the very early phase of PCD, an immediate burst in hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion production rate was accompanied by two-phase changes of superoxide dismutases and ascorbate peroxidase. A short period of increase in the activity was followed by prolonged impairment. Thus,we conclude that salt can induce PCD in rice root tip cells, and propose that in the early phase of rice root tip cell PCD, salt stress-induced oxidative burst increased the antioxidant enzyme activity, which, In turn, scavenged the ROS and abrogated PCD. Also, when the stress is prolonged, the antioxidant system is damaged and accumulated ROS induces the PCD process, which leads to cytochrome c release and nuclear change.

  4. Chaperone-Targeting Cytotoxin and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Inducing Drug Synergize to Kill Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Backer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Diverse physiological and therapeutic insults that increase the amount of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER induce the unfolded protein response, an evolutionarily conserved protective mechanism that manages ER stress. Glucose-regulated protein 78/immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (GRP78/BiP is an ER-resident protein that plays a central role in the ER stress response and is the only known substrate of the proteolytic A subunit (SubA of a novel bacterial AB5 toxin. Here, we report that an engineered fusion protein, epidermal growth factor (EGF-SubA, combining EGF and SubA, is highly toxic to growing and confluent epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing cancer cells, and its cytotoxicity is mediated by a remarkably rapid cleavage of GRP78/BiP. Systemic delivery of EGF-SubA results in a significant inhibition of human breast and prostate tumor xenografts in mouse models. Furthermore, EGF-SubA dramatically increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to the ER stress-inducing drug thapsigargin, and vice versa, demonstrating the first example of mechanism-based synergism in the action of a cytotoxin and an ER-targeting drug.

  5. Stress-induced inhibition of translation independently of eIF2α phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Jon Halvor Jonsrud; Rødland, Gro Elise; Bøe, Cathrine Arnason; Håland, Tine Weise; Sunnerhagen, Per; Grallert, Beáta; Boye, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Exposure of fission yeast cells to ultraviolet (UV) light leads to inhibition of translation and phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor-2α (eIF2α). This phosphorylation is a common response to stress in all eukaryotes. It leads to inhibition of translation at the initiation stage and is thought to be the main reason why stressed cells dramatically reduce protein synthesis. Phosphorylation of eIF2α has been taken as a readout for downregulation of translation, but the role of eIF2α phosphorylation in the downregulation of general translation has not been much investigated. We show here that UV-induced global inhibition of translation in fission yeast cells is independent of eIF2α phosphorylation and the eIF2α kinase general control nonderepressible-2 protein (Gcn2). Also, in budding yeast and mammalian cells, the UV-induced translational depression is largely independent of GCN2 and eIF2α phosphorylation. Furthermore, exposure of fission yeast cells to oxidative stress generated by hydrogen peroxide induced an inhibition of translation that is also independent of Gcn2 and of eIF2α phosphorylation. Our findings show that stress-induced translational inhibition occurs through an unknown mechanism that is likely to be conserved through evolution. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Impaired endothelial shear stress induces podosome assembly via VEGF up-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, Theres; Schubert, Kai Michael; Schneider, Holger; Fein, Evelyn; Kleinert, Eike; Pohl, Ulrich; Dendorfer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Podosomes are dynamic cytoskeletal membrane structures with local adhesive and proteolytic activity. They are critically involved in angiogenesis and vascular adaptive growth. Here, we studied in HUVECs and murine small vessels whether shear stress controls podosome assembly and local proteolytic activity. Podosomes were characterized by immunohistochemistry, and their proteolytic activity was assessed as degradation imprints in fluorescent gelatin that was used as growth substrate. Compared with controls (10 dyn/cm(2)), the number of podosomes formed per time was doubled when cells were exposed to low shear stress (0.3 dyn/cm(2)) or even increased 5-fold under static conditions. This was a result of an enhanced expression of VEGF after reduction of shear stress. Consequently, enhanced podosome formation could be prevented by a VEGF receptor antagonist as well by interruption of VEGF signaling via inhibition of PI3K, Src, or p38. Increase of podosome assembly went along with significantly augmented cell motility. In vivo experiments in mouse arteries confirmed increased endothelial podosome numbers when shear stress was abolished by vessel occlusion. We conclude that shear stress, by reducing VEGF release, inhibits podosome assembly. Hence, endothelial cell-mediated matrix proteolysis and migratory activity are inhibited, thereby stabilizing the structure of the vessel wall.-Fey, T., Schubert, K. M., Schneider, H., Fein, E., Kleinert, E., Pohl, U., Dendorfer, A. Impaired endothelial shear stress induces podosome assembly via VEGF up-regulation.

  7. Recurrence of Postoperative Stress-Induced Cardiomyopathy Resulting from Status Epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Yousef M.; Tarant, Nicki S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Classically, stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC), also known as takotsubo cardiomyopathy, displays the pathognomonic feature of reversible left ventricular apical ballooning without coronary artery stenosis following stressful event(s). Temporary reduction in ejection fraction (EF) resolves spontaneously. Variants of SIC exhibiting mid-ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities have been identified. Recent case series present SIC as a finding in association with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). This case presents a patient who develops recurrence of nonapical cardiomyopathy secondary to status epilepticus. Case Report. Involving a postoperative, postmenopausal woman having two distinct episodes of status epilepticus (SE) preceding two incidents of SIC. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) confirms the patient's baseline EF of 60% prior to the second event. Postoperatively, SE occurs, and the initial electrocardiogram exhibits T-wave inversions with subsequent elevation of troponin I. Postoperative TTE shows an EF of 30% with mid-ventricular wall akinesia restoring baseline EF rapidly. Conclusion. This case identifies the need to understand SIC and its diagnostic criteria, especially when cardiac catheterization is neither indicated nor available. Sudden cardiac death should be considered as a possible complication of refractory status epilepticus. The pathophysiology in SUDEP is currently unknown; yet a correlation between SUDEP and SIC is hypothesized to exist. PMID:28210509

  8. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids in liver toxicity and oxidative stress induced by methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koriem, Khaled M M; Soliman, Rowan E

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine intoxication can cause acute hepatic failure. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids are the major dietary polyphenols present in various foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of chlorogenic and caftaric acids in liver toxicity and oxidative stress induced by methamphetamine in rats. Thirty-two male albino rats were divided into 4 equal groups. Group 1, which was control group, was injected (i.p) with saline (1 mL/kg) twice a day over seven-day period. Groups 2, 3, and 4 were injected (i.p) with methamphetamine (10 mg/kg) twice a day over seven-day period, where groups 3 and 4 were injected (i.p) with 60 mg/kg chlorogenic acid and 40 mg/kg caftaric acid, respectively, one day before methamphetamine injections. Methamphetamine increased serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. Also, malondialdehyde in serum, liver, and brain and plasma and liver nitric oxide levels were increased while methamphetamine induced a significant decrease in serum total protein, albumin, globulin, albumin/globulin ratio, brain serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine, blood and liver superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels. Chlorogenic and caftaric acids prior to methamphetamine injections restored all the above parameters to normal values. In conclusion, chlorogenic and caftaric acids before methamphetamine injections prevented liver toxicity and oxidative stress where chlorogenic acid was more effective.

  9. Influence of reaction stresses induced by dislocation slips on the orientation evolution in bcc metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A plastic deformation model for bcc metals is proposed in consideration of reaction stresses. The shear strains and the corresponding reaction stresses induced by the activation of dislocations are calculated in the model, which will influence the following dislocation activation. The rolling texture in bcc metals is simulated up to 80% reduction, while the ratio of critical resolved shear stresses between the dislocations slipping on the {110} and {112} planes is chosen as 0.95. The corresponding calculation is also conducted with the activation of second dislocation, if the difference between the orientation factor of the two dislocations with maximal orientation factors is lower than 5%. It is shown that the simulated texture is closer to that of the 80% rolled interstitial free steels than other modeling. It is believed that the new model can give more attention to both of the strain and stress continuities during the plastic deformation of polycrystalline metals, and therefore approaches closer to the real deformation process in bcc metals.

  10. Stress induced anisotropy in CoFeMn soft magnetic nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, A. M., E-mail: leary@cmu.edu; Keylin, V.; McHenry, M. E. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Ohodnicki, P. R. [Functional Materials Development Division, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), 626 Cochrans Mill Road, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15236 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    The use of processing techniques to create magnetic anisotropy in soft magnetic materials is a well-known method to control permeability and losses. In nanocomposite materials, field annealing below the Curie temperature results in uniaxial anisotropy energies up to ∼2 kJ/m{sup 3}. Higher anisotropies up to ∼10 kJ/m{sup 3} result after annealing Fe-Si compositions under stress due to residual stress in the amorphous matrix acting on body centered cubic crystals. This work describes near zero magnetostriction Co{sub 80−x−y}Fe{sub x}Mn{sub y}Nb{sub 4}B{sub 14}Si{sub 2} soft magnetic nanocomposites, where x and y < 8 at.% with close packed crystalline grains that show stress induced anisotropies up to ∼50 kJ/m{sup 3} and improved mechanical properties with respect to Fe-Si compositions. Difference patterns measured using transmission X-ray diffraction show evidence of affine strain with respect to the stress axis.

  11. Stress induced anisotropy in CoFeMn soft magnetic nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, AM; Keylin, V; Ohodnicki, PR; McHenry, ME

    2015-05-07

    The use of processing techniques to create magnetic anisotropy in soft magnetic materials is a well-known method to control permeability and losses. In nanocomposite materials, field annealing below the Curie temperature results in uniaxial anisotropy energies up to similar to 2 kJ/m(3). Higher anisotropies up to similar to 10 kJ/m(3) result after annealing Fe-Si compositions under stress due to residual stress in the amorphous matrix acting on body centered cubic crystals. This work describes near zero magnetostriction Co80-x-yFexMnyNb4B14Si2 soft magnetic nanocomposites, where x and y < 8 at. % with close packed crystalline grains that show stress induced anisotropies up to similar to 50 kJ/m(3) and improved mechanical properties with respect to Fe-Si compositions. Difference patterns measured using transmission X-ray diffraction show evidence of affine strain with respect to the stress axis. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  12. Antioxidative effect of ginseng stem-leaf saponins on oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Chen, Y; Zhai, L; Zhang, L; Xu, Y; Wang, S; Hu, S

    2015-05-01

    Previous investigation demonstrated that oral administration of ginseng stem-leaf saponins in chickens could enhance the immune response. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of ginseng stem-leaf saponins on oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide in chickens. One hundred and twenty chickens were randomly divided into 5 groups. Groups 1 to 4 received intramuscular injection of cyclophosphamide to induce oxidative stress while group 5 was injected with saline solution and served as control. Following administration of cyclophosphamide, groups 1 to 3 were orally administered ginseng stem-leaf saponins at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg BW in drinking water for 7 d, respectively. After that, the spleen, thymus, bursa, and serum were collected to measure the indices of the organs and oxidative parameters. The results showed that ginseng stem-leaf saponins significantly inhibited cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress by increasing the organ indices, total antioxidant capacity, and the levels of glutathione, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, while elevating the activity of total superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, as well as decreasing the protein carbonyl content and malondialdehyde. Therefore, ginseng stem-leaf saponins could be a promising agent against oxidative stress in the poultry industry.

  13. Hyperosmotic Stress Induces Tau Proteolysis by Caspase-3 Activation in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera-Santa Catalina, Marta; Caballero-Bermejo, Montaña; Argent, Ricardo; Alonso, Juan C; Cuenda, Ana; Lorenzo, María J; Centeno, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and other related tauopathies. In this subset of neurodegenerative disorders, Tau auto-assembles into insoluble fibrils that accumulate in neurons as paired helical filaments (PHFs), promoting cellular dysfunction and cytotoxic effects. Growing evidence suggests that abnormal post-translational regulation, mainly hyperphosphorylation and aberrant cleavage, drives Tau to this pathological state. In this work we show that sorbitol-induced hyperosmotic stress promotes Tau proteolysis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The appearance of cleaved Tau was preceded by the activation of μ-calpain, the proteasome system and caspase-3. Tau proteolysis was completely prevented by caspase-3 inhibition but unaffected by neither the proteasome system nor μ-calpain activity blockade. Concomitantly, hyperosmotic stress induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells, which was efficiently avoided by the inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Altogether, our results provide the first evidence that Tau protein is susceptible to caspase-3 proteolysis under hyperosmotic stress and suggest a positive relationship between Tau proteolysis and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2781-2790, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Preventive and therapeutic effect of treadmill running on chronic stress-induced memory deficit in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2015-04-01

    Previous results indicated that stress impairs learning and memory. In this research, the effects of preventive, therapeutic and regular continually running activity on chronic stress-induced memory deficit in rats were investigated. 70 male rats were randomly divided into seven groups as follows: Control, Sham, Stress-Rest, Rest-Stress, Stress-Exercise, Exercise-Stress and Exercise-Stress & Exercise groups. Chronic restraint stress was applied 6 h/day for 21days and treadmill running 1 h/day. Memory function was evaluated by the passive avoidance test. The results revealed that running activities had therapeutic effect on mid and long-term memory deficit and preventive effects on short and mid-term memory deficit in stressed rats. Regular continually running activity improved mid and long-term memory compared to Exercise-Stress group. The beneficial effects of exercise were time-dependent in stress conditions. Finally, data corresponded to the possibility that treadmill running had a more important role on treatment rather than on prevention on memory impairment induced by stress.

  15. Peripheral relays in stress-induced activation of visceral afferents in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wijngaard, René M; Klooker, Tamira K; de Jonge, Wouter J; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2010-02-16

    Multiple organs are targeted by the stress response, but the focus of this article is on stress-induced activation of visceral afferents in the gut. During recent years it became apparent that mast cells are pivotal in this response. Peripheral corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) induces their degranulation whereupon mast cell mediators activate visceral afferents. In addition, these mediators are responsible for gut barrier dysfunction and subsequent influx of luminal antigens and bacteria. Some research groups have begun to investigate the possible importance of barrier dysfunction for enhanced visceral sensitivity. After reviewing the current knowledge on CRF-induced mast cell degranulation we will discuss these groundbreaking papers in a more elaborate way. They form the basis for a hypothesis in which not only CRF-induced but also antigen-mediated mast cell degranulation is relevant to stress-related afferent activation. Part of this hypothesis is certainly speculative and needs further investigation. At the end of this article we sum up some of the unanswered questions raised by others and during this review.

  16. Perivascular Mast Cells Govern Shear Stress-Induced Arteriogenesis by Orchestrating Leukocyte Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omary Chillo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The body has the capacity to compensate for an occluded artery by creating a natural bypass upon increased fluid shear stress. How this mechanical force is translated into collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis is unresolved. We show that extravasation of neutrophils mediated by the platelet receptor GPIbα and uPA results in Nox2-derived reactive oxygen radicals, which activate perivascular mast cells. These c-kit+/CXCR-4+ cells stimulate arteriogenesis by recruiting additional neutrophils as well as growth-promoting monocytes and T cells. Additionally, mast cells may directly contribute to vascular remodeling and vascular cell proliferation through increased MMP activity and by supplying growth-promoting factors. Boosting mast cell recruitment and activation effectively promotes arteriogenesis, thereby protecting tissue from severe ischemic damage. We thus find that perivascular mast cells are central regulators of shear stress-induced arteriogenesis by orchestrating leukocyte function and growth factor/cytokine release, thus providing a therapeutic target for treatment of vascular occlusive diseases.

  17. Cross-country differences in basal and stress-induced cortisol secretion in older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana N Souza-Talarico

    Full Text Available Several studies have emphasized the association between socioeconomic status (SES and inadequate response of the biological stress system. However, other factors related to SES are rarely considered, such as cultural values, social norms, organization, language and communication skills, which raises the need to investigate cross-country differences in stress response. Although some studies have shown differences in cortisol levels between immigrants and natives, there is no cross-country evidence regarding cortisol levels in country-native elders. This is particularly important given the high prevalence of stress-related disorders across nations during aging. The current study examined basal diurnal and reactive cortisol levels in healthy older adults living in two different countries.Salivary cortisol of 260 older adults from Canada and Brazil were analyzed. Diurnal cortisol was measured in saliva samples collected at home throughout two working days at awakening, 30 min after waking, 1400 h, 1600 h and before bedtime. Cortisol reactivity was assessed in response to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST in both populations.Our results showed that even under similar health status, psychological and cognitive characteristics, Brazilian elders exhibited higher basal and stress-induced cortisol secretion compared to the Canadian participants.These findings suggest that country context may modulate cortisol secretion and could impact the population health.

  18. Mechanisms of Stress-Induced Visceral Pain: Implications in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B; Moloney, R D; Johnson, A C; Vicario, M

    2016-08-01

    Visceral pain is a term describing pain originating from the internal organs of the body and is a common feature of many disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Stress is implicated in the development and exacerbation of many visceral pain disorders. Recent evidence suggests that stress and the gut microbiota can interact through complementary or opposing factors to influence visceral nociceptive behaviours. The Young Investigator Forum at the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology (ISPNE) annual meeting reported experimental evidence suggesting the gut microbiota can affect the stress response to affect visceral pain. Building upon human imaging data showing abnormalities in the central processing of visceral stimuli in patients with IBS and knowledge that the amygdala plays a pivotal role in facilitating the stress axis, the latest experimental evidence supporting amygdala-mediated mechanisms in stress-induced visceral pain was reviewed. The final part of the session at ISPNE reviewed experimental evidence suggesting that visceral pain in IBS may be a result, at least in part, of afferent nerve sensitisation following increases in epithelial permeability and mucosal immune activation. © 2016 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  19. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  20. Histopathological changes associated with oxidative stress induced by electromagnetic waves in rats' ovarian and uterine tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S.H. Alchalabi

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Results executed that the potential alteration of antioxidant capacity may contribute to endometrial oxidative damage that could be related to pathogenesis and progression of endometritis.

  1. Prenatal stress induces depressive-like behavior in a sex-specific manner; impact of familiar versus novel environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle Mark; Arentzen, Tine S; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard

    Stress, including prenatal maternal stress, increases affective disorder morbidity. Furthermore, women appear twice as likely as men to develop stress- and depression-related disorders. Some of the behaviors associated with depression are also found in rat offspring following maternal prenatal...... stress (PS) incl. increased helplessness and altered anxiety response. Our purpose was to investigate behavioral depression indices following PS and potential differences between male and female offspring. To this end, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to repeated variable stress on days 13...... plus maze, EPM), and sleep behavior (via EEG recordings) was assessed in male and female offspring. In addition, half of PS and control animals, respectively, were exposed to an acute stressor prior to the behavioral tests. Weight gain during the last part of the pregnancy was significantly reduced...

  2. Unstable microsatellite repeats facilitate rapid evolution of coding and regulatory sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, A; Gemayel, R; Verstrepen, K J

    2012-01-01

    Tandem repeats are intrinsically highly variable sequences since repeat units are often lost or gained during replication or following unequal recombination events. Because of their low complexity and their instability, these repeats, which are also called satellite repeats, are often considered to be useless 'junk' DNA. However, recent findings show that tandem repeats are frequently found within promoters of stress-induced genes and within the coding regions of genes encoding cell-surface and regulatory proteins. Interestingly, frequent changes in these repeats often confer phenotypic variability. Examples include variation in the microbial cell surface, rapid tuning of internal molecular clocks in flies, and enhanced morphological plasticity in mammals. This suggests that instead of being useless junk DNA, some variable tandem repeats are useful functional elements that confer 'evolvability', facilitating swift evolution and rapid adaptation to changing environments. Since changes in repeats are frequent and reversible, repeats provide a unique type of mutation that bridges the gap between rare genetic mutations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, and highly unstable but reversible epigenetic inheritance.

  3. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Small, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins constitute one of the largest protein families in land plants, with more than 400 members in most species. Over the past decade, much has been learned about the molecular functions of these proteins, where they act in the cell, and what physiological roles they play during plant growth and development. A typical PPR protein is targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, binds one or several organellar transcripts, and influences their expression by altering RNA sequence, turnover, processing, or translation. Their combined action has profound effects on organelle biogenesis and function and, consequently, on photosynthesis, respiration, plant development, and environmental responses. Recent breakthroughs in understanding how PPR proteins recognize RNA sequences through modular base-specific contacts will help match proteins to potential binding sites and provide a pathway toward designing synthetic RNA-binding proteins aimed at desired targets.

  4. Central immune overactivation in the presence of reduced plasma corticosterone contributes to swim stress-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Roca, H; Quintero, L; Avila, R; Medina, S; De Freitas, M; Cárdenas, R

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely known that immunological, hormonal and nociceptive mechanisms are altered by exposure to repeated stress, the interplaying roles of each function in the development of post-stress hyperalgesia are not completely clear. Thus, we wanted to establish how interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), corticosterone and microglia interact to contribute in the development of hyperalgesia following repeated forced swim. Rats were subjected to either forced swim, sham swim or non-conditioned. Each group was then treated with minocycline, ketoconazole, or saline. Thermal nociception was measured via the hot plate test, before and after the behavioral conditioning, whereas blood and lumbar spinal cord tissue samples were obtained at the end of the protocol. Serum levels of corticosterone, spinal tissue concentration of IL-1β and spinal OX-42 labeling (microglial marker) were determined. Rats exposed to forced swim stress developed thermal hyperalgesia along with elevated spinal tissue IL-1β, increased OX-42 labeling and relatively diminished serum corticosterone. Pre-treatment with minocycline and ketoconazole prevented the development of thermal hyperalgesia and the increase in IL-1β, without significantly modifying serum corticosterone. These results suggest that the development of forced swim-induced thermal hyperalgesia requires the simultaneous presence of increased spinal IL-1β, microglial activation, and relatively decreased serum corticosterone.

  5. TaSK5, an abiotic stress-inducible GSK3/shaggy-like kinase from wheat, confers salt and drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Nikolai Kirilov; Christova, Petya Koeva; Kato, Hideki; Liu, Yuelin; Sasaki, Kentaro; Imai, Ryozo

    2014-11-01

    A novel cold-inducible GSK3/shaggy-like kinase, TaSK5, was isolated from winter wheat using a macroarray-based differential screening approach. TaSK5 showed high similarity to Arabidopsis subgroup I GSK3/shaggy-like kinases ASK-alpha, AtSK-gamma and ASK-epsilon. RNA gel blot analyses revealed TaSK5 induction by cold and NaCl treatments and to a lesser extent by drought treatment. TaSK5 functionally complemented the cold- and salt-sensitive phenotypes of a yeast GSK3/shaggy-like kinase mutant, △mck1. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaSK5 cDNA showed enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stresses. By contrast, the tolerance of the transgenic plants to freezing stress was not altered. Microarray analysis revealed that a number of abiotic stress-inducible genes were constitutively induced in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, suggesting that TaSK5 may function in a novel signal transduction pathway that appears to be unrelated to DREB1/CBF regulon and may involve crosstalk between abiotic and hormonal signals.

  6. DELLA signaling mediates stress-induced cell differentiation in Arabidopsis leaves through modulation of anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Hannes; Skirycz, Aleksandra; Maleux, Katrien; Inzé, Dirk

    2012-06-01

    Drought is responsible for considerable yield losses in agriculture due to its detrimental effects on growth. Drought responses have been extensively studied, but mostly on the level of complete plants or mature tissues. However, stress responses were shown to be highly tissue and developmental stage specific, and dividing tissues have developed unique mechanisms to respond to stress. Previously, we studied the effects of osmotic stress on dividing leaf cells in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and found that stress causes early mitotic exit, in which cells end their mitotic division and start endoreduplication earlier. In this study, we analyzed this phenomenon in more detail. Osmotic stress induces changes in gibberellin metabolism, resulting in the stabilization of DELLAs, which are responsible for mitotic exit and earlier onset of endoreduplication. Consequently, this response is absent in mutants with altered gibberellin levels or DELLA activity. Mitotic exit and onset of endoreduplication do not correlate with an up-regulation of known cell cycle inhibitors but are the result of reduced levels of DP-E2F-LIKE1/E2Fe and UV-B-INSENSITIVE4, both inhibitors of the developmental transition from mitosis to endoreduplication by modulating anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome activity, which are down-regulated rapidly after DELLA stabilization. This work fits into an emerging view of DELLAs as regulators of cell division by regulating the transition to endoreduplication and differentiation.

  7. Prion Induction by the Short-lived Stress Induced Protein Lsb2 Is Regulated by Ubiquitination and Association with the Actin Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernova, Tatiana A.; Romanyuk, Andrey V.; Karpova, Tatiana S.; Shanks, John R.; Ali, Moiez; Moffatt, Nela; Howie, Rebecca L.; O'Dell, Andrew; McNally, James G.; Liebman, Susan W.; Chernoff, Yury O.; Wilkinson, Keith D.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Yeast prions are self-perpetuating QN-rich amyloids, that control heritable traits and serve as a model for mammalian amyloidoses. De novo prion formation by overproduced prion protein is facilitated by other aggregated QN-rich protein(s), and is influenced by alterations of protein homeostasis. Here we explore the mechanism by which the Las17-binding protein Lsb2 (Pin3) promotes conversion of the translation termination factor Sup35 into its prion form [PSI+]. We show that Lsb2 localizes with some Sup35 aggregates and that Lsb2 is a short-lived protein whose levels are controlled via the ubiquitin-proteasome system and are dramatically increased by stress. Loss of Lsb2 decreases stability of [PSI+] after brief heat shock. Mutations interfering with Lsb2 ubiquitination increase prion induction, while a mutation eliminating association of Lsb2 with the actin cytoskeleton blocks its aggregation and prion–inducing ability. These findings directly implicate the UPS and actin cytoskeleton in regulating prions via a stress-inducible QN-rich protein. PMID:21777813

  8. Effects of Traumatic Stress Induced in the Juvenile Period on the Expression of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Type A Subunits in Adult Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Yan Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have found that early traumatic experience significantly increases the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA deficits were proposed to be implicated in development of PTSD, but the alterations of GABA receptor A (GABAAR subunits induced by early traumatic stress have not been fully elucidated. Furthermore, previous studies suggested that exercise could be more effective than medications in reducing severity of anxiety and depression but the mechanism is unclear. This study used inescapable foot-shock to induce PTSD in juvenile rats and examined their emotional changes using open-field test and elevated plus maze, memory changes using Morris water maze, and the expression of GABAAR subunits (γ2, α2, and α5 in subregions of the brain in the adulthood using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. We aimed to observe the role of GABAAR subunits changes induced by juvenile trauma in the pathogenesis of subsequent PTSD in adulthood. In addition, we investigated the protective effects of exercise for 6 weeks and benzodiazepine (clonazepam for 2 weeks. This study found that juvenile traumatic stress induced chronic anxiety and spatial memory loss and reduced expression of GABAAR subunits in the adult rat brains. Furthermore, exercise led to significant improvement as compared to short-term BZ treatment.

  9. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  10. Downregulation of the stress-induced ligand ULBP1 following SV40 infection confers viral evasion from NK cell cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Yoav; Drayman, Nir; Ben-Nun-Shaul, Orly; Vitenstein, Alon; Yamin, Rachel; Ophir, Yael; Oppenheim, Ariella; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-03-29

    Polyomaviruses are a diverse family of viruses which are prevalent in the human population. However, the interactions of these viruses with the immune system are not well characterized. We have previously shown that two human polyomaviruses, JC and BK, use an identical microRNA to evade immune attack by Natural Killer (NK) cells. We showed that this viral microRNA suppresses ULBP3 expression, a stress induced ligand for the killer receptor NKG2D. Here we show that Simian Virus 40 (SV40) also evades NK cell attack through the down regulation of another stress-induced ligand of NKG2D, ULBP1. These findings indicate that NK cells play an essential role in fighting polyomavirus infections and further emphasize the importance of various members of the ULBP family in controlling polyomavirus infection.

  11. Caspase-4 directly activates caspase-9 in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Akiko; Kishino, Takashi; Ohshima, Yu; Yoshioka, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Kasai, Atsushi; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the function of caspase-4 in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis in human neuronal cell line SH-SY5Y. Tunicamycin, which is known to induce ER stress, activated both caspase-9 and caspase-4, and the activation of caspase-4 preceded that of caspase-9. The caspase-4 inhibitor LEVD-CHO suppressed both the apoptosis and caspase-9 activation. In addition, human recombinant active caspase-4 cleaved wild type and D330A mutant substituted Asp-330 for alanine of human recombinant procaspase-9, but did not cleave D315A mutant substituted Asp-315 for alanine. These results suggest that caspase-4 directly activates caspase-9 by the processing of procaspase-9 at Asp-315 in ER stress-induced neuronal apoptosis.

  12. Skeletal muscle PGC-1α1 modulates kynurenine metabolism and mediates resilience to stress-induced depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agudelo, Leandro Z; Femenía, Teresa; Orhan, Funda

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a debilitating condition with a profound impact on quality of life for millions of people worldwide. Physical exercise is used as a treatment strategy for many patients, but the mechanisms that underlie its beneficial effects remain unknown. Here, we describe a mechanism by which...... skeletal muscle PGC-1α1 induced by exercise training changes kynurenine metabolism and protects from stress-induced depression. Activation of the PGC-1α1-PPARα/δ pathway increases skeletal muscle expression of kynurenine aminotransferases, thus enhancing the conversion of kynurenine into kynurenic acid......, a metabolite unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Reducing plasma kynurenine protects the brain from stress-induced changes associated with depression and renders skeletal muscle-specific PGC-1α1 transgenic mice resistant to depression induced by chronic mild stress or direct kynurenine administration...

  13. Stress-induced deformation at Ap~Mp and thermal cycling behavior of Cu-Al-Ni single crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈庆福; 蔡伟; 赵连城

    2001-01-01

    Stress-induced deformation in Ap~Mp and concomitant shape recovery behavior of Cu-13.4Al-4.0Ni single crystals were studied. Abnormal high stress-induced deformation exists in Ap~Mp under the conditions of either heating with load or cooling with load. The recovered deformation is successively composed of four parts, the recoveries from superelasticity, normal reverse transformation, thermally activated reverse transformation of partially stabilized martensite and reverse transformation of stabilized martensite by over-heating. With increasing cycling number, the recovery part from normal reverse transformation decreases, while that from reverse transformation of stabilized martensite by over-heating increases, which shows a typical stabilization of martensite.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of stress-induced phase transformations and grain nucleation at crack tips in Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latapie, A.; Farkas, D.

    2003-09-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation technique is used to study a stress-induced new grain formation mechanism at the crack tip of a nanocrystalline alpha-iron sample at temperatures ranging from 100 to 600 K. The stress-induced formation of new bcc grains, created inside existing grains, is found to occur through a metastable bcc to fcc phase transformation at the crack tip of the sample. A Nishiyama-Wassermann orientation relationship is found between the original bcc grain and the fcc phase and a Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationship is found between the new bcc grain created and the fcc transition phase. The new grain nucleation is observed to increase with increasing temperature and stacking faults associated with the fcc phase are observed at the higher temperatures.

  15. Effects of Shuyusan on monoamine neurotransmitters expression in a rat model of chronic stress-induced depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Zhang; Jianjun Jia; Liping Chen; Zhitao Han; Yulan Zhao; Honghong Zhang; Yazhuo Hu

    2011-01-01

    Shuyusan, a traditional Chinese medicine, was shown to improve depression symptoms and behavioral scores, as well as increase 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophan levels, in a rat model of chronic stress-induced depression. However, dopamine, noradrenalin, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol expressions remained unchanged following Shuyusan treatment. Compared with the model group, the number of 5-HT-positive neurons in layers 4-5 of the frontal cortex, as well as hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions, significantly increased following Shuyusan treatment. These results suggested that Shuyusan improved symptoms in a rat model of chronic stress-induced depression with mechanisms that involved 5-HT, 5-HT metabolite, 5-HT precursor expressions.

  16. Per capita interactions and stress tolerance drive stress-induced changes in biodiversity effects on ecosystem functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Jan M; Janssen, Colin R; Sabbe, Koen; De Laender, Frederik

    2016-08-18

    Environmental stress changes the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functions, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Because species interactions shape biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships, changes in per capita interactions under stress (as predicted by the stress gradient hypothesis) can be an important driver of stress-induced changes in these relationships. To test this hypothesis, we measure productivity in microalgae communities along a diversity and herbicide gradient. On the basis of additive partitioning and a mechanistic community model, we demonstrate that changes in per capita interactions do not explain effects of herbicide stress on the biodiversity-productivity relationship. Instead, assuming that the per capita interactions remain unaffected by stress, causing species densities to only change through differences in stress tolerance, suffices to predict the stress-induced changes in the biodiversity-productivity relationship and community composition. We discuss how our findings set the stage for developing theory on how environmental stress changes biodiversity effects on ecosystem functions.

  17. Systematic control of stress-induced anisotropy in pseudomorphic iron garnet thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, M., E-mail: Masashi.Kubota@dsn.rohm.co.jp [Correlated Electron Research Group (CERG) and Cross-Correlated Materials Research Group (CMRG), RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Power Electronics R and D Unit, ROHM Co., Ltd., Kyoto 615-8585 (Japan); Shibuya, K.; Tokunaga, Y. [Correlated Electron Research Group (CERG) and Cross-Correlated Materials Research Group (CMRG), RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kagawa, F. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tsukazaki, A. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tokura, Y.; Kawasaki, M. [Correlated Electron Research Group (CERG) and Cross-Correlated Materials Research Group (CMRG), RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Iron garnets are one of the most well-studied magnetic materials that enabled magnetic bubble memories and magneto-optical devices employing films with a perpendicular easy axis. However, most studies have been conducted on rather thick films (>1 μm), and it has not been elucidated whether it is possible to align the magnetic easy axis perpendicular to the film plane for much thinner (<100 nm) films by overcoming shape anisotropy. We studied the effects of epitaxial strain and film composition on the magnetic properties of 50-nm-thick garnet thin films grown by pulsed-laser deposition. Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} was selected as the most prototypical garnet and Sm{sub 3−x}Tm{sub x}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (x=1, 2, 3) was selected in view of its negatively large magnetostriction constants. We employed (111) planes of single crystalline Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} and (CaGd){sub 3}(MgGaZr){sub 5}O{sub 12} substrates to tune the epitaxial strain. Thin films with a pseudomorphic structure were fabricated with the in-plane strain (ε{sub //}) ranging from −1.5% to +0.5%, corresponding to the stress-induced anisotropy field (H{sub A}) ranging from −40 kOe to +25 kOe, respectively. The magnetization ratio of the out-of-plane to in-plane component (M{sub ⊥}/M{sub //}) systematically varied in accord with H{sub A}, yielding M{sub ⊥}/M{sub //} >1 for thin films with H{sub A} values larger than 20 kOe. Among the films grown, Tm{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} on Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} showed the largest ε{sub //} and H{sub A} values of +0.5% and +25 kOe, respectively, to realize an apparently perpendicular easy axis, confirmed by a large M{sub ⊥}/M{sub //} value of 7.8. Further, magnetic force microscope images showed a maze pattern typical of a perpendicularly magnetized film. These results reveal a method for tailoring the magnetic anisotropy of garnet ultrathin films by utilizing epitaxial strain. These thin films may be utilized to obtain nanoscale magnetic bubbles

  18. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone

    OpenAIRE

    Gaelle eDominguez; Pierre eFaucher; Nadia eHenkous; Ali eKrazem; Christophe ePierard; Daniel eBeracochea

    2014-01-01

    Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus (dHPC) in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1...

  19. Nitric Oxide Reduces Hydrogen Peroxide Accumulation Involved in Water Stress-induced Subcellular Anti-oxidant Defense in Maize Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianrong Sang; Mingyi Jiang; Fan Lin; Shucheng Xu; Aying Zhang; Mingpu Tan

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) Is a bioactive molecule involved in many biological events, and has been reported as pro-oxidant as well as anti-oxidant in plants. In the present study, the sources of NO production under water stress, the role of NO in water stress-induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation and subcellular activities of anti-oxidant enzymes in leaves of maize (Zea mays L.) plants were investigated. Water stress Induced defense increases in the generation of NO In maize mesphyll cells and the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the cytosolic and microsomal fractions of maize leaves. Water stress-induced defense increases in the production of NO were blocked by pretreatments with Inhibitors of NOS and nitrate reductase (NR), suggesting that NO is produced from NOS and NR in leaves of maize plants exposed to water stress. Water stress also induced increases in the activities of the chloroplastic and cytosolic anti-oxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidass (APX), and glutathione reductase (GR), and the increases in the activities of anti-oxidant enzymes were reduced by pretreatments with inhibitors of NOS and NR. Exogenous NO increases the activities of water stress-induced subcellular anti-oxidant enzymes, which decreases accumulation of H2O2. Our results suggest that NOS and NR are involved in water strese-induced NO production and NOS is the major source of NO. The potential ability of NO to scavenge H2O2 is, at least in part, due to the induction of a subcellular anti-oxidant defense.

  20. Deformation behavior after stress-induced martensite transformation in a Ti-50.8 at.% Ni alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiebin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the deformation behavior of a Ti-50.8 at.% Ni thin wire, which was subjected to different heat treatments, was investigated by means of uniaxial tensile tests. Considerable ductility (tensile elongation