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Sample records for repeated skin heating

  1. Spaceship with heat-isolating outer skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Baten, T.J.; Buursink, J.

    2002-01-01

    A spaceship provided with a skin layer and cooling member for the skin layer that comprises a liquid-holding layer provided behind the skin layer, with an empty space being present between the liquid holding layer and the skin layer, so as to prevent heat transfer due to conduction between the skin

  2. Stability of dental waxes following repeated heatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsiomiti, E; McCabe, J F

    1995-02-01

    The flow and strength properties of dental waxes were examined following excessive and repeated heatings of the materials. For one product, the flow at 40 +/- 0.5 degrees C was reduced by 25.3% following heating above 200 degrees C. A decrease of the elastic modulus at 20 +/- 1 degree C by approximately 66% was observed in some cases after the heating temperature had been increased to 300 degrees C. Property variations were related to compositional changes, which were investigated by infrared spectoscopy and thermal analysis. Exposure of dental waxes to temperatures higher than 200 degrees C, particularly if it is repeated, may affect the composition and properties, resulting in inferior materials.

  3. Familial Mediterranean fever variant with repeated atypical skin eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tomoko; Fujisawa, Tomomi; Kimura, Masaki; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Seishima, Mariko

    2015-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is characterized by self-limited bouts of fever and polyserositis. Skin involvement is not common in FMF, and erysipelas-like erythema is found to be the most frequent skin eruption which is often accompanied by arthritis and fever, and disappears within 12-72 h. We report a 40-year-old Japanese woman who presented with a 2-year history of recurrent fever with general fatigue, polyarthralgia and transient maculopapular eruptions on her lower extremities and trunk. The histological findings of the maculopapular eruption showed lymphocyte infiltration around the capillaries in the entire dermis. Mutation analysis showed a heterozygous E148Q-P369S mutation of MEFV. These findings suggested a diagnosis of late-onset FMF variant with atypical skin eruptions. The patient was successfully treated with colchicine. Thus, we should pay attention to repeated atypical skin eruptions for the early detection of atypical FMF. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  4. Effects of repeated skin exposure to low nickel concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, N H; Menné, T; Kristiansen, J

    1999-01-01

    and nickel allergy, either on normal or on SLS-treated forearm skin. The present study strongly suggests that the changes observed were specific to nickel exposure. Standardized methods to assess trace to moderate nickel exposure on the hands, and the associated effects in nickel-sensitized subjects...... with a group of patients who immersed a finger into water. The nickel concentrations used also provoked significant inflammatory skin changes on sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS)-treated forearm skin of the patients, whereas inflammatory skin changes were not observed in healthy volunteers without hand eczema...

  5. [Changes in mesenteric microcirculation in rats following repeated skin burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtykhno, Iu M

    1976-07-01

    Acute experiments were conducted on rats; repeated extensive burn of a convalescent who formerly sustained the burn disease was better tolerated, led tono fatal outcome and was accompanied by moderate microcirculatory disturbances. The smae burn was accompanied in intact rats by a severe shock followed by death, intravascular aggregation of erythrocytes and significant microcirculatory disturbances leading to disturbance of tissue nutrition. It is supposed that the results obtained could serve as an indirect proof that toxemia played an important role in the genesis of intravascular aggregation of erythrocytes in burn shock.

  6. The interrealtionship between locally applied heat, ageing and skin blood flow on heat transfer into and from the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Alshahmmari, Faris; Yim, Jong Eun; Hamdan, Adel; Lee, Haneul; Neupane, Sushma; Shetye, Gauri; Moniz, Harold; Chen, Wei-Ti; Cho, Sungkwan; Pathak, Kunal; Malthane, Swapnil; Shenoy, Samruddha; Somanaboina, Karunakar; Alshaharani, Mastour; Nevgi, Bhakti; Dave, Bhargav; Desai, Rajavi

    2011-07-01

    In response to a thermal stress, skin blood flow (BF) increases to protect the skin from damage. When a very warm, noxious, heat source (44 °C) is applied to the skin, the BF increases disproportionately faster than the heat stress that was applied, creating a safety mechanism for protecting the skin. In the present investigation, the rate of rise of BF in response to applied heat at temperatures between 32 °C and 40 °C was examined as well as the thermal transfer to and from the skin with and without BF in younger and older subjects to see how the skin responds to a non-noxious heat source. Twenty male and female subjects (10 - 20-35 years, 10 - 40-70 years) were examined. The arms of the subjects were passively heated for 6 min with and without vascular occlusion by a thermode at temperatures of 32, 36, 38 or 40 °C. When occlusion was not used during the 6 min exposure to heat, there was an exponential rise in skin temperature and BF in both groups of subjects over the 6-min period. However, the older subjects achieved similar skin temperatures but with the expenditure of fewer calories from the thermode than was seen for the younger subjects (p<0.05). BF was significantly less in the older group than the younger group at rest and after exposure to each of the three warmest thermode temperatures (p<0.05). As was seen for noxious temperatures, after a delay, the rate of rise of BF at the three warmest thermode temperatures was faster than the rise in skin temperature in the younger group but less in the older group of subjects. Thus, a consequence of ageing is reduced excess BF in response to thermal stress increasing susceptibility to thermal damage. This must be considered in modelling of BF.

  7. Mechanical Alterations Associated with Repeated Treadmill Sprinting under Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocherie, Franck; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Racinais, Sébastien; Millet, Grégoire P.; Périard, Julien D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Examine the mechanical alterations associated with repeated treadmill sprinting performed in HOT (38°C) and CON (25°C) conditions. Methods Eleven recreationally active males performed a 30-min warm-up followed by three sets of five 5-s sprints with 25-s recovery and 3-min between sets in each environment. Constant-velocity running for 1-min at 10 and 20 km.h-1 was also performed prior to and following sprinting. Results Mean skin (37.2±0.7 vs. 32.7±0.8°C; P<0.001) and core (38.9±0.2 vs. 38.8±0.3°C; P<0.05) temperatures, together with thermal comfort (P<0.001) were higher following repeated sprinting in HOT vs. CON. Step frequency and vertical stiffness were lower (-2.6±1.6% and -5.5±5.5%; both P<0.001) and contact time (+3.2±2.4%; P<0.01) higher in HOT for the mean of sets 1–3 compared to CON. Running distance per sprint decreased from set 1 to 3 (-7.0±6.4%; P<0.001), with a tendency for shorter distance covered in HOT vs. CON (-2.7±3.4%; P = 0.06). Mean vertical (-2.6±5.5%; P<0.01), horizontal (-9.1±4.4%; P<0.001) and resultant ground reaction forces (-3.0±2.8%; P<0.01) along with vertical stiffness (-12.9±2.3%; P<0.001) and leg stiffness (-8.4±2.7%; P<0.01) decreased from set 1 to 3, independently of conditions. Propulsive power decreased from set 1 to 3 (-16.9±2.4%; P<0.001), with lower propulsive power values in set 2 (-6.6%; P<0.05) in HOT vs. CON. No changes in constant-velocity running patterns occurred between conditions, or from pre-to-post repeated-sprint exercise. Conclusions Thermal strain alters step frequency and vertical stiffness during repeated sprinting; however without exacerbating mechanical alterations. The absence of changes in constant-velocity running patterns suggests a strong link between fatigue-induced velocity decrements during sprinting and mechanical alterations. PMID:28146582

  8. Neck-cooling improves repeated sprint performance in the heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eSunderland

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effect of neck-cooling during exercise on repeated sprint ability in a hot environment. Seven team-sport playing males completed two experimental trials involving repeated sprint exercise (5 x 6 s before and after two 45 min bouts of a football specific intermittent treadmill protocol in the heat (33.0  0.2 ºC; 53 ± 2% relative humidity. Participants wore a neck-cooling collar in one of the trials (CC. Mean power output and peak power output declined over time in both trials but were higher in CC (540 ± 99 v 507 ± 122W, d = 0.32; 719 ± 158 v 680 ± 182 W, d = 0.24 respectively. The improved power output was particularly pronounced (d = 0.51 – 0.88 after the 2nd 45 min bout but the CC had no effect on % fatigue. The collar lowered neck temperature and the thermal sensation of the neck (P 0.05. There were no trial differences but interaction effects were demonstrated for prolactin concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE. Prolactin concentration was initially higher in the collar cold trial and then was lower from 45 minutes onwards (interaction trial x time P=0.04. RPE was lower during the football intermittent treadmill protocol in the collar cold trial (interaction trial x time P = 0.01. Neck-cooling during exercise improves repeated sprint performance in a hot environment without altering physiological or neuroendocrinological responses. RPE is reduced and may partially explain the performance improvement.

  9. Local heat preconditioning in skin sparing mastectomy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Saahil; Rolph, Rachel; Cornelius, Victoria; Harder, Yves; Farhadi, Jian

    2013-12-01

    Experimental data has shown an association with a reduction of flap necrosis after local heat-application to a supraphysiological level resulting from the up-regulation of heat shock proteins, such as HSP-32. The proteins maintained capillary perfusion and increased tissue tolerance to ischaemia. The purpose of this translational study was to evaluate the effect of local heat preconditioning before skin sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. A prospective non-randomised trial was performed from July 2009-April 2010. 50 consecutive patients at risk of skin flap necrosis (BMI >30, sternal-to-nipple distance>26 cm or breast size>C-cup) were included. Twenty-five patients were asked to heat-precondition their breast 24-h prior to surgery using a hot water bottle with a water temperature of 43 °C (thermometers provided), in three 30-min cycles interrupted by spontaneous cooling to room temperature. Skin flap necrosis was defined by the need for surgical debridement. LDI images were taken pre- and post-mastectomy to demonstrate an increase in tissue vascularity. 36% of women (n=25) without local heat-treatment developed skin flap necrosis, 12% developed skin flap necrosis in the treatment group, resulting in a 24% difference (n=25; p=0.047 (95%CI 1%-47%)). LDI scanning of the heated breast demonstrated an increase in vascularity compared to the contralateral non-heated breast. Median length of inpatient stay for treatment group was 4 days (95%CI(4, 7)), controls 8 days (95%CI(8, 9) (p=mastectomy. ACTRN12612001197820. II. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Duration of postoperative immunosuppression assessed by repeated delayed type hypersensitivity skin tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, J H; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Moesgaard, F;

    1992-01-01

    The duration of postoperative impairment in cell-mediated immunity was assessed by repeated skin testing with seven delayed type common antigens in 15 patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery compared to a similar testing regimen in 10 healthy volunteers. All were skin tested four times......, with 72-hour intervals, and in the surgical patients the first test was applied 2 days before surgery, followed by tests on postoperative days 1, 4 and 7. The tests were read after 48 h. Postoperatively, the skin test area decreased on day 3 (p less than 0.01) and recurred to preoperative levels on day 9....... In contrast, the skin test area in the volunteers increased from test to test (p less than 0.001) during the study, confirming a previous finding of a vaccination effect. These results suggest that the postoperative immunosuppression is maintained for about 6-9 days....

  11. Factors influencing adverse skin responses in rats receiving repeated subcutaneous injections and potential impact on neurobehavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levoe, S. Nikki; Flannery, Brenna M.; Brignolo, Laurie; Imai, Denise M.; Koehne, Amanda; Austin, Adam T.; Bruun, Donald A.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated subcutaneous (s.c.) injection is a common route of administration in chronic studies of neuroactive compounds. However, in a pilot study we noted a significant incidence of skin abnormalities in adult male Long-Evans rats receiving daily s.c. injections of peanut oil (1.0 ml/kg) in the subscapular region for 21 d. Histopathological analyses of the lesions were consistent with a foreign body reaction. Subsequent studies were conducted to determine factors that influenced the incidence or severity of skin abnormalities, and whether these adverse skin reactions influenced a specific neurobehavioral outcome. Rats injected daily for 21 d with food grade peanut oil had an earlier onset and greater incidence of skin abnormalities relative to rats receiving an equal volume (1.0 ml/kg/d) of reagent grade peanut oil or triglyceride of coconut oil. Skin abnormalities in animals injected daily with peanut oil were increased in animals housed on corncob versus paper bedding. Comparison of animals obtained from different barrier facilities exposed to the same injection paradigm (reagent grade peanut oil, 1.0 ml/kg/d s.c.) revealed significant differences in the severity of skin abnormalities. However, animals from different barrier facilities did not perform differently in a Pavlovian fear conditioning task. Collectively, these data suggest that environmental factors influence the incidence and severity of skin abnormalities following repeated s.c. injections, but that these adverse skin responses do not significantly influence performance in at least one test of learning and memory. PMID:25705100

  12. A propagating heat wave model of skin electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliquett, Uwe; Gusbeth, Ch; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2008-03-21

    The main barrier to transdermal drug delivery in human skin is the stratum corneum. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) of sufficient amplitude can create new aqueous pathways across this barrier and enhance drug delivery through the skin. Here, we describe a model of pore formation between adjacent corneocytes that predicts the following sequence of events: (1) the PEF rapidly charges the stratum corneum near the electrode until the transepidermal potential difference is large enough to drive water into a small region of the stratum corneum, creating new aqueous pathways. (2) PEFs then drive a high current density through this newly created electropore to generate Joule heating that warms the pore perimeter. (3) This temperature rise at the perimeter increases the probability of further electroporation there as the local sphingolipids reach their phase transition temperature. (4) This heat-generated wave of further electroporation propagates outward until the surface area of the pore becomes so large that the reduced current density no longer generates sufficient heat to reach the phase transition temperature of the sphingolipids. (5) Cooling and partial recovery occurs after the field pulse. This process yields large, high permeability regions in the stratum corneum at which molecules can more readily cross this skin barrier. We present a model for this process that predicts that the initial radius of the first aqueous pathway is approximately 5nm for a transdermal voltage of 60V at room temperature.

  13. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure.

  14. Effects of single and repeated exposure to biocidal active substances on the barrier function of the skin in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, H.E.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Burgsteden, J.A. van; Heer, C. de

    2005-01-01

    The dermal route of exposure is important in worker exposure to biocidal products. Many biocidal active substances which are used on a daily basis may decrease the barrier function of the skin to a larger extent than current risk assessment practice addresses, due to possible skin effects of repeate

  15. Effects of single and repeated exposure to biocidal active substances on the barrier function of the skin in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, H.E.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Burgsteden, J.A. van; Heer, C. de

    2005-01-01

    The dermal route of exposure is important in worker exposure to biocidal products. Many biocidal active substances which are used on a daily basis may decrease the barrier function of the skin to a larger extent than current risk assessment practice addresses, due to possible skin effects of repeate

  16. Association of condensin with chromosomes depends on DNA binding by its HEAT-repeat subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Ilaria; Rutkowska, Anna; Ori, Alessandro; Walczak, Marta; Metz, Jutta; Pelechano, Vicent; Beck, Martin; Haering, Christian H

    2014-06-01

    Condensin complexes have central roles in the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes during cell divisions, but how they interact with chromatin to promote chromosome segregation is largely unknown. Previous work has suggested that condensin, in addition to encircling chromatin fibers topologically within the ring-shaped structure formed by its SMC and kleisin subunits, contacts DNA directly. Here we describe the discovery of a binding domain for double-stranded DNA formed by the two HEAT-repeat subunits of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae condensin complex. From detailed mapping data of the interfaces between the HEAT-repeat and kleisin subunits, we generated condensin complexes that lack one of the HEAT-repeat subunits and consequently fail to associate with chromosomes in yeast and human cells. The finding that DNA binding by condensin's HEAT-repeat subunits stimulates the SMC ATPase activity suggests a multistep mechanism for the loading of condensin onto chromosomes.

  17. The Effect of Repeated Heating on Fatty Acid Profile of Beef and Spices of Rendang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Yenrina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rendang is a traditional Minangkabau cuisine with the main ingredient of beef or buffalo meat which is cooked using coconut milk and some spices. Rendang is cooked more than 2 hours, and after that do the repeated heating. This study aimed to determine the effect of repeated heating on fatty acid profiles of beef and spices of rendang. The analysis carried out at Chemistry Lab. and Biochemistry Lab. In  Fateta Unand and Integrated Lab in IPB Bogor. This  study   designed  used a completely  randomized  design  with 5 treatments and 3 replications.  The treatments that used in this study were A (raw beef, B (freshly cooked rendang, C (first heating, D (second heating, E (third heating where the heating was done every 2 days. Data were collected for  fatty acids profile of beef and spices of rendang. Analysis of the Type of  Fatty Acid by HPLC method (AOAC, 1984. The results shown that repeated heating of beef and spice of rendang had significantly different effect on the type of fatty acids and an increased trans fatty Acid of rendang.

  18. Repeated short climatic change affects the epidermal differentiation program and leads to matrix remodeling in a human organotypic skin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutrand, Laetitia-Barbollat; Thépot, Amélie; Muther, Charlotte; Boher, Aurélie; Robic, Julie; Guéré, Christelle; Vié, Katell; Damour, Odile; Lamartine, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Human skin is subject to frequent changes in ambient temperature and humidity and needs to cope with these environmental modifications. To decipher the molecular response of human skin to repeated climatic change, a versatile model of skin equivalent subject to “hot–wet” (40°C, 80% relative humidity [RH]) or “cold–dry” (10°C, 40% RH) climatic stress repeated daily was used. To obtain an exhaustive view of the molecular mechanisms elicited by climatic change, large-scale gene expression DNA microarray analysis was performed and modulated function was determined by bioinformatic annotation. This analysis revealed several functions, including epidermal differentiation and extracellular matrix, impacted by repeated variations in climatic conditions. Some of these molecular changes were confirmed by histological examination and protein expression. Both treatments (hot–wet and cold–dry) reduced the expression of genes encoding collagens, laminin, and proteoglycans, suggesting a profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Strong induction of the entire family of late cornified envelope genes after cold–dry exposure, confirmed at protein level, was also observed. These changes correlated with an increase in epidermal differentiation markers such as corneodesmosin and a thickening of the stratum corneum, indicating possible implementation of defense mechanisms against dehydration. This study for the first time reveals the complex pattern of molecular response allowing adaption of human skin to repeated change in its climatic environment.

  19. Tissue deposition of the insect repellent DEET and the sunscreen oxybenzone from repeated topical skin applications in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fediuk, Daryl J; Wang, Tao; Raizman, Joshua E; Parkinson, Fiona E; Gu, Xiaochen

    2010-12-01

    Insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET) and sunscreen oxybenzone are capable of enhancing skin permeation of each other when applied simultaneously. We carried out a cellular study in rat astrocytes and neurons to assess cell toxicity of DEET and oxybenzone and a 30-day study in Sprague-Dawley rats to characterize skin permeation and tissue disposition of the compounds. Cellular toxicity occurred at 1 µg/mL for neurons and 7-day treatment for astrocytes and neurons. DEET and oxybenzone permeated across the skin to accumulate in blood, liver, and brain after repeated topical applications. DEET disappeared from the application site faster than oxybenzone. Combined application enhanced the disposition of DEET in liver. No overt sign of behavioral toxicity was observed from several behavioral testing protocols. It was concluded that despite measurable disposition of the study compounds in vivo, there was no evidence of neurotoxicological deficits from repeated topical applications of DEET, oxybenzone, or both.

  20. Mathematical Simulation of Heat Impact of Heated Up to High Temperatures Particle on Human Skin: Simple One-Dimensional Statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solodkin Andrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is developed physical and mathematical models of process of a heat transfer between skin and a heating source - single heated up to high temperatures particle. Temperature distribution in system “particle-skin” for heated wooden particle is obtained. The data obtained during work can be used for addition of already available materials on the given subjects and comparisons of influences on a skin of various factors, and also can be useful to development of new systems of protection against the influences damaging factors in the conditions of fire.

  1. Heat stress impairs repeated jump ability after competitive elite soccer games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Krustrup, Peter

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT:: The present study examined the effect of environmental heat stress on repeated jump performance after elite competitive soccer games. Male elite soccer players (n=19) from two Scandinavian teams participated (age; 26.7±1.0 yrs, height; 181.7±1.1 cm, body mass; 75.8±1.0 kg). The players...

  2. Using skin temperature gradients or skin heat flux measurements to determine thresholds of vasoconstriction and vasodilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2002-11-01

    Forearm-fingertip skin temperature differentials (T(sk-diff)) are used to indicate vasomotor tone, vasoconstriction defined as having occurred when T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C (Sessler et al. 1987, 1988a, b). This study was conducted to determine whether T(sk-diff) or finger pad heat flux (HF) can be used to predict when vasoconstriction and vasodilatation occur. Seven subjects (one female) sat in water at [mean (SD)] 40.7 (0.8) degrees C until their core temperature (T(c)) increased by 1 degrees C, ensuring vasodilatation. The water was then cooled [at a rate of 0.6 (0.1) degrees C x min(-1)] until T(c) fell to 0.5 degrees C below pretesting values, causing vasoconstriction. Subjects were then rewarmed in water [41.2 (1.0) degrees C]. Skin blood flow (SkBF) was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) on the left second finger pad [immersed in water at 10.4 (1.4) degrees C as part of another experiment], and infrared plethysmography on the third finger pad of both hands. T(sk-diff) and HF were measured on the right upper limb, which remained in air. When vasodilated, the subjects had a stable T(sk-diff) and HF. During cooling, rapid-onset vasoconstriction occurred coincidental with large gradient changes in HF and T(sk-diff) (inflection points). In two subjects the original vasoconstriction definition (T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C) was not attained, in the other five this was achieved 31-51 min after vasoconstriction. During rewarming, the T(sk-diff) and HF inflection points less accurately reflected the onset of vasodilatation, although with one exception they were within 5 min of the LDF changes. We conclude that T(sk-diff) and HF inflection points predict vasoconstriction accurately, and better than T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C.

  3. Genotoxic and carcinogenic risks associated with the dietary consumption of repeatedly heated coconut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Smita; Singh, Madhulika; George, Jasmine; Bhui, Kulpreet; Murari Saxena, Anand; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2010-11-01

    Repeated heating of vegetable oils at high temperatures during cooking is a very common cooking practice. Repeated heating of edible oils can generate a number of compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), some of which have been reported to have carcinogenic potential. Consumption of these repeatedly heated oils can pose a serious health hazard. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the genotoxic and carcinogenic risks associated with the consumption of repeatedly heated coconut oil (RCO), which is one of the commonly consumed cooking and frying medium. The PAH were analysed using HPLC in fresh CO, single-heated CO (SCO) and RCO. Results revealed the presence of certain PAH, known to possess carcinogenic potential, in RCO when compared with SCO. Oral intake of RCO in Wistar rats resulted in a significant induction of aberrant cells (P<0·05) and micronuclei (P<0·05) in a dose-dependent manner. Oxidative stress analysis showed a significant (P<0·05) decrease in the levels of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and catalase with a concurrent increase in reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation in the liver. In addition, RCO given alone and along with diethylnitrosamine for 12 weeks induced altered hepatic foci as noticed by alteration in positive (γ-glutamyl transpeptidase and glutathione-S-transferase) and negative (adenosine triphosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase) hepatospecific biomarkers. A significant decrease in the relative and absolute hepatic weight of RCO-supplemented rats was recorded (P<0·05). In conclusion, dietary consumption of RCO can cause a genotoxic and preneoplastic change in the liver.

  4. Hydrogen production by anaerobic microbial communities exposed to repeated heat treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangmanee, T; Padmasiri, S I; Simmons, J J; Raskin, L; Sung, S

    2007-09-01

    Biological hydrogen production by anaerobic mixed communities was studied in laboratory-scale bioreactors using sucrose as the substrate. A bioreactor in which a fraction of the return sludge was exposed to repeated heat treatments performed better than a control bioreactor without repeated heat treatment of return sludge and produced a yield of 2.15 moles of hydrogen per mole of sucrose, with 50% hydrogen in the biogas. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that two different Clostridium groups (comprised of one or more species) were dominant during hydrogen production. The relative abundance of two other non-Clostridium groups increased during periods of decreased hydrogen production. The first group consisted of Bifidobacterium thermophilum, and the second group included one or more of Bacillus, Melissococcus, Spirochaeta, and Spiroplasma spp.

  5. Skin friction and heat transfer of liquid jet over a continuous moving horizontal hot plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The skin friction and heat transfer occurring in the laminarboundary layer which caused by a vertical liquid jet impinging on a continuously moving horizontal plate were studied. Similarity solutionsfor shear stress and heat distribution were obtained by using the shooting technique. The results shows that the skin friction decreases with an increase of velocity parameter, the evolving of thermal boundarydecrease with increasing in Prandtl number, but increase with increasing of velocity parameter.

  6. Repeated short climatic change affects the epidermal differentiation program and leads to matrix remodeling in a human organotypic skin model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutrand LB

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laetitia-Barbollat Boutrand,1 Amélie Thépot,2 Charlotte Muther,3 Aurélie Boher,2 Julie Robic,4 Christelle Guéré,4 Katell Vié,4 Odile Damour,5 Jérôme Lamartine1,3 1Departement de Biologie, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, 2LabSkinCreations, 3CNRS UMR5305, Laboratoire de Biologie Tissulaire et d’Ingénierie Thérapeutique (LBTI, Lyon, 4Laboratoires Clarins, Cergy-Pontoise, 5Banque de Tissus et Cellules, Hospices Civiles de Lyon, Lyon, France Abstract: Human skin is subject to frequent changes in ambient temperature and humidity and needs to cope with these environmental modifications. To decipher the molecular response of human skin to repeated climatic change, a versatile model of skin equivalent subject to “hot–wet” (40°C, 80% relative humidity [RH] or “cold–dry” (10°C, 40% RH climatic stress repeated daily was used. To obtain an exhaustive view of the molecular mechanisms elicited by climatic change, large-scale gene expression DNA microarray analysis was performed and modulated function was determined by bioinformatic annotation. This analysis revealed several functions, including epidermal differentiation and extracellular matrix, impacted by repeated variations in climatic conditions. Some of these molecular changes were confirmed by histological examination and protein expression. Both treatments (hot–wet and cold–dry reduced the expression of genes encoding collagens, laminin, and proteoglycans, suggesting a profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Strong induction of the entire family of late cornified envelope genes after cold–dry exposure, confirmed at protein level, was also observed. These changes correlated with an increase in epidermal differentiation markers such as corneodesmosin and a thickening of the stratum corneum, indicating possible implementation of defense mechanisms against dehydration. This study for the first time reveals the complex pattern of molecular response allowing

  7. Increased advanced glycation end product specific fluorescence in repeatedly heated used cooking oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Anupriya; Bhatia, Alka; Ram, Anil Kumar; Goel, Sumit

    2017-07-01

    Repeated heating of cooking oils is known to cause their degradation and generation of toxins. Dietary Advanced glycation end products (dAGEs) are formed when the foods are cooked in dry heat at very high temperatures. dAGEs are believed to contribute significantly to total pool of AGEs in body. In this study, cooking oil samples used for frying snacks were collected from 102 shops. AGEs were extracted using Aqueous-TCA-chloroform method. Fluorescent AGE levels were determined using a fluorescence spectrophotometer and compared with AGEs in corresponding fresh oil samples collected from same shops. Palm oil was most commonly (62.5%) used for cooking. Most of the samples were subjected to several rounds of heating (1-6). AGE specific fluorescence (ASF) in used oil (range = 8.5-745.11) samples was found to be significantly higher in 88/102 as compared to the corresponding fresh oil samples. Treatment with inhibitors like lime concentrate and vitamin C decreased ASF (10/14 and 10/11 samples respectively) of the used oils. The results suggest that cooking oil subjected to repeated heating can contribute to increase in fluorescent AGEs in diet. Simple practices like liberal use of common household substances like lime concentrate may help to reduce these in fried food.

  8. Skin histology and its role in heat dissipation in three pinniped species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khamas Wael A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pinnipeds have a thick blubber layer and may have difficulty maintaining their body temperature during hot weather when on land. The skin is the main thermoregulatory conduit which emits excessive body heat. Methods Thorough evaluation of the skin histology in three pinniped species; the California sea lion-Zalophus californianus, the Pacific harbor seal-Phoca vitulina richardsi, and the Northern elephant seal-Mirounga angustirostris, was conducted to identify the presence, location and distribution of skin structures which contribute to thermoregulation. These structures included hair, adipose tissue, sweat glands, vasculature, and arteriovenous anastomoses (AVA. Thermal imaging was performed on live animals of the same species to correlate histological findings with thermal emission of the skin. Results The presence and distribution of skin structures directly relates to emissivity of the skin in all three species. Emissivity of skin in phocids (Pacific harbor and Northern elephant seals follows a different pattern than skin in otariids (California sea lions. The flipper skin in phocids tends to be the most emissive region during hot weather and least emissive during cold weather. On the contrary in otariids, skin of the entire body has a tendency to be emissive during both hot and cold weather. Conclusion Heat dissipation of the skin directly relates to the presence and distribution of skin structures in all three species. Different skin thermal dissipation patterns were observed in phocid versus otariid seals. Observed thermal patterns can be used for proper understanding of optimum thermal needs of seals housed in research facilities, rescue centers and zoo exhibits.

  9. Mitochondrial tolerance to single and repeat exposure to simulated sunlight in human epidermal and dermal skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J; Murphy, J E J

    2016-12-01

    Sunlight represents the primary threat to mitochondrial integrity in skin given the unique nature of the mitochondrial genome and its proximity to the electron transport chain. The accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is a key factor in many human pathologies and this is linked to key roles of mitochondrial function in terms of energy production and cell regulation. The main objective of this study was to evaluate solar radiation induced changes in mitochondrial integrity, function and dynamics in human skin cells using a Q-Sun solar simulator to deliver a close match to the intensity of summer sunlight. Spontaneously immortalised human skin epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT) and Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDFn) were divided into two groups. Group A were irradiated once and Group B twice 7days apart and evaluated using cell survival, viability and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mass at 1, 4 and 7days post one exposure for Group A and 1, 4, 7 and 14days post second exposure for Group B. Viability and survival of HaCaT and HDFn cells decreased after repeat exposure to Simulated Sunlight Irradiation (SSI) with no recovery. HDFn cells showed no loss in MMP after one or two exposures to SSI compared to HaCaT cells which showed a periodic loss of MMP after one exposure with a repeat exposure causing a dramatic decrease from which cells did not recover. Mitochondrial Mass in exposed HDFn cells was consistent with control after one or two exposures to SSI; however mitochondrial mass was significantly decreased in HaCaT cells. Data presented here suggests that mitochondria in epidermal cells are more sensitive to sunlight damage compared to mitochondria in dermal cells, despite their origin, confirming a skin layer specific sensitivity to sunlight, but not as expected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Repeated exposure to heat stress results in a diaphragm phenotype that resists ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Toshinori; Ichinoseki-Sekine, Noriko; Kakigi, Ryo; Tsuzuki, Takamasa; Sugiura, Takao; Powers, Scott K; Naito, Hisashi

    2015-11-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is a life-saving intervention for patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) results in diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction, both of which are predicted to contribute to problems in weaning patients from the ventilator. Therefore, developing a strategy to protect the diaphragm against ventilator-induced weakness is important. We tested the hypothesis that repeated bouts of heat stress result in diaphragm resistance against CMV-induced atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six experimental groups: 1) control; 2) single bout of whole body heat stress; 3) repeated bouts of whole body heat stress; 4) 12 h CMV; 5) single bout of whole body heat stress 24 h before CMV; and 6) repeated bouts of whole body heat stress 1, 3, and 5 days before 12 h of CMV. Our results revealed that repeated bouts of heat stress resulted in increased levels of heat shock protein 72 in the diaphragm and protection against both CMV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction at submaximal stimulation frequencies. The specific mechanisms responsible for this protection remain unclear: this heat stress-induced protection against CMV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and weakness may be partially due to reduced diaphragmatic oxidative stress, diminished activation of signal transducer/transcriptional activator-3, lower caspase-3 activation, and decreased autophagy in the diaphragm.

  11. Time course of primary and secondary hyperalgesia after heat injury to the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Kehlet, H

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the time course of, and relationship between, primary and secondary hyperalgesia after thermal injury to the skin in humans. Burn injuries (15 x 25 mm rectangular thermode, 49 degrees C, 5 min) were produced in eight healthy, unmedicated male volunteers, on the medial side...... of the right calf, on two occasions at least 8 days apart. Heat pain detection thresholds (HPDT), heat pain tolerance (HPT), mechanical pain detection threshold (MPDT) and the intensity of burn-injury induced erythema (skin erythema index, SEI) were assessed inside the burn injury. HPT was assessed only in one...

  12. On the X-ray heated skin of Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, S

    1999-01-01

    We present a simple analytical formula for the Thomson depth of the X-rayheated skin of accretion disks valid at any radius and for a broad range ofspectral indices of the incident X-rays, accretion rates and black hole masses.We expect that this formula may find useful applications in studies of geometryof the inner part of accretion flows around compact objects, and in severalother astrophysically important problems, such as the recently observed X-ray``Baldwin'' effect (i.e., monotonic decrease of Fe line's equivalent width withthe X-ray luminosity of AGN), the problem of missing Lyman edge in AGN, andline and continuum variability studies in accretion disks around compactobjects. We compute the reflected X-ray spectra for several representativecases and show that for hard X-ray spectra and large ionizing fluxes the skinrepresents a perfect mirror that does not produce any Fe lines or absorptionfeatures. At the same time, for soft X-ray spectra or small ionizing fluxes,the skin produces very strong ionized...

  13. Skin and muscle components of forearm blood flow in directly heated resting man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detry, J.-M. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Rowell, L. B.; Wyss, C.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in forearm muscle blood flow (FMBF) during direct whole-body heating were measured in 17 normal subjects using three different methods. We conclude that FMBF is not increased by direct whole-body heating. Since renal and splanchnic blood flow fall 30% under these conditions, maximal total skin blood flow in 12 previously studied subjects can be estimated from the rise in cardiac output to be 7.6 L/min (3.0-11.1 L/min).

  14. Effects of Blood Flow on Skin Heating Induced by Millimeter Wave Irradiation in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    Johnson and Proppe 1996), resulting in an effi- cient removal of heat by the increased SkBF. Presum- ably, the noted inter-species variability in the...over the majority of their surface area (Johnson and Proppe 1996). Furthermore, mathe- matical modeling indicated that the rate of skin heating could...New York: The Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, Inc.; Report IEEE Std C95.1.1999; 1999. Johnson JM, Proppe DW. Cardiovascular

  15. Analytical analysis of the Pennes bioheat transfer equation with sinusoidal heat flux condition on skin surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tzu-Ching; Yuan, Ping; Lin, Win-Li; Kou, Hong-Sen

    2007-11-01

    This study focuses on the effect of the temperature response of a semi-infinite biological tissue due to a sinusoidal heat flux at the skin. The Pennes bioheat transfer equation such as rho(t)c(t)( partial differentialT/ partial differentialt)+W(b)c(b)(T-T(a))=k partial differential(2)T/ partial differentialx(2) with the oscillatory heat flux boundary condition such as q(0,t)=q(0)e(iomegat) was investigated. By using the Laplace transform, the analytical solution of the Pennes bioheat transfer equation with surface sinusoidal heating condition is found. This analytical expression is suitable for describing the transient temperature response of tissue for the whole time domain from the starting periodic oscillation to the final steady periodic oscillation. The results show that the temperature oscillation due to the sinusoidal heating on the skin surface is unstable in the initial period. Further, it is unavailable to predict the blood perfusion rate via the phase shifting between the surface heat flux and the surface temperature. Moreover, the lower frequency of sinusoidal heat flux on the skin surface induces a more sensitive phase shift response to the blood perfusion rate change, but extends the beginning time of sampling because of the avoidance of the unavailable first cyclic oscillation.

  16. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrishankar, T R; Stewart, Donald A; Martin, Gregory T; Weaver, James C

    2004-11-17

    Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1) surface contact heating and (2) spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42 degrees C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45 degrees C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. The heat transport system model of the skin was solved by exploiting the mathematical

  17. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gregory T

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. Methods We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1 surface contact heating and (2 spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42°C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. Results The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45°C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. Conclusions The heat transport system model of the

  18. Heat transfers in a double-skin roof ventilated by natural convection in summer time

    CERN Document Server

    Biwole, Pascal; Pompeo, C

    2013-01-01

    The double-skin roofs investigated in this paper are formed by adding a metallic screen on an existing sheet metal roof. The system enhances passive cooling of dwellings and can help diminishing power costs for air conditioning in summer or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers are investigated. Depending on its surface properties, the screen reflects a large amount of oncoming solar radiation. Natural convection in the channel underneath drives off the residual heat. The bi-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters for the system's efficiency. They are, by order of importance, the sheet metal surface emissivity, the screen internal and external surface emissivity, the insulation thickness and the inclination angle for a channel width over 6 cm. The influence of those parameters on Rayleigh and Nusselt numbers is also investigated. Temperature and air velocity profiles on seve...

  19. Primary afferent depolarization and flexion reflexes produced by radiant heat stimulation of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, R E; Rudomin, P; Vyklický, L; Zajac, F E

    1971-02-01

    1. The reflex effects of pulses of intense radiant heat applied to the skin of the central plantar pad have been studied in unanaesthetized (decerebrate) spinal cats.2. Pad heat pulses produced flexion of the ipsilateral hind limb and increased ipsilateral flexor monosynaptic reflexes, due to post-synaptic excitation of flexor alpha motoneurones. These effects were accompanied by reduction of extensor monosynaptic reflexes and post-synaptic inhibition of extensor motoneurones.3. Ipsilateral (and contralateral) pad heat pulses consistently evoked negative dorsal root potentials (DRPs) as well as increased excitability of both cutaneous and group Ib muscle afferent terminals. The excitability of group Ia afferents was sometimes also increased during pad heat pulses, but to a lesser extent.4. Pad heat pulses produced negative DRPs in preparations in which positive DRP components could be demonstrated following electrical stimulation of both skin and muscle nerves.5. The motor and primary afferent effects of heat pulses always accompanied one another, beginning after the pad surface temperature had reached rather high levels (usually 48-55 degrees C).6. Negative DRPs increased excitability of cutaneous and group Ib afferents, and motoneurone activation produced by pad heat pulses was essentially unmodified when conduction in large myelinated afferents from the central plantar pad was blocked by cooling the posterior tibial nerve trunk.7. It is concluded that adequate noxious activation of cutaneous afferents of small diameter produces primary afferent depolarization in a variety of large diameter afferent fibres, as well as post-synaptic effects in alpha motoneurones.

  20. Three-dimensional model on thermal response of skin subject to laser heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wensheng; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Fuqian

    2005-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) multilayer model based on the skin physical structure is developed to investigate the transient thermal response of human skin subject to laser heating. The temperature distribution of the skin is modeled by the bioheat transfer equation, and the influence of laser heating is expressed as a source term where the strength of the source is a product of a Gaussian shaped incident irradiance, an exponentially shaped axial attenuation, and a time function. The water evaporation and diffusion is included in the model by adding two terms regarding the heat loss due to the evaporation and diffusion, where the rate of water evaporation is determined based on the theory of laminar boundary layer. Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) in laser therapy is studied, as well as its effect on the skin thermal response. The time-dependent equation is discretized using the finite difference method with the Crank-Nicholson scheme and the stability of the numerical method is analyzed. The large sparse linear system resulted from discretizing the governing partial differential equation is solved by a GMRES solver and the expected simulation results are obtained.

  1. Skin blood flow and local temperature independently modify sweat rate during passive heat stress in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, Jonathan E; Low, David A; Keller, David M; Brothers, R Matthew; Shibasaki, Manabu; Crandall, Craig G

    2010-11-01

    Sweat rate (SR) is reduced in locally cooled skin, which may result from decreased temperature and/or parallel reductions in skin blood flow. The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature each independently attenuate sweating. In protocols I and II, eight subjects rested supine while wearing a water-perfused suit for the control of whole body skin and internal temperatures. While 34°C water perfused the suit, four microdialysis membranes were placed in posterior forearm skin not covered by the suit to manipulate skin blood flow using vasoactive agents. Each site was instrumented for control of local temperature and measurement of local SR (capacitance hygrometry) and skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry). In protocol I, two sites received norepinephrine to reduce skin blood flow, while two sites received Ringer solution (control). All sites were maintained at 34°C. In protocol II, all sites received 28 mM sodium nitroprusside to equalize skin blood flow between sites before local cooling to 20°C (2 sites) or maintenance at 34°C (2 sites). In both protocols, individuals were then passively heated to increase core temperature ~1°C. Both decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature attenuated the slope of the SR to mean body temperature relationship (2.0 ± 1.2 vs. 1.0 ± 0.7 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased skin blood flow, P = 0.01; 1.2 ± 0.9 vs. 0.07 ± 0.05 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased local temperature, P = 0.02). Furthermore, local cooling delayed the onset of sweating (mean body temperature of 37.5 ± 0.4 vs. 37.6 ± 0.4°C, P = 0.03). These data demonstrate that local cooling attenuates sweating by independent effects of decreased skin blood flow and decreased local skin temperature.

  2. Risk of sensitization in healthy adults following repeated administration of rdESAT-6 skin test reagent by the Mantoux injection technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillebaek, Troels; Bergstedt, Winnie; Tingskov, Pernille N;

    2009-01-01

    1 open clinical trial was to assess the sensitization risk and safety of repeated administration of rdESAT-6 reagent in 31 healthy adult volunteers. Three groups of volunteers received two fixed doses of 0.1 microg rdESAT-6 28, 56 or 112 days apart, respectively. After the second injection......Limited specificity of the tuberculin skin test incited the development of the intradermal Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific rdESAT-6 skin test. Animal studies have shown, however, that there is a possible risk of sensitization when repeated injections of rdESAT-6 are given. The aim of this phase...

  3. Differential translocation of heat shock factor-1 after mild and severe stress to human skin fibroblasts undergoing aging in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirovic, Dino; de Toda, Irene Martinez; Nizard, Carine; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2014-12-01

    Repeated exposure to mild heat shock (HS) has been shown to induce a wide range of health promoting hormetic effects in various biological systems, including human cells undergoing aging in vitro. In order to understand how cells distinguish between mild and severe stress, we have investigated the extent of early and immediate HS response by analyzing the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor heat shock factor-1 (HSF1), in serially passaged normal adult human facial skin fibroblasts exposed to mild (41 °C) or severe (43 °C) HS. Cells respond differently when exposed to mild and severe HS at different passage levels in terms of the extent of HSF1 translocation. In early passage young cells there was a 5-fold difference between mild and severe HS in the extent of HSF1 translocation. However, in near senescent late passage cells, the difference between mild and severe stress in terms of the extent of HSF1 translocation was reduced to less than 2-fold. One of the reasons for this age-related attenuation of heat shock response is due to the fact there was a higher basal level of HSF1 in the nuclei of late passage cells, which is indicative of increased intrinsic stress during cellular aging. These observations are consistent with previously reported data that whereas repeated mild stress given at younger ages can slow down aging and increase the lifespan, the same level of stress given at older ages may not provide the same benefits. Therefore, elucidating the early and immediate steps in the induction of stress response can be useful in deciding whether a particular level of stress is potentially hormetically beneficial or not.

  4. Evaporative cooling: effective latent heat of evaporation in relation to evaporation distance from the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenith, George; Bröde, Peter; den Hartog, Emiel; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmer, Ingvar; Rossi, Rene M; Richards, Mark; Farnworth, Brian; Wang, Xiaoxin

    2013-03-15

    Calculation of evaporative heat loss is essential to heat balance calculations. Despite recognition that the value for latent heat of evaporation, used in these calculations, may not always reflect the real cooling benefit to the body, only limited quantitative data on this is available, which has found little use in recent literature. In this experiment a thermal manikin, (MTNW, Seattle, WA) was used to determine the effective cooling power of moisture evaporation. The manikin measures both heat loss and mass loss independently, allowing a direct calculation of an effective latent heat of evaporation (λeff). The location of the evaporation was varied: from the skin or from the underwear or from the outerwear. Outerwear of different permeabilities was used, and different numbers of layers were used. Tests took place in 20°C, 0.5 m/s at different humidities and were performed both dry and with a wet layer, allowing the breakdown of heat loss in dry and evaporative components. For evaporation from the skin, λeff is close to the theoretical value (2,430 J/g) but starts to drop when more clothing is worn, e.g., by 11% for underwear and permeable coverall. When evaporation is from the underwear, λeff reduction is 28% wearing a permeable outer. When evaporation is from the outermost layer only, the reduction exceeds 62% (no base layer), increasing toward 80% with more layers between skin and wet outerwear. In semi- and impermeable outerwear, the added effect of condensation in the clothing opposes this effect. A general formula for the calculation of λeff was developed.

  5. Numerical modeling of skin tissue heating using the interval finite difference method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochnacki, B; Belkhayat, Alicja Piasecka

    2013-09-01

    Numerical analysis of heat transfer processes proceeding in a nonhomogeneous biological tissue domain is presented. In particular, the skin tissue domain subjected to an external heat source is considered. The problem is treated as an axially-symmetrical one (it results from the mathematical form of the function describing the external heat source). Thermophysical parameters of sub-domains (volumetric specific heat, thermal conductivity, perfusion coefficient etc.) are given as interval numbers. The problem discussed is solved using the interval finite difference method basing on the rules of directed interval arithmetic, this means that at the stage of FDM algorithm construction the mathematical manipulations are realized using the interval numbers. In the final part of the paper the results of numerical computations are shown, in particular the problem of admissible thermal dose is analyzed.

  6. Heat transfer analysis of skin during thermal therapy using thermal wave equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashcooli, Meisam; Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Shirani, Ebrahim

    2017-02-01

    Specifying exact geometry of vessel network and its effect on temperature distribution in living tissues is one of the most complicated problems of the bioheat field. In this paper, the effects of blood vessels on temperature distribution in a skin tissue subjected to various thermal therapy conditions are investigated. Present model consists of counter-current multilevel vessel network embedded in a three-dimensional triple-layered skin structure. Branching angles of vessels are calculated using the physiological principle of minimum work. Length and diameter ratios are specified using length doubling rule and Cube law, respectively. By solving continuity, momentum and energy equations for blood flow and Pennes and modified Pennes bioheat equations for the tissue, temperature distributions in the tissue are measured. Effects of considering modified Pennes bioheat equation are investigated, comprehensively. It is also observed that blood has an impressive role in temperature distribution of the tissue, especially at high temperatures. The effects of different parameters such as boundary conditions, relaxation time, thermal properties of skin, metabolism and pulse heat flux on temperature distribution are investigated. Tremendous effect of boundary condition type at the lower boundary is noted. It seems that neither insulation nor constant temperature at this boundary can completely describe the real physical phenomena. It is expected that real temperature at the lower levels is somewhat between two predicted values. The effect of temperature on the thermal properties of skin tissue is considered. It is shown that considering temperature dependent values for thermal conductivity is important in the temperature distribution estimation of skin tissue; however, the effect of temperature dependent values for specific heat capacity is negligible. It is seen that considering modified Pennes equation in processes with high heat flux during low times is significant

  7. Molecular action mechanisms of solar infrared radiation and heat on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhalaya, M Ya; Maksimov, G V; Rubin, A B; Lademann, J; Darvin, M E

    2014-07-01

    The generation of ROS underlies all solar infrared-affected therapeutic and pathological cutaneous effects. The signaling pathway NF-kB is responsible for the induced therapeutic effects, while the AP-1 for the pathological effects. The different signaling pathways of infrared-induced ROS and infrared-induced heat shock ROS were shown to act independently multiplying the influence on each other by increasing the doses of irradiation and/or increasing the temperature. The molecular action mechanisms of solar infrared radiation and heat on human skin are summarized and discussed in detail in the present paper. The critical doses are determined. Protection strategies against infrared-induced skin damage are proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutation of serine 1333 in the ATR HEAT repeats creates a hyperactive kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica W Luzwick

    Full Text Available Subcellular localization, protein interactions, and post-translational modifications regulate the DNA damage response kinases ATR, ATM, and DNA-PK. During an analysis of putative ATR phosphorylation sites, we found that a single mutation at S1333 creates a hyperactive kinase. In vitro and in cells, mutation of S1333 to alanine (S1333A-ATR causes elevated levels of kinase activity with and without the addition of the protein activator TOPBP1. S1333 mutations to glycine, arginine, or lysine also create a hyperactive kinase, while mutation to aspartic acid decreases ATR activity. S1333A-ATR maintains the G2 checkpoint and promotes completion of DNA replication after transient exposure to replication stress but the less active kinase, S1333D-ATR, has modest defects in both of these functions. While we find no evidence that S1333 is phosphorylated in cultured cells, our data indicate that small changes in the HEAT repeats can have large effects on kinase activity. These mutants may serve as useful tools for future studies of the ATR pathway.

  9. The effects of heat on skin barrier function and in vivo dermal absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Gabriela; Leverett, Jesse C; Emamzadeh, Mandana; Lane, Majella E

    2014-04-10

    Enhanced delivery of ingredients across the stratum corneum (SC) is of great interest for improving the efficacy of topically applied formulations. Various methods for improving dermal penetration have been reported including galvanic devices and micro-needles. From a safety perspective it is important that such approaches do not compromise SC barrier function. This study investigates the influence of topically applied heat in vivo on the dermal uptake and penetration of a model active, allantoin from gel and lotion formulations. A custom designed device was used to deliver 42°C for 30s daily to human subjects after application of two formulations containing allantoin. The results were compared with sites treated with formulations containing no active and no heat, and a control site. In addition to penetration of allantoin, the integrity of the SC was monitored using trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements. The results showed that just 30s of 42°C topically applied heat was enough to cause significantly more penetration of allantoin from the lotion formulation compared with no application of heat. TEWL data indicated that the integrity of the skin was not compromised by the treatment. However, the application of heat did not promote enhanced penetration of the active from the gel formulation. Vehicle composition is therefore an important factor when considering thermal enhancement strategies for targeting actives to the skin.

  10. Sequential cryogen spraying for heat flux control at the skin surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majaron, Boris; Aguilar, Guillermo; Basinger, Brooke; Randeberg, Lise L.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2001-05-01

    Heat transfer rate at the skin-air interface is of critical importance for the benefits of cryogen spray cooling in combination with laser therapy of shallow subsurface skin lesions, such as port-wine stain birthmarks. With some cryogen spray devices, a layer of liquid cryogen builds up on the skin surface during the spurt, which may impair heat transfer across the skin surface due to relatively low thermal conductivity and potentially higher temperature of the liquid cryogen layer as compared to the spray droplets. While the mass flux of cryogen delivery can be adjusted by varying the atomizing nozzle geometry, this may strongly affect other spray properties, such as lateral spread (cone), droplet size, velocity, and temperature distribution. We present here first experiments with sequential cryogen spraying, which may enable accurate mass flux control through variation of spray duty cycle, while minimally affecting other spray characteristics. The observed increase of cooling rate and efficiency at moderate duty cycle levels supports the above described hypothesis of isolating liquid layer, and demonstrates a novel approach to optimization of cryogen spray devices for individual laser dermatological applications.

  11. A study of heat distribution in human skin: use of Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huon V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the long-term objectives of this study is to be able to act quickly on body burns, to avoid propagating lesions due to heat diffusion. An experimental and numerical study is presented to better understand the thermomechanical behavior of the skin and its direct environment when exposed to strong thermal variations. The experimental step, suggested in this article, consists in placing a cooled cylindrical steel bar on the skin of a human forearm and measuring the temperature change using an infra-red camera. Blood circulation in the veins was seen to clearly influence of the heat diffusion. These experimental measurements provide a numerical model of the skin and its direct vicinity. This two-dimensional multi-layer model uses the Pennes equation to model biological tissue and the equation of heat in a fluid, to model blood. The properties of materials from the literature are validated by experimentation. The numerical model is able to simulate the experimental observations, but also to estimate blood speed in the veins.

  12. A real-time heat strain risk classifier using heart rate and skin temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Mark J; Latzka, William A; Yokota, Miyo; Tharion, William J; Moran, Daniel S

    2008-12-01

    Heat injury is a real concern to workers engaged in physically demanding tasks in high heat strain environments. Several real-time physiological monitoring systems exist that can provide indices of heat strain, e.g. physiological strain index (PSI), and provide alerts to medical personnel. However, these systems depend on core temperature measurement using expensive, ingestible thermometer pills. Seeking a better solution, we suggest the use of a model which can identify the probability that individuals are 'at risk' from heat injury using non-invasive measures. The intent is for the system to identify individuals who need monitoring more closely or who should apply heat strain mitigation strategies. We generated a model that can identify 'at risk' (PSI 7.5) workers from measures of heart rate and chest skin temperature. The model was built using data from six previously published exercise studies in which some subjects wore chemical protective equipment. The model has an overall classification error rate of 10% with one false negative error (2.7%), and outperforms an earlier model and a least squares regression model with classification errors of 21% and 14%, respectively. Additionally, the model allows the classification criteria to be adjusted based on the task and acceptable level of risk. We conclude that the model could be a valuable part of a multi-faceted heat strain management system.

  13. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system.

  14. Involvement of Inflammation and Adverse Vascular Remodelling in the Blood Pressure Raising Effect of Repeatedly Heated Palm Oil in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yi Ng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil thermoxidation during deep frying generates harmful oxidative free radicals that induce inflammation and increase the risk of hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeatedly heated palm oil on blood pressure, aortic morphometry, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 expression in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: control, fresh palm oil (FPO, one-time-heated palm oil (1HPO, five-time-heated palm oil (5HPO, or ten-time-heated palm oil (10HPO. Feeding duration was six months. Blood pressure was measured at baseline and monthly using tail-cuff method. After six months, the rats were sacrificed and the aortic arches were dissected for morphometric and immunohistochemical analyses. FPO group showed significantly lower blood pressure than all other groups. Blood pressure was increased significantly in 5HPO and 10HPO groups. The aortae of 5HPO and 10HPO groups showed significantly increased thickness and area of intima-media, circumferential wall tension, and VCAM-1 than other groups. Elastic lamellae were disorganised and fragmented in 5HPO- and 10HPO-treated rats. VCAM-1 expression showed a significant positive correlation with blood pressure. In conclusion, prolonged consumption of repeatedly heated palm oil causes blood pressure elevation, adverse remodelling, and increased VCAM-1, which suggests a possible involvement of inflammation.

  15. Inter-subject, inter-ocular and inter-session repeatability of the photopic negative response of the electroretinogram recorded using DTL and skin electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, Katharine E; Binns, Alison M; Aldebasi, Yousef H; North, Rachel V

    2010-10-01

    The photopic negative response (PhNR) has attracted interest as a flash ERG component reflecting inner retinal activity, with investigators adopting various approaches to analysing the response. This study has two principal aims: first to determine the most reliable technique for assessing the PhNR amplitude; secondly to compare the repeatability characteristics of the PhNR recorded using DTL and skin active electrodes. Electroretinograms were recorded in 31 subjects, using both electrode types, in response to a Ganzfeld red stimulus (Lee filter "bright red"; 1.76 log phot td.s; 4 Hz) presented over a steady blue background (Schott glass filter BG28; 3.9 log scot td). Sixteen subjects returned to assess repeatability. PhNR amplitude was measured from b-wave peak-to-PhNR trough, pre-stimulus baseline to trough, and from peak and baseline to a fixed time-point; a ratio of b-wave/PhNR amplitude was also calculated. Coefficients of variation (CoV), and inter-ocular and inter-session limits of agreement (LoA) were calculated for all measures. The ratio of b-wave/PhNR amplitude showed the lowest CoV (14.3% DTL; 23.2% skin), inter-ocular LoA (22.2% DTL; 25.0% skin), and inter-session LoA (22.8% DTL; 20.3% skin). The peak-to-trough and peak-to-fixed-time measurements were also consistently reliable. Least reliable measures were those measured from baseline. While skin electrode responses were significantly smaller than DTL responses (P < 0.0001), the variability was only slightly increased. This study suggests that peak-to-trough measurements are the most reliable means of measuring the PhNR and ratio calculation further improves repeatability. Skin electrodes provided a viable alternative to DTL electrodes for recording the PhNR.

  16. Analysis of the dual phase lag bio-heat transfer equation with constant and time-dependent heat flux conditions on skin surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaei Poor Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on temperature response of skin tissue due to time-dependent surface heat fluxes. Analytical solution is constructed for DPL bio-heat transfer equation with constant, periodic and pulse train heat flux conditions on skin surface. Separation of variables and Duhamel’s theorem for a skin tissue as a finite domain are employed. The transient temperature responses for constant and time-dependent boundary conditions are obtained and discussed. The results show that there is major discrepancy between the predicted temperature of parabolic (Pennes bio-heat transfer, hyperbolic (thermal wave and DPL bio-heat transfer models when high heat flux accidents on the skin surface with a short duration or propagation speed of thermal wave is finite. The results illustrate that the DPL model reduces to the hyperbolic model when τT approaches zero and the classic Fourier model when both thermal relaxations approach zero. However for τq = τT the DPL model anticipates different temperature distribution with that predicted by the Pennes model. Such discrepancy is due to the blood perfusion term in energy equation. It is in contrast to results from the literature for pure conduction material, where the DPL model approaches the Fourier heat conduction model when τq = τT . The burn injury is also investigated.

  17. Virgin Coconut Oil Prevents Blood Pressure Elevation and Improves Endothelial Functions in Rats Fed with Repeatedly Heated Palm Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badlishah Sham Nurul-Iman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to explore the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO in male rats that were fed with repeatedly heated palm oil on blood pressure, plasma nitric oxide level, and vascular reactivity. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: (i control (basal diet, (ii VCO (1.42 mL/kg, oral, (iii five-times-heated palm oil (15% (5HPO, and (iv five-times-heated palm oil (15% and VCO (1.42 mL/kg, oral (5HPO + VCO. Blood pressure was significantly increased in the group that was given the 5HPO diet compared to the control group. Blood pressure in the 5HPO + VCO group was significantly lower than the 5HPO group. Plasma nitric oxide (NO level in the 5HPO group was significantly lower compared to the control group, whereas in the 5HPO + VCO group, the plasma NO level was significantly higher compared to the 5HPO group. Aortic rings from the 5HPO group exhibited attenuated relaxation in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside as well as increased vasoconstriction to phenylephrine compared to the control group. Aortic rings from the 5HPO + VCO group showed only attenuated vasoconstriction to phenylephrine compared to the 5HPO group. In conclusion, VCO prevents blood pressure elevation and improves endothelial functions in rats fed with repeatedly heated palm oil.

  18. Virgin coconut oil prevents blood pressure elevation and improves endothelial functions in rats fed with repeatedly heated palm oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurul-Iman, Badlishah Sham; Kamisah, Yusof; Jaarin, Kamsiah; Qodriyah, Hj Mohd Saad

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to explore the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) in male rats that were fed with repeatedly heated palm oil on blood pressure, plasma nitric oxide level, and vascular reactivity. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: (i) control (basal diet), (ii) VCO (1.42 mL/kg, oral), (iii) five-times-heated palm oil (15%) (5HPO), and (iv) five-times-heated palm oil (15%) and VCO (1.42 mL/kg, oral) (5HPO + VCO). Blood pressure was significantly increased in the group that was given the 5HPO diet compared to the control group. Blood pressure in the 5HPO + VCO group was significantly lower than the 5HPO group. Plasma nitric oxide (NO) level in the 5HPO group was significantly lower compared to the control group, whereas in the 5HPO + VCO group, the plasma NO level was significantly higher compared to the 5HPO group. Aortic rings from the 5HPO group exhibited attenuated relaxation in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside as well as increased vasoconstriction to phenylephrine compared to the control group. Aortic rings from the 5HPO + VCO group showed only attenuated vasoconstriction to phenylephrine compared to the 5HPO group. In conclusion, VCO prevents blood pressure elevation and improves endothelial functions in rats fed with repeatedly heated palm oil.

  19. Numerical analysis for the conjugate heat transfer of skin under various temperature conditions of contrast therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Da Ae; Oh, Han Nah; Choi, Hyoung Gwon [Dept. of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byoung Jin; Kim, Eun Jeoung; Lee, Seung Deok [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the contrast therapy of skin was numerically investigated by solving the conjugate heat transfer problem. A finite volume method based on the SIMPLE algorithm was adopted to solve the axisymmetric incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, coupled with an energy equation. These equations are strongly coupled with the Pennes bio-heat equation in order to consider the effect of blood perfusion rate. We investigated the thermal response of skin at some selected depths for various input temperature profiles of a stimulator for contrast therapy. From the numerical simulations, the regions with cold/hot threshold temperatures were found for five input temperature profiles. It was shown that the temperature varies mildly for different input profiles as the depth increases, owing to the Pennes effect. The input temperatures for effective hot/cold stimulation of dermis layer were found to be 47 degrees C and 7 degrees C, respectively. The present numerical results will be used for finding an optimal temperature profile of a stimulator for contrast therapy.

  20. Environmental heat stress modulates thyroid status and its response to repeated endotoxin (LPS) challenge in steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones are important in the adaptation to heat stress, allowing the adjustment of metabolic rates in favor of decreased energy utilization and heat production. Thyroid status is compromised in a variety of acute and chronic infections and toxin-mediated disease states. Our objective was to...

  1. Long-term repeatability of the skin prick test is high when supported by history or allergen-sensitivity tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodtger, U; Jacobsen, C R; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2003-01-01

    Long-term reproducibility of the skin-prick test (SPT) has been questioned. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical relevance of SPT changes.......Long-term reproducibility of the skin-prick test (SPT) has been questioned. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical relevance of SPT changes....

  2. Reproducibility of the heat/capsaicin skin sensitization model in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavallone LF

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Laura F Cavallone,1 Karen Frey,1 Michael C Montana,1 Jeremy Joyal,1 Karen J Regina,1 Karin L Petersen,2 Robert W Gereau IV11Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St Louis, School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA; 2California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA, USAIntroduction: Heat/capsaicin skin sensitization is a well-characterized human experimental model to induce hyperalgesia and allodynia. Using this model, gabapentin, among other drugs, was shown to significantly reduce cutaneous hyperalgesia compared to placebo. Since the larger thermal probes used in the original studies to produce heat sensitization are now commercially unavailable, we decided to assess whether previous findings could be replicated with a currently available smaller probe (heated area 9 cm2 versus 12.5–15.7 cm2.Study design and methods: After Institutional Review Board approval, 15 adult healthy volunteers participated in two study sessions, scheduled 1 week apart (Part A. In both sessions, subjects were exposed to the heat/capsaicin cutaneous sensitization model. Areas of hypersensitivity to brush stroke and von Frey (VF filament stimulation were measured at baseline and after rekindling of skin sensitization. Another group of 15 volunteers was exposed to an identical schedule and set of sensitization procedures, but, in each session, received either gabapentin or placebo (Part B.Results: Unlike previous reports, a similar reduction of areas of hyperalgesia was observed in all groups/sessions. Fading of areas of hyperalgesia over time was observed in Part A. In Part B, there was no difference in area reduction after gabapentin compared to placebo.Conclusion: When using smaller thermal probes than originally proposed, modifications of other parameters of sensitization and/or rekindling process may be needed to allow the heat/capsaicin sensitization protocol to be used as initially intended. Standardization and validation of

  3. Food-induced contact urticaria syndrome (CUS) in atopic dermatitis: Reproducibility of repeated and duplicate testing with a skin provocation test,the skin application food test (SAFT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Oranje (Arnold); D. van Gysel (Dirk); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); P.H. Dieges

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIgE-mediated contact urticaria syndrome (CUS) is one of the manifestations of allergy in childhood atopic dermatitis (AD). Allergens such as foods and animal products penetrate the skin easily. They can then cause urticarial reactions in sensitized individuals. A provocation test system

  4. Effects of heat exposure and 3% dehydration achieved via hot water immersion on repeated cycle sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Justin A; Green, James M; Bishop, Phillip A; Richardson, Mark T; Neggers, Yasmin H; Leeper, James D

    2011-03-01

    This study examined effects of heat exposure with and without dehydration on repeated anaerobic cycling. Males (n = 10) completed 3 trials: control (CT), water-bath heat exposure (∼39°C) to 3% dehydration (with fluid replacement) (HE), and similar heat exposure to 3% dehydration (DEHY). Hematocrit increased significantly from pre to postheat immersion in both HE and DEHY. Participants performed 6 × 15s cycle sprints (30s active recovery). Mean Power (MP) was significantly lower vs. CT (596 ± 66 W) for DEHY (569 ± 72 W), and the difference approached significance for HE (582 ± 76 W, p = 0.07). Peak Power (PP) was significantly lower vs. CT (900 ± 117 W) for HE (870 ± 128 W) and approached significance for DEHY (857 ± 145 W, p = 0.07). Postsprint ratings of perceived exertion was higher during DEHY (6.4 ± 2.0) and HE (6.3 ± 1.6) than CT (5.7 ± 2.1). Combined heat and dehydration impaired MP and PP (decrements greatest in later bouts) with HE performance intermediate to CT and DEHY.

  5. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures.

  6. Long-term repeatability of the skin prick test is high when supported by history or allergen-sensitivity tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtger, Uffe; Jacobsen, C R; Poulsen, L K;

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term reproducibility of the skin-prick test (SPT) has been questioned. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical relevance of SPT changes. METHODS: SPT to 10 common inhalation allergens was performed annually from 1999 to 2001 in 25 nonsensitized and 21 sensitized...

  7. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates cutaneous vasodilation during local heating and is attenuated in middle-aged human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, Rebecca S; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Smith, Caroline J; Berkowitz, Dan E; Kenney, W Larry; Holowatz, Lacy A

    2012-06-01

    Local skin heating is used to assess microvascular function in clinical populations because NO is required for full expression of the response; however, controversy exists as to the precise NO synthase (NOS) isoform producing NO. Human aging is associated with attenuated cutaneous vasodilation but little is known about the middle aged, an age cohort used for comparison with clinical populations. We hypothesized that endothelial NOS (eNOS) is the primary isoform mediating NO production during local heating, and eNOS-dependent vasodilation would be reduced in middle-aged skin. Vasodilation was induced by local heating (42°C) and during acetylcholine dose-response (ACh-DR: 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, 100.0 mmol/l) protocols. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of 24 men and women; age cohorts were 12 middle-aged (53 ± 1 yr) and 12 young (23 ± 1 yr). Sites served as control, nonselective NOS inhibited [N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)], inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibited (1400W), and neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibited (N(ω)-propyl-l-arginine). After full expression of the local heating response, l-NAME was perfused at all sites. Cutaneous vascular conductance was measured and normalized to maximum (%CVC(max): Nitropress). l-NAME reduced %CVCmax at baseline, all phases of the local heating response, and at all ACh concentrations compared with all other sites. iNOS inhibition reduced the initial peak (53 ± 2 vs. 60 ± 2%CVC(max); P vasodilation during local heating (52 ± 6 vs. 68 ± 4%CVC(max); P = 0.013) and ACh perfusion (50 mmol/l: 83 ± 3 vs. 93 ± 2%CVC(max); 100 mmol/l: 83 ± 4 vs. 92 ± 3%CVC(max); both P = 0.03) were reduced in middle-aged skin. There were no differences in NOS isoform expression obtained from skin biopsy samples between groups (all P > 0.05). These data suggest that eNOS mediates the production of NO during local heating and that cutaneous vasodilation is attenuated in middle-aged skin.

  8. Crystal Structure of DNA-PKcs Reveals a Large Open-Ring Cradle Comprised of HEAT Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Bancinyane L.; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2009-01-01

    Broken chromosomes arising from DNA double strand breaks result from endogenous events such as the production of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism, as well as from exogenous sources such as ionizing radiation1, 2, 3. Left unrepaired or incorrectly repaired they can lead to genomic changes that may result in cell death or cancer. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a holo-enzyme that comprises DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs)4, 5 and the heterodimer Ku70/Ku80, plays a major role in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the main pathway in mammals used to repair double strand breaks6, 7, 8. DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine protein kinase comprising a single polypeptide chain of 4128 amino acids and belonging to the phosphotidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)- related protein family9. DNA-PKcs is involved in the sensing and transmission of DNA damage signals to proteins such as p53, setting off events that lead to cell cycle arrest10, 11. It phosphorylates a wide range of substrates in vitro, including Ku70/Ku80, which is translocated along DNA12. Here we present the crystal structure of human DNA-PKcs at 6.6Å resolution, in which the overall fold is for the first time clearly visible. The many α-helical HEAT repeats (helix-turn-helix motifs) facilitate bending and allow the polypeptide chain to fold into a hollow circular structure. The C-terminal kinase domain is located on top of this structure and a small HEAT repeat domain that likely binds DNA is inside. The structure provides a flexible cradle to promote DNA double-strand-break repair. PMID:20023628

  9. Theoretical modeling of time-dependent skin temperature and heat losses during whole-body cryotherapy: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, G; Marreiro, A; Pron, H; Lestriez, P; Boyer, F C; Quinart, H; Tourbah, A; Taïar, R

    2016-11-01

    This article establishes the basics of a theoretical model for the constitutive law that describes the skin temperature and thermolysis heat losses undergone by a subject during a session of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC). This study focuses on the few minutes during which the human body is subjected to a thermal shock. The relationship between skin temperature and thermolysis heat losses during this period is still unknown and have not yet been studied in the context of the whole human body. The analytical approach here is based on the hypothesis that the skin thermal shock during a WBC session can be thermally modelled by the sum of both radiative and free convective heat transfer functions. The validation of this scientific approach and the derivation of temporal evolution thermal laws, both on skin temperature and dissipated thermal power during the thermal shock open many avenues of large scale studies with the aim of proposing individualized cryotherapy protocols as well as protocols intended for target populations. Furthermore, this study shows quantitatively the substantial imbalance between human metabolism and thermolysis during WBC, the explanation of which remains an open question.

  10. Effect of cold water immersion on repeated 1-km cycling performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Abbiss, Chris R; Watson, Greig; Nosaka, Kazunori; Laursen, Paul B

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a short cold water immersion (CWI) intervention on rectal and muscle temperature, isokinetic strength and 1-km cycling time trial performance in the heat. Ten male cyclists performed a 1-km time trial at 35.0+/-0.3 degrees C and 40.0+/-3.0% relative humidity, followed by 20 min recovery sitting in either cold water (14 degrees C) for 5 min or in 35 degrees C air (control); a second 1-km time trial immediately followed. Peak and mean cycling power output were recorded for both time trials. Rectal and muscle temperature, and maximal isokinetic concentric torque of the knee extensors were measured before and immediately after the first and second time trials. Rectal temperature was not different between cold water immersion and control conditions at any time points. After the second time trial, however, muscle temperature was significantly lower (-1.3+/-0.7 degrees C) in cold water immersion compared with the control trial. While peak and mean power decreased from the first to second time trial in both conditions (-86+/-54 W and -24+/-16 W, respectively), maximal isokinetic concentric torque was similar between conditions at all time points. The 5 min cold water immersion intervention lowered muscle temperature but did not affect isokinetic strength or 1-km cycling performance. Copyright (c) 2008 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Numerical simulation of an atmospheric pressure RF-driven plasma needle and heat transfer to adjacent human skin using COMSOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Maximilian; Ochoa, Angel; Breitkopf, Cornelia

    2015-06-07

    Plasma medicine is an emerging field where plasma physics is used for therapeutical applications. Temperature is an important factor to take into account with respect to the applications of plasma to biological systems. During the treatment, the tissue temperature could increase to critical values. In this work, a model is presented, which is capable of predicting the skin temperature during a treatment with a radio frequency driven plasma needle. The main gas was helium. To achieve this, a discharge model was coupled to a heat transfer and fluid flow model. The results provide maximum application times for different power depositions in order to avoid reaching critical skin temperatures.

  12. [Study on the skin-core evolvement of carbon fibers as a function of heat treatment temperature by Raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-jie; Fan, Li-dong; Wang, Hao-jing; Zhu, Zhen-ping

    2008-08-01

    The skin-core evolvement of the carbon fibers was studied as a function of heat-treatment temperature though the analysis of Raman spectroscopy of the carbon fibers surface and core. It was found that the change of the Raman spectra of the carbon fibers core was similar to that on the surface with the increase in heat-treatment temperature. At 1600 degrees C, the Rs and Rc values were almost equal, indicating that the degrees of the graphitization of the carbon fibers surface and core were almost uniform. The Rs and Rc values decreased dramatically with the increase in heat-treatment temperature, and Rs decreased more. At 2800 degrees C, the Rs value came to 0.429, lowered 77.2%, while the Rc value then came to 1.101, lowered 38.7% only. It implied that the graphitization degree of the carbon fibers was enhanced with increasing the heat treatment temperature, and that of carbon fibers surface was enhanced more. The graphite characters of the carbon of the carbon fibers surface were different from that of the carbon fibers core. The former is close to soft carbon, which is easy to graphitize, while the latter is close to hard carbon, which is difficult to graphitize, and it may be resin carbon Skin-core structure gene Rsc (= Rs/Rc) which denoted the skin-core degree of the carbon fibers was first brought forward and adopted. The Rsc value is between 0 and 1. When the Rsc value is equal to 1, the carbon fibers are homogenous. When the Rsc value is close to zero, there are serious skin-core structures in the carbon fibers. The Rsc value reduced linearly with the increase in heat-treatment temperature, indicating that the homogeneous degrees of the carbon fibers decreased and the skin-core degrees of the carbon fibers increased. The crystallite size of the carbon fibers surface and core increased gradually with the increase in heat-treatment temperature, but the surface's increased more quickly, indicating that the carbon of the carbon fibers surface was easier to

  13. An elastic second skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.; Anderson, R. Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (<40%), and that withstands elongations exceeding 250%, elastically recoiling with minimal strain-energy loss on repeated deformation. The application of XPL to the herniated lower eyelid fat pads of 12 subjects resulted in an average 2-grade decrease in herniation appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  14. Environmental heat stress modulates thyroid status and its response to repeated endotoxin challenge in steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, S; Elsasser, T H; Rhoads, R P; Collier, R J; Baumgard, L H

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in cattle, the effects of acute exposure to a heat stress (HS) environment on the status of the pituitary (thyrotropin, TSH)-thyroid (thyroxine, T4)-peripheral tissue T4 deiodination (type 1 5'-deiodinase [D1]; triiodothyronine [T3]; reverse-triiodothyronine [rT3]) axis, and the further response of this pituitary-thyroid-peripheral tissue axis (PTTA) to perturbation caused by the induction of the proinflammatory innate immune state provoked by the administration of gram-negative bacteria endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). Ten steers (318 ± 49 kg body weight) housed in controlled environment chambers were subjected to either a thermoneutral (TN: constant 19°C) or HS temperature conditions (cyclical daily temperatures: 32.2°C-40.0°C) for a total period of 9 d. To minimize the effects of altered plane of nutrition due to HS, steers in TN were pair-fed to animals in HS conditions. Steers received 2 LPS challenges 3 d apart (LPS1 and LPS2; 0.2 μg/kg body weight, intravenously, Escherichia coli 055:B5) with the first challenge administered on day 4 relative to the start of the environmental conditioning. Jugular blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 7, and 24 h relative to the start of each LPS challenge. Plasma TSH, T4, T3, and rT3 were measured by radioimmunoassay. Liver D1 activity was measured in biopsy samples collected before the LPS1 (0 h) and 24 h after LPS2. Before the start of LPS1, HS decreased (P thyroid components of the PTTA, whereas a normal capacity to generate T3 from T4 in the liver is preserved. The data also suggest that LPS challenge further suppresses all components of the PTTA including liver T3 generation, and these PTTA perturbations are more pronounced in steers that encounter a HS exposure. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Studying the effects of the heat stress on the various layers of human skin using damage function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijaz, Mir; Khanday, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    This paper develops a model to identify the effects of thermal stress on temperature distribution and damage in human dermal regions. The design and selection of the model takes into account many factors effecting the temperature distribution of skin, e.g., thermal conductance, perfusion, metabolic heat generation and thermal protective capabilities of the skin. The transient temperature distribution within the region is simulated using a two-dimensional finite element model of the Pennes’ bioheat equation. The relationship between temperature and time is integrated to view the damage caused to human skin by using Henriques’ model Henriques, F. C., Arch. Pathol. 43 (1947) 489-502]. The Henriques’ damage model is found to be more desirable for use in predicting the threshold of thermal damage. This work can be helpful in both emergency medicines as well as to plastic surgeon in deciding upon a course of action for the treatment of different burn injuries.

  16. Delayed-type hypersensitivity, contact sensitivity, and phytohemagglutinin skin-test responses of heat- and cold-stressed calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, K W; Greenfield, R E; Evermann, J F; Parish, S M; Perryman, L E

    1982-05-01

    Three-week-old Holstein bull calves were used to investigate the effect of a 2-week chronic heat (35 C) or cold (-5 C) exposure on delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions to purified protein derivative after sensitization with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis, contact sensitivity (CS) reactions to 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin tests. Heat exposure reduced expression of DTH reactions by 42% and CS reactions by 38% at 24 hours after elicitation of the responses. The PHA-induced skin tests were not affected after 1 week of heat exposure, but this reaction was reduced by 20% after 2 weeks of heat exposure. The immune response of calves exposed to cold air temperatures was more complex. Cold exposure suppressed CS reactions by 39% at the end of both the 1st and 2nd weeks. The PHA response was reduced by 39% after 2 weeks of cold exposure. The DTH response depended on duration of cold exposure. The DTH reaction was increased by 42% after 1 week, but was reduced by 14% after 2 weeks. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that environmental stressors alter host resistance by affecting the immune system. Furthermore, these stress-induced changes in immune events depend on the type of immune response, the nature of the environmental stressor, and the length of time that calves are exposed to the stressor.

  17. Specific Binding of Tetratricopeptide Repeat Proteins to Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) Is Regulated by Affinity and Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assimon, Victoria A; Southworth, Daniel R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2015-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) require the help of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain-containing cochaperones for many of their functions. Each monomer of Hsp70 or Hsp90 can interact with only a single TPR cochaperone at a time, and each member of the TPR cochaperone family brings distinct functions to the complex. Thus, competition for TPR binding sites on Hsp70 and Hsp90 appears to shape chaperone activity. Recent structural and biophysical efforts have improved our understanding of chaperone-TPR contacts, focusing on the C-terminal EEVD motif that is present in both chaperones. To better understand these important protein-protein interactions on a wider scale, we measured the affinity of five TPR cochaperones, CHIP, Hop, DnaJC7, FKBP51, and FKBP52, for the C-termini of four members of the chaperone family, Hsc70, Hsp72, Hsp90α, and Hsp90β, in vitro. These studies identified some surprising selectivity among the chaperone-TPR pairs, including the selective binding of FKBP51/52 to Hsp90α/β. These results also revealed that other TPR cochaperones are only able to weakly discriminate between the chaperones or between their paralogs. We also explored whether mimicking phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues near the EEVD motif might impact affinity and found that pseudophosphorylation had selective effects on binding to CHIP but not other cochaperones. Together, these findings suggest that both intrinsic affinity and post-translational modifications tune the interactions between the Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins and the TPR cochaperones.

  18. Modeling and simulation of heat distribution in human skin caused by laser irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luan, Y.; Dams, S.D.

    2009-01-01

    Study of light-based skin rejuvenation needs prospective insights of mechanism of laser tissue interaction. A well-built model plays a key role in predicting temperature distribution in human skin exposed to laser irradiation. Therefore, it not only provides guidance for in vitro experiment, but

  19. Modeling and simulation of heat distribution in human skin caused by laser irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luan, Y.; Dams, S.D.

    2009-01-01

    Study of light-based skin rejuvenation needs prospective insights of mechanism of laser tissue interaction. A well-built model plays a key role in predicting temperature distribution in human skin exposed to laser irradiation. Therefore, it not only provides guidance for in vitro experiment, but als

  20. Spread of smoke and heat along narrow air cavity in double-skin façade fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Lun Cheuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A scenario on double-skin façade fire was identified earlier for hazard assessment. A flashover room fire occurred next to the façade, broke the interior glass pane and spread to the façade cavity. As observed in experiments, hot gas moved up as a vertical channel flow for narrow façade cavity. Heat and smoke spread along the narrow air cavity of a double-skin façade will be studied in this paper. A simple mathematical model is developed from basic heat transfer theory for studying the vertical air temperature profiles of the hot gas flowing along the cavity. Assuming one-dimensional flow for hot gas moving up the façade cavity, conservation equations on mass and enthalpy were solved. Experimental results on two double-skin façade rigs of height 6 m and 15 m with narrow cavity depth were used to justify the results. A total of 11 tests were carried out. Correlation expressions between cavity air temperature and the height above ceiling of the fire room were derived.

  1. Synergistic skin heat shock protein expression in response to combined laser treatment with a diode laser and ablative fractional lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasch, Uwe; Sonja, Grunewald; Haedersdal, Merete

    2014-06-01

    Diode laser-based skin heating has been shown to minimise scars by interfering with wound healing responses through the induction of heat shock proteins (HSP). HSP are also induced after ablative fractional laser (AFXL) wound healing. AFXL itself is highly recommended for scar treatment. Therefore, the sequential combination of both modalities may produce superior outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the pretreatment effects of a diode laser before AFXL on wound healing responses in terms of HSP up-regulation in an in vitro model. Immediate responses and responses on days 1, 3 or 6 post-procedure were studied in an in vitro porcine skin model (n = 240). Untreated samples served as control. Immunohistochemical investigation (Hsp70) was performed in all untreated controls, diode laser-, AFXL-, and in diode laser + AFXL-treated samples. Hsp70 was shown to be up-regulated by all interventions between days 1 and 6 after interventions. The largest effect was caused by the combination of a diode laser and an AFXL procedure. Diode laser exposure induces a skin HSP response that can be further enhanced by sequential AFXL treatment. Clinical studies are necessary to investigate the dose response of HSP on scar formation and refine suitable laser exposure settings.

  2. Nonablative skin tightening with a variable depth heating 1310-nm wavelength laser in combination with surface cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene

    2007-11-01

    A near-infrared laser with the ability to target different depths within skin has been developed and evaluated for the application of facial and neck skin tightening in a pilot clinical study. The device consists of a combination of a 1310-nm wavelength and sapphire contact cooling. Cooling temperature and laser pulse duration were varied to target different dermal depths in various subgroups of the subject population. Quantitative changes in various categories characterizing the aging skin employing a comprehensive grading scale as well as subject satisfaction were calculated. A mean improvement of 7.9% (95% CI [confidence interval] 3.6-12.3) in laxity and 10.6% (95% CI 5.8-15.4) in rhytides was determined by quantitative grading at one month after the treatment regimen. These values were 11.0% (5.5-16.5) and 11.7% (5.8-17.7) at 3 months after the treatment regimen. The percent of patients reporting mild or better improvement in laxity of the face and neck was 78% and 61% at one month, and 63% and 61% at 3 months, respectively. The discomfort was minimal. Side effects were limited to short-term erythema and edema. In summary, a variable depth heating laser can achieve skin tightening and wrinkle reduction with high subject satisfaction.

  3. Level of knowledge, attitude and practice of night market food outlet operators in Kuala Lumpur regarding the usage of repeatedly heated cooking oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, A; Mohd Shahrul, S; Chan, S X; Noorhazliza, A P; Khairunnisak, M; Nur Azlina, M F; Qodriyah, H M S; Kamisah, Y; Jaarin, K

    2012-02-01

    Consumption of repeatedly heated oil can be detrimental to health. The objective of this study was to determine the level of knowledge, attitude and practice of night market food outlet operators in Kuala Lumpur regarding the usage of repeatedly heated cooking oil. The quality of cooking oil was also investigated. A cross-sectional study involving pretested questionnaire was undertaken in April 2009. The questionnaire was designed as a tool to collect data from the respondents (n=100) by face-to-face interview. The results showed that majority of respondents had only moderate (53.0%) or low (18.0%) level of knowledge regarding this issue. Most respondents (67.0%) agreed that it is not a good practice. The majority (69.0%) agreed that the usage of repeatedly heated cooking oil is detrimental to health. Despite that, most respondents (63.0%) admitted that they had used cooking oil repeatedly. Most (62.0%) of the cooking oil samples taken from the night market food outlets were considered fit for human consumption. In conclusion, the level of knowledge of night market food outlet operators in Kuala Lumpur regarding this issue needs to be improved in order to ensure the safety of fried food purchased from such establishments.

  4. Effect of short-term heat acclimation on endurance time and skin blood flow in trained athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen TI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tsung-I Chen,1,2 Pu-Hsi Tsai,3 Jui-Hsing Lin,4 Ning-Yuean Lee,5 Michael TC Liang61Graduate Institute of Sport Science, National Taiwan Sport University, Taoyuan, 2Center for Physical Education, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, 3Department of Sport and Leisure, National Quemoy University, Kinmen, 4Department of Physical Education, National Pingtung University of Education, Pingtung, 5College of Living Technology, Tainan University of Technology, Tainan, Taiwan; 6Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA, USABackground: To examine whether short-term, ie, five daily sessions, vigorous dynamic cycling exercise and heat exposure could achieve heat acclimation in trained athletes and the effect of heat acclimation on cutaneous blood flow in the active and nonactive limb.Methods: Fourteen male badminton and table tennis athletes (age = 19.6 ± 1.2 years were randomized into a heat acclimation (EXP, n = 7 or nonheat acclimation (CON, n = 7 group. For 5 consecutive days, the EXP group was trained using an upright leg cycle ergometer in a hot environment (38.4°C ± 0.4°C, while the CON group trained in a thermoneutral environment (24.1°C ± 0.3°C. For both groups, the training intensity and duration increased from a work rate of 10% below ventilatory threshold (VT and 25 minutes per session on day 1, to 10% above VT and 45 minutes per session on day 5. Subjects performed two incremental leg cycle exercise tests to exhaustion at baseline and post-training in both hot and thermoneutral conditions. Study outcome measurements include: maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max; exercise heart rate (HR; O2 pulse; exercise time to exhaustion (tmax; skin blood flow in the upper arm (SkBFa and quadriceps (SkBFq; and mean skin (Tsk.Results: The significant heat-acclimated outcome measurements obtained during high-intensity leg cycling exercise in the high ambient environment are: (1 56%–100% reduction in cutaneous

  5. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Transfer Rate Using a Thin-Skin Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the design and use of a thin metallic calorimeter for measuring heat transfer rate (also called heat flux). Thermocouples are attached to the unexposed surface of the calorimeter. A one-dimensional heat flow analysis is used for calculating the heat transfer rate from the temperature measurements. Applications include aerodynamic heating, laser and radiation power measurements, and fire safety testing. 1.2 Advantages 1.2.1 Simplicity of ConstructionThe calorimeter may be constructed from a number of materials. The size and shape can often be made to match the actual application. Thermocouples may be attached to the metal by spot, electron beam, or laser welding. 1.2.2 Heat transfer rate distributions may be obtained if metals with low thermal conductivity, such as some stainless steels, are used. 1.2.3 The calorimeters can be fabricated with smooth surfaces, without insulators or plugs and the attendant temperature discontinuities, to provide more realistic flow conditions for ...

  6. Optimised Cockpit Heat Load Analysis using Skin Temperature Predicted by CFD and Validation by Thermal Mapping to Improve the Performance of Fighter Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paresh Gupta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Designing of optimum environmental control system (ECS plays a major role for increasing performance of fighter aircraft depending upon requirement of engine bleed air for running of ECS. Accurate estimation of cockpit skin temperature for obtaining optimised cockpit heat load helps in estimation of engine bleed air for ECS. Present research evolved a methodology for comparing the theoretically calculated skin temperature with computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis to obtain optimum skin temperature. Results are validated by flight tests under critical flight conditions using thermal crayons. Based on which the optimized heat load and bleed air requirements has been computed. Uncertainty analysis of skin temperature measurement for thermal crayons have been undertaken. The results indicate that the theoretical skin temperature is -26.70 per cent as that of CFD estimated skin temperature. Optimized average cockpit heat load at critical flight profiles is 0.74 times the theoretical cockpit heat load, leading to reduction of bleed air requirement by 26 per cent as compared to theoretical. Due to this literature survey has pridicted the increase in performance parameters like increase in bleed air pressure by 78 per cent, increase in thrust by 60 per cent, and decrease in specific fuel consumption (SFC by 40 per cent to improve the endurance of aircraft. The research has generated governing equations for variation of cockpit heat loads w.r.t aircraft skin temperatures.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 1, January 2015, pp.12-24, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.7200

  7. Effects of water-filtered infrared-A and of heat on cell death, inflammation, antioxidative potential and of free radical formation in viable skin--first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazena, Helmut; Pittermann, Wolfgang; Müller, Werner; Jung, Katinka; Kelleher, Debra K; Herrling, Thomas; Meffert, Peter; Uebelhack, Ralf; Kietzmann, Manfred

    2014-09-05

    The effects of water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) and of convective heat on viability, inflammation, inducible free radicals and antioxidative power were investigated in natural and viable skin using the ex vivo Bovine Udder System (BUS) model. Therefore, skin samples from differently treated parts of the udder of a healthy cow were analyzed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) measurement and by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Neither cell viability, the inflammation status, the radical status or the antioxidative defence systems of the skin were significantly affected by wIRA applied within 30 min by using an irradiance of 1900 W m(-2) which is of relevance for clinical use, but which exceeded the maximum solar IR-A irradiance at the Earth's surface more than 5 times and which resulted in a skin surface temperature of about 45 °C without cooling and of about 37 °C with convective cooling by air ventilation. No significant effects on viability and on inflammation were detected when convective heat was applied alone under equivalent conditions in terms of the resulting skin surface temperatures and exposure time. As compared with untreated skin, free radical formation was almost doubled, whereas the antioxidative power was reduced to about 50% after convective heating to about 45 °C.

  8. Comparison of thermal and hemodynamic responses in skin and muscles to heating with electric and magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Glažar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 12.00 Introduction: It has been shown that sufficient amount of energy provided by electromagnetic diathermy induces the increase of skin temperature and underlying tissues. However, scarce information is available on the differences in responses initiated by various techniques of diathermy. The goal of the present study was to compare thermal and hemodynamic responses of the skin and underlying muscles of the forearm to diathermy applied with electric (EF or magnetic field (MF. Methods: Eleven healthy volunteers participated in the study. On two separate occasions, they randomly received 20-minut diathermy with EF or with MF. Skin and tympanic temperature, and heart rate were measured. Further, kinetics of muscle oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin kinetics were obtained. Thermal perception and thermal comfort were noted through the application of EF and MF. Results: The skin temperature increased similarly during the administration of EF and MF, by ~ 8.0 ± 1.3°C on both occasions. The thermal perception was more intense during the application of EF. Accordingly, the thermal comfort during the application of EF was perceived as less comfortable as compared with MF. During MF the increase in minute muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption was for ~ 42 % higher compared to the heating with EF. Conclusion: Although the increase in skin temperature was similar between EF and MF, the application of diathermy with MF was perceived more comfortable by the participants. Furthermore, the increase in minute muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption was higher in MF compared with EF. Thus, when muscle is the target tissue for physical therapy, a diathermy with magnetic field is the technique of choice. Normal 0 21 false false false SL X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Navadna tabela"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso

  9. Analytical skin friction and heat transfer formula for compressible internal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechant, Lawrence J.; Tattar, Marc J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytic, closed-form friction formula for turbulent, internal, compressible, fully developed flow was derived by extending the incompressible law-of-the-wall relation to compressible cases. The model is capable of analyzing heat transfer as a function of constant surface temperatures and surface roughness as well as analyzing adiabatic conditions. The formula reduces to Prandtl's law of friction for adiabatic, smooth, axisymmetric flow. In addition, the formula reduces to the Colebrook equation for incompressible, adiabatic, axisymmetric flow with various roughnesses. Comparisons with available experiments show that the model averages roughly 12.5 percent error for adiabatic flow and 18.5 percent error for flow involving heat transfer.

  10. Minimal-invasive magnetic heating of tumors does not alter intra-tumoral nanoparticle accumulation, allowing for repeated therapy sessions: an in vivo study in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettering, Melanie; Richter, Heike; Wiekhorst, Frank; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Trahms, Lutz; Alois Kaiser, Werner; Hilger, Ingrid

    2011-12-01

    Localized magnetic heating treatments (hyperthermia, thermal ablation) using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) continue to be an active area of cancer research. For generating the appropriate heat to sufficiently target cell destruction, adequate MNP concentrations need to be accumulated into tumors. Furthermore, the knowledge of MNP bio-distribution after application and additionally after heating is significant, firstly because of the possibility of repeated heating treatments if MNPs remain at the target region and secondly to study potential adverse effects dealing with MNP dilution from the target region over time. In this context, little is known about the behavior of MNPs after intra-tumoral application and magnetic heating. Therefore, the present in vivo study on the bio-distribution of intra-tumorally injected MNPs in mice focused on MNP long term monitoring of pre and post therapy over seven days using multi-channel magnetorelaxometry (MRX). Subsequently, single-channel MRX was adopted to study the bio-distribution of MNPs in internal organs and tumors of sacrificed animals. We found no distinct change of total MNP amounts in vivo during long term monitoring. Most of the MNP amounts remained in the tumors; only a few MNPs were detected in liver and spleen and less than 1% of totally injected MNPs were excreted. Apparently, the application of magnetic heating and the induction of apoptosis did not affect MNP accumulation. Our results indicate that MNP mainly remained within the injection side after magnetic heating over a seven-days-observation and therefore not affecting healthy tissue. As a consequence, localized magnetic heating therapy of tumors might be applied periodically for a better therapeutic outcome.

  11. Effect of functional electrostimulation on impaired skin vasodilator responses to local heating in spinal cord injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, N.T.L. van; Janssen, T.W.; Green, D.J.; Minson, C.T.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces vascular adaptations below the level of the lesion, such as impaired cutaneous vasodilation. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences are unclear. The aim of this study is to examine arm and leg cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) responses to local heat

  12. The effect of pre- versus postinjury infiltration with lidocaine on thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia after heat injury to the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Brennum, J; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of pre- and postinjury infiltration with lidocaine on alterations in mechanical and thermal sensitivity after heat injury to the skin. In the first part of the study, burn injuries (15 x 25 mm rectangular thermode, 50 degrees C, 7 min) were produced...... twice in each subject on the medial side of the left and right calves at least 24 h apart in 8 healthy, unmedicated male volunteers, in order to investigate the effects of the injury on sensitivity in untreated skin. In the second part of the study, burn injuries (15 x 25 mm rectangular thermode, 50...... degrees C, 6 min) were produced twice in each subject on the medial side of the left and right calves at least 24 h apart (n = 10). This was preceded by subcutaneous (s.c.) infiltration with 5-6 ml of 1% plain lidocaine (pre-injury block) on one day, and the same block was performed 35 min after injury...

  13. Differential effects of an expected actin-tropomyosin binding region of heat shock protein 20 on the relaxation in skinned carotid artery and taenia cecum from guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Ryo; Yumoto, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Masaru; Konishi, Masato; Haraoka, Jo; Miki, Tamotsu

    2009-02-01

    To explore the possible role of heat shock protein 20 (HSP20) -linked regulation of actin-myosin interaction in living vascular smooth muscle contraction, we studied the effects of HSP20p and TnIp, synthetic peptides originating from an actin tropomyosin binding region of human heat shock protein 20 [residues 110-121; GFVAREFHRRYR] and that of rabbit cardiac troponin I [residues 136-147; GKFKRPTLRRVR], respectively, on the active stress and phosphorylation level of myosin regulatory light chain (MLC(20)) during relaxation of skinned (cell membrane permeabilized) preparations from "tonic" carotid artery and "phasic" taenia cecum from guinea pig. Active stress of the skinned preparations, resulting from actin-myosin interaction, biphasically decayed following Ca(2+) removal (relaxation). Decay of MLC(20) phosphorylation level by Ca(2+) removal was much faster than active stress in an exponential manner. In skinned carotid artery, HSP20p did neither affect relaxation time course nor MLC(20) dephosphorylation, whereas, in skinned taenia cecum, the peptide slowed relaxation time course through inhibition of MLC(20) dephosphorylation and slowing "latch"-bridge dissociation. On the other hand, TnIp accelerated relaxation time course without affecting MLC(20) dephosphorylation in both skinned carotid artery and skinned taenia cecum. Our present results suggest that, HSP20p slows the relaxation processes through intracellular regulatory mechanisms such as Rho A/Rho-kinase mediated pathways, which are known to be dominant in "phasic" smooth muscles but to be recessive in "tonic" smooth muscles.

  14. Study on critical heat flux in narrow rectangular channel with repeated-rib roughness. 1. Experimental facility and preliminary experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Terada, Atsuhiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    In the design of a spallation target system, the water cooling system, for example a proton beam window and a safety hull, is used with narrow channels, in order to remove high heat flux and prevent lowering of system performance by absorption of neutron. And in narrow channel, heat transfer enhancement using 2-D rib is considered for reduction the cost of cooling component and decrease inventory of water in the cooling system, that is, decrease of the amount of irradiated water. But few studies on CHF with rib have been carried out. Experimental and analytical studies with rib-roughened test section, in 10:1 ratio of pitch to height, are being carried out in order to clarify the CHF in rib-roughened channel. This paper presents the review of previous researches on heat transfer in channel with rib roughness, overview of the test facility and the preliminary experimental and analytical results. As a result, wall friction factors were about 3 times as large as that of smooth channel, and heat transfer coefficients are about 2 times as large as that of smooth channel. The obtained CHF was as same as previous mechanistic model by Sudo. (author)

  15. Conductive and evaporative precooling lowers mean skin temperature and improves time trial performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, S H; Hupperets, M; Hodder, S G; Havenith, G

    2015-06-01

    Self-paced endurance performance is compromised by moderate-to-high ambient temperatures that are evident in many competitive settings. It has become common place to implement precooling prior to competition in an attempt to alleviate perceived thermal load and performance decline. The present study aimed to investigate precooling incorporating different cooling avenues via either evaporative cooling alone or in combination with conductive cooling on cycling time trial performance. Ten trained male cyclists completed a time trial on three occasions in hot (35 °C) ambient conditions with the cooling garment prepared by (a) immersion in water (COOL, evaporative); (b) immersion in water and frozen (COLD, evaporative and conductive); or (c) no precooling (CONT). COLD improved time trial performance by 5.8% and 2.6% vs CONT and COOL, respectively (both P COLD vs CONT (P COLD compared with COOL and CONT (both P COLD. The combination of evaporative and conductive cooling (COLD) had the greatest benefit to performance, which is suggested to be driven by reduced skin temperature following cooling. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Wearable sensors for skin heating and electric field strength in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jay; Klem, Ethan; Cunningham, Garry; Dummer, Andrew

    2010-04-01

    Two novel sensor technologies have been developed for the measurement of skin surface temperature and RF field strength in an RF environment. Such a sensor system would be particularly useful in the test and evaluation of directed energy systems. The sensors operate without being affected by the presence of RF fields and with minimal perturbation of the fields, therefore having a minimal effect on a test. The sensors are designed to be wearable and interface with a portable, battery powered electronics pack by optical fibers. The temperature sensor is based on the variation in fluorescence intensity of a sensor layer with temperature. The RF field sensors operate using a passive circuit that converts the RF field into an optical signal that is measured remotely. Both sensors have been demonstrated in high power microwave lab tests. RF sensor operability has been demonstrated for fields in the range of 0.4 - 8.9 W/cm2, while the temperature sensor has been demonstrated over the 30 - 60°C temperature range.

  17. Pulsed-laser heating: a tool for studying degradation of materials subjected to repeated high-temperature excursions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A.; Cornell, R.H.

    1980-08-21

    The use of pulsed-laser heating was evaluated as a means to obtain high cyclic peak temperatures with short rise times. A two-stage neodymium glass laser was used which produces a 600-..mu..s pulse with energy outputs of up to 100 J. Small disk-shaped samples of AISI 4340 steel served as targets. Some of these were coated with a tungsten deposit. The rear face of some of the targets was instrumented for evaluation of temperature, strain, and stress response. Post-shot metallographic evaluations were made on a number of targets. We saw evidence of surface melting, cracking, and phase transformation. Surface damage was related to differences in the number of pulse cycles and input energy level, variables in the target materials, and the extent of strain-induced stresses. These experiments were performed in air at 1 atm and ambient laboratory temperature. 36 figures.

  18. Effect of ThermaCare HeatWraps and Icy Hot Cream/Patches on Skin and Quadriceps Muscle Temperature and Blood Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott; Laymon, Michael; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of over-the-counter treatments-ThermaCare HeatWraps (chemical reaction to produce heat above the skin), Icy Hot Patch, and Icy Hot Cream (topically applied menthol)-on skin and deep tissue temperature. This was a longitudinal crossover study. On each of 3 days, a ThermaCare HeatWrap, Icy Hot Cream, or Icy Hot Patch was applied randomly over the quadriceps muscle in 15 healthy volunteers with normal body mass. Skin and muscle temperature and blood flow were measured by laser flowmetry every 15 minutes for 2 hours. After 2 hours, mean temperature decreased by 2.1°C (7.0%; P = .02) in skin and 1.0°C (2.9%; P = .01) in muscle with Icy Hot Cream. Icy Hot Patch decreased skin and muscle temperature by 1.7°C (5.4%; P = .03) and 1.3°C (3.8%; P = .01), respectively. In contrast, ThermaCare raised skin and muscle temperature by 7.8°C (25.8%; P = .001) and 2.7°C (7.7%; P = .002), respectively; both were significantly warmer with ThermaCare vs either Icy Hot product (all P Cream: 56.7 flux [39.3%; P = .003]; Patch: 19.1 flux [16.7%; P = .045]). Muscle blood flow decreased with the Patch (6.7 flux [7.0%; P = .02]). After a period of fluctuations, Icy Hot Cream produced a net increase vs baseline of 7.0 flux (16.9%; P = .02). ThermaCare more than doubled blood flow in skin (83.3 flux [109.7%; P = .0003]) and muscle (25.1 flux [148.5%; P = .004]). In this group of 15 healthy volunteers, ThermaCare HeatWraps provided the greatest degree of tissue warming and increase in tissue blood flow.

  19. A passive heat maintenance strategy implemented during a simulated half-time improves lower body power output and repeated sprint ability in professional Rugby Union players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Mark; West, Daniel J; Briggs, Marc A; Bracken, Richard M; Cook, Christian J; Giroud, Thibault; Gill, Nicholas; Kilduff, Liam P

    2015-01-01

    Reduced physical performance has been observed following the half-time period in team sports players, likely due to a decrease in muscle temperature during this period. We examined the effects of a passive heat maintenance strategy employed between successive exercise bouts on core temperature (Tcore) and subsequent exercise performance. Eighteen professional Rugby Union players completed this randomised and counter-balanced study. After a standardised warm-up (WU) and 15 min of rest, players completed a repeated sprint test (RSSA 1) and countermovement jumps (CMJ). Thereafter, in normal training attire (Control) or a survival jacket (Passive), players rested for a further 15 min (simulating a typical half-time) before performing a second RSSA (RSSA 2) and CMJ's. Measurements of Tcore were taken at baseline, post-WU, pre-RSSA 1, post-RSSA 1 and pre-RSSA 2. Peak power output (PPO) and repeated sprint ability was assessed before and after the simulated half-time. Similar Tcore responses were observed between conditions at baseline (Control: 37.06±0.05°C; Passive: 37.03±0.05°C) and for all other Tcore measurements taken before half-time. After the simulated half-time, the decline in Tcore was lower (-0.74±0.08% vs. -1.54±0.06%, psprint times were 1.39±0.17% (prepeated sprint ability in professional Rugby Union players.

  20. The contribution of sensory nerves to the onset threshold for cutaneous vasodilatation during gradual local skin heating of the forearm and leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Gary J; McGarr, Gregory W; Mallette, Matthew M; Del Pozzi, Andrew T; Cheung, Stephen S

    2016-05-01

    During local skin heating, the temporal onset of vasodilatation is delayed in the leg compared to the forearm, and sensory nerve blockade abolishes these differences. However, previous work using rapid skin heating did not allow for determination of sensory nerve influences on temperature thresholds for vasodilatation. Two sites were examined on both the forearm and leg, one control (CTRL), and one treated for sensory nerve blockade (EMLA). Skin blood flux was monitored using laser-Doppler probes, with heaters controlling local skin temperature (Tloc). Tloc was increased from 32-44 °C (+1 °C·10 min(-1)). Stimulus-response curves were constructed by fitting a four-parameter logistic function. EMLA significantly increased Tloc onset in the forearm (CTRL=35.3 ± 0.4 °C; EMLA=36.8 ± 0.7 °C) and leg (CTRL=36.5 ± 0.4 °C; EMLA=38.4 ± 0.5 °C; both Psensory nerves play an important role in both limbs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A passive heat maintenance strategy implemented during a simulated half-time improves lower body power output and repeated sprint ability in professional Rugby Union players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Russell

    Full Text Available Reduced physical performance has been observed following the half-time period in team sports players, likely due to a decrease in muscle temperature during this period. We examined the effects of a passive heat maintenance strategy employed between successive exercise bouts on core temperature (Tcore and subsequent exercise performance. Eighteen professional Rugby Union players completed this randomised and counter-balanced study. After a standardised warm-up (WU and 15 min of rest, players completed a repeated sprint test (RSSA 1 and countermovement jumps (CMJ. Thereafter, in normal training attire (Control or a survival jacket (Passive, players rested for a further 15 min (simulating a typical half-time before performing a second RSSA (RSSA 2 and CMJ's. Measurements of Tcore were taken at baseline, post-WU, pre-RSSA 1, post-RSSA 1 and pre-RSSA 2. Peak power output (PPO and repeated sprint ability was assessed before and after the simulated half-time. Similar Tcore responses were observed between conditions at baseline (Control: 37.06±0.05°C; Passive: 37.03±0.05°C and for all other Tcore measurements taken before half-time. After the simulated half-time, the decline in Tcore was lower (-0.74±0.08% vs. -1.54±0.06%, p<0.001 and PPO was higher (5610±105 W vs. 5440±105 W, p<0.001 in the Passive versus Control condition. The decline in PPO over half-time was related to the decline in Tcore (r = 0.632, p = 0.005. In RSSA 2, best, mean and total sprint times were 1.39±0.17% (p<0.001, 0.55±0.06% (p<0.001 and 0.55±0.06% (p<0.001 faster for Passive versus Control. Passive heat maintenance reduced declines in Tcore that were observed during a simulated half-time period and improved subsequent PPO and repeated sprint ability in professional Rugby Union players.

  2. Assessing complexity of skin blood flow oscillations in response to locally applied heating and pressure in rats: Implications for pressure ulcer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fuyuan; O'Brien, William D.; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of local heating on the complexity of skin blood flow oscillations (BFO) under prolonged surface pressure in rats. Eleven Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: 7 rats underwent surface pressure with local heating (△t=10 °C) and 4 rats underwent pressure without heating. A pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The loading period was divided into nonoverlapping 30 min epochs. For each epoch, multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) was utilized to compute DFA coefficients and complexity of endothelial related metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic frequencies of BFO. The results showed that under surface pressure, local heating led to a significant decrease in DFA coefficients of myogenic frequency during the initial epoch of loading period, a sustained decrease in complexity of myogenic frequency, and a significantly higher degree of complexity of metabolic frequency during the later phase of loading period. Surrogate tests showed that the reduction in complexity of myogenic frequency was associated with a loss of nonlinearity whereas increased complexity of metabolic frequency was associated with enhanced nonlinearity. Our results indicate that increased metabolic activity and decreased myogenic response due to local heating manifest themselves not only in magnitudes of metabolic and myogenic frequencies but also in their structural complexity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using complexity analysis of BFO to monitor the ischemic status of weight-bearing skin and risk of pressure ulcers.

  3. Sagging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin Scars Skin Growths Skin Lesions Spider Veins Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose ... Skin Scars Skin Growths Skin Lesions Spider Veins Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose ...

  4. Relative contributions of interface pressure, shear stress, and temperature on ischemic-induced, skin-reactive hyperemia in healthy volunteers: a repeated measures laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenbruch, Charlie; Tzen, Yi-Ting; Brienza, David; Karg, Patricia E; Lachenbruch, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Although the primary risk factors for pressure ulcer development - pressure, shear, skin temperature, moisture, and friction - have been identified for decades, the relative contribution of each to this risk remains unclear. To confirm the results of and expand upon earlier research into the relative contributions of interface pressures, shear stress, and skin temperature among 4 healthy volunteers, a study involving 6 additional healthy 40- to 75-year-old volunteers was conducted and results of the 2 studies were pooled. All 3 variables (interface pressures, shear stress, and skin temperature) were systematically and randomly varied. In the prone position, volunteers each underwent 18 test conditions representing different combinations of temperature (28˚ C, 32˚ C, 36˚ C), pressure (8.0 and 13.3 kPa), and shear (0, 6.7, and 14.0 kPa) using a computer-controlled indenter applied to the sacrum for 20 minutes exerting weights of 100 g and 200 g to induce 0.98 N and 1.96 N of shear force, respectively. Each condition was tested twice, resulting in a total of 360 trials. Magnitude of postload reactive hyperemia as an index of ischemia was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Fixed effects regression models were used to predict 3 different indices of reactive hyperemic magnitude. Friedman tests were performed to compare the reactive hyperemia among 3 different skin temperatures or shear stresses under the same amount of localized pressure. In all regression models, pressure and temperature were highly significant predictors of the extent of reactive hyperemia (P pressure and shear stress, and the difference was more profound between 32˚ C and 36˚ C than between 28˚ C and 32˚ C. These results confirm that, in laboratory settings, temperature is an important factor in tissue ischemia. Additional studies examining the relative importance of pressure, shear, and temperature and potential effects of lowering temperature on tissue ischemia in healthy volunteers and

  5. The Effect of Local Heat and Cold Therapy on the Intraarticular and Skin Surface Temperature of the Knee

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of local application of ice chips, ligno-paraffin, short-wave diathermy, and nitrogen-cold air on skin and intraarticular temperature. Methods. Forty-two healthy subjects were divided into 4 treatment groups. A temperature probe was inserted into the knee joint cavity and another placed on the overlying skin, and changes in temperature over 3 hours, by treatment group, were recorded. Results. The mean skin surface temperature dropped from 27.9°C to 11.5°C af...

  6. Neural and non-neural control of skin blood flow during isometric handgrip exercise in the heat stressed human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibasaki, M.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    During heat stress, isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise causes cutaneous vasoconstriction, but it remains controversial whether neural mechanisms are responsible for this observation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that cutaneous vasoconstriction during IHG exercise in heat ...

  7. Changes in Ocean Heat, Carbon Content, and Ventilation: A Review of the First Decade of GO-SHIP Global Repeat Hydrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, L D; Feely, R A; Sloyan, B M; Wanninkhof, R; Baringer, M O; Bullister, J L; Carlson, C A; Doney, S C; Fine, R A; Firing, E; Gruber, N; Hansell, D A; Ishii, M; Johnson, G C; Katsumata, K; Key, R M; Kramp, M; Langdon, C; Macdonald, A M; Mathis, J T; McDonagh, E L; Mecking, S; Millero, F J; Mordy, C W; Nakano, T; Sabine, C L; Smethie, W M; Swift, J H; Tanhua, T; Thurnherr, A M; Warner, M J; Zhang, J-Z

    2016-01-01

    Global ship-based programs, with highly accurate, full water column physical and biogeochemical observations repeated decadally since the 1970s, provide a crucial resource for documenting ocean change. The ocean, a central component of Earth's climate system, is taking up most of Earth's excess anthropogenic heat, with about 19% of this excess in the abyssal ocean beneath 2,000 m, dominated by Southern Ocean warming. The ocean also has taken up about 27% of anthropogenic carbon, resulting in acidification of the upper ocean. Increased stratification has resulted in a decline in oxygen and increase in nutrients in the Northern Hemisphere thermocline and an expansion of tropical oxygen minimum zones. Southern Hemisphere thermocline oxygen increased in the 2000s owing to stronger wind forcing and ventilation. The most recent decade of global hydrography has mapped dissolved organic carbon, a large, bioactive reservoir, for the first time and quantified its contribution to export production (∼20%) and deep-ocean oxygen utilization. Ship-based measurements also show that vertical diffusivity increases from a minimum in the thermocline to a maximum within the bottom 1,500 m, shifting our physical paradigm of the ocean's overturning circulation.

  8. A unique HEAT repeat-containing protein SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 is involved in vacuolar membrane dynamics in gravity-sensing cells of Arabidopsis inflorescence stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Yasuko; Yano, Daisuke; Nagafusa, Kiyoshi; Kato, Takehide; Saito, Chieko; Uemura, Tomohiro; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Tasaka, Masao; Terao Morita, Miyo

    2014-04-01

    Plant vacuoles play critical roles in development, growth and stress responses. In mature cells, vacuolar membranes (VMs) display several types of structures, which are formed by invagination and folding of VMs into the lumenal side and can gradually move and change shape. Although such VM structures are observed in a broad range of tissue types and plant species, the molecular mechanism underlying their formation and maintenance remains unclear. Here, we report that a novel HEAT-repeat protein, SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 (SGR6), of Arabidopsis is involved in the control of morphological changes and dynamics of VM structures in endodermal cells, which are the gravity-sensing cells in shoots. SGR6 is a membrane-associated protein that is mainly localized to the VM in stem endodermal cells. The sgr6 mutant stem exhibits a reduced gravitropic response. Higher plants utilize amyloplast sedimentation as a means to sense gravity direction. Amyloplasts are surrounded by VMs in Arabidopsis endodermal cells, and the flexible and dynamic structure of VMs is important for amyloplast sedimentation. We demonstrated that such dynamic features of VMs are gradually lost in sgr6 endodermal cells during a 30 min observation period. Histological analysis revealed that amyloplast sedimentation was impaired in sgr6. Detailed live-cell imaging analyses revealed that the VM structures in sgr6 had severe defects in morphological changes and dynamics. Our results suggest that SGR6 is a novel protein involved in the formation and/or maintenance of invaginated VM structures in gravity-sensing cells.

  9. Changes in Ocean Heat, Carbon Content, and Ventilation: A Review of the First Decade of GO-SHIP Global Repeat Hydrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, L. D.; Feely, R. A.; Sloyan, B. M.; Wanninkhof, R.; Baringer, M. O.; Bullister, J. L.; Carlson, C. A.; Doney, S. C.; Fine, R. A.; Firing, E.; Gruber, N.; Hansell, D. A.; Ishii, M.; Johnson, G. C.; Katsumata, K.; Key, R. M.; Kramp, M.; Langdon, C.; Macdonald, A. M.; Mathis, J. T.; McDonagh, E. L.; Mecking, S.; Millero, F. J.; Mordy, C. W.; Nakano, T.; Sabine, C. L.; Smethie, W. M.; Swift, J. H.; Tanhua, T.; Thurnherr, A. M.; Warner, M. J.; Zhang, J.-Z.

    2016-01-01

    Global ship-based programs, with highly accurate, full water column physical and biogeochemical observations repeated decadally since the 1970s, provide a crucial resource for documenting ocean change. The ocean, a central component of Earth's climate system, is taking up most of Earth's excess anthropogenic heat, with about 19% of this excess in the abyssal ocean beneath 2,000 m, dominated by Southern Ocean warming. The ocean also has taken up about 27% of anthropogenic carbon, resulting in acidification of the upper ocean. Increased stratification has resulted in a decline in oxygen and increase in nutrients in the Northern Hemisphere thermocline and an expansion of tropical oxygen minimum zones. Southern Hemisphere thermocline oxygen increased in the 2000s owing to stronger wind forcing and ventilation. The most recent decade of global hydrography has mapped dissolved organic carbon, a large, bioactive reservoir, for the first time and quantified its contribution to export production (˜20%) and deep-ocean oxygen utilization. Ship-based measurements also show that vertical diffusivity increases from a minimum in the thermocline to a maximum within the bottom 1,500 m, shifting our physical paradigm of the ocean's overturning circulation.

  10. EEG frequency tagging using ultra-slow periodic heat stimulation of the skin reveals cortical activity specifically related to C fiber thermonociceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Elisabeth; Liberati, Giulia; Mouraux, André

    2017-01-01

    The recording of event-related brain potentials triggered by a transient heat stimulus is used extensively to study nociception and diagnose lesions or dysfunctions of the nociceptive system in humans. However, these responses are related exclusively to the activation of a specific subclass of nociceptive afferents: quickly-adapting thermonociceptors. In fact, except if the activation of Aδ fibers is avoided or if A fibers are blocked, these responses specifically reflect activity triggered by the activation of Type 2 quickly-adapting A fiber mechano-heat nociceptors (AMH-2). Here, we propose a novel method to isolate, in the human electroencephalogram (EEG), cortical activity related to the sustained periodic activation of heat-sensitive thermonociceptors, using very slow (0.2 Hz) and long-lasting (75 s) sinusoidal heat stimulation of the skin between baseline and 50°C. In a first experiment, we show that when such long-lasting thermal stimuli are applied to the hand dorsum of healthy volunteers, the slow rises and decreases of skin temperature elicit a consistent periodic EEG response at 0.2 Hz and its harmonics, as well as a periodic modulation of the magnitude of theta, alpha and beta band EEG oscillations. In a second experiment, we demonstrate using an A fiber block that these EEG responses are predominantly conveyed by unmyelinated C fiber nociceptors. The proposed approach constitutes a novel mean to study C fiber function in humans, and to explore the cortical processing of tonic heat pain in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27871921

  11. Comparative analysis of repeated skin dilation in the treatment of scarring baldness%重复皮肤扩张术治疗瘢痕性秃发的对比分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李继洋; 惠雷; 盖亚; 郭力

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effect of repeated skin expansion technique on scarring alopecia. Methods Twenty-eight cases of scarring alopecia underwent repeated relay skin ex-pansion technique were chosen,and 21 cases of scarring alopecia underwent repeated delay skin expan-sion technique were chose. The times of operations,length of hospital stay,expenses and times of anes-thesia were compared between the two methods. Results Relay dilatation was used to repair scarring al-opecia in 28 cases,26 patients had good repairment,the average length of hospital stay was(24 ± 6)d, the average hospitalization expenses were(26 ± 3)thousand yuan. Delay skin expansion was used to re-pair scarring alopecia in 21 cases,20 cases of had good reparrment,the average length of hospital stay was(32 ± 4)d,the average hospitalization expenses were(38 ± 4)thousand yuan. There were signifi-cant differences in the average length of hospital stay and the average hospitalization expenses between the two methods( P<0 . 01 ). Conclusions Delayed skin expansion and relayed expansion both can better repair scarring alopecia,but relayed expansion is feasible,and has fewer operation times,shorter length of hospital stay,little costs and pain.%目的:探讨重复皮肤扩张术治疗瘢痕性秃发的临床效果。方法选择本科重复接力皮肤扩张术治疗瘢痕性秃发28例,重复延期皮肤扩张术治疗瘢痕性秃发21例,对两种治疗方法的手术次数、住院时间、手术费用、麻醉次数等进行比较分析。结果接力扩张术修复瘢痕性秃发28例,修复良好26例,平均住院时间(24±6)d,平均住院费用(2.6±0.3)万元;延期皮肤扩张修复瘢痕秃发21例,修复良好20例,平均住院时间(32±4)d,平均住院费用(3.8±0.4)万元。两种治疗方式的平均住院时间及平均住院费比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)。结论延期皮肤扩张和接力扩

  12. Optimal and safe treatment of spider leg veins measuring less than 1.5 mm on skin type IV patients, using repeated low-fluence Nd:YAG laser pulses after polidocanol injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Moraga, Javier; Hernández, Esteban; Royo, Josefina; Alcolea, Justo; Isarría, M Jose; Pascu, Mihail Lucian; Smarandache, Adriana; Trelles, Mario

    2013-05-01

    Treatment of micro-veins of less than 1.5 mm with laser and with chemical sclerosis is technically challenging because of their difficulty to remedy. Laser treatment is even more difficult when dark phototypes are involved.Three groups of 30 patients each, skin type IV, and vessels measuring less than 1.5 mm in diameter, were enrolled for two treatment sessions 8 weeks apart: group A, polidocanol (POL) micro-foam injection; group B, Nd:YAG laser alone; and group C, laser after POL injection. Repeated 8-Hz low-fluence pulses, moving the hand piece over a 3-cm vein segment with an average of five laser passes maximum and with a total time irradiation of 1 s were used. Sixteen weeks after the second treatment, statistically, degree of clearance after examining photographs and patients satisfaction index, plotted on a visual analogue scale and comparing results of all three groups, results were significantly better for group C (p<0.0001). No significant differences in complications were noticed between the three groups. Efficacy of combining POL and laser proved safe and satisfactory in 96 % of patients using low-fluence laser pulses with a total cumulative energy in the 3 cm venous segment, lower than that of conventional treatment. Very few and transient complications were observed. POL foam injection followed by laser pulses is safe and efficient for vein treatment in dark-skinned patients.

  13. Modeling Burns for Pre-Cooled Skin Flame Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgrim Log

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available On a television show, a pre-cooled bare-skinned person (TV host passed through engulfing kerosene flames. The assumption was that a water film should protect him during 0.74 s flame exposure in an environment of 86 kW/m2 heat flux. The TV host got light burn inflammation on the back, arms and legs. The present work studies skin temperatures and burn damage integral of such dangerous flame exposure. The skin temperature distribution during water spray pre-cooling, transport to the flames, flame exposure, transport to the water pool, and final water pool cooling is modelled numerically. Details of the temperature development of the skin layers are presented, as well as the associated damage integral. It is shown that 5 °C water spray applied for a 30 s period pre-cooled the skin sufficiently to prevent severe skin injury. Soot marks indicate that the water layer evaporated completely in some areas resulting in skin flame contact. This exposed dry skin directly to the flames contributing significantly to the damage integral. It is further analyzed how higher water temperature, shorter pre-cooling period or longer flame exposure influence the damage integral. It is evident that minor changes in conditions could lead to severe burns and that high heat flux levels at the end of the exposure period are especially dangerous. This flame stunt should never be repeated.

  14. Vasomotion in human skin before and after local heating recorded with laser Doppler flowmetry. A method for induction of vasomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J; Bülow, J; Lassen, N A

    1989-01-01

    Rhythmical variations in blood cell flux in human skin have been studied using laser Doppler flowmetry. The fluctuations in blood cell flux could be divided into two different categories named alpha- and beta-oscillations with a median frequency of 6.8 min-1 and 1.5 min-1, respectively. The ampli...

  15. The Effect of Local Heat and Cold Therapy on the Intraarticular and Skin Surface Temperature of the Knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld, F.G.J.; Rasker, J.J.; Jacobs, J.W.G.; Overmars, H.J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of local application of ice chips, ligno-paraffin, short-wave diathermy, and nitrogen-cold air on skin and intraarticular temperature. Methods. Forty-two healthy subjects were divided into 4 treatment groups. A temperature probe was inserted into the knee joint ca

  16. 热休克蛋白在某些皮肤病的研究进展%Heat shock proteins in some skin diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张珍; 骆丹

    2010-01-01

    热休克蛋白家族广泛存在于所有原核和真核细胞内,在环境应激作用下热休克蛋白的表达水平明显增高,可对细胞起一定的保护作用.大多数热休克蛋白为分子伴侣,其主要功能是调节蛋白质代谢,包括促进蛋白质折叠、跨膜运输和错误蛋白多肽的降解及调控等.人皮肤中的热休克蛋白表达与表皮分化、光防护和某些皮肤疾病密切相关.概述热休克蛋白在正常皮肤、光损伤状态下以及某些炎性皮肤病中的表达情况及作用方面的研究进展.%The family of heat shock protein (HSP) exists in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The expression increase of HSPs in response to environmental stress protects cells in a cenain degree. Most HSPs are molecular chaperones, and their principal function is to regulate protein metabolism. including protein folding, transmembrane transport, degradation and regulation of erroneous proteins. The expression of HSPs is closely related to epidermal differentiation, photoprotection and some skin diseases. This review focuses on the expression of HSPs in normal skin, photodamaged skin and lesions of some inflammatory skin diseases as well as its significance

  17. Analysis of spectral identifier of fatty acid functional group of packaging frying oil and bulk frying oil with the effect of repeated heating using FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Vinda Dwi Dini; Nasution, Aulia M. T.

    2016-11-01

    Frying oil is a cooking medium that is commonly used in Indonesia. Frying process can lead changes in the properties of frying oil. Heating oil with high temperature and many repetition will cause degradation in oil and may cause health problems, such as cholesterol, induces heart disease, and cancer. Degradation of the frying oil can be determined based on changes in the cluster function of fatty acids due to the heating influence. Therefore, it is necessary to test the frying oil under treatments with variety of time heating using a spectrometer Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). Spectra from FTIR was processed using derivative spectroscopy method to clearly see the difference in the measured spectra. Range spectra of interest is at wavelength of 13,500 to 14,200 nm i.e. indicating the double bond of carbon in molecule HC = CH. The analysis was performed by calculating the area of the spectral curve from the respected 2nd order derivative. Result show that the absorbance of packaging frying oil is higher than the bulk frying oil. In addition, heating of frying oil can decrease the area of respected 2nd order derivative. Packaging frying oil heating on 30 minutes which has the area of spectral curve of 0.904217 decrease become 0.881394 after 3 times heating. While the bulk frying oil heating 30 minutes, in the first heating which has area of spectral curve of 0.916089 decrease become 0.865379 after 3 times heating. The decline in the area of the curve occurs due to breakdown of the double bond of carbon in the molecule HC = CH that caused by heating at high temperatures and repeated heating.

  18. Reliability and validity of skin temperature measurement by telemetry thermistors and a thermal camera during exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, C A; Richardson, A J; Watt, P W; Maxwell, N S

    2014-10-01

    New technologies afford convenient modalities for skin temperature (TSKIN) measurement, notably involving wireless telemetry and non-contact infrared thermometry. The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of skin temperature measurements using a telemetry thermistor system (TT) and thermal camera (TC) during exercise in a hot environment. Each system was compared against a certified thermocouple, measuring the surface temperature of a metal block in a thermostatically controlled waterbath. Fourteen recreational athletes completed two incremental running tests, separated by one week. Skin temperatures were measured simultaneously with TT and TC compared against a hard-wired thermistor system (HW) throughout rest and exercise. Post hoc calibration based on waterbath results displayed good validity for TT (mean bias [MB]=-0.18 °C, typical error [TE]=0.18 °C) and reliability (MB=-0.05 °C, TE=0.31 °C) throughout rest and exercise. Poor validity (MB=-1.4 °C, TE=0.35 °C) and reliability (MB=-0.65 °C, TE=0.52 °C) was observed for TC, suggesting it may be best suited to controlled, static situations. These findings indicate TT systems provide a convenient, valid and reliable alternative to HW, useful for measurements in the field where traditional methods may be impractical.

  19. The response of skin friction, wall heat transfer and pressure drop to wall waviness in the presence of buoyancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. B. Rao

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminar natural convection flow and heat transfer of a viscous incompressible fluid confined between two long vertical wavy walls has been analysed taking the fluid properties constant and variable. In particular, attention is restricted to estimate the effects of viscous dissipation and wall waviness on the flow and heat transfer characteristics. Use has been made of a linearization technique to simplify the governing equations and of Galerkin's method in the solution. The solutions obtained for the velocity and the temperature-fields hold good for all values of the Grashof number and wave number of the wavy walls.

  20. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  1. Aging changes in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stress Other causes of skin changes: Allergies to plants and other substances Climate Clothing Exposures to industrial and household chemicals Indoor heating Sunlight can cause: Loss of elasticity (elastosis) ...

  2. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  3. Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Skin KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Skin Print A A ... are really dead skin cells. continue Bye-Bye Skin Cells These old cells are tough and strong, ...

  4. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exhaustion symptoms include cool, moist, pale or flushed skin; headache; dizziness; weakness; feeling exhausted; heavy sweating; nausea; ... stage of heat illness) include flushed, hot, dry skin; fainting; a rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing; ...

  5. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exhaustion symptoms include cool, moist, pale or flushed skin; headache; dizziness; weakness; feeling exhausted; heavy sweating; nausea; ... stage of heat illness) include flushed, hot, dry skin; fainting; a rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing; ...

  6. Skin prick testing with extensively heated milk or egg products helps predict the outcome of an oral food challenge: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraj Zein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cow’s milk and hen’s egg are the most frequently encountered food allergens in the pediatric population. Skin prick testing (SPT with commercial extracts followed by an oral food challenge (OFC are routinely performed in the diagnostic investigation of these children. Recent evidence suggests that milk-allergic and/or egg-allergic individuals can often tolerate extensively heated (EH forms of these foods. This study evaluated the predictive value of a negative SPT with EH milk or egg in determining whether a child would tolerate an OFC to the EH food product. Methods Charts from a single allergy clinic were reviewed for any patient with a negative SPT to EH milk or egg, prepared in the form of a muffin. Data collected included age, sex, symptoms of food allergy, co-morbidities and the success of the OFC to the muffin. Results Fifty-eight patients had negative SPTs to the EH milk or egg in a muffin and underwent OFC to the appropriate EH food in the outpatient clinic. Fifty-five of these patients tolerated the OFC. The negative predictive value for the SPT with the EH food product was 94.8%. Conclusions SPT with EH milk or egg products was predictive of a successful OFC to the same food. Larger prospective studies are required to substantiate these findings.

  7. Hyperalgesia and temporal summation of pain after heat injury in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Andersen, O K; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    1998-01-01

    , in three areas: primary and secondary mechanical hyperalgesia induced by the heat injury, and in a mirror image of the injury on the opposite leg. Temporal summation of pain was induced by repeated electrical stimuli (five stimuli at 2 Hz) and assessed by visual analog scale (VAS). Primary hyperalgesia......Temporal summation of pain occurs when repeated stimuli become increasingly painful in spite of unchanged stimulus intensity. Summation can be quantified as the difference in pain between the first and the last stimulus in a train of stimuli. The aim of the study was to compare temporal summation...... of pain in normal skin with summation of pain in skin with primary and secondary hyperalgesia evoked by a heat injury. A heat injury was produced on the crus of 12 volunteers with a 50 x 25 mm thermode (47 degrees C, 7 min). Measurements were made before, and 0, 1, 2, and 4 h after the heat injury...

  8. Influence of repeated daily menthol exposure on human temperature regulation and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, D Jason; Weston, Neil; House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    A single exposure to menthol can, depending on concentration, enhance both cool sensations and encourage body heat storage. This study tested whether there is an habituation in either response after repeated-daily exposures. Twenty-two participants were assigned to one of three spray groups: Control (CON; n=6), 0.05% L-menthol (M(0.05%); n=8), and 0.2% L-menthol (M(0.2%); n=8). On Monday (20°C, 50% rh) participants were sprayed with 100 mL of solution and undertook 40 min of cycling at 45% of their peak power (Ex1), from Tuesday to Thursday (30°C, 50% rh) they were sprayed twice daily whilst resting (R1 to R6), Friday was a repeat of Monday (Ex2). Thermal sensation (TS), thermal comfort, perceived exertion, irritation, rectal and skin temperature (Tsk), skin blood flow (SkBF) and sweat rate were monitored. A two-way ANOVA (alpha=0.05) compared responses from the beginning (Ex1, R1) and end (Ex2, R5) of the testing week. M(0.2%) induced significantly (PMenthol caused a heat storage response, mediated by vasoconstriction, at the beginning and end of the week, suggesting the habituation of TS occurred in a pathway specific to sensation. In summary, the cooling influence of 0.2% menthol habituates after repeated-daily exposures, but with no habituation in heat storage.

  9. Skin Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Skin Biopsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Skin Biopsy Print A A ... español Biopsia de piel What Is a Skin Biopsy and Who Would Need One? In a biopsy, ...

  10. Skin Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  11. Skin abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... Skin abscesses are common and affect people of all ages. They occur when an infection causes pus ...

  12. Parallel-type skin effect frequency heating power inverter%并联型集肤效应变频加热逆变电源

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓卫燕; 唐小云; 汪旭莹; 韩朋

    2014-01-01

    A method of skin effect heating power was provided. PIC18F MCU was used by the systemas control er, IGBT ful-bridge inverter circuit was used by power conversion circuit as the basic unit. The four groups of IGBT ful-bridge inverter circuit unit were connected in paral el. Multi-sensor fusion technology was used by the temperature feedback. In operation, the microcontrol er was responded in accordance with the set temperature signal and the feedback temperature signal. The inverter circuit was control ed by the control ECCP module PWM half-bridge output mode. With simulink simulation analysis, the system could be flexibly output duty and the continuous adjustable frequency AC square wave, and had good control performance.%设计了一种集肤效应加热电源。系统采用PIC18F系列单片机作为控制器,功率转换电路采用四组IGBT全桥逆变电路单元并联的方式,温度反馈采用多传感器融合技术。工作时,单片机根据设定的温度信号和反馈的温度信号作出响应,控制ECCP模块以PWM半桥输出方式集中控制逆变电路,经Simulink仿真分析,系统能灵活输出占空比和频率连续可调的交流方波,控制性能好。

  13. Ultrasound skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkis, Kira; Alam, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound skin tightening is a noninvasive, nonablative method that allows for energy deposition into the deep dermal and subcutaneous tissue while avoiding epidermal heating. Ultrasound coagulation is confined to arrays of 1-mm(3) zones that include the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and connective tissue. This technology gained approval from the Food and Drug Administration as the first energy-based skin "lifting" device, specifically for lifting lax tissue on the neck, submentum, and eyebrows. Ultrasound has the unique advantage of direct visualization of treated structures during treatment. Ultrasound is a safe and efficacious treatment for mild skin tightening and lifting.

  14. Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Skin ... (bacterial infection of the deeper layers of the skin and tissues beneath) are typical childhood skin infections. The usual bacterial culprits in skin ...

  15. Skin Biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhrquist, N; Salava, A; Auvinen, P; Lauerma, A

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous microbiome has been investigated broadly in recent years and some traditional perspectives are beginning to change. A diverse microbiome exists on human skin and has a potential to influence pathogenic microbes and modulate the course of skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis. In addition to the known dysfunctions in barrier function of the skin and immunologic disturbances, evidence is rising that frequent skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis, might be connected to a dysbiosis of the microbial community and changes in the skin microbiome. As a future perspective, examining the skin microbiome could be seen as a potential new diagnostic and therapeutic target in inflammatory skin disorders.

  16. Neuromodulators for Aging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin Scars Skin Growths Skin Lesions Spider Veins Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose ... Skin Scars Skin Growths Skin Lesions Spider Veins Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose ...

  17. Sprayed skin turbine component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  18. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are round and lie directly under squamous cells. Melanocytes are specialized skin cells that produce pigment called melanin. The melanin pigment produced by melanocytes gives skin its color. It also protects the ...

  19. Skin turgor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arm or abdomen is checked. The skin is held for a few seconds then released. Skin with ... University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the ...

  20. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types ... face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. Anyone ...

  1. Skin Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  2. Sprint performance under heat stress: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, O; Brocherie, F; Bishop, D J

    2015-06-01

    Training and competition in major track-and-field events, and for many team or racquet sports, often require the completion of maximal sprints in hot (>30 °C) ambient conditions. Enhanced short-term (heat exposure (muscle temperature rise), can be attributed to improved muscle contractility. Under heat stress, elevations in skin/core temperatures are associated with increased cardiovascular and metabolic loads in addition to decreasing voluntary muscle activation; there is also compelling evidence to suggest that large performance decrements occur when repeated-sprint exercise (consisting of brief recovery periods between sprints, usually 39 °C). Here we also discuss strategies (heat acclimatization, precooling, hydration strategies) employed by "sprint" athletes to mitigate the negative influence of higher environmental temperatures.

  3. EVALUATION OF HEAT TRANSFER BETWEEN CASTING AND CRYSTALLIZER IN THE AREA OF FORMATION OF INITIAL SKIN AT CONTINUOUS HORIZONTAL CASTING OF CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Algorithms of the solution of inverse problem of heat transfer, the combining analytical and numerical methods of the calculations providing an opportunity of definition of thermal flow and factors of heat exchange in crystallizer in real time in established mode of continuous casting of cylindrical ingot are developed. Averages for cycle heat transfer coefficients on borders casting—crystallizer and crystallizer-water are calculated. Dependence of heat transfer coefficients on border casting—crystallizer from time of a cycle is approximately estimated.

  4. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  5. Skin moisturization mechanisms: new data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonté, F

    2011-05-01

    The main function of the skin is to protect the body against exogenous substances and excessive water loss. The skin barrier is located in the outermost layer of the skin, called the stratum corneum, which is composed of corneocytes, originating from the keratinocytes differentiation process, embedded in organized complex lipid domains. Moisturizing of the skin is recognized as the first anti-aging skin care. Skin moisturization is essential for its appearance, protection, complexion, softness and the reinforcement of its barrier properties against deleterious and exogenous environmental factors. The intrinsic water binding capacity of skin is not only due to the complex natural moisturizing factor present in corneocytes, but also to hyaluronic acid and a regulated water transport within the skin. Recent data shows that the water movements between the cells at the different levels of the epidermis are due to dedicated water and glycerol transport proteins named aquaporins. Their role in the skin moisturization is completed by corneodesmosomes and tight junctions. Water and pH are now shown to be of prime importance in the regulation of the epidermal enzymes linked to corneocytes desquamation and lipid synthesis. Furthermore, the level of moisturization of the skin is important in its protection against repeated exposure to various irritant agents or phenomena such as very frequent washing with strong tensioactive materials.

  6. Use of the novel contact heat evoked potential stimulator (CHEPS for the assessment of small fibre neuropathy: correlations with skin flare responses and intra-epidermal nerve fibre counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chizh Boris A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS rapidly stimulates cutaneous small nerve fibres, and resulting evoked potentials can be recorded from the scalp. We have studied patients with symptoms of sensory neuropathy and controls using CHEPS, and validated the findings using other objective measures of small nerve fibres i.e. the histamine-induced skin flare response and intra-epidermal fibres (IEF, and also quantitative sensory testing (QST, a subjective measure. Methods In patients with symptoms of sensory neuropathy (n = 41 and healthy controls (n = 9 we performed clinical examination, QST (monofilament, vibration and thermal perception thresholds, nerve conduction studies, histamine-induced skin flares and CHEPS. Skin punch biopsies were immunostained using standard ABC immunoperoxidase for the nerve marker PGP 9.5 or the heat and capsaicin receptor TRPV1. Immunoreactive IEF were counted per length of tissue section and epidermal thickness recorded. Results Amplitudes of Aδ evoked potentials (μV following face, arm or leg stimulation were reduced in patients (e.g. for the leg: mean ± SEM – controls 11.7 ± 1.95, patients 3.63 ± 0.85, p = 0.0032. Patients showed reduced leg skin flare responses, which correlated with Aδ amplitudes (rs = 0.40, p = 0.010. In patient leg skin biopsies, PGP 9.5- and TRPV1-immunoreactive IEF were reduced and correlated with Aδ amplitudes (PGP 9.5, rs = 0.51, p = 0.0006; TRPV1, rs = 0.48, p = 0.0012. Conclusion CHEPS appears a sensitive measure, with abnormalities observed in some symptomatic patients who did not have significant IEF loss and/or QST abnormalities. Some of the latter patients may have early small fibre dysfunction or ion channelopathy. CHEPS provides a clinically practical, non-invasive and objective measure, and can be a useful additional tool for the assessment of sensory small fibre neuropathy. Although further evaluation is required, the technique shows

  7. Influence of repeated washings with soap and synthetic detergents on pH and resident flora of the skin of forehead and forearm. Results of a cross-over trial in health probationers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korting, H C; Kober, M; Mueller, M; Braun-Falco, O

    1987-01-01

    Ten healthy individuals washed their forehead and forearm twice a day over consecutive periods of four weeks with soap and synthetic detergents or vice versa (cross-over design). In general the pH values were higher during the period when soap was applied (the mean pH differed by 0.3 units, p less than 0.01). As a rule the counts of coagulase-negative staphylococci were not much altered. The number of propionibacteria, however, was markedly higher when soap was used (p = 0.02 and 0.01 resp.). At the forehead there was a clear correlation between bacterial counts and skin pH both with propionibacteria (0.56, p less than 0.001) and staphylococci (0.51, p less than 0.001). At the forearm only the former proved true (0.24, p less than 0.05). Thus the skin pH seems to be open to long-standing changes according to the preferred washing habits which may also be of major influence on the composition of the cutaneous bacterial flora.

  8. Pathophysiological Study of Sensitive Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhé, Virginie; Vié, Katell; Guéré, Christelle; Natalizio, Audrey; Lhéritier, Céline; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Huet, Flavien; Talagas, Matthieu; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Marcorelles, Pascale; Carré, Jean-Luc; Misery, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical syndrome characterized by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations, such as pruritus, burning or pain, in response to various factors, including skincare products, water, cold, heat, or other physical and/or chemical factors. Although these symptoms suggest inflammation and the activation of peripheral innervation, the pathophysiogeny of sensitive skin remains unknown. We systematically analysed cutaneous biopsies from 50 healthy women with non-sensitive or sensitive skin and demonstrated that the intraepidermal nerve fibre density, especially that of peptidergic C-fibres, was lower in the sensitive skin group. These fibres are involved in pain, itching and temperature perception, and their degeneration may promote allodynia and similar symptoms. These results suggest that the pathophysiology of skin sensitivity resembles that of neuropathic pruritus within the context of small fibre neuropathy, and that environmental factors may alter skin innervation.

  9. Opto-thermal in-vivo skin hydration measurements - a comparison study of different measurement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, P; Singh, H; Imhof, R E [Faculty of ESBE, London South Bank University, 103 Borough Road, London SE1 0AA (United Kingdom); Ciortea, L I; Berg, E P [Biox Systems Ltd, 103 Borough Road, London SE1 0AA (United Kingdom); Cui, Y, E-mail: xiaop@lsbu.ac.u [Sunrise Systems Limited, Flint Bridge Business Centre, Ely Road, Waterbeach, Cambridge CB5 9QZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-01

    We compared five different skin hydration measurement techniques, namely OTTER, Fingerprint sensors, Corneometer, Nova, and Moisture Checker, in order to understand the correlations between different skin hydration measurement techniques and to understand the repeatability of each technique. The measurements are performed on different in-vivo skin sites from different volunteers and at different hydration levels. The repeatability of different techniques is achieved by measuring the same skin site repeatedly. The correlations between different skin hydration measurement techniques are achieved by plotting results from different techniques against each other. The different skin hydration levels are achieved through the recovery period after a skin immersive hydration.

  10. Oily skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keep your skin clean using warm water and soap, or a soapless cleanser. Clean your face with astringent pads if frequent face washing causes irritation. Use only water-based or oil-free cosmetics if you have oily skin. Your ...

  11. Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Without skin, people's muscles, bones, and organs would be hanging out all over the place. Skin holds everything together. It also: protects our bodies helps keep our bodies at just the right temperature allows us to have the sense of touch Don't Miss Your Epidermis The ...

  12. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in Chesterfield, Missouri Heat-related illness can be caused by overexposure to the sun or any situation ... pale skin, rapid pulse, elevated or lowered blood pressure, nausea, loss of consciousness, vomiting or a high ...

  13. Detection Methods for Oxide Skin on Inner Heating Surface of Boiler Tubes%电站锅炉高温受热面管内壁氧化皮检测方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑小腾; 余焕伟; 董伟雄

    2016-01-01

    高温受热面管内壁氧化皮剥落堵管造成的爆管问题是影响电站锅炉正常安全运行的主要因素之一。本文在简要介绍铁素体耐热钢和奥氏体不锈钢两种不同材质高温受热面管内壁氧化皮生成原理、结构形式及剥落特性的基础上,重点介绍了高频超声和磁技术检测两种高温受热面管内壁氧化皮检测方法的检测原理、系统组成、适用范围及使用特点,以期为现场检验检测提供参考。%The metal oxidation of boiler tubes becomes one of the main factors which affect the safe operation of the utility boiler. To provide references for the on-site inspection, this paper briefly introduced the generation, structure and exfoliation of oxide skin on the inner heating surface of boiler tubes with ferrite heat resistant steel and austenitic stainless steel, and then mainly introduced two important detection methods of oxide skin : high frequency ultrasound and magnetic technology, including their detection principles, system compositions, application scopes as well as the usage characters.

  14. Aging skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognia, J L

    1995-01-16

    Aging of the skin is a composite of actinic damage, chronologic aging, and hormonal influences. The majority of changes associated with aging, such as wrinkles and solar lentigines ("liver spots"), are due to photoaging and reflect cumulative sun exposure as well as skin pigmentation. Classically, chronologic aging includes those cutaneous changes that occur in non-sun-exposed areas, such as the buttocks, and are observed in both men and women. A clinical example would be soft tissue sagging due to elastic fiber degeneration. In women, investigations into the effect of hormones on aging of the skin have concentrated on estrogens; in men, there have been a limited number of studies on the influence of testosterone. The latter have shown an age-dependent decrease in tissue androgens in pubic skin, but not scrotal or thigh skin. To date, age has not been shown to have an effect on androgen receptor binding, although a decrease in foreskin 5 alpha-reductase activity with increasing age has been described. In fibroblast cultures from foreskins, there have been conflicting results as to whether 5 alpha-reductase activity decreases in an age-dependent manner. Some of the skin changes that have been categorized as secondary to chronologic aging, such as decreased sebaceous gland activity and decreased hair growth, may actually represent a decline in the concentration of tissue androgens with increasing age. The influence of androgens on age-related changes in keratinocyte and fibroblast function remains speculative.

  15. Skin Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? ... prevent cancer are being studied. General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  16. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  17. Dry Skin Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy priorities AADA Health System Reform Principles Drug pricing and availability CVS dermatologic formulary restrictions Access to ... Skin care for men Skin care on a budget Skin care products Skin care secrets Skin of ...

  18. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  19. Distortion of Near-Surface Seawater Temperature Structure by a Moored-Buoy Hull and Its Effect on Skin Temperature and Heat Flux Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Ando

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that the accuracy of temperature measurements by surface-moored buoys may be affected by distortions of the near-surface temperature structure by the buoy hull on calm, sunny days. We obtained the first definite observational evidence that the temperature near the hull was not horizontally homogeneous at the same nominal depth. We observed large temperature differences of 1.0 K or more between thermometers at 0.2 m depth. The distortion of the surface temperature field yielded an error in estimates of daytime net surface heat flux up to more than 30 Wm–2.

  20. Skin temperature during sunbathing--relevance for skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Bibi; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2014-08-01

    It has been found that exposure to heat and infrared radiation (IR) can be carcinogenic, and that a combination of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and IR possibly amplifies carcinogenesis. To investigate how the skin temperature is affected by sunbathing, we measured the skin temperature on 20 healthy volunteers over 6 days' sun holiday in Egypt. Temperatures were measured with an infrared thermometer gun at 8 skin sites on the volunteers while they were indoors in the morning and when sunbathing during the day. Skin temperatures were higher during sunbathing (33.5 °C ± 2.1 °C) (mean ± SD) than when indoors in the morning (32.6 °C ± 1.4 °C) (mean ± SD) (P < 0.0001). The average skin temperature for men was higher than for women by 0.40 °C in the morning (P = 0.02) and by 0.44 °C during sunbathing (P < 0.0001). Our results show that sunbathing has an impact on skin temperature, which possibly by activation of the heat shock response, is likely to contribute to the immediate and delayed effects of UV in a way that has to be found out in future studies.

  1. Synthetic peptides of actin-tropomyosin binding region of troponin I and heat shock protein 20 modulate the relaxation process of skinned preparations of taenia caeci from guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yasumasa; Sakurai, Wataru; Morimoto, Sachio; Watanabe, Masaru

    2005-12-01

    To explore the possible role of the thin filament-linked regulation of cross-bridge cycling in living smooth muscle contraction, we studied the effects of TnIp and HSP20p, a synthetic peptide originating from an actin tropomyosin binding region of rabbit cardiac troponin I (residues 136-147; GKFKRPTLRRVR), and that of human heat shock protein 20 (residues 110-121; GFVAREFHRRYR) on the relaxation of skinned (cell membrane ilized) preparations from guinea pig taenia caeci. An active stress of the skinned preparations, resulting from actin-myosin interaction, rapidly decayed following Ca(2+) removal (relaxation). TnIp accelerated the initial rapid phase and slowed the following slow phase of the relaxation. On the other hand, HSP20p only slowed the whole process of the relaxation. The relaxation time courses were well fitted in a double exponential manner, and the double exponential decay of the stress could be explained as a portion of fast-detaching cross bridges not to dissociate rapidly by Ca(2+) removal, but to transfer to latch bridges dissociating very slowly. Our present results suggested that (i) TnIp and HSP20p accelerated transferring from fast-detaching cross bridges to slow-detaching (latch) bridges, and (ii) TnIp accelerated dissociation of the fast-detaching cross bridges and the latch bridges, while HSP20p slowed dissociation the fast-detaching cross bridges. Since TnIp and HSP20p are thought to bind to actin and tropomyosin, but not to myosin, we concluded that through thin-filament-dependent mechanisms these peptides regulated the formation and/or deformation of latch bridges in smooth muscle. The thin-filament-dependent regulation might physiologically control the stress maintenance and relaxation in smooth muscle cells.

  2. Multisource radiofrequency for fractional skin resurfacing-significant reduction of wrinkles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Serge; Rousseaux, Isabelle; Cartier, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    Skin roughness, color change, wrinkles and skin laxity are the main characteristics of aging skin. Dermatologists and plastic surgeons look for a treatment that will provide both epidermal resurfacing for the improvement of skin roughness and deep volumetric heating that will trigger collagen remodeling in the dermis to reduce wrinkles and skin laxity. These goals should be achieved with minimal pain and downtime. The study included 10 subjects (Fitzpatrick's skin type 2-3) with Fitzpatrick wrinkle and elastosis scale of 5-8 (average 7.3). Treatment was done with the Fractional skin resurfacing handpiece of the EndyMed PRO multisource radiofrequency system (EndyMed Ltd, Cesarea, Israel). Treatment was repeated each month up to a total of three treatment sessions. Patients photographs were graded according to accepted scales by a board certified dermatologists. Patients' pain and satisfaction were scored using dedicated questionnaires. Doctors' satisfaction was also evaluated. Post treatment skin erythema was noted in all treated patients, lasting up to 10 hours. Fifty six percent of patients reported no pain after treatment, and the rest (44%) reported minimal pain. All patients showed significant reduction in the Fitzpatrick wrinkle score. Average Fitzpatrick wrinkle score was 7.3 at baseline, 4.9 at 1 month after the first treatment, 4.2 at 1 month after the second treatment, and 4.1 at 1 month after the third treatment. The score was similar at 3 months after the third treatment with a score of 4.1. When asked at the end of three treatment sessions, all patients answered they will recommend the treatment to their friends (66% "definitely yes" and 33% "yes"). When asked the same question 3 months after the end of treatment, all patients (100%) answered "definitely yes".

  3. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  4. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  5. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  6. A strategy for skin irritation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael K; Perkins, Mary A

    2002-03-01

    Skin irritation safety testing and risk assessment for new products, and the ingredients they contain, is a critical requirement before market introduction. In the past, much of this skin testing required the use of experimental animals. However, new current best approaches for skin corrosion and skin irritation testing and risk assessment are being defined, obviating the need for animal test methods. Several in vitro skin corrosion test methods have been endorsed after successful validation and are gaining acceptance by regulatory authorities. In vitro test methods for acute, cumulative (repeat exposure), and chronic (prolonged exposure) skin irritation are under development. Though not yet validated, many are being used successfully for testing and risk assessment purposes as documented through an expanding literature. Likewise, a novel acute irritation patch test in human subjects is providing a valid and ethical alternative to animal testing for prediction of chemical skin irritation potential. An array of other human test methods also have been developed and used for the prediction of cumulative/chronic skin irritation and the general skin compatibility of finished products. The development of instrumental methods (e.g., transepidermal water loss, capacitance, and so on) has provided the means for analyzing various biophysical properties of human skin and changes in these properties caused by exposure to irritants. However, these methods do not directly measure skin inflammation. A recently introduced skin surface tape sampling procedure has been shown to detect changes in skin surface cytokine recovery that correlate with inflammatory skin changes associated with chemical irritant exposures or existing dermatitis. It holds promise for more objective quantification of skin irritation events, including subclinical (sensory) irritation, in the future.

  7. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  8. Characterizing human skin blood flow regulation in response to different local skin temperature perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Nieuwenhoff, M D; Huygen, F J P M; van der Helm, F C T; Niehof, S; Schouten, A C

    2017-05-01

    Small nerve fibers regulate local skin blood flow in response to local thermal perturbations. Small nerve fiber function is difficult to assess with classical neurophysiological tests. In this study, a vasomotor response model in combination with a heating protocol was developed to quantitatively characterize the control mechanism of small nerve fibers in regulating skin blood flow in response to local thermal perturbation. The skin of healthy subjects' hand dorsum (n=8) was heated to 42°C with an infrared lamp, and then naturally cooled down. The distance between the lamp and the hand was set to three different levels in order to change the irradiation intensity on the skin and implement three different skin temperature rise rates (0.03°C/s, 0.02°C/s and 0.01°C/s). A laser Doppler imager (LDI) and a thermographic video camera recorded the temporal profile of the skin blood flow and the skin temperature, respectively. The relationship between the skin blood flow and the skin temperature was characterized by a vasomotor response model. The model fitted the skin blood flow response well with a variance accounted for (VAF) between 78% and 99%. The model parameters suggested a similar mechanism for the skin blood flow regulation with the thermal perturbations at 0.03°C/s and 0.02°C/s. But there was an accelerated skin vasoconstriction after a slow heating (0.01°C/s) (p-value<0.05). An attenuation of the skin vasodilation was also observed in four out of the seven subjects during the slow heating (0.01°C/s). Our method provides a promising way to quantitatively assess the function of small nerve fibers non-invasively and non-contact.

  9. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Skin Cancer ... clinical trials before, during, or after starting their cancer treatment. Some clinical trials only include patients who have ...

  10. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  11. Skin Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Host a Fundraising Event | About Us | Store The Skin Cancer Foundation The Skin Cancer Foundation is the only ... Handbook A "Sunscreen Gene"? Skin Cancer Facts & Statistics Skin Cancer Treatment Glossary Information on medications and procedures The ...

  12. Skin Bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Samira M.

    2015-01-01

    In this project, I aim to investigate the reasoning behind the practice of skin bleaching by analyzing the documentary ”Dark Girls”, to gain a better understanding of race and colorism issues. Also this project tries to see if there is a connection with history and if this has been a part of making the european beauty ideal determine the choices black’s make in regards to beauty.

  13. 毫米波辐照下大鼠皮肤温度场及血液灌注率影响%Local heating of murine skin by millimeter waves:effect of blood perfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡双喜; 邓逗逗; 范春利; 杨立; 孙丰瑞

    2012-01-01

    根据Pennes方程和毫米波在动物皮肤内的传播特性,建立了在33.5 GHz毫米波同辐照强度下的大鼠皮肤的非稳态多层传热模型.在二维柱坐标下进行离散计算,得到了长时间辐照条件下不同皮肤深度的温度变化规律,并将理论结果与实验数据进行了比较.在284 mW/cm2和853 mW/cm2辐照强度下,理论结果和实验结果基本一致;在474 mW/cm2和664 mW/cm2辐照强度下,有一定的误差,但误差仍不超过1℃,验证了该理论模型的准确性.分析了实际趋肤深度内的温度分布,发现毫米波引起的生物热效应的最高温度点并非在皮肤表面,而是皮下某点,其与表面辐照中心点的温差可超过1℃.进一步分析了血液灌注率对温度场的影响,发现在讨论的温度范围内,血液灌注率的变化对毫米波辐照下的皮肤表面温度场的影响较小.%We built up a transient thermal multilayer model for heating of human skin with high power millimeter waves by finite volume method (FVM) based on Pennes' bioheat transfer equation. We analyzed the calculated results and compared them with the experimental ones. The errors were no more than 1 ℃, especially at the incident power densities of 284 and 853 mW/cm2. The computing results agreed closely with the experimental ones. The veracity and reliability of finite volume model were validated. We charted the temperature changes with depth in the energy penetration depth at different radiation intensity of steady state. It was found that the maximum temperature spot caused by millimeter wave was not on the skin surface, but at some spot in subcutaneous. The difference in temperature between these two spots could be more than 1 ℃. The effect of blood perfusion rate on the temperature of skin surface was further analyzed. The change of blood perfu-sion rate had little effect on the temperature of skin surface in the temperature range studied in this paper.

  14. Cutaneous skin tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  15. Skin temperature during sunbathing--relevance for skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bibi; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2014-01-01

    It has been found that exposure to heat and infrared radiation (IR) can be carcinogenic, and that a combination of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and IR possibly amplifies carcinogenesis. To investigate how the skin temperature is affected by sunbathing, we measured the skin temperature on 20 healthy...... volunteers over 6 days' sun holiday in Egypt. Temperatures were measured with an infrared thermometer gun at 8 skin sites on the volunteers while they were indoors in the morning and when sunbathing during the day. Skin temperatures were higher during sunbathing (33.5 °C ± 2.1 °C) (mean ± SD) than when...... indoors in the morning (32.6 °C ± 1.4 °C) (mean ± SD) (P skin temperature for men was higher than for women by 0.40 °C in the morning (P = 0.02) and by 0.44 °C during sunbathing (P skin temperature, which possibly...

  16. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  17. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  18. REPEAT facility. Report for May, June, July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, C. B.

    1981-08-01

    The construction of the REPEAT facility, a test facility for passive and hybrid solar heating systems is reported. The development of a simulation program for envelope type passive solar systems, constructing an envelope test cell, collecting data to validate the program, and application of the program to determine the best envelope type design are discussed. A low cost monitoring system using a dedicated microprocessor system, an inexpensive, high accuracy A/D converter, and minimum system hardware is developed. A method to determine the average temperature and the average daily temperature variation inside a passively heated solar building is presented.

  19. Skin Keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengrong; Zieman, Abigail; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Keratins comprise the type I and type II intermediate filament-forming proteins and occur primarily in epithelial cells. They are encoded by 54 evolutionarily conserved genes (28 type I, 26 type II) and regulated in a pairwise and tissue type-, differentiation-, and context-dependent manner. Keratins serve multiple homeostatic and stress-enhanced mechanical and nonmechanical functions in epithelia, including the maintenance of cellular integrity, regulation of cell growth and migration, and protection from apoptosis. These functions are tightly regulated by posttranslational modifications as well as keratin-associated proteins. Genetically determined alterations in keratin-coding sequences underlie highly penetrant and rare disorders whose pathophysiology reflects cell fragility and/or altered tissue homeostasis. Moreover, keratin mutation or misregulation represents risk factors or genetic modifiers for several acute and chronic diseases. This chapter focuses on keratins that are expressed in skin epithelia, and details a number of basic protocols and assays that have proven useful for analyses being carried out in skin.

  20. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  1. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  2. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer Order the free Anyone Can ... rarely, younger children can develop skin cancer. How can people with dark skin get skin cancer? Although ...

  3. Reproducibility of transcutaneous oximetry and laser Doppler flowmetry in facial skin and gingival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalestad, J; Hellem, S; Vaagbø, G; Irgens, A; Thorsen, E

    2010-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and transcutaneous oximetry (TcPO(2)) are non-invasive techniques, widely used in the clinical setting, for assessing microvascular blood flow and tissue oxygen tension, e.g. recording vascular changes after radiotherapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. With standardized procedures and improved reproducibility, these methods might also be applicable in longitudinal studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of facial skin and gingival LDF and facial skin TcPO(2). The subjects comprised ten healthy volunteers, 5 men, aged 31-68 years. Gingival perfusion was recorded with the LDF probe fixed to a custom made, tooth-supported acrylic splint. Skin perfusion was recorded on the cheek. TcPO(2) was recorded on the forehead and cheek and in the second intercostal space. The reproducibility of LDF measurements taken after vasodilation by heat provocation was greater than for basal flow in both facial skin and mandibular gingiva. Pronounced intraday variations were observed. Interweek reproducibility assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.74 to 0.96 for LDF and from 0.44 to 0.75 for TcPO(2). The results confirm acceptable reproducibility of LDF and TcPO(2) in longitudinal studies in a vascular laboratory where subjects serve as their own controls. The use of thermoprobes is recommended. Repeat measurements should be taken at the same time of day.

  4. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  5. Abnormally dark or light skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperpigmentation; Hypopigmentation; Skin - abnormally light or dark ... Normal skin contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce melanin , the substance that gives skin its color. Skin with ...

  6. Skin color - patchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003224.htm Skin color - patchy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Patchy skin color is areas where the skin color is irregular. ...

  7. Responsive corneosurfametry following in vivo skin preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhoda, E; Goffin, V; Pierard, G E

    2003-12-01

    Skin is subjected to many environmental threats, some of which altering the structure and function of the stratum corneum. Among them, surfactants are recognized factors that may influence irritant contact dermatitis. The present study was conducted to compare the variations in skin capacitance and corneosurfametry (CSM) reactivity before and after skin exposure to repeated subclinical injuries by 2 hand dishwashing liquids. A forearm immersion test was performed on 30 healthy volunteers. 2 daily soak sessions were performed for 5 days. At inclusion and the day following the last soak session, skin capacitance was measured and cyanoacrylate skin-surface strippings were harvested. The latter specimens were used for the ex vivo microwave CSM. Both types of assessments clearly differentiated the 2 hand dishwashing liquids. The forearm immersion test allowed the discriminant sensitivity of CSM to increase. Intact skin capacitance did not predict CSM data. By contrast, a significant correlation was found between the post-test conductance and the corresponding CSM data. In conclusion, a forearm immersion test under realistic conditions can discriminate the irritation potential between surfactant-based products by measuring skin conductance and performing CSM. In vivo skin preconditioning by surfactants increases CSM sensitivity to the same surfactants.

  8. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Young children and the elderly are most at risk, but anyone can be affected. Here you will ... moist, pale skin, rapid pulse, elevated or lowered blood pressure, nausea, loss of consciousness, vomiting or a high body temperature. For late stage heat stroke symptoms, ...

  9. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  10. Skin Care and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Care and Aging How Aging Affects Skin Your skin changes with age. It becomes thinner, ... to make it feel and look better. Dry Skin and Itching Click for more information Many older ...

  11. Development and Production of a Leishmania Skin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    manufacturing process of Leishmania tropica Skin Test Antigen (LtSTA) was made during this contract period to increase the yield and robustness of the...interest group. 15. SUBJECT TERMS LtSTA = Leishmania tropica Skin Test Antigen 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT... tropica Skin Test Antigen (LtSTA), is a sterile injectable microfluidized lysate of Leishmania tropica (WR#1063:C1A) promastigotes. The product is heat

  12. The Protective Role of Melanin Against UV Damage in Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Michaela; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2008-01-01

    Human skin is repeatedly exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) that influences the function and survival of many cell types and is regarded as the main causative factor in the induction of skin cancer. It has been traditionally believed that skin pigmentation is the most important photoprotective factor, since melanin, besides functioning as a broadband UV absorbent, has antioxidant and radical scavenging properties. Besides, many epidemiological studies have shown a lower incidence for skin...

  13. Graphene heat dissipating structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Wheeler, David R.; Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Railkar, Tarak A.

    2017-08-01

    Various technologies presented herein relate to forming one or more heat dissipating structures (e.g., heat spreaders and/or heat sinks) on a substrate, wherein the substrate forms part of an electronic component. The heat dissipating structures are formed from graphene, with advantage being taken of the high thermal conductivity of graphene. The graphene (e.g., in flake form) is attached to a diazonium molecule, and further, the diazonium molecule is utilized to attach the graphene to material forming the substrate. A surface of the substrate is treated to comprise oxide-containing regions and also oxide-free regions having underlying silicon exposed. The diazonium molecule attaches to the oxide-free regions, wherein the diazonium molecule bonds (e.g., covalently) to the exposed silicon. Attachment of the diazonium plus graphene molecule is optionally repeated to enable formation of a heat dissipating structure of a required height.

  14. [Sarcoidosis of the skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Y; Ogawa, H

    1994-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is characterized by formation of epithelioid-cell tubercules, without caseation, of the affected organ systems. The mediastinum, peripheral lymph nodes and eyes, in addition to the skin, are most frequently affected. Between 10% and 30% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis in Japan have skin lesions. Skin sarcoidosis is morphologically classified into three basic groups, erythema nodosum, scar sarcoidosis and skin sarcoid. Skin sarcoid is characterized by specific cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis, and may take nodular, plaque, angiolupoid, subcutaneous and some other forms. Clinical manifestations of the cutaneous lesions are usually asymptomatic and polymorphous. Skin biopsy is, however, often highly useful for confirming a diagnosis of sarcoidosis.

  15. In vivo animal histology and clinical evaluation of multisource fractional radiofrequency skin resurfacing (FSR) applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadick, Neil S; Sato, Masaki; Palmisano, Diana; Frank, Ido; Cohen, Hila; Harth, Yoram

    2011-10-01

    Acne scars are one of the most difficult disorders to treat in dermatology. The optimal treatment system will provide minimal downtime resurfacing for the epidermis and non-ablative deep volumetric heating for collagen remodeling in the dermis. A novel therapy system (EndyMed Ltd., Cesarea, Israel) uses phase-controlled multi-source radiofrequency (RF) to provide simultaneous one pulse microfractional resurfacing with simultaneous volumetric skin tightening. The study included 26 subjects (Fitzpatrick's skin type 2-5) with moderate to severe wrinkles and 4 subjects with depressed acne scars. Treatment was repeated each month up to a total of three treatment sessions. Patients' photographs were graded according to accepted scales by two uninvolved blinded evaluators. Significant reduction in the depth of wrinkles and acne scars was noted 4 weeks after therapy with further improvement at the 3-month follow-up. Our data show the histological impact and clinical beneficial effects of simultaneous RF fractional microablation and volumetric deep dermal heating for the treatment of wrinkles and acne scars.

  16. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  17. Perioperative Challenges in Repeat Bladder Exstrophy Repair - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otu Enenyi Etta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital malformation. It presents as leakage of urine in the anterior abdominal wall following defects in midline anterior abdominal wall skin and bladder. We report the use of combined general anaesthesia and caudal epidural analgesia in a 4yr old boy for repeat bladder exstrophy repair. Problems of prolonged surgery and the challenges of pain and sedation management in the post operative period are discussed.

  18. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  19. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  20. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  1. Human Dark Skin and Equatorial Africa: Toward a Critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain K. Cibangu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While skin color represents one of the most common markers of humans, the theories that explain it remain largely unknown both in academia and industry. Meanwhile, fraught with theoretical shortcomings about skin color, as clear from its body of knowledge, racial studies has not addressed skin color with needed attention. Consequently, misconceptions about human skin color have proliferated. This paper discusses anew Gloger’s theory and its widespread impact in the social sciences and general public. Gloger explained dark skin by heat. Not surprisingly, dark skin is believed to be the product of and response to ultra violet radiation in Equatorial Africa. One reason might be the fixation of the debate on the white-black binary. Another reason might be the commonplace belief about the African heat. The present paper calls into question the Equator-Africa presentation of black skin. To this end, the paper situates the debate in the broader spectrum of social science disciplines, and investigates the ways in which black skin is presented. The paper advocates for the consideration of skin complexity and of minorities in the field of skin color. The goal is to work toward a deeper understanding of others and their traits, with a view to raise awareness among policy makers, the general public, and social science experts. The paper takes an encyclopedic approach to best cater to these audiences.

  2. Learning about Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information, in skin cells, creating "misspellings" in their genetic code and, as a result, alter the function of those cells. Cancers generally are caused by a combination of environmental and genetic factors. With skin cancer, the environment plays a ...

  3. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Items Awareness Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly ... use this video. UPDATED: November 23, 2016 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly ...

  4. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  5. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  6. Bleeding into the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003235.htm Bleeding into the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bleeding into the skin can occur from broken blood ...

  7. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... video. UPDATED: November 23, 2016 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ...

  8. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... video. UPDATED: November 23, 2016 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ...

  9. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and ... having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - Slow down. Avoid strenuous ...

  10. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  11. Male skin care: shaving and moisturization needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblong, John E

    2012-01-01

    Historically, most cosmetic and medical cosmetic research has been focused on the female consumer. Advancements in the development of grooming instruments as well as changing consumer habits and attitudes toward male cosmetic skin care needs support the need to develop a deeper understanding of male skin biology and how that can be used to improve the quality of life relative to societal interactions. Male skin biology has been found to have unique properties that are distinct from females and have a significant impact on the way males groom and maintain their overall appearance. Research to date has found that male skin has a different response profile to such environmental insults as UV, heat, and stress that is based not on just differences in cosmetic or dermatological product usage but also on underlying biological differences. These differences are discussed with the implications to a broader understanding of male facial skin care needs that spans from daily grooming practices to overall health status that impacts higher incidence rate of skin cancer among males. This highlights that male skin care has a holistic need to ensure proper grooming and sunscreen moisturizer usage.

  12. Repeated Instant Self-healing Shape Memory Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. C.; Ding, Z.; Purnawali, H.; Huang, W. M.; Fan, H.; Sun, L.

    2012-12-01

    We present a shape memory composite which is made of two types of shape memory materials, namely shape memory alloy (SMA) and shape memory hybrid. This composite has repeated instant self-healing function by means of not only shape recovery but also strength recovery (over 80%). The activation of the self-healing function is triggered by joule heating the embedded SMA.

  13. A Realistic Evaluation of Two Training Programs on Implementing Skin-to-Skin as a Standard of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimdyr, Kajsa; Widström, Ann-Marie; Cadwell, Karin; Svensson, Kristin; Turner-Maffei, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    The authors used realistic evaluation to examine the real-world effectiveness of two 5-day training techniques on sustained optimal skin-to-skin practices that support Step 4 of the revised Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). The authors found that education alone was insufficient to effect sustainable practice change. Exposure to the 5-day immersion model (Practice, Reflection, Education and training, Combined with Ethnography for Sustainable Success, or PRECESS) alone or combined with education was an effective strategy to change and sustain the standard of care for skin-to-skin practice (p < 0.00001). The intended outcome of sustained practice change toward implementation of skin-to-skin care through immersion or a combined approach shows promise and should be repeated in other localities. PMID:23730126

  14. AGN Heating Through Cavities and Shocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.J. Nulsen; C. Jones; W.R. Forman; L.P. David; B.R. McNamara; D.A. Rafferty; L. Bîrzan; M. Wise

    2007-01-01

    Three comments are made on AGN heating of cooling flows. A simple physical argument is used to show that the enthalpy of a buoyant radio lobe is converted to heat in its wake. Thus, a significant part of ``cavity'' enthalpy is likely to end up as heat. Second, the properties of the repeated weak sho

  15. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology.

  16. Skin self-exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; Skin mole - self-exam ... Experts do not agree on whether or not skin self-exams should be performed. So there is ...

  17. Microbiome and skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Timmerman, H.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. RECENT FINDINGS: Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing technolog

  18. Microbiome and skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.; Kleerebezem, M.; Timmerman, H.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. Recent findings: Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing technolog

  19. Microbiome and skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Timmerman, H.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. RECENT FINDINGS: Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing

  20. Microbiome and skin diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.; Kleerebezem, M.; Timmerman, H.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: This article reviews recent findings on the skin microbiome. It provides an update on the current understanding of the role of microbiota in healthy skin and in inflammatory and allergic skin diseases. Recent findings: Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing

  1. On skin expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Djenane C; Velloso, Raquel Q; Radwanski, Henrique N

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses skin expansion without considering cellular growth of the skin. An in vivo analysis was carried out that involved expansion at three different sites on one patient, allowing for the observation of the relaxation process. Those measurements were used to characterize the human skin of the thorax during the surgical process of skin expansion. A comparison between the in vivo results and the numerical finite elements model of the expansion was used to identify the material elastic parameters of the skin of the thorax of that patient. Delfino's constitutive equation was chosen to model the in vivo results. The skin is considered to be an isotropic, homogeneous, hyperelastic, and incompressible membrane. When the skin is extended, such as with expanders, the collagen fibers are also extended and cause stiffening in the skin, which results in increasing resistance to expansion or further stretching. We observed this phenomenon as an increase in the parameters as subsequent expansions continued. The number and shape of the skin expanders used in expansions were also studied, both mathematically and experimentally. The choice of the site where the expansion should be performed is discussed to enlighten problems that can lead to frustrated skin expansions. These results are very encouraging and provide insight into our understanding of the behavior of stretched skin by expansion. To our knowledge, this study has provided results that considerably improve our understanding of the behavior of human skin under expansion.

  2. PPD skin test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test; Mantoux test Images Tuberculosis in the kidney Tuberculosis in the lung Positive PPD skin test PPD skin test References Chernecky CC, Berger ... test, purified protein derivative test, Tb test, tuberculin skin test, TST, tuberculosis test) - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. ...

  3. Psychoneuroimmunology and the Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyman, Juan F

    2016-08-23

    The nervous, immune, endocrine and integumentary systems are closely related and interact in a number of normal and pathological conditions. Nervous system mediators may bring about direct changes to the skin or may induce the release of immunological or hormonal mediators that cause pathological changes to the skin. This article reviews the psychological mechanisms involved in the development of skin diseases.

  4. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  5. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  6. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  7. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals.

  8. Skin absorption through atopic dermatitis skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals...... ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis. We identified 40 articles, i.e. 11 human studies...... examining model penetrants, 26 human studies examining atopic dermatitis drugs and 3 animal studies. We conclude that atopic dermatitis patients have nearly two-fold increased skin absorption when compared to healthy controls. There is a need for well-designed epidemiological and dermato...

  9. What Is Melanoma Skin Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z About Melanoma Skin Cancer What Is Melanoma Skin Cancer? Key Statistics for Melanoma Skin Cancer What’s New in Melanoma ... Policy . About Melanoma Skin Cancer What Is Melanoma Skin Cancer? Key Statistics for Melanoma Skin Cancer What’s New in Melanoma ...

  10. Measurement of skin temperature after infrared laser stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandri, M; Saturno, M; Spadavecchia, L; Iannetti, G D; Cruccu, G; Truini, A

    2006-01-01

    Several types of lasers are available for eliciting laser evoked responses (LEPs). In order to understand advantages and drawbacks of each one, and to use it properly, it is important that the pattern of skin heating is known and duly considered. This study was aimed at assessing the skin temperature during and immediately after irradiation with pulses by Nd:YAP and CO(2) lasers. The back of the non-dominant hand was irradiated in 8 subjects. Temperatures were measured by a fast analogical pyrometer (5 ms response time). Stimuli were tested on natural colour (white) and blackened skin. Nd:YAP pulses yielded temperatures that were correlated with pulse energy, but not with pulse duration; much higher temperatures were obtained irradiating blackened skin than white skin (ranges 100-194 degrees C vs 35-46 degrees C). Temperature decay was extremely slow in white skin, reaching its basal value in more than 30 s. CO(2) pulses delivered with power of 3W and 6W yielded temperatures of 69-87 degrees C on white skin, and 138-226 degrees C on blackened skin. Temperature decay was very fast (4-8 ms). Differences in peak temperatures and decay times between lasers and tested conditions depend on energy and volume of heated skin. The highest temperatures are reached with lesser degree of penetration, as in the case of CO(2) laser and blackened skin. Taking into account the temperature decay time of the skin, the minimum interstimulus interval to get reliable LEPs should be no less than 10 s for Nd:YAP and 100 ms for CO(2) laser. Another important practical consequence of the heating pattern is that the Nd:YAP pulses will activate warmth receptors more easily than CO(2).

  11. Characterizing human skin blood flow regulation in response to different local skin temperature perturbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.; M.D. Nieuwenhoff (Mariska D.); F.J.P.M. Huygen (Frank); F.C.T. van der Helm (Frans C.); S.P. Niehof (Sjoerd); A.C. Schouten (A.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractSmall nerve fibers regulate local skin blood flow in response to local thermal perturbations. Small nerve fiber function is difficult to assess with classical neurophysiological tests. In this study, a vasomotor response model in combination with a heating protocol was developed to

  12. Analysis of repeated measures data

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M Ataharul

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad range of statistical techniques to address emerging needs in the field of repeated measures. It also provides a comprehensive overview of extensions of generalized linear models for the bivariate exponential family of distributions, which represent a new development in analysing repeated measures data. The demand for statistical models for correlated outcomes has grown rapidly recently, mainly due to presence of two types of underlying associations: associations between outcomes, and associations between explanatory variables and outcomes. The book systematically addresses key problems arising in the modelling of repeated measures data, bearing in mind those factors that play a major role in estimating the underlying relationships between covariates and outcome variables for correlated outcome data. In addition, it presents new approaches to addressing current challenges in the field of repeated measures and models based on conditional and joint probabilities. Markov models of first...

  13. EFFECT OF PRE-COOLING ON REPEAT-SPRINT PERFORMANCE IN SEASONALLY ACCLIMATISED MALES DURING AN OUTDOOR SIMULATED TEAM-SPORT PROTOCOL IN WARM CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly J. Brade

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Whether precooling is beneficial for exercise performance in warm climates when heat acclimatised is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of precooling on repeat-sprint performance during a simulated team-sport circuit performed outdoors in warm, dry field conditions in seasonally acclimatised males (n = 10. They performed two trials, one with precooling (PC; ice slushy and cooling jacket and another without (CONT. Trials began with a 30-min baseline/cooling period followed by an 80 min repeat-sprint protocol, comprising 4 x 20-min quarters, with 2 x 5-min quarter breaks and a 10-min half-time recovery/cooling period. A clear and substantial (negative; PC slower effect was recorded for first quarter circuit time. Clear and trivial effects were recorded for overall circuit time, third and fourth quarter sprint times and fourth quarter best sprint time, otherwise unclear and trivial effects were recorded for remaining performance variables. Core temperature was moderately lower (Cohen's d=0.67; 90% CL=-1.27, 0.23 in PC at the end of the precooling period and quarter 1. No differences were found for mean skin temperature, heart rate, thermal sensation, or rating of perceived exertion, however, moderate Cohen's d effect sizes suggested a greater sweat loss in PC compared with CONT. In conclusion, repeat- sprint performance was neither clearly nor substantially improved in seasonally acclimatised players by using a combination of internal and external cooling methods prior to and during exercise performed in the field in warm, dry conditions. Of practical importance, precooling appears unnecessary for repeat-sprint performance if athletes are seasonally acclimatised or artificially acclimated to heat, as it provides no additional benefit

  14. Effect of pre-cooling on repeat-sprint performance in seasonally acclimatised males during an outdoor simulated team-sport protocol in warm conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brade, Carly J; Dawson, Brian T; Wallman, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    Whether precooling is beneficial for exercise performance in warm climates when heat acclimatised is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of precooling on repeat-sprint performance during a simulated team-sport circuit performed outdoors in warm, dry field conditions in seasonally acclimatised males (n = 10). They performed two trials, one with precooling (PC; ice slushy and cooling jacket) and another without (CONT). Trials began with a 30-min baseline/cooling period followed by an 80 min repeat-sprint protocol, comprising 4 x 20-min quarters, with 2 x 5-min quarter breaks and a 10-min half-time recovery/cooling period. A clear and substantial (negative; PC slower) effect was recorded for first quarter circuit time. Clear and trivial effects were recorded for overall circuit time, third and fourth quarter sprint times and fourth quarter best sprint time, otherwise unclear and trivial effects were recorded for remaining performance variables. Core temperature was moderately lower (Cohen's d=0.67; 90% CL=-1.27, 0.23) in PC at the end of the precooling period and quarter 1. No differences were found for mean skin temperature, heart rate, thermal sensation, or rating of perceived exertion, however, moderate Cohen's d effect sizes suggested a greater sweat loss in PC compared with CONT. In conclusion, repeat- sprint performance was neither clearly nor substantially improved in seasonally acclimatised players by using a combination of internal and external cooling methods prior to and during exercise performed in the field in warm, dry conditions. Of practical importance, precooling appears unnecessary for repeat-sprint performance if athletes are seasonally acclimatised or artificially acclimated to heat, as it provides no additional benefit. Key PointsPre-cooling did not improve repeated sprint performance during a prolonged team-sport circuit in field conditions.If individuals are already heat acclimatised/acclimated, pre-cooling is

  15. Characterization of suspected illegal skin whitening cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, B; Van Hoeck, E; Rogiers, V; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O; De Paepe, K; Deconinck, E

    2014-03-01

    An important group of suspected illegal cosmetics consists of skin bleaching products, which are usually applied to the skin of the face, hands and décolleté for local depigmentation of hyper pigmented regions or more importantly, for a generalized reduction of the skin tone. These cosmetic products are suspected to contain illegal active substances that may provoke as well local as systemic toxic effects, being the reason for their banning from the EU market. In that respect, illegal and restricted substances in cosmetics, known to have bleaching properties, are in particular hydroquinone, tretinoin and corticosteroids. From a legislative point of view, all cosmetic products containing a prohibited whitening agent are illegal and must be taken off the EU market. A newly developed screening method using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time off flight-mass spectrometry allows routine analysis of suspected products. 163 suspected skin whitening cosmetics, collected by Belgian inspectors at high risk sites such as airports and so-called ethnic cosmetic shops, were analyzed and 59% were classified as illegal. The whitening agents mostly detected were clobetasol propionate and hydroquinone, which represent a serious health risk when repeatedly and abundantly applied to the skin.

  16. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Renowned experts present the latest knowledge Although a very fragile structure, the skin barrier is probably one of the most important organs of the body. Inward/out it is responsible for body integrity and outward/in for keeping microbes, chemicals, and allergens from penetrating the skin. Since...... the role of barrier integrity in atopic dermatitis and the relationship to filaggrin mutations was discovered a decade ago, research focus has been on the skin barrier, and numerous new publications have become available. This book is an interdisciplinary update offering a wide range of information...... on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...

  17. Aquaporins in the Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ravi; Kevin Heard, L; Chen, Xunsheng; Bollag, Wendy B

    2017-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body, serving as an important barrier between the internal milieu and the external environment. The skin is also one of the first lines of defense against microbial infection and other hazards, and thus, the skin has important immune functions . This organ is composed of many cell types, including immune-active dendritic cells (epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells), connective tissue-generating dermal fibroblasts and pigment-producing melanocytes. Comprising the outer skin layer are the epidermal keratinocytes, the predominant cell of this layer, the epidermis , which provides both a mechanical barrier and a water -permeability barrier. Recent data suggest that aquaporins, a family of barrel-shaped proteins surrounding internal pores that allow the passage of water and, in some family members, small solutes such as glycerol , play critical roles in regulating various skin parameters. The involvement of different aquaporin family members in skin function is discussed.

  18. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir NEW OSHA- ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  19. Basophils and skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Granata, Francescopaolo; Marone, Gianni

    2014-05-01

    Since their discovery in 1879, basophils have been viewed as circulating blood granulocytes with limited immune function. New research tools for their functional analysis in vivo have revealed previously unrecognized roles for basophils in several skin disorders. Human basophils infiltrate different skin lesions and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diseases ranging from chronic idiopathic urticaria to systemic lupus erythematosus. In mouse models, basophils participate in IgE-mediated chronic allergic inflammation of the skin and have a protective role in tick infestation. In this review, we discuss critical advances in our understanding of basophil biology and their roles in the pathophysiology of skin disorders.

  20. Skin Images Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali E. Zaart

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Image segmentation is a fundamental step in many applications of image processing. Skin cancer has been the most common of all new cancers detected each year. At early stage detection of skin cancer, simple and economic treatment can cure it mostly. An accurate segmentation of skin images can help the diagnosis to define well the region of the cancer. The principal approach of segmentation is based on thresholding (classification that is lied to the problem of the thresholds estimation. Approach: The objective of this study is to develop a method to segment the skin images based on a mixture of Beta distributions. We assume that the data in skin images can be modeled by a mixture of Beta distributions. We used an unsupervised learning technique with Beta distribution to estimate the statistical parameters of the data in skin image and then estimate the thresholds for segmentation. Results: The proposed method of skin images segmentation was implemented and tested on different skin images. We obtained very good results in comparing with the same techniques with Gamma distribution. Conclusion: The experiment showed that the proposed method obtained very good results but it requires more testing on different types of skin images.

  1. Heating automation

    OpenAIRE

    Tomažič, Tomaž

    2013-01-01

    This degree paper presents usage and operation of peripheral devices with microcontroller for heating automation. The main goal is to make a quality system control for heating three house floors and with that, increase efficiency of heating devices and lower heating expenses. Heat pump, furnace, boiler pump, two floor-heating pumps and two radiator pumps need to be controlled by this system. For work, we have chosen a development kit stm32f4 - discovery with five temperature sensors, LCD disp...

  2. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  3. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  4. Epidermal melanin absorption in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    The principle of laser induced selective photothermolysis is to induced thermal damage to specific targets in such a manner that the temperature of the surrounding tissue is maintained below the threshold for thermal damage. The selectivity is obtained by selection of a proper wavelength and pulse duration. The technique is presently being used in the clinic for removal of port-wine stains. The presence of melanin in the epidermal layer can represent a limitation to the selectivity. Melanin absorption drops off significantly with increasing wavelength, but is significant in the entire wavelength region where the blood absorption is high. Treatment of port-wine stain in patients with high skin pigmentation may therefore give overheating of the epidermis, resulting in epidermal necrosis. Melanosomal heating is dependent on the energy and duration of the laser pulse. The heating mechanism for time scales less than typically 1 microsecond(s) corresponds to a transient local heating of the individual melanosomes. For larger time scales, heat diffusion out of the melanosomes become of increased importance, and the temperature distribution will reach a local steady state condition after typically 10 microsecond(s) . For even longer pulse duration, heat diffusing from neighboring melanosomes becomes important, and the temperature rise in a time scale from 100 - 500 microsecond(s) is dominated by this mechanism. The epidermal heating during the typical 450 microsecond(s) pulse used for therapy is thus dependent on the average epidermal melanin content rather than on the absorption coefficient of the individual melanosomes. This study will present in vivo measurements of the epidermal melanin absorption of human skin when exposed to short laser pulses (< 0.1 microsecond(s) ) from a Q-switched ruby laser and with long laser pulses (approximately 500 microsecond(s) ) from a free-running ruby laser or a long pulse length flashlamp pumped dye laser. The epidermal melanin

  5. Staged regenerative sorption heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system for cooling and heating a space. A sorbent is confined in a plurality of compressors of which at least four are first stage and at least four are second stage. The first stage operates over a first pressure region and the second stage over a second pressure region which is higher than the first. Sorbate from the first stage enters the second stage. The sorbate loop includes a condenser, expansion valve, evaporator and the compressors. A single sorbate loop can be employed for single-temperature-control such as air conditioning and heating. Two sorbate loops can be used for two-temperature-control as in a refrigerator and freezer. The evaporator temperatures control the freezer and refrigerator temperatures. Alternatively the refrigerator temperature can be cooled by the freezer with one sorbate loop. A heat transfer fluid is circulated in a closed loop which includes a radiator and the compressors. Low temperature heat is exhausted by the radiator. High temperature heat is added to the heat transfer fluid entering the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Heat is transferred from compressors which are sorbing vapor to the heat transfer fluid, and from the heat transfer fluid to the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Each compressor is subjected to the following phases, heating to its highest temperature, cooling down from its highest temperature, cooling to its lowest temperature, and warming up from its lowest temperature. The phases are repeated to complete a cycle and regenerate heat.

  6. Assessment of the Repeatability and Sensitivity of the Thermoelectric Perfusion Probe

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Brent Earl

    2006-01-01

    The Thermoelectric Perfusion Probe is a completely electronic system that cyclically heats and cools tissue to measure blood perfusion. The probe produces the thermal event with a thermoelectric cooler and then measures the resulting heat flux and temperatures: the arterial temperature and the sensor temperature (the temperature between the heat flux gage and the skin). The Thermoelectric Perfusion Probe was validated and calibrated on a phantom tissue test stand, a system that simulates pe...

  7. The impact of skin decontamination on the time for effective treatment of low volatile nerve agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, M.J.A.; Schans, M.J. van der; Noort, D.

    2013-01-01

    Low volatile organophosphorous (OP) nerve agents such as VX, will most likely enter the body via the skin. In previous investigations conducted in hairless guinea pigs, it was shown that skin exposure to VX resulted in a slow and variable onset of observable signs of toxicity. Repeated treatments

  8. The impact of skin decontamination on the time for effective treatment of low volatile nerve agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, M.J.A.; Schans, M.J. van der; Noort, D.

    2013-01-01

    Low volatile organophosphorous (OP) nerve agents such as VX, will most likely enter the body via the skin. In previous investigations conducted in hairless guinea pigs, it was shown that skin exposure to VX resulted in a slow and variable onset of observable signs of toxicity. Repeated treatments ad

  9. Considerations on repeated repairing of weldments in Inconel 718 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E. O.; Lovoy, C. V.; Mcilwain, M. C.; Munafo, P.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of repeated weld repairs on the metallurgical characteristics, high cycle fatigue (HCF), and tensile properties of Inconel 718 butt weld joints were determined. A 1/4 in thick plate and a 1/2 in thick plate were used as well as tungsten inert gas welding, and Inconel 718 filler wire. Weld panels were subjected to 2, 6, and 12 repeated repairs and were made in a highly restrained condition. Post weld heat treatments were also conducted with the welded panel in the highly restrained condition. Results indicate that no significant metallurgical anomaly is evident as a result of up to twelve repeated weld repairs. No degradation in fatigue life is noted for up to twelve repeated repairs. Tensile results from specimens which contained up to twelve repeated weld repairs revealed no significant degradation in UTS and YS. However, a significant decrease in elongation is evident with specimens (solution treated and age hardened after welding) which contained twelve repeated repairs. The elongation loss is attributed to the presence of a severe notch on each side (fusion line) of the repair weld bead reinforcement.

  10. Skin Diseases: Skin and Sun—Not a good mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin and Sun —Not a good mix Past Issues / ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Good skin care begins with sun safety. Whether it is ...

  11. Dark Skin No Shield from Deadly Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166194.html Dark Skin No Shield From Deadly Skin Cancer Death rates from melanoma are higher for people of color, skin expert says To use the sharing features on ...

  12. Parasites and the skin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-06-11

    Jun 11, 2009 ... remind you of those rare and wonderful infestations that you might never see. ... from a burrow, mounted on a glass slide. The findings are ... Parasitic infections may be confined to the skin or may have skin involvement as part ...

  13. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der E.; Zeng, X.; Masen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is fre

  14. Deformable skinning on bones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bent Dalgaard; Petersen, Kim Steen; Jakobsen, Bjarke

    2001-01-01

    Applying skin to a model is a relatively simple task to implement. Nonetheless it seems that no good resource exists that describes both the concepts and math necessary to understand and implement skinning. The intention of this article is an attempt to give a thoroughly description...

  15. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  16. Chromium content in human skin after in vitro application of ordinary cement and ferrous-sulphate-reduced cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fullerton, A; Gammelgaard, Bente; Avnstorp, C

    1993-01-01

    The amount of chromium found in human skin after in vitro application of cement suspensions on full-thickness human skin in diffusion cells was investigated. Cement suspensions made from ordinary Portland cement or Portland cement with the chromate reduced with added ferrous sulphate were used....... The cement suspensions were either applied on the skin surface under occlusion for 48 h or applied repeatedly every 24 h for 96 h. No statistically significant difference in chromium content of skin layers between skin exposed to ordinary Portland cement, skin exposed to cement with added ferrous sulphate...

  17. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  18. Bionanomaterials for skin regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Leonida, Mihaela D

    2016-01-01

    This book gives a concise overview of bionanomaterials with applications for skin regeneration. The advantages and challenges of nanoscale materials are covered in detail, giving a basic view of the skin structure and conditions that require transdermal or topical applications. Medical applications, such as wound healing, care for burns, skin disease, and cosmetic care, such as aging of the skin and photodamage, and how they benefit from bionanomaterials, are described in detail. A final chapter is devoted to the ethical and social issues related to the use of bionanomaterials for skin regeneration. This is an ideal book for researchers in materials science, medical scientists specialized in dermatology, and cosmetic chemists working in formulations. It can also serve as a reference for nanotechnologists, dermatologists, microbiologists, engineers, and polymer chemists, as well as students studying in these fields.

  19. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Macmichael, DBA

    1988-01-01

    A fully revised and extended account of the design, manufacture and use of heat pumps in both industrial and domestic applications. Topics covered include a detailed description of the various heat pump cycles, the components of a heat pump system - drive, compressor, heat exchangers etc., and the more practical considerations to be taken into account in their selection.

  20. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRowe, Steven D.; Saladin, Michael E.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held one week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions. PMID:17537583

  1. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRowe, Steven D; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2007-12-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held 1 week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

  2. Time between skin incision and delivery during cesarean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossouw, Jana N; Hall, David; Harvey, Justin

    2013-04-01

    To investigate factors influencing skin incision-to-delivery time (including sub-divisions thereof) and the effect of these surgical intervals on immediate neonatal outcome. A prospective cohort analysis was conducted of all women undergoing cesarean delivery at Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa, from May 24 to November 2, 2010. Three surgical intervals were evaluated: skin incision to myometrium, myometrium to delivery, and skin incision to delivery. Neonatal outcome was assessed by the 5-minute Apgar score. Of 1120 cesarean deliveries recorded during the study period, 77.2% were emergency procedures, which were performed more quickly at all surgical planes (Pdelivery time was significantly extended among repeat procedures (Pdeliveries. Repeat procedures, adhesions, and obesity prolonged the time taken for cesarean delivery. Nevertheless, the effect of these factors on the 5-minute Apgar score was minimal. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The ...

  4. Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... removed. That is the most common form of skin cancer and not as dangerous as melanoma. Photo: Corbis ...

  5. Skin temperature: its role in thermoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovsky, A A

    2014-03-01

    This review analyses whether skin temperature represents ambient temperature and serves as a feedforward signal for the thermoregulation system, or whether it is one of the body's temperatures and provides feedback. The body is covered mostly by hairy (non-glabrous) skin, which is typically insulated from the environment (with clothes in humans and with fur in non-human mammals). Thermal signals from hairy skin represent a temperature of the insulated superficial layer of the body and provide feedback to the thermoregulation system. It is explained that this feedback is auxiliary, both negative and positive, and that it reduces the system's response time and load error. Non-hairy (glabrous) skin covers specialized heat-exchange organs (e.g. the hand), which are also used to explore the environment. In thermoregulation, these organs are primarily effectors. Their main thermosensory-related role is to assess local temperatures of objects explored; these local temperatures are feedforward signals for various behaviours. Non-hairy skin also contributes to the feedback for thermoregulation, but this contribution is limited. Autonomic (physiological) thermoregulation does not use feedforward signals. Thermoregulatory behaviours use both feedback and feedforward signals. Implications of these principles to thermopharmacology, a new approach to achieving biological effects by blocking temperature signals with drugs, are discussed.

  6. Radiative heat transfer between metallic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Laroche, Marine; Volz, Sebastian; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    International audience; In this letter, we study the radiative heat transfer between two nanoparticles in the near field and in the far field. We find that the heat transfer is dominated by the electric dipole-dipole interaction for dielectric particles and by the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction for metallic nanoparticles. We introduce polarizabilities formulas valid for arbitrary values of the skin depth. While the heat transfer mechanism is different for metallic and dielectric nanoparti...

  7. EAMJ Dec. Repeatability.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... Results:Kappa values for four-week repeatability for the wheeze and asthma questions were 0.61 ... for logistic, cultural and ethical reasons, to use ... individual with baseline forced expiratory volume in .... period is likely to also include the effects of true ... data, the writing of the manuscript or the decision.

  8. Skin Picking Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Cetinay Aydin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin picking disorder is not a dermatological disorder and it is a table characterized with picking skin excessively and repetitively, leading to damage in skin tissue. Unlike normal picking behaviour, psychogenic skin picking is repetitive and it can lead to severe damage in the skin and even complications which constitute vital danger. While some patients define frequent but short lasting picking attacks, others define rarer attacks which last a few hours. Skin picking disorder, which is not included in the classification systems up to DSM-5 as a separate diagnosis category, is included as an independent diagnosis in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Associated Disorders category in DSM-5. In case reports, open label studies and double blind studies selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are shown to be effective in the treatment of skin picking disorder. Mostly, cognitive-behaviourial techniques are used and have been proven to be useful in psychotherapy. Habit reversal is one of the behaviourial techniques which are frequently applied, give positive results in which well-being state can be maintained. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 401-428

  9. Archaea on human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Probst

    Full Text Available The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  10. Skin and antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljsak, Borut; Dahmane, Raja; Godic, Aleksandar

    2013-04-01

    It is estimated that total sun exposure occurs non-intentionally in three quarters of our lifetimes. Our skin is exposed to majority of UV radiation during outdoor activities, e.g. walking, practicing sports, running, hiking, etc. and not when we are intentionally exposed to the sun on the beach. We rarely use sunscreens during those activities, or at least not as much and as regular as we should and are commonly prone to acute and chronic sun damage of the skin. The only protection of our skin is endogenous (synthesis of melanin and enzymatic antioxidants) and exogenous (antioxidants, which we consume from the food, like vitamins A, C, E, etc.). UV-induced photoaging of the skin becomes clinically evident with age, when endogenous antioxidative mechanisms and repair processes are not effective any more and actinic damage to the skin prevails. At this point it would be reasonable to ingest additional antioxidants and/or to apply them on the skin in topical preparations. We review endogenous and exogenous skin protection with antioxidants.

  11. Povidone iodine skin absorption: an ex-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvadbova, Martina; Crosera, Matteo; Maina, Giovanni; Larese Filon, Francesca

    2015-06-15

    Povidone iodine is a water-soluble complex used to disinfect the skin surface and it exerts prolonged germicidal action against a broad spectrum of germs. Indeed, it is often applied on burned skin, large wounds, deep tissues or mucosa. Notably some surgical hand-scrub solutions, which are considered safe antiseptics, contain large amounts of iodine that can be absorbed by skin. The aim of present study was to study the skin absorption of iodine after the application on the skin of povidone-iodine solution, used by health care workers during surgical procedure. We use Franz diffusion static cells with human skin. After 24h from the beginning of our measurement the iodine concentration in the receiving compartment was 11.59±6.3μg/cm(2). The medium flux calculated was 0.73±0.33μg/cm(2)/h with a lag time of 8.9±1.5h. These in vitro results confirmed that povidone iodine could pass through the skin in a relevant amount that can explain the clinical findings in burned or surgically treated patients. In professional use the repetitive contact with povidone iodine, also as soap, can cause iodine skin permeation that must be considered when the washing procedures are repeated more than 20 times a day.

  12. Eicosanoids in skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Eicosanoids play an integral part in homeostatic mechanisms related to skin health and structural integrity. They also mediate inflammatory events developed in response to environmental factors, such as exposure to ultraviolet radiation, and inflammatory and allergic disorders, including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. This review article discusses biochemical aspects related to cutaneous eicosanoid metabolism, the contribution of these potent autacoids to skin inflammation and related conditions, and considers the importance of nutritional supplementation with bioactives such as omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and plant-derived antioxidants as means of addressing skin health issues.

  13. Leishmania Skin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    2009, a dose of 50µg will be used in the design of a phase III clinical trial. 15. SUBJECT TERMS LtSTA = Leishmania tropica Skin Test Antigen 16...2010 on a Leishmania Skin Test (LtSTA) developed from the promastigotes of Leishmania tropica . During this period a phase IIB study was in progress...diluent. The final product is referred to as Leishmania tropica Skin Test Antigen (LtSTA). Figure 3 is a schematic diagram of the Drug Product

  14. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  15. A pilot study of the diagnosis and treatment of impaired skin integrity: dry skin in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, M A

    1990-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to isolate the clinical indicators of dry skin in the elderly, test an instrument used to measure dry skin, analyze the importance of factors thought to contribute to dry skin, test the effectiveness of an intervention for treating dry skin, and determine the feasibility of clinical implementation of the protocol. The sample included 15 elderly long-term care residents with a nursing and medical diagnosis of dry skin. Although the small sample size limits interpretation of findings, there is some evidence that scaling and flaking may be indicators of skin dryness. Subjects received the bathing intervention for 6 weeks and were assessed every 2 weeks during the 6-week periods before, during, and after intervention (nine data collection points). Analysis of the nine repeated measures of skin dryness indicated significantly reduced total dryness (p = .031), redness (p = .001), scaling (p = .007), and flaking (p = .002) over time. Post hoc comparisons, interrater agreement on the Skin Condition Data Form, and categorical variables were analyzed. Findings from this study will be used to generate further hypotheses.

  16. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Brodowicz, Kazimierz; Wyszynski, M L; Wyszynski

    2013-01-01

    Heat pumps and related technology are in widespread use in industrial processes and installations. This book presents a unified, comprehensive and systematic treatment of the design and operation of both compression and sorption heat pumps. Heat pump thermodynamics, the choice of working fluid and the characteristics of low temperature heat sources and their application to heat pumps are covered in detail.Economic aspects are discussed and the extensive use of the exergy concept in evaluating performance of heat pumps is a unique feature of the book. The thermodynamic and chemical properties o

  17. [Skin-picking disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeier, V; Peters, E; Gieler, U

    2015-10-01

    The disorder is characterized by compulsive repetitive skin-picking (SP), resulting in skin lesions. The patients must have undertaken several attempts to reduce or stop SP. The disorder must have led to clinically significant limitations in social, professional, or other important areas of life. The symptoms cannot be better explained by another emotional disorder or any other dermatological disease. In the new DSM-V, skin-picking disorder has been included in the diagnostic system as an independent disorder and describes the self-injury of the skin by picking or scratching with an underlying emotional disorder. SP is classified among the impulse-control disorders and is, thus, differentiated from compulsive disorders as such. There are often emotional comorbidities. In cases of pronounced psychosocial limitation, interdisciplinary cooperation with a psychotherapist and/or psychiatrist is indicated.

  18. Skin picking disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Chamberlain, Samuel R; Keuthen, Nancy J; Lochner, Christine; Stein, Dan J

    2012-11-01

    Although skin picking has been documented in the medical literature since the 19th century, only now is it receiving serious consideration as a DSM psychiatric disorder in discussions for DSM-5. Recent community prevalence studies suggest that skin picking disorder appears to be as common as many other psychiatric disorders, with reported prevalences ranging from 1.4% to 5.4%. Clinical evaluation of patients with skin picking disorder entails a broad physical and psychiatric examination, encouraging an interdisciplinary approach to evaluation and treatment. Approaches to treatment should include cognitive-behavioral therapy (including habit reversal or acceptance-enhanced behavior therapy) and medication (serotonin reuptake inhibitors, N-acetylcysteine, or naltrexone). Based on clinical experience and research findings, the authors recommend several management approaches to skin picking disorder.

  19. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. When you have radiation treatment for cancer, you may have some changes ...

  20. Scalded skin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Severe bloodstream infection ( septicemia ) Spread to deeper skin infection ( cellulitis ) When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your provider or go to the emergency room if you have symptoms of this disorder. Prevention ... Alternative Names Ritter disease; Staphylococcal ...

  1. Skin Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Potential Partners for Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalitions References Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Trends Behavior Rates What CDC Is Doing Skin Cancer Prevention Progress Report The Burning Truth Initiative A ...

  2. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... produce melanin, the pigment that gives skin its color. All people have roughly the same number of ...

  3. Skin or nail culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  4. Allergy testing - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch tests - allergy; Scratch tests - allergy; Skin tests - allergy; RAST test; Allergic rhinitis - allergy testing; Asthma - allergy testing; Eczema - allergy testing; Hayfever - allergy testing; Dermatitis - allergy testing; Allergy testing; ...

  5. Skin graft - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/presentations/100100.htm Skin graft - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... 2017 Updated by: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason ...

  6. Impairments in Skin Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphree, Rose W

    2017-09-01

    Altered skin integrity increases the chance of infection, impaired mobility, and decreased function and may result in the loss of limb or, sometimes, life. Skin is affected by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic factors can include altered nutritional status, vascular disease issues, and diabetes. Extrinsic factors include falls, accidents, pressure, immobility, and surgical procedures. Ensuring skin integrity in the elderly requires a team approach and includes the individual, caregivers, and clinicians. The twenty-first century clinician has several online, evidence-based tools to assist with optimal treatment plans. Understanding best practices in addressing skin integrity issues can promote positive outcomes with the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Designing pliable structural Skins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Peters, Brady; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2013-01-01

    Structural stability can be formed through structured or seemingly unstructured approaches to fold, plead or crumble paper. This paper reports on two projects that showcase how computational design approaches can help to widen the understanding and use of structural skins....

  8. Occupational skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahler, Vera; Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Alfonso, Jose Hernan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-related skin diseases (WSD) are caused or worsened by a professional activity. Occupational skin diseases (OSD) need to fulfil additional legal criteria which differ from country to country. OSD range amongst the five most frequently notified occupational diseases (musculoskeletal...... diseases, neurologic diseases, lung diseases, diseases of the sensory organs, skin diseases) in Europe. OBJECTIVE: To retrieve information and compare the current state of national frameworks and pathways to manage patients with occupational skin disease with regard to prevention, diagnosis, treatment...... in Science and Technology (COST) Action TD 1206 (StanDerm) (www.standerm.eu). RESULTS: Besides a national health service or a statutory health insurance, most European member states implemented a second insurance scheme specifically geared at occupational diseases [insurance against occupational risks...

  9. Skin lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... procedure will leave a small indented area. This type of biopsy is often done when a skin cancer is ... may have stitches to close the area. This type of biopsy is often done to diagnose rashes . EXCISIONAL BIOPSY ...

  10. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Glossary of Terms Resources Resources Global Resources Cancer Centers Online Resources The Melanoma Book Clinical Trials Download a Skin Self-Exam Card Download a Patient Navigation Card ...

  11. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  12. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenefelt PD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Philip D Shenefelt,1 Debrah A Shenefelt2 1Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, 2Congregation Or Ahavah, Lutz, FL, USA Abstract: Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, "goose bumps", redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. Keywords: skin, skin disorders, spiritual, religious

  13. Sensitive skin is not limited to the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Martory, C; Roguedas-Contios, A M; Sibaud, V; Degouy, A; Schmitt, A M; Misery, L

    2008-01-01

    Sensitive skin (or reactive or hyper-reactive skin) is defined as skin that reacts by erythema and/or subjective symptoms (pricking, burning, pain, pruritus etc.) to stimuli that are not pathogens in themselves (e.g. wind, heat, cold, water, cosmetics, stress). This phenomenon is very frequent, occurring in about 50% of the European population. Sensitive skin is always reported on the face. The aim of our study was to determine if it can occur in other localizations. We have performed this study in two centres. One was a department of dermatology in a university hospital while the other one was a centre for cosmetological studies. A questionnaire was given to women aged > 15 years. The questions were: Do you have sensitive skin? If yes, in which localization? What are the symptoms and triggering factors? Four hundred subjects were included in the study (200 in each centre). The two populations were similar in terms of age, sex, and most of the results. The mean age was 40 years. Eighty-five per cent of the 400 subjects declared that they had sensitive skin on the face, and 70% had sensitive skin in another area: hands (58%), scalp (36%), feet (34%), neck (27%), torso (23%) or back (21%). Triggering factors included cold (66%), heat (28%), stress (61%), sun exposure (51%), wind (42%), water from a shower (29%) or a swimming pool (40%), soaps (42%), cosmetics (28%) and pollution (18%). Friction from clothes was reported in 28% of cases. Sensitive skin was observed as redness in most cases along with various subjective symptoms. The proportion of subjects presenting with sensitive skin is probably overestimated. However, the main result of this study is that sensitive skin is not restricted to the face but rather it is also present at other localizations, mainly the hands, and often the scalp and feet.

  14. Directionality switchable gain stabilized linear repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayuki; Ohmachi, Tadashi; Aida, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new approach to realize a bidirectional linear repeater suitable for future optical internet networks and fault location in repeater chain with OTDR. The proposed approach is the linear repeater of simple configuration whose directionality is rearranged dynamically by electrical control signal. The repeater is composed of a magneto-optical switch, a circulator, a dynamically gain stabilized unidirectional EDFA, and control circuits. The repeater directionality is rearranged as fast as 0.1ms by an electrical control pulse. It is experimentally confirmed that OTDR with the directionality switchable repeater is feasible for repeater chain. The detailed design and performance of the repeater are also discussed, including the multi-pass interference (MPI) which may arise in the proposed repeater, the effect of the MPI on SNR degradation of the repeater chain and the feed-forward EDFA gain control circuit.

  15. Nicotinamide and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew C; Damian, Diona L

    2014-08-01

    Nicotinamide, an amide form of vitamin B3, boosts cellular energy and regulates poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase 1, an enzyme with important roles in DNA repair and the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Nicotinamide shows promise for the treatment of a wide range of dermatological conditions, including autoimmune blistering disorders, acne, rosacea, ageing skin and atopic dermatitis. In particular, recent studies have also shown it to be a potential agent for reducing actinic keratoses and preventing skin cancers.

  16. Mantoux Tuberculin Skin Test

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-11-22

    Learn how to evaluate people for latent TB infection with the Mantoux tuberculin skin test. This podcast includes sections on administering and reading the Mantoux tuberculin skin test, the standard method for detecting latent TB infection since the 1930s.  Created: 11/22/2006 by National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 12/12/2006.

  17. Skin Cancer - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expand Section Skin Cancer: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Cáncer de piel: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National Library of Medicine Ukrainian (українська ) Expand Section Skin Cancer - українська (Ukrainian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Characters ...

  18. Measurement-based quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Zwerger, M; Briegel, H J

    2012-01-01

    We introduce measurement-based quantum repeaters, where small-scale measurement-based quantum processors are used to perform entanglement purification and entanglement swapping in a long-range quantum communication protocol. In the scheme, pre-prepared entangled states stored at intermediate repeater stations are coupled with incoming photons by simple Bell-measurements, without the need of performing additional quantum gates or measurements. We show how to construct the required resource states, and how to minimize their size. We analyze the performance of the scheme under noise and imperfections, with focus on small-scale implementations involving entangled states of few qubits. We find measurement-based purification protocols with significantly improved noise thresholds. Furthermore we show that already resource states of small size suffice to significantly increase the maximal communication distance. We also discuss possible advantages of our scheme for different set-ups.

  19. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  20. A comparison of temperature profile depending on skin types for laser hair removal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Gwi-Won; Youn, Jong-In

    2014-11-01

    Although numerous lasers with different wavelengths are available for laser hair removal, their use in individuals with dark-pigmented skin remains a challenge. The present study aims to develop a numerical heat diffusion model considering skin types over various wavelengths. This numerical mode uses Pennes approximation to represent heat from metabolism, blood perfusion and an external heating source. The heat diffusion model is experimentally validated by using agar-based skin tissue phantoms. Diode lasers with four different wavelengths were used with two antithetical skin models. The pulse width and beam spot size were set to 200 ms and 1 cm(2), respectively. Temperature distribution along the hair structure and skin tissue was examined to determine both thermal confinement and heat transfer to the hair follicle. Experimental results are well matched with the numerical results. The results show that for the light skin model, thermal confinement is well achieved over various wavelengths, and treatment efficacy is expected to be better at a shorter wavelength. Otherwise, for the dark skin model, thermal confinement is poorly achieved as the wavelength decreases (hair tip and the hair root is significantly large compared with the light skin model, which may lead to adverse effects. We believe that the developed numerical model will help to establish optimal laser parameters for different individuals during laser hair removal.

  1. Ultraflexible organic photonic skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Zalar, Peter; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Jinno, Hiroaki; Matsuhisa, Naoji; Kitanosako, Hiroki; Tachibana, Yutaro; Yukita, Wakako; Koizumi, Mari; Someya, Takao

    2016-04-01

    Thin-film electronics intimately laminated onto the skin imperceptibly equip the human body with electronic components for health-monitoring and information technologies. When electronic devices are worn, the mechanical flexibility and/or stretchability of thin-film devices helps to minimize the stress and discomfort associated with wear because of their conformability and softness. For industrial applications, it is important to fabricate wearable devices using processing methods that maximize throughput and minimize cost. We demonstrate ultraflexible and conformable three-color, highly efficient polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) and organic photodetectors (OPDs) to realize optoelectronic skins (oe-skins) that introduce multiple electronic functionalities such as sensing and displays on the surface of human skin. The total thickness of the devices, including the substrate and encapsulation layer, is only 3 μm, which is one order of magnitude thinner than the epidermal layer of human skin. By integrating green and red PLEDs with OPDs, we fabricate an ultraflexible reflective pulse oximeter. The device unobtrusively measures the oxygen concentration of blood when laminated on a finger. On-skin seven-segment digital displays and color indicators can visualize data directly on the body.

  2. DOSHIC PHYSIOLOGY OF SKIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivprasad Chiplunkar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The balance of dosha  represents the healthy state and imbalance will cause various diseases. In normalcy doshas will be performing their own functions and individual doshas will be having their own specific sites. By telling the various sthana of each dosha, different function that is taken up by individual dosha in different sites has been highlighted.By mentioning ‘sparshanendriyam’ as one of the sthana of vata dosha the sensory functions of skin to vata dosha has been emphasised. By mentioning ‘sparshanam’ as one of the sthana of pittadosha, the function of colouring/pigmentation of skin, which is majorly carried out  by melanocytes by secreting melanin pigment has been highlighted. Meda is one among the sthanas of kapha dosha; this can be considered as the adipose tissue of skin/below skin. Since sweda is mala of meda it can be also considered as the secretions from the eccrine glands.With respect to skin, sensory functions, both tactile and thermal is carried out by vata dosha more specifically vyana vata, pigmentation to the skin carried out by meloncytes by secreting melanin, it is nothing but function of pitta dosha more specifically brajaka pitta with the help of udana vata and finally production of sweat in sweat glands is the function of kapha. So there is the need for further study and research regarding the sthanas of all three doshas in different structures/organs in the body and its physiology.

  3. Zinc and skin biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Youichi; Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Shimada, Shinji

    2016-12-01

    Of all tissues, the skin has the third highest abundance of zinc in the body. In the skin, the zinc concentration is higher in the epidermis than in the dermis, owing to a zinc requirement for the active proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes. Here we review the dynamics and functions of zinc in the skin as well as skin disorders associated with zinc deficiency, zinc finger domain-containing proteins, and zinc transporters. Among skin disorders associated with zinc deficiency, acrodermatitis enteropathica is a disorder caused by mutations in the ZIP4 transporter and subsequent zinc deficiency. The triad acrodermatitis enteropathica is characterized by alopecia, diarrhea, and skin lesions in acral, periorificial, and anogenital areas. We highlight the underlying mechanism of the development of acrodermatitis because of zinc deficiency by describing our new findings. We also discuss the accumulating evidence on zinc deficiency in alopecia and necrolytic migratory erythema, which is typically associated with glucagonomas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Repeatability of Harris Corner Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Lili

    2003-01-01

    Interest point detectors are commonly employed to reduce the amount of data to be processed. The ideal interest point detector would robustly select those features which are most appropriate or salient for the application and data at hand. This paper shows that interest points are geometrically stable under different transformations.This property makes interest points very successful in the context of image matching. To measure this property quantatively, we introduce a evaluation criterion: repeatability rate.

  5. Method of making self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, John T.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Shibata, Jason

    2017-06-06

    An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

  6. HEAT RECUPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Rovin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat recovery is an effective method of shortening specific energy consumption. new constructions of recuperators for heating and cupola furnaces have been designed and successfully introduced. two-stage recuperator with computer control providing blast heating up to 600 °C and reducing fuel consumption by 30% is of special interest.

  7. Effect of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and intense pulsed light on the expression of heat shock protein 70 in rat skin%Q开关Nd:YAG激光与强脉冲光对鼠皮肤热休克蛋白70表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟华; 马伟元; 蔡大幸; 孙青

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of Q - switched Nd: YAG laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) on the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in rat skin. Methods: The dorsal skin of twenty Wister rats were divided into three areas before treatments: the cephalic region as normal control group, the middle region as the IPL treatment group and the caudal region as the YAG group. The skin samples were taken at day 1, day 7 and on week 4 after irradiation. The expression of HSF70 protein was detected with immunohistochemistry. Results: The expression of HSP70 of two treatment groups were reached the most significant at 1 week. At week 4 after irradiation, the expression of HSP70 decreased and there was no difference between the IPL group and the control group ( P > 0.05) , but YAG group was still stronger than the control group ( P < 0.05) , The expression of HSP70 of two light irradiated groups were different significantly at 1 day, 1 week and 4 weeks ( P < 0.05). Conclusion: The intensity of HSP70 expression in rat skin is related to the degree and depth of thermal damage after the light irradiation. The effect of Q- switched 1064 ran Nd: YAG laser on rat skin rejuvenation is stronger and more durable than IPL.%目的:确定Q开关1064 nm Nd:YAG激光与强脉冲光(IPL)对Wistar大鼠皮肤热休克蛋白70(HSP70)表达的影响.方法:Wistar大鼠20只,背部皮肤脱毛,平均分成3部分:近头侧区为正常对照组,中间区为IPL组,近尾侧区为YAG组.于照射后1天、1周、4周取大鼠皮肤标本,免疫组化技术检测HSP70的表达.结果:免疫组化显示:Q开关1064 nm Nd:YAG激光和IPL照射后1周,HSP70表达最为显著;照射后4周,HSP70表达下调,IPL组表达与正常对照组无差别,YAG组仍较正常对照组表达增强(P<0.05);两光照组间于照射后1天、1周和4周HSP70表达差别有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:HSP70的表达强度与光照后组织热损伤的程度和深度有关,Q开关1064 nm Nd:YAG激

  8. MINIVER: Miniature version of real/ideal gas aero-heating and ablation computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendler, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Computer code is used to determine heat transfer multiplication factors, special flow field simulation techniques, different heat transfer methods, different transition criteria, crossflow simulation, and more efficient thin skin thickness optimization procedure.

  9. Measurement and simulation of Joule heating during treatment of B-16 melanoma tumors in mice with nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliquett, Uwe; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Experimental evidence shows that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) trigger apoptosis in skin tumors. We have postulated that the energy delivered by nsPEF is insufficient to impart significant heating to the treated tissue. Here we use both direct measurements and theoretical modeling of the Joule heating in order to validate this assumption. For the temperature measurement, thermo-sensitive liquid crystals (TLC) were used to determine the surface temperature while a micro-thermocouple (made from 30 μm wires) was used for measuring the temperature inside the tissue. The calculation of the temperature distribution used an asymptotic approach with the repeated calculation of the electric field, Joule heating and heat transfer, and the subsequent readjustment of the electrical tissue conductivity. This yields a temperature distribution both in space and time. It can be shown that for the measured increase in temperature an unexpectedly high electrical conductivity of the tissue would be required, which was indeed found by using voltage and current monitoring during the experiment. Using impedance measurements within t(after)=50 μs after the pulse revealed a fast decline of the high conductivity state when the electric field ceases. The experimentally measured high conductance of a skin fold (mouse) between plate electrodes was about 5 times higher than those of the maximally expected conductance due to fully electroporated membrane structures (G(max)/G(electroporated))≈5. Fully electroporated membrane structure assumes that 100% of the membranes are conductive which is estimated from an impedance measurement at 10 MHz where membranes are capacitively shorted. Since the temperature rise in B-16 mouse melanoma tumors due to equally spaced (Δt=2 s) 300 ns-pulses with E=40 kV/cm usually does not exceed ΔΤ=3 K at all parts of the skin fold between the electrodes, a hyperthermic effect on the tissue can be excluded.

  10. Origin and fate of repeats in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaz, G; Rocha, E P C; Netter, P; Coissac, E

    2002-07-01

    We investigated 53 complete bacterial chromosomes for intrachromosomal repeats. In previous studies on eukaryote chromosomes, we proposed a model for the dynamics of repeats based on the continuous genesis of tandem repeats, followed by an active process of high deletion rate, counteracted by rearrangement events that may prevent the repeats from being deleted. The present study of long repeats in the genomes of Bacteria and Archaea suggests that our model of interspersed repeats dynamics may apply to them. Thus the duplication process might be a consequence of very ancient mechanisms shared by all three domains. Moreover, we show that there is a strong negative correlation between nucleotide composition bias and the repeat density of genomes. We hypothesise that in highly biased genomes, non-duplicated small repeats arise more frequently by random effects and are used as primers for duplication mechanisms, leading to a higher density of large repeats.

  11. Recent Progress in Electronic Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiandi; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Hanlu; Yu, Ruomeng; Pan, Caofeng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the human body and can sense pressure, temperature, and other complex environmental stimuli or conditions. The mimicry of human skin's sensory ability via electronics is a topic of innovative research that could find broad applications in robotics, artificial intelligence, and human–machine interfaces, all of which promote the development of electronic skin (e‐skin). To imitate tactile sensing via e‐skins, flexible and stretchable pressure sensor arrays are co...

  12. Skin aging and oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sayeeda Ahsanuddin; Minh Lam; Baron, Elma D.

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging occurs through two main pathways, intrinsic and extrinsic. These pathways have significant interaction in contributing to the aging phenotype, which includes skin laxity, wrinkling, pigmentation irregularities, and the appearance of neoplastic skin lesions. Here, we review the critical role that oxidative stress plays in skin aging, including its effects on signaling pathways involved in skin matrix formation and degradation, proteasome activity, as well as DNA structure. Furthermo...

  13. Skin involvement in Dupuytren's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, R.; Igali, L; Figus, A

    2016-01-01

    Whether the palmar skin has a role in the development, propagation or recurrence of Dupuytren's disease remains unclear. Clinical assessment for skin involvement is difficult and its correlation with histology uncertain. We prospectively biopsied the palmar skin of consecutive patients undergoing single digit fasciectomy (for primary Dupuytren's disease without clinically involved skin) and dermofasciectomy (for clinically involved skin or recurrence) in order to investigate this relationship...

  14. Immediate Changes to Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Strains Following Manual Lymph Drainage in Legs with Lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakutani, Hiromi; Nakamura, Kaori; Morikage, Noriyasu; Yamashita, Osamu; Harada, Takasuke; Ueda, Koshiro; Samura, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuya; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study the immediate impact of manual lymph drainage (MLD) on skin and subcutaneous tissue strains in legs with lymphedema using free-hand real-time tissue elastography (RTE). Methods: Skin and subcutaneous tissue strain measurements were taken at the middle of the inner thigh and calf by RTE in 20 legs with lymphedema of 18 patients (stage II: 11, late stage II: 7, stage III: 2) and in 70 legs of 35 normal subjects. In patients with lymphedema, the same measurements were repeated immediately following MLD. Results: Significant negative correlations were found between pre-MLD strains and the MLD-induced changes in thigh and calf skin strains (thigh skin: p <0.01, calf skin: p = 0.05), but not in subcutaneous tissue strains. Pre-MLD intercepts of these regression lines were closer to normal values as compared to mean pre-MLD values (normal thigh skin: 0.54% ± 0.30%, calf skin: 0.25% ± 0.18%, Pre-MLD thigh skin: 0.39% ± 0.20%, calf skin: 0.17% ± 0.12%, Pre-MLD intercept of thigh skin: 0.48%, Pre-MLD intercept of calf skin: 0.31%). Conclusions: It appears that MLD did not simply soften the skin, but rather normalized it in terms of strain. However, this was not confirmed in the subcutaneous tissue. PMID:27087870

  15. Heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, L.B.; Farma, A.J.

    1987-01-06

    This invention concerns a heat exchanger as used in a space heater, of the type in which hot exhaust gases transfer heat to water or the like flowing through a helical heat exchange coil. A significant improvement to the efficiency of the heat exchange occurring between the air and water is achieved by using a conduit for the water having external helical fluting such that the hot gases circulate along two paths, rather than only one. A preferred embodiment of such a heat exchanger includes a porous combustion element for producing radiant heat from a combustible gas, surrounded by a helical coil for effectively transferring the heat in the exhaust gas, flowing radially from the combustion element, to the water flowing through the coil. 4 figs.

  16. Effect of a lotion containing the heat-treated probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 on Staphylococcus aureus colonization in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet-Réthoré, Sandrine; Bourdès, Valérie; Mercenier, Annick; Haddar, Cyrille H; Verhoeven, Paul O; Andres, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus dominates the skin microbiota in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), with bacterial loads correlating with disease severity. The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the effect of a cosmetic lotion containing heat-treated Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (HT La1) on S. aureus colonization in AD patients. This open-label, multicenter study was performed in AD patients in Germany. First, detection of S. aureus was performed in all patients using the swab or scrub-wash method of sampling, followed by quantitative culture or quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Repeatability and reproducibility of all method combinations were evaluated to select the best combination of sampling and quantification. Second, a lotion containing HT La1 was applied to lesional skin twice daily for 3 weeks. Scoring using local objective SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD), measurement of S. aureus load, and lesional microbiome analysis were performed before and after the 3-week treatment period. Thirty-one patients with AD were included in the study. All sampling and quantification methods were found to be robust, reproducible, and repeatable for assessing S. aureus load. For simplicity, a combination of swab and quantitative polymerase chain reaction was chosen to assess the efficacy of HT La1. Following application of a lotion containing HT La1 to AD lesions for 3 weeks, a reduction in S. aureus load was observed in patients, which correlated with a decrease in local objective SCORAD. Interestingly, high baseline skin concentrations of S. aureus were associated with good responses to the lotion. This study demonstrated that the application of a lotion containing HT La1 to the lesional skin of patients with AD for 3 weeks controlled S. aureus colonization and was associated with local clinical improvement (SCORAD). These findings support further development of topical treatments containing heat-treated nonreplicating beneficial bacteria for patients with

  17. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenefelt, Philip D; Shenefelt, Debrah A

    2014-01-01

    Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, “goose bumps”, redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. PMID:25120377

  18. Skin cleansing in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmetti, C

    2001-09-01

    The problems of skin cleansing in infants have been re-evaluated in recent years on the basis of current understanding of cosmetology and skin physiology. The anatomical and functional peculiarities of infant's skin have been elucidated and, although it is known that the barrier function is established at birth in normal babies, it remains the case that children's skin is more delicate and therefore more prone to irritant and allergic contact dermatitis. These factors determine the choice of cleansing agents during infancy. The products available on the market differ markedly. Indeed detergents, bath oils, bath powders, due to their distinctive properties, have different indications and different benefits. The method of cleansing the skin, i.e. bathing or showering, is also important. The frequency of cleansing should take into account the age and the degree of exposure to pollutants. For special purposes, e.g. impetiginized dermatoses, antiseptics such as potassium permanganate or chlorhexidine can be added to the water in appropriate concentrations. The ideal paediatric detergent should be very mild to avoid irritant dermatitis, and very simple to avoid allergic dermatitis.

  19. How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin Scars Skin Growths Skin Lesions Spider Veins Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose ... Skin Scars Skin Growths Skin Lesions Spider Veins Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose ...

  20. Improving repeatability by improving quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ackers, Mark; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla; Brink, Mundy

    1998-12-31

    Time lapse (4-D) seismic is a promising tool for reservoir characterization and monitoring. The method is apparently simple: to acquire data repeatedly over the same reservoir, process and interpret the data sets, then changes between the data sets indicate changes in the reservoir. A problem with time lapse seismic data is that reservoirs are a relatively small part of the earth and important reservoir changes may cause very small differences to the time lapse data. The challenge is to acquire and process economical time lapse data such that reservoir changes can be detected above the noise of varying acquisition and environment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  2. Physiological effects after exposure to heat : A brief literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, C.P.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Many employees are exposed to heat stress during their work. Although the direct effects of heat are well reported, the long term physiological effects occurring after heat exposure are hardly described. The present manuscript addresses these issues in the form of a brief literature review. Repeated

  3. Physiological effects after exposure to heat : A brief literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, C.P.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Many employees are exposed to heat stress during their work. Although the direct effects of heat are well reported, the long term physiological effects occurring after heat exposure are hardly described. The present manuscript addresses these issues in the form of a brief literature review. Repeated

  4. Cold pressor pain in skin picking disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Redden, Sarah A; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2017-03-01

    Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) is a disabling, under-recognized condition in which individuals repeatedly pick at their skin, leading to noticeable tissue damage. There has been no examination as to whether individuals with SPD have different pain thresholds or pain tolerances compared to healthy counterparts. Adults with SPD were examined on a variety of clinical measures including symptom severity and functioning. All participants underwent the cold pressor test. Heart rate, blood pressure, and self-reported pain were compared between SPD participants (n=14) and healthy controls (n=14). Adults with SPD demonstrated significantly dampened autonomic response to cold pressor pain as exhibited by reduced heart rate compared to controls (group x time interaction using repeated ANOVA F=3.258, p<0.001). There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of overall pain tolerance (measured in seconds), recovery time, or blood pressure. SPD symptom severity was not significantly associated with autonomic response in the patients. In this study, adults with SPD exhibited a dampened autonomic response to pain while reporting pain intensity similar to that reported by the controls. The lack of an autonomic response may explain why the SPD participants continue a behavior that they cognitively find painful and may offer options for future interventions.

  5. Evaluation of contact heat thermal threshold testing for standardized assessment of cutaneous nociception in horses - comparison of different locations and environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poller Christin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of contact heat thermal stimulation in horses at different body sites and under different environmental conditions and different test situations. Five warm-blood horses were equipped with the thermal probe located on the skin of nostril (N, withers (W or coronary band (C. Skin temperature and reaction temperature (thermal threshold at each location were measured and percent thermal excursion (% TE = 100 * (threshold temperature - skin temperature/(cut-out temperature - skin temperature was calculated. Environmental conditions were changed in partial random order for all locations, so each horse was tested in its familiar box stall and stocks, in the morning and evening and at warm and cold ambient temperatures. Type of reaction to the stimulus and horse’s general behaviour during stimulation were recorded. The stimulation sites were examined for the occurrence of possible skin lesions. Results Skin temperatures were significantly different during warm and cold ambient temperatures at all three locations, but remained constant over repeated stimulation. An obvious response to stimulation before reaching cut-out temperature could be detected most frequently at N and W in boxes during warm ambient temperatures. The most frequent type of reaction to thermal stimulation at the nostril was headshaking (64.6%, skin twitching at the withers (82.9% and hoof withdrawal at the coronary band (79.2%. Conclusion The outcome of thermal threshold testing depended on ambient temperature, stimulation site and environment. Best results with the WTT2 in horses were obtained at the nostrils or withers in a familiar environment at warm ambient temperatures.

  6. Extreme skin depth waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Jahani, Saman

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we introduced a paradigm shift in light confinement strategy and introduced a class of extreme skin depth (e-skid) photonic structures (S. Jahani and Z. Jacob, "Transparent sub-diffraction optics: nanoscale light confinement without metal," Optica 1, 96-100 (2014)). Here, we analytically establish that figures of merit related to light confinement in dielectric waveguides are fundamentally tied to the skin depth of waves in the cladding. We contrast the propagation characteristics of the fundamental mode of e-skid waveguides and conventional waveguides to show that the decay constant in the cladding is dramatically larger in e-skid waveguides, which is the origin of sub-diffraction confinement. Finally, we propose an approach to verify the reduced skin depth in experiment using the decrease in the Goos-H\\"anchen phase shift.

  7. Skin Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Durga Rao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available : In recent days, skin cancer is seen as one of the most Hazardous form of the Cancers found in Humans. Skin cancer is found in various types such as Melanoma, Basal and Squamous cell Carcinoma among which Melanoma is the most unpredictable. The detection of Melanoma cancer in early stage can be helpful to cure it. Computer vision can play important role in Medical Image Diagnosis and it has been proved by many existing systems. In this paper, we present a survey on different steps which are being to detect the Melanoma Skin Cancer using Image Processing tools. In every step, what are the different methods are be included in our paper

  8. Smoking and skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-06-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic wounds. Most likely, alteration of inflammatory cell function and extracellular matrix turnover caused by smoking-induced oxidative stress are involved in the pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  9. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings...... suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably...... pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...

  10. Spatial quantification and classification of skin response following perturbation using organotypic skin cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommerencke, Thora; Westphal, Kathi; Ernst, Claudia; Safferling, Kai; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Grabe, Niels

    2010-11-01

    For a mechanistic understanding of skin and its response to an induced perturbation, systems biology is gaining increasing attention. Unfortunately, quantitative and spatial expression data for skin, like for most other tissues, are almost not available. Integrating organotypic skin cultures, whole-slide scanning and subsequent image processing provides bioinformatics with a novel source of spatial expression data. We here used this approach to quantitatively describe the effect of treating organotypic skin cultures with sodium dodecyl sulphate in a non-corrosive concentration. We first measured the differentiation-related spatial expression gradient of Heat-Shock-Protein 27 in a time series of up to 24 h. Secondly, a multi-dimensional tissue classifier for predicting skin irritation was developed based on abstract features of these profiles. We obtained a high specificity of 0.94 and a sensitivity of 0.92 compared with manual classification. Our results demonstrate that the integration of tissue cultures, whole-slide scanning and image processing is well suited for both the standardized data acquisition for systems biological tissue models and a highly robust classification of tissue responses.

  11. Optoelectronic set for measuring reflectance spectrum of living human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryko, Lukasz; Zajac, Andrzej; Gilewski, Marian; Kulesza, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    In the paper the authors present the developed optoelectronic set for measuring spectral reflectance of living human skin. The basic elements of the set are: the illuminator consists of the LED illuminator emitting a uniform distribution of spectral irradiance in the exposed field, the semispherical measuring chamber and the spectrometer which measures spectrum of reflected radiation. Measured radiation is from spectral range of tissue optical window (from 600 nm to 1000 nm). Knowledge about the reflectance spectrum of the patient skin allows adjusting spectral and energetic parameters of the radiation used in biostimulation treatment. The developed set also enables the repeatable exposures of patients in the Low Level Laser Therapy procedures.

  12. Skin test reactivity among Danish children measured 15 years apart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, SF; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Porsbjerg, C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of secular trends in the prevalence of allergy among children stems in large part from questionnaire surveys, whereas repeated cross-sectional studies using objective markers of atopic sensitization are sparse. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether the prevalence of skin prick...... (n = 527) and the second in 2001 (n = 480). Skin test reactivity to nine common aeroallergens was measured at both occasions. RESULTS: The prevalence of positive SPT to at least one allergen decreased from 24.1% in 1986 to 18.9% in 2001, (p = 0.05). We found a declining prevalence of sensitization...

  13. Relationships between the intensity and duration of Peltier heat stimulation and pain magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierck, Charles J; Mauderli, Andre P; Riley, Joseph L

    2013-03-01

    Ramp-and-hold heat stimulation with a Peltier thermode is a standard procedure for quantitative sensory testing of human pain sensitivity. Because myelinated and unmyelinated nociceptive afferents respond preferentially to changing and steady temperatures, respectively, ramp-and-hold heat stimulation could assess processing of input from A-delta nociceptors early and C nociceptors late during prolonged thermal stimulation. In order to evaluate the progression from dynamic change to a steady temperature during prolonged Peltier stimulation, recordings of temperatures at the probe-skin interface were obtained. First, recordings of temperature during contact-and-hold stimulation (solenoid powered delivery of a preheated thermode to the skin) provided an evaluation of heat dissipation from the beginning of stimulation, uncontaminated by ramping. The heat-sink effect lasted up to 8 s and accounted in part for a slow increase in pain intensity for stimulus durations of 1-16 s and stimulus intensities of 43-59 °C. Recordings during longer periods of stimulation showed that feedback-controlled Peltier stimulation generated oscillations in temperature that were tracked for up to 75 s by subjects' continuous ratings of pain. During 120-s trials, sensitization of pain was observed over 45 s after the oscillations subsided. Thus, long-duration stimulation can be utilized to evaluate sensitization, presumably of C nociception, when not disrupted by oscillations in thermode temperature (e.g., those inherent to feedback control of Peltier stimulation). In contrast, sensitization was not observed during 130.5 s of stimulation with alternately increasing and decreasing temperatures that repeatedly activated A-delta nociceptors.

  14. Crowding by a repeating pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target-flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker.

  15. Radiative heat transfer between metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Volz, Sebastian; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    In this letter, we study the radiative heat transfer between two nanoparticles in the near field and in the far field. We find that the heat transfer is dominated by the electric dipole-dipole interaction for dielectric particles and by the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction for metallic nanoparticles. We introduce polarizabilities formulas valid for arbitrary values of the skin depth. While the heat transfer mechanism is different for metallic and dielectric nanoparticles, we show that the distance dependence is the same. However, the dependence of the heat flux on the particle radius is different.

  16. Skin mucus proteins of lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Manjari Patel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fish skin mucus serves as a first line of defense against pathogens and external stressors. In this study the proteomic profile of lumpsucker skin mucus was characterized using 2D gels coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Mucosal proteins were identified by homology searches across the databases SwissProt, NCBInr and vertebrate EST. The identified proteins were clustered into ten groups based on their gene ontology biological process in PANTHER (www.patherdb.org. Calmodulin, cystatin-B, histone H2B, peroxiredoxin1, apolipoprotein A1, natterin-2, 14-3-3 protein, alfa enolase, pentraxin, warm temperature acclimation 65 kDa (WAP65kDa and heat shock proteins were identified. Several of the proteins are known to be involved in immune and/or stress responses. Proteomic profile established in this study could be a benchmark for differential proteomics studies.

  17. Skin Temperature Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Sarjoghian, Siamak

    2017-01-01

    This report represents the design and implementation of a skin temperature measurement system. The system aims to measure the skin temperature from a sensor and send it to the PC using a USB cable to display on screen. The data needs to be updated every second. The PIC18F4550 microcontroller has been used in this project to obtain data from the sensor and send it to the PC using USB 2.0 that has been built into the microcontroller. The microcontroller has a 10-bit Analog Digital Converting ac...

  18. Skin innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Aksoy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available All multicellular organisms protect themselves from external universe and microorganisms by innate immune sytem that is constitutively present. Skin innate immune system has several different components composed of epithelial barriers, humoral factors and cellular part. In this review information about skin innate immune system and its components are presented to the reader. Innate immunity, which wasn’t adequately interested in previously, is proven to provide a powerfull early protection system, control many infections before the acquired immunity starts and directs acquired immunity to develop optimally

  19. Aircraft-skin Infrared Radiation Characteristics Modeling and Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Jianwei; Wang Qiang

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important problems of stealth technology is to evaluate the infrared radiation (IR) level received by IR sensors from fighters to be detected. This article presents a synthetic method for calculating the IR emitted from aircraft-skin. By reckoning the aerodynamic heating and hot engine casing to be the main heat sources of the exposed aircraft-skin, a numerical model of skin temperature distribution is established through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. Based on it, an infrared signature model for solving the complex geometry and structure of a fighter is proposed with the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method. Finally, by way of determining the IR intensity from aircraft-skin, the aircraft components that emit the most IR can be identified; and the cooling effects of the main aircraft components on IR intensity are investigated. It is found that reduction by 10 K in the skin temperature of head, vertical stabilizers and wings could lead to decline of more than 8% of the IR intensity on the aircraft-skin in front view while at the broadside of the aircraft, the drops in IR intensity could attain under 8%. The results provide useful reference in designing stealthy aircraft.

  20. The effect of skin temperature on performance during a 7.5-km cycling time trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levels, K.; Koning, J.J. de; Foster, C.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic exercise performance is seriously compromised in the heat. Possibly, a high skin temperature causes a rating of perceived exertion (RPE)-mediated decrease in exercise intensity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of skin temperature on power output during a 7.5-km cycling

  1. The simulation of skin temperature distributions by means of a relaxation method (applied to IR thermography)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermey, G.F.

    1975-01-01

    To solve the differential equation for the heat in a two-layer, rectangular piece of skin tissue, a relaxation method, based on a finite difference technique, is used. The temperature distributions on the skin surface are calculated. The results are used to derive a criterion for the resolution for

  2. Automatization and familiarity in repeated checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dek, Eliane C P; van den Hout, Marcel A.; Giele, Catharina L.; Engelhard, Iris M.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated checking paradoxically increases memory uncertainty. This study investigated the underlying mechanism of this effect. We hypothesized that as a result of repeated checking, familiarity with stimuli increases, and automatization of the checking procedure occurs, which should result in decrea

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... file Error processing SSI file Preventing Repeat Teen Births Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... Too many teens, ages 15–19, have repeat births. Nearly 1 in 5 births to teens, ages ...

  4. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation.

  5. MHD-Conjugate Free Convection from an Isothermal Horizontal Circular Cylinder with Joule Heating and Heat Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NHM. A. Azim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is devoted to the numerical study of laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD conjugate natural convection flow from a horizontal circular cylinder taking into account Joule heating and internal heat generation. The governing equations and the associated boundary conditions for this analysis are made nondimensional forms using a set of dimensionless variables. Thus, the nondimensional governing equations are solved numerically using finite difference method with Keller box scheme. Numerical outcomes are found for different values of the magnetic parameter, conjugate conduction parameter, Prandtl number, Joule heating parameter, and heat generation parameter for the velocity and the temperature within the boundary layer as well as the skin friction coefficients and the rate of heat transfer along the surface. It is found that the skin friction increases, and heat transfer rate decreases for escalating value of Joule heating parameter and heat generation parameter. Results are presented graphically with detailed discussion.

  6. Expanded complexity of unstable repeat diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Urszula; McIvor, Elizabeth; Dent, Sharon Y.R.; Wells, Robert D.; Napierala, Marek.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable Repeat Diseases (URDs) share a common mutational phenomenon of changes in the copy number of short, tandemly repeated DNA sequences. More than 20 human neurological diseases are caused by instability, predominantly expansion, of microsatellite sequences. Changes in the repeat size initiate a cascade of pathological processes, frequently characteristic of a unique disease or a small subgroup of the URDs. Understanding of both the mechanism of repeat instability and molecular consequen...

  7. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater station. 97.205 Section 97.205... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.205 Repeater station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a repeater. A holder of...

  8. 47 CFR 22.1015 - Repeater operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater operation. 22.1015 Section 22.1015... Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1015 Repeater operation. Offshore central stations may be used as repeater stations provided that the licensee is able to maintain control of the station, and in...

  9. ProtRepeatsDB: a database of amino acid repeats in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Virander S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide and cross species comparisons of amino acid repeats is an intriguing problem in biology mainly due to the highly polymorphic nature and diverse functions of amino acid repeats. Innate protein repeats constitute vital functional and structural regions in proteins. Repeats are of great consequence in evolution of proteins, as evident from analysis of repeats in different organisms. In the post genomic era, availability of protein sequences encoded in different genomes provides a unique opportunity to perform large scale comparative studies of amino acid repeats. ProtRepeatsDB http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/repeats/ is a relational database of perfect and mismatch repeats, access to which is designed as a resource and collection of tools for detection and cross species comparisons of different types of amino acid repeats. Description ProtRepeatsDB (v1.2 consists of perfect as well as mismatch amino acid repeats in the protein sequences of 141 organisms, the genomes of which are now available. The web interface of ProtRepeatsDB consists of different tools to perform repeat s; based on protein IDs, organism name, repeat sequences, and keywords as in FASTA headers, size, frequency, gene ontology (GO annotation IDs and regular expressions (REGEXP describing repeats. These tools also allow formulation of a variety of simple, complex and logical queries to facilitate mining and large-scale cross-species comparisons of amino acid repeats. In addition to this, the database also contains sequence analysis tools to determine repeats in user input sequences. Conclusion ProtRepeatsDB is a multi-organism database of different types of amino acid repeats present in proteins. It integrates useful tools to perform genome wide queries for rapid screening and identification of amino acid repeats and facilitates comparative and evolutionary studies of the repeats. The database is useful for identification of species or organism specific

  10. About Skin-to-Skin Care (Kangaroo Care)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share About Skin-to-Skin Care Page Content Article Body You may be able ... care, also called kangaroo care. What is Kangaroo Care? Kangaroo care was developed in South America as ...

  11. Allergy Skin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... once. This test is usually done to identify allergies to pollen, mold, pet dander, dust mites and foods. In adults, the test is usually done on the forearm. Children may be tested on the upper back. Allergy skin tests aren't painful. This type of ...

  12. Preventing Skin Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-18

    A man and a woman talk about how they’ve learned to protect their skin from the sun over the years. .  Created: 5/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/18/2016.

  13. Skin-reducing mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Maurizio B; Cortinovis, Umberto; Ottolenghi, Joseph; Riggio, Egidio; Pennati, Angela; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Greco, Marco; Rovere, Guidubaldo Querci Della

    2006-09-01

    The authors propose a combined flap technique to reconstruct large and medium-sized ptotic breasts in a single-stage operation by use of anatomical permanent implants. The authors enrolled 28 patients fulfilling criteria for skin-sparing mastectomy and presenting with ptotic breasts whose areola-to-inframammary fold distance was more than 8 cm. All reconstructions were performed as a single-stage procedure. After preoperative planning, a large area in the lower half of the breast was deepithelialized according to the conventional Wise pattern. Mastectomy was then carried out. To perform reconstructions, the inferomedial fibers of the pectoralis major muscle were dissected and sutured to the superior border of the inferior dermal flap. An anatomical implant was then inserted into the pouch, which was closed laterally with the previously harvested serratus anterior fascia. Skin flaps were finally closed down to the inframammary fold. The authors performed 30 procedures on 28 patients. The medium size anatomical implants was 433 cc. Twelve women achieved symmetrization in a single stage ending in a symmetric inverted-T scar. The overall complication rate was 20 percent, with four cases (13 percent) complicated by severe, extensive necrosis of the skin flaps requiring implant removal. Breast cancer treatment must nowadays optimize cosmetic results. This can be accomplished in selected cases by means of a single-stage operation that the authors call "skin-reducing mastectomy." The final scars imitate those of cosmetic surgery. Careful patient selection and improvement in the learning curve may reduce the complication rate.

  14. Tuberculin Skin Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guidance for XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains Data & Statistics Trends in Tuberculosis, 2015 TB Incidence in the United ... No. RR-17). CDC. Mantoux Tuberculin Skin Test: Training Materials Kit (2003). CDC. Targeted tuberculin testing and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection . MMWR 2000; 49 (No. ... CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act ...

  15. Immunopathology of skin lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Nazoora

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted on 130 patients suffering from skin lesions which included psoriasis, lichen planus, DLE, pemphigus, vitiligo and alopecia areata. Forty age-and-sex-matched healthy individuals served as control. Serum IgG, IgM, and circulating immune complexes (CIC were estimated. Significant increase in serum IgG (1937.2 ± 1030.43 mg% and IgM (232.12 ± 136.98 mg% was observed in all the skin lesions when compared with controls except in lichen planus where they were significantly lowered, values being 580.61± 77.35 mg% and 66.88 ± 6.59mg% respectively. CIC levels were significantly raised (P<0.00 1 in various skin lesions (40.49±23.29 when compared with controls (17.68± 3.21, but no significance was observed in lichen planus( 17.72 ± 4.28. Serum IgG, IgM and CIC were statistically significantly altered depending on the extent of the lesion and lowered significantly to almost normal values following treatment, thereby confirming the role of immunity in the pathogenesis of these skin disorders.

  16. Frog skin function revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid Larsen, Erik; Ramløv, Hans

    2013-01-01

    of the epidermis. These mechanisms have evolved pari passu with life alternating between aquatic and terrestrial habitats associated with permeabilities of the skin controlled by external ion- and osmotic concentrations (loc. cit.). This allows for fast switching of the cutaneous uptake of chloride between active...

  17. Cryoglobulin induced skin ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Razvi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus Erythematosus (LE is a multi-organ auto-immune disease which results from complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The clinical spectrum ranges from minor cutaneous lesions to life threatening multi-organ dysfunction. The skin manifestations are variable and common and range from LE specific to LE non-specific cutaneous disease. Vasculitis is one of the most common non-specific skin lesion of Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and appears as purpuric lesions, infarcts along lateral nail folds, peripheral gangrene, sub-cutaneous nodules and ulcers. Mixed cryoglobulinaemia (type II is associated with connective tissue disorders including SLE. Skin manifestations are seen in 60-100% patients and are more common in females. The most common manifestation is palpable purpura of lower extremities seen in 30-100% which often is triggered in winter or on cold exposure. Skin infarction, hemorrhagic crusts and ulcers are seen in 25% of patients. Wide spread necrotic ulcers are seen in 10-25% of patients which are often exacerbated by cold.

  18. Skin Conditions during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... appear on the skin during pregnancy? • What are stretch marks? • Is acne common during pregnancy? • How can I ... runs from the navel to the pubic hair • Stretch marks •Acne • Spider veins • Varicose veins • Changes in nail ...

  19. Cytokines and the Skin Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Malte Baron

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is the largest organ of the human body and builds a barrier to protect us from the harmful environment and also from unregulated loss of water. Keratinocytes form the skin barrier by undergoing a highly complex differentiation process that involves changing their morphology and structural integrity, a process referred to as cornification. Alterations in the epidermal cornification process affect the formation of the skin barrier. Typically, this results in a disturbed barrier, which allows the entry of substances into the skin that are immunologically reactive. This contributes to and promotes inflammatory processes in the skin but also affects other organs. In many common skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, a defect in the formation of the skin barrier is observed. In these diseases the cytokine composition within the skin is different compared to normal human skin. This is the result of resident skin cells that produce cytokines, but also because additional immune cells are recruited. Many of the cytokines found in defective skin are able to influence various processes of differentiation and cornification. Here we summarize the current knowledge on cytokines and their functions in healthy skin and their contributions to inflammatory skin diseases.

  20. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Small, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins constitute one of the largest protein families in land plants, with more than 400 members in most species. Over the past decade, much has been learned about the molecular functions of these proteins, where they act in the cell, and what physiological roles they play during plant growth and development. A typical PPR protein is targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, binds one or several organellar transcripts, and influences their expression by altering RNA sequence, turnover, processing, or translation. Their combined action has profound effects on organelle biogenesis and function and, consequently, on photosynthesis, respiration, plant development, and environmental responses. Recent breakthroughs in understanding how PPR proteins recognize RNA sequences through modular base-specific contacts will help match proteins to potential binding sites and provide a pathway toward designing synthetic RNA-binding proteins aimed at desired targets.

  1. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  2. General benchmarks for quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Using a technique based on quantum teleportation, we simplify the most general adaptive protocols for key distribution, entanglement distillation and quantum communication over a wide class of quantum channels in arbitrary dimension. Thanks to this method, we bound the ultimate rates for secret key generation and quantum communication through single-mode Gaussian channels and several discrete-variable channels. In particular, we derive exact formulas for the two-way assisted capacities of the bosonic quantum-limited amplifier and the dephasing channel in arbitrary dimension, as well as the secret key capacity of the qubit erasure channel. Our results establish the limits of quantum communication with arbitrary systems and set the most general and precise benchmarks for testing quantum repeaters in both discrete- and continuous-variable settings.

  3. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Kovács

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried out in the morning and afternoon in order to decrease the effect of the distant temporal correction. To further increase the accuracy, on-site dIdD variometer has also been installed near the Aggtelek station, in the Baradla cave, during the survey of the easternmost sites. The paper presents the technical details and the results of our last campaign. The improvement of the accuracy of the temporal reduction by the use of the local variometer is also reported.

  4. Current concepts of active vasodilation in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brett J.; Hollowed, Casey G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In humans, an increase in internal core temperature elicits large increases in skin blood flow and sweating. The increase in skin blood flow serves to transfer heat via convection from the body core to the skin surface while sweating results in evaporative cooling of the skin. Cutaneous vasodilation and sudomotor activity are controlled by a sympathetic cholinergic active vasodilator system that is hypothesized to operate through a co-transmission mechanism. To date, mechanisms of cutaneous active vasodilation remain equivocal despite many years of research by several productive laboratory groups. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advancements in the field of cutaneous active vasodilation framed in the context of some of the historical findings that laid the groundwork for our current understanding of cutaneous active vasodilation.

  5. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  6. 清热利湿、益气养血法治疗皮肤变性皮损型糖尿病足的理论与临床(附1例报告)%Theory and clinical of clearing heat and promoting diuresis and Yi Qi Yang Xue method in the treatment of skin degeneration skin lesions type diabetic foot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高玉魁

    2015-01-01

    糖尿病是一种目前无法治愈的慢性疾病,具有庞大的“患者群”和“后备军”,同时有心、脑、肾、血管、视网膜、足部等并发症。因此,要加强糖尿病治疗的“三早”措施,即早发现、早诊断、早治疗。运用中西医结合的清热利湿、益气养血的治法效果良好。科学地治疗、积极改善生活方式,对糖尿病一级、二级预防都有很大现实意义,不仅要控制血糖,更重要的是对患者进行全面的人文关怀,才能为患者提供科学的指导和治疗。%Diabetes is a incurable chronic diseases at present,the incidence has the huge “patient group” and “reserve army”,at the same time it has the heart,brain,kidney,blood vessels,retinal,foot and other complications.Therefore,it should strengthen“three early”measures in the treatment of diabetes,namely the early discovery,early diagnosis,early treatment.The use of traditional Chinese and western medicine combination of clearing heat and promoting diuresis and Yi Qi Yang Xue method have good effect.Scientific treatment,actively improving the lifestyle have great practical significance on the primary and secondary prevention of diabetes.Not only to control blood sugar,it is more important to comprehensive humanistic care for patients to provide scientific guidance and treatment for patients.

  7. Skin color independent assessment of aging using skin autofluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, M.; Nur, E.; Chunmao, H.; Lutgers, H.L.; Links, T.P.; Smit, A.J.; Rakhorst, G.; de Graaff, R.

    2010-01-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) for the non-invasive assessment of the amount of accumulated tissue Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) increases with aging. In subjects with darker skin colors, measurements typically result in lower AF values than in subjects with fair skin colors, e. g. due to select

  8. Skin color independent assessment of aging using skin autofluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, M.; Nur, E.; Chunmao, H.; Lutgers, H.L.; Links, T.P.; Smit, A.J.; Rakhorst, G.; de Graaff, R.

    2010-01-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) for the non-invasive assessment of the amount of accumulated tissue Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) increases with aging. In subjects with darker skin colors, measurements typically result in lower AF values than in subjects with fair skin colors, e. g. due to

  9. Skin tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbridge, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    The major applications of tissue-engineered skin substitutes are in promoting the healing of acute and chronic wounds. Several approaches have been taken by commercial companies to develop products to address these conditions. Skin substitutes include both acellular and cellular devices. While acellular skin substitutes act as a template for dermal formation, this discussion mainly covers cellular devices. In addressing therapeutic applications in tissue engineering generally, a valuable precursor is an understanding of the mechanism of the underlying pathology. While this is straightforward in many cases, it has not been available for wound healing. Investigation of the mode of action of the tissue-engineered skin substitutes has led to considerable insight into the mechanism of formation, maintenance and treatment of chronic wounds. Four aspects mediating healing are considered here for their mechanism of action: (i) colonization of the wound bed by live fibroblasts in the implant, (ii) the secretion of growth factors, (iii) provision of a suitable substrate for cell migration, particularly keratinocytes and immune cells, and (iv) modification of the immune system by secretion of neutrophil recruiting chemokines. An early event in acute wound healing is an influx of neutrophils that destroy planktonic bacteria. However, if the bacteria are able to form biofilm, they become resistant to neutrophil action and prevent reepithelialization. In this situation the wound becomes chronic. In chronic wounds, fibroblasts show a senescence-like phenotype with decreased secretion of neutrophil chemoattractants that make it more likely that biofilms become established. Treatment of the chronic wounds involves debridement to eliminate biofilm, and the use of antimicrobials. A role of skin substitutes is to provide non-senescent fibroblasts that attract and activate neutrophils to prevent biofilm re-establishment. The emphasis of the conclusion is the importance of preventing

  10. Spatial temperature distribution in human hairy and glabrous skin after infrared CO2 laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arendt-Nielsen Lars

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CO2 lasers have been used for several decades as an experimental non-touching pain stimulator. The laser energy is absorbed by the water content in the most superficial layers of the skin. The deeper located nociceptors are activated by passive conduction of heat from superficial to deeper skin layers. Methods In the current study, a 2D axial finite element model was developed and validated to describe the spatial temperature distribution in the skin after infrared CO2 laser stimulation. The geometry of the model was based on high resolution ultrasound scans. The simulations were compared to the subjective pain intensity ratings from 16 subjects and to the surface skin temperature distributions measured by an infrared camera. Results The stimulations were sensed significantly slower and less intense in glabrous skin than they were in hairy skin (MANOVA, p 0.90, p 2 (5 W, 0.12 s, d1/e2 = 11.4 mm only two reported pain to glabrous skin stimulation using the same stimulus intensity. The temperature at the epidermal-dermal junction (depth 50 μm in hairy and depth 133 μm in glabrous skin was estimated to 46°C for hairy skin stimulation and 39°C for glabrous skin stimulation. Conclusions As compared to previous one dimensional heat distribution models, the current two dimensional model provides new possibilities for detailed studies regarding CO2 laser stimulation intensity, temperature levels and nociceptor activation.

  11. In vitro permeation and disposition of niacinamide in silicone and porcine skin of skin barrier-mimetic formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Tasnuva; Lane, Majella E; Sil, Bruno C; Crowther, Jonathan M; Moore, David J

    2017-03-30

    Niacinamide (NIA) is an amide form of vitamin B3 which is used in cosmetic formulations to improve various skin conditions and it has also been shown to increase stratum corneum thickness following repeated application. In this study, three doses (5, 20 and 50μL per cm(2)) of two NIA containing oil-in-water skin barrier-mimetic formulations were evaluated in silicone membrane and porcine ear skin and compared with a commercial control formulation. Permeation studies were conducted over 24h in Franz cells and at the end of the experiment membranes were washed and niacinamide was extracted. For the three doses, retention or deposition of NIA was generally higher in porcine skin compared with silicone membrane, consistent with the hydrophilic nature of the active. Despite the control containing a higher amount of active, comparable amounts of NIA were deposited in skin for all formulations for all doses; total skin absorption values (permeation and retention) of NIA were also comparable across all formulations. For infinite (50μL) and finite (5μL) doses the absolute permeation of NIA from the control formulation was significantly higher in porcine skin compared with both test formulations. This likely reflects differences in formulation components and/or presence of skin penetration enhancers in the formulations. Higher permeation for the 50 and 20μL dose was also evident in porcine skin compared with silicone membrane but the opposite is the case for the finite dose. The findings point to the critical importance of dose and occlusion when evaluating topical formulations in vitro and also the likelihood of exaggerated effects of excipients on permeation at infinite and pseudo-finite dose applications.

  12. SKIN DETECTION OF ANIMATION CHARACTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Tanvir Ahmed Siddiqui

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing popularity of animes makes it vulnerable to unwanted usages like copyright violations and pornography. That’s why, we need to develop a method to detect and recognize animation characters. Skin detection is one of the most important steps in this way. Though there are some methods to detect human skin color, but those methods do not work properly for anime characters. Anime skin varies greatly from human skin in color, texture, tone and in different kinds of lighting. They also vary greatly among themselves. Moreover, many other things (for example leather, shirt, hair etc., which are not skin, can have color similar to skin. In this paper, we have proposed three methods that can identify an anime character’s skin more successfully as compared with Kovac, Swift, Saleh and Osman methods, which are primarily designed for human skin detection. Our methods are based on RGB values and their comparative relations.

  13. Staining of skin with dihydroxyacetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WITTGENSTEIN, E; BERRY, H K

    1960-09-30

    The reaction of skin with dihydroxyacetone to produce a brown "artificial tan" appears to proceed through combination with free amino groups in skin proteins, and particularly by combination of dihydroxyacetone with the free guanido group in arginine.

  14. Candida infection of the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000880.htm Candida infection of the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Candida infection of the skin is a yeast infection ...

  15. Maintaining Healthy Skin -- Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from seams or elastic binding. Check also for blisters, bumps, insect bites, dry flaky skin or pimples. ... always check your skin carefully after wearing new shoes or clothing. Too loose — Loose clothing can form ...

  16. Tissue Engineered Human Skin Equivalents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human skin not only serves as an important barrier against the penetration of exogenous substances into the body, but also provides a potential avenue for the transport of functional active drugs/reagents/ingredients into the skin (topical delivery and/or the body (transdermal delivery. In the past three decades, research and development in human skin equivalents have advanced in parallel with those in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The human skin equivalents are used commercially as clinical skin substitutes and as models for permeation and toxicity screening. Several academic laboratories have developed their own human skin equivalent models and applied these models for studying skin permeation, corrosivity and irritation, compound toxicity, biochemistry, metabolism and cellular pharmacology. Various aspects of the state of the art of human skin equivalents are reviewed and discussed.

  17. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer, including drugs for basal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and ...

  18. Skin Cancers of the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cracking, bleeding, or ulceration. Frequently, individuals discover their skin cancer after unrelated ailments near the affected site. Causes We often view the sun's harmful rays as the primary cause of skin cancer; the condition is often found on parts of ...

  19. Helminth Infection and Commensal Microbiota Drive Early IL-10 Production in the Skin by CD4+ T Cells That Are Functionally Suppressive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Sanin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The skin provides an important first line of defence and immunological barrier to invasive pathogens, but immune responses must also be regulated to maintain barrier function and ensure tolerance of skin surface commensal organisms. In schistosomiasis-endemic regions, populations can experience repeated percutaneous exposure to schistosome larvae, however little is known about how repeated exposure to pathogens affects immune regulation in the skin. Here, using a murine model of repeated infection with Schistosoma mansoni larvae, we show that the skin infection site becomes rich in regulatory IL-10, whilst in its absence, inflammation, neutrophil recruitment, and local lymphocyte proliferation is increased. Whilst CD4+ T cells are the primary cellular source of regulatory IL-10, they expressed none of the markers conventionally associated with T regulatory (Treg cells (i.e. FoxP3, Helios, Nrp1, CD223, or CD49b. Nevertheless, these IL-10+ CD4+ T cells in the skin from repeatedly infected mice are functionally suppressive as they reduced proliferation of responsive CD4+ T cells from the skin draining lymph node. Moreover, the skin of infected Rag-/- mice had impaired IL-10 production and increased neutrophil recruitment. Finally, we show that the mechanism behind IL-10 production by CD4+ T cells in the skin is due to a combination of an initial (day 1 response specific to skin commensal bacteria, and then over the following days schistosome-specific CD4+ T cell responses, which together contribute towards limiting inflammation and tissue damage following schistosome infection. We propose CD4+ T cells in the skin that do not express markers of conventional T regulatory cell populations have a significant role in immune regulation after repeated pathogen exposure and speculate that these cells may also help to maintain skin barrier function in the context of repeated percutaneous insult by other skin pathogens.

  20. Tissue viability imaging for quantification of skin erythema and blanching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Gert E.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2010-02-01

    Naked eye observation has up to recently been the main method of determining skin erythema (vasodilatation) and blanching (vasoconstriction) in skin testing. Since naked eye observation is a highly subjective and investigatordependent method, it is difficult to attain reproducibility and to compare results reported by different researchers performing their studies at different laboratories. Consequently there is a need for more objective, quantitative and versatile methods in the assessment of alterations in skin erythema and blanching caused by internal and external factors such as the intake of vasoactive drugs, application of agents on the skin surface and by constituents in the environment. Since skin microcirculation is sensitive to applied pressure and heat, such methods should preferably be noninvasive and designed for remote use without touching the skin. As skin microcirculation further possesses substantial spatial variability, imaging techniques are to be preferred before single point measurements. An emerging technology based on polarization digital camera spectroscopy - Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) - fulfills these requirements. The principles of TiVi (1) and some of its early applications (2-5) are addressed in this paper.

  1. Nicotinamide for skin cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Diona L

    2017-03-20

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3 ) has a range of photoprotective effects in vitro and in vivo; it enhances DNA repair, reduces UV radiation-induced suppression of skin immune responses, modulates inflammatory cytokine production and skin barrier function and restores cellular energy levels after UV exposure. Pharmacological doses of nicotinamide have been shown to reduce actinic keratoses and nonmelanoma skin cancer incidence in high-risk individuals, making this a nontoxic and accessible option for skin cancer chemoprevention in this population.

  2. A REVIEW ON SKIN CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ramya Silpa; Chidvila V

    2013-01-01

    Skin cancer can be of 2 types mainly. They are malignant melanoma and non-malignant melanoma. Skin cancer mainly occurs due to exposure of sunlight. Ozone depletion and chemical exposures are other factors involved in precipitating skin cancer. Mutations of p53 gene are involved in UV- induced carcinogenesis. P53 gene acts vital in development of SCC. So, prevention of skin cancer is the main criteria. Regular application of sunscreens could be one of the primary prevention. The purpose of pr...

  3. Clinical Study on the Etiology of Postthyroidectomy Skin Sinus Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Jin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thyroidectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures worldwide. Despite technical advances and high experience of thyroidectomy of specialized centers, it is still burdened by a significant rate of postoperative complications. Among them, the skin sinus formation is an extremely rare postthyroidectomy complication. Here, we first report the incidence of the skin sinus formation after thyroidectomy to identify the causes for skin sinus formation after thyroidectomy and to discuss its prevention and treatment options. Methods. A retrospective analysis was carried out of patients who underwent excision operation of fistula for postthyroidectomy skin sinus formation. Data were retrieved from medical records department of the Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolia Medical University. Results. Of the 5,686 patients who underwent thyroid surgery, only 5 patients (0.088% had developed skin sinus formation. All 5 patients successfully underwent complete excision of fistula. Conclusion. Infection, foreign body, thyroid surgery procedure, combined disease, and iatrogenic factors may be related with skin sinus formation after thyroidectomy. To reduce the recurrence of postoperative infections and sinus formation, intra- and postoperative compliance with aseptic processing, intraoperative use absorbable surgical suture/ligature, repeated irrigation and drainage, and postoperative administration of anti-inflammatory treatment are to be followed.

  4. Advanced Development of Leishmania Topical Skin Test Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    followed to assess the effectiveness of the cleaning and sanitization procedures. The filling, capping and assembly of final containers occurred in Class...disappeared after several days in both subjects. Topical steroid cream was administered to one subject to promote resolution. 2.5.2 Phase II Dose...al. (3) studied the effects of repeat skin tests in healthy volunteers residing in a leishmaniasis non-endemic area. The Leishmnaia antigen used in

  5. Skin cancer: Etiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays, occurrence of skin cancer is very common in humans. It is reported that the most common cause of the skin cancer is excessive exposure to sunlight as it contains harmful radiations; the ultra violet rays. Different management strategies are used for different types of skin cancers, which are chemotherapy, radiation therapy.

  6. Skin Pedagogies and Abject Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenway, Jane; Bullen, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    How does the beauty industry "narrate the skin"? What does it teach women from different cultural groups about the female body? How does skin function as a site where female subjection and abjection are produced and reproduced? In this paper we examine the skin industry pointing to its extreme commodification of the female body and to the…

  7. Skin Pedagogies and Abject Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenway, Jane; Bullen, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    How does the beauty industry "narrate the skin"? What does it teach women from different cultural groups about the female body? How does skin function as a site where female subjection and abjection are produced and reproduced? In this paper we examine the skin industry pointing to its extreme commodification of the female body and to the…

  8. CCR3 is essential for skin eosinophilia and airway hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of allergic skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weilie; Bryce, Paul J; Humbles, Alison A; Laouini, Dhafer; Yalcindag, Ali; Alenius, Harri; Friend, Daniel S; Oettgen, Hans C; Gerard, Craig; Geha, Raif S

    2002-03-01

    The CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) is expressed by eosinophils, mast cells, and Th2 cells. We used CCR3(-/-) mice to assess the role of CCR3 in a murine model of allergic skin inflammation induced by repeated epicutaneous sensitization with ovalbumin (OVA), and characterized by eosinophil skin infiltration, local expression of Th2 cytokines, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to inhaled antigen. Eosinophils and the eosinophil product major basic protein were absent from the skin of sham and OVA-sensitized CCR3(-/-) mice. Mast cell numbers and expression of IL-4 mRNA were normal in skin of CCR3(-/-) mice, suggesting that CCR3 is not important for infiltration of the skin by mast cells and Th2 cells. CCR3(-/-) mice produced normal levels of OVA-specific IgE, and their splenocytes secreted normal amounts of IL-4 and IL-5 following in vitro stimulation with OVA, indicating effective generation of systemic Th2 helper responses. Recruitment of eosinophils to lung parenchyma and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was severely impaired in CCR3(-/-) mice, which failed to develop AHR to methacholine following antigen inhalation. These results suggest that CCR3 plays an essential role in eosinophil recruitment to the skin and the lung and in the development of AHR.

  9. Comparison of Subcuticular Suture Materials in Cesarean Skin Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Solmaz Hasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Comparison of the rate of wound complications, pain, and patient satisfaction based on used subcuticular suture material. Methods. A total of 250 consecutive women undergoing primary and repeat cesarean section with low transverse incision were prospectively included. The primary outcome was wound complication rate including infection, dehiscence, hematoma, and hypertrophic scar formation within a 6-week period after operation. Secondary outcomes were skin closure time, the need for use of additional analgesic agent, pain score on numeric rating scale, cosmetic score, and patient scar satisfaction scale. Results. Absorbable polyglactin was used in 108 patients and nonabsorbable polypropylene was used in 142 patients. Wound complication rates were similar in primary and repeat cesarean groups based on the type of suture material. Skin closure time is longer in nonabsorbable suture material group in both primary and repeat cesarean groups. There was no difference between groups in terms of postoperative pain, need for additional analgesic use, late phase pain, and itching at the scar. Although the cosmetic results tended to be better in the nonabsorbable group in primary surgery patients, there was no significant difference in the visual satisfaction of the patients. Conclusions. Absorbable and nonabsorbable suture materials are comparable in cesarean section operation skin closure.

  10. Selective inhibition of JNK with a peptide inhibitor attenuates pain hypersensitivity and tumor growth in a mouse skin cancer pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong-Jing; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Zeng, Qing; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Decosterd, Isabelle; Xu, Xiaoyin; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2009-09-01

    Cancer pain significantly affects the quality of cancer patients, and current treatments for this pain are limited. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been implicated in tumor growth and neuropathic pain sensitization. We investigated the role of JNK in cancer pain and tumor growth in a skin cancer pain model. Injection of luciferase-transfected B16-Fluc melanoma cells into a hindpaw of mouse induced robust tumor growth, as indicated by increase in paw volume and fluorescence intensity. Pain hypersensitivity in this model developed rapidly (Tumor growth was associated with JNK activation in tumor mass, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and spinal cord and a peripheral neuropathy, such as loss of nerve fibers in the hindpaw skin and induction of ATF-3 expression in DRG neurons. Repeated systemic injections of D-JNKI-1 (6 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective and cell-permeable peptide inhibitor of JNK, produced an accumulative inhibition of mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. A bolus spinal injection of D-JNKI-1 also inhibited mechanical allodynia. Further, JNK inhibition suppressed tumor growth in vivo and melanoma cell proliferation in vitro. In contrast, repeated injections of morphine (5 mg/kg), a commonly used analgesic for terminal cancer, produced analgesic tolerance after 1 day and did not inhibit tumor growth. Our data reveal a marked peripheral neuropathy in this skin cancer model and important roles of the JNK pathway in cancer pain development and tumor growth. JNK inhibitors such as D-JNKI-1 may be used to treat cancer pain.

  11. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  12. How Is Melanoma Skin Cancer Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Tests for Melanoma Skin Cancer Most melanomas are brought to a doctor’s attention ... Melanoma Skin Cancer, by Stage More In Melanoma Skin Cancer About Melanoma Skin Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  13. Serotonin in human skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo Huang; Qiying Gong; Guiming Li

    2005-01-01

    In this review the authors summarize data of a potential role for serotonin in human skin physiology and pathology. The uncovering of endogenous serotonin synthesis and its transformation to melatonin underlines a putative important role of this pathway in melanocyte physiology and pathology. Pathways of the biosynthesis and biodegradation of serotonin have been characterized in human beings and its major cellular populations. Moreover, receptors of serotonin are expressed on keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts and these mediate phenotypic actions on cellular proliferation and differentiation. And the widespread expression of a cutaneous seorotoninergic system indicates considerable selectivity of action to facilitate intra-, auto-, or paracrine mechanisms that define and influence skin function in a highly compartmentalized manner. Melatonin, in turn, can also act as a hormone, neurotransmitter, cytokine, biological modifier and immunomodulator. Thus, Serotonin local synthesis and cellular localization could thus become of great importance in the diagnosis and management of cutaneous pathology.

  14. Skin contamination dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamby, David M.; Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Cazalas, Edward

    2011-06-21

    A technique and device provides absolute skin dosimetry in real time at multiple tissue depths simultaneously. The device uses a phoswich detector which has multiple scintillators embedded at different depths within a non-scintillating material. A digital pulse processor connected to the phoswich detector measures a differential distribution (dN/dH) of count rate N as function of pulse height H for signals from each of the multiple scintillators. A digital processor computes in real time from the differential count-rate distribution for each of multiple scintillators an estimate of an ionizing radiation dose delivered to each of multiple depths of skin tissue corresponding to the multiple scintillators embedded at multiple corresponding depths within the non-scintillating material.

  15. Double-Skin Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena

    difficulties experienced by scientists when attempting to model DSF thermal and energy performance were examined. In addition, the lack of experimental studies and empirical validation of models was realized, many numerical models have not been empirically validated and most of them require an expert knowledge...... IEA Annex 34/43, subtask E "Double-Skin Facade". The results of empirical validation are discussed in this work. Discussion and analysis of experimental results is carried out. It has lead to hypothesis of recirculation flow phenomenon in the DSF cavity. Finally, a suggestion of a new numerical model......Double-Skin Facades (DSF) are gaining popularity that, in fact, appears to be independent from sturdy critics of the concept in the past years. DSF buildings are being built in Europe and worldwide, DSF concept is being taught at schools of architecture and fully glazed office buildings are being...

  16. Heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, Peter D

    1994-01-01

    It is approximately 10 years since the Third Edition of Heat Pipes was published and the text is now established as the standard work on the subject. This new edition has been extensively updated, with revisions to most chapters. The introduction of new working fluids and extended life test data have been taken into account in chapter 3. A number of new types of heat pipes have become popular, and others have proved less effective. This is reflected in the contents of chapter 5. Heat pipes are employed in a wide range of applications, including electronics cooling, diecasting and injection mo

  17. Echo: skin stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-01-01

    Skin Stress Test of the 12-foot satellite built as a prototype of the full-scale Echo satellite. The 12-foot diameter of the sphere was chosen because that was the ceiling height in the Langley model shop. The proposal to build the 12-foot satellite was made in November 1957. - Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, pp. 170-171.

  18. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...... wounds. Most likely, alteration of inflammatory cell function and extracellular matrix turnover caused by smoking-induced oxidative stress are involved in the pathophysiologic mechanisms....

  19. Development of human skin equivalents to unravel the impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eweje, M.O.

    2016-01-01

    The studies in this thesis describes the barrier defects in Atopic Dermatitis (AD) skin and various techniques to develop AD Human Skin Equivalents (HSEs) which can be used to better understand the role of several factors in the pathogenesis of AD skin. The results described show that Inflammation p

  20. Skin changes in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognia, J L; Braverman, I M; Rousseau, M E; Sarrel, P M

    1989-12-01

    Skin signs and symptoms were examined in 46 menopausal women prior to estrogen replacement therapy. Several symptoms such as pruritus, bruising, dryness and thinning were seen more frequently in sun-exposed skin emphasizing the contribution of photoaging. At the end of a 6-mth treatment period, no significant difference was observed in the prevalence or severity of the cutaneous signs and symptoms when patients receiving transdermal 17 beta-estradiol (Estraderm) were compared with controls (the only exception was cutaneous flushing). Elastic fibers from sun-protected (buttock) skin of menopausal women were studied by light and electron microscopy. In 3 women (ages 30-37) with a history of premature menopause, the elastic fibers had several degenerative changes including coalescence of cystic spaces into lacunae, peripheral fragmentation, granular degeneration and splitting of the fibers into strands. Similar age-related ultrastructural changes are normally found in individuals that are at least 20 yrs older than these patients. These findings are suggestive of a relationship between premature aging of the dermal elastic fibers and estrogen deprivation.

  1. SKIN RADIATION IN PANORAMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Irawan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental panoramic radiograph in Indonesia has been widely used. Modern diagnostic imaging equipment with minimum radiation is still very limited. One of the conditions in nuclear safety law, UU 10/1997, is an optimization of all radiation sources with DRL through skin dose measurements. In Indonesia, the national DRL has not been established yet, and there were no reports on the study of panoramic skin dose in Indonesia. The aim of this preliminary study was to obtain a panoramic skin dose radiation as reference to establish DRL in Indonesia. Panoramic radiographs of sixteen female and fifteen male patients, aged 4 – 48 years, were taken using the standard conventional method, with TLD chips attached in location groups. The chips were then read with the detector and integrator of BATAN, in high and low temperature condition at the same time. It was revealed that behind the right and left ear were the regions with the highest radiation dose received, followed by the back of the neck, left jaw, right jaw, and chin. The result of this study has shown the importance of DRL in Indonesia since the use of modern diagnostic imaging equipement that limits radiation dose to the minimum level is still very limited.

  2. Evaluation of Perfusion and Thermal Parameters of Skin Tissue Using Cold Provocation and Thermographic Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strąkowska Maria

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the perfusion coefficient and thermal parameters of skin tissue using dynamic thermography is presented in this paper. A novel approach based on cold provocation and thermal modelling of skin tissue is presented. The measurement was performed on a person’s forearm using a special cooling device equipped with the Peltier module. The proposed method first cools the skin, and then measures the changes of its temperature matching the measurement results with a heat transfer model to estimate the skin perfusion and other thermal parameters. In order to assess correctness of the proposed approach, the uncertainty analysis was performed.

  3. Ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Deevya L; Saladi, Rao N; Fox, Joshua L

    2010-09-01

    Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in fair-skinned populations in many parts of the world. The incidence, morbidity and mortality rates of skin cancers are increasing and, therefore, pose a significant public health concern. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the major etiologic agent in the development of skin cancers. UVR causes DNA damage and genetic mutations, which subsequently lead to skin cancer. A clearer understanding of UVR is crucial in the prevention of skin cancer. This article reviews UVR, its damaging effects on the skin and its relationship to UV immunosuppression and skin cancer. Several factors influence the amount of UVR reaching the earth's surface, including ozone depletion, UV light elevation, latitude, altitude, and weather conditions. The current treatment modalities utilizing UVR (i.e. phototherapy) can also predispose to skin cancers. Unnecessary exposure to the sun and artificial UVR (tanning lamps) are important personal attributable risks. This article aims to provide a comprehensive overview of skin cancer with an emphasis on carefully evaluated statistics, the epidemiology of UVR-induced skin cancers, incidence rates, risk factors, and preventative behaviors & strategies, including personal behavioral modifications and public educational initiatives. © 2010 The International Society of Dermatology.

  4. Magnetar heating

    CERN Document Server

    Beloborodov, Andrei M

    2016-01-01

    We examine four candidate mechanisms that could explain the high surface temperatures of magnetars. (1) Heat flux from the liquid core heated by ambipolar diffusion. It could sustain the observed surface luminosity $L_s\\approx 10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$ if core heating offsets neutrino cooling at a temperature $T_{\\rm core}>6\\times 10^8$ K. This scenario is viable if the core magnetic field exceeds $10^{16}$ G, the magnetar has mass $M10^{16}$ G varying on a 100 meter scale could provide $L_s\\approx 10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$. (4) Bombardment of the stellar surface by particles accelerated in the magnetosphere. This mechanism produces hot spots on magnetars. Observations of transient magnetars show evidence for external heating.

  5. Heat emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... death. The early symptoms of heat cramps include: Muscle cramps and pains that most often occur in the ... do if salt beverages are not available. For muscle cramps , give beverages as noted above and massage affected ...

  6. Effects of seasonal ambient heat stress (spring vs. summer) on physiological and metabolic variables in hair sheep located in an arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Cruz, U.; López-Baca, M. A.; Vicente, R.; Mejía, A.; Álvarez, F. D.; Correa-Calderón, A.; Meza-Herrera, C. A.; Mellado, M.; Guerra-Liera, J. E.; Avendaño-Reyes, L.

    2016-08-01

    Twenty Dorper × Pelibuey primiparous ewes were used to evaluate effects of seasonal ambient heat stress (i.e., spring vs. summer) on physiological and metabolic responses under production conditions in an arid region. Ten ewes experiencing summer heat stress (i.e., temperature = 34.8 ± 4.6 °C; THI = 81.6 ± 3.2 units) and 10 under spring thermoneutral conditions (temperature = 24.2 ± 5.4 °C; THI = 68.0 ± 4.8 units) were corralled together to measure rectal temperature, respiratory frequency, and skin temperatures at 0600, 1200, 1800, and 2400 h on four occasions over 40 days. Blood metabolite and electrolyte concentrations were also measured at 0600 and 1800 hours. Data were analyzed with a completely randomized design using repeated measurements in time. Rectal and skin temperatures, as well as respiratory frequency, were higher ( P hair breed ewes in an arid region, which included blood metabolite and electrolyte adjustments to efficiently cope with summer heat stress.

  7. Photothermal Radiometry for Skin Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Xiao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photothermal radiometry is an infrared remote sensing technique that has been used for skin and skin appendages research, in the areas of skin hydration, hydration gradient, skin hydration depth profiling, skin thickness measurements, skin pigmentation measurements, effect of topically applied substances, transdermal drug delivery, moisture content of bio-materials, membrane permeation, and nail and hair measurements. Compared with other technologies, photothermal radiometry has the advantages of non-contact, non-destructive, quick to make a measurement (a few seconds, and being spectroscopic in nature. It is also colour blind, and can work on any arbitrary sample surfaces. It has a unique depth profiling capability on a sample surface (typically the top 20 µm, which makes it particularly suitable for skin measurements. In this paper, we present a review of the photothermal radiometry work carried out in our research group. We will first introduce the theoretical background, then illustrate its applications with experimental results.

  8. Mesh-independent prediction of skin burns injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, E Y; Chua, L T

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a robust finite element model (FEM) with multiple-layers of varying properties for investigation of burn effects on human skin during a burning process resulting from exposure of skin surface to a contact heat source and a hot moving fluid. Henriques' theory of skin burns is used in conjunction with two-dimensional Pennes bioheat transfer equation for determining the spatial and temporal extent of burn injury. The model developed is a two-dimensional axisymmetric model in cylindrical coordinates. The various tissue layers account for changing thermal properties with respect to skin anatomy. A finite element scheme that uses the backward Euler method is used to solve the problem. The injury processes of skin subsequent to the removal of the heat source (post-burn) will also be inspected. The mesh employed in this model consists of a high density of nodes and elements in which a thorough mesh convergence study was done. A comparison of the transient temperature field computed by this model against Diller's results using the FE technique with a comparatively coarse mesh of 125 elements and experimental data by Orgill et al. has been done in the present study. It concluded that improved accurate solutions have been performed using the robust model developed due to the achievement of a mesh-independent solution.

  9. Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated testing with feedback benefits learning compared to rereading of introductory psychology key-concepts in an educational context. The testing effect was examined immediately after practice, after 18 days, and at a five-week delay in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 83). The results revealed that repeated testing with feedback significantly enhanced learning compared to rereading at all delays, demonstrating that repeated retrieval enhances retention compared to repeated encoding in the short- and the long-term. In addition, the effect of repeated testing was beneficial for students irrespectively of working memory capacity. It is argued that teaching methods involving repeated retrieval are important to consider by the educational system.

  10. Commercial glucocorticoid formulations and skin dryness. Could it be caused by the vehicle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korting, H C; Kerscher, M; Vieluf, D; Mehringer, L; Megele, M; Braun-Falco, O

    1991-01-01

    Eczema craquelé can be induced by repeated open application of a topical glucocorticoid, viz. 0.05% clobetasole 17-propionate cream. This might not be invariably due to the active component. Comparison of the skin surface roughness as assessed by profilometry and as expressed by RZDIN showed a decrease after repeated open application of 0.1% betamethasone 17-valerate cream and 0.25% prednicarbate cream, but an increase following the vehicle of the latter preparation. Thus commercial oil-in-water emulsion preparations seem to be potentially injurious to human skin, though this may be masked when a glucocorticoid is added.

  11. Repeat concussions in the national football league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Ira R; Viano, David C; Powell, John W; Pellman, Elliot J

    2011-01-01

    Repeat concussion is an important issue in the National Football League (NFL). An initial description of repeat injuries was published for 6 years (1996-2001). The characteristics and frequency of repeat concussion in the NFL have not changed in the subsequent 6 years (2002-2007). Case control. From 1996 to 2007, concussions were reported using a standardized form documenting signs and symptoms, loss of consciousness and medical action taken. Data on repeat concussions were analyzed for the 12 years and compared between the 2 periods. In 2002-2007, 152 players had repeat concussions (vs 160 in 1996-2001); 44 had 3+ head injuries (vs 52). The positions most often associated with repeat concussion in 2002-2007 were the defensive secondary, kick unit, running back, and linebacker. The odds for repeat concussion were elevated for wide receivers, tight ends, and linebackers but lower than in the earlier period. During 2002-2007, over half of players with repeat concussion were removed from play, and fewer immediately returned (vs 1996-2001). The average duration between concussions was 1.25 years for 2002-2007 and 1.65 years for the 12-year period. Over 12 years, 7.6% of all repeat concussions occurred within 2 weeks of the prior concussion. The defensive secondary, kick unit, running back, and linebacker have the highest incidence of repeat concussion. During 2002-2007, more than half of players with repeat concussion were removed from play, and only a fraction immediately returned. Although concussion was managed more conservatively by team physicians in the recent 6 years, repeat concussions occurred at similar rates during both periods.

  12. Automated quality checks on repeat prescribing.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Jeremy E; Wroe, Christopher J; Roberts, Angus; Swallow, Angela; Stables, David; Cantrill, Judith A; Rector, Alan L.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Good clinical practice in primary care includes periodic review of repeat prescriptions. Markers of prescriptions that may need review have been described, but manually checking all repeat prescriptions against the markers would be impractical. AIM: To investigate the feasibility of computerising the application of repeat prescribing quality checks to electronic patient records in United Kingdom (UK) primary care. DESIGN OF STUDY: Software performance test against benchmark manual...

  13. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  14. Effectiveness of exercise-heat acclimation for preventing heat illness in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Fumio

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of heat-related illness in the workplace is linked to whether or not workers have acclimated to a hot environment. Heat acclimation improves endurance work performance in the heat and thermal comfort at a given work rate. These improvements are achieved by increased sweating and skin blood flow responses, better fluid balance and cardiovascular stability. As a practical means of acclimatizing the body to heat stress, daily aerobic exercise training is recommended since thermoregulatory capacity and blood volume increase with physical fitness. In workers wearing personal protective suits in hot environments, however, little psychophysiological benefit is received from short-term exercise training and/or heat acclimation because of the ineffectiveness of sweating for heat dissipation and the aggravation of thermal discomfort with the accumulation of sweat within the suit. For a manual laborer who works under uncompensable heat stress, better management of the work rate, the work environment and health is required.

  15. Development of human skin equivalents to unravel the impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis skin

    OpenAIRE

    Eweje, M.O.

    2016-01-01

    The studies in this thesis describes the barrier defects in Atopic Dermatitis (AD) skin and various techniques to develop AD Human Skin Equivalents (HSEs) which can be used to better understand the role of several factors in the pathogenesis of AD skin. The results described show that Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of epidermal and SC features of AD skin and that AD epidermal features can be maintained in vitro when AD skin biopsies are used to generate explant-HSEs. The...

  16. Effect of repeated and prolonged exposure to low concentrations of Low Molecular Weight chemicals on local lymph node responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong WH de; Beek M ter; Veenman C; Klerk A de; Loveren H van; TOX

    2006-01-01

    The results of the local lymph node assay are not for all compounds useful as starting point for a quantitative risk assessment. This study describes the effects after repeated exposure of the skin to a concentration of a sensitizer below the threshold used in the local lymph node assay. Positive re

  17. Detection of local inflammation induced by repeated exposure to contact allergens by use of IVIS SpectrumCT analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten M; Schmidt, Jonas Damgård; Christensen, Jan P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contact allergy is characterized by local skin inflammation that, in some cases, can result in systemic immune activation. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether IVIS SpectrumCT analyses can be used to detect the immune response induced by contact allergens. METHODS: Mice were repeatedly ...

  18. Skin thermal response to sapphire contact and cryogen spray cooling: a comparative study based on measurements in a skin phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jorge H.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Tanenbaum, B. S.; Anvari, Bahman

    2000-05-01

    Non-specific thermal injury to the epidermis may occur as a result of laser treatment of cutaneous hypervascular malformations (e.g. port wine stains) and other dermatoses. Methods to protect the epidermis from thermal injury include sapphire contact cooling (SCC) and cryogen spray cooling (CSC). Evaluation of the skin thermal response to either cooling method and better understanding of the heat transfer process at the skin surface are essential for further optimization of cooling technique during laser therapy. We present internal temperature measurements in an epoxy resin phantom in response to both SCC and CSC, and use the results in conjunction with a mathematical model to predict the temperature distributions within human skin. Based on our results, a conductive heat transfer process at the skin interface appears to be the primary mechanism for both SCC and CSC. In the case of CSC, 'film cooling' rather than 'evaporative cooling' seems to be the dominant mode during the spurt duration. Currently, due to the lower temperature of the cryogen film and its shorter time of application, CSC produces larger temperature reductions at the skin surface and smaller temperature reductions at depths greater than 200 micrometer (i.e., higher spatial selectivity) when compared to SCC. However, SCC can potentially induce temperature reductions comparable to those produced by CSC if a sapphire temperature similar to that for a cryogen could be achieved in practice.

  19. Consensus recommendations on training and competing in the heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Racinais, Sébastien; Alonso, Juan-Manuel; Coutts, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    conditions. The most important intervention one can adopt to reduce physiological strain and optimize performance is to heat acclimatize. Heat acclimatization should comprise repeated exercise-heat exposures over 1-2 weeks. In addition, athletes should initiate competition and training in an euhydrated state...... and minimize dehydration during exercise. Following the development of commercial cooling systems (e.g., cooling vests), athletes can implement cooling strategies to facilitate heat loss or increase heat storage capacity before training or competing in the heat. Moreover, event organizers should plan for large...

  20. Consensus recommendations on training and competing in the heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Racinais, S; Alonso, J M; Coutts, A J

    2015-01-01

    conditions. The most important intervention one can adopt to reduce physiological strain and optimize performance is to heat acclimatize. Heat acclimatization should comprise repeated exercise-heat exposures over 1-2 weeks. In addition, athletes should initiate competition and training in a euhydrated state...... and minimize dehydration during exercise. Following the development of commercial cooling systems (e.g., cooling vest), athletes can implement cooling strategies to facilitate heat loss or increase heat storage capacity before training or competing in the heat. Moreover, event organizers should plan for large...

  1. Sampling by sponge wipe or skin excision for recovery of inoculated Salmonella and Campylobacter from defeathered broiler carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrang, Mark E; Cox, Nelson A; Oakley, Brian B

    2014-05-01

    Broilers may carry Salmonella and Campylobacter on inner and outer surfaces upon arrival at the slaughter plant, and carcasses can be further contaminated during commercial processing. A sensitive, nondestructive, repeatable sampling method would be useful to test carcasses for levels of bacteria before and after specific processing steps to measure either contamination or efficacy of intervention techniques. Blending of excised skin is accepted as an effective sampling method but requires damage to the carcass; this makes repeated measurements on the same carcass difficult. Herein we compare sponge sampling to skin excision to recover inoculated Salmonella and Campylobacter from broiler carcasses. In each of three replications, broiler carcass breast skin was inoculated with approximately 6.0 log antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter, allowed to dry for 60 s, and sampled by either sponge, skin excision, or sponge followed by skin excision. Antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter were enumerated from all samples. Skin excision allowed recovery of 0.1 to 0.2 log more inoculated bacteria than did sponge sampling. When excision was used on the same skin previously sampled by sponging, the combination of both methods did not significantly improve recovery compared with sponging alone. Skin excision is slightly more sensitive than sponge sampling; however, for repeated nondestructive sampling of broiler carcasses during processing, sponge sampling may be preferable to recover Salmonella and Campylobacter within 60 s of a contamination event.

  2. Climate change and skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balato, N; Ayala, F; Megna, M; Balato, A; Patruno, C

    2013-02-01

    Global climate appears to be changing at an unprecedented rate. Climate change can be caused by several factors that include variations in solar radiation received by earth, oceanic processes (such as oceanic circulation), plate tectonics, and volcanic eruptions, as well as human-induced alterations of the natural world. Many human activities, such as the use of fossil fuel and the consequent accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, land consumption, deforestation, industrial processes, as well as some agriculture practices are contributing to global climate change. Indeed, many authors have reported on the current trend towards global warming (average surface temperature has augmented by 0.6 °C over the past 100 years), decreased precipitation, atmospheric humidity changes, and global rise in extreme climatic events. The magnitude and cause of these changes and their impact on human activity have become important matters of debate worldwide, representing climate change as one of the greatest challenges of the modern age. Although many articles have been written based on observations and various predictive models of how climate change could affect social, economic and health systems, only few studies exist about the effects of this change on skin physiology and diseases. However, the skin is the most exposed organ to environment; therefore, cutaneous diseases are inclined to have a high sensitivity to climate. For example, global warming, deforestation and changes in precipitation have been linked to variations in the geographical distribution of vectors of some infectious diseases (leishmaniasis, lyme disease, etc) by changing their spread, whereas warm and humid environment can also encourage the colonization of the skin by bacteria and fungi. The present review focuses on the wide and complex relationship between climate change and dermatology, showing the numerous factors that are contributing to modify the incidence and the clinical pattern of many

  3. Epidemiology of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas; Garbe, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) are now the most common types of cancer in white populations. Both tumor entities show an increasing incidence rate worldwide but a stable or decreasing mortality rate. NMSC is the most common cancer in white-skinned individuals with a worldwide increasing incidence. NMSC is an increasing problem for health care services worldwide which causes significant morbidity. The rising incidence rates of NMSC are probably caused by a combination of increased exposure to ultraviolet (UV) or sun light, increased outdoor activities, changes in clothing style, increased longevity, ozone depletion, genetics and in some cases, immune suppression. An intensive UV exposure in childhood and adolescence was causative for the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) whereas for the etiology of SCC a chronic UV exposure in the earlier decades was accused. Cutaneous melanoma is the most rapidly increasing cancer in white populations, in the last 3 decades incidence rates have risen up to 5-fold. In 2008 melanoma was on place 5 in women and on place 8 in men of the most common solid tumor entities in Germany. The frequency of its occurrence is closely associated with the constitutive color of the skin, and the geographical zone. Changes in outdoor activities and exposure to sunlight during the past 50 years are an important factor for the increasing incidence of melanoma. Mortality rates of melanoma show a stabilization in the USA, Australia and also in European countries. In contrast to SCC, melanoma risk seems to be associated with an intermittent exposure to sunlight. Prevention campaigns aim on reducing incidence and achieving earlier diagnosis, which resulted in an ongoing trend toward thin melanoma since the last two decades. However, the impact of primary prevention measures on incidence rates of melanoma is unlikely to be seen in the near future, rather increasing incidence rates to 40-50/100,000 inhabitants/year should be expected in

  4. Recovery and Cultivation of Keratinocytes From Shipped Mouse Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsin-Ya; La, Thi Dinh; Gurenko, Zhanna; Steenhuis, Pieter; Liu, Wei; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2015-02-01

    Murine keratinocyte culture from neonatal skin is an important tool for studying the functional role of specific genes in epithelial biology. However, when the transgenic animal is only available in a geographically distant local, obtaining viable keratinocytes can be problematic. A method for transferring the isolated murine skin from collaborating labs could decrease the cost of shipping live animals, and would allow the efficient use of the tissues from the transgenic animals. Here we optimized shipping conditions and characterized the cells retrieved and cultured from mouse skin shipped for 48 h at 0 °C. The cultured keratinocytes from the control, non-shipped skin and the 2-day shipped skin were 43.6 +/- 7.8% viable, doubled every 2 days, and expressed comparable amounts of heat shock proteins and CD29/integrin beta-1. However, under the same shipping conditions, the 3-day shipped tissue failed to establish colonies in the culture. Therefore, this 2-day shipping technique allows the transfer mouse skin from distant locations with recovery of viable, propagatable keratinocytes, facilitating long-distance collaborations.

  5. In vitro burn model illustrating heat conduction patterns using compressed thermal papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Yong; Jung, Sung-No; Kwon, Ho

    2015-01-01

    To date, heat conduction from heat sources to tissue has been estimated by complex mathematical modeling. In the present study, we developed an intuitive in vitro skin burn model that illustrates heat conduction patterns inside the skin. This was composed of tightly compressed thermal papers with compression frames. Heat flow through the model left a trace by changing the color of thermal papers. These were digitized and three-dimensionally reconstituted to reproduce the heat conduction patterns in the skin. For standardization, we validated K91HG-CE thermal paper using a printout test and bivariate correlation analysis. We measured the papers' physical properties and calculated the estimated depth of heat conduction using Fourier's equation. Through contact burns of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 seconds on porcine skin and our burn model using a heated brass comb, and comparing the burn wound and heat conduction trace, we validated our model. The heat conduction pattern correlation analysis (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.846, p < 0.001) and the heat conduction depth correlation analysis (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.93, p < 0.001) showed statistically significant high correlations between the porcine burn wound and our model. Our model showed good correlation with porcine skin burn injury and replicated its heat conduction patterns.

  6. Skin and bones. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlow, S J; Watsky, K L; Bolognia, J L

    1991-08-01

    Skin disorders in which a radiograph may detect associated bony changes or abnormalities of calcification are discussed. They are grouped into eight categories: (1) inherited diseases (e.g., alkaptonuria, neurofibromatosis); (2) congenital disorders (e.g., Sturge-Weber and Proteus syndromes); (3) inflammatory conditions (e.g., dermatomyositis, sarcoidosis); (4) infections (e.g., dental sinus, syphilis); (5) neoplasias (e.g., histiocytosis, mastocytosis); (6) drug- and environment-induced (e.g., acroosteolysis, retinoid toxicity); (7) calcinosis cutis; and (8) osteoma cutis. Part I of our review discusses the first two categories.

  7. Skin and bones. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlow, S J; Watsky, K L; Bolognia, J L

    1991-09-01

    Skin disorders in which a radiograph may detect associated bony changes or abnormalities of calcification are discussed. They are grouped into eight categories: (1) inherited diseases (e.g., alkaptonuria, neurofibromatosis); (2) congenital disorders (e.g., Sturge-Weber and Proteus syndromes); (3) inflammatory conditions (e.g., dermatomyositis, sarcoidosis); (4) infections (e.g., dental sinus, syphilis); (5) neoplasias (e.g., histiocytosis, mastocytosis); (6) drug- and environment-induced (e.g., acroosteolysis, retinoid toxicity); (7) calcinosis cutis; and (8) osteoma cutis. The first part of this review, published in the August 1991 issue of this JOURNAL, dealt with the first two categories; part II discusses categories 3 through 8.

  8. Skin photoprotection by green tea: antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2003-09-01

    Because of a characteristic aroma and health benefits, green tea is consumed worldwide as a popular beverage. The epicatechin derivatives, commonly called polyphenols, present in green tea possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. The major and most highly chemopreventive constituent in green tea responsible for the biochemical or pharmacological effects is (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Epidemiological, clinical and biological studies have implicated that solar ultraviolet (UV) light is a complete carcinogen and repeated exposure can lead to the development of various skin disorders including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. We and others have shown that topical treatment or oral consumption of green tea polyphenols (GTP) inhibit chemical carcinogen- or UV radiation-induced skin carcinogenesis in different laboratory animal models. Topical treatment of GTP and EGCG or oral consumption of GTP resulted in prevention of UVB-induced inflammatory responses, immunosuppression and oxidative stress, which are the biomarkers of several skin disease states. Topical application of GTP and EGCG prior to exposure of UVB protects against UVB-induced local as well as systemic immune suppression in laboratory animals, which was associated with the inhibition of UVB-induced infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes. Prevention of UVB-induced suppression of immune responses by EGCG was also associated with the reduction in immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 production at UV irradiated skin and draining lymph nodes, whereas IL-12 production was significantly enhanced in draining lymph nodes. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of green tea were also observed in human skin. Treatment of EGCG to human skin resulted in the inhibition of UVB-induced erythema, oxidative stress and infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes. We also showed that treatment of GTP to human skin prevents UVB-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers

  9. Is skin penetration a determining factor in skin sensitization ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary:Background. It is widely accepted that substances that cannot penetrate through the skin will not be sensitisers. Thresholds based on relevant physicochemical parameters such as a LogKow > 1 and a MW 1 is a true requirement for sensitisation.Methods. A large dataset of substances that had been evaluated for their skin sensitisation potential, together with measured LogKow values was compiled from the REACH database. The incidence of skin sensitisers relative to non-skin sensitisers below and above the LogKow = 1 threshold was evaluated. Results. 1482 substances with associated skin sensitisation outcomes and measured LogKow values were identified. 305 substances had a measured LogKow skin sensitisation above and below the LogKow = 1 threshold. Reaction chemistry considerations could explain the skin sensitisation observed for the 38 sensitisers with a LogKow skin sensitisation potential and potency. Using the REACH data extracted to test out the validity of common assumptions in the skin sensitization AOP. Builds on trying to develop a proof of concept IATA

  10. [Data mining analysis of professor Li Fa-zhi AIDS itchy skin medical record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan-Ni; Li, Zhen; Xu, Li-Ran; Guo, Hui-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Analysis of professor Li Fa-zhi in the treatment of AIDS drug laws of itchy skin, provide the corresponding drug reference basis for Chinese medicine treatment of AIDS, skin itching. By using the method of analyzing the complex network of Weishi county, Henan in 2007 October to 2011 July during an interview with professor Li Fa-zhi treatment of AIDS patients with skin pruritus, etiology and pathogenesis analysis, skin itching AIDS syndrome differentiation of old Chinese medicine treatment and medication rule. The use of multi-dimensional query analysis, core drug skin itching AIDS treatment in this study as a windbreak, cicada slough, bupleurum, Qufeng solution table drug, licorice detoxification efficacy of drugs, Radix Scutellariae, Kochia scoparia, clearing away heat and promoting diuresis medicine; core prescription for Jingfang San streak virus. Professor Li Fa-zhi treatment of AIDS in the skin itching Qufeng solution table dehumidification antipruritic treatment.

  11. Spatial temperature distribution in human hairy and glabrous skin after infrared CO2 laser radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frahm, Ken Steffen; Andersen, Ole K.; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Background: CO(2) lasers have been used for several decades as an experimental non-touching pain stimulator. The laser energy is absorbed by the water content in the most superficial layers of the skin. The deeper located nociceptors are activated by passive conduction of heat from superficial...... to deeper skin layers. Methods: In the current study, a 2D axial finite element model was developed and validated to describe the spatial temperature distribution in the skin after infrared CO(2) laser stimulation. The geometry of the model was based on high resolution ultrasound scans. The simulations were...... compared to the subjective pain intensity ratings from 16 subjects and to the surface skin temperature distributions measured by an infrared camera. Results: The stimulations were sensed significantly slower and less intense in glabrous skin than they were in hairy skin (MANOVA, p

  12. Cutaneous effects of topical indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, on uv-damaged skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, D.S.

    1975-05-01

    Topical application of a 2.5 percent indomethacin (IM) solution to the sunburned skin of humans and guinea pigs resulted in a marked decrease in ultraviolet light (UVL)-induced erythema. In humans, a decrease in skin temperature and hyperalgesia to near normal levels was also observed. Epidermal responses to UVL injury such as keratinocyte cell death and altered DNA synthesis proceeded unmodified by IM. Repeated applications of IM in the 48-hr period following UVL exposure did not improve upon the results obtained following a single treatment. Guinea-pig skin provides a relevant model system for evaluating the effects of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on sunburn. (auth)

  13. Photoacoustic study of the penetration kinetics of nimesulid into human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barja, P R; Veloso, D J D V, E-mail: barja@univap.b [Research and Development Institute, UNIVAP, Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, 12209-010 (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    The photoacoustic (PA) effect is observed when modulated (or pulsed) light is absorbed by a sample inside a closed chamber and converted in heat, generating acoustic waves; PA measurements have been employed to evaluate transdermal penetration of topically applied drugs. Phonophoresis is the utilization of ultrasonic (US) energy to enhance absorption of drugs across the epidermal barrier, and its usefulness has been shown by PA measurements. The aim of the present work was to determine the characteristic absorption times of the anti-inflammatory Nimesulid (gel) in human skin, with and without help of therapeutic phonophoresis. After local cleaning, measurements were performed in the forearm of each volunteer before Nimesulid application and for different times after application through massage with the US equipment head; the protocol was repeated for the opposite forearm, but without US emission. Curves of the PA signal level as a function of time were adjusted by a Boltzmann equation, leading to the determination of the characteristic absorption time (about 12 minutes). No significant gain was observed in Nimesulid absorption with the utilization of US radiation, indicating that topic application of Nimesulid does not require the use of phonophoresis, due to the natural fast penetration of the Nimesulid gel.

  14. Repeatability & Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2009

    KAUST Repository

    Manegold, Stefan

    2010-12-15

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters\\' programs against their data to verify the repeatability of the experiments published [1]. Given the positive feedback concerning the SIGMOD 2008 repeatability initiative, SIGMOD 2009 modified and expanded the initiative with a workability assessment.

  15. Shoulder skin and muscle hemodynamics during backpack carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Clifford P; Macias, Brandon R; Hargens, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of loaded backpacks on shoulder muscle oxygenation, skin blood flow, and pain. We hypothesized that backpack load carriage is associated with lower shoulder muscle oxygenation and skin microvascular flow. Near-infrared spectroscopy quantified shoulder tissue oxygenation and laser Doppler flow measured skin microvascular flow. Eight adult volunteers donned a standard backpack without added load, 5 kg load, and 10 kg load for 5 min while standing. An 8 min rest period before each backpack donning condition ensured that all measured parameters returned to baseline. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA and significance set at p backpack significantly reduced shoulder muscle oxygenation by 22 ± 23% as compared to the empty backpack control condition (p = 0.023). In addition, a 10 kg backpack load reduced skin microvascular flow by 82 ± 22%, as compared to the empty backpack control condition (p = 0.024). Perceived pain was significantly higher when wearing the 10 kg backpack (level 4 on a 10-maximal pain scale) as compared to the empty backpack (0, 0-no pain) (p backpack loads of 10 kg decrease shoulder muscle oxygenation and skin microvascular flow.

  16. The 'beauty' of skin neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincelli, C; Bonté, F

    2003-07-01

    The skin is the most densely innervated organ in the body and there is a close relationship between the skin and the nervous system. Most skin cells express receptors for neuromediators (NM) and skin cells themselves are an important source of NM. In particular, human keratinocytes synthesize neurotrophins and endorphins and express their receptors. In addition to neurotrophic activity, NM are involved in skin homeostasis, trophism and stress responses. NM released from keratinocytes also function in a paracrine fashion on other skin cells, such as Langerhans cells, melanocytes and fibroblasts. We discuss the influence of NM on these cells, which may be involved in major cosmetic problems like ageing, baldness and dyspigmentation. Based on this correlation, it seems reasonable to target neural factors for cosmetic purposes.

  17. Reward modulation of contextual cueing: Repeated context overshadows repeated target location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifian, Fariba; Contier, Oliver; Preuschhof, Claudia; Pollmann, Stefan

    2017-08-07

    Contextual cueing can be enhanced by reward. However, there is a debate if reward is associated with the repeated target-distractor configurations or with the repeated target locations that occur in both repeated and new displays. Based on neuroimaging evidence, we hypothesized that reward becomes associated with the target location only in new displays, but not in repeated displays, where the repeated target location is overshadowed by the more salient repeated target-distractor configuration. To test this hypothesis, we varied the reward value associated with the same target location in repeated and new displays. The results confirmed the overshadowing hypothesis in that search facilitation in repeated target-distractor configurations was modulated by the variable value associated with the target location. This effect was observed mainly in early learning.

  18. Childhood experiences and repeated suicidal behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Gertrud; Nielsen, Bent; Rask, P

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of various events in childhood on suicidal behavior in adult age. For this purpose, 99 patients admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of Odense University Hospital after making a suicide attempt were followed for 5 years, to register repeated...... suicidal behavior. The results showed that three fourths of the patients attempted suicide more than once (62% nonfatal and 14% fatal outcome). The sex distribution was about the same among the first-evers as among the repeaters. Most repeaters were younger people in their twenties and thirties......, and the first-evers on average were past the age of 40. Somewhat unexpectedly, significantly more repeaters than first-evers had grown up with both their parents. However, the results also showed that significantly more repeaters than first-evers had had an unhappy childhood. This indicates...

  19. UK 2009-2010 repeat station report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J.G. Shanahan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The British Geological Survey is responsible for conducting the UK geomagnetic repeat station programme. Measurements made at the UK repeat station sites are used in conjunction with the three UK magnetic observatories: Hartland, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick, to produce a regional model of the local field each year. The UK network of repeat stations comprises 41 stations which are occupied at approximately 3-4 year intervals. Practices for conducting repeat station measurements continue to evolve as advances are made in survey instrumentation and as the usage of the data continues to change. Here, a summary of the 2009 and 2010 UK repeat station surveys is presented, highlighting the measurement process and techniques, density of network, reduction process and recent results.

  20. Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, S.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

  1. Heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, J P

    2010-01-01

    As one of the most popular heat transfer texts, Jack Holman's "Heat Transfer" is noted for its clarity, accessible approach, and inclusion of many examples and problem sets. The new tenth edition retains the straight-forward, to-the-point writing style while covering both analytical and empirical approaches to the subject. Throughout the book, emphasis is placed on physical understanding while, at the same time, relying on meaningful experimental data in those situations that do not permit a simple analytical solution. New examples and templates provide students with updated resources for computer-numerical solutions.

  2. [Thermal lasers and skin cicatrization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, Serge; Capon, Alexandre; Fournier, Nathalie; Iarmarcovai, Gwen

    2010-01-01

    Any cutaneous damage triggers a cascade of biological effects in the skin responsible for re-establishing skin integrity. Wound healing is a complex biological process inducing dermal remodelling leading at least to a visible scar, and sometimes to hypertrophic or keloid scars. Recent studies suggest that using a laser generates a precisely defined thermal effect in the skin, improving the wound healing process and potentially opening the door to scarless healing.

  3. Protecting the skin during thyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Bezerra Lira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this note we describe the standard technical maneuver used in our department to protect the skin during thyroidectomy in order to get the best aesthetic result. We use surgical gloves to protect the skin during these operations to reduce the negative impact of thermal trauma and mechanical retractors and energy delivery devices at the edges of the skin incised. This practice is effective, inexpensive, rapid, reproducible and showed no complication in our experience of over 2,500 thyroidectomies.

  4. Successful skin homografting from an identical twin in a severely burned patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Emin; Karagulle, Erdal; Turan, Hale; Oguz, Hakan; Abali, Ebru Sakallioglu; Ozcay, Necdet; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Flame burns are a serious condition and usually have high morbidity and mortality because they affect large areas of the body surface as well as the lungs. In these patients, it is especially difficult to find healthy skin for grafting if they have more than 70% third-degree burns. Repeated autografting or synthetic wound care materials are the only treatment options to cover burned areas. Partial-thickness skin grafting from the patient's identical twin sibling may be an alternative treatment option, if possible. Here, we report a patient with severe flame injury treated with skin from his identical twin. The patient had third-degree burns covering 70% of his body surface. Initial treatment consisted of fluid and electrolyte replacement, daily wound care, and surgical debridements, as well as nutritional support. After initial treatment, we performed a successful skin grafting from his identical twin. Skin grafting between identical twins might be an alternate method for severely burned patients.

  5. In vivo characterization of skin using a Weiner nonlinear stochastic system identification method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Hunter, Ian W

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an indentometer device used to identify the linear dynamic and nonlinear properties of skin and underlying tissue using an in vivo test. The device uses a Lorentz force actuator to apply a dynamic force to the skin and measures the resulting displacement. It was found that the skin could be modeled as a Wiener system (i.e. a linear dynamic system followed by a static nonlinearity). Using a stochastic nonlinear system identification technique, the method presented in this paper was able to identify the dynamic linear and static nonlinear mechanical parameters of the indentometer-skin system within 2 to 4 seconds. The shape of the nonlinearity was found to vary depending on the area of the skin that was tested. We show that the device can repeatably distinguish between different areas of human tissue for multiple test subjects.

  6. A Square Wave Based Electrical Method for Human Skin Moisture Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guolin Zhou; Yonggui Dong

    2006-01-01

    The moisture content measurement of human skin is a significant way to assess skin conditions and diagnose diseases that influence skin function. The necessity of evaluating the efficacy of a cosmetic product makes it important to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of the measurement. A pair of interdigitated gold electrodes was fabricated on the printed circuit board (PCB) substrate and utilized directly in contact with the measured skin. A square-wave voltage at a single frequency was applied to the electrodes and the corresponding response current was measured to get the equivalent impedance of human skin. Since it's easy to generate and control a square-wave signal by digital electric circuits, this method is suitable to be used in the portable application. The experimental results indicate that good repeatability and satisfied accuracy can be obtained by this method.

  7. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of heat stroke or exhaustion. Heat Stroke and Exhaustion Symptoms of early heat exhaustion symptoms ... heavy sweating; nausea; and giddiness. Symptoms of heat stroke (late stage of heat illness) include flushed, hot, ...

  8. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of heat stroke or exhaustion. Heat Stroke and Exhaustion Symptoms of early heat exhaustion symptoms ... heavy sweating; nausea; and giddiness. Symptoms of heat stroke (late stage of heat illness) include flushed, hot, ...

  9. Skin decontamination: principles and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Heidi P; Zhai, Hongbo; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2013-11-01

    Skin decontamination is the primary intervention needed in chemical, biological and radiological exposures, involving immediate removal of the contaminant from the skin performed in the most efficient way. The most readily available decontamination system on a practical basis is washing with soap and water or water only. Timely use of flushing with copious amounts of water may physically remove the contaminant. However, this traditional method may not be completely effective, and contaminants left on the skin after traditional washing procedures can have toxic consequences. This article focuses on the principles and practices of skin decontamination.

  10. Pathophysiological Study of Sensitive Skin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buhé, Virginie; Vié, Katell; Guéré, Christelle; Natalizio, Audrey; Lhéritier, Céline; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Huet, Flavien; Talagas, Matthieu; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Marcorelles, Pascale; Carré, Jean-Luc; Misery, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical syndrome characterized by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations, such as pruritus, burning or pain, in response to various factors, including skincare products, water...

  11. Menstrual cycle and skin reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Damm, P; Skouby, S O

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that a cyclic variation exists in skin reactivity to irritant stimuli. Twenty-nine healthy women with regular menstrual cycles were challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate as an irritant patch test at day 1 and at days 9 through 11 of the menstrual cycle. The skin response...... to the applied irritant stimulus was evaluated by visual scoring and also quantified by measurements of transepidermal water loss, edema formation, and blood flow in the skin. The skin response to challenge with sodium lauryl sulfate was found to be significantly stronger at day 1 than at days 9 through 11...

  12. HOX genes in the skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Mei; LI Qing-feng; ZHANG Feng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Deep skin wounds heal by scar formation with a loss of its original appearance, structure and function.However, when the same damage occurs to the skin of an early gestational fetus, complete regeneration can be observed. Despite significant research in the field of skin regeneration, many mysteries remain, such as the loss of wound healing ability with maturity, the differences in healing at different parts of the body, and the presence of hypertrophic scars and keloids in some races but not in others. The finding of HOX genes in the skin provides new explanations to these conundrums.

  13. The future of skin metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Alban; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics, the direct exploitation of environmental microbial DNA, is complementary to traditional culture-based approaches for deciphering taxonomic and functional microbial diversity in a plethora of ecosystems, including those related to the human body such as the mouth, saliva, teeth, gut or skin. DNA extracted from human skin analyzed by sequencing the PCR-amplified rrs gene has already revealed the taxonomic diversity of microbial communities colonizing the human skin ("skin microbiome"). Each individual possesses his/her own skin microbial community structure, with marked taxonomic differences between different parts of the body and temporal evolution depending on physical and chemical conditions (sweat, washing etc.). However, technical limitations due to the low bacterial density at the surface of the human skin or contamination by human DNA still has inhibited extended use of the metagenomic approach for investigating the skin microbiome at a functional level. These difficulties have been overcome in part by the new generation of sequencing platforms that now provide sequences describing the genes and functions carried out by skin bacteria. These methodological advances should help us understand the mechanisms by which these microorganisms adapt to the specific chemical composition of each skin and thereby lead to a better understanding of bacteria/human host interdependence. This knowledge will pave the way for more systemic and individualized pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications.

  14. Infrared sensing based sensitive skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zheng-cai; FU Yi-li; WANG Shu-guo; JIN Bao

    2006-01-01

    Developed robotics sensitive skin is a modularized, flexible, mini-type array of infrared sensors with data processing capabilities, which can be used to cover the body of a robot. Depending on the infrared sensors and periphery processing circuit, robotics sensitive skin can in real-time provide existence and distance information about obstacles for robots within sensory areas. The methodology of designing sensitive skin and the algorithm of a mass of IR data fusion are presented. The experimental results show that the multi-joint robot with this sensitive skin can work autonomously in an unknown environment.

  15. Effects of TLC-Ag dressings on skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Jean-François; Hidalgo-Lucas, Sophie; Bouschbacher, Marielle; Thomassin, Laetitia

    2013-06-01

    The TLC-Ag dressings, a combination of technology lipido-colloid and silver salts, are used to promote healing in wounds with risks or signs of local infection, thanks to the antimicrobial properties of the silver salts. Nanocrystalline silver dressings containing nanocrystalline silver, also used to improve wound healing, present both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of TLC-Ag dressings in a model of chronic skin inflammation induced by repeated application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate to the skin of hairless mice, in comparison with TLC dressing, Silcryst nanocrystalline dressing, desonide cream 0.05%, a corticoid cream used as positive control, and gauze. Daily treatments of the mice began 7 days after the start of induction of chronic skin inflammation and lasted for 7 days. A macroscopic score was performed daily during the treatment period until the mice killing on day 15 and skin samples were taken for histopathological analysis. TLC-Ag reduced significantly the macroscopic score of chronic skin inflammation from day 10 in comparison with gauze and TLC dressing, similarly to Silcryst nanocrystalline dressing and desonide cream, which presented the best anti-inflammatory effects. No significant differences were observed between TLC dressing and gauze. TLC-Ag reduced significantly the microscopic score of chronic skin inflammation in comparison with TLC dressing and gauze, similarly to Silcryst nanocrystalline dressing but significantly less than desonide cream. These results demonstrate that TLC-Ag dressings present significant anti-inflammatory effects on chronic skin inflammation. They can improve wound healing, due to both the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. © 2013 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  16. Muscle-damaging exercise increases heat strain during subsequent exercise heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Matthew Benjamin; Di Felice, Umberto; Dolci, Alberto; Junglee, Naushad A; Crockford, Michael J; West, Liam; Hillier-Smith, Ryan; Macdonald, Jamie Hugo; Walsh, Neil Peter

    2013-10-01

    It remains unclear whether exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) increases heat strain during subsequent exercise heat stress, which in turn may increase the risk of exertional heat illness. We examined heat strain during exercise heat stress 30 min after EIMD to coincide with increases in circulating pyrogens (e.g., interleukin-6 [IL-6]) and 24 h after EIMD to coincide with the delayed muscle inflammatory response when a higher rate of metabolic energy expenditure (M˙) and thus decreased economy might also increase heat strain. Thirteen non-heat-acclimated males (mean ± SD, age = 20 ± 2 yr) performed exercise heat stress tests (running for 40 min at 65% V˙O2max in 33°C, 50% humidity) 30 min (HS1) and 24 h (HS2) after treatment, involving running for 60 min at 65% V˙O2max on either -10% gradient (EIMD) or +1% gradient (CON) in a crossover design. Rectal (Tre) and skin (Tsk) temperature, local sweating rate, and M˙ were measured throughout HS tests. Compared with CON, EIMD evoked higher circulating IL-6 pre-HS1 (P correlated with the pre-HS1 circulating IL-6 concentration (r = 0.67). Heat strain was increased during endurance exercise in the heat conducted 30 min after and, to a much lesser extent, 24 h after muscle-damaging exercise. These data indicate that EIMD is a likely risk factor for exertional heat illness particularly during exercise heat stress when behavioral thermoregulation cues are ignored.

  17. Infrared heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    IR heating was first industrially used in the 1930s for automotive curing applications and rapidly became a widely applied technology in the manufacturing industry. Contrarily, a slower pace in the development of IR technologies for processing foods and agricultural products was observed, due to lim...

  18. What Are Behind The Electric Car Heat?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Is the world's auto industry going to change greatly in the future 3-5 years so that ICEs will fade out?Will this electric car heat repeat itselfjust like it did in the history? The Chinese government issued pro- grams in Jan 2009 to cheer up the auto industrv.The plans include enacting new energy vehicle strategy,industrializing

  19. Trophic skin ulceration of leprosy: skin and serum zinc concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oon, B B; Khong, K Y; Greaves, M W; Plummer, V M

    1974-06-08

    Skin and serum zinc measurements have been made in patients with leprosy with and without trophic skin ulceration and in several other groups. Serum zinc concentrations were decreased in leprosy irrespective of the presence or absence of skin ulceration. Serum zinc concentrations in leprosy were also unrelated to smears positive for Mycobacterium leprae and to the clinical type of leprosy. Since a decrease of the serum zinc was also found in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and pulmonary tuberculosis it seems likely that the decreased serum zinc in leprosy is a nonspecific metabolic consequence of chronic skin and internal disease. The mean skin zinc concentration in leprosy did not differ significantly from the corresponding value in control subjects, the lack of agreement between serum and skin concentrations being possibly related to the presence of nonexchangeable keratin-bound zinc in skin. Though the clinical significance of lowered serum zinc concentrations in leprosy is uncertain therapeutic trials of zinc treatment in leprosy with trophic skin ulceration seem justifiable.

  20. Hospital celebrates skin to skin contact to raise awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    NEONATAL nurses at Birmingham's City Hospital have been celebrating the benefits of skin to skin contact with premature babies. They held a week of celebrations in the unit last month, in which they promoted the kangaroo care technique and breastfeeding to parents.

  1. INTERACTION OF FEMTOSECOND LASER RADIATION WITH SKIN: MATHEMATICAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Yu. Rogov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The features of human skin response to the impact of femtosecond laser radiation were researched. The Monte–Carlo method was used for estimation of the radiation penetration depth into the skin cover. We used prevalent wavelength equal to 800 nm (for Ti: sapphire laser femtosecond systems. A mathematical model of heat transfer process was introduced based on the analytical solution of the system of equations describing the dynamics of the electron and phonon subsystems. An experiment was carried out to determine the threshold energy of biological tissue injury (chicken skin was used as a test object. The value of electronic subsystem relaxation time was determined from the experiment and is in keeping with literature data. The results of this work can be used to assess the maximum permissible exposure of laser radiation of different lengths that cause the damage of biological tissues, as well as for the formation of safe operation standards for femtosecond laser systems.

  2. Optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin and skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    , as have many diseases. The method can provide accurate measures of epidermal and nail changes in normal tissue. Skin cancer and other tumors, as well as inflammatory diseases, have been studied and good agreement found between OCT images and histopathological architecture. OCT also allows noninvasive......Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging technology based on light reflection. It provides real-time images with up to 2-mm penetration into the skin and a resolution of approximately 10 μm. It is routinely used in ophthalmology. The normal skin and its appendages have been studied...... monitoring of morphologic changes in skin diseases and may have a particular role in the monitoring of medical treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer. The technology is however still evolving and continued technological development will necessitate an ongoing evaluation of its diagnostic accuracy. Several...

  3. Characterization of Temperature Profiles in Skin and Transdermal Delivery System When Exposed to Temperature Gradients In Vivo and In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Murawsky, Michael; LaCount, Terri; Hao, Jinsong; Kasting, Gerald B; Newman, Bryan; Ghosh, Priyanka; Raney, Sam G; Li, S Kevin

    2017-07-01

    Performance of a transdermal delivery system (TDS) can be affected by exposure to elevated temperature, which can lead to unintended safety issues. This study investigated TDS and skin temperatures and their relationship in vivo, characterized the effective thermal resistance of skin, and identified the in vitro diffusion cell conditions that would correlate with in vivo observations. Experiments were performed in humans and in Franz diffusion cells with human cadaver skin to record skin and TDS temperatures at room temperature and with exposure to a heat flux. Skin temperatures were regulated with two methods: a heating lamp in vivo and in vitro, or thermostatic control of the receiver chamber in vitro. In vivo basal skin temperatures beneath TDS at different anatomical sites were not statistically different. The maximum tolerable skin surface temperature was approximately 42-43°C in vivo. The temperature difference between skin surface and TDS surface increased with increasing temperature, or with increasing TDS thermal resistance in vivo and in vitro. Based on the effective thermal resistance of skin in vivo and in vitro, the heating lamp method is an adequate in vitro method. However, the in vitro-in vivo correlation of temperature could be affected by the thermal boundary layer in the receiver chamber.

  4. The child accident repeater: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J G

    1980-04-01

    The child accident repeater is defined as one who has at least three accidents that come to medical attention within a year. The accident situation has features in common with those of the child who has a single accident through simple "bad luck", but other factors predispose him to repeated injury. In the child who has a susceptible personality, a tendency for accident repetition may be due to a breakdown in adjustment to a stressful environment. Prevention of repeat accidents should involve the usual measures considered appropriate for all children as well as an attempt to provide treatment of significant maladjustment and modification of a stressful environment.

  5. 止汗除湿散治疗高温湿热条件下局部多汗及其皮损的效果观察%Efficacy of Zhihanchushi Powder for treatment of localized hyperhidrosis and skin lesions in heat and humidity condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵志勇; 王刚; 马玉琛; 吕菲菲; 王勇; 黎发根

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察自制外用止汗除湿散治疗高温湿热条件下局部多汗及皮损的临床疗效.方法 纳入某部官兵550例,按照足多汗、阴部多汗及足癣者分为3组,每组随机分为实验组和对照组,实验组使用附带止汗除湿散的对应生活用品,对照组使用普通的生活用品,连续使用2周,采用自创印录法测量多汗者汗液浸染面积,并对足癣者进行真菌镜检及培养.结果 实验组各组症状及测量指标与对照组相比明显改善,足多汗、足癣、阴部多汗组中实验组总有效率分别为83%、76%、86%,均明显高于对照组,差异均具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 止汗除湿散能有效地预防高温湿热条件下局部多汗及足癣.%Objective To observe the clinical effect of Zhihanchushi Powder on the localized hyperhidrosis and skin lesions in heat and humidity condition. Methods 550 military officers and soldiers in an unit were divided into 3 groups according to the foot sweating, genital organ sweating and tinea pedis. And these 3 groups were further divided into trial group and control group randomly. The trial group was provided with daily necessities plus Zhihanchushi Powder, while the control group used ordinary daily necessities. After 2 weeks, the hyperhidrosis areas were measured by the original seal record method, and the tinea pedis was microscopically examined and then subjected to germiculture. Results The trial group significantly improved after 2 weeks of continuous medication, compared with the control group. And the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusions The Zhihanchushi Powder can effectively prevent localized hyperhidrosis and tinea pedis.

  6. Pygmies, Giants, and Skins

    CERN Document Server

    Piekarewicz, J

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of neutron-rich matter is a central goal of nuclear physics that cuts across a variety of disciplines. Indeed, the limits of nuclear existence, the collision of energetic heavy ions, the structure of neutron stars, and the dynamics of core-collapse supernova all depend critically on the nuclear-matter EOS. In this contribution I focus on the EOS of cold baryonic matter with special emphasis on its impact on the structure, dynamics, and composition of neutron stars. In particular, I discuss how laboratory experiments on neutron skins as well as on Pygmy and Giant resonances can help us elucidate the structure of these fascinating objects.

  7. Repeated Nrf2 stimulation using sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Sherin T.; Bergström, Petra; Hammarsten, Ola, E-mail: ola.hammarsten@clinchem.gu.se

    2014-05-01

    Most of the cytotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation is mediated by radical-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Cellular protection from free radicals can be stimulated several fold by sulforaphane-mediated activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 that regulates more than 50 genes involved in the detoxification of reactive substances and radicals. Here, we report that repeated sulforaphane treatment increases radioresistance in primary human skin fibroblasts. Cells were either treated with sulforaphane for four hours once or with four-hour treatments repeatedly for three consecutive days prior to radiation exposure. Fibroblasts exposed to repeated-sulforaphane treatment showed a more pronounced dose-dependent induction of Nrf2-regulated mRNA and reduced amount of radiation-induced free radicals compared with cells treated once with sulforaphane. In addition, radiation- induced DNA double-strand breaks measured by gamma-H2AX foci were attenuated following repeated sulforaphane treatment. As a result, cellular protection from ionizing radiation measured by the 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) assay was increased, specifically in cells exposed to repeated sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane treatment was unable to protect Nrf2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, indicating that the sulforaphane-induced radioprotection was Nrf2-dependent. Moreover, radioprotection by repeated sulforaphane treatment was dose-dependent with an optimal effect at 10 uM, whereas both lower and higher concentrations resulted in lower levels of radioprotection. Our data indicate that the Nrf2 system can be trained to provide further protection from radical damage. - Highlights: • Repeated treatment with sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation • Repeated sulforaphane treatment attenuates radiation induced ROS and DNA damage • Sulforaphane mediated protection is Nrf2 dependent.

  8. Sulfate transport in toad skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Simonsen, K

    1988-01-01

    1. In short-circuited toad skin preparations exposed bilaterally to NaCl-Ringer's containing 1 mM SO2(-4), influx of sulfate was larger than efflux showing that the skin is capable of transporting sulfate actively in an inward direction. 2. This active transport was not abolished by substituting ...

  9. Pain-induced skin autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Odoardi, Francesca; Neuhuber, Winfried; Flügel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A recent paper published in Nature reports sensory nerve fibers in the skin that give local immune cells important instructions for the organization of an immune response; in this particular case the cooperation between the nervous and immune systems had disastrous consequences, namely an auto-destruction of the skin.

  10. Hereditary skin diseases of hemidesmosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkman, MF

    1999-01-01

    Studies of hereditary blistering skin diseases (epidermolysis bullosa) and targeted gene mutation experiments in knockout mice have greatly improved our understanding of hemidesmosomes and their associated structures in the cytoskeleton and basement membrane of the skin and mucous membranes. At leas

  11. Air Pollution and the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni eDrakaki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The increase of air pollution over the years has major effects on the human skin. The skin is exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR and environmental air pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, volatile organic compounds (VOCs, oxides, particulate matter (PM, ozone (O3 and cigarette smoke. Although human skin acts as a biological shield against pro-oxidative chemical and physical air pollutants, the prolonged or repetitive exposure to high levels of these pollutants may have profound negative effects on the skin. Exposure of the skin to air pollutants has been associated with skin aging and inflammatory or allergic skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis or acne, while skin cancer is among the most serious effects. On the other hand, some air pollutants (ie, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide and scattering particulates (clouds and soot in the troposphere reduce the effects of shorter wavelength UVR and significant reductions in UV irradiance have been observed in polluted urban areas.

  12. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complete chart of side effects. Side effects of Skin Cancer Treatment OrganSystem General Body • cTo ( i D rme ... scrilineesnr/ desbuaoocrnfettedhh) e( ersatkrrieena) tment HELPFUL WEBSITES ON SKIN CANCER TARG E T I NG C A NC ...

  13. Salvia plebeia suppresses atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Salvia plebeia R. Br. (Lamiaceae) has been used for folk medicines in Asian countries, including Korea and China, to treat skin inflammatory diseases and asthma. In this study, we investigated the effects of S. plebeia extract (SPE) on atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions and defined underlying mechanisms of action. We established an AD model in BALB/c mice by repeated local exposure of house dust mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to the ears. Repeated alternative treatment of DFE/DNCB caused AD-like skin lesions. The oral administration of SPE decreased AD symptoms based on ear thickness and histopathological analysis, in addition to serum IgE and IgG2a levels. SPE suppressed mast cell infiltration into the ear and serum histamine level. SPE inhibited Th1/Th2/Th17 phenotype CD4(+) T lymphocytes expansion in the lymph node and the expression of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines in the ear tissue. To define the underlying mechanisms of action, the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ activated human keratinocytes (HaCaT) model was used. SPE significantly suppressed the expression of cytokines and chemokines through the down-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-κB, and STAT1 in HaCaT cells. Taken together, our results suggest that SPE might be a candidate for the treatment of AD.

  14. Non-respiratory tuberculosis with Mycobacterium tuberculosis after penetrating lesions of the skin : five case histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JW; van Altena, R

    2000-01-01

    Tuberculosis is primarily transmitted from person to person via the respiratory route. We describe five cases of patients who developed tuberculosis at the site of a skin injury: three after being treated repeatedly with local corticosteroids via intramuscular injections, and two who cut themselves

  15. Non-respiratory tuberculosis with Mycobacterium tuberculosis after penetrating lesions of the skin : five case histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JW; van Altena, R

    2000-01-01

    Tuberculosis is primarily transmitted from person to person via the respiratory route. We describe five cases of patients who developed tuberculosis at the site of a skin injury: three after being treated repeatedly with local corticosteroids via intramuscular injections, and two who cut themselves

  16. Mechanistic effects of long-term ultraviolet B irradiation induce epidermal and dermal changes in human skin xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachiya, Akira; Sriwiriyanont, Penkanok; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Ohuchi, Atsushi; Kitahara, Takashi; Takema, Yoshinori; Kitzmiller, William J; Visscher, Marty O; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Boissy, Raymond E

    2009-02-01

    UVB irradiation has been reported to induce photoaging and suppress systemic immune function that could lead to photocarcinogenesis. However, because of the paucity of an UVB-induced photodamaged skin model, precise and temporal mechanism(s) underlying the deleterious effects of long-term UVB exposure on human skin have yet to be delineated. In this study, we established a model using human skin xenografted onto severe combined immunodeficient mice, which were subsequently challenged by repeated UVB irradiation for 6 weeks. Three-dimensional optical image analysis of skin replicas and noninvasive biophysical measurements illustrated a significant increase in skin surface roughness, similar to premature photoaging, and a significant loss of skin elasticity after long-term UVB exposure. Resembling authentically aged skin, UVB-exposed samples exhibited significant increases in epithelial keratins (K6, K16, K17), elastins, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-9, MMP-12) as well as degradation of collagens (I, IV, VII). The UVB-induced deterioration of fibrous keratin intermediate filaments was also observed in the stratum corneum. Additionally, similarities in gene expression patterns between our model and chronologically aged skin substantiated the plausible relationship between photodamage and chronological age. Furthermore, severe skin photodamage was observed when neutralizing antibodies against TIMP-1, an endogenous inhibitor of MMPs, were administered during the UVB exposure regimen. Taken together, these findings suggest that our skin xenograft model recapitulates premature photoaged skin and provides a comprehensive tool with which to assess the deleterious effects of UVB irradiation.

  17. Common skin conditions during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunzi, Marc; Gray, Gary R

    2007-01-15

    Common skin conditions during pregnancy generally can be separated into three categories: hormone-related, preexisting, and pregnancy-specific. Normal hormone changes during pregnancy may cause benign skin conditions including striae gravidarum (stretch marks); hyperpigmentation (e.g., melasma); and hair, nail, and vascular changes. Preexisting skin conditions (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, fungal infections, cutaneous tumors) may change during pregnancy. Pregnancy-specific skin conditions include pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy, prurigo of pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, pemphigoid gestationis, impetigo herpetiformis, and pruritic folliculitis of pregnancy. Pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy are the most common of these disorders. Most skin conditions resolve postpartum and only require symptomatic treatment. However, there are specific treatments for some conditions (e.g., melasma, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, impetigo herpetiformis, pruritic folliculitis of pregnancy). Antepartum surveillance is recommended for patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, impetigo herpetiformis, and pemphigoid gestationis.

  18. Microvascular blood flow and skin temperature changes in the fingers following a deep nspiratory gasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John; Frame, John R; Murray, Alan

    2002-05-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the changes in finger pulp skin temperature, laser Doppler flow (LDF, microvascular flux) and photoplethysmogram (PPG, microvascular blood volume pulsatility), induced by a deep inspiration in healthy subjects, and to investigate the repeatability of these responses within a measurement session and between measurement sessions on separate days. A system comprising an electronic thermometer, a laser Doppler flowmeter and a PPG amplifier measured simultaneous vasoconstrictor responses to a deep inspiratory gasp from three adjacent fingers of one hand. Clearly defined responses were obtained in 15 of the 17 subjects studied. Skin temperature fell in all of these subjects after each gasp, with a median fall of 0.089 degrees C (P < 0.001). The median value of LDF flux reduction was 93% (P < 0.001) indicating a momentary almost complete shut-down of microvascular blood flow; and PPG also showed a large response relative to pulse amplitude of 2.6 (P < 0.001). The median times for waveforms to reach their minimum were 4.6 s (PPG), 6.3 s (LDF) and 29.1 s (skin pulp temperature), with median delays between minima of LDF and PPG of 1.6 s (P < 0.001) and skin temperature and PPG of 23.5 s (P < 0.001). The vascular responses of skin temperature, LDF and PPG to an inspiratory gasp were repeatable, with temperature change repeatable to within 10% of the median subject change.

  19. Heat Related Illnesses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Carter III; Samuel N. Cheuvront; Michael N. Sawka

    2007-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Heat illnesses range in severity from mild (heat rash, heat syncope, cramps) to serious (heat exhaustion, heat injury, heat stroke). · Although heat illness can occur in anyone, an increased risk is associated with a variety of environmental factors, personal characteristics,health conditions, and medications.

  20. Geothermal district heating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budney, G. S.; Childs, F.

    1982-06-01

    Ten district heating demonstration projects and their present status are described. The projects are Klamath County YMCA, Susanville District Heating, Klamath Falls District Heating, Reno Salem Plaza Condominium, El Centro Community Center Heating/Cooling, Haakon School and Business District Heating, St. Mary's Hospital, Diamond Ring Ranch, Pagosa Springs District Heating, and Boise District Heating.

  1. The Moral Maturity of Repeater Delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronio, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Differences in moral development (as conceived by Kohlberg) were examined in a sample of delinquent teenagers. The repeater group was not found, as had been hypothesized, to be lower on moral maturity than those who engaged in less delinquency. (GC)

  2. Periostin in Skin Tissue Skin-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukie Yamaguchi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, periostin—a matricellular protein—has been highlighted for its pivotal functions in the skin. Analysis of periostin null mice has revealed that periostin contributes to collagen fibrillogenesis, collagen cross-linking, and the formation of ECM meshwork via interactions with other ECM components. Periostin expression is enhanced by mechanical stress or skin injury; this is indicative of the physiologically protective functions of periostin, which promotes wound repair by acting on keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Along with its physiological functions, periostin plays pathogenic roles in skin fibrosis and chronic allergic inflammation. In systemic sclerosis (SSc patients, periostin levels reflect the severity of skin fibrosis. Periostin null mice have shown reduced skin fibrosis in a bleomycin-induced SSc mouse model, indicating a key role of periostin in fibrosis. Moreover, in atopic dermatitis (AD, attenuated AD phenotype has been observed in periostin null mice in a house dust mite extract-induced AD mouse model. Th2 cytokine-induced periostin acts on keratinocytes to produce inflammatory cytokines that further enhance the Th2 response, thereby sustaining and amplifying chronic allergic inflammation. Thus, periostin is deeply involved in the pathogenesis of AD and other inflammation-related disorders affecting the skin. Understanding the dynamic actions of periostin would be key to dissecting pathogenesis of skin-related diseases and to developing novel therapeutic strategies.

  3. Dosimetry for Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy in Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Sung Sil; Loh, John J. K.; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-06-15

    Increasing frequency of skin cancer, mycosis fungoides, Kaposi sarcoma etc, it need to treatment dose planning for total skin electron beam (TSEB) therapy. Appropriate treatment planning for TSEB therapy is needed to give homogeneous dose distribution throughout the entire skin surface. The energy of 6 MeV electron from the 18 MeV medical linear accelerator was adapted for superficial total skin electron beam therapy. The energy of the electron beam was reduced to 4.2 MeV by a 0.5cmx90cmx180cm acryl screen placed in a feet front of the patient. Six dual field beam was adapted for total skin irradiation to encompass the entire body surface from head to toe simultaneously. The patients were treated behind the acryl screen plate acted as a beam scatterer and contained a parallel-plate shallow ion chamber for dosimetry and beam monitoring. During treatment, the patient was placed in six different positions due to be homogeneous dose distribution for whole skin around the body. One treatment session delivered 400 cGy to the entire skin surface and patients were treated twice a week for eight consecutive weeks, which is equivalent to TDF value 57. Instrumentation and techniques developed in determining the depth dose, dose distribution and bremsstrahlung dose are discussed.

  4. Laser speckle and skin cancer: skin roughness assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tim K.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey

    2009-10-01

    Incidence of skin cancer has been increasing rapidly since the last few decades. Non-invasive optical diagnostic tools may improve the diagnostic accuracy. In this paper, skin structure, skin cancer statistics and subtypes of skin cancer are briefly reviewed. Among the subtypes, malignant melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous; early detection dramatically improves the prognosis. Therefore, a non-invasive diagnostic tool for malignant melanoma is especially needed. In addition, in order for the diagnostic tool to be useful, it must be able to differentiate melanoma from common skin conditions such as seborrheic keratosis, a benign skin disease that resembles melanoma according to the well known clinical-assessment ABCD rule. The key diagnostic feature between these two diseases is surface roughness. Based on laser speckle contrast, our research team has recently developed a portable, optical, non-invasive, in-vivo diagnostic device for quantifying skin surface roughness. The methodology of our technique is described in details. Examining the preliminary data collected in a pilot clinical study for the prototype, we found that there was a difference in roughness between melanoma and seborrheic keratosis. In fact, there was a perfect cutoff value for the two diseases based on our initial data.

  5. Skin protection in the prevention of skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Occupational skin diseases comprise a wide spectrum of conditions. Under epidemiological aspects, occupational contact dermatitis that is usually manifested on the hands is the most frequent occupational skin disease with an estimated average incidence rate of 0.7-1.5 cases per 1,000 workers per year. Irritant dermatitis is due to individual susceptibility and the exposure to irritants such as wet work combined with detergents or other hydrophilic irritants or solvents at the workplace. Chronic irritant dermatitis is a risk factor for delayed-type sensitization and subsequently allergic contact dermatitis. It is therefore the prevention of chronic or cumulative irritant dermatitis that is the decisive factor in the prevention of occupational skin disease. Within prevention programs at the workplace, skin protection plays an important, but limited role. Others are technical and organizational means to avoid or reduce skin exposure to irritants and allergens. Educational measures to increase the awareness of workers for workplace hazards and to motivate them to use skin protection measures appropriately are just as important as the careful selection of skin protection materials.

  6. Use of optical skin phantoms for calibration of dermatological lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Sekowska, A.; Marchwiński, M.; Galla, S.; Cenian, A.

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of dermatological diseases can be efficiently treated using laser heating. Nevertheless, before the new laser is introduced into clinical practice, its parameters and ability to interact with human skin have to be carefully examined. In order to do that optical skin phantoms can be used. Such phantoms closely imitate the scattering and absorption properties of real human skin tissue along with its thermal properties, such as capacitance and conductivity specific heat. We have fabricated a range of optical tissue phantoms based on polyvinylchloride-plastisol PVC-P with varying optical properties, including the absorption, scattering and density of the matrix material. We have utilized a pre-clinical dermatological laser system with a 975 nm diode laser module. A range of laser settings were tested, such as laser pulse duration, laser power and number of pulses. We have studied laser irradiation efficiency on fabricated optical tissue phantoms. Measurements of the temporal and spatial temperature distribution on the phantoms' surface were performed using thermographic imaging. The comparison of results between tissues' and phantoms' optical and thermal response prove that they can be used for approximate evaluation of laser heating efficiency. This study presents a viable approach for calibration of dermatological lasers which can be utilized in practice.

  7. Star repeaters for fiber optic links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, D H; Gravel, R L

    1977-02-01

    A star repeater combines the functions of a passive star coupler and a signal regenerating amplifier. By more effectively utilizing the light power radiated by a light emitting diode, the star repeater can, when used with small diameter channels, couple as much power to all receivers of a multiterminal link as would be coupled to the single receiver of a simple point-to-point link.

  8. Survey of skin pigmentation of yellow-skinned broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirri, F; Petracci, M; Bianchi, M; Meluzzi, A

    2010-07-01

    The appearance of whole carcass and skin-on cut-up products is an important attribute that deeply affects the consumer's choice. Skin pigmentation is affected mainly by genetics, concentration and dietary source of pigments, health status of the birds, and scalding-plucking conditions during slaughtering, although other factors might play an important role. Retailers request batches of broiler chicken carcasses characterized by uniform skin pigmentation to be sold as whole carcass or parts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability of skin color of yellow-skinned broilers reared under intensive conditions. For the study, a total of 2,300 medium size broiler chickens (2,300 to 2,500 g of live weight) from 23 flocks (100 birds/flock; n = 12 flocks of males and n = 11 flocks of females; n = 12 flocks of Ross 508 and n = 11 flocks of Ross 308) were randomly selected in a single slaughterhouse. The color measurements were carried out on both breast and thigh pterylae as well as on shank skin adopting the L* a* b* system and using a Minolta colorimeter CR 300. The overall range in measured yellowness (b*) was fairly large for all skin color measurement positions. For breast, a mean value of 22.77 (SD = 5.12) was observed, with values ranging from 7.45 to 39.12. Average values of thigh and shank were 20.23 (SD = 5.02; range 1.99 to 37.82) and 53.99 (SD = 8.13; range 24.22 to 78.65), respectively. A higher skin yellowness was observed in females in all body parts as well as in Ross 308. Yellowness values of breast and thigh were significantly correlated (r = 0.85; P < 0.01), suggesting that the color evaluation may be carried out only on one measurement position of the skin.

  9. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors.

  10. Quantum Key Distribution over Probabilistic Quantum Repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Amirloo, Jeyran; Majedi, A Hamed

    2010-01-01

    A feasible route towards implementing long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) systems relies on probabilistic schemes for entanglement distribution and swapping as proposed in the work of Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) [Nature 414, 413 (2001)]. Here, we calculate the conditional throughput and fidelity of entanglement for DLCZ quantum repeaters, by accounting for the DLCZ self-purification property, in the presence of multiple excitations in the ensemble memories as well as loss and other sources of inefficiency in the channel and measurement modules. We then use our results to find the generation rate of secure key bits for QKD systems that rely on DLCZ quantum repeaters. We compare the key generation rate per logical memory employed in the two cases of with and without a repeater node. We find the cross-over distance beyond which the repeater system outperforms the non-repeater one. That provides us with the optimum inter-node distancing in quantum repeater systems. We also find the optimal exci...

  11. Remarkable selective constraints on exonic dinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2014-09-01

    Long dinucleotide repeats found in exons present a substantial mutational hazard: mutations at these loci occur often and generate frameshifts. Here, we provide clear and compelling evidence that exonic dinucleotides experience strong selective constraint. In humans, only 18 exonic dinucleotides have repeat lengths greater than six, which contrasts sharply with the genome-wide distribution of dinucleotides. We genotyped each of these dinucleotides in 200 humans from eight 1000 Genomes Project populations and found a near-absence of polymorphism. More remarkably, divergence data demonstrate that repeat lengths have been conserved across the primate phylogeny in spite of what is likely considerable mutational pressure. Coalescent simulations show that even a very low mutation rate at these loci fails to explain the anomalous patterns of polymorphism and divergence. Our data support two related selective constraints on the evolution of exonic dinucleotides: a short-term intolerance for any change to repeat length and a long-term prevention of increases to repeat length. In general, our results implicate purifying selection as the force that eliminates new, deleterious mutants at exonic dinucleotides. We briefly discuss the evolution of the longest exonic dinucleotide in the human genome--a 10 x CA repeat in fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1)--that should possess a considerably greater mutation rate than any other exonic dinucleotide and therefore generate a large number of deleterious variants. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Dynamic combinatorial libraries of artificial repeat proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Margarita; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2013-06-15

    Repeat proteins are found in almost all cellular systems, where they are involved in diverse molecular recognition processes. Recent studies have suggested that de novo designed repeat proteins may serve as universal binders, and might potentially be used as practical alternative to antibodies. We describe here a novel chemical methodology for producing small libraries of repeat proteins, and screening in parallel the ligand binding of library members. The first stage of this research involved the total synthesis of a consensus-based three-repeat tetratricopeptide (TPR) protein (~14 kDa), via sequential attachment of the respective peptides. Despite the effectiveness of the synthesis and ligation steps, this method was found to be too demanding for the production of proteins containing variable number of repeats. Additionally, the analysis of binding of the individual proteins was time consuming. Therefore, we designed and prepared novel dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs), and show that their equilibration can facilitate the formation of TPR proteins containing up to eight repeating units. Interestingly, equilibration of the library building blocks in the presence of the biologically relevant ligands, Hsp90 and Hsp70, induced their oligomerization into forming more of the proteins with large recognition surfaces. We suggest that this work presents a novel simple and rapid tool for the simultaneous screening of protein mixtures with variable binding surfaces, and for identifying new binders for ligands of interest.

  13. Skin Exposures & Effects in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH SKIN EXPOSURES & EFFECTS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... currently lacking for measuring and assessing skin exposures. Skin Notation (SK) Profiles NIOSH has developed a strategy ...

  14. Significant damage of the skin and hair following hair bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Mi-Sook; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Won-Ji; Kim, Seong-Jin; Lee, Ki-Young

    2010-10-01

    Scalp burns can be caused by hair bleaching with excess procedures such as unnecessary heating and excessive treatment with bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological and histological changes of the hair and skin after bleaching. Ammonium persulfate and hydrogen peroxide (6% or 9%) solution mixed at a ratio of 1:2 (weight ratio) were sufficiently applied to human hairs and rat skin. The bleached hairs were brightened up to yellow by increasing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and time of bleach treatment. After bleaching, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe that the cuticle scales of the hairs were irregular and lifted. The mechanical properties of the bleached hairs, such as tensile strength and elongation, were slightly different than the untreated hairs. The tested rat skin showed severe swelling after treatment of the bleaching agent (9% hydrogen peroxide). The rat skin bleached with 9% hydrogen peroxide exhibited epidermal thinning and subepidermal vesicle formation. The extracellular matrix of the skin was seriously disrupted after bleaching. Therefore, the use of only suitable bleaching procedures is suggested in order to avoid injuries. © 2010 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  15. Development and coupling analysis of active skin antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinzhu; Huang, Jin; He, Qingqang; Tang, Baofu; Song, Liwei

    2017-02-01

    An active skin antenna is a multifunctional composite structure that can provide load-bearing structure and steerable beam pointing functions, and is usually installed in the structural surface of aircraft, warships, and armored vehicles. This paper presents an innovative design of the active skin antenna, which consists of a package layer, control and signal processing layer, and RF (radio frequency) layer. The RF layer is fabricated by low temperature co-fired ceramics, with 64 microstrip antenna elements, tile transmitting and receiving modules, microchannel heat sinks, and feeding networks integrated into a functional block 2.8 mm thick. In this paper, a full-sized prototype of an active skin antenna was designed, fabricated, and tested. Moreover, a coupling analysis method was presented to evaluate the mechanical and electromagnetic performance of the active skin antenna subjected to aerodynamic loads. A deformed experimental system was built to validate the effectiveness of the coupling analysis method, which was also implemented to evaluate the performance of the active skin antenna when subjected to aerodynamic pressure. The fabricated specimen demonstrated structural configuration feasibility, and superior environmental load resistance.

  16. minSKIN Does a multifaceted intervention improve the competence in the diagnosis of skin cancer by general practitioners? Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandjung Ryan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Switzerland, skin cancer is one of the most common neoplasms. Melanoma is the most aggressive one and can be lethal if not detected and removed on time. Nonmelanoma skin cancer is more frequent as melanoma; it is seldom lethal but can disfigure patients in advanced stages. General practitioners (GPs are often faced with suspicious skin lesions of their patients. Methods/Design Design: Randomised controlled trial (RCT. Population: 60 GPs, randomised into intervention group and control group. Intervention: GPs get a Lumio loupe, a digital camera and continuous feedback based on pictures of skin lesions they send to the Dermatologist. Primary outcome: Competence in the diagnosis of skin cancer by GPs, measured as the percentage of correctly classified pictures of skin lesions. Measurements: At baseline, and prior to any intervention (T0, GPs will be asked to rate 36 pictures of skin lesions according to their likelihood of malignancy on a visual analogue scale (VAS. After a full day training course with both groups (T1 and after one year of continuous feedback (T2 with the intervention group, we will repeat the picture scoring session with both groups, using new pictures. Discussion We want to determine whether a multifaceted intervention (including technical equipment and a continuous feedback on skin lesions leads to an improved competence in the diagnosis of skin cancer by GPs. This study addresses the hypothesis that an additional feedback loop, based on pictures performed in daily practice by GPs is superior to a simple educational intervention regarding diagnostic competence. We expect an improvement of the competence in skin cancer diagnosis by GPs in both groups after the full day training course. Beside this immediate effect, we also expect a long term effect in the intervention group because of the continuous problem based feedback. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN29854485

  17. Procedure of Forecasting Operational and Extremal State of Critical Systems of the Rocket Technique Under Repeated Thermo-Force Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko Yu.M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model for investigation of the thermoelastoplastic stress-strain state and the strength of the rocket technique systems under the repeated starting is proposed. The thermal conductivity equation and constitutive equations of thermoplasticity for the repeated elastic-plastic deformation processes of isotropic materials along small-curvature paths, the strength and low-cyclic fatigue criteria, numerical methods for solving the boundary-value heat conduction problems and corresponding computer software are used.

  18. The use of the diffusion approximation for simulating radiation and thermal processes in the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtanyuk, A. E.; Grenkin, G. V.; Chebotarev, A. Yu.

    2017-08-01

    Radiation and thermal processes in skin exposed to solar radiation are simulated based on the diffusion model of radiative-conductive heat exchange. Using the model proposed for the parameters corresponding to radiation with a wavelength of 800 nm, the contributions of thermal radiation induced by the skin and the reflection and refraction effects are estimated, and the photoprotective properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2) when introduced into the stratum corneum are studied.

  19. Heat-Killed Enterococcus faecalis EF-2001 Ameliorates Atopic Dermatitis in a Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ju Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have shown the immunomodulatory effect of heat-killed lactic acid bacteria. Atopic dermatitis (AD is an allergic skin disease, caused by immune dysregulation among other factors. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of heat-killed Enterococcus faecalis EF-2001 (EF-2001 on AD. We established an in vivo AD model by repeated local exposure of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE; house dust mite extract and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB to the ears of mice. After oral administration of EF-2001 for four weeks, the epidermal and dermal ear thickness, mast cell infiltration, and serum immunoglobulin levels were measured. In addition, the gene expression levels of pathogenic cytokines in the ears, lymph nodes, and splenocytes were assayed. EF-2001 attenuated AD symptoms based on the ear thickness, histopathological analysis, and serum immunoglobulin levels. Moreover, EF-2001 decreased the DFE/DNCB-induced expression of various pathogenic cytokines in the ears, lymph nodes, and splenocytes. These results suggest that EF-2001 has therapeutic potential in the treatment of AD owing to its immunomodulatory effects.

  20. Age-related skin changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božanić Snežana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related skin changes can be induced by chronological ageing, manifested in subcutaneous fat reduction, and photo-ageing eliciting increased elastotic substance in the upper dermis, destruction of its fibrilar structure, augmented intercellular substance and moderate inflammatory infiltrate. Forty-five biopsy skin samples of the sun-exposed and sun-protected skin were analyzed. The patients were both males and females, aged from 17 to 81 years. The thickness of the epidermal layers and the number of cellular living layers is greater in younger skin. The amount of keratohyaline granules is enlarged in older skin. Dermoepidermal junction is flattened and the presence of elastotic material in the dermis is pronounced with age. The amount of inflammatory infiltrate is increased, the fibrous trabeculae are thickened in older skin and the atrophy of the hypodermis is observed. Chronological ageing alters the fibroblasts metabolism by reducing their life span, capacity to divide and produce collagen. During ageing, the enlargement of collagen fibrils diminishes the skin elasticity.