WorldWideScience

Sample records for repeated short sprints

  1. The effect of a short practical warm-up protocol on repeated sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jonathan M; Weston, Matthew; Portas, Matthew D

    2013-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of a short, practical, 2-phase warm-up on repeated sprint performance when compared with more traditional warm-up protocols that contain stretching activities. Eleven subelite male soccer players completed a warm-up protocol that commenced with 5 minutes jogging at approximately 65% of maximal heart rate, followed by no stretching, static stretching, or dynamic stretching and finishing with a task-specific high-intensity activity. Using a crossover design, the 3 warm-up protocols were performed in a counterbalanced order with at least 48 hours between sessions. Repeated sprint performance was measured using a repeated sprint test that consisted of 6 × 40-m maximal sprints interspersed with a 20-second recovery. There were trivial differences in mean sprint time (0.2%) and posttest blood lactate (3.1%) between the 2-phase warm-up and the 3-phase warm-up that included dynamic stretching, whereas the short warm-up had a possibly detrimental effect on fastest sprint time (0.7%). Fastest (-1.1%) and mean (-1.2%) sprint times were quicker and posttest blood lactates were higher (13.2%) after the 2-phase warm-up when compared with the 3-phase warm-up that included static stretching. Although it is not harmful to complete a traditional 3-phase warm-up that includes dynamic stretching, it appears practical for athletes preparing for activities dependent on repeated sprint ability to complete a 2-phase warm-up consisting of a cardiovascular and specific high-intensity activity.

  2. Short- or long-rest intervals during repeated-sprint training in soccer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaia, F Marcello; Fiorenza, Matteo; Larghi, Luca; Alberti, Giampietro; Millet, Grégoire P; Girard, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of two repeated-sprint training (RST) programs, differing in duration of the between-sprint rest intervals, on various soccer-related exercise performances. For 5 weeks during the competitive season, twenty-nine young trained male soccer players either replaced two of their habitual fitness conditioning sessions with RST characterized by short (5-15; n = 9) or long (5-30; n = 10) rest intervals, or served as control (n = 10). The 5-15 and 5-30 protocols consisted of 6 repetitions of 30-m (~5 s) straight-line sprints interspersed with 15 s or 30 s of passive recovery, respectively. 5-15 improved 200-m sprint time (2.0±1.5%; psprint performance, whereas 5-30 lowered the 20-m sprint time (2.7±1.6%; psprint performance. The distance covered during the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 2 increased following 5-15 (11.4±5.0%; prepeated-sprint ability test were possibly greater following 5-30 (3.6±0.9%; prepeated-sprint ability test as well as in blood lactate concentration during submaximal exercise (17-18%). No changes occurred in the control group. In soccer players, RST over a 5-week in-season period is an efficient means to simultaneously develop different components of fitness relevant to match performance, with different benefits induced by shorter compared to longer rest intervals.

  3. The relationship between short- and long-distance swimming performance and repeated sprint ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckel, Yoav; Bishop, David J; Rabinovich, Moran; Kaufman, Leonid; Nemet, Dan; Eliakim, Alon

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine indices of repeated sprint ability (RSA) during a repeated sprint swimming test (RST), to compare these with previous similar running and cycling RST, and to correlate these indices with the best short (100 m, as an index of anaerobic performance) and long (2,000 m, as an index of aerobic performance) distance swimming times in 20 elite, national team level, male swimmers. Indices of RSA included the ideal sprint time (IS), the total sprint time (TS), and the performance decrement (PD) recorded during an 8 × 15-m swimming RST. The PD during the present swimming RST (4.7 ± 2.3%) was similar to that in previous running or cycling RSTs. However, the physiological responses after the swimming RST (heart rate 168 ± 7 b·min(-1) and blood lactate concentration 5.5 ± 2.0 mmol·L(-1)) were lower than typical responses after running or cycling RSTs. There was no significant relationship between any of the RST performance indices and either the 100-m or 2,000-m swimming results. Multiple regression analysis indicated that the 3 RST indices (IS, TS, and PD), contributed 36% of the variance of the 2,000-m, but not the 100-m, swimming time. A strong correlation was found between the 100- and 2,000-m swim times (r = 0.74, p 100- and 2,000-m swim times is unique for swimming.

  4. Short- or long-rest intervals during repeated-sprint training in soccer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaia, F. Marcello; Fiorenza, Matteo; Larghi, Luca; Alberti, Giampietro; Millet, Grégoire P.; Girard, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of two repeated-sprint training (RST) programs, differing in duration of the between-sprint rest intervals, on various soccer-related exercise performances. For 5 weeks during the competitive season, twenty-nine young trained male soccer players either replaced two of their habitual fitness conditioning sessions with RST characterized by short (5–15; n = 9) or long (5–30; n = 10) rest intervals, or served as control (n = 10). The 5–15 and 5–30 protocols consisted of 6 repetitions of 30-m (~5 s) straight-line sprints interspersed with 15 s or 30 s of passive recovery, respectively. 5–15 improved 200-m sprint time (2.0±1.5%; psoccer players, RST over a 5-week in-season period is an efficient means to simultaneously develop different components of fitness relevant to match performance, with different benefits induced by shorter compared to longer rest intervals. PMID:28199402

  5. Effects of a Ten Week Training Programme on Repeated Short Sprints among Football Referees of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam Nathan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate whether a ten week training programme would improve repeated short sprints of football referees in Malaysia. Sixty national football referees were randomly assigned into 3 groups (n=20 namely the control group, experimental one and experimental two. Experimental one followed a 10 week training programme (duration of training 4 days in a week, each session=90 minutes and time 5 pm supervised by a physical education lecturer and his assistants. Experimental two reported for training at a different venue and trained on their own (duration, frequency and time as for experimental one. Pre-test and post-test results were used to determine whether there was an improvement. SPANOVA results rejected the null hypothesis [F (2, 57 =75.86 p<0.05].  Pillai’s Trace indicated there was a significant difference between pre-test and post-test results and significant interaction effect. Tukey Pair Wise Comparison indicated best performance by experimental one and the control group the poorest. The results indicated that the training programme was acceptable.

  6. Repeated sprint ability but not neuromuscular fatigue is dependent on short versus long duration recovery time between sprints in healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, Michael R; Compton, Chris T; Yetman, Joseph D; Power, Kevin E; Button, Duane C

    2017-06-01

    During maximal intensity leg cycling sprints, previous research has shown that central and peripheral fatigue development occurs with various (sprints. The aim of the current study was to compare the development of neuromuscular fatigue during maximal intensity lower-body sprints interspersed with short and longer duration recovery periods. Crossover study. Ten participants completed 10, 10s sprints interspersed with either 30 or 180s of recovery. Peak power outputs were measured for each sprint. Maximal force, voluntary activation (VA) and evoked contractile properties of the knee extensors were measured at pre-sprint 1, post-sprint 5 and post-sprint 10. Perceived pain was also measured immediately following each sprint. Peak power output was significantly lower by 16.1±4.2% (psprint 10 with 30 compared to 180s of recovery. Irrespective of recovery time, maximal force, VA and potentiated twitch force decreased by 26.7±7.2% (psprint 1 to post-sprint 10. MVC and PT decreased by 17±4% (psprint 1 to post-sprint 5. Although decreases in peak power and increases in perceived pain were greater when sprints were interspersed with 30 compared to 180s of recovery, the development of neuromuscular fatigue of the knee extensors was similar. The results illustrate that peripheral fatigue developed early whereas central fatigue developed later in the sprint protocol, however the effect of recovery time on neuromuscular fatigue could be task specific. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving repeated sprint ability in young elite soccer players: repeated shuttle sprints vs. explosive strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Delhomel, Gregory; Brughelli, Matt; Ahmaidi, Said

    2010-10-01

    To compare the effects of explosive strength (ExpS) vs. repeated shuttle sprint (RS) training on repeated sprint ability (RSA) in young elite soccer players, 15 elite male adolescents (14.5 ± 0.5 years) performed, in addition to their soccer training program, RS (n = 7) or ExpS (n = 8) training once a week for a total of 10 weeks. RS training consisted of 2-3 sets of 5-6 × 15- to 20-m repeated shuttle sprints interspersed with 14 seconds of passive or 23 seconds of active recovery (≈2 m·s⁻¹); ExpS training consisted of 4-6 series of 4-6 exercises (e.g., maximal unilateral countermovement jumps (CMJs), calf and squat plyometric jumps, and short sprints). Before and after training, performance was assessed by 10 and 30 m (10 and 30 m) sprint times, best (RSAbest) and mean (RSAmean) times on a repeated shuttle sprint ability test, a CMJ, and a hopping (Hop) test. After training, except for 10 m (p = 0.22), all performances were significantly improved in both groups (all p's repeated shuttle sprint test were only observed after RS training, whereas CMJ height was only increased after ExpS. Because RS and ExpS were equally efficient at enhancing maximal sprinting speed, RS training-induced improvements in RSA were likely more related to progresses in the ability to change direction.

  8. Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Harvey M; Cooke, Karl; Sumners, David P; Mileva, Katya N; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-12-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) is a critical success factor for intermittent sport performance. Repeated sprint training has been shown to improve RSA, we hypothesised that hypoxia would augment these training adaptations. Thirty male well-trained academy rugby union and rugby league players (18.4 ± 1.5 years, 1.83 ± 0.07 m, 88.1 ± 8.9 kg) participated in this single-blind repeated sprint training study. Participants completed 12 sessions of repeated sprint training (10 × 6 s, 30 s recovery) over 4 weeks in either hypoxia (13% FiO₂) or normoxia (21% FiO₂). Pretraining and post-training, participants completed sports specific endurance and sprint field tests and a 10 × 6 s RSA test on a non-motorised treadmill while measuring speed, heart rate, capillary blood lactate, muscle and cerebral deoxygenation and respiratory measures. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test performance improved after RS training in both groups, but gains were significantly greater in the hypoxic (33 ± 12%) than the normoxic group (14 ± 10%, prepeated aerobic high intensity workout than an equivalent normoxic training. Performance gains are evident in the short term (4 weeks), a period similar to a preseason training block.

  9. SHORT DURATIONS OF STATIC STRETCHING WHEN COMBINED WITH DYNAMIC STRETCHING DO NOT IMPAIR REPEATED SPRINTS AND AGILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del P. Wong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA and change of direction (COD. Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s. Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total. Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p < 0.001. However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (< 90 s static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments

  10. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Del P.; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Behm, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key points The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. PMID:24149890

  11. Oxygen uptake during repeated-sprint exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGawley, Kerry; Bishop, David J

    2015-03-01

    Repeated-sprint ability appears to be influenced by oxidative metabolism, with reductions in fatigue and improved sprint times related to markers of aerobic fitness. The aim of the current study was to measure the oxygen uptake (VO₂) during the first and last sprints during two, 5 × 6-s repeated-sprint bouts. Cross-sectional study. Eight female soccer players performed two, consecutive, 5 × 6-s maximal sprint bouts (B1 and B2) on five separate occasions, in order to identify the minimum time (trec) required to recover total work done (Wtot) in B1. On a sixth occasion, expired air was collected during the first and last sprint of B1 and B2, which were separated by trec. The trec was 10.9 ± 1.1 min. The VO₂ during the first sprint was significantly less than the last sprint in each bout (psprint (measured in kJ) was significantly related to VO₂max in both B1 (r=0.81, p=0.015) and B2 (r=0.93, p=0.001). In addition, the VO₂ attained in the final sprint was not significantly different from VO₂max in B1 (p=0.284) or B2 (p=0.448). The current study shows that the VO₂ increases from the first to the last of 5 × 6-s sprints and that VO₂max may be a limiting factor to performance in latter sprints. Increasing V˙O₂max in team-sport athletes may enable increased aerobic energy delivery, and consequently work done, during a bout of repeated sprints. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Repeated-sprint ability and aerobic fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, Nicolas; Léger, Luc A; Passelergue, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to reinvestigate the relationship between aerobic fitness and fatigue indices of repeated-sprint ability (RSA), with special attention to methodological normalization. Soldiers were divided into low (n = 10) and high (n = 9) fitness groups according to a preset maximal aerobic speed (MAS) of 17 km·h(-1) (∼60 ml O2·kg(-1)·min) measured with the University of Montreal Track Test (UMTT). Subjects' assessment included the RSA test (3 sets of 5 40-m sprints with 1-minute rest between sprints and 1.5 minutes between sets), a 40-m sprint (criterion test used in the computation of fatigue indices for the RSA test), strength and power measurement of the lower limbs, and the 20-m shuttle run test (20-m SRT) and the UMTT, which are measures of maximal aerobic power. The highest correlation with the RSA fatigue indices was obtained with the 20-m SRT (r = 0.90, p = 0.0001, n = 19), a test with 180° direction changes and accelerations and decelerations. The lower correlation (r = 0.66, p repeated sprints and achieved better recovery between series. A MAS of at least 17 km·h(-1) favors constant and high speed level during repeated sprints. From a practical point of view, a high aerobic fitness is a precious asset in counteracting fatigue in sports with numerous sprint repetitions.

  13. Intermittent endurance and repeated sprint ability in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouachi, Anis; Manzi, Vincenzo; Wong, Del P; Chaalali, Anis; Laurencelle, Louis; Chamari, Karim; Castagna, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The ability to perform high-intensity intermittent exercise (i.e., Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test [Yo-Yo IR1]) and to repeat sprints with relatively short recovery times (i.e., 20- to 30-seconds, relatively short time interval [repeated sprint ability (RSA)]) has been shown to be relevant fitness variables in soccer. However, though they potentially share common features, it is not known whether these 2 abilities are associated. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between Yo-Yo IR1 and RSA performances in elite soccer players. Twenty-three soccer players (age 19 ± 1 years, height 181 ± 5.7 cm, body mass 73.2 ± 4.1 kg, %body fat 11 ± 2.4) performed the Yo-Yo IR1 and a test for RSA (7 × 30 m with 25-second recovery). Results were 2,289 ± 409 m, 31.21 ± 1.13 seconds, and 4 ± 2.1% for Yo-Yo IR1, total sprint time, and sprint decrement, respectively. Yo-Yo IR1 showed a significant and moderate relationship with sprint decrement (r² = -0.44, p = 0.04). Splitting the sample into Best and Worst Yo-Yo IR1 performers according to median score (2,320 m), the Best group showed lower RSA total time (30.69 ± 0.99 vs. 31.79 ± 1.06, p Sprint-time deterioration over 30 m occurred earlier (from the second sprint on) in the Yo-YoWorst compared with in the Yo-YoBest group (from the fourth sprint on, p sprint bouts.

  14. Repeated-sprint ability - part II: recommendations for training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, David; Girard, Olivier; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto

    2011-09-01

    Short-duration sprints, interspersed with brief recoveries, are common during most team sports. The ability to produce the best possible average sprint performance over a series of sprints (≤10 seconds), separated by short (≤60 seconds) recovery periods has been termed repeated-sprint ability (RSA). RSA is therefore an important fitness requirement of team-sport athletes, and it is important to better understand training strategies that can improve this fitness component. Surprisingly, however, there has been little research about the best training methods to improve RSA. In the absence of strong scientific evidence, two principal training theories have emerged. One is based on the concept of training specificity and maintains that the best way to train RSA is to perform repeated sprints. The second proposes that training interventions that target the main factors limiting RSA may be a more effective approach. The aim of this review (Part II) is to critically analyse training strategies to improve both RSA and the underlying factors responsible for fatigue during repeated sprints (see Part I of the preceding companion article). This review has highlighted that there is not one type of training that can be recommended to best improve RSA and all of the factors believed to be responsible for performance decrements during repeated-sprint tasks. This is not surprising, as RSA is a complex fitness component that depends on both metabolic (e.g. oxidative capacity, phosphocreatine recovery and H+ buffering) and neural factors (e.g. muscle activation and recruitment strategies) among others. While different training strategies can be used in order to improve each of these potential limiting factors, and in turn RSA, two key recommendations emerge from this review; it is important to include (i) some training to improve single-sprint performance (e.g. 'traditional' sprint training and strength/power training); and (ii) some high-intensity (80-90% maximal oxygen

  15. Repeated-sprint ability - part I: factors contributing to fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Bishop, David

    2011-08-01

    Short-duration sprints (ability to recover and to reproduce performance in subsequent sprints is probably an important fitness requirement of athletes engaged in these disciplines, and has been termed repeated-sprint ability (RSA). This review (Part I) examines how fatigue manifests during repeated-sprint exercise (RSE), and discusses the potential underpinning muscular and neural mechanisms. A subsequent companion review to this article will explain a better understanding of the training interventions that could eventually improve RSA. Using laboratory and field-based protocols, performance analyses have consistently shown that fatigue during RSE typically manifests as a decline in maximal/mean sprint speed (i.e. running) or a decrease in peak power or total work (i.e. cycling) over sprint repetitions. A consistent result among these studies is that performance decrements (i.e. fatigue) during successive bouts are inversely correlated to initial sprint performance. To date, there is no doubt that the details of the task (e.g. changes in the nature of the work/recovery bouts) alter the time course/magnitude of fatigue development during RSE (i.e. task dependency) and potentially the contribution of the underlying mechanisms. At the muscle level, limitations in energy supply, which include energy available from phosphocreatine hydrolysis, anaerobic glycolysis and oxidative metabolism, and the intramuscular accumulation of metabolic by-products, such as hydrogen ions, emerge as key factors responsible for fatigue. Although not as extensively studied, the use of surface electromyography techniques has revealed that failure to fully activate the contracting musculature and/or changes in inter-muscle recruitment strategies (i.e. neural factors) are also associated with fatigue outcomes. Pending confirmatory research, other factors such as stiffness regulation, hypoglycaemia, muscle damage and hostile environments (e.g. heat, hypoxia) are also likely to compromise

  16. Aerobic Capacity is Related to Repeated Sprint Ability with Sprint Distances Less Than 40 Meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Gabriel J; Turner, Zachary; Boos, Brian; Peacock, Corey A; Peveler, Willard; Lipping, Alar

    2017-01-01

    Research is inconclusive regarding the association between aerobic fitness (objectively measured VO2max) and repeated sprint performance when the sprints are less than 40 meters. Soccer athletes must be able to repeat sprints without significant decreases in speed and strength and conditioning coaches need to better understand if aerobic fitness is related to repeated sprint ability (RSA). Twenty (10 male, 10 female) Division I soccer athletes first completed a graded maximal treadmill test to measure VO2max. Then on a separate day, athletes completed the RSA test. The RSA test consisted of 10, 30-meter sprints which athletes repeated every 30 seconds. There were significant negative correlations (r ≤ -0.69, P sprint times and average sprint time. More aerobically fit Division I soccer athletes were faster at all time points during the RSA test. Aerobic fitness is associated with faster sprint times during a more anaerobic RSA test when sprint distances are less than 40 meters.

  17. Repeated-sprint ability and team selection in Australian football league players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rossignol, Peter; Gabbett, Tim J; Comerford, Dan; Stanton, Warren R

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between selected physical capacities and repeated-sprint performance of Australian Football League (AFL) players and to determine which physical capacities contributed to being selected for the first competition game. Sum of skinfolds, 40-m sprint (with 10-, 20-, 30-, and 40-m splits), repeated-sprint ability (6 × 30-m sprints), and 3-km-run time were measured during the preseason in 20 AFL players. The physical qualities of players selected to play the first match of the season and those not selected were compared. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationship among variables, and a regression analysis identified variables significantly related to repeated-sprint performance. In the regression analysis, maximum velocity was the best predictor of repeated-sprint time, with 3-km-run time also contributing significantly to the predictive model. Sum of skinfolds was significantly correlated with 10-m (r = .61, P sprint times. A 2.6% ± 2.1% difference in repeated-sprint time (P repeated-sprint performance in AFL players than short 10- to 20-m intervals from standing starts. Further research is warranted to establish the relative importance of endurance training for improving repeated-sprint performance in AFL football.

  18. Repeated-sprint and effort ability in rugby league players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Rich D; Gabbett, Tim J

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to (a) investigate the influence of tackling on repeated-sprint performance; (b) determine whether repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and repeated-effort ability (REA) are 2 distinct qualities; and (c) assess the test-retest reliability of repeated-sprint and repeated-effort tests in rugby league. Twelve rugby league players performed a repeated-sprint (12 × 20-m sprints performed on a 20-second cycle) and a repeated-effort (12 × 20-m sprints with intermittent tackling, performed on a 20-second cycle) test 7 days apart. The test-retest reliability of these tests was also established. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were recorded throughout the tests. There was a significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) and large effect size (ES) differences for total sprint time (ES = 1.19), average heart rate (ES = 1.64), peak heart rate (ES = 1.35), and perceived exertion (ES = 3.39) for the repeated-effort test compared with the repeated-sprint test. A large difference (ES = 1.02, p = 0.06) was detected for percentage decrement between the 2 tests. No significant relationship was found between the repeated-sprint and repeated-effort tests for any of the dependent variables. Both tests proved reliable, with total sprint time being the most reliable method of assessing performance. This study demonstrates that the addition of tackling significantly increases the physiological response to repeated-sprint exercise and reduces repeated-sprint performance in rugby league players. Furthermore, RSA and REA appear to be 2 distinct qualities that can be reliably assessed with total time being the most reliable measure of performance.

  19. Reliability characteristics and applicability of a repeated sprint ability test in male young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Carlo; Francini, Lorenzo; Krustrup, Peter; Fenarnandes-da-Silva, Juliano; Póvoas, Susana C A; Bernardini, Andrea; D'Ottavio, Stefano

    2017-07-28

    The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness and reliability characteristics of a repeated sprint ability test considering 5 line sprints of 30-m interspersed with 30-s of active recovery in non-elite outfield young male soccer players. Twenty-six (age 14.9±1.2 years, height 1.72±0.12 cm, body mass 62.2±5.1 kg) players were tested 48 hours and 7 days apart for 5x30-m performance over 5 trials (T1-T5). Short- (T1-T2) and long-term reliability (T1-T3-T4-T5) were assessed with Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and with typical error for measurement (TEM). Short- and long-term reliability ICCs and TEMs for total sprint time and best sprint performance were nearly perfect and satisfactory, respectively. Usefulness (as smallest worthwhile change and TEM ratio) resulted acceptable (i.e =1) and good (i.e >1) for total sprint time and best sprint performance, respectively. The present study revealed that the 5x30-m sprint test is a reliable field test in the short and long-term when the sum of sprint times and the best sprint performance are considered as outcome variables. Sprint performance decrements variables showed large variability across trials.

  20. Hypoxic Repeat Sprint Training Improves Rugby Player's Repeated Sprint but Not Endurance Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Michael J; Olsen, Peter D; Marshall, Helen C; Lizamore, Catherine A; Elliot, Catherine A

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the performance changes in 19 well-trained male rugby players after repeat-sprint training (six sessions of four sets of 5 × 5 s sprints with 25 s and 5 min of active recovery between reps and sets, respectively) in either normobaric hypoxia (HYP; n = 9; FIO2 = 14.5%) or normobaric normoxia (NORM; n = 10; FIO2 = 20.9%). Three weeks after the intervention, 2 additional repeat-sprint training sessions in hypoxia (FIO2 = 14.5%) was investigated in both groups to gauge the efficacy of using "top-up" sessions for previously hypoxic-trained subjects and whether a small hypoxic dose would be beneficial for the previously normoxic-trained group. Repeated sprint (8 × 20 m) and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 (YYIR1) performances were tested twice at baseline (Pre 1 and Pre 2) and weekly after (Post 1-3) the initial intervention (intervention 1) and again weekly after the second "top-up" intervention (Post 4-5). After each training set, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and rate of perceived exertion were recorded. Compared to baseline (mean of Pre 1 and Pre 2), both the hypoxic and normoxic groups similarly lowered fatigue over the 8 sprints 1 week after the intervention (Post 1: -1.8 ± 1.6%, -1.5 ± 1.4%, mean change ± 90% CI in HYP and NORM groups, respectively). However, from Post 2 onwards, only the hypoxic group maintained the performance improvement compared to baseline (Post 2: -2.1 ± 1.8%, Post 3: -2.3 ± 1.7%, Post 4: -1.9 ± 1.8%, and Post 5: -1.2 ± 1.7%). Compared to the normoxic group, the hypoxic group was likely to have substantially less fatigue at Post 3-5 (-2.0 ± 2.4%, -2.2 ± 2.4%, -1.6 ± 2.4% Post 3, Post 4, Post 5, respectively). YYIR1 performances improved throughout the recovery period in both groups (13-37% compared to baseline) with unclear differences found between groups. The addition of two sessions of "top-up" training after intervention 1, had little effect on either group. Repeat-sprint training in

  1. Hypoxic Repeat Sprint Training Improves Rugby Player's Repeated Sprint but Not Endurance Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Michael J.; Olsen, Peter D.; Marshall, Helen C.; Lizamore, Catherine A.; Elliot, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the performance changes in 19 well-trained male rugby players after repeat-sprint training (six sessions of four sets of 5 × 5 s sprints with 25 s and 5 min of active recovery between reps and sets, respectively) in either normobaric hypoxia (HYP; n = 9; FIO2 = 14.5%) or normobaric normoxia (NORM; n = 10; FIO2 = 20.9%). Three weeks after the intervention, 2 additional repeat-sprint training sessions in hypoxia (FIO2 = 14.5%) was investigated in both groups to gauge the efficacy of using “top-up” sessions for previously hypoxic-trained subjects and whether a small hypoxic dose would be beneficial for the previously normoxic-trained group. Repeated sprint (8 × 20 m) and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 (YYIR1) performances were tested twice at baseline (Pre 1 and Pre 2) and weekly after (Post 1–3) the initial intervention (intervention 1) and again weekly after the second “top-up” intervention (Post 4–5). After each training set, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and rate of perceived exertion were recorded. Compared to baseline (mean of Pre 1 and Pre 2), both the hypoxic and normoxic groups similarly lowered fatigue over the 8 sprints 1 week after the intervention (Post 1: −1.8 ± 1.6%, −1.5 ± 1.4%, mean change ± 90% CI in HYP and NORM groups, respectively). However, from Post 2 onwards, only the hypoxic group maintained the performance improvement compared to baseline (Post 2: −2.1 ± 1.8%, Post 3: −2.3 ± 1.7%, Post 4: −1.9 ± 1.8%, and Post 5: −1.2 ± 1.7%). Compared to the normoxic group, the hypoxic group was likely to have substantially less fatigue at Post 3–5 (−2.0 ± 2.4%, −2.2 ± 2.4%, −1.6 ± 2.4% Post 3, Post 4, Post 5, respectively). YYIR1 performances improved throughout the recovery period in both groups (13–37% compared to baseline) with unclear differences found between groups. The addition of two sessions of “top-up” training after intervention 1, had little effect on either

  2. Development of Repeated Sprint Ability in Talented Youth Basketball Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Wierike, Sanne C. M.; de Jong, Mark C.; Tromp, Eveline J. Y.; Vuijk, Pieter J.; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Malina, Robert M.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    te Wierike, SCM, de Jong, MC, Tromp, EJY, Vuijk, PJ, Lemmink, KAPM, Malina, RM, Elferink-Gemser, MT, and Visscher, C. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players. J Strength Cond Res 28(4): 928-934, 2014-Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated

  3. Development of Repeated Sprint Ability in Talented Youth Basketball Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Wierike, Sanne C. M.; de Jong, Mark C.; Tromp, Eveline J. Y.; Vuijk, Pieter J.; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Malina, Robert M.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    2014-01-01

    te Wierike, SCM, de Jong, MC, Tromp, EJY, Vuijk, PJ, Lemmink, KAPM, Malina, RM, Elferink-Gemser, MT, and Visscher, C. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players. J Strength Cond Res 28(4): 928-934, 2014-Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated i

  4. Development of Repeated Sprint Ability in Talented Youth Basketball Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Wierike, Sanne C. M.; de Jong, Mark C.; Tromp, Eveline J. Y.; Vuijk, Pieter J.; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Malina, Robert M.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    2014-01-01

    te Wierike, SCM, de Jong, MC, Tromp, EJY, Vuijk, PJ, Lemmink, KAPM, Malina, RM, Elferink-Gemser, MT, and Visscher, C. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players. J Strength Cond Res 28(4): 928-934, 2014-Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated i

  5. Effects of Hypohydration on Repeated 40-yd Sprint Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gann, Joshua J; Green, James M; OʼNeal, Eric K; Renfroe, Lee G; Andre, Thomas L

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the effects of hypohydration on repeated 40-yd sprint performance. Anaerobically fit current and former Division II male athletes (n = 12) completed 2 bouts of 10 × 40-yd sprints followed by an agility test, dehydrated (∼3% body weight [DT]), or hydrated trial (HT). Statistical analysis of group means indicated that hypohydration had little effect on sprint times for either the first (DT= 5.38 ± 0.37; HT = 5.35 ± 0.34) or second (DT = 5.47 ± 0.39; HT = 5.42 ± 0.39) bout of 10 sprints with only sprint number 2, 5, and 6 of bout 2 reaching statistical significance. However, when individual sprint performance was considered, a greater effect was seen. In all, 83% (10 of 12) of subjects experienced a meaningful change (≥0.1 seconds) (positive or negative) in mean sprint time (DT vs. HT) for one or more bout of 10 sprints. Ratings of perceived exertion was significantly higher (∼1 unit on a 10 point scale) for DT in all sprints during bout 1 and the first 2 sprints of bout 2. These results indicate that the effect of hypohydration on repeated sprint performance varies among individuals. Some improved performance with hypohydration, while others experienced detrimental effects. Hypohydration also resulted in a particularly notable negative impact on perceptual measures of exertion even when performance was similar.

  6. Low volume short duration high-intensity interval training and repeated sprint ability in Gaelic football players

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, David

    2014-01-01

    Gaelic Football is the most popular sport in Ireland and is characterized by irregular changes of pace and high-intensity efforts interspersed with periods of light to moderate intensity activity. Speed, power and aerobic capacity are essential fitness components for optimal performance during match play. A high level of aerobic conditioning is required to generate and maintain power output during repeated high intensity activities. Study 1: Anthropometric, physiological, metabolic and en...

  7. Effects of in-season short-term aerobic and high-intensity interval training program on repeated sprint ability and jump performance in handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermassi, Souhail; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen; Schwesig, René; Fieseler, Georg; Delank, Karl S; Chamari, Karim; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed S

    2016-11-16

    This study examined the effects of a 7-week in-season aerobic and high-intensity interval-training program on performance tests linked to successful handball play (e.g., repeated sprint and jumping ability). Thirty participants (age 17.0 ± 1.2 years, body mass 81.1 ± 3.4 kg, height 1.82± 0.07 m) performed a Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1), a squat (SJ) and a countermovement jump test (CMJ), as well as a repeated sprint ability test (RSA). From this, maximal aerobic speed (MAS, reached at the end of the Yo-Yo IR1), jumping ability, best time in a single sprint trial (RSAbest), total time (RSATT) and the performance decrement (RSAdec) during all sprints were calculated. Later, subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (CG; n=15) performing their normal training schedule (5 weekly sessions of ~90 min of handball training) or an experimental group (EG; n=15). The EG performed two 30 min sessions per week of high-intensity aerobic exercises at 100-130% of MAS in addition to their normal training schedule. Demonstrated a significant improvement in MAS (d=4.1), RSAbest (d=1.9), RSATT (d=1.5) and RSAdec (d=2.3) after the training period. Also, significant interaction effects (time x group) were found for all parameters as the EG significantly improved performances in all tests after training. The greatest interaction effects were observed in MAS (2=0.811) and CMJ (2=0.759). No relevant changes in test performances were found in the CG (mean d=-0.02). These results indicate that individually speed controlled aerobic and interval training is effective for improving specific handball performance.

  8. Evolution of Determinant Factors of Repeated Sprint Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja-Blanco, Fernando; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Rodríguez-Rosell, David; López-Segovia, Manuel; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Bachero-Mena, Beatriz; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the relationships between repeated sprint ability (RSA) and anthropometric measures as well as fitness qualities in soccer players. Twenty-one professional soccer players performed several anthropometric and physical tests including countermovement vertical jumps (CMJs), a straight-line 30 m sprint (T30), an RSA test (6 x 20 + 20 m with 20 s recovery), a progressive isoinertial loading test in a full squat, a Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level-1 (YYIRT-1) and a 20 m shuttle run test (20mSRT). The mean (RSAmean), the fastest (RSAbest), each single sprint time, and the percentage in a sprint decrease (%Dec) in the RSA test were calculated. RSAbest correlated significantly with RSAmean (r = .82) and with all single sprints (p sprints performed increased. No significant relationship was observed between the %Dec and RSA performance. CMJs and the T30 also showed a correlation with RSA performance, whereas lower limb strength did not show any relationship with RSA performance. RSAmean showed significant (p repeated sprints increased. The 20mSRT showed minimal relationships with RSA performance. In conclusion, maximal sprint capacity seems to be relevant for the RSA performance, mainly in the first sprints. However, high intermittent endurance capacity and low adiposity might help enhance the RSA performance when increasing the number of repeated sprints.

  9. Aerobic Capacity is Related to Repeated Sprint Ability with Sprint Distances Less Than 40 Meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    SANDERS, GABRIEL J.; TURNER, ZACHARY; BOOS, BRIAN; PEACOCK, COREY A.; PEVELER, WILLARD; LIPPING, ALAR

    2017-01-01

    Research is inconclusive regarding the association between aerobic fitness (objectively measured VO2max) and repeated sprint performance when the sprints are less than 40 meters. Soccer athletes must be able to repeat sprints without significant decreases in speed and strength and conditioning coaches need to better understand if aerobic fitness is related to repeated sprint ability (RSA). Twenty (10 male, 10 female) Division I soccer athletes first completed a graded maximal treadmill test to measure VO2max. Then on a separate day, athletes completed the RSA test. The RSA test consisted of 10, 30-meter sprints which athletes repeated every 30 seconds. There were significant negative correlations (r ≤ −0.69, P distances are less than 40 meters.

  10. Repeated high-intensity running and sprinting in elite women’s soccer competition

    OpenAIRE

    Gabbett, Tim J; Wiig, Håvard; Spencer, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Background: To the authors’ knowledge, no study has investigated the concurrent repeated, high-intensity (RHIA) and repeated-sprint activity (RSA) of intermittent team-sport competition. Purpose: In this study, they report on the RSA of elite women’s football competition. In addition, they describe the nature of RHIA (eg, striding and sprinting activities) that involve a high energy cost and are associated with short (ie, ≤20 s) recovery periods. Methods: Thirteen elite women soccer players u...

  11. The relationship between repeated sprint ability and the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadley, G; Le Rossignol, P

    1998-06-01

    A large number of team games require participants to repeatedly produce maximal or near maximal sprints of short duration with brief recovery periods. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between a repeated sprint ability (RSA) test that is specific to the energy demands of Australian Rules football (ARF), and the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems. Seventeen ARF players participated in the study. Each participant was assessed for VO2 max, accumulated oxygen deficit (AOD), best 20 m sprint time and RSA. The RSA test involved 12x20 m sprints departing every 20 s. When including the work performed during the time taken to decelerate, the test involved a work to rest ratio of approximately 1:3. Total sprinting time and the percentage decrement of repeated sprinting times were the two derived measures of RSA. The results indicate that the best 20 m sprint time was the only factor to correlate significantly with total sprinting time (r = 0.829, P RSA test. This was interpreted to signify that the phosphagen system was the major energy contributor for this test.

  12. Improving acceleration and repeated sprint ability in well-trained adolescent handball players: speed versus sprint interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Quod, Marc; Quesnel, Thomas; Ahmaidi, Said

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare the effects of speed/agility (S/A) training with sprint interval training (SIT) on acceleration and repeated sprint ability (RSA) in well-trained male handball players. In addition to their normal training program, players performed either S/A (n = 7) or SIT (n = 7) training for 4 wk. Speed/agility sessions consisted of 3 to 4 series of 4 to 6 exercises (eg, agility drills, standing start and very short sprints, all of Sprint interval training consisted of 3 to 5 repetitions of 30-s all-out shuttle sprints over 40 m, interspersed with 2 min of passive recovery. Pre- and posttests included a countermovement jump (CMJ), 10-m sprint (10m), RSA test and a graded intermittent aerobic test (30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test, V(IFT)). S/A training produced a very likely greater improvement in 10-m sprint (+4.6%, 90% CL 1.2 to 7.8), best (+2.7%, 90% CL 0.1 to 5.2) and mean (+2.2%, 90% CL -0.2 to 4.5) RSA times than SIT (all effect sizes [ES] greater than 0.79). In contrast, SIT resulted in an almost certain greater improvement in V(IFT) compared with S/A (+5.2%, 90% CL 3.5 to 6.9, with ES = -0.83). In well-trained handball players, 4 wk of SIT is likely to have a moderate impact on intermittent endurance capacity only, whereas S/A training is likely to improve acceleration and repeated sprint performance.

  13. Caffeine Ingestion Improves Repeated Freestyle Sprints in Elite Male Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S.R. Goods, Grant Landers, Sacha Fulton

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of a moderate dose of caffeine to improve repeat-sprint performance in elite freestyle sprinters. Nine highly trained male swimmers performed 6 x 75 m freestyle sprints on two occasions 1-h after consuming either 3 mg·kg-1 caffeine (CAF, or placebo, in a cross-over manner. Capillary blood samples for the analysis of blood lactate concentration and pH were collected after the 1st, 3rd, and 5th sprint, while heart rate and perceived exertion (RPE were collected after every sprint. There was a moderate effect for improved mean sprint time in the CAF condition (0.52 s; 1.3%; d = 0.50. When assessed individually, there was a large effect for improved performance in sprints 3 (1.00 s; 2.5%; d = 1.02 and 4 (0.84 s; 2.1%; d = 0.84 in CAF compared to placebo, with worthwhile performance improvement found for each of the first 5 sprints. There was a significant treatment effect for higher blood lactate concentration for CAF (p = 0.029, and a significant treatment*time effect for reduced pH in the CAF condition (p = 0.004. Mean heart rate (167 ± 9 bpm vs 169 ± 7 bpm and RPE (17 ± 1 vs 17 ± 1 were not different between placebo and CAF trials, respectively. This investigation is the first to demonstrate enhanced repeat-sprint ability in swimmers following acute caffeine ingestion. It appears likely that the combination of a moderate dose of caffeine (3-6 mg·kg-1 with trained athletes is most likely to enhance repeat-sprint ability in various athletic populations; however, the exact mechanism(s for an improved repeat-sprint ability following acute caffeine ingestion remain unknown.

  14. Evolution of Determinant Factors of Repeated Sprint Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pareja-Blanco Fernando

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the relationships between repeated sprint ability (RSA and anthropometric measures as well as fitness qualities in soccer players. Twenty-one professional soccer players performed several anthropometric and physical tests including countermovement vertical jumps (CMJs, a straight-line 30 m sprint (T30, an RSA test (6 x 20 + 20 m with 20 s recovery, a progressive isoinertial loading test in a full squat, a Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level-1 (YYIRT-1 and a 20 m shuttle run test (20mSRT. The mean (RSAmean, the fastest (RSAbest, each single sprint time, and the percentage in a sprint decrease (%Dec in the RSA test were calculated. RSAbest correlated significantly with RSAmean (r = .82 and with all single sprints (p < 0.05, showing a downward trend as the number of sprints performed increased. No significant relationship was observed between the %Dec and RSA performance. CMJs and the T30 also showed a correlation with RSA performance, whereas lower limb strength did not show any relationship with RSA performance. RSAmean showed significant (p < 0.05 relationships with body mass (r = .44, adiposity (r = .59 and the YYIRT-1 (r = -.62, increasing as the number of repeated sprints increased. The 20mSRT showed minimal relationships with RSA performance. In conclusion, maximal sprint capacity seems to be relevant for the RSA performance, mainly in the first sprints. However, high intermittent endurance capacity and low adiposity might help enhance the RSA performance when increasing the number of repeated sprints.

  15. The effect of 40-m repeated sprint training on maximum sprinting speed, repeated sprint speed endurance, vertical jump, and aerobic capacity in young elite male soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnessen, Espen; Shalfawi, Shaher A I; Haugen, Thomas; Enoksen, Eystein

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 10 weeks' 40-m repeated sprint training program that does not involve strength training on sprinting speed and repeated sprint speed on young elite soccer players. Twenty young well-trained elite male soccer players of age (±SD) 16.4 (±0.9) years, body mass 67.2 (±9.1) kg, and stature 176.3 (±7.4) cm volunteered to participate in this study. All participants were tested on 40-m running speed, 10 × 40-m repeated sprint speed, 20-m acceleration speed, 20-m top speed, countermovement jump (CMJ), and aerobic endurance (beep test). Participants were divided into training group (TG) (n = 10) and control group (CG) (n = 10). The study was conducted in the precompetition phase of the training program for the participants and ended 13 weeks before the start of the season; the duration of the precompetition period was 26 weeks. The TG followed a Periodized repeated sprint training program once a week. The training program consisted of running 40 m with different intensities and duration from week to week. Within-group results indicate that TG had a statistically marked improvement in their performance from pre to posttest in 40-m maximum sprint (-0.06 seconds), 10 × 40-m repeated sprint speed (-0.12 seconds), 20- to 40-m top speed (-0.05 seconds), and CMJ (2.7 cm). The CG showed only a statistically notable improvement from pre to posttest in 10 × 40-m repeated sprint speed (-0.06 seconds). Between-group differences showed a statistically marked improvement for the TG over the CG in 10 × 40-m repeated sprint speed (-0.07 seconds) and 20- to 40-m top speed (-0.05 seconds), but the effect of the improvement was moderate. The results further indicate that a weekly training with repeated sprint gave a moderate but not statistically marked improvement in 40-m sprinting, CMJ, and beep test. The results of this study indicate that the repeated sprint program had a positive effect on several of the parameters tested

  16. Caffeine Ingestion Improves Repeated Freestyle Sprints in Elite Male Swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goods, Paul S.R.; Landers, Grant; Fulton, Sacha

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of a moderate dose of caffeine to improve repeat-sprint performance in elite freestyle sprinters. Nine highly trained male swimmers performed 6 x 75 m freestyle sprints on two occasions 1-h after consuming either 3 mg·kg-1 caffeine (CAF), or placebo, in a cross-over manner. Capillary blood samples for the analysis of blood lactate concentration and pH were collected after the 1st, 3rd, and 5th sprint, while heart rate and perceived exertion (RPE) were collected after every sprint. There was a moderate effect for improved mean sprint time in the CAF condition (0.52 s; 1.3%; d = 0.50). When assessed individually, there was a large effect for improved performance in sprints 3 (1.00 s; 2.5%; d = 1.02) and 4 (0.84 s; 2.1%; d = 0.84) in CAF compared to placebo, with worthwhile performance improvement found for each of the first 5 sprints. There was a significant treatment effect for higher blood lactate concentration for CAF (p = 0.029), and a significant treatment*time effect for reduced pH in the CAF condition (p = 0.004). Mean heart rate (167 ± 9 bpm vs 169 ± 7 bpm) and RPE (17 ± 1 vs 17 ± 1) were not different between placebo and CAF trials, respectively. This investigation is the first to demonstrate enhanced repeat-sprint ability in swimmers following acute caffeine ingestion. It appears likely that the combination of a moderate dose of caffeine (3-6 mg·kg-1) with trained athletes is most likely to enhance repeat-sprint ability in various athletic populations; however, the exact mechanism(s) for an improved repeat-sprint ability following acute caffeine ingestion remain unknown. Key points A moderate dose of caffeine (3 mg·kg-1) ingested 1 h before a repeat-sprint freestyle set significantly improves mean sprint time in elite swimmers. The combination of at least a moderate dose of caffeine (>3 mg·kg-1) with trained athletes appears the most likely to result in ergogenic benefit to anaerobic

  17. Time of day effects on repeated sprint ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouk, N; Chtourou, H; Rebai, H; Hammouda, O; Souissi, N; Dogui, M; Hug, F

    2012-12-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the effects of time-of-day on muscle power and associated electromyographic (EMG) activity level of 4 thigh muscles during a repeated pedalling sprint exercise. After a familiarization session, 12 male subjects were asked to perform the repeated sprint ability test during 2 experimental sessions (randomized order), which were set up either at 06:00 or 18:00 h. For each sprint, peak power output, percentage of peak power decrement and total work were calculated. EMG activity of vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, vastus medialis and biceps femoris muscles was recorded throughout the test and analyzed for each sprint. Total work and percentage of peak power decrement were higher in the evening than in the morning (psprints (psprint 1 and psprint 2 and 3). There was no time-of-day effect for EMG activity level. The neuromuscular efficiency decreased significantly over the repeated sprint ability test at the 2 times of testing (prepeated sprint ability test, EMG activity of major thigh muscles was not time-of-day dependent. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Elevations in core and muscle temperature impairs repeated sprint performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drust, B.; Rasmussen, P.; Mohr, Magni

    2005-01-01

    following the hyperthermic sprints compared to control. CONCLUSION: Although an elevated muscle temperature is expected to promote sprint performance, power output during the repeated sprints was reduced by hyperthermia. The impaired performance does not seem to relate to the accumulation of recognized...... on a cycle ergometer in normal (approximately 20 degrees C, control) and hot (40 degrees C, hyperthermia) environments. RESULTS: Completion of the intermittent protocol in the heat elevated core and muscle temperatures (39.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C; 40.2 +/- 0.4 degrees C), heart rate (178 +/- 11 beats min(-1......)), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) (18 +/- 1) and noradrenaline (38.9 +/- 13.2 micromol l(-1)) (all P power output were similar across the environmental conditions. However, mean power over the last four sprints declined to a larger extent...

  19. Fitness determinants of repeated-sprint ability in highly trained youth football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Matt; Pyne, David; Santisteban, Juanma; Mujika, Iñigo

    2011-12-01

    Variations in rates of growth and development in young football players can influence relationships among various fitness qualities. To investigate the relationships between repeated-sprint ability and other fundamental fitness qualities of acceleration, agility, explosive leg power, and aerobic conditioning through the age groups of U11 to U18 in highly trained junior football players. Male players (n = 119) across the age groups completed a fitness assessment battery over two testing sessions. The first session consisted of countermovement jumps without and with arm swing, 15-m sprint run, 15-m agility run, and the 20-m Shuttle Run (U11 to U15) or the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test, Level 1 (U16 to U18). The players were tested for repeated-sprint ability in the second testing session using a protocol of 6 × 30-m sprints on 30 s with an active recovery. The correlations of repeated-sprint ability with the assorted fitness tests varied considerably between the age groups, especially for agility (r = .02 to .92) and explosive leg power (r = .04 to .84). Correlations of repeated sprint ability with acceleration (r = .48 to .93) and aerobic conditioning (r = .28 to .68) were less variable with age. Repeated-sprint ability associates differently with other fundamental fitness tests throughout the teenage years in highly trained football players, although stabilization of these relationships occurs by the age of 18 y. Coaches in junior football should prescribe physical training accounting for variations in short-term disruptions or impairment of physical performance during this developmental period.

  20. Influence of Strength, Sprint Running, and Combined Strength and Sprint Running Training on Short Sprint Performance in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, M C; Gabbett, T J; Marinho, D A; Blazevich, A J; Sousa, A; van den Tillaar, R; Izquierdo, M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of transference of 6 weeks of full squat vs. full squat plus sprint running training to short (ranged from 0-10 to 0-30 m) sprint running performance in non-athletes. We hypothesized that a speed-full-squat training regimen could enhance squat strength and power with simultaneous improvements in short sprint performance. 122 physically active adults (age: 20.5±2.5 years; body mass: 65.8±6.1 kg; height: 1.71±0.08 m) were randomly divided into 4 groups: full squat training (n=36), combined full squat and sprint training (n=32), speed training only (n=34) and non-training control group (n=20). Each training group completed 2 sessions per week over 6 weeks, while the control group performed only their normal physical activity. Sprint performance was improved after sprint running or full squat training alone (1.7% and 1.8% Psprint training intervention. These results suggest that in recreationally active adults, combined full squat and sprint training provides a greater stimulus for improving sprint performance than either modality alone.

  1. Effects of caffeine and carbohydrate mouth rinses on repeated sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaven, C Martyn; Maulder, Peter; Pooley, Adrian; Kilduff, Liam; Cook, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Our purpose was to examine the effectiveness of carbohydrate and caffeine mouth rinses in enhancing repeated sprint ability. Previously, studies have shown that a carbohydrate mouth rinse (without ingestion) has beneficial effects on endurance performance that are related to changes in brain activity. Caffeine ingestion has also demonstrated positive effects on sprint performance. However, the effects of carbohydrate or caffeine mouth rinses on intermittent sprints have not been examined previously. Twelve males performed 5 × 6-s sprints interspersed with 24 s of active recovery on a cycle ergometer. Twenty-five milliliters of either a noncaloric placebo, a 6% glucose, or a 1.2% caffeine solution was rinsed in the mouth for 5 s prior to each sprint in a double-blinded and balanced cross-over design. Postexercise maximal heart rate and perceived exertion were recorded, along with power measures. A second experiment compared a combined caffeine-carbohydrate rinse with carbohydrate only. Compared with the placebo mouth rinse, carbohydrate substantially increased peak power in sprint 1 (22.1 ± 19.5 W; Cohen's effect size (ES), 0.81), and both caffeine (26.9 ± 26.9 W; ES, 0.71) and carbohydrate (39.1 ± 25.8 W; ES, 1.08) improved mean power in sprint 1. Experiment 2 demonstrated that a combination of caffeine and carbohydrate improved sprint 1 power production compared with carbohydrate alone (36.0 ± 37.3 W; ES, 0.81). We conclude that carbohydrate and (or) caffeine mouth rinses may rapidly enhance power production, which could have benefits for specific short sprint exercise performance. The ability of a mouth-rinse intervention to rapidly improve maximal exercise performance in the absence of fatigue suggests a central mechanism.

  2. Comparison of Two Types of Warm-Up Upon Repeated-Sprint Performance in Experienced Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Tillaar, Roland; von Heimburg, Erna

    2016-08-01

    van den Tillaar, R and von Heimburg, E. Comparison of two types of warm-up upon repeated-sprint performance in experienced soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2258-2265, 2016-The aim of the study was to compare the effects of a long warm-up and a short warm-up upon repeated-sprint performance in soccer players. Ten male soccer players (age, 21.9 ± 1.9 years; body mass, 77.7 ± 8.3 kg; body height, 1.85 ± 0.03 m) conducted 2 types of warm-ups with 1 week in between: a long warm-up (20 minutes: LWup) and a short warm-up (10 minutes: SWup). Each warm-up was followed by a repeated-sprint test consisting of 8 × 30 m sprints with a new start every 30th second. The best sprint time, total sprinting time, and % decrease in time together with heart rate, lactate, and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured. No significant differences in performance were found for the repeated-sprint test parameters (total sprint time: 35.99 ± 1.32 seconds [LWup] and 36.12 ± 0.96 seconds [SWup]; best sprint time: 4.32 ± 0.13 seconds [LWup] and 4.30 ± 0.10 seconds [SWup]; and % sprint decrease: 4.16 ± 2.15% [LWup] and 5.02 ± 2.07% [SWup]). No differences in lactate concentration after the warm-up and after the repeated-sprint test were found. However, RPE and heart rate were significantly higher after the long warm-up and the repeated-sprint test compared with the short warm-up. It was concluded that a short warm-up is as effective as a long warm-up for repeated sprints in soccer. Therefore, in regular training, less warm-up time is needed; the extra time could be used for important soccer skill training.

  3. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierike, S.C. te; Jong, M.C. de; Tromp, E.J.; Vuijk, P.J.; Lemmink, K.A.; Malina, R.M.; Elferink-Gemser, M.T.; Visscher, C.

    2013-01-01

    Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated in a mixed-longitudinal sample of 48 elite basketball players 14 to 19 years of age (16.1±1.7 years). Players were observed on six occasions during the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 seasons. Three basketball-specific field tests were administe

  4. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koen A.P.M. Lemmink; S.C. te Wierike; E.J. Tromp; M.T. Elferink-Gemser; M.C. de Jong; R.M. Malina; P.J. Vuijk; C. Visscher

    2013-01-01

    Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated in a mixed-longitudinal sample of 48 elite basketball players 14 to 19 years of age (16.1±1.7 years). Players were observed on six occasions during the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 seasons. Three basketball-specific field tests were

  5. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koen A.P.M. Lemmink; S.C. te Wierike; E.J. Tromp; M.T. Elferink-Gemser; M.C. de Jong; R.M. Malina; P.J. Vuijk; C. Visscher

    2013-01-01

    Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated in a mixed-longitudinal sample of 48 elite basketball players 14 to 19 years of age (16.1±1.7 years). Players were observed on six occasions during the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 seasons. Three basketball-specific field tests were administe

  6. Carbohydrate mouth rinse does not improve repeated sprint performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Ricardo Altimari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a carbohydrate mouth rinse on the repeated sprint ability (RSA of young soccer players. Nine youth soccer players (15.0 ± 1.5 years; 60.7 ± 4.84 kg; 1.72 ± 0.05 m; 20.5 ± 1.25 kg/m2 were selected. The athletes were submitted to an RSA test consisting of six sprints of 40 m (going/return = 20 m + 20 m, separated by 20 s of passive recovery, under three experimental conditions: carbohydrate mouth rinse (CHO or placebo (PLA and control (CON. The mouth rinses containing CHO or PLA were administered 5 min and immediately before the beginning of the test in doses of 100 mL. The best sprint time (RSAbest, mean sprint time (RSAmean, and drop-off in sprint performance (fatigue index were determined for the different treatments. One-not identify significant differences (p> 0.05 in RSAbest (CHO way ANOVA for repeated measures did = 7.30 ± 0.31 s; PLA = 7.30 ± 0.30 s; CON = 7.26 ±0.16 s, RSA mean (CHO = 7.71 ± 0.30 s; PLA = 7.71 ± 0.25 s; CON = 7.66 ± 0.24s, or fatigue index (CHO = 5.58 ± 2.16%; PLA = 5.77 ± 3.04%; CON = 5.55 ±3.72%. The results suggest that a carbohydrate mouth rinse does not improve the repeated sprint performance of young soccer players.

  7. Mechanical Alterations Associated with Repeated Treadmill Sprinting under Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocherie, Franck; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Racinais, Sébastien; Millet, Grégoire P.; Périard, Julien D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Examine the mechanical alterations associated with repeated treadmill sprinting performed in HOT (38°C) and CON (25°C) conditions. Methods Eleven recreationally active males performed a 30-min warm-up followed by three sets of five 5-s sprints with 25-s recovery and 3-min between sets in each environment. Constant-velocity running for 1-min at 10 and 20 km.h-1 was also performed prior to and following sprinting. Results Mean skin (37.2±0.7 vs. 32.7±0.8°C; P<0.001) and core (38.9±0.2 vs. 38.8±0.3°C; P<0.05) temperatures, together with thermal comfort (P<0.001) were higher following repeated sprinting in HOT vs. CON. Step frequency and vertical stiffness were lower (-2.6±1.6% and -5.5±5.5%; both P<0.001) and contact time (+3.2±2.4%; P<0.01) higher in HOT for the mean of sets 1–3 compared to CON. Running distance per sprint decreased from set 1 to 3 (-7.0±6.4%; P<0.001), with a tendency for shorter distance covered in HOT vs. CON (-2.7±3.4%; P = 0.06). Mean vertical (-2.6±5.5%; P<0.01), horizontal (-9.1±4.4%; P<0.001) and resultant ground reaction forces (-3.0±2.8%; P<0.01) along with vertical stiffness (-12.9±2.3%; P<0.001) and leg stiffness (-8.4±2.7%; P<0.01) decreased from set 1 to 3, independently of conditions. Propulsive power decreased from set 1 to 3 (-16.9±2.4%; P<0.001), with lower propulsive power values in set 2 (-6.6%; P<0.05) in HOT vs. CON. No changes in constant-velocity running patterns occurred between conditions, or from pre-to-post repeated-sprint exercise. Conclusions Thermal strain alters step frequency and vertical stiffness during repeated sprinting; however without exacerbating mechanical alterations. The absence of changes in constant-velocity running patterns suggests a strong link between fatigue-induced velocity decrements during sprinting and mechanical alterations. PMID:28146582

  8. Neuromuscular adjustments of the quadriceps muscle after repeated cycling sprints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Girard

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study investigated the supraspinal processes of fatigue of the quadriceps muscle in response to repeated cycling sprints. METHODS: Twelve active individuals performed 10 × 6-s "all-out" sprints on a cycle ergometer (recovery = 30 s, followed 6 min later by 5 × 6-s sprints (recovery = 30 s. Transcranial magnetic and electrical femoral nerve stimulations during brief (5-s and sustained (30-s isometric contractions of the knee extensors were performed before and 3 min post-exercise. RESULTS: Maximal strength of the knee extensors decreased during brief and sustained contractions (~11% and 9%, respectively; P0.05. While cortical voluntary activation declined (P 40% reduced (P<0.001 following exercise. CONCLUSION: The capacity of the motor cortex to optimally drive the knee extensors following a repeated-sprint test was shown in sustained, but not brief, maximal isometric contractions. Additionally, peripheral factors were largely involved in the exercise-induced impairment in neuromuscular function, while corticospinal excitability was well-preserved.

  9. Effect of endurance training on performance and muscle reoxygenation rate during repeated-sprint running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Ufland, Pierre

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of an 8-week endurance training program on repeated-sprint (RS) performance and post-sprints muscle reoxygenation rate in 18 moderately trained males (34 ± 5 years). Maximal aerobic speed (MAS), 10 km running and RS (2 × 15-s shuttle-sprints, interspersed with 15 s of passive recovery) performance were assessed before and after the training intervention. Total distance covered (TD) and the percentage of distance decrement (%Dec) were calculated for RS. Between-sprints muscle reoxygenation rate (Reoxy rate) was assessed with near-infrared spectroscopy during RS before and after training. After training, MAS (+9.8 ± 5.8%, with 100% chances to observe a substantial improvement), 10 km time (-6.2 ± 5.3%, 99%), TD (+9.6 ± 7.7%, 98%), %Dec (-25.6 ± 73.6%, 93%) and Reoxy rate (+152.4 ± 308.1%, 95%) were improved. The improvement of Reoxy rate was largely correlated with improvements in MAS [r = 0.63 (90% CL, 0.31;-0.82)] and %Dec [r = -0.52 (-0.15;-0.76)]. Present findings confirm the beneficial effect of endurance training on post-sprint muscle reoxygenation rate, which is likely to participate in the improvement of repeated-sprint ability after training. These data also confirm the importance of aerobic conditioning in sports, where repeating high-intensity/maximal efforts within a short time-period are required.

  10. Attentional and visual demands for sprint performance in non-fatigued and fatigued conditions: reliability of a repeated sprint test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diercks Ron L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical performance measures are widely used to assess physical function, providing information about physiological and biomechanical aspects of motor performance. However they do not provide insight into the attentional and visual demands for motor performance. A figure-of-eight sprint test was therefore developed to measure the attentional and visual demands for repeated-sprint performance. The aims of the study were: 1 to assess test-retest reliability of the figure-of-eight sprint test, and 2 to study the attentional and visual demands for sprint performance in a non-fatigued and fatigued condition. Methods Twenty-seven healthy athletes were included in the study. To determine test-retest reliability, a subgroup of 19 athletes performed the figure-of-eight sprint test twice. The figure-of-eight sprint test consisted of nine 30-second sprints. The sprint test consisted of three test parts: sprinting without any restriction, with an attention-demanding task, and with restricted vision. Increases in sprint times with the attention-demanding task or restricted vision are reflective of the attentional and visual demands for sprinting. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs and mean difference between test and retest with 95% confidence limits (CL were used to assess test-retest reliability. Repeated-measures ANOVA were used for comparisons between the sprint times and fatigue measurements of the test parts in both a non-fatigued and fatigued condition. Results The figure-of-eight sprint test showed good test-retest reliability, with ICCs ranging from 0.75 to 0.94 (95% CL: 0.40-0.98. Zero lay within the 95% CL of the mean differences, indicating that no bias existed between sprint performance at test and retest. Sprint times during the test parts with attention-demanding task (P = 0.01 and restricted vision (P Conclusions High ICCs and the absence of systematic variation indicate good test-retest reliability of the figure

  11. No Additional Benefit of Repeat-Sprint Training in Hypoxia than in Normoxia on Sea-Level Repeat-Sprint Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goods, Paul S.R.; Dawson, Brian; Landers, Grant J.; Gore, Christopher J.; Peeling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    To assess the impact of ‘top-up’ normoxic or hypoxic repeat-sprint training on sea-level repeat-sprint ability, thirty team sport athletes were randomly split into three groups, which were matched in running repeat-sprint ability (RSA), cycling RSA and 20 m shuttle run performance. Two groups then performed 15 maximal cycling repeat-sprint training sessions over 5 weeks, in either normoxia (NORM) or hypoxia (HYP), while a third group acted as a control (CON). In the post-training cycling RSA test, both NORM (13.6%; p = 0.0001, and 8.6%; p = 0.001) and HYP (10.3%; p = 0.007, and 4.7%; p = 0.046) significantly improved overall mean and peak power output, respectively, whereas CON did not change (1.4%; p = 0.528, and -1.1%; p = 0.571, respectively); with only NORM demonstrating a moderate effect for improved mean and peak power output compared to CON. Running RSA demonstrated no significant between group differences; however, the mean sprint times improved significantly from pre- to post-training for CON (1.1%), NORM (1.8%), and HYP (2.3%). Finally, there were no group differences in 20 m shuttle run performance. In conclusion, ‘top-up’ training improved performance in a task-specific activity (i.e. cycling); however, there was no additional benefit of conducting this ‘top-up’ training in hypoxia, since cycle RSA improved similarly in both HYP and NORM conditions. Regardless, the ‘top-up’ training had no significant impact on running RSA, therefore the use of cycle repeat-sprint training should be discouraged for team sport athletes due to limitations in specificity. Key points ‘Top-up’ repeat-sprint training performed on a cycle ergometer enhances cycle repeat-sprint ability compared to team sport training only in football players. The addition of moderate hypoxia to repeat-sprint training provides no additional performance benefits to sea-level repeat-sprint ability or endurance performance than normoxic repeat-sprint training.

  12. No Additional Benefit of Repeat-Sprint Training in Hypoxia than in Normoxia on Sea-Level Repeat-Sprint Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goods, Paul S R; Dawson, Brian; Landers, Grant J; Gore, Christopher J; Peeling, Peter

    2015-09-01

    To assess the impact of 'top-up' normoxic or hypoxic repeat-sprint training on sea-level repeat-sprint ability, thirty team sport athletes were randomly split into three groups, which were matched in running repeat-sprint ability (RSA), cycling RSA and 20 m shuttle run performance. Two groups then performed 15 maximal cycling repeat-sprint training sessions over 5 weeks, in either normoxia (NORM) or hypoxia (HYP), while a third group acted as a control (CON). In the post-training cycling RSA test, both NORM (13.6%; p = 0.0001, and 8.6%; p = 0.001) and HYP (10.3%; p = 0.007, and 4.7%; p = 0.046) significantly improved overall mean and peak power output, respectively, whereas CON did not change (1.4%; p = 0.528, and -1.1%; p = 0.571, respectively); with only NORM demonstrating a moderate effect for improved mean and peak power output compared to CON. Running RSA demonstrated no significant between group differences; however, the mean sprint times improved significantly from pre- to post-training for CON (1.1%), NORM (1.8%), and HYP (2.3%). Finally, there were no group differences in 20 m shuttle run performance. In conclusion, 'top-up' training improved performance in a task-specific activity (i.e. cycling); however, there was no additional benefit of conducting this 'top-up' training in hypoxia, since cycle RSA improved similarly in both HYP and NORM conditions. Regardless, the 'top-up' training had no significant impact on running RSA, therefore the use of cycle repeat-sprint training should be discouraged for team sport athletes due to limitations in specificity. Key points'Top-up' repeat-sprint training performed on a cycle ergometer enhances cycle repeat-sprint ability compared to team sport training only in football players.The addition of moderate hypoxia to repeat-sprint training provides no additional performance benefits to sea-level repeat-sprint ability or endurance performance than normoxic repeat-sprint training.'Top-up' cycling repeat-sprint training

  13. Neck-cooling improves repeated sprint performance in the heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eSunderland

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effect of neck-cooling during exercise on repeated sprint ability in a hot environment. Seven team-sport playing males completed two experimental trials involving repeated sprint exercise (5 x 6 s before and after two 45 min bouts of a football specific intermittent treadmill protocol in the heat (33.0  0.2 ºC; 53 ± 2% relative humidity. Participants wore a neck-cooling collar in one of the trials (CC. Mean power output and peak power output declined over time in both trials but were higher in CC (540 ± 99 v 507 ± 122W, d = 0.32; 719 ± 158 v 680 ± 182 W, d = 0.24 respectively. The improved power output was particularly pronounced (d = 0.51 – 0.88 after the 2nd 45 min bout but the CC had no effect on % fatigue. The collar lowered neck temperature and the thermal sensation of the neck (P 0.05. There were no trial differences but interaction effects were demonstrated for prolactin concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE. Prolactin concentration was initially higher in the collar cold trial and then was lower from 45 minutes onwards (interaction trial x time P=0.04. RPE was lower during the football intermittent treadmill protocol in the collar cold trial (interaction trial x time P = 0.01. Neck-cooling during exercise improves repeated sprint performance in a hot environment without altering physiological or neuroendocrinological responses. RPE is reduced and may partially explain the performance improvement.

  14. Effect of training in hypoxia on repeated sprint performance in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Nobukazu; Mizuno, Sahiro; Ishimoto, Sayuri; Sakamoto, Etsuko; Maruta, Misato; Goto, Kazushige

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the effect of repeated sprint training in hypoxia (RSH) in female athletes. Thirty-two college female athletes performed repeated cycling sprints of two sets of 10 × 7-s sprints with a 30-s rest between sprints twice per week for 4 weeks under either normoxic conditions (RSN group; FiO2, 20.9%; n = 16) or hypoxic conditions (RSH group; FiO2, 14.5%; n = 16). The repeated sprint ability (10 × 7-s sprints) and maximal oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) were determined before and after the training period. After training, when compared to pre-values, the mean power output was higher in all sprints during the repeated sprint test in the RSH group but only for the second half of the sprints in the RSN group (P ≤ 0.05). The percentage increases in peak and mean power output between before and after the training period were significantly greater in the RSH group than in the RSN group (peak power output, 5.0 ± 0.7% vs. 1.5 ± 0.9%, respectively; mean power output, 9.7 ± 0.9% vs. 6.0 ± 0.8%, respectively; P repeated sprint test compared with RSN.

  15. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Wierike, Sanne C M; de Jong, Mark C; Tromp, Eveline J Y; Vuijk, Pieter J; Lemmink, Koen A P M; Malina, Robert M; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Visscher, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated in a mixed-longitudinal sample of 48 elite basketball players 14-19 years of age (16.1 ± 1.7 years). Players were observed on 6 occasions during the 2008-09 and 2009-10 seasons. Three following basketball-specific field tests were administered on each occasion: the shuttle sprint test for RSA, the vertical jump for lower body explosive strength (power), and the interval shuttle run test for interval endurance capacity. Height and weight were measured; body composition was estimated (percent fat, lean body mass). Multilevel modeling of RSA development curve was used with 32 players (16.0 ± 1.7 years) who had 2 or more observations. The 16 players (16.1 ± 1.8 years) measured on only 1 occasion were used as a control group to evaluate the appropriateness of the model. Age, lower body explosive strength, and interval endurance capacity significantly contributed to RSA (p ≤ 0.05). Repeated sprint ability improved with age from 14 to 17 years (p ≤ 0.05) and reached a plateau at 17-19 years. Predicted RSA did not significantly differ from measured RSA in the control group (p ≥ 0.05). The results suggest a potentially important role for the training of lower body explosive strength and interval endurance capacity in the development of RSA among youth basketball players. Age-specific reference values for RSA of youth players may assist basketball coaches in setting appropriate goals for individual players.

  16. Effects of four weeks of repeated sprint training on physiological indices in futsal players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cesar do Nascimento

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2015v17n1p91   The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of short repeated-sprint ability (RSA training on the neuromuscular and physiological indices in U17 futsal players during the competitive period. Fourteen players were divided into two groups: intervention group (n = 8 and control group (n = 6. Both groups performed a repeated maximal sprint test (40-m MST, intermittent shuttle-running test (Carminatti’s test and vertical jumps before and after the training period. The intervention group was submitted to an additional four-week repeated sprints program, twice a week, while the control group maintained their normal training routine. There was no significant interaction between time and groups for all variables analysed (p > 0.05. However, a significant main effect was observed for time (p < 0.01 indicating an increase on speed at heart rate deflection point (VHRDP and the continuous jump performance while the peak lactate (40m-LACpeak and sprint decrement decreased after training, in both groups. Still, based on effect sizes (ES the greater changes with practical relevance were verified for intervention group in important variables such as peak velocity (ES = 0,71, VHRDP (ES = 0,83 and 40m-LACpeak (ES = 1,00. This study showed that RSA-based and normal training routine are equally effective in producing changes in the analysed variables during a short period of intervention. However, the effect size suggests that four weeks of RSA training would be a minimum time that could induce the first changes of futsal player’s physical fitness.

  17. Are "classical" tests of repeated-sprint ability in football externally valid? A new approach to determine in-game sprinting behaviour in elite football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpchen, Jan; Skorski, Sabrina; Nopp, Stephan; Meyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of repeated sprinting bouts in elite football. Furthermore, the construct validity of current tests assessing repeated-sprint ability (RSA) was analysed using information of sprinting sequences as they actually occurred during match-play. Sprinting behaviour in official competition was analysed for 19 games of the German national team between August 2012 and June 2014. A sprinting threshold was individually calculated based on the peak velocity reached during in-game sprinting. Players performed 17.2 ± 3.9 sprints per game and during the entire 19 games a total of 35 bouts of repeated sprinting (a minimum of three consecutive sprints with a recovery duration repeated sprinting per player every 463 min. No general decrement in maximal sprinting speed was observed during bouts with up to five consecutive sprints. Results of the present study question the importance of RSA as it is classically defined. They indicate that shorter accelerations are more important in game-specific situations which do not reach speeds necessary to qualify them as sprints. The construct validity of classic tests of RSA in football is not supported by these observations.

  18. Postactivation Potentation Effects From Accommodating Resistance Combined With Heavy Back Squats on Short Sprint Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyland, Timothy P; Van Dorin, Joshua D; Reyes, G Francis Cisco

    2015-11-01

    Applying accommodating resistance combined with isoinertial resistance has been demonstrated to be effective in improving neuromuscular attributes important for sport performance. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether short sprints can be acutely enhanced after several sets of back squats with or without accommodating resistance. Twenty recreationally resistance-trained males (age: 23.3 ± 4.4 years; height: 178.9 ± 6.5 cm; weight: 88.3 ± 10.8 kg) performed pre-post testing on 9.1-m sprint time. Three different interventions were implemented in randomized order between pre-post 9.1-m sprints. On 3 separate days, subjects either sat for 5 minutes (CTRL), performed 5 sets of 3 repetitions at 85% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM) with isoinertial load (STND), or performed 5 sets of 3 repetitions at 85% of their 1RM, with 30% of the total resistance coming from elastic band tension (BAND) between pre-post 9.1-m sprint testing. Posttesting for 9.1-m sprint time occurred immediately after the last set of squats (Post-Immediate) and on every minute for 4 minutes after the last set of squats (Post-1min, Post-2min, Post-3min, and Post-4min). Repeated-measures analysis of variance statistical analyses revealed no significant changes in sprint time across posttesting times during the CTRL and STND condition. During the BAND condition, sprint time significantly decreased from Post-Immediate to Post-4min (p = 0.002). The uniqueness of accommodating resistance could create an optimal postactivation potentiation effect to increase neuromuscular performance. Coaches and athletes can implement heavy accommodating resistance exercises to their warm-up when improving acute sprint time is desired.

  19. A Comparison of Two Reading Fluency Methods: Repeated Readings to a Fluency Criterion and Interval Sprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostewicz, Douglas E.; Kubina, Richard M., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Teachers have used the method of repeated readings to build oral reading fluency in students with and without special needs. A new fluency building intervention called interval sprinting uses shorter timing intervals (i.e., sprints) across a passage. This study used an alternating treatment design to compare repeated readings and interval…

  20. Effect of the number of sprint repetitions on the variation of blood lactate concentration in repeated sprint sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, Z; Dardouri, W; Haj-Sassi, R; Castagna, C; Chamari, K; Souissi, N

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of number of sprint repetitions on the variation of blood lactate concentration (blood [La]) during different repeated-sprint sessions in order to find the appropriate number of sprint repetitions that properly simulates the physiological demands of team sport competitions. Twenty male team-sport players (age, 22.2 ± 2.9 years) performed several repeated-sprint sessions (RSS) consisting of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, or 10 repetitions of 30 m shuttle sprints (2 × 15 m) with 30 s recovery in between. The blood [La] was obtained after 3 min of recovery at the end of each RSS. The present study showed that for RSS of 3 sprints (RSS3) there was a high increase (psprints (9.6±1.4 and 10.5±1.9 mmol · l(-1), p=0.96 and 0.26, respectively). After RSS9 and RSS10 blood [La] further significantly increased to 12.6 and 12.7 mmol · l(-1), psprint speed decrement (Sdec) (1.5±1.2; 2.0±1.1 and 2.6±1.4%, respectively). There was also no significant difference between RSS9 and RSS10 for Sdec (3.9±1.3% and 4.5±1.4%, respectively). In conclusion, the repeated-sprint protocol composed of 5 shuttle sprint repetitions is more representative of the blood lactate demands of the team sports game intensity.

  1. Reliability of specific on-ice repeated-sprint ability test for ice-hockey players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Hůlka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Repeated sprint ability tests are today widely used to evaluate the performance capability in team sports. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of a specific ice hockey test, which indicates the agility and repeated-sprint ability of the players. Methods: Twenty four highly trained junior ice hockey players (age = 17.68 ± 1.52 years; BMI = 23.8 ± 1.92 kg . m-2 participated in the study. Each participant was assessed for specific on-ice repeated-sprint ability test 12 × 54 m with 30 s rest. Intraclass correlation coefficient (association between two repeated measurements and coefficient of variation were calculated to assess the reliability of the test. Results: All intraclass correlation coefficients were .78 for sprint decrement and .98 for total time and the best time, the coefficient of variation was 1.52% for best sprint time, 1.31% for total time and 19.3% for sprint decrement variable. Conclusions: The results suggest the high reliability of the ice hockey agility test expressed by the best sprint time and repeated-sprint ability by the total time and less reliability of sprint decrement.

  2. Repeated sprint ability in young basketball players: one vs. two changes of direction (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attene, Giuseppe; Laffaye, Guillaume; Chaouachi, Anis; Pizzolato, Fabio; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Padulo, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the training effects based on repeated sprint ability (RSA) (with one change of direction) with an intensive repeated sprint ability (IRSA) (with two changes of direction) on jump performance and aerobic fitness. Eighteen male basketball players were assigned to repeated sprint ability and intensive repeated sprint ability training groups (RSAG and IRSAG). RSA, IRSA, squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ) and Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 test were assessed before and after four training weeks. The RSA and IRSA trainings consisted of three sets of six sprints (first two weeks) and eight sprints (second two weeks) with 4-min sets recovery and 20-s of sprints recovery. Four weeks of training led to an overall improvement in most of the measures of RSA, but little evidence of any differences between the two training modes. Jump performance was enhanced: CMJ of 7.5% (P repeated sprint training with one/two changes of direction promotes improvements in both RSA and IRSA respectively but the better increase on jump performance shown a few changes on sprint and endurance performances.

  3. Neuro-mechanical and metabolic adjustments to the repeated anaerobic sprint test in professional football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocherie, Franck; Millet, Gregoire P; Girard, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the neuro-mechanical and metabolic adjustments in the lower limbs induced by the running anaerobic sprint test (the so-called RAST). Eight professional football players performed 6 × 35 m sprints interspersed with 10 s of active recovery on artificial turf with their football shoes. Sprinting mechanics (plantar pressure insoles), root mean square activity of the vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles (surface electromyography, EMG) and VL muscle oxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy) were monitored continuously. Sprint time, contact time and total stride duration increased from the first to the last repetition (+17.4, +20.0 and +16.6 %; all P 0.05), decreased over sprint repetitions and were correlated with the increase in running time (r = -0.82 and -0.90; both P sprint repetitions, players with a better repeated-sprint performance (lower cumulated times) also displayed faster muscle de- (during sprints) and re-oxygenation (during recovery) rates (r = -0.74 and -0.84; P repeated anaerobic sprint test leads to substantial alterations in stride mechanics and leg-spring behaviour. Our results also strengthen the link between repeated-sprint ability and the change in neuromuscular activation as well as in muscle de- and re-oxygenation rates.

  4. Effects of Sprint Training With and Without Weighted Vest on Speed and Repeated Sprint Ability in Male Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Ezequiel; Padrón-Cabo, Alexis; Fernández-Penedo, Diego

    2016-11-16

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect resisted sprint training using weighted vests (WV) compared with unresisted sprint training (US) on physical fitness (countermovement jump, 10 m sprint, 30 m sprint and repeated sprint ability (RSA)) in amateur male soccer players. 19 soccer players (age: 23.7±4.5 years; height: 178.3±5.8 cm; body mass: 72.9±5.2 kg) were randomly assigned to a WV (n= 10) or a US (n= 9) group. The intervention program had to be carried out 2 times a week over 6 weeks. The only difference between the two interventions was that the WV group performed all the sprints with an additional weight of 18.9% ± 2.1% of body mass. Within-group analysis showed significant improvements (psprint performance from pretest to post-test in WB (+9.42% and +6.04%) and CTU (+10.87% and +5.10%). Players in both WV and US also showed significant enhancements in RSA average time, fastest time, and total time from pretest to posttest. Percentage changes in 30 m sprint performance, for both groups combined, had a very large correlation with percentage changes in average time of RSA. In the between-groups analysis, there were no differences between the sprint training groups (WV vs US) in any variable. In conclusion, the findings of this study indicate that both sprint training methods used seem to be effective to improve soccer related performance measures, and could be beneficial to players and coaches in field settings.

  5. The development of a test of repeated-sprint ability for elite women's soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a game-specific test of repeated-sprint ability for elite women's soccer players. Nineteen elite women's soccer players (mean +/- SD; age, 18.1 +/- 2.9 y) participated in this study. After familiarization, players completed a repeated-sprint test consisting of 6 x 20-m maximal effort sprints, on a 15-second cycle. At the completion of each sprint, players performed a 10-m deceleration and a 10-m active jog recovery. Ten elite female soccer players performed the test on 2 occasions, 1 week apart, to determine the reliability of the test. In addition, the validity of the repeated-sprint test to discriminate among players of different playing ability was evaluated by testing national (n = 11) and state (n = 8) women's soccer players. Heart rate and blood lactate concentration were recorded to determine the physiological responses to the test. The total sprint time proved to be highly reproducible (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.91; typical error of measurement = 1.5%). However, the percentage decrement was less reliable (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.14, typical error of measurement = 19.5%). The repeated-sprint test was valid in discriminating between national- and state-level players, with national players having significantly lower (p repeated-sprint times than state players (20.9 +/- 0.5 s vs. 23.3 +/- 0.4 s). The mean (+/-SD) heart rate and blood lactate concentration were 182 +/- 6 beats/min and 9.3 +/- 2.0 mmol/L, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate that the developed repeated-sprint test discriminates players of higher and lesser skill levels and offers a reliable method of assessing repeated-sprint ability in elite women's soccer players when results are expressed as the total sprint time.

  6. Repeated sprint ability in elite water polo players and swimmers and its relationship to aerobic and anaerobic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckel, Yoav; Bishop, David; Rabinovich, Moran; Kaufman, Leonid; Nemet, Dan; Eliakim, Alon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine indices of swimming repeated sprint ability (RSA) in 19 elite water polo players compared to 16 elite swimmers during a repeated sprint swimming test (RST), and to examine the relationships between these indices and aerobic and anaerobic performance capabilities in both groups. Indices of RSA were determined by the ideal sprint time (IS), the total sprint time (TS), and the performance decrement (PD) recorded during an 8 x 15-m swimming RST. Single long - (800-m) and short-(25-m) distance swim tests were used to determined indices of aerobic and anaerobic swimming capabilities, respectively. The water polo players exhibited lower RSA swimming indices, as well as lower scores in the single short and long swim distances, compared to the swimmers. Significant relationships were found between the 25- m swim results and the IS and the TS, but not the PD of both the swimmers and the water polo players. No significant relationships were found between the 800-m swim results and any of the RSA indices in either the swimmers or the water polo players. No significant relationships were found between the 25-m and the 800-m swim results in either the swimmers or the water polo players. The results indicate that swimmers posses better RSA as well as higher anaerobic and aerobic capabilities, as reflected by the single short- and long-distance swim tests, compared to water polo players. The results also indicate that, as for running and cycling, repeated sprint swim performance is strongly related to single sprint performance. Key PointsElite water polo players demonstrated lower repeated sprint ability (RSA), aerobic and anaerobic capabilities compared to elite swimmers.A 25-m swim trial correlated significantly with ideal sprint time and total sprint time, emphasizing the important contribution of anaerobic metabolism for these exercise types in both water polo players and swimmers.800-m swim results did not correlate with RSA or 25-m

  7. Relationship between Repeated Sprint Ability and Aerobic Capacity in Professional Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhys M. Jones

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between maximal aerobic capacity ( and repeated sprint ability (RSA in a group of professional soccer players. Methods. Forty-one professional soccer players (age  yrs, height  cm, weight  kg were required to perform tests to assess RSA and on two separate days with at least 48 hr rest between testing sessions. Each player performed a treadmill test to determine their and a test for RSA involving the players completing  m sprints (turn after 20 m with 20 s active recovery between each sprint. Results. There was a significant negative correlation between body mass normalised and mean sprint time ( (; and total sprint time ( (, . Conclusion. Results of the current study indicate that is one important factor aiding soccer players in the recovery from repeated sprint type activities.

  8. Fatigue in repeated-sprint exercise is related to muscle power factors and reduced neuromuscular activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Hamer, Peter; Bishop, David

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to determine the relationship between each individual's anaerobic power reserve (APR) [i.e., the difference between the maximum anaerobic (Pana) and aerobic power (Paer)] and fatigability during repeated-sprint exercise and (2) to examine the acute effects of repeated sprints on neuromuscular activity, as evidenced by changes in the surface electromyogram (EMG) signals. Eight healthy males carried out tests to determine Pana (defined as the highest power output attained during a 6-s cycling sprint), Paer (defined as the highest power output achieved during a progressive, discontinuous cycling test to failure) and a repeated cycling sprint test (10 x 6-s max sprints with 30 s rest). Peak power output (PPO) and mean power output (MPO) were calculated for each maximal 6-s cycling bout. Root mean square (RMS) was utilized to quantify EMG activity from the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle of the right leg. Over the ten sprints, PPO and MPO decreased by 24.6 and 28.3% from the maximal value (i.e., sprint 1), respectively. Fatigue index during repeated sprints was significantly correlated with APR (R = 0.87; P < 0.05). RMS values decreased over the ten sprints by 14.6% (+/-6.3%). There was a strong linear relationship (R2 = 0.97; P < 0.05) between the changes in MPO and EMG RMS from the vastus lateralis muscle during the ten sprints. The individual advantage in fatigue-resistance when performing a repeated sprint task was related with a lower anaerobic power reserve. Additionally, a suboptimal net motor unit activity might also impair the ability to repeatedly generate maximum power outputs.

  9. Avaliação da capacidade de realizar sprints repetidos no futebol Repeated sprint ability evaluation in soccer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Bortolotti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A maioria dos esportes coletivos (ex.: futebol, basquete, handebol tem como característica a intermitência, flutuando entre breves períodos de esforços máximos ou próximos ao máximo seguidos de períodos e formas de recuperação. Alguns autores têm proposto diversos testes que tem por finalidade mensurar a capacidade desses atletas em realizar esforços repetidos máximos (RSA, a qual estaria diretamente relacionada aos momentos decisivos durante partida. Dessa forma, o presente estudo teve como objetivo descrever os diferentes protocolos de testes para avaliar a RSA em jogadores de futebol, com base em artigos originais e algumas revisões levantadas na base de dados Medline. Diante dos achados, sugerimos a utilização de quatro protocolos, dois envolvendo sprints lineares (AZIZ et al., 2008; REILLY, 2001 e dois utilizando sprints com mudanças de direção (BANGSBO, 2008; IMPELLIZZERI et al., 2008 para avaliação da RSA em jogadores de futebol, gerando importantes parâmetros de desempenho, que permitem ainda a elaboração de programas de treinamento para a melhora dessa capacidade. Recomendamos ainda, a utilização do tempo médio e/ou total como uma medida geral da capacidade de realizar sprints repetidos e as parciais de tempo de cada sprint para identificar possíveis pontos fortes e fraco de cada atleta.The most of team sports (soccer, basketball, handball is characterized by intermittency, fluctuating between brief periods of maximum effort or near the maximum followed by periods and forms of recovery. Some authors have proposed several tests to measure the ability of these athletes to perform repeated sprints (repeated sprint ability - RSA, which would be directly related to the decisive moments during match. Then, this study aimed to describe the different test protocols to assess RSA in soccer players, based on original articles and reviews selected in some databases (Medline. Therefore, we suggest four protocols, two

  10. Repeated Sprint Ability in Elite Water Polo Players and Swimmers and its Relationship to Aerobic and Anaerobic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Meckel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine indices of swimming repeated sprint ability (RSA in 19 elite water polo players compared to 16 elite swimmers during a repeated sprint swimming test (RST, and to examine the relationships between these indices and aerobic and anaerobic performance capabilities in both groups. Indices of RSA were determined by the ideal sprint time (IS, the total sprint time (TS, and the performance decrement (PD recorded during an 8 x 15-m swimming RST. Single long - (800-m and short-(25-m distance swim tests were used to determined indices of aerobic and anaerobic swimming capabilities, respectively. The water polo players exhibited lower RSA swimming indices, as well as lower scores in the single short and long swim distances, compared to the swimmers. Significant relationships were found between the 25- m swim results and the IS and the TS, but not the PD of both the swimmers and the water polo players. No significant relationships were found between the 800-m swim results and any of the RSA indices in either the swimmers or the water polo players. No significant relationships were found between the 25-m and the 800-m swim results in either the swimmers or the water polo players. The results indicate that swimmers posses better RSA as well as higher anaerobic and aerobic capabilities, as reflected by the single short- and long-distance swim tests, compared to water polo players. The results also indicate that, as for running and cycling, repeated sprint swim performance is strongly related to single sprint performance.

  11. Acute effects of a caffeine-taurine energy drink on repeated sprint performance of American college football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwacham, Nnamdi; Wagner, Dale R

    2012-04-01

    Consumption of energy drinks is common among athletes; however, there is a lack of research on the efficacy of these beverages for short-duration, intense exercise. The purpose of this research was to investigate the acute effects of a low-calorie caffeine-taurine energy drink (AdvoCare Spark) on repeated sprint performance and anaerobic power in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I football players. Twenty football players (age 19.7 ± 1.8 yr, height 184.9 ± 5.3 cm, weight 100.3 ± 21.7 kg) participated in a double-blind, randomized crossover study in which they received the energy drink or an isoenergetic, isovolumetric, non-caffeinated placebo in 2 trials separated by 7 days. The Running Based Anaerobic Sprint Test, consisting of six 35-m sprints with 10 s of rest between sprints, was used to assess anaerobic power. Sprint times were recorded with an automatic electronic timer. The beverage treatment did not significantly affect power (F = 3.84, p = .066) or sprint time (F = 3.06, p = .097). However, there was a significant interaction effect between caffeine use and the beverage for sprint times (F = 4.62, p = .045), as well as for anaerobic power (F = 5.40, p = .032), indicating a confounding effect. In conclusion, a caffeine-taurine energy drink did not improve the sprint performance or anaerobic power of college football players, but the level of caffeine use by the athletes likely influenced the effect of the drink.

  12. Repeated double-poling sprint training in hypoxia by competitive cross-country skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiss, Raphael; Willis, Sarah; Born, Dennis-Peter; Sperlich, Billy; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Millet, Grégoire P

    2015-04-01

    Repeated-sprint training in hypoxia (RSH) was recently shown to improve repeated-sprint ability (RSA) in cycling. This phenomenon is likely to reflect fiber type-dependent, compensatory vasodilation, and therefore, our hypothesis was that RSH is even more beneficial for activities involving upper body muscles, such as double poling during cross-country skiing. In a double-blinded fashion, 17 competitive cross-country skiers performed six sessions of repeated sprints (each consisting of four sets of five 10-s sprints, with 20-s intervals of recovery) either in normoxia (RSN, 300 m; FiO2, 20.9%; n = 8) or normobaric hypoxia (RSH, 3000 m; FiO2, 13.8 %; n = 9). Before (pre) and after (post) training, performance was evaluated with an RSA test (10-s all-out sprints-20-s recovery, until peak power output declined by 30%) and a simulated team sprint (team sprint, 3 × 3-min all-out with 3-min rest) on a double-poling ergometer. Triceps brachii oxygenation was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. From pretraining to posttraining, peak power output in the RSA was increased (P sprints performed was enhanced in RSH (10.9 ± 5.2 vs 17.1 ± 6.8, P sprints throughout RSA rose more in RSH (P sprints improved by 11% ± 9% in RSH and 15% ± 7% in RSN. Our findings reveal greater improvement in the performance of repeated double-poling sprints, together with larger variations in the perfusion of upper body muscles in RSH compared with those in RSN.

  13. Sex differences in acute translational repressor 4E-BP1 activity and sprint performance in response to repeated-sprint exercise in team sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Jessica R; Edge, Johann A; Hawke, Emma; McMahon, Christopher; Mündel, Toby

    2015-11-01

    The physiological requirements underlying soccer-specific exercise are incomplete and sex-based comparisons are sparse. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a repeated-sprint protocol on the translational repressor 4E-BP1 and sprint performance in male and female soccer players. Cross-over design involving eight female and seven male university soccer players. Participants performed four bouts of 6 × 30-m maximal sprints spread equally over 40 min. Heart rate, sprint time and sprint decrement were measured for each sprint and during the course of each bout. Venous blood samples and muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were taken at rest, at 15 min and 2h post-exercise. While males maintained a faster mean sprint time for each bout (P sprint performance for each bout (P sprint performance in males, with no sex differences for heart rate or lactate. Muscle analyses revealed sex differences in resting total (P repeated sprints. We show that females have a larger sprint decrement indicating that males have a superior ability to recover sprint performance. Sex differences in resting 4E-BP1 Thr37/46 suggest diversity in the training-induced phenotype of the muscle of males and females competing in equivalent levels of team-sport competition. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of the running-based anaerobic sprint test as a measure of repeated sprint ability in collegiate-level soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keir, Daniel A; Thériault, Francis; Serresse, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) refers to an individual's ability to perform maximal sprints of short duration in succession with little recovery between sprints. The running-based anaerobic sprint test (RAST) has been adapted from the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) protocol as a tool to assess RSA and anaerobic power. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between performance variables and physiological responses obtained during the RAST and the WAnT using 8 collegiate-level soccer players. Participants performed a single trial of both the WAnT and the RAST. Breath-by-breath gas exchange was monitored throughout each trial, and blood lactate (BL) measures were recorded postexercise. The oxygen uptake (VO2) profile suggested that the RAST required greater contributions from aerobic metabolism although there was no difference in VO2peak (p < 0.05). Peak BL values were also similar between the RAST and the WAnT (p < 0.05). Neither peak physiological values nor performance variables (peak and mean power) were significantly correlated between protocols. The weak association in physiological responses indicates that different combinations of metabolic contributions exist between protocols, suggesting that individual performances on each test are not related in collegiate soccer players. Further studies on these relationships with players of other competitive levels and team sport athletes are warranted.

  15. Relationship between measures of aerobic fitness, speed and repeated sprint ability in full and part time youth soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, N; Currie, J; Johnston, R; Hill, J

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between repeated sprint ability (RSA) involving changes in direction, short linear sprinting and aerobic capacity in young elite soccer players. A secondary aim was to assess any differences in performance of these assessments between players of different age groups. Thirty-two male adolescent soccer players belonging to the same elite club academy were assessed for RSA comprising 6 x 40m efforts interspersed by 25s recovery, linear sprinting speed over 15m, and aerobic capacity via the YYIE2 assessment. There was a significant correlation between performance in the YYIE2 and RSA total time, RSA fastest sprint and RSA percentage decrement (r = -0.71, -0.53, and -0.52 respectively. Psprint (Psprinting. Assessments of RSA over 40m and incorporating changes of direction appear to be significantly correlated with YYIE2 performance in young elite level soccer players. In addition older players performed significantly better in the YYIE2 assessment and RSA protocol but not in short linear sprinting. These results have implications for the design of assessment protocols for young elite soccer players of different ages.

  16. Age-related differences in repeated-sprint ability in highly trained youth football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Inigo; Spencer, Matt; Santisteban, Juanma; Goiriena, Juan Jose; Bishop, David

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the age-related differences in repeated-sprint ability and blood lactate responses in 134 youth football players. Players from the development programme of a professional club were grouped according to their respective under-age team (U-11 to U-18). Following familiarization, the participants performed a repeated-sprint ability test [6 x 30-m sprints 30 s apart, with active recovery (2.0-2.2 m . s(-1)) between sprints]. The test variables were total time, percent sprint decrement, and post-test peak lactate concentration. Total time improved from the U-11 to U-15 age groups (range 33.15 +/- 1.84 vs. 27.25 +/- 0.82 s), whereas no further significant improvements were evident from U-15 to U-18. No significant differences in percent sprint decrement were reported among groups (range 4.0 +/- 1.0% to 5.5 +/- 2.1%). Post-test peak lactate increased from one age group to the next (range 7.3 +/- 1.8 to 12.6 +/- 1.6 mmol . l(-1)), but remained constant when adjusted for age-related difference in body mass. Peak lactate concentration was moderately correlated with sprint time (r = 0.70, P > 0.001). Our results suggest that performance in repeated-sprint ability improves during maturation of highly trained youth football players, although a plateau occurs from 15 years of age. In contrast to expectations based on previous suggestions, percent sprint decrement during repeated sprints did not deteriorate with age.

  17. The effects of 20-m repeated sprint training on aerobic capacity in college volleyball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaynak Kerimhan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a repeated sprint training program in addition to volleyball training on the aerobic capacity of college volleyball players.

  18. Importance of muscle power variables in repeated and single sprint performance in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Segovia, Manuel; Dellal, Alexandre; Chamari, Karim; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2014-03-27

    This study examined the relationship between lower body power and repeated as well as single sprint performance in soccer players. The performance of nineteen male soccer players was examined. The first testing session included the countermovement jump (CMJL) and the progressive full squat (FSL), both with external loads. Power in the CMJL and FSL was measured with each load that was lifted. The second session included a protocol of 40-m repeated sprints with a long recovery period (2 min). The number of sprints executed until there was a 3% decrease in performance for the best 40-m sprint time was recorded as a repeated sprint index (RSI). The RSI was moderately associated with power output relative to body mass in the CMJL and FSL (r = 0.53/0.54, p ≤ 0.05). The most and least powerful players (determined by FSL) showed significant differences in the RSI (9.1 ± 4.2 vs. 6.5 ± 1.6) and 10 m sprint time (p ± 0.01). Repeated and single sprints are associated with relatively lower body power in soccer players.

  19. Smaller muscle ATP reduction in women than in men by repeated bouts of sprint exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbjörnsson-Liljedahl, Mona; Bodin, Kristina; Jansson, Eva

    2002-09-01

    It was hypothesized that the reduction of high-energy phosphates in muscle after repeated sprints is smaller in women than in men. Fifteen healthy and physically active women and men with an average age of 25 yr (range of 19-42 yr) performed three 30-s cycle sprints (Wingate test) with 20 min of rest between sprints. Repeated blood and muscle samples were obtained. Freeze-dried pooled muscle fibers of types I and II were analyzed for high-energy phosphates and their breakdown products and for glycogen. Accumulation of plasma ATP breakdown products, plasma catecholamines, and blood lactate, as well as glycogen reduction in type I fibers, was all lower in women than in men during sprint exercise. Repeated sprints induced smaller reduction of ATP and smaller accumulation of IMP and inosine in women than in men in type II muscle fibers, with no gender differences in changes of ATP and its breakdown products during the bouts of exercise themselves. This indicates that the smaller ATP reduction in women than in men during repeated sprints was created during recovery periods between the sprint exercises and that women possess a faster recovery of ATP via reamination of IMP during these recovery periods.

  20. Muscle power and repeated sprint ability in soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Giovana dos Santos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle power is one of the most important physical qualities of soccer playerperformance and needs to be maintained during a match. Thus, the aim of this study was toinvestigate the levels of muscle power in soccer players before and after performing repeatedsprints (RS, and the association between power and RS performance. Twenty soccer playersfrom the under-20 category aged 18-20 years participated in this study. The study consisted ofthe execution of vertical jumps, execution of RS, new execution of vertical jumps, and collectionof blood samples. The continuous jump (CJ test was performed on a piezoelectric force platformfor the measurement of muscle power and the RAST test was used to evaluate RS ability. Nosignificant difference in the levels of muscle power was observed after RS (p=0.57. Significantdifferences were observed in the first to fifth sprint times (p<0.01, but not between the fifth andsixth sprint (p=0.06. CJ height before RS was correlated with first sprint time (r=-0.62, p<0.01,best sprint time (r=-0.60, p<0.01, and average sprint time (r= -0.54, p<0.01. In conclusion,the soccer players studied showed no significant reduction in muscle power after RS. A decreasein performance was observed from the first to the fifth sprint, but not between the fifth and sixthsprint. The muscle power of soccer players was a determinant factor to perform one maximumsprint, as well as successive sprints.

  1. Repeated-Sprint Sequences During Female Soccer Matches Using Fixed and Individual Speed Thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Fábio Y; Pereira, Lucas A; Loturco, Irineu; Rosseti, Marcelo; Moura, Felipe A; Bradley, Paul S

    2017-07-01

    Nakamura, FY, Pereira, LA, Loturco, I, Rosseti, M, Moura, FA, and Bradley, PS. Repeated-sprint sequences during female soccer matches using fixed and individual speed thresholds. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1802-1810, 2017-The main objective of this study was to characterize the occurrence of single sprint and repeated-sprint sequences (RSS) during elite female soccer matches, using fixed (20 km·h) and individually based speed thresholds (>90% of the mean speed from a 20-m sprint test). Eleven elite female soccer players from the same team participated in the study. All players performed a 20-m linear sprint test, and were assessed in up to 10 official matches using Global Positioning System technology. Magnitude-based inferences were used to test for meaningful differences. Results revealed that irrespective of adopting fixed or individual speed thresholds, female players produced only a few RSS during matches (2.3 ± 2.4 sequences using the fixed threshold and 3.3 ± 3.0 sequences using the individually based threshold), with most sequences composing of just 2 sprints. Additionally, central defenders performed fewer sprints (10.2 ± 4.1) than other positions (fullbacks: 28.1 ± 5.5; midfielders: 21.9 ± 10.5; forwards: 31.9 ± 11.1; with the differences being likely to almost certainly associated with effect sizes ranging from 1.65 to 2.72), and sprinting ability declined in the second half. The data do not support the notion that RSS occurs frequently during soccer matches in female players, irrespective of using fixed or individual speed thresholds to define sprint occurrence. However, repeated-sprint ability development cannot be ruled out from soccer training programs because of its association with match-related performance.

  2. Significant Molecular and Systemic Adaptations after Repeated Sprint Training in Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiss, Raphael; Léger, Bertrand; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Fournier, Pierre-Etienne; Eggel, Yan; Dériaz, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2013-01-01

    While intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) has been reported to evoke cellular responses via hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) but without substantial performance benefits in endurance athletes, we hypothesized that repeated sprint training in hypoxia could enhance repeated sprint ability (RSA) performed in normoxia via improved glycolysis and O2 utilization. 40 trained subjects completed 8 cycling repeated sprint sessions in hypoxia (RSH, 3000 m) or normoxia (RSN, 485 m). Before (Pre-) and after (Post-) training, muscular levels of selected mRNAs were analyzed from resting muscle biopsies and RSA tested until exhaustion (10-s sprint, work-to-rest ratio 1∶2) with muscle perfusion assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy. From Pre- to Post-, the average power output of all sprints in RSA was increased (psprints to exhaustion was increased in RSH (9.4±4.8 vs. 13.0±6.2 sprints, psprints throughout RSA test increased to a greater extent (prepeated sprint performance in RSH than in RSN with significant molecular adaptations and larger blood perfusion variations in active muscles. PMID:23437154

  3. The effect of heavy resistance exercise on repeated sprint performance in youth athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Daniel; Harsley, Paul; Shaw, Matthew; Peart, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This investigation assessed whether prior heavy resistance exercise would improve the repeated sprint performance of 16 trained youth soccer players (Age 17.05 ± 0.65 years; height 182.6 ± 8.9 cm; body mass 77.8 ± 8.2 kg). In session 1, individual 1 repetition max was measured utilising a squat movement. In sessions 2 and 3, participants performed a running-based repeated anaerobic sprint test with and without prior heavy resistance exercise of 91% of their 1 repetition max. Times were recorded for each of the 6 sprints performed in the repeated sprint test and summed to provide total time. T-tests compared the two exercise conditions via differences in corresponding sprint times and total time. Analysis revealed significantly reduced total time with use of heavy resistance exercise (33.48 (±1.27) vs. 33.59 (±1.27); P = 0.01). Sprints 1 (P = 0.05) and 2 (P = 0.02) were also faster in the heavy resistance exercise condition (5.09 (±0.16) vs. 5.11 (±0.16) and 5.36 (±0.24) vs. 5.45 (±0.26) seconds respectively) although no other differences were shown. Findings demonstrate improved sprint times of trained adolescent soccer players after heavy resistance exercise although benefits appear not as sustained as in adult participants.

  4. Significant molecular and systemic adaptations after repeated sprint training in hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Faiss

    Full Text Available While intermittent hypoxic training (IHT has been reported to evoke cellular responses via hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs but without substantial performance benefits in endurance athletes, we hypothesized that repeated sprint training in hypoxia could enhance repeated sprint ability (RSA performed in normoxia via improved glycolysis and O(2 utilization. 40 trained subjects completed 8 cycling repeated sprint sessions in hypoxia (RSH, 3000 m or normoxia (RSN, 485 m. Before (Pre- and after (Post- training, muscular levels of selected mRNAs were analyzed from resting muscle biopsies and RSA tested until exhaustion (10-s sprint, work-to-rest ratio 1:2 with muscle perfusion assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy. From Pre- to Post-, the average power output of all sprints in RSA was increased (p<0.01 to the same extent (6% vs 7%, NS in RSH and in RSN but the number of sprints to exhaustion was increased in RSH (9.4±4.8 vs. 13.0±6.2 sprints, p<0.01 but not in RSN (9.3±4.2 vs. 8.9±3.5. mRNA concentrations of HIF-1α (+55%, carbonic anhydrase III (+35% and monocarboxylate transporter-4 (+20% were augmented (p<0.05 whereas mitochondrial transcription factor A (-40%, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (-23% and monocarboxylate transporter-1 (-36% were decreased (p<0.01 in RSH only. Besides, the changes in total hemoglobin variations (Δ[tHb] during sprints throughout RSA test increased to a greater extent (p<0.01 in RSH. Our findings show larger improvement in repeated sprint performance in RSH than in RSN with significant molecular adaptations and larger blood perfusion variations in active muscles.

  5. Specific Measurement of Tethered Running Kinetics and its Relationship to Repeated Sprint Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Filipe; Dos Reis, Ivan; Ribeiro, Luiz; Martins, Luiz; Gobatto, Claudio

    2015-12-22

    Repeated sprint ability has been widely studied by researchers, however, analysis of the relationship between most kinetic variables and the effect of fatigue is still an ongoing process. To search for the best biomechanical parameter to evaluate repeated sprint ability, several kinetic variables were measured in a tethered field running test and compared regarding their sensitivity to fatigue and correlation with time trials in a free running condition. Nine male sprint runners (best average times: 100 m = 10.45 ± 0.07 s; 200 m = 21.36 ± 0.17 s; 400 m = 47.35 ± 1.09 s) completed two test sessions on a synthetic track. Each session consisted of six 35 m sprints interspersed by 10 s rest under tethered field running or free running conditions. Force, power, work, an impulse and a rate of force development were all directly measured using the sensors of a new tethered running apparatus, and a one-way ANOVA with Scheffé post-hoc test used to verify differences between sprints (p sprints. These three variables presented low to moderate correlations with free running performance (r between 0.01 and -0.35). Maximum and mean power presented the strongest correlations with free running performance (r = -0.71 and -0.76, respectively; p sprint ability than the other studied variables.

  6. Correlation between explosive strength, aerobic power and repeated sprint ability in elite basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovic, M D; Ostojic, S M; Calleja-González, J; Milosevic, Z; Mikic, M

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between explosive strength and aerobic power with basketball-specific repeated sprint ability in elite male basketball players. Twenty-four elite basketball players (age 22.2±3.4 years, height 197.1±6.2 cm, weight 95.7±8.8 kg; training experience 11.0±3.1 years; mean±SD), participated in the study. Subjects performed countermovement jump (CMJ) test and incremental pseudo-ramp test protocol with measured CMJ height and VO2max, respectively. Specific repeated sprint ability (RSA) test was conducted, with total sprinting time (summation of 10 sprint times - RSAtot) and sprint decrement (fatigue index - RSAFI) calculated. Significant decrements in sprint performance from the eight 30-m sprint (P<0.05) were observed. Strong inverse correlation was found between CMJ and RSAtot (r=-0.74, P<0.01). No significant correlation was found between VO2max and RSA outcomes neither between CMJ and RSAFI. CMJ is a predictor of RSA in elite basketball players. It seems that coaches and strength and conditioning professionals should devote additional time for explosive strength development in elite basketball players during preparatory period to enhance RSA performance.

  7. The effect of an official match on repeated sprint ability in junior basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprino, Davide; Clarke, Neil David; Delextrat, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an official basketball match on repeated sprint ability indices in male junior players. Ten (16 ± 1 years old; 183.6 ± 7.0 cm; 76.6 ± 8.0 kg) starting players for their teams performed three repeated sprint ability tests, before, at half-time and immediately after an official match. Each repeated sprint ability test consisted of 10 shuttle-run sprints of 30 m (15 + 15 m) separated by 30 seconds of passive recovery. The matches were video-taped to determine the frequency of eight types of movement patterns, and blood lactate concentration was measured before and immediately after each repeated sprint ability test. Differences in total time, ideal time and percentage decrement between tests was assessed by a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures, while a two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to identify differences in blood lactate concentration. The main results indicated a significant decrease in total movement frequency (-9.9%), high-intensity activity frequency (-13.3%), run frequency (-13.0%) and sprint frequency (-23.3%) in the second compared to the first half, and significantly worse total time and ideal time at the end of the match, compared to the start and half-time (differences ranging from -2.1% to -2.9%, P < 0.05). The practical implications of these findings suggest that regional basketball players should participate in conditioning sessions that focus on the improvement of repeated sprint ability.

  8. Is there a diurnal variation in repeated sprint ability on a non-motorised treadmill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullinger, Samuel A; Brocklehurst, Emma L; Iveson, Reece P; Burniston, Jatin G; Doran, Dominic A; Waterhouse, James M; Edwards, Ben J

    2014-04-01

    In active males, muscle force production and short-term (variation is attributed to motivational, peripheral and central factors, and possibly the higher core and muscle temperatures observed in the evening. However, little is known regarding whether diurnal variation on a treadmill also exists in team-sport specific tests of repeated sprint ability (RSA), as would be relevant to football, for example. A controlled laboratory protocol using a non-motorised treadmill has been used to investigate whether daily variation in RSA is present in highly motivated athletes. Twenty active males (mean ± SD: age, 21.0 ± 2.2 yrs; maximal oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text] max), 60.8 ± 4.8 ml kg min(-1); body mass, 77.02 ± 10.5 kg and height, 1.79 ± 0.07 m) volunteered and completed two sessions counterbalanced in order of administration (separated by >48 h): a morning (M, 07:30 h) and evening (E, 17:30 h) session. Both sessions included a 5-min active warm-up on a motorised treadmill at 10 km h(-1) followed by three task-specific warm-up sprints at 50%, 70% and 80%, respectively, on a non-motorised treadmill. During each trial, 10 × 3 s repeated sprints with 30 s recoveries were performed on the non-motorised treadmill. Rectal (Trec) and muscle temperature measurements (Tm) were taken after subjects had reclined for 30 min at the start of the protocol, and again after the active warm-up. Values of heart rate, thermal comfort (TC), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and effort were measured throughout. Blood samples were taken at rest, after the sprints and 5-min post sprints. Data were analysed using a GLM with repeated measures. Trec and Tm values were higher at rest in the evening than the morning (0.46 °C and 0.57 °C, respectively, p p > 0.05). All subjects reported maximal values for "effort" for each sprint. There were significant positive correlations between Trec and Tm, Trec and RPE, TC and all measures of RSA performance. However, there was no correlation

  9. The Effect of Passive versus Active Recovery on Power Output over Six Repeated Wingate Sprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Egla-Irina D.; Smoliga, James M.; Zavorsky, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of active versus passive recovery on 6 repeated Wingate tests (30-s all-out cycling sprints on a Velotron ergometer). Method: Fifteen healthy participants aged 29 (SD = 8) years old (body mass index = 23 [3] kg/m[superscript 2]) participated in 3 sprint interval training sessions separated…

  10. Effects of combined creatine and sodium bicarbonate supplementation on repeated sprint performance in trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, James J; McDermott, Ann Y; McGaughey, Karen J; Olmstead, Jennifer D; Hagobian, Todd A

    2013-01-01

    Creatine and sodium bicarbonate supplementation independently increase exercise performance, but it remains unclear whether combining these 2 supplements is more beneficial on exercise performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of combining creatine monohydrate and sodium bicarbonate supplementation on exercise performance. Thirteen healthy, trained men (21.1 ± 0.6 years, 23.5 ± 0.5 kg·m(-2), 66.7 ± 5.7 ml·(kg·m)(-1) completed 3 conditions in a double-blinded, crossover fashion: (a) Placebo (Pl; 20 g maltodextrin + 0.5 g·kg(-1) maltodextrin), (b) Creatine (Cr; 20 g + 0.5 g·kg(-1) maltodextrin), and (c) Creatine plus sodium bicarbonate (Cr + Sb; 20 g + 0.5 g·kg(-1) sodium bicarbonate). Each condition consisted of supplementation for 2 days followed by a 3-week washout. Peak power, mean power, relative peak power, and bicarbonate concentrations were assessed during six 10-second repeated Wingate sprint tests on a cycle ergometer with a 60-second rest period between each sprint. Compared with Pl, relative peak power was significantly higher in Cr (4%) and Cr + Sb (7%). Relative peak power was significantly lower in sprints 4-6, compared with that in sprint 1, in both Pl and Cr. However, in Cr + Sb, sprint 6 was the only sprint significantly lower compared with sprint 1. Pre-Wingate bicarbonate concentrations were significantly higher in Cr + Sb (10%), compared with in Pl and Cr, and mean concentrations remained higher after sprint 6, although not significantly. Combining creatine and sodium bicarbonate supplementation increased peak and mean power and had the greatest attenuation of decline in relative peak power over the 6 repeated sprints. These data suggest that combining these 2 supplements may be advantageous for athletes participating in high-intensity, intermittent exercise.

  11. Interaction of central and peripheral factors during repeated sprints at different levels of arterial O2 saturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Billaut

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the interaction between the development of peripheral locomotor muscle fatigue, muscle recruitment and performance during repeated-sprint exercise (RSE. METHOD: In a single-blind, randomised and cross-over design, ten male team-sport athletes performed two RSE (fifteen 5-s cycling sprints interspersed with 25 s of rest; power self-selected in normoxia and in acute moderate hypoxia (FIO2 0.138. Mechanical work, total electromyographic intensity (summed quadriceps electromyograms, RMSsum and muscle (vastus lateralis and pre-fontal cortex near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS parameters were calculated for every sprint. Blood lactate concentration ([Lac(-] was measured throughout the protocol. Peripheral quadriceps fatigue was assessed via changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (ΔQtw,pot pre- versus post-exercise in response to supra-maximal magnetic femoral nerve stimulation. The central activation ratio (QCAR was used to quantify completeness of quadriceps activation. RESULTS: Compared with normoxia, hypoxia reduced arterial oxygen saturation (-13.7%, P=0.001, quadriceps RMSsum (-13.7%, P=0.022, QCAR (-3.3%, P=0.041 and total mechanical work (-8.3%, P=0.019. However, the magnitude of quadriceps fatigue induced by RSE was similar in the two conditions (ΔQtw,pot: -53.5% and -55.1%, P=0.71. The lower cycling performance in hypoxia occurred despite similar metabolic (muscle NIRS parameters and blood [Lac(-] and functional (twitch and M-wave muscle states. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that the central nervous system regulates quadriceps muscle recruitment and, thereby, performance to limit the development of muscle fatigue during intermittent, short sprints. This finding highlights the complex interaction between muscular perturbations and neural adjustments during sprint exercise, and further supports the presence of pacing during intermittent sprint exercise.

  12. Performance and physiological responses to repeated-sprint exercise: a novel multiple-set approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpiello, Fabio R; McKenna, Michael J; Stepto, Nigel K; Bishop, David J; Aughey, Robert J

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the acute and chronic responses to multiple sets of repeated-sprint exercise (RSE), focusing on changes in acceleration, intermittent running capacity and physiological responses. Ten healthy young adults (7 males, 3 females) performed an incremental test, a Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level1 (Yo-Yo IR1), and one session of RSE. RSE comprised three sets of 5 × 4-s maximal sprints on a non-motorised treadmill, with 20 s of passive recovery between repetitions and 4.5 min of passive recovery between sets. After ten repeated-sprint training sessions, participants repeated all tests. During RSE, performance was determined by measuring acceleration, mean and peak power/velocity. Recovery heart rate (HR), HR variability, and finger-tip capillary lactate concentration ([Lac(-)]) were measured. Performance progressively decreased across the three sets of RSE, with the indices of repeated-sprint ability being impaired to a different extent before and after training. Training induced a significant increase (p RSE. There were strong correlations between Yo-Yo IR1 performance and indices of RSE performance, especially acceleration post-training (r = 0.88, p = 0.004). Repeated-sprint training, comprising only 10 min of exercise overall, effectively improved performance during multiple-set RSE. This exercise model better reflects team-sport activities than single-set RSE. The rapid training-induced improvement in acceleration, quantified here for the first time, has wide applications for professional and recreational sport activities.

  13. Repeated-sprint performance, locomotor profile and muscle oxygen uptake recovery: effect of training background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufland, P; Ahmaidi, S; Buchheit, M

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the respective importance of locomotor profile and muscle oxygen uptake (mV(˙)O₂) recovery on repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and overall repeated-sprint performance. 11 sprint- (STR) and 10 middle-distance-trained (MDTR) athletes (20.8±4.0 yr) performed an incremental test and a 40-to-50-m sprint to estimate their maximal aerobic (MAS) and sprinting (MSS) speeds. They also performed 6×30-m sprints, departing every 30 s, where mean (RS(mean)) sprint time was calculated. Muscle oxygenation (Near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS, [Hb(diff)]) was measured for ~ 4 min post test. The mean response time of [Hb(diff)]-mV(˙)O₂ recovery (monoexponential curve fitting, MRT[Hb(diff)]-mV(˙)O₂) was calculated. Compared with MDTR, STR presented faster MSS (+11.4±6.7%, with 99% chances to observe a substantially greater value) and RS(mean) (-3.7±5.4%, 78%), but slower MAS (-15.8±8.0%, 100%) and MRT[Hb(diff)]-mV(˙)O₂ (+46.2±31.7%, 96%). RS(mean) was largely correlated with MSS [r=-0.83 (90%CL, -0.92;-0.67)], but neither with MAS [r=-0.12 (-0.47;0.25)] nor MRT[Hb(diff)]-mV(˙)O₂ [r=-0.27(-0.58;0.11)]. RS(mean) adjusted for MSS (which indirectly reflects RSA) was largely correlated with both MAS [r=0.51(0.18;0.74)] and MRT[Hb(diff)]-mV(˙)O₂ [r=0.53(0.20;0.75)]. While a fast mV(˙)O₂ recovery is associated with an improved RSA, MSS remains of primary importance for overall repeated-sprint performance (i.e., RS(mean)).

  14. Effects of sodium phosphate and caffeine ingestion on repeated-sprint ability in male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Benjamin J; Dawson, Brian T; Buck, Christopher; Wallman, Karen E

    2016-03-01

    To assess the effects of sodium phosphate (SP) and caffeine supplementation on repeated-sprint performance. Randomized, double-blind, Latin-square design. Eleven team-sport males participated in four trials: (1) SP (50mgkg(-1) of free fat-mass daily for six days) and caffeine (6mgkg(-1) ingested 1h before exercise); SP+C, (2) SP and placebo (for caffeine), (3) caffeine and placebo (for SP) and (4) placebo (for SP and caffeine). After loading, participants performed a simulated team-game circuit (STGC) consisting of 2×30min halves, with 6×20-m repeated-sprint sets performed at the start, half-time and end of the STGC. There were no interaction effects between trials for first-sprint (FS), best-sprint (BS) or total-sprint (TS) times (p>0.05). However, SP resulted in the fastest times for all sprints, as supported by moderate to large effect sizes (ES; d=0.51-0.83) and 'likely' to 'very likely' chances of benefit, compared with placebo. Compared with caffeine, SP resulted in 'possible' to 'likely' chances of benefit for FS, BS and TS for numerous sets and a 'possible' chance of benefit compared with SP+C for BS (set 2). Compared with placebo, SP+C resulted in moderate ES (d=0.50-0.62) and 'possible' to 'likely' benefit for numerous sprints, while caffeine resulted in a moderate ES (d=0.63; FS: set 3) and 'likely' chances of benefit for a number of sets. While not significant, ES and qualitative analysis results suggest that SP supplementation may improve repeated-sprint performance when compared with placebo. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of oral creatine supplementation on performance in single and repeated sprint swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrebrune, M C; Nevill, M E; Donaldson, F J; Cosford, D J

    1998-04-01

    We studied the effects of oral creatine supplementation on sprint swimming performance in 14 elite competitive male swimmers. The subjects performed a single sprint (1 x 50 yards [45.72 m]) and repeated sprint set (8 x 50 yards at intervals of 1 min 30 s) before and after a 5 day period of either creatine (9 g creatine + 4.5 g maltodextrin + 4.5 g glucose day(-1)) or placebo (18 g glucose day(-1); double-blind protocol) supplementation. Venous and capillary blood samples were taken for the determination of plasma ammonia, blood pH and lactate. Mean times recorded for the single 50 yard sprint were unchanged as a result of supplementation (creatine vs control, N.S.). During the repeated sprint test, mean times increased (Pcreatine supplementation (sprints 1-8: control pre-, 23.35+/-0.68 to 26.32+/-1.34 s; control post-, 23.59+/-0.66 to 26.19+/-1.48 s; creatine pre-, 23.20+/-0.67 to 26.85+/-0.42 s; creatine post-, 23.39+/-0.54 to 25.73+/-0.26 s; P creatine supplementation (control, 12.7+/-5.7% vs 11.0+/-5.5%; creatine, 15.7+/-4.3% vs 10.0+/-2.5%; Pcreatine in this group of swimmers after an identical supplementation regimen. In summary, our results suggest that ingesting 9 g creatine per day for 5 days can improve swimming performance in elite competitors during repeated sprints, but appears to have no effect on a single 50 yard sprint.

  16. Effect of Beta alanine and sodium bicarbonate supplementation on repeated-sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducker, Kagan J; Dawson, Brian; Wallman, Karen E

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate if combining beta alanine (BA) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) supplementation could lead to enhanced repeated-sprint performance in team-sport athletes, beyond what is possible with either supplement alone. Participants (n = 24) completed duplicate trials of a repeated-sprint test (3 sets; 6 × 20 m departing every 25 seconds, 4 minutes active recovery between sets) and were then allocated into 4 groups as follows: BA only (n = 6; 28 days BA, acute sodium chloride placebo); NaHCO3 only (n = 6; 28 days glucose placebo, acute NaHCO3); BA/NaHCO3 (n = 6; 28 days BA, acute NaHCO3); placebo only (n = 6; 28 days glucose placebo, acute sodium chloride placebo), then completed duplicate trials postsupplementation. Sodium bicarbonate alone resulted in moderate effect size (d = 0.40-0.71) and "likely" and "very likely" benefit for overall total sprint times (TST) and for each individual set and for first sprint (sets 2 and 3) and best sprint time (sets 2 and 3). Combining BA and NaHCO3 resulted in "possible" to "likely" benefits for overall TST and for sets 2 and 3. First sprint (set 3) and best sprint time (sets 2 and 3) also showed "likely" benefit after this trial. The BA and placebo groups showed no differences in performance after supplementation. In conclusion, these results indicate that supplementation with acute NaHCO3 improved repeated-sprint performance more than either a combination of NaHCO3 and BA or BA alone.

  17. Sex alters impact of repeated bouts of sprint exercise on neuromuscular activity in trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Smith, Kurt

    2009-08-01

    This study characterized the effect of sex on neuromuscular activity during repeated bouts of sprint exercise. Thirty-three healthy male and female athletes performed twenty 5-s cycle sprints separated by 25 s of rest. Mechanical work and integrated electromyograhs (iEMG) of 4 muscles of the dominant lower limb were calculated in every sprint. The iEMG signals from individual muscles were summed to represent overall electrical activity of these muscles (sum-iEMG). Neuromuscular efficiency (NME) was calculated as the ratio of mechanical work and sum-iEMG for every sprint. Arterial oxygen saturation was estimated (SpO2) with pulse oximetry throughout the protocol. The sprint-induced work decrement (18.9% vs. 29.6%; p women than for the men. However, the sprints decreased NME (10.1%; p men, R2 = 0.87; women, R2 = 0.91; all p sprint exercise is not likely to be explained by a difference in muscle contractility impairment in men and women, but may be due to a sex difference in muscle recruitment strategy. We speculate that women would be less sensitive to arterial O2 desaturation than men, which may trigger lower neuromuscular adjustments to exhaustive exercise.

  18. Effects of sodium phosphate and beetroot juice supplementation on repeated-sprint ability in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher L; Henry, Timothy; Guelfi, Kym; Dawson, Brian; McNaughton, Lars R; Wallman, Karen

    2015-10-01

    Sodium phosphate (SP) and beetroot juice (BJ) supplementation was assessed on repeated-sprint ability (RSA). Thirteen female team-sport participants completed four trials: (1) SP and BJ (SP + BJ), (2) SP and placebo (for BJ), (3) BJ and placebo (for SP) and (4) placebo (for SP + BJ), with ~21 days separating each trial. After each trial, participants performed a simulated team-game circuit (STGC) consisting of four 15 min quarters, with a 6 × 20-m repeated-sprint set performed at the start, half-time and end. Total sprint times were between 0.95-1.30 and 0.83-1.12 s faster for each RSA set and 3.25 and 3.12 s faster overall (~5% improvement) after SP compared with placebo and BJ, respectively (p = 0.02 for sets 1, 2 and overall; Cohen's effect size: d = -0.51 to -0.90 for all sets and overall). Additionally, total sprint times were 0.48 s faster after SP + BJ compared with placebo (set 2; p = 0.05, ~2% improvement). Furthermore, best sprints were 0.13-0.23 and 0.15-0.20 s faster (~6% improvement; p sprint times were faster after SP compared with placebo and BJ.

  19. Relationship between repeated sprint ability and aerobic capacity in professional soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rhys M; Cook, Christian C; Kilduff, Liam P; Milanović, Zoran; James, Nic; Sporiš, Goran; Fiorentini, Bruno; Fiorentini, Fredi; Turner, Anthony; Vučković, Goran

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2max)) and repeated sprint ability (RSA) in a group of professional soccer players. Forty-one professional soccer players (age 23 ± 4 yrs, height 180.0 ± 5.3 cm, weight 79.6 ± 5.3 kg) were required to perform tests to assess RSA and VO(2max) on two separate days with at least 48 hr rest between testing sessions. Each player performed a treadmill test to determine their VO(2max) and a test for RSA involving the players completing 6 × 40 m sprints (turn after 20 m) with 20 s active recovery between each sprint. There was a significant negative correlation between body mass normalised VO(2max) and mean sprint time (RSAmean) (r = -0.655; P sprint time (RSAtotal) (r = -0.591, P repeated sprint type activities.

  20. Relationship between Repeated Sprint Ability and Aerobic Capacity in Professional Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rhys M.; Cook, Christian C.; Kilduff, Liam P.; Milanović, Zoran; James, Nic; Sporiš, Goran; Fiorentini, Bruno; Fiorentini, Fredi; Turner, Anthony; Vučković, Goran

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between maximal aerobic capacity (VO2 max) and repeated sprint ability (RSA) in a group of professional soccer players. Methods. Forty-one professional soccer players (age 23 ± 4 yrs, height 180.0 ± 5.3 cm, weight 79.6 ± 5.3 kg) were required to perform tests to assess RSA and VO2 max on two separate days with at least 48 hr rest between testing sessions. Each player performed a treadmill test to determine their VO2 max and a test for RSA involving the players completing 6 × 40 m sprints (turn after 20 m) with 20 s active recovery between each sprint. Results. There was a significant negative correlation between body mass normalised VO2 max and mean sprint time (RSAmean) (r = −0.655; P < 0.01) and total sprint time (RSAtotal) (r = −0.591, P < 0.01). Conclusion. Results of the current study indicate that VO2 max is one important factor aiding soccer players in the recovery from repeated sprint type activities. PMID:24198732

  1. Reliability, usefulness, and validity of a repeated sprint and jump ability test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Spencer, Matt; Ahmaidi, Said

    2010-03-01

    Two studies involving 122 handball players were conducted to assess the reliability, usefulness, and validity of a repeated shuttle-sprint and jump ability (RSSJA) test. The test consisted of 6x(2x12.5-m) sprints departing on 25 s, with a countermovement jump performed during recovery between sprints. For the reliability and usefulness study, 14 well-trained male handball players performed the RSSJA test 7 d apart. Reliability of the test variables was assessed by the typical error of measurement, expressed as a coefficient of variation (CV). The minimal changes likely to be "real" in sprint time and jump power were also calculated. For the validity study, players of seven teams (national to international levels, women and men) performed the RSSJA test. CV values for best and mean sprint time were 1.0% (90% CL, 0.7 to 1.6) and 1.0% (90% CL, 0.7 to 1.4). CV values for best and mean jump peak power were 1.7% (90% CL, 1.2 to 2.7) and 1.5% (90% CL, 1.1 to 2.5). The percent sprint and jump decrements were less reliable, with CVs of 22.3% (90% CL, 15.7 to 38.3) and 34.8% (90% CL, 24.2 to 61.8). Minimal changes likely to be "real" for mean sprint time and jumping peak power were -2.6% and 4.8%. Qualitative analysis revealed that the majority of between-team differences were rated as "almost certain" (ie, 100% probability that the true differences were meaningful) for mean sprint and jump performances. The RSSJA test is reliable and valid to assess repeated explosive effort sequences in team sports such as handball. Test results are likely to be representative of gender and competition level; thus the test could be used to discriminate across playing standards and monitor fitness levels.

  2. Effects of Three Different Resistance Training Frequencies on Jump, Sprint, and Repeated Sprint Ability Performance in Professional Futsal Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Franco, Adrián; Rey, Ezequiel; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto

    2017-02-21

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of 3 different resistance training frequencies (one strength training session per week (1W), two strength training sessions per week (2W) or one strength training session every second week (0.5W)) on jump, sprint and repeated sprint performance (RSA) in professional futsal players. Thirty-five futsal players were randomized into 1 of 3 groups, the 1W group (n= 12), 2W group (n= 12), or the 0.5W group (n= 11). The players performed the same resistance training during 6 weeks and only training frequency differed between the groups. Within-group analysis showed significant improvements in jump (p≤0.001, Effect Size (ES)= 0.13-0.35), sprint (p≤0.001, ES= 0.48-0.71), and RSA (p≤0.01, ES= 0.22-0.63) from pretest to posttest in 1W and 2W. However, no significant (p>0.05) pre-post changes were observed for the 0.5W in any variable. In the between-groups analysis, significant better results were found in jump (p≤0.01), sprint (p≤0.01), and RSA performance (p≤0.01) in the 1W group and 2W group in comparison with 0.5W group. Also, jump (p≤0.05) and 5 m sprint (p≤0.05) performances was significantly better in the 2W group in comparison with 1W group. In conclusion, the current study showed that 6 weeks of RT one or two times per week in addition to typical futsal training, produced significant improvements in jump, sprint and RSA performance. Additionally, RT one every second week may be sufficient to maintain physical fitness in professional futsal players. This information may be useful for coaches when planning training contents during congested fixture schedules or in periods where the emphasis need to be put on other qualities and spend as little time as possible on maintaining or increasing physical performance.

  3. Repeated-sprint performance and vastus lateralis oxygenation: effect of limited O₂ availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, F; Buchheit, M

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the influence of muscle deoxygenation and reoxygenation on repeated-sprint performance via manipulation of O2 delivery. Fourteen team-sport players performed 10 10-s sprints (30-s recovery) under normoxic (NM: FI O2 0.21) and acute hypoxic (HY: FI O2 0.13) conditions in a randomized, single-blind fashion and crossover design. Mechanical work was calculated and arterial O2 saturation (Sp O2 ) was estimated via pulse oximetry for every sprint. Muscle deoxyhemoglobin concentration ([HHb]) was monitored continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy. Differences between NM and HY data were analyzed for practical significance using magnitude-based inferences. HY reduced Sp O2 (-10.7 ± 1.9%, with chances to observe a higher/similar/lower value in HY of 0/0/100%) and mechanical work (-8.2 ± 2.1%; 0/0/100%). Muscle deoxygenation increased during sprints in both environments, but was almost certainly higher in HY (12.5 ± 3.1%, 100/0/0%). Between-sprint muscle reoxygenation was likely more attenuated in HY (-11.1 ± 11.9%; 2/7/91%). The impairment in mechanical work in HY was very largely correlated with HY-induced attenuation in muscle reoxygenation (r = 0.78, 90% confidence limits: 0.49; 0.91). Repeated-sprint performance is related, in part, to muscle reoxygenation capacity during recovery periods. These results extend previous findings that muscle O2 availability is important for prolonged repeated-sprint performance, in particular when the exercise is taken in hypoxia.

  4. Specific Measurement of Tethered Running Kinetics and its Relationship to Repeated Sprint Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa Filipe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Repeated sprint ability has been widely studied by researchers, however, analysis of the relationship between most kinetic variables and the effect of fatigue is still an ongoing process. To search for the best biomechanical parameter to evaluate repeated sprint ability, several kinetic variables were measured in a tethered field running test and compared regarding their sensitivity to fatigue and correlation with time trials in a free running condition. Nine male sprint runners (best average times: 100 m = 10.45 ± 0.07 s; 200 m = 21.36 ± 0.17 s; 400 m = 47.35 ± 1.09 s completed two test sessions on a synthetic track. Each session consisted of six 35 m sprints interspersed by 10 s rest under tethered field running or free running conditions. Force, power, work, an impulse and a rate of force development were all directly measured using the sensors of a new tethered running apparatus, and a one-way ANOVA with Scheffé post-hoc test used to verify differences between sprints (p < 0.05. Pearson product-moment correlation measured the relationship between mechanical variables and free running performance. A total impulse, the rate of force development and maximum force did not show significant differences for most sprints. These three variables presented low to moderate correlations with free running performance (r between 0.01 and -0.35. Maximum and mean power presented the strongest correlations with free running performance (r = -0.71 and -0.76, respectively; p < 0.001, followed by mean force (r = -0.61; p < 0.001 and total work (r = -0.50; p < 0.001. It was concluded that under a severe work-to-rest ratio condition, power variables were better suited to evaluating repeated sprint ability than the other studied variables.

  5. Effects of sodium phosphate and caffeine loading on repeated-sprint ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher; Guelfi, Kym; Dawson, Brian; McNaughton, Lars; Wallman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The effects of sodium phosphate and caffeine supplementation were assessed on repeated-sprint ability. Using a randomised, double-blind, Latin-square design, 12 female, team-sport players participated in four trials: (1) sodium phosphate and caffeine, (2) sodium phosphate and placebo (for caffeine), (3) caffeine and placebo (for sodium phosphate) and (4) placebo (for sodium phosphate and caffeine), with ~21 days separating each trial. After each trial, participants performed a simulated team-game circuit (4 × 15 min quarters) with 6 × 20-m repeated-sprints performed once before (Set 1), at half-time (Set 2), and after end (Set 3). Total sprint times were faster after sodium phosphate and caffeine supplementation compared with placebo (Set 1: P = 0.003; Set 2: d = -0.51; Set 3: P sprint times were faster after sodium phosphate supplementation compared with placebo (Set 1: d = -0.52; Set 3: d = -0.58). Best sprint results were faster after sodium phosphate and caffeine supplementation compared with placebo (Set 3: P = 0.007, d = -0.90) and caffeine (Set 3: P = 0.024, d = -0.73). Best sprint times were also faster after sodium phosphate supplementation compared with placebo (d = -0.54 to -0.61 for all sets). Sodium phosphate and combined sodium phosphate and caffeine loading improved repeated-sprint ability.

  6. Not quite so fast: effect of training at 90% sprint speed on maximal and repeated-sprint ability in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Thomas; Tonnessen, Espen; Leirstein, Svein; Hem, Erlend; Seiler, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of training at an intensity eliciting 90% of maximal sprinting speed on maximal and repeated-sprint performance in soccer. It was hypothesised that sprint training at 90% of maximal velocity would improve soccer-related sprinting. Twenty-two junior club-level male and female soccer players (age 17 ± 1 year, body mass 64 ± 8 kg, body height 174 ± 8 cm) completed an intervention study where the training group (TG) replaced one of their weekly soccer training sessions with a repeated-sprint training session performed at 90% of maximal sprint speed, while the control group (CG) completed regular soccer training according to their teams' original training plans. Countermovement jump, 12 × 20-m repeated-sprint, VO2max and the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test were performed prior to and after a 9-week intervention period. No significant between-group differences were observed for any of the performance indices and effect magnitudes were trivial or small. Before rejecting the hypothesis, we recommend that future studies should perform intervention programmes with either stronger stimulus or at other times during the season where total training load is reduced.

  7. No Improved Performance With Repeated-Sprint Training in Hypoxia Versus Normoxia: A Double-Blind and Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, David; Lundby, Carsten

    2017-02-01

    Few recent studies indicate that short-term repeated-sprint (RS) training in hypoxia (RSH) improves RS performance compared with identical training under normoxic conditions (RSN) in endurance-trained subjects. To determine the effects of RSH against RSN on RS performance under normoxic and moderate hypoxic conditions, using a randomized, doubleblind, crossover experimental design. Fifteen endurance-trained male subjects (age 25 ± 4 y) performed 4 wk of RS training (3 sessions/wk) in normobaric hypoxia (RSH, FiO2 = 13.8%) and normoxia (RSN, FiO2 = 20.9%) in a crossover manner. Before and after completion of training, RS tests were performed on a cycle ergometer with no prior exercise (RSNE), after an incremental exercise test (RSIE), and after a time-trial test (RSTT) in normoxia and hypoxia. Peak power outputs at the incremental exercise test and time-trial performance were unaltered by RSH in normoxia and hypoxia. RS performance was generally enhanced by RSH, as well as RSN, but there were no additional effects of RSH over RSN on peak and mean sprint power output and the number of repeated sprints performed in the RSNE, RSIE, and RSTT trials under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The present double-blind crossover study indicates that RSH does not improve RS performance compared with RSN in normoxic and hypoxic conditions in endurance-trained subjects. Therefore, caution should be exercised when proposing RSH as an advantageous method to improve exercise performance.

  8. Effect of short burst activities on sprint and agility performance in 11- to 12-year-old boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Svein A; Mathisen, Gunnar E

    2012-04-01

    There are limited data on how coordinative sprint drills and maximal short burst activities affects children's sprint and agility performance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of short burst activities on sprint and agility performance in 11- to 12-year-old boys. A training group (TG) of 14 boys followed a 6-week, 1-hour·week(-1), training program consisting of different short burst competitive sprinting activities. Eleven boys of similar age served as controls (control group [CG]). Pre- and posttests assessed 10-m sprint, 20-m sprint, and agility performance. Results revealed significant performance improvement in all tests within TG (p sprint test. Furthermore, the relationships between the performances in straight-line sprint and agility showed a significant transfer effect (r = 0.68-0.75, p sprint and agility performance in 11- to 12-year-old boys.

  9. Longitudinal study of repeated sprint performance in youth soccer players of contrasting skeletal maturity status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente-dos-Santos, Joao; Coelho-e-Silva, Manuel J.; Severino, Vitor; Duarte, Joao; Martins, Raul S.; Figueiredo, Antonio J.; Seabra, Andre T.; Philippaerts, Renaat M.; Cumming, Sean P.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije; Malina, Robert M.

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the developmental changes in performance in a repeated-sprint ability (RSA) test in young soccer players of contrasting maturity status. A total of 83 regional level Portuguese youth soccer players, aged 11-13 years at baseline was assessed annually. Stature,

  10. Longitudinal study of repeated sprint performance in youth soccer players of contrasting maturity status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Duarte; A. Seabra; A. Figueiredo; S. Cumming; R. Martins; R. Philippaerts; M. Coelho e Silva; J. Valente dos Santos; V. Severino; Marije Elferink-Gemser

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the developmental changes in performance in a repeated-sprint ability (RSA) test in young soccer players of contrasting maturity status. A total of 83 regional level Portuguese youth soccer players, aged 11- 13 years at baseline was assessed annually.

  11. Effetti dell'allenamento intermittente breve ad alta intensità e delle ripetute aerobiche sul Test Repeated Sprint Ability in giovani calciatori d'elite

    OpenAIRE

    Ibba, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of two different training methods: the repeated aerobic bouts and the short intermittent high intensity workout on the ability to carry out repeated sprint bouts RSA in a group of young soccer players and also to determine the impact of training on aerobic and neuromuscular performances. Twenty-Four (24) male soccer players have been assessed and trained, all of them partecipating regularly in the 2013-2014 season at the Nati...

  12. Changes in spring-mass model characteristics during repeated running sprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Millet, Grégoire P

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated fatigue-induced changes in spring-mass model characteristics during repeated running sprints. Sixteen active subjects performed 12 × 40 m sprints interspersed with 30 s of passive recovery. Vertical and anterior-posterior ground reaction forces were measured at 5-10 m and 30-35 m and used to determine spring-mass model characteristics. Contact (P Stride frequency (P  0.05) increased with time. As a result, vertical stiffness decreased (P  0.05). Changes in vertical stiffness were correlated (r > 0.7; P stride frequency. When compared to 5-10 m, most of ground reaction force-related parameters were higher (P stride frequency, vertical and leg stiffness were lower (P run-based sprints are repeated, which alters impact parameters. Maintaining faster stride frequencies through retaining higher vertical stiffness is a prerequisite to improve performance during repeated sprinting.

  13. Relationship among Repeated Sprint Ability, Chronological Age and Puberty in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perroni, Fabrizio; Pintus, Antonio; Frandino, Mattia; Guidetti, Laura; Baldari, Carlo

    2016-01-20

    The aim of this study was to analyzed the relationship of Repeated Sprinting Ability (RSA) with chronological age and puberty in 100 young soccer players (Age: 13 ± 3 yr - 160 ± 33 month-; High: 159 ± 16 cm, Weight: 49.7 ± 14.1 kg; BMI 19.2 ± 2.5 kg/m) grouped on "Pulcini" (9 - 10 yrs), "Esordienti" (11 - 12 yrs), "Giovanissimi" (13 - 14 yrs), "Allievi" (15 - 16 yrs) and "Juniores" (> 17 yrs) categories. Anthropometric (Weight, Height, BMI), RSA (7x30 m sprint with 25s active rest: Total Time -TT, the lowest sprinting time (LST) and the fatigue index percentage -%IF), and Development (Self-Administered Rating Scale for pubertal development - PDS; Puberty) parameters were measured. ANOVA among categories was applied to asses differences (pinjury and overtraining during the different phases of growth and maturation.

  14. Laboratory Determinants of Repeated-Sprint and Sport-Specific-Technique Ability in World-Class Ice Sledge Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Julia Kathrin; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2016-03-01

    To investigate on-ice repeated-sprint and sports-specific-technique abilities and the relationships to aerobic and anaerobic off-ice capacities in world-class ice sledge hockey players. Twelve Norwegian national team players performed 8 repeated maximal 30-m sprints and a sports-specific-technique test while upper-body poling on ice, followed by 4 maximal upper-body strength tests and 8-s peak power and 3-min peak aerobic-capacity (VO2peak) tests while ergometer poling. The fastest 30-m sprint time was 6.5 ± 0.4 s, the fastest initial 10-m split-time 2.9 ± 0.2 s, and the corresponding power output 212 ± 37 W. Average 30-m time during the 8 repeated sprints was 6.7 ± 0.4 s, and the sprint-time decrement was 4.3% ± 1.8%. Time to execute the sport-specific-technique test was 25.6 ± 2.7 s. Averaged 1-repetition-maximum strength of the 4 exercises correlated with the fastest 30-m sprint time (r = -.77), the fastest initial 10-m split time (r = -.72), the corresponding power output (r = .67), and the average 30-m sprint time (r = -.84) (all P sprint test correlated with the highest initial 10-m power (r = .83, P sprint time (r = -.68, P sprint-time decrement. All off-ice variables except VO2peak correlated with technique-test time (r = -.58 to .73, all P ability to sprint fast and rapid execution of a technically complex test, whereas mode-specific endurance capacity is particularly important for maintenance of sprint ability in ice sledge hockey.

  15. Mechanical work accounts for sex differences in fatigue during repeated sprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Bishop, David J

    2012-04-01

    To investigate whether the larger reduction in mechanical work observed during repeated-sprint exercise (RSE) in men versus women represents a true, physiological sex dimorphism or is the consequence of the higher initial mechanical work performed by men. Male and female team-sport athletes (n = 35) performed 20, 5-s cycle sprints interspersed with 25 s of rest. Mechanical work and surface electromyograms (EMG) of four muscles were recorded in every sprint. Mechanical work achieved in one sprint (20.7%, P = 0.0006), total work accumulated over the 20 sprints (21.1%, P = 0.009) and percent work decrement (32.2%, P = 0.008) were larger in men than in women. When both sexes were plotted together, there was a positive relationship between the initial-sprint work and the work decrement across sprint repetitions (r = 0.89, P = 0.002). The RSE induced larger (P = 0.009) absolute EMG amplitude changes in men (-155.2 ± 60.3 mVs) than in women (-102.5 ± 45.1 mVs). Interestingly, in a subset of men and women (n = 7 per group) matched for initial-sprint work, the sex difference in percent work decrement (men: -29.5 ± 1.5%; women: -27.2 ± 3.2%; P = 0.72) and EMG changes (men: -17.7 ± 6.9% vs. women: -15.3 ± 7.1%; P = 0.69) no longer persisted. Results show that the proposed greater fatigue in men is likely to be a consequence of their greater absolute initial-sprint performance, rather than a sex difference in fatigue resistance per se. We conclude that, on the basis of the absolute mechanical work completed, women are not more fatigue resistant than men and use comparable muscle recruitment strategies to perform RSE.

  16. Relationship Between Repeated Sprint Performance and both Aerobic and Anaerobic Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardouri, Wajdi; Selmi, Mohamed Amin; Sassi, Radhouane Haj; Gharbi, Zied; Rebhi, Ahmed; Yahmed, Mohamed Haj; Moalla, Wassim

    2014-03-27

    The aims of this study were firstly, to examine the relationship between repeated sprint performance indices and anaerobic speed reserve (AnSR), aerobic fitness and anaerobic power and secondly, to identify the best predictors of sprinting ability among these parameters. Twenty nine subjects (age: 22.5 ± 1.6 years, body height: 1.8 ± 0.1 m, body mass: 68.8 ± 8.5 kg, body mass index (BMI): 22.2 ± 2.1 kg•m-2, fat mass: 11.3 ± 2.9 %) participated in this study. All participants performed a 30 m sprint test (T30) from which we calculated the maximal anaerobic speed (MAnS), vertical and horizontal jumps, 20m multi-stage shuttle run test (MSRT) and repeated sprint test (10 × 15 m shuttle run). AnSR was calculated as the difference between MAnS and the maximal speed reached in the MSRT. Blood lactate sampling was performed 3 min after the RSA protocol. There was no significant correlation between repeated sprint indices (total time (TT); peak time (PT), fatigue index (FI)) and both estimated VO2max and vertical jump performance). TT and PT were significantly correlated with T30 (r=0.63, p=0.001 and r=0.62, p=0.001; respectively), horizontal jump performance (r = -0.47, p = 0.001 and r = -0.49, p = 0.006; respectively) and AnSR (r=-0.68, p= 0.001 and r=-0.70, p=0.001, respectively). Significant correlations were found between blood lactate concentration and TT, PT, and AnSR (r=-0.44, p=0.017; r=-0.43, p=0.018 and r=0.44, p=0.016; respectively). Stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that AnSR was the only significant predictor of the TT and PT, explaining 47% and 50% of the shared variance, respectively. Our findings are of particular interest for coaches and fitness trainers in order to predict repeated sprint performance by using AnSR that can easily identify the respective upper performance limits supported by aerobic and anaerobic power of a player involved in multi-sprint team sports.

  17. Relationship Between Repeated Sprint Performance and both Aerobic and Anaerobic Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardouri, Wajdi; Selmi, Mohamed Amin; Sassi, Radhouane Haj; Gharbi, Zied; Rebhi, Ahmed; Yahmed, Mohamed Haj; Moalla, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were firstly, to examine the relationship between repeated sprint performance indices and anaerobic speed reserve (AnSR), aerobic fitness and anaerobic power and secondly, to identify the best predictors of sprinting ability among these parameters. Twenty nine subjects (age: 22.5 ± 1.6 years, body height: 1.8 ± 0.1 m, body mass: 68.8 ± 8.5 kg, body mass index (BMI): 22.2 ± 2.1 kg•m-2, fat mass: 11.3 ± 2.9 %) participated in this study. All participants performed a 30 m sprint test (T30) from which we calculated the maximal anaerobic speed (MAnS), vertical and horizontal jumps, 20m multi-stage shuttle run test (MSRT) and repeated sprint test (10 × 15 m shuttle run). AnSR was calculated as the difference between MAnS and the maximal speed reached in the MSRT. Blood lactate sampling was performed 3 min after the RSA protocol. There was no significant correlation between repeated sprint indices (total time (TT); peak time (PT), fatigue index (FI)) and both estimated VO2max and vertical jump performance). TT and PT were significantly correlated with T30 (r=0.63, p=0.001 and r=0.62, p=0.001; respectively), horizontal jump performance (r = −0.47, p = 0.001 and r = −0.49, p = 0.006; respectively) and AnSR (r=−0.68, p= 0.001 and r=−0.70, p=0.001, respectively). Significant correlations were found between blood lactate concentration and TT, PT, and AnSR (r=−0.44, p=0.017; r=−0.43, p=0.018 and r=0.44, p=0.016; respectively). Stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that AnSR was the only significant predictor of the TT and PT, explaining 47% and 50% of the shared variance, respectively. Our findings are of particular interest for coaches and fitness trainers in order to predict repeated sprint performance by using AnSR that can easily identify the respective upper performance limits supported by aerobic and anaerobic power of a player involved in multi-sprint team sports. PMID:25031682

  18. Performance and physiological responses to repeated-sprint and jump sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the performance and selected physiological responses to team-sport specific repeated-sprint and jump sequence were investigated. On four occasions, 13 team-sport players (22 ± 3 year) performed alternatively six repeated maximal straight-line or shuttle-sprints interspersed with a jump ([RS(+j), 6 × 25 m] or [RSS(+j), 6 × (2 × 12.5 m)]) or not ([RS, 6 × 25 m] or [RSS, 6 × (2 × 12.5 m)]) within each recovery period. Mean running time, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), pulmonary oxygen uptake (V(O)₂), blood lactate ([La](b)), and vastus lateralis deoxygenation ([HHb]) were obtained for each condition. Mean sprint times were greater for RS(+j) versus RS (4.14 ± 0.17 vs. 4.09 ± 0.16 s, with the qualitative analysis revealing a 82% chance of RS(+j) times to be greater than RS) and for RSS(+j) versus RSS (5.43 ± 0.18 vs. 5.29 ± 0.17 s; 99% chance of RSS(+j) to be >RSS). The correlation between sprint and jump abilities were large-to-very-large, but below 0.71 for RSSs. Jumps increased RPE (Cohen's d ± 90% CL: +0.7 ± 0.5; 95% chance for RS(+j) > RS and +0.7 ± 0.5; 96% for RSS(+j) > RSS), V(O)₂(+0.4 ± 0.5; 80% for RS(+j) > RS and +0.5 ± 0.5; 86% for RSS(+j) > RSS), [La](b) (+0.5 ± 0.5; 59% for RS(+j) > RS and +0.2 ± 0.5; unclear for RSS(+j) > RSS), and [HHb] (+0.5 ± 0.5; 86% for RS(+j) > RS and +0.5 ± 0.5; 85% for RSS(+j) > RSS). To conclude, repeated- sprint and jump abilities could be considered as specific qualities. The addition of a jump within the recovery periods during repeated-sprint running sequences impairs sprinting performance and might be an effective training practice for eliciting both greater systemic and vastus lateralis physiological loads.

  19. Repeated sprint ability in soccer players: associations with physiological and neuromuscular factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Marcelo; DA Silva, Juliano F; Buzzachera, Cosme F; Castagna, Carlo; Guglielmo, Luiz G

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between repeated sprint ability (RSA, 6×40 m [20+20 m] with 20-s recovery) and neuromuscular and aerobic fitness variables in male collegiate soccer players. Twenty-six players (age 22.5±3.6 years) were tested on separate days for countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), and standing long jump (LJ), and for maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2max), velocity at onset of blood lactate accumulation (vOBLA), maximal aerobic speed (vV̇O2max), and peak blood lactate concentration (peak [La]). They were also tested for best and mean times on a repeated shuttle sprint ability test. RSA best time (r=-0.73 and r=-0.54) and RSA mean sprint time (r=-0.69 and r=-0.62) were significantly (Psprint time and sprint decrement with vOBLA (r=-0.44) and peak [La] (r=0.47), respectively. This study showed that RSA performance had a large to very large association with the individual level of jump performance and to a smaller extent to aerobic fitness variables in male collegiate soccer players. Given this finding, lower limbs' explosive-strength performance should be regarded as a relevant factor for male soccer.

  20. Repeated sprint swimming performance after low- or high-intensity active and passive recoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubekis, Argyris G; Adam, Georgios V; Douda, Helen T; Antoniou, Panagiotis D; Douroundos, Ioannis I; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects on sprint swimming performance after low- and high-intensity active recovery (AR) as compared to passive recovery. Ten male competitive swimmers (age: 17.9 ± 2.3 years; body mass: 73.2 ± 4.0 kg; height: 1.81 ± 0.04 m, 100-m best time: 54.90 ± 1.96 seconds) performed 8 × 25-m sprints with 120-second rest intervals followed by a 50-m sprint 6 minutes later. During the 120-second and the 6-minute interval periods swimmers rested passively (PAS) or swam at an intensity of 40% (ACT40; 36 ± 8% of the V(O2)max) and 60% (ACT60; 59 ± 7% of the V(O2)max) of their individual 100-m velocity. Performance time of the 8 × 25-m after ACT60 was slower compared with PAS and ACT40, but no difference was observed between ACT40 and PAS conditions (PAS: 12.15 ± 0.48, ACT40: 12.23 ± 0.54, ACT60: 12.35 ± 0.57 seconds, p sprint was no different between conditions (PAS: 26.45 ± 0.91; ACT40: 26.30 ± 1.18; ACT60: 26.21 ± 1.19 seconds; p > 0.05). Blood lactate concentration was not different between PAS, ACT40, and ACT60 after the 8 × 25-m and the 50-m sprints (p > 0.05). Passive recovery, or low intensity of AR (40% of the 100-m velocity), is advised to maintain repeated 25-m sprint swimming performance when a 2-minute interval period is provided. Active recovery at an intensity corresponding to 60% of the 100-m velocity decreases performance during the 25-m repeated sprints without affecting the performance time on a subsequent longer duration sprint (i.e., 50 m).

  1. Effects of red bull energy drink on repeated sprint performance in women athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, Todd A; Matera, Angela J; Basinger, Jency; Evans, Mindy; Schurman, Taylor; Marquez, Rodney

    2012-05-01

    Energy drinks are frequently consumed by athletes prior to competition to improve performance. This study examined the effect of Red Bull™ on repeated sprint performance in women athletes. Fifteen collegiate soccer players participated, with mean age, height, and body mass equal to 19.5±1.1 year, 168.4±5.8 cm, and 63.4±6.1 kg, respectively. After performing a familiarization trial, subjects performed three sets of eight bouts of the modified t test after ingestion of 255 mL of placebo or Red Bull 1 h pre-exercise in a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design. Throughout testing, sprint time, heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were continuously obtained. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to examine differences in variables between drink conditions. Across athletes, t test time ranged from 10.4 to 12.7 s. Mean sprint time was similar (p>0.05) between Red Bull (11.31±0.61 s) and placebo (11.35±0.61 s). HR and RPE increased (p0.05) of Red Bull on either variable versus placebo. Findings indicate that 255 mL of Red Bull containing 1.3 mg/kg of caffeine and 1 g of taurine does not alter repeated sprint performance, RPE, or HR in women athletes versus placebo. One serving of this energy drink provides no ergogenic benefit for women athletes engaging in sprint-based exercise.

  2. Neuro-mechanical determinants of repeated treadmill sprints - Usefulness of an “hypoxic to normoxic recovery” approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier; Brocherie, Franck; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2015-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the limiting factors during repeated sprinting, we manipulated hypoxia severity during an initial set and examined the effects on performance and associated neuro-mechanical alterations during a subsequent set performed in normoxia. On separate days, 13 active males performed eight 5-s sprints (recovery = 25 s) on an instrumented treadmill in either normoxia near sea-level (SL; FiO2 = 20.9%), moderate (MH; FiO2 = 16.8%) or severe normobaric hypoxia (SH; FiO2 = 13.3%) followed, 6 min later, by four 5-s sprints (recovery = 25 s) in normoxia. Throughout the first set, along with distance covered [larger sprint decrement score in SH (−8.2%) compared to SL (−5.3%) and MH (−7.2%); P sprint of the subsequent normoxic set, the distance covered (99.6, 96.4, and 98.3% of sprint 1 in SL, MH, and SH, respectively), the main kinetic (mean vertical, horizontal, and resultant forces) and kinematic (contact time and step frequency) variables as well as surface electromyogram of quadriceps and plantar flexor muscles were fully recovered, with no significant difference between conditions. Despite differing hypoxic severity levels during sprints 1–8, performance and neuro-mechanical patterns did not differ during the four sprints of the second set performed in normoxia. In summary, under the circumstances of this study (participant background, exercise-to-rest ratio, hypoxia exposure), sprint mechanical performance and neural alterations were largely influenced by the hypoxia severity in an initial set of repeated sprints. However, hypoxia had no residual effect during a subsequent set performed in normoxia. Hence, the recovery of performance and associated neuro-mechanical alterations was complete after resting for 6 min near sea level, with a similar fatigue pattern across conditions during subsequent repeated sprints in normoxia. PMID:26441679

  3. Adaptation to Damaging Dance and Repeated-Sprint Activity in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Meghan A; Howatson, Glyn; Keane, Karen M; Stevenson, Emma J

    2016-09-01

    Brown, MA, Howatson, G, Keane, KM, and Stevenson, EJ. Adaptation to damaging dance and repeated-sprint activity in women. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2574-2581, 2016-The repeated bout effect (RBE) refers to the prophylactic effect from damaging exercise after a single previous bout of exercise. There is a paucity of data examining the RBE in women, and investigations using exercise paradigms beyond isolated eccentric contractions are scarce. In light of the limited literature, this investigation aimed to determine whether 2 different sport-specific exercise bouts would elicit a RBE in women. Twenty-one female dancers (19 ± 1 years) completed either a dance-specific protocol (n = 10) or sport-specific repeated-sprint protocol (n = 11). Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), limb girths, creatine kinase (CK), countermovement jump height, reactive strength index, maximal voluntary contraction, and 30-meter sprint time were recorded before and 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. An identical exercise bout was conducted approximately 4 weeks after the initial bout, during which time the subjects maintained habitual training and dietary behaviors. DOMS and 30-meter sprint time decreased after a second bout of both activities (p = 0.003; (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.38 and p = 0.008; and (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.31, respectively). Circulating CK was also lower at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the second bout, independent of group (p = 0.010 and (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.23). Compared with the repeated-sprint protocol, the magnitude of change in DOMS was greater after a subsequent bout of the dance protocol (p = 0.010 and (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.19). These data are the first to demonstrate that dance and repeated-sprint activity resulting in muscle damage in women confers a protective effect against muscle damage after a subsequent bout.

  4. Advancing hypoxic training in team sports: from intermittent hypoxic training to repeated sprint training in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiss, Raphaël; Girard, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    Over the past two decades, intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), that is, a method where athletes live at or near sea level but train under hypoxic conditions, has gained unprecedented popularity. By adding the stress of hypoxia during 'aerobic' or 'anaerobic' interval training, it is believed that IHT would potentiate greater performance improvements compared to similar training at sea level. A thorough analysis of studies including IHT, however, leads to strikingly poor benefits for sea-level performance improvement, compared to the same training method performed in normoxia. Despite the positive molecular adaptations observed after various IHT modalities, the characteristics of optimal training stimulus in hypoxia are still unclear and their functional translation in terms of whole-body performance enhancement is minimal. To overcome some of the inherent limitations of IHT (lower training stimulus due to hypoxia), recent studies have successfully investigated a new training method based on the repetition of short (training in hypoxia (RSH). The aims of the present review are therefore threefold: first, to summarise the main mechanisms for interval training and repeated sprint training in normoxia. Second, to critically analyse the results of the studies involving high-intensity exercises performed in hypoxia for sea-level performance enhancement by differentiating IHT and RSH. Third, to discuss the potential mechanisms underpinning the effectiveness of those methods, and their inherent limitations, along with the new research avenues surrounding this topic.

  5. Altering Work to Rest Ratios Differentially Influences Fatigue Indices During Repeated Sprint Ability Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Monica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Beyer, Kyle S; Hoffman, Mattan W; Miramonti, Amelia A; Riffe, Josh J; Baker, Kayla M; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the influence of recovery time on fatigue indices, performance (total work [TW], peak power [PP], and mean power [MP]), and oxygen consumption during repeated sprint ability (RSA) on a cycle ergometer. Eight recreationally-trained men performed 3 RSA protocols consisting of 10 × 6 s sprints with 12 s, 18 s, and 24 s rest intervals between each sprint. Fatigue indices were determined as percent decrement (%Dec) and rate of decline using either a log transform method or standard slope approach for TW, PP, and MP during respective RSA protocols. The maximal VO2 value in response to given sprint intervals and the minimal VO2 value in response to given rest periods (VO2 work and VO2 rest, respectively) were recorded. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to analyze all variables. Average VO2 work was not different among rest interval trials. Average VO2 rest with 12 s rest was greater than 18 s and 24 s (2.16 ± 0.17 L · min(-1), 1.91 ± 0.18 L · min(-1), 1.72 ± 0.15 L · min(-1), respectively), while 18 s was greater than 24 s. Average TW and MP were greater with 24 s rest than 12 s (4,604.44 ± 915.98 J vs. 4,305.46 ± 727.17 J, respectively), with no differences between RSA protocols for PP. No differences in %Dec were observed. Both methods of calculating rates of decline per sprint for PP and TW were greater during 12 s than 18 s or 24 s. Since changes were only noted between the 12 s and 24 s protocols, a 6 s differential in rest intervals may not be enough to elicit alterations in TW, PP, MP, or %Dec in RSA performance. Rate of decline may be a more sensitive measure of fatigue than %Dec.

  6. REPEATED SPRINT ABILITY AND RECOVERY PERIOD: COMPARISON OF TRAINED AND UNTRAINED INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of training both in repeated sprint ability (RSA and during the recovery after sprint. Soccer players playing in regional amateur league (n=14, age: 21.86±2.35 years, height: 180.14±4.54 cm, body mass: 72.57±5.03 kg, training age: 8.71±1.86 years and students from faculty of sport sciences that played soccer in the past (n=13, age: 23.77±2.65 years, height: 178.54±4.67 cm, body mass: 74.54±10.52 kg participated in this study as trained and untrained group, respectively. The groups were tested using Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YIRT1 and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max was calculated using a formula from distance covered in YIRT1. Groups performed a repeated sprint ability (RSA, 6x6 s of Wingate test protocol + 30 s of rest test after 48 h. Blood lactate level and heart rate of groups were recorded at rest, immediately, 5, 15, and 30 min after RSA test. The absolute peak power and relative mean power in repeated sprints and the VO2max values were significantly higher in trained group than in untrained group (p<0.05. The absolute values of mean power was also significantly higher in trained group compared to that of the untrained group, except for the first sprint (p<0.05. On the other hand, it was observed that blood lactate level at 30 min and heart rate at 15 and 30 min of the recovery after testing was significantly lower in trained group than those of untrained group (p<0.05. The performance and metabolic results showed that VO2max level would be effective both in maintaining repeated sprint ability performance and for the acceleration of the recovery period.

  7. Sympathetic enhancement in futsal players but not in football players after repeated sprint ability test

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yung-Sheng; Liao, Chih-Jung; Lu, Wan-An; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) can disclose the specific adaptation of sympathovagal modulation to exercise. This study investigated the change in HRV measures after anaerobic and aerobic intermittent exercises in university football and futsal players. Method 36 male university students with physically active lifestyle (n=14), football (n=12), and futsal (n=10) participated in this study. The participants completed the repeated sprint ability (RSA) test and Yo-Yo (YY) intermittent r...

  8. Repeated sprint performance and metabolic recovery curves: effects of aerobic and anaerobic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Turnes, Tiago; Santos de Oliveira Cruz, Rogério; Salvador, Amadeo Félix; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    To examine the influence of aerobic and anaerobic indices on repeated sprint (RS) performance and ability (RSA), 8 sprinters (SPR), 8 endurance runners (END), and 8 active participants (ACT) performed the following tests: (i) incremental test; (ii) 1-min test to determine first decay time constant of pulmonary oxygen uptake off-kinetics and parameters related to anaerobic energy supply, lactate exchange, and removal abilities from blood lactate kinetics; and (iii) RS test (ten 35-m sprints, departing every 20 s) to determine best (RSbest) and mean (RSmean) sprint times and percentage of sprint decrement (%Dec). While SPR had a 98%-100% likelihood of having the fastest RSbest (Cohen's d of 1.8 and 1.4 for ACT and END, respectively) and RSmean (2.1 and 0.9 for ACT and END, respectively), END presented a 97%-100% likelihood of having the lowest %Dec (0.9 and 2.2 for ACT and SPR, respectively). RSmean was very largely correlated with RSbest (r=0.85) and moderately correlated with estimates of anaerobic energy supply (r=-0.40 to -0.49). RSmean adjusted for RSbest (which indirectly reflects RSA) was largely correlated with lactate exchange ability (r=0.55). Our results confirm the importance of locomotor- and anaerobic-related variables to RS performance, and highlight the importance of disposal of selected metabolic by-products to RSA.

  9. Aerobic and anaerobic determinants of repeated sprint ability in team sports athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, Z; Dardouri, W; Haj-Sassi, R; Chamari, K; Souissi, N

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine in team sports athletes the relationship between repeated sprint ability (RSA) indices and both aerobic and anaerobic fitness components. Sixteen team-sport players were included (age, 23.4 ± 2.3 years; weight, 71.2 ± 8.3 kg; height, 178 ± 7 cm; body mass index, 22.4 ± 2 kg · m(-2); estimated VO2max, 54.16 ± 3.5 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)). Subjects were licensed in various team sports: soccer (n = 8), basketball (n = 5), and handball (n = 3). They performed 4 tests: the 20 m multi-stage shuttle run test (MSRT), the 30-s Wingate test (WingT), the Maximal Anaerobic Shuttle Running Test (MASRT), and the RSA test (10 repetitions of 30 m shuttle sprints (15 + 15 m with 180° change of direction) with 30 s passive recovery in between). Pearson's product moment of correlation among the different physical tests was performed. No significant correlations were found between any RSA test indices and WingT. However, negative correlations were found between MASRT and RSA total sprint time (TT) and fatigue index (FI) (r = -0.53, p sprint time (PT) and total sprint time (TT) was found. Nevertheless, VO2max was significantly correlated with the RSA FI (r = -0.57, p ability to resist fatigue during RSA exercise. Our results highlighted the usefulness of MASRT, in contrast to WingT, as a specific anaerobic testing procedure to identify the anaerobic energy system contribution during RSA.

  10. Aerobic and anaerobic determinants of repeated sprint ability in team sports athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Gharbi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine in team sports athletes the relationship between repeated sprint ability (RSA indices and both aerobic and anaerobic fitness components. Sixteen team-sport players were included (age, 23.4 ± 2.3 years; weight, 71.2 ± 8.3 kg; height, 178 ± 7 cm; body mass index, 22.4 ± 2 kg · m -2 ; estimated VO 2 max, 54.16 ± 3.5 mL · kg-1 · min-1. Subjects were licensed in various team sports: soccer (n = 8, basketball (n = 5, and handball (n = 3. They performed 4 tests: the 20 m multi-stage shuttle run test (MSRT, the 30-s Wingate test (WingT, the Maximal Anaerobic Shuttle Running Test (MASRT, and the RSA test (10 repetitions of 30 m shuttle sprints (15 + 15 m with 180° change of direction with 30 s passive recovery in between. Pearson’s product moment of correlation among the different physical tests was performed. No significant correlations were found between any RSA test indices and WingT. However, negative correlations were found between MASRT and RSA total sprint time (TT and fatigue index (FI (r = -0.53, p < 0.05 and r = -0.65, p < 0.01, respectively. No significant relationship between VO 2 max and RSA peak sprint time (PT and total sprint time (TT was found. Nevertheless, VO 2 max was significantly correlated with the RSA FI (r = -0.57, p < 0.05. In conclusion, aerobic fitness is an important factor influencing the ability to resist fatigue during RSA exercise. Our results highlighted the usefulness of MASRT, in contrast to WingT, as a specific anaerobic testing procedure to identify the anaerobic energy system contribution during RSA.

  11. Effect of ischemic preconditioning on repeated sprint ability in team sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Neil; Mahony, Ben; Tracey, Claire; Fawkner, Samantha; Murray, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether ischemic preconditioning (IPC) in a trained population affected repeated sprint performance. A secondary aim was to assess responses according to gender. Sixteen (nine females and seven males) well trained team sport athletes took part in a randomised crossover study design. Participants underwent an IPC and placebo treatment involving three periods of 5 min occlusion applied unilaterally (3 × 5 min occlusion to each leg) at either 220 mmHg or 50 mmHg. Each period of occlusion was followed by 5 min reperfusion. Following treatment 5 × 6 s maximal effort sprints were undertaken on a cycle ergometer against 7.5% body mass, each interspersed by 24 s recovery. Measured parameters included peak power, total power, percentage decrement, post-exercise blood lactate and ratings of perceived exertion. Nor within subject main effect for IPC was observed, neither was there an interaction effect with gender. Effect sizes were trivial (ES repeated sprint performance. A lower blood lactate response in female participants following IPC may suggest improved blood flow through vasodilation.

  12. High-intensity interval training vs. repeated-sprint training in tennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Zimek, Rico; Wiewelhove, Thimo; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and repeated-sprint training (RST) on aerobic fitness, tennis-specific endurance, linear and repeated-sprint ability (RSA), and jumping ability. Thirty-one competitive male tennis players took part in a training intervention of 6 weeks. The players were matched into 3 groups, HIIT (n = 11), RST (n = 12), or control group (CON, n = 9). The results showed significant time × intervention interactions for VO(2)peak, with a significant increase in the VO(2)peak level of 6.0% in HIIT (p = 0.008) and 4.9% in RST (p = 0.010), whereas no changes occurred in CON. However, the following differences were found between the intervention groups: The HIIT-induced greater improvements in tennis-specific endurance (HIIT 28.9% vs. RST 14.5%; p training strategy induced any effects on jumping and sprinting abilities. Both training interventions showed similar improvements in general aerobic fitness. Also, the present results suggest that RST represents a time-efficient stimulus for a simultaneous improvement of general and tennis-specific aerobic fitness as well for RSA.

  13. A Clustered Repeated-Sprint Running Protocol for Team-Sport Athletes Performed in Normobaric Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Morrison, Chris McLellan, Clare Minahan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study compared the performance (peak speed, distance, and acceleration of ten amateur team-sport athletes during a clustered (i.e., multiple sets repeated-sprint protocol, (4 sets of 4, 4-s running sprints; i.e., RSR444 in normobaric normoxia (FiO2 = 0.209; i.e., RSN with normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 = 0.140; i.e., RSH. Subjects completed two separate trials (i. RSN, ii. RSH; randomised order between 48 h and 72 h apart on a non-motorized treadmill. In addition to performance, we examined blood lactate concentration [La-] and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2 before, during, and after the RSR444. While there were no differences in peak speed or distance during set 1 or set 2, peak speed (p = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively and distance (p = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively were greater during set 3 and set 4 of RSN compared with RSH. There was no difference in the average acceleration achieved in set 1 (p = 0.45, set 2 (p = 0.26, or set 3 (p = 0.23 between RSN and RSH; however, the average acceleration was greater in RSN than RSH in set 4 (p < 0.01. Measurements of [La-] were higher during RSH than RSN immediately after Sprint 16 (10.2 ± 2.5 vs 8.6 ± 2.6 mM; p = 0.02. Estimations of SpO2 were lower during RSH than RSN, respectively, immediately prior to the commencement of the test (89.0 ± 2.0 vs 97.2 ± 1.5 %, post Sprint 8 (78.0 ± 6.3 vs 93.8 ± 3.6 % and post Sprint 16 (75.3 ± 6.3 vs 94.5 ± 2.5 %; all p < 0.01. In summary, the RSR444 is a practical protocol for the implementation of a hypoxic repeated-sprint training intervention into the training schedules of team-sport athletes. However, given the inability of amateur team-sport athletes to maintain performance in hypoxic (FiO2 = 0.140 conditions, the potential for specific training outcomes (i.e. speed to be achieved will be compromised, thus suggesting that the RSR444 should be used with caution.

  14. Repeated sprint ability in young soccer players at different game stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckel, Yoav; Einy, Avner; Gottlieb, Roni; Eliakim, Alon

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the repeated sprint ability (RSA) of young (16.9 ± 0.5 years) soccer players at different game stages. Players performed repeated sprint test (RST) (12 × 20 m) after warm-up before a game, at half-time, and after a full soccer game, each on a different day, in a random order. The ideal (fastest) sprint time (IS) and total (accumulative) sprint time (TS) were significantly slower at the end of the game compared with those after the warm-up before the game (p < 0.01 for each). Differences between IS and TS after the warm-up before the game and at half-time, and between half-time and end of the game, were not statistically significant. There was no significant difference in the performance decrement during the RST after warm-up before the game, at half-time, or the end of the game. Significant negative correlation was found between predicted V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and the difference between TS after the warm-up before the game and the end of the game (r = -0.52), but not between predicted V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and the difference in any of the RST performance indices between warm-up before the game and half-time, or between half-time and the end of the game. The findings indicate a significant RSA reduction only at the end but not at the half-time of a soccer game. The results also suggest that the contribution of the aerobic system to soccer intensity maintenance is crucial, mainly during the final stages of the game.

  15. Effect of between-set recovery durations on repeated sprint ability in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, M A; Haj, Sassi R; Haj, Yahmed M; Moalla, W; Elloumi, M

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the effect of between-set recovery duration on physiological responses (heart rate and blood lactate), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and performance indices of repeated sprint sets (RSS) and to investigate their relationship with aerobic power. Twenty-four young male soccer players (age: 17.4 ± 0.32 years) performed three randomized RSS protocols consisting of 2 sets of 5x20 m with 15 s recovery between sprints and 1 min (RSS1), 2 min (RSS2) and 4 min (RSS4) between sets, and a multi-stage aerobic track test to estimate VO2max. Results showed that in contrast to RSS2 and RSS4, RSS1 leads to a large decline in performance expressed as the sum of sprint times (34.0±1.0 s, 34.0±1.1s and 34.6±1.1s, respectively) and a significant increase of both mean heart rate (124.0±9.7 bpm, 112.5±6.7 bpm and 137.3±12.4, respectively) and RPE (3.2±1.5, 3.4±1.2 and 6.3±1.4, respectively) with no change in blood lactate and peak HR between the three rest conditions. No significant correlations were obtained between estimated VO2max and any of the indices of the three RSS protocols. In conclusion, 1 min of recovery between sets is sufficient to ensure a significant decrease in performance in the second set, while 2 min and 4 min of recovery were long enough to provide maintenance of high intensity work in the second set. These findings would be useful for coaches and sport scientists when attempting to assess repeated sprint abilities, allowing coaches to accurately define the intended training goals in young soccer players.

  16. Effect of between-set recovery durations on repeated sprint ability in young soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Selmi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to examine the effect of between-set recovery duration on physiological responses (heart rate and blood lactate, rating of perceived exertion (RPE and performance indices of repeated sprint sets (RSS and to investigate their relationship with aerobic power. Twenty-four young male soccer players (age: 17.4 ± 0.32 years performed three randomized RSS protocols consisting of 2 sets of 5x20 m with 15 s recovery between sprints and 1 min (RSS1, 2 min (RSS2 and 4 min (RSS4 between sets, and a multi-stage aerobic track test to estimate VO2max. Results showed that in contrast to RSS2 and RSS4, RSS1 leads to a large decline in performance expressed as the sum of sprint times (34.0±1.0 s, 34.0±1.1s and 34.6±1.1s, respectively and a significant increase of both mean heart rate (124.0±9.7 bpm, 112.5±6.7 bpm and 137.3±12.4, respectively and RPE (3.2±1.5, 3.4±1.2 and 6.3±1.4, respectively with no change in blood lactate and peak HR between the three rest conditions. No significant correlations were obtained between estimated VO2max and any of the indices of the three RSS protocols. In conclusion, 1 min of recovery between sets is sufficient to ensure a significant decrease in performance in the second set, while 2 min and 4 min of recovery were long enough to provide maintenance of high intensity work in the second set. These findings would be useful for coaches and sport scientists when attempting to assess repeated sprint abilities, allowing coaches to accurately define the intended training goals in young soccer players.

  17. Effects of two different half-squat training programs on fatigue during repeated cycling sprints in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanis, Gregory C; Papaspyrou, Aggeliki; Souglis, Athanasios G; Theos, Apostolos; Sotiropoulos, Aristomenis; Maridaki, Maria

    2011-07-01

    This study compared the effects of two different half-squat training programs on the repeated-sprint ability of soccer players during the preseason. Twenty male professional soccer players were divided into 2 groups: One group (S-group) performed 4 sets of 5 repetitions with 90% of their 1-repetition maximum (1RM), and the other group (H-group) performed 4 sets of 12 repetitions with 70% of 1RM, 3 times per week for 6 weeks, in addition to their common preseason training program. Repeated-sprint ability was assessed before and after training by 10 × 6-second cycle ergometer sprints separated by 24 seconds of passive recovery. Maximal half-squat strength increased significantly in both groups (p < 0.01), but this increase was significantly greater in the S-group compared with the H-group (17.3 ± 1.9 vs. 11.0 ± 1.9%, p < 0.05). Lean leg volume (LLV) increased only in the H-group. Total work over the 10 sprints improved in both groups after training, but this increase was significantly greater in the second half (8.9 ± 2.6%) compared with the first half of the sprint test (3.2 ± 1.7%) only in the S-group. Mean power output (MPO) expressed per liter of LLV was better maintained during the last 6 sprints posttraining only in the S-group, whereas there was no change in MPO per LLV in the H-group over the 10 sprints. These results suggest that resistance training with high loads is superior to a moderate-load program, because it increases strength without a change in muscle mass and also results in a greater improvement in repeated sprint ability. Therefore, resistance training with high loads may be preferable when the aim is to improve maximal strength and fatigue during sprinting in professional soccer players.

  18. Repeated sprint ability is not enhanced by caffeine, arginine, and branched-chain amino acids in moderately trained soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolao, Andrea; Zanotto, Tobia; Carraro, Nicolò; Fornasier, Tommaso; Zaccaria, Marco; Neunhaeuserer, Daniel; Bergamin, Marco

    2017-02-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of a dietary supplementation on the repeated sprint ability (RSA) performance in recreationally trained team sports athletes. Twelve young men underwent a RSA exercise protocol in five trials, in which participants ingested carbohydrates (CHO) plus caffeine (Caf), CHO plus arginine (Arg), CHO plus branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), CHO plus Caf, Arg, and BCAA (ALL), and CHO only. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, hematic lactate, ratings of perceived exertion, average sprint time, total time, best sprint time, peak power, and average power were taken. Data revealed no significant effects neither on physiological nor performance parameters with any of the supplements.

  19. Repeated sprint ability is not enhanced by caffeine, arginine, and branched-chain amino acids in moderately trained soccer players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolao, Andrea; Zanotto, Tobia; Carraro, Nicolò; Fornasier, Tommaso; Zaccaria, Marco; Neunhaeuserer, Daniel; Bergamin, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of a dietary supplementation on the repeated sprint ability (RSA) performance in recreationally trained team sports athletes. Twelve young men underwent a RSA exercise protocol in five trials, in which participants ingested carbohydrates (CHO) plus caffeine (Caf), CHO plus arginine (Arg), CHO plus branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), CHO plus Caf, Arg, and BCAA (ALL), and CHO only. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, hematic lactate, ratings of perceived exertion, average sprint time, total time, best sprint time, peak power, and average power were taken. Data revealed no significant effects neither on physiological nor performance parameters with any of the supplements. PMID:28349034

  20. Postactivation potentiation on repeated-sprint ability in elite handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Nilo M; Tricoli, Valmor; Silva, Salomão B C; Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Moreira, Alexandre; Kiss, Maria A P D M

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the changes on repeated-sprint ability (RSA) performance after heavy load exercise in elite handball players. Twelve subjects were submitted to the following experimental sessions: (a) 1-repetition maximum (1RM) test on the half squat exercise, (b) RSA test (control condition), and (c) RSA with a conditioning activity on the same exercise as 1RM test (experimental condition). The conditioning activity comprised 1 set of 5 × 50% 1RM, 1 set of 3 × 70% 1RM, and 5 sets of 1 × 90% 1RM. A significant improvement in the best sprint time (RSAbest) and mean sprint time (RSAmean) was observed with the conditioning activity (RSAbest = 5.74 ± 0.16 seconds; RSAmean = 5.99 ± 0.19 seconds) when compared with the situation without the conditioning activity (RSAbest = 5.82 ± 0.15 seconds; RSAmean = 6.06 ± 0.18 seconds; p < 0.01) with a moderate (Cohen's d = -0.54) and small effect (Cohen's d = -0.41) to RSAbest and RSAmean, respectively. Therefore, the findings of this study demonstrated that prior heavy load exercise can be used to improve the RSA performance, however, with a small to moderate magnitude of change.

  1. A Clustered Repeated-Sprint Running Protocol for Team-Sport Athletes Performed in Normobaric Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jaime; McLellan, Chris; Minahan, Clare

    2015-12-01

    The present study compared the performance (peak speed, distance, and acceleration) of ten amateur team-sport athletes during a clustered (i.e., multiple sets) repeated-sprint protocol, (4 sets of 4, 4-s running sprints; i.e., RSR444) in normobaric normoxia (FiO2 = 0.209; i.e., RSN) with normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 = 0.140; i.e., RSH). Subjects completed two separate trials (i. RSN, ii. RSH; randomised order) between 48 h and 72 h apart on a non-motorized treadmill. In addition to performance, we examined blood lactate concentration [La(-)] and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) before, during, and after the RSR444. While there were no differences in peak speed or distance during set 1 or set 2, peak speed (p = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively) and distance (p = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively) were greater during set 3 and set 4 of RSN compared with RSH. There was no difference in the average acceleration achieved in set 1 (p = 0.45), set 2 (p = 0.26), or set 3 (p = 0.23) between RSN and RSH; however, the average acceleration was greater in RSN than RSH in set 4 (p Sprint 16 (10.2 ± 2.5 vs 8.6 ± 2.6 mM; p = 0.02). Estimations of SpO2 were lower during RSH than RSN, respectively, immediately prior to the commencement of the test (89.0 ± 2.0 vs 97.2 ± 1.5 %), post Sprint 8 (78.0 ± 6.3 vs 93.8 ± 3.6 %) and post Sprint 16 (75.3 ± 6.3 vs 94.5 ± 2.5 %; all p sprint training intervention into the training schedules of team-sport athletes. However, given the inability of amateur team-sport athletes to maintain performance in hypoxic (FiO2 = 0.140) conditions, the potential for specific training outcomes (i.e. speed) to be achieved will be compromised, thus suggesting that the RSR444 should be used with caution. Key pointsThe RSR444 is a practical, multiple-set repeated-sprint running protocol designed for team-sport athletes.During performance of the RSR444 in hypoxia (FiO2 = 0.140), amateur team-sport athletes were unable to replicate the peak speed, distance covered or

  2. The Effects of Novel Ingestion of Sodium Bicarbonate on Repeated Sprint Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peter; Robinson, Amy L; Sparks, S Andy; Bridge, Craig A; Bentley, David J; McNaughton, Lars R

    2016-02-01

    This work examined the influence of an acute dose of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) on buffering capacity and performance during a repeated sprint ability (RSA) protocol. Eleven (mean ± SD: age 24.6 ± 6.1 years; mass 74.9 ± 5.7 kg; height 177.2 ± 6.7 cm) participated in the study, undertaking 4 test sessions. On the first visit to the laboratory, each participant ingested 300 mg · kg(-1) of NaHCO3 (in 450 ml of flavored water) and blood samples were obtained at regular intervals to determine the individual times peak pH and HCO3. In subsequent visits, participants ingested 300 mg · kg(-1) of NaHCO3, 270 mg · kg(-1) body mass (BM) of NaCI, or no drink followed by a RSA cycling protocol (10 × 6 seconds sprints with 60 seconds recovery), which commenced at each individuals predetermined ingestion peak pH response time. Blood samples were obtained before exercise and after the first, fifth, and 10th sprint to determine the blood pH, HCO3, and lactate (La) responses. Total work completed during the repeated sprint protocol was higher (p ≤ 0.05) in the NaHCO3 condition (69.8 ± 11.7 kJ) compared with both the control (59.6 ± 12.2 kJ) and placebo (63.0 ± 8.3 kJ) conditions. Peak power output was similar (p > 0.05) between the 3 conditions. Relative to the control and placebo conditions, NaHCO3 ingestion induced higher (p ≤ 0.05) blood pH and HCO3 concentrations before exercise and during the bouts, and higher lactate concentrations (p ≤ 0.05) after the final sprint. Results suggest that NaHCO3 improves the total amount of work completed during RSA through enhanced buffering capacity.

  3. Effects of Carbohydrate Ingestion and Carbohydrate Mouth Rinse on Repeat Sprint Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, Ben M; Peterson, Timothy J; Shepherd, Brandon D; McAllister, Matthew J; Smith, JohnEric W

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine to the influence of carbohydrate ingestion (CHOI) and carbohydrate mouth rinse (CHOR) on acute repeat maximal sprint performance. Fourteen healthy males (age: 21.7 ± 1.8 years, mass: 82.3 ± 12.3 kg) completed a total of five 15-s maximal repeat sprints on a cycle ergometer against 0.075 kg ・ kg(-1) body mass each separated by 4 min of active recovery. Subjects completed four experimental trials and were randomly assigned one of four treatments: (1) CHOI, (2) CHOR, (3) placebo mouth rinse (PLAR), (4) placebo ingestion (PLAI). Subjects rinsed or ingested six 50 mL 10% CHO solutions throughout each trial. Performance variables measured included rating of perceived exertion, peak heart rate, peak and mean power output, fatigue index, and total work. Significant treatment main effects were observed for mean power output (p = 0.026), total work (p = 0.020), fatigue index (p = 0.004), and heart rate (p = 0.013). Overall mean power output and total work were significantly greater with CHOI (659.3 ± 103.0 watts, 9849.8 ± 1598.8 joules) compared with CHOR (645.8 ± 99.7 watts, 9447.5 ± 1684.9 joules, p PLAI, and PLAR. Athletes required to complete repeat bouts of high intensity exercise may benefit from CHOI.

  4. Is repeated-sprint ability of soccer players predictable from field-based or laboratory physiological tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psotta, R; Bunc, V; Hendl, J; Tenney, D; Heller, J

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate multiple regression models with prediction equations that would enable a valid estimate of running repeated-sprint ability (RSA) in soccer players from the variables measured in field and laboratory physiological tests. Adolescent soccer players (N=33) performed five field performance tests and two laboratory tests for assessment of muscle strength of legs, sprint ability, anaerobic power and capacity, aerobic power and capacity, and running economy. These tests served as potential predictors of RSA. RSA was assessed by a intermittent anaerobic running test (IAnRT) consisted of ten 20 m sprints. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the mean speed in the 20 m sprint test and the 2 km endurance running test accounted for 89% of total variation in the mean running speed in the IAnRT (VIAnRT) as the indicator of capacity for multiple sprint work (R2=0.89, SEM=0.09 m.s-1). Using the variables from the laboratory tests, the best prediction of the VIAnRT was obtained from the running speed at the ventilatory threshold level (VVT) and anaerobic power (Pmax.kg-1) (R2=0.49, SEM=0.21 m.s-1). Performance in the multiple-sprint exercise as an indicator of RSA can be estimated by the regression equation with two predictors - mean speed in the 20 m sprint and 2 km running test with an error of 4%.

  5. Neuro-mechanical determinants of repeated treadmill sprints - Usefulness of an ‘hypoxic to normoxic recovery’ approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier eGIRARD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To improve our understanding of the limiting factors during repeated sprinting, we manipulated hypoxia severity during an initial set and examined the effects on performance and associated neuro-mechanical alterations during a subsequent set performed in normoxia. On separate days, thirteen active males performed eight 5-s sprints (recovery = 25 s on an instrumented treadmill in either normoxia near sea-level (SL; FiO2 = 20.9%, moderate (MH; FiO2 = 16.8% or severe normobaric hypoxia (SH; FiO2 = 13.3% followed, 6 min later, by four 5-s sprints (recovery = 25 s in normoxia. Throughout the first set, along with distance covered [larger sprint decrement score in SH (-8.2% compared to SL (-5.3% and MH (-7.2%; P<0.05], changes in contact time, step frequency and root mean square activity (surface electromyography of the quadriceps (rectus femoris muscle in SH exceeded those in SL and MH (P<0.05. During first sprint of the subsequent normoxic set, the distance covered (99.6%, 96.4% and 98.3% of sprint 1 in SL, MH and SH, respectively, the main kinetic (mean, horizontal and resultant forces and kinematic (contact time and step frequency variables as well as surface electromyogram of quadriceps and plantar flexor muscles were fully recovered, with no significant difference between conditions. Despite differing hypoxic severity levels during sprints 1 to 8, performance and neuro-mechanical patterns did not differ during the four sprints of the second set performed in normoxia. In summary, under the circumstances of this study (participant background, exercise-to-rest ratio, hypoxia exposure, sprint mechanical performance and neural alterations were largerly influenced by the hypoxia severity in an initial set of repeated sprints. However, hypoxia had no residual effect during a subsequent set performed in normoxia. Hence, the recovery of performance and associated neuro-mechanical alterations was complete after resting for 6 min near sea level, with a

  6. Evaluation of critical rest interval determined from repeated sprint ability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LA Monica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Beyer, Kyle S; Hoffman, Mattan W; Miramonti, Amelia A; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R

    2016-10-01

    To test if the critical power (CP) concept can be utilized to determine the critical rest interval (CRI) using repeated sprint ability (RSA) testing with varying work-to-rest ratios. Twelve recreationally trained men (mean±SD; age 24.1±3.6 years) completed a graded exercise test and three RSA protocols with 6-second maximal sprints and varying rest intervals (12-36 s) on a cycle ergometer to determine CRI. Intermittent critical power (ICP) was calculated through the linear total work (TW) and time-to-exhaustion (TTE) relationship, whereas CRI was estimated using average work per sprint and ICP. Validation trials above and below CRI were conducted to evaluate physiological response. Repeated measures analysis of variance were used to analyze variables from RSA trials and changes in blood lactate, oxygen uptake (V̇O2), heart rate (HR), peak power, and TW throughout the validation trials. Blood lactate, average V̇O2, V̇O2peak, and heart rate were significantly greater below CRI (8.94±4.89 mmol/L, 2.05±0.36 L/min, 2.84±0.48 L/min, and 151.14±18.46 bpm, respectively) when compared to above CRI (6.56±3.45 mmol/L, 1.78±0.26 L/min, 2.61±0.43 L/min, and 138.14±17.51 bpm). Significant interactions were found between above and below CRI for minimal V̇O2 response and maximal HR response, which were consistent with the heavy and severe exercise intensity domains. The use of the work-time relationship determined from RSA testing with varying rest intervals can be used to determine CRI and may distinguish between physiological responses related to exercise intensity domains.

  7. Repeated sprint ability in young basketball players: one vs. two changes of direction (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padulo, Johnny; Laffaye, Guillaume; Haddad, Monoem; Chaouachi, Anis; Attene, Giuseppe; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Chamari, Karim; Pizzolato, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the changes of direction on repeated sprint ability (RSA) vs. intensive repeated sprint ability (IRSA) protocols in basketball. Eighteen young male basketball players performed on RSA [10 × 30-m (15 + 15-m, one change of direction)] and IRSA [10 × 30-m (10 + 10 + 10-m, two changes of direction)]. A correlation matrix between RSA, IRSA, "squat jump (SJ)-countermovement jump (CMJ)", footstep analysis and total distance in Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 was performed. The best time, worst time, total time and the number of footsteps were significantly smaller in the RSA test compared to IRSA test (P  0.80, P  0.478, P  0.515, P  0.489, P basketball game's actions (~2 s). Besides, IRSA could be an appropriate choice for assessing both RSA and changes of direction capacities in basketball players.

  8. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  9. Effects of Beetroot Juice on Recovery of Muscle Function and Performance between Bouts of Repeated Sprint Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Clifford

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of beetroot juice (BTJ on recovery between two repeated-sprint tests. In an independent groups design, 20 male, team-sports players were randomized to receive either BTJ or a placebo (PLA (2 × 250 mL for 3 days after an initial repeated sprint test (20 × 30 m; RST1 and after a second repeated sprint test (RST2, performed 72 h later. Maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MIVC, countermovement jumps (CMJ, reactive strength index (RI, pressure-pain threshold (PPT, creatine kinase (CK, C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, protein carbonyls (PC, lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH and the ascorbyl free radical (A•− were measured before, after, and at set times between RST1 and RST2. CMJ and RI recovered quicker in BTJ compared to PLA after RST1: at 72 h post, CMJ and RI were 7.6% and 13.8% higher in BTJ vs. PLA, respectively (p < 0.05. PPT was 10.4% higher in BTJ compared to PLA 24 h post RST2 (p = 0.012 but similar at other time points. No group differences were detected for mean and fastest sprint time or fatigue index. MIVC, or the biochemical markers measured (p > 0.05. BTJ reduced the decrement in CMJ and RI following and RST but had no effect on sprint performance or oxidative stress.

  10. Effects of Beetroot Juice on Recovery of Muscle Function and Performance between Bouts of Repeated Sprint Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Tom; Berntzen, Bram; Davison, Gareth W; West, Daniel J; Howatson, Glyn; Stevenson, Emma J

    2016-08-18

    This study examined the effects of beetroot juice (BTJ) on recovery between two repeated-sprint tests. In an independent groups design, 20 male, team-sports players were randomized to receive either BTJ or a placebo (PLA) (2 × 250 mL) for 3 days after an initial repeated sprint test (20 × 30 m; RST1) and after a second repeated sprint test (RST2), performed 72 h later. Maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MIVC), countermovement jumps (CMJ), reactive strength index (RI), pressure-pain threshold (PPT), creatine kinase (CK), C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), protein carbonyls (PC), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and the ascorbyl free radical (A(•-)) were measured before, after, and at set times between RST1 and RST2. CMJ and RI recovered quicker in BTJ compared to PLA after RST1: at 72 h post, CMJ and RI were 7.6% and 13.8% higher in BTJ vs. PLA, respectively (p sprint time or fatigue index. MIVC, or the biochemical markers measured (p > 0.05). BTJ reduced the decrement in CMJ and RI following and RST but had no effect on sprint performance or oxidative stress.

  11. The effects of repeated-sprint training on field-based fitness measures: a meta-analysis of controlled and non-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jonathan; Macpherson, Tom; Spears, Iain; Weston, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Repeated-sprint training appears to be an efficient and practical means for the simultaneous development of different components of fitness relevant to team sports. Our objective was to systematically review the literature and meta-analyse the effect of repeated-sprint training on a selection of field-based measures of athletic performance, i.e. counter-movement jump, 10 m sprint, 20 m sprint, 30 m sprint, repeated-sprint ability and high-intensity intermittent running performance. The SPORTDiscus, PubMed, MEDLINE and Web of Science databases were searched for original research articles. Search terms included 'repeated-sprint training', 'sprint training', 'aerobic endurance', 'repeated-sprint ability', 'counter-movement jump' and 'sprint performance'. Inclusion criteria included intervention consisting of a series of ≤10 s sprints with ≤60 s recovery; trained participants; intervention duration of 2-12 weeks; field-based fitness measures; running- or cycling-based intervention; published up to, and including, February 2014. Our final dataset included six trials for counter-movement jump (two controlled trials), eight trials for 10 m sprint, four trials for 20 m sprint (three controlled trials), two trials for 30 m sprint, eight trials for repeated-sprint ability and three trials for high-intensity intermittent running performance. Analyses were conducted using comprehensive meta-analysis software. Uncertainty in the meta-analysed effect of repeated-sprint training was expressed as 95% confidence limits (CL), along with the probability that the true value of the effect was trivial, beneficial or harmful. Magnitude-based inferences were based on standardised thresholds for small, moderate and large changes of 0.2, 0.6 and 1.2 standard deviations, respectively. Repeated-sprint training had a likely small beneficial effect in non-controlled counter-movement jump trials (effect size 0.33; 95% CL ±0.30), with a possibly moderate beneficial effect in controlled

  12. LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF REPEATED SPRINT PERFORMANCE IN YOUTH SOCCER PLAYERS OF CONTRASTING SKELETAL MATURITY STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Valente-dos-Santos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the developmental changes in performance in a repeated-sprint ability (RSA test in young soccer players of contrasting maturity status. A total of 83 regional level Portuguese youth soccer players, aged 11- 13 years at baseline was assessed annually. Stature, body mass, 7x34.2-m sprint protocol (25-s active recovery, 20-m multi-stage continuous shuttle endurance run and counter-movement jump (CMJ without the use of the arms were measured. Fat-free mass (FFM was determined by age and gender- specific formulas. Developmental changes in total sprint time across ages were predicted using multilevel modeling. Corresponding measurements were performed on an independent cross-sectional subsample of 52 youth soccer players 11-17 years to evaluate the predictive model. CA, CA2, maturational status (SA-CA, body size (mass and stature, FFM, aerobic endurance, lower limb explosive strength and annual volume training significantly improved the statistical fit of the RSA multilevel model. In 'late' maturing athletes, the best model for predicting change in RSA was expressed by the following equation: 86.54 - 2.87 x CA + 0.05 x CA2 - 0.25 x FFM + 0.15 x body mass + 0.05 x stature - 0.05 x aerobic endurance - 0.09 x lower limb explosive strength - 0.01 x annual volume training. The best fitting models for players who were 'on time' and 'early' maturing were identical to the best model for late maturing players, less 0.64 seconds and 1.74 seconds, respectively. Multilevel modeling provided performance curves that permitted the prediction of individual RSA performance across adolescent years in regional level soccer players

  13. Attentional and visual demands for sprint performance in non-fatigued and fatigued conditions : reliability of a repeated sprint test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reininga, Inge H. F.; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Diercks, Ron L.; Buizer, Arina T.; Stevens, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Physical performance measures are widely used to assess physical function, providing information about physiological and biomechanical aspects of motor performance. However they do not provide insight into the attentional and visual demands for motor performance. A figure-of-eight sprint

  14. The effect of slope on repeated sprint ability in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padulo, J; Ardigò, L P; Attene, G; Cava, C; Wong, D P; Chamari, K; Migliaccio, G M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to describe a gradient repeated sprint ability (RSA) test in comparison with a standard level one by investigating performance, metabolic demand and muscular jumping performance as a proxy for running mechanics. Eighteen athletes performed two level RSA tests (40 m × 6) - for reliability evaluation - and one ±5% gradient RSA test, second leg downhill (RSAgrad). Rating of perceived exertion (RPE), blood lactate concentration (BLa) concentration, vertical jump heights were assessed as well. Level test measures resulted highly reliable (Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) ≥0.96). RSAgrad worsened only first sprints' performance (-2%) but not overall test performance (~45 s). RSAgrad resulted to be less deteriorating in terms of fatigue index (FI) (-36%), BLa (-23%), RPE (-11%), jumping performance (RSAgrad post-/pre-squat jump, countermovement jump heights (CMJh): -3%, -6%, respectively). RSAgrad could be used to diversify common training protocol without stressing excessively athletes' current metabolic-anaerobic capacity. Such physical conditioning procedures could improve acceleration/braking capability.

  15. The optimal exercise to rest ratios in repeated sprint ability training in youth soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscello, Bruno; Partipilo, Filippo; Pantanella, Laura; Esposito, Mario; D'Ottavio, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of three different exercise to rest ratios in RSA training in youth soccer players, applying those ones already adopted in adult players, when performing three different sprinting modes (straight, shuttle and sprinting with changing of direction). Eighteen young trained male soccer players (Height: 1.66±0.07 m; weight: 58.22±7.64 kg; BMI 19.37±3.42 kg·m-2; age:14 years) participated to the study. In order to compare the different values of the time recorded, a Fatigue Index (FI) was used. Recovery times among trials in the sets were administered according to the 1:5, 1:3; 1:2 exercise to rest ratio, respectively. Significant differences among trials within each set (Repeated Measures Anova; Psprinting modalities when applying the investigated exercise to rest ratios (Factorial Anova; between; P>0.05). The results of this study confirm that the exercise to rest ratios considered in this study might be suitable to design effective testing protocols and training sessions aimed at the development of the RSA in youth soccer players, keeping the performances in the speed domain (FI%< ≈7-8%) but inducing the fatigue processes sought with this kind of training method.

  16. Changes in repeated-sprint performance in relation to change in locomotor profile in highly-trained young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of changes in maximal aerobic (MAS) and sprinting (MSS) speeds and the anaerobic reserve (ASR) on repeated-sprint performance. Two hundred and seventy highly-trained soccer players (14.5 ± 1.6 year) completed three times per season (over 5 years) a maximal incremental running test to approach MAS, a 40-m sprint with 10-m splits to assess MSS and a repeated-sprint test (10 × 30-m sprints), where best (RSb) and mean (RSm) sprint times, and percentage of speed decrement (%Dec) were calculated. ASR was calculated as MSS-MAS. While ∆RSb were related to ∆MSS and ∆body mass (r(2) = 0.42, 90%CL[0.34;0.49] for the overall multiple regression, n = 334), ∆RSm was also correlated with ∆MAS and ∆sum of 7 skinfolds (r(2) = 0.43 [0.35;0.50], n = 334). There was a small and positive association between ∆%Dec and ∆MAS (r(2) = 0.02 [-0.07;0.11], n = 334). Substantial ∆MSS and ∆MAS had a predictive value of 70 and 55% for ∆RSm, respectively. Finally, ∆ASR per se was not predictive of ∆RSm (Cohen's = +0.8 to -0.3 with increased ASR), but the greater magnitude of ∆RSm improvement was observed when MSS, MAS and ASR increased together (0.8 vs. +0.4 with ASR increased vs. not, additionally to MSS and MAS). Low-cost field tests aimed at assessing maximal sprinting and aerobic speeds can be used to monitor ∆RS performance.

  17. Modelling Developmental Changes in Repeated-Sprint Ability by Chronological and Skeletal Ages in Young Soccer Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente-dos-Santos, J.; Coelho-e-Silva, M. J.; Martins, R. A.; Figueiredo, A. J.; Cyrino, E. S.; Sherar, L. B.; Vaeyens, R.; Huijgen, B. C. H.; Elferink-Gemser, M. T.; Malina, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of chronological (CA) and skeletal ages (SA), anthropometry, aerobic endurance and lower limb explosive strength on developmental changes in repeated-sprint ability (RSA) in soccer players aged 11-17 years. Participants were annually followed over 5 years, resul

  18. Modelling Developmental Changes in Repeated-Sprint Ability by Chronological and Skeletal Ages in Young Soccer Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente-dos-Santos, J.; Coelho-e-Silva, M. J.; Martins, R. A.; Figueiredo, A. J.; Cyrino, E. S.; Sherar, L. B.; Vaeyens, R.; Huijgen, B. C. H.; Elferink-Gemser, M. T.; Malina, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of chronological (CA) and skeletal ages (SA), anthropometry, aerobic endurance and lower limb explosive strength on developmental changes in repeated-sprint ability (RSA) in soccer players aged 11-17 years. Participants were annually followed over 5 years, resul

  19. Modelling Developmental Changes in Repeated-Sprint Ability by Chronological and Skeletal Ages in Young Soccer Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente-dos-Santos, J.; Coelho-e-Silva, M. J.; Martins, R. A.; Figueiredo, A. J.; Cyrino, E. S.; Sherar, L. B.; Vaeyens, R.; Huijgen, B. C. H.; Elferink-Gemser, M. T.; Malina, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of chronological (CA) and skeletal ages (SA), anthropometry, aerobic endurance and lower limb explosive strength on developmental changes in repeated-sprint ability (RSA) in soccer players aged 11-17 years. Participants were annually followed over 5 years,

  20. Metabolic and respiratory adaptations during intense exercise following long-sprint training of short duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Claire; Bernard, Olivier; Enea, Carina; Jalab, Chadi; Hanon, Christine

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to determine metabolic and respiratory adaptations during intense exercise and improvement of long-sprint performance following six sessions of long-sprint training. Nine subjects performed before and after training (1) a 300-m test, (2) an incremental exercise up to exhaustion to determine the velocity associated with maximal oxygen uptake (v-VO(2max)), (3) a 70-s constant exercise at intensity halfway between the v-VO(2max) and the velocity performed during the 300-m test, followed by a 60-min passive recovery to determine an individual blood lactate recovery curve fitted to the bi-exponential time function: [Formula: see text], and blood metabolic and gas exchange responses. The training program consisted of 3-6 repetitions of 150-250 m interspersed with rest periods with a duration ratio superior or equal to 1:10, 3 days a week, for 2 weeks. After sprint training, reduced metabolic disturbances, characterized by a lower peak expired ventilation and carbon dioxide output, in addition to a reduced peak lactate (P < 0.05), was observed. Training also induced significant decrease in the net amount of lactate released at the beginning of recovery (P < 0.05), and significant decrease in the net lactate release rate (NLRR) (P < 0.05). Lastly, a significant improvement of the 300-m performance was observed after training. These results suggest that long-sprint training of short durations was effective to rapidly prevent metabolic disturbances, with alterations in lactate accumulation and gas exchange, and improvement of the NLRR. Furthermore, only six long-sprint training sessions allow long-sprint performance improvement in active subjects.

  1. Repeated high-speed activities during youth soccer games in relation to changes in maximal sprinting and aerobic speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, M; Simpson, B M; Mendez-Villanueva, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine in highly-trained young soccer players whether substantial changes in either maximal sprinting speed (MSS) or maximal aerobic speed (as inferred from peak incremental test speed, V(Vam-Eval)) can affect repeated high-intensity running during games. Data from 33 players (14.5±1.3 years), who presented substantial changes in either MSS or V(Vam-Eval) throughout 2 consecutive testing periods (~3 months) were included in the final analysis. For each player, time-motion analyses were performed using a global positioning system (1-Hz) during 2-10 international club games played within 1-2 months from/to each testing period of interest (n for game analyzed=109, player-games=393, games per player per period=4±2). Sprint activities were defined as at least a 1-s run at intensities higher than 61% of individual MSS. Repeated-sprint sequences (RSS) were defined as a minimum of 2 consecutive sprints interspersed with a maximum of 60 s of recovery. Improvements in both MSS and V(Vam-Eval) were likely associated with a decreased RSS occurrence, but in some positions only (e. g., - 24% vs. - 3% for improvements in MSS in strikers vs. midfielders, respectively). The changes in the number of sprints per RSS were less clear but also position-dependent, e. g., +7 to +12% for full-backs and wingers, - 5 to - 7% for centre-backs and midfielders. In developing soccer players, changes in repeated-sprint activity during games do not necessarily match those in physical fitness. Game tactical and strategic requirements are likely to modulate on-field players' activity patterns independently (at least partially) of players' physical capacities.

  2. Higher Drop in Speed during a Repeated Sprint Test in Soccer Players Reporting Former Hamstring Strain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røksund, Ola D; Kristoffersen, Morten; Bogen, Bård E; Wisnes, Alexander; Engeseth, Merete S; Nilsen, Ann-Kristin; Iversen, Vegard V; Mæland, Silje; Gundersen, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Hamstring strain injury is common in soccer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical capacity of players who have and have not suffered from hamstring strain injury in a sample of semi-professional and professional Norwegian soccer players in order to evaluate characteristics and to identify possible indications of insufficient rehabilitation. Method: Seventy-five semi-professional and professional soccer players (19 ± 3 years) playing at the second and third level in the Norwegian league participated in the study. All players answered a questionnaire, including one question about hamstring strain injury (yes/no) during the previous 2 years. They also performed a 40 m maximal sprint test, a repeated sprint test (8 × 20 m), a countermovement jump, a maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) test, strength tests and flexibility tests. Independent sample t-tests were used to evaluate differences in the physical capacity of the players who had suffered from hamstring strain injury and those who had not. Mixed between-within subject's analyses of variance was used to compare changes in speed during the repeated sprint test between groups. Results: Players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous two years (16%) had a significantly higher drop in speed (0.07 vs. 0.02 s, p = 0.007) during the repeated sprint test, compared to players reporting no previous hamstring strain injury. In addition, there was a significant interaction (groups × time) (F = 3.22, p = 0.002), showing that speed in the two groups changed differently during the repeated sprint test. There were no significant differences in relations to age, weight, height, body fat, linear speed, countermovement jump height, leg strength, VO2max, or hamstring flexibility between the groups. Conclusion: Soccer players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous 2 years showed significant higher drop in speed during the repeated sprint test compared to players with no hamstring

  3. Higher Drop in Speed during a Repeated Sprint Test in Soccer Players Reporting Former Hamstring Strain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røksund, Ola D.; Kristoffersen, Morten; Bogen, Bård E.; Wisnes, Alexander; Engeseth, Merete S.; Nilsen, Ann-Kristin; Iversen, Vegard V.; Mæland, Silje; Gundersen, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Hamstring strain injury is common in soccer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical capacity of players who have and have not suffered from hamstring strain injury in a sample of semi-professional and professional Norwegian soccer players in order to evaluate characteristics and to identify possible indications of insufficient rehabilitation. Method: Seventy-five semi-professional and professional soccer players (19 ± 3 years) playing at the second and third level in the Norwegian league participated in the study. All players answered a questionnaire, including one question about hamstring strain injury (yes/no) during the previous 2 years. They also performed a 40 m maximal sprint test, a repeated sprint test (8 × 20 m), a countermovement jump, a maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) test, strength tests and flexibility tests. Independent sample t-tests were used to evaluate differences in the physical capacity of the players who had suffered from hamstring strain injury and those who had not. Mixed between-within subject's analyses of variance was used to compare changes in speed during the repeated sprint test between groups. Results: Players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous two years (16%) had a significantly higher drop in speed (0.07 vs. 0.02 s, p = 0.007) during the repeated sprint test, compared to players reporting no previous hamstring strain injury. In addition, there was a significant interaction (groups × time) (F = 3.22, p = 0.002), showing that speed in the two groups changed differently during the repeated sprint test. There were no significant differences in relations to age, weight, height, body fat, linear speed, countermovement jump height, leg strength, VO2max, or hamstring flexibility between the groups. Conclusion: Soccer players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous 2 years showed significant higher drop in speed during the repeated sprint test compared to players with no hamstring

  4. Arterial oxygen desaturation response to repeated bouts of sprint exercise in healthy young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniyoshi, Shimpei; Endoh, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Minoru; Endoh, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The decline in arterial oxygen saturation of hemoglobin during exercise has been termed exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia (EIAH). We examined whether repeated bouts of sprint exercise (SprE) would induce EIAH in healthy young men and women. Ten men and 11 women (20.4 +/- 0.3 year) performed an anaerobic power test (three bouts of 10 s cycling with 120 s intervals) using a cycle ergometer. Arterial oxygen saturation of hemoglobin measured by pulse oximeter (SpO(2)), heart rate (HR), rate perceived exertion (RPE), and the blood lactate concentration ([La](b)) were assessed at rest, during, and 5 min after repeated bouts of SprE. Women exhibited a lower maximal anaerobic power (MAnP) compared to men (498 +/- 23 vs. 759 +/- 22 watts, respectively, p women were comparable with those in men throughout the test. However, the only significant decline in SpO(2) after a single bout of SprE (95.5 +/- 0.7%) from the resting value (97.9 +/- 0.2%) was observed in women, and further declines occurred following heavier SprE (women, mild to moderate EIAH developed, whereas only 2 men showed mild EIAH. Thus, these findings suggest that repeated bouts of SprE might induce mild EIAH in young women but not men.

  5. Effect of Small-Sided Games and Repeated Shuffle Sprint Training on Physical Performance in Elite Handball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dello Iacono, Antonio; Ardigò, Luca P; Meckel, Yoav; Padulo, Johnny

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of small-sided games (SSGs) and repeated shuffle sprint (RSS) training on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and countermovement jump (CMJ) tests performances of elite handball players. Eighteen highly trained players (24.8 ± 4.4 years) were assigned to either SSG or RSS group training protocols twice a week for 8 weeks. The SSG training consisted of 5 small-sided handball games with 3-a-side teams excluding goalkeepers. The RSS consisted of 2 sets of 14-17 of 20-m shuttle sprints and 9-m jump shots interspersed by 20-second recoveries. Before and after training, the following performance variables were assessed: speed on 10-m and 20-m sprint time, agility and RSA time, CMJ height, standing throw, and jump shot speed. Significant pre-to-post treatment improvements were found in all the assessed variables following both training protocols (multivariate analysis of variance, p ≤ 0.05). There was a significantly greater improvement on 10-m sprint, CMJ, and jump shooting, after the RSS in comparison with SSG training (+4.4% vs. +2.4%, +8.6% vs. +5.6%, and +5.5% vs. +2.7%, respectively). Conversely, agility and standing throwing showed lower improvements after RSS in comparison with SSG (+1.0% vs. +7.8% and +1.6% vs. +9.0%, respectively). These results indicate that these training methods are effective for fitness development among elite adult handball players during the last period of the competitive season. Specifically, SSG seems to be more effective in improving agility and standing throw, whereas RSS seems preferable in improving 10-m sprint, CMJ, and jump shot.

  6. High Altitude Increases Alteration in Maximal Torque but Not in Rapid Torque Development in Knee Extensors after Repeated Treadmill Sprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier; Brocherie, Franck; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed knee extensor neuromuscular adjustments following repeated treadmill sprints in different normobaric hypoxia conditions, with special reference to rapid muscle torque production capacity. Thirteen team- and racquet-sport athletes undertook 8 × 5-s “all-out” sprints (passive recovery = 25 s) on a non-motorized treadmill in normoxia (NM; FiO2 = 20.9%), at low (LA; FiO2 = 16.8%) and high (HA; FiO2 = 13.3%) normobaric hypoxia (simulated altitudes of ~1800 m and ~3600 m, respectively). Explosive (~1 s; “fast” instruction) and maximal (~5 s; “hard” instruction) voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE), with concurrent electromyographic (EMG) activity recordings of the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles, were performed before and 1-min post-exercise. Rate of torque development (RTD) and EMG (i.e., Root Mean Square or RMS) rise from 0 to 30, −50, −100, and −200 ms were recorded, and were also normalized to maximal torque and EMG values, respectively. Distance covered during the first 5-s sprint was similar (P > 0.05) in all conditions. A larger (P sprint decrement score and a shorter (P sprints occurred in HA (−8 ± 4% and 178 ± 11 m) but not in LA (−7 ± 3% and 181 ± 10 m) compared to NM (−5 ± 2% and 183 ± 9 m). Compared to NM (−9 ± 7%), a larger (P 0.05). Irrespectively of condition (P > 0.05), peak RTD (−6 ± 11%; P 0.05), whereas it increased (P repeated-sprint ability and post-exercise MVC decrease were greater at high altitude than in normoxia or at low altitude. However, the post-exercise alterations in RTD were similar between normoxia and low-to-high hypoxia. PMID:27014095

  7. Effects of Four Weeks of β-Alanine Supplementation on Repeated Sprint Ability in Water Polo Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisola, Gabriel Motta Pinheiro; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Papoti, Marcelo; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on repeated sprint ability in water polo players. Twenty-two male water polo players participated in the study, divided randomly into two homogeneous groups (placebo and β-alanine groups). The study design was double-blind, parallel and placebo controlled. Before and after the supplementation period (28 days), the athletes performed two specific repeated sprint ability tests interspaced by a 30-minute swimming test. Participants received 4.8g∙day-1 of the supplement (dextrose or β-alanine) on the first 10 days and 6.4g∙day-1 on the final 18 days. There was no significant group-time interaction for any variable. The qualitative inference for substantial changes demonstrated a likely beneficial effect in the β-alanine group (β-alanine vs placebo) for mean time (6.6±0.4s vs 6.7±0.4s; 81% likely beneficial), worst time (6.9±0.5s vs 7.1±0.5s; 78% likely beneficial) and total time (39.3±2.5s vs 40.4±2.5s; 81% likely beneficial) in the first repeated sprint ability set and for worst time (7.2±0.6s vs 7.5±0.6s; 57% possible beneficial) in the second repeated sprint ability set. Further, was found substantial change for total time for both repeated sprint ability tests (80.8±5.7s vs 83.4±5.6s; 52% possible beneficial). To conclude, four weeks of β-alanine supplementation had a likely beneficial effect in the first set of repeated sprint ability tests and a possible beneficial effect for worst time in the second set performed in a specific protocol in water polo players.

  8. Effects of Four Weeks of β-Alanine Supplementation on Repeated Sprint Ability in Water Polo Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisola, Gabriel Motta Pinheiro; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Papoti, Marcelo; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on repeated sprint ability in water polo players. Twenty-two male water polo players participated in the study, divided randomly into two homogeneous groups (placebo and β-alanine groups). The study design was double-blind, parallel and placebo controlled. Before and after the supplementation period (28 days), the athletes performed two specific repeated sprint ability tests interspaced by a 30-minute swimming test. Participants received 4.8g∙day-1 of the supplement (dextrose or β-alanine) on the first 10 days and 6.4g∙day-1 on the final 18 days. There was no significant group-time interaction for any variable. The qualitative inference for substantial changes demonstrated a likely beneficial effect in the β-alanine group (β-alanine vs placebo) for mean time (6.6±0.4s vs 6.7±0.4s; 81% likely beneficial), worst time (6.9±0.5s vs 7.1±0.5s; 78% likely beneficial) and total time (39.3±2.5s vs 40.4±2.5s; 81% likely beneficial) in the first repeated sprint ability set and for worst time (7.2±0.6s vs 7.5±0.6s; 57% possible beneficial) in the second repeated sprint ability set. Further, was found substantial change for total time for both repeated sprint ability tests (80.8±5.7s vs 83.4±5.6s; 52% possible beneficial). To conclude, four weeks of β-alanine supplementation had a likely beneficial effect in the first set of repeated sprint ability tests and a possible beneficial effect for worst time in the second set performed in a specific protocol in water polo players. PMID:27930743

  9. Influence of the number of trials and the exercise to rest ratio in repeated sprint ability, with changes of direction and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscello, Bruno; Tozzo, Nazzareno; Briotti, Gianluca; Padua, Elvira; Ponzetti, Francesco; D'Ottavio, Stefano

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if there were different trends in physical fatigue observed in 3 different sets, of 7 trials each, in repeated sprint training, performed in 3 different modes: straight sprinting over 30 m, shuttle sprinting over 15 + 15 m, and sprinting over 30 m with changes of direction. Recovery time among trials in the sets was administered according to the 1:5 exercise to rest ratio. The sets were performed on 3 different days, with at least 48 hours between each set. The study involved 17 trained male soccer players (height, 177.33 ± 6.21 cm; body mass, 71.63 ± 9.58 kg; body mass index, 23 ± 2.39 kg·m; age, 21.94 ± 3.58 years). To compare the different values of the time recorded, an index of fatigue was used. Significant differences among trials within each set (repeated measures analysis of variance; p repeated sprint ability in nonlinear and multidirectional sprints (shuttle and change of direction), which might imply a different number of trials within the set or different exercise to rest ratios from the ones usually adopted for straight sprinting, to induce similar trends of fatigue. As practical applications, the estimated numbers of necessary trials in the different sets and the possible exercise to rest ratios, resulting from mathematical modeling, are provided for each investigated sprinting mode.

  10. Effects of leg contrast strength training on sprint, agility and repeated change of direction performance in male soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Mehréz; Negra, Yassine; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed-Souhaiel

    2017-11-01

    Contrast training is a popular technique among individuals who are involved in dynamic sports, having as its goal an increase in dynamic muscular performance. It is characterized by the use of high and low loads in the same strength training session. The present investigation aimed to determine the effects of adding 8 weeks of contrast strength training (CSTP) to regular soccer practice in U-17 male soccer players during the competitive season. We hypothesized that CSTP would enhance their performance. Subjects were divided randomly between a control group (CG, N.=12) and a contrast strength group (CSG, N.=19). The 2 groups trained together; controls followed the regular soccer program, which was replaced by a contrast strength training program for the experimental group. Performance was assessed before and after training, using 10 measures: 5-10-, 20- 30-, and 40-m sprints, a 4x5 m sprint (S4x5), a 9-3-6-3-9 m sprint with 180° turns (S180), a 9-3-6-3-9 m sprint with backward and forward running (SBF), a Repeated-Shuttle-Sprint Ability Test (RSSA), and a Repeated Change of Direction Test (RCOD). CSG showed gains relative to controls in 5-m (Psprints. There were also significant gains in S180°, SBF, and S4 x 5 agility tests (P<0.01), and all RCOD parameters (P<0.05) except RCOD-FI (P=0.055) but no significant change in any RSSA parameters. We conclude that biweekly contrast strength training can be commended to U-17 male soccer players as a means of improving many important components of athletic performance relative to standard in-season training.

  11. The effect of combined resisted agility and repeated sprint training vs. strength training on female elite soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalfawi, Shaher A I; Haugen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Tore A; Enoksen, Eystein; Tønnessen, Espen

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of in-season combined resisted agility and repeated sprint training with strength training on soccer players' agility, linear single sprint speed, vertical jump, repeated sprint ability (RSA), and aerobic capacity. Twenty well-trained elite female soccer players of age ± SD 19.4 ± 4.4 years volunteered to participate in this study. The participants were randomly assigned to either the agility and repeated sprint training group or to the strength training group. All the participants were tested before and after a 10-week specific conditioning program. The pretest and posttest were conducted on 3 separate days with 1 day of low-intensity training in between. Test day 1 consisted of squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and RSA. Test day 2 consisted of a 40-m maximal linear sprint and an agility test, whereas a Beep test was conducted on test day 3 to assess aerobic capacity. The agility and repeated sprint training implemented in this study did not have a significant effect on agility, although there was a tendency for moderate improvements from 8.23 ± 0.32 to 8.06 ± 0.21 seconds (d = 0.8). There was a significant (p < 0.01) and moderate-positive effect on Beep-test performance from level 9.6 ± 1.4 to level 10.8 ± 1.0, and only a trivial small effect on all other physical variables measured in this study. The strength training group had a positive, moderate, and significant (p < 0.01) effect on Beep-test performance from level 9.7 ± 1.3 to level 10.9 ± 1.2 (d = 1.0) and a significant (p < 0.05) but small effect (d = 0.5) on SJ performance (25.9 ± 2.7 to 27.5 ± 4.1 cm). Furthermore, the strength training implemented in this study had a trivial and negative effect on agility performance (d = -0.1). No between-group differences were observed. The outcome of this study indicates the importance of a well-planned program of conditioning that does not result in a decreased performance of the players, the

  12. Repeated sprint ability and stride kinematics are altered following an official match in national-level basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delextrat, A; Baliqi, F; Clarke, N

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of playing an official national-level basketball match on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and stride kinematics. Nine male starting basketball players (22.8±2.2 years old, 191.3±5.8 cm, 88±10.3 kg, 12.3±4.6% body fat) volunteered to take part. Six repetitions of maximal 4-s sprints were performed on a non-motorised treadmill, separated by 21-s of passive recovery, before and immediately after playing an official match. Fluid loss, playing time, and the frequencies of the main match activities were recorded. The peak, mean, and performance decrement for average and maximal speed, acceleration, power, vertical and horizontal forces, and stride parameters were calculated over the six sprints. Differences between pre- and post-match were assessed by student t-tests. Significant differences between pre- and post-tests were observed in mean speed (-3.3%), peak and mean horizontal forces (-4.3% and -17.4%), peak and mean vertical forces (-3.4% and -3.7%), contact time (+7.3%), stride duration (+4.6%) and stride frequency (-4.0%), (Psprint, jump and shuffle frequencies (Prepeated sprint ability depends on the specific activities performed, and that replacing fluid loss through sweating during a match is crucial.

  13. In-season effect of a combined repeated sprint and explosive strength training program on elite junior tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Sanz-Rivas, David; Kovacs, Mark S; Moya, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of a combined explosive strength (ExpS) and repeated sprint (RS)-training program (2 times per week) on performance (sprint, jumping ability, and RS ability [RSA]) in young elite tennis players during a competitive period. Eight competitive internationally ranked male junior tennis players participated in an 8-week training intervention. After training, except for percentage of decrement in the RS test (p = 0.72) and maximal aerobic performance (p = 1.0), all performance variables (i.e., sprint, countermovement jump, and RSA) were significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05; effect sizes ranging from 0.56 to 1.12). Although one can expect greater effects of ExpS or RS training programs alone than a combined program, the results obtained here show that the inclusion of a combined ExpS and RS training program seems to be an effective training tool to improve neuromuscular performance (i.e., changes in jumping ability and single sprint) as well as RSA in high-level tennis players.

  14. Endurance, aerobic high-intensity, and repeated sprint cycling performance is unaffected by normobaric "Live High-Train Low"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejder, Jacob; Andersen, Andreas Breenfeldt; Buchardt, Rie

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to investigate whether 6 weeks of normobaric "Live High-Train Low" (LHTL) using altitude tents affect highly trained athletes incremental peak power, 26-km time-trial cycling performance, 3-min all-out performance, and 30-s repeated sprint ability. In a double-blinded, placebo...... conducted in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over design do not affect power output during an incremental test, a ~26-km time-trial test, or 3-min all-out exercise in highly trained triathletes. Furthermore, 30 s of repeated sprint ability was unaltered.......-out exercise, and 8 × 30 s of all-out sprint was evaluated before and after the intervention. Following at least 8 weeks of wash-out, the subjects crossed over and repeated the procedure. Incremental peak power output was similar after both interventions [LHTL: 375 ± 74 vs. 369 ± 70 W (pre-vs-post), placebo...

  15. Relationships between repeated sprint ability, mechanical parameters, and blood metabolites in professional soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo, Jose A; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Cuadrado-Peñafiel, Victor; Lozano, Emilio; Ortega-Becerra, Manuel; Párraga, Juan

    2015-06-01

    This study analyzed the acute metabolic and mechanical responses to a specific repeated sprint ability (RSA) test. Eighteen male professional soccer players from a team of the First Division of Spanish National League participated. A 12 × 30-m RSA test with 30-second recovery together with countermovement jump test (CMJ) pre a post RSA test was performed. Mechanical responses (i.e., height performance in CMJ and speed loss) and metabolic responses (i.e., blood lactate and ammonia concentrations) were measured before and after exercise. A related sample t-test was used to analyze CMJ height pre-post changes as well as to compare pre- and post-exercise lactate and ammonia levels. Countermovement jump height loss pre-post session (8%) was significant, and fatigue, measured as CMJ height loss, was strongly correlated to lactate (r = 0.97; p < 0.001) and ammonia (r = 0.92; p < 0.001) for all players. The relationships between the variables studied were determined by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficients. The metabolic stress developed during the effort can be estimated by controlling CMJ because of the high correlation between CMJ and blood lactate and ammonia concentrations. The high correlations found between mechanical (speed and CMJ height losses) and metabolic (lactate and ammonia) measures of fatigue highlight the utility and validity of using CMJ to monitor training load and quantify objectively neuromuscular fatigue during RSA.

  16. The Effects of a Single Whole-Body Cryotherapy Exposure on Physiological, Performance, and Perceptual Responses of Professional Academy Soccer Players After Repeated Sprint Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Mark; Birch, Jack; Love, Thomas; Cook, Christian J; Bracken, Richard M; Taylor, Tom; Swift, Eamon; Cockburn, Emma; Finn, Charlie; Cunningham, Daniel; Wilson, Laura; Kilduff, Liam P

    2017-02-01

    Russell, M, Birch, J, Love, T, Cook, CJ, Bracken, RM, Taylor, T, Swift, E, Cockburn, E, Finn, C, Cunningham, D, Wilson, L, and Kilduff, LP. The effects of a single whole-body cryotherapy exposure on physiological, performance, and perceptual responses of professional academy soccer players after repeated sprint exercise. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 415-421, 2017-In professional youth soccer players, the physiological, performance, and perceptual effects of a single whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) session performed shortly after repeated sprint exercise were investigated. In a randomized, counterbalanced, and crossover design, 14 habituated English Premier League academy soccer players performed 15 × 30 m sprints (each followed by a 10 m forced deceleration) on 2 occasions. Within 20 minutes of exercise cessation, players entered a WBC chamber (Cryo: 30 seconds at -60° C, 120 seconds at -135° C) or remained seated (Con) indoors in temperate conditions (∼25° C). Blood and saliva samples, peak power output (countermovement jump), and perceptual indices of recovery and soreness were assessed pre-exercise and immediately, 2-hour and 24-hour postexercise. When compared with Con, a greater testosterone response was observed at 2-hour (+32.5 ± 32.3 pg·ml, +21%) and 24-hour (+50.4 ± 48.9 pg·ml, +28%) postexercise (both P = 0.002) in Cryo (trial × treatment interaction: P = 0.001). No between-trial differences were observed for other salivary (cortisol and testosterone/cortisol ratio), blood (lactate and creatine kinase), performance (peak power output), or perceptual (recovery or soreness) markers (all trial × treatment interactions: P > 0.05); all of which were influenced by exercise (time effects: all P ≤ 0.05). A single session of WBC performed within 20 minutes of repeated sprint exercise elevated testosterone concentrations for 24 hours but did not affect any other performance, physiological, or perceptual measurements taken. Although unclear, WBC may be

  17. Improvement of Repeated-Sprint Ability and Horizontal-Jumping Performance in Elite Young Basketball Players With Low-Volume Repeated-Maximal-Power Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Skok, Oliver; Tous-Fajardo, Julio; Arjol-Serrano, José Luis; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Casajús, José Antonio; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    To examine the effects of a low-volume repeated-power-ability (RPA) training program on repeated-sprint and change-of- direction (COD) ability and functional jumping performance. Twenty-two male elite young basketball players (age 16.2 ± 1.2 y, height 190.0 ± 10.0 cm, body mass 82.9 ± 10.1 kg) were randomly assigned either to an RPA-training group (n = 11) or a control group (n = 11). RPA training consisted of leg-press exercise, twice a week for 6 wk, of 1 or 2 blocks of 5 sets × 5 repetitions with 20 s of passive recovery between sets and 3 min between blocks with the load that maximized power output. Before and after training, performance was assessed by a repeated-sprint-ability (RSA) test, a repeated-COD-ability test, a hop for distance, and a drop jump followed by tests of a double unilateral hop with the right and left legs. Within-group and between-groups differences showed substantial improvements in slowest (RSAs) and mean time (RSAm) on RSA; best, slowest and mean time on repeated-COD ability; and unilateral right and left hop in the RPA group in comparison with control. While best time on RSA showed no improvement in any group, there was a large relationship (r = .68, 90% CI .43;.84) between the relative decrement in RSAm and RSAs, suggesting better sprint maintenance with RPA training. The relative improvements in best and mean repeated-COD ability were very largely correlated (r = .89, 90% CI .77;.94). Six weeks of lowvolume (4-14 min/wk) RPA training improved several physical-fitness tests in basketball players.

  18. The recovery of repeated-sprint exercise is associated with PCr resynthesis, while muscle pH and EMG amplitude remain depressed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Mendez-Villanueva

    Full Text Available The physiological equivalents of power output maintenance and recovery during repeated-sprint exercise (RSE remain to be fully elucidated. In an attempt to improve our understanding of the determinants of RSE performance we therefore aimed to determine its recovery following exhaustive exercise (which affected intramuscular and neural factors concomitantly with those of intramuscular concentrations of adenosine triphosphate [ATP], phosphocreatine [PCr] and pH values and electromyography (EMG activity (a proxy for net motor unit activity changes. Eight young men performed 10, 6-s all-out sprints on a cycle ergometer, interspersed with 30 s of recovery, followed, after 6 min of passive recovery, by five 6-s sprints, again interspersed by 30 s of passive recovery. Biopsies of the vastus lateralis were obtained at rest, immediately after the first 10 sprints and after 6 min of recovery. EMG activity of the vastus lateralis was obtained from surface electrodes throughout exercise. Total work (TW, [ATP], [PCr], pH and EMG amplitude decreased significantly throughout the first ten sprints (P<0.05. After 6 min of recovery, TW during sprint 11 recovered to 86.3±7.7% of sprint 1. ATP and PCr were resynthesized to 92.6±6.0% and 85.3±10.3% of the resting value, respectively, but muscle pH and EMG amplitude remained depressed. PCr resynthesis was correlated with TW done in sprint 11 (r = 0.79, P<0.05 and TW done during sprints 11 to 15 (r = 0.67, P<0.05. There was a ∼2-fold greater decrease in the TW/EMG ratio in the last five sprints (sprint 11 to 15 than in the first five sprints (sprint 1 to 5 resulting in a disproportionate decrease in mechanical power (i.e., TW in relation to EMG. Thus, we conclude that the inability to produce power output during repeated sprints is mostly mediated by intramuscular fatigue signals probably related with the control of PCr metabolism.

  19. High altitude increases alteration in maximal torque but not in rapid torque development in knee extensors after repeated treadmill sprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier eGIRARD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We assessed knee extensor neuromuscular adjustments following repeated treadmill sprints in different normobaric hypoxia conditions, with special reference to rapid muscle torque production capacity. Thirteen team- and racquet-sport athletes undertook 8 x 5-s all-out sprints (passive recovery = 25 s on a non-motorized treadmill in normoxia (NM; FiO2 = 20.9%, at low (LA; FiO2 = 16.6% and high (HA; FiO2 = 13.3% normobaric hypoxia (simulated altitudes of ~1800 m and ~3600 m, respectively. Explosive (∼1 s; fast instruction and maximal (∼5 s; hard instruction voluntary isometric contractions (MVC of the knee extensors, with concurrent electromyographic (EMG activity recordings of the vastus lateralis (VL and rectus femoris (RF muscles, were performed before and 1-min post-exercise. Rate of torque development (RTD and EMG (i.e., Root Mean Square or RMS rise from 0 to 30, -50, -100 and -200 ms were recorded, and were also normalized to maximal torque and EMG values, respectively. Distance covered during the first 5-s sprint was similar (P>0.05 in all conditions. A larger (P0.05. Irrespectively of condition (P>0.05, peak RTD (-6±11%; P0.05, whereas it increased (P<0.05 for RF muscle during all epochs post-exercise, independently of the conditions. In summary, alteration in repeated-sprint ability and post-exercise MVC decrease were greater at high altitude than in normoxia or at low altitude. However, the post-exercise alterations in RTD were similar between normoxia and low-to-high hypoxia.

  20. Sympathetic enhancement in futsal players but not in football players after repeated sprint ability test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Sheng; Liao, Chih-Jung; Lu, Wan-An; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) can disclose the specific adaptation of sympathovagal modulation to exercise. This study investigated the change in HRV measures after anaerobic and aerobic intermittent exercises in university football and futsal players. 36 male university students with physically active lifestyle (n=14), football (n=12), and futsal (n=10) participated in this study. The participants completed the repeated sprint ability (RSA) test and Yo-Yo (YY) intermittent recovery test level 1 in randomised order. ECG signals of the participants were recorded in supine position 15 min before and 30 min after exercises. Before exercise, and 5 and 30 min after exercise, the blood pressures were also taken. In the RSA protocol, the percentage changes in normalised high-frequency power (nHFP) were significantly decreased, while the percentage changes in the very low/high frequency power ratio (VLHR) and low/high frequency power ratio (LHR) were significantly increased in futsal players after exercise, as compared with the controls. No significant changes in all HRV indices were found in the YY protocol, except the respiratory frequency. After exercise, the percent decrease in vagal modulation in futsal players was significantly reduced, while the percentage increase in sympathetic modulation in futsal players was significantly enhanced in the RSA test, but not in the YY test, as compared with the control group. The increase in sympathetic activity and the decrease in vagal activity in the futsal players were greater than the corresponding increase and decrease in the football players in the RSA test.

  1. The effects of short-cycle sprints on power, strength, and salivary hormones in elite rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewther, Blair T; Cook, Christian J; Lowe, Tim E; Weatherby, Robert P; Gill, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of short-cycle sprints on power, strength, and salivary hormones in elite rugby players. Thirty male rugby players performed an upper-body power and lower-body strength (UPLS) and/or a lower-body power and upper-body strength (LPUS) workout using a crossover design (sprint vs. control). A 40-second upper-body or lower-body cycle sprint was performed before the UPLS and LPUS workouts, respectively, with the control sessions performed without the sprints. Bench throw (BT) power and box squat (BS) 1 repetition maximum (1RM) strength were assessed in the UPLS workout, and squat jump (SJ) power and bench press (BP) 1RM strength were assessed in the LPUS workout. Saliva was collected across each workout and assayed for testosterone (Sal-T) and cortisol (Sal-C). The cycle sprints improved BS (2.6 ± 1.2%) and BP (2.8 ± 1.0%) 1RM but did not affect BT and SJ power. The lower-body cycle sprint produced a favorable environment for the BS by elevating Sal-T concentrations. The upper-body cycle sprint had no hormonal effect, but the workout differences (%) in Sal-T (r = -0.59) and Sal-C (r = 0.42) concentrations correlated to the BP, along with the Sal-T/C ratio (r = -0.49 to -0.66). In conclusion, the cycle sprints improved the BP and BS 1RM strength of elite rugby players but not power output in the current format. The improvements noted may be explained, in part, by the changes in absolute or relative hormone concentrations. These findings have practical implications for prescribing warm-up and training exercises.

  2. Enzyme adaptations of human skeletal muscle during bicycle short-sprint training and detraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linossier, M T; Dormois, D; Perier, C; Frey, J; Geyssant, A; Denis, C

    1997-12-01

    The effect of sprint training and detraining on supramaximal performances was studied in relation to muscle enzyme adaptations in eight students trained four times a week for 9 weeks on a cycle ergometer. The subjects were tested for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), maximal aerobic power (MAP) and maximal short-term power output (Wmax) before and after training and after 7 weeks of detraining. During these periods, biopsies were taken from vastus lateralis muscle for the determination of creatine kinase (CK), adenylate kinase (AK), glycogen phosphorylase (PHOS), hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and its isozymes, 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) and citrate synthase (CS) activities. Training induced large improvements in Wmax (28%) with slight increases (3%) in VO2peak (P power output as a result of a muscle glycogenolytic and glycolytic adaptation. A long interruption in training has negligible effects on short-sprint ability and muscle anaerobic potential. On the other hand, a persistent training stimulus is required to maintain high aerobic capacity and muscle oxidative potential. This may contribute to a rapid return to competitive fitness for sprinters and power athletes.

  3. Acute effects of two different initial heart rates on testing the Repeated Sprint Ability in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscello, B; Briotti, G; Tozzo, N; Partipilo, F; Taraborelli, M; Zeppetella, A; Padulo, J; D'Ottavio, S

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the acute effects of two different initial heart rates intensities when testing the repeated sprint ability (RSA) performances in young soccer players. Since there are many kinds of pre-match warm-ups, we chose to take as an absolute indicator of internal load the heart rate reached at the end of two different warm-up protocols (60 vs. 90% HRmax) and to compare the respective RSA performances. The RSA tests were performed on fifteen male soccer players (age: 17.9±1.5 years) with two sets of ten shuttle-sprints (15+15 m) with a 1:3 exercise to rest ratio, in different days (randomized order) with different HR% (60 & 90% HRmax). In order to compare the different sprint performances a Fatigue Index (FI%) was computed, while the blood lactate concentrations (BLa-) were measured before and after testing, to compare metabolic demand. Significant differences among trials within each sets (P4 mmol/L(-1)).

  4. Performance and Metabolic Demand of a New Repeated-Sprint Ability Test in Basketball Players: Does the Number of Changes of Direction Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, Alessandro M; Ardigò, Luca P; Barbieri, Fabio A; Milioni, Fabio; Dello Iacono, Antonio; Camargo, Bruno H F; Padulo, Johnny

    2017-09-01

    Zagatto, AM, Ardigò, LP, Barbieri, FA, Milioni, F, Dello Iacono, A, Camargo, BHF, and Padulo, J. Performance and metabolic demand of a new repeated-sprint ability test in basketball players: does the number of changes of direction matter? J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2438-2446, 2017-This study compared 2 repeated-sprint ability (RSA) tests in basketball players. Both tests included 10 × 30-m sprints, with the difference that the previously validated test (RSA2COD) featured 2 changes of direction (COD) per sprint, whereas the experimental test (RSA5COD) featured 5 CODs per sprint. Test performances and metabolic demands were specifically assessed in 20 basketball players. First, RSA5COD test-retest reliability was investigated. Then, RSA2COD, RSA5COD sprint times, peak speeds, oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2) and posttest blood lactate concentration [La] were measured. The RSA5COD results showed to be reliable. RSA2COD performance resulted better than the RSA5COD version (p sprint times and higher peak speeds. Over sprints, the tests did not differ from each other in terms of V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (p > 0.05). Over whole bout, the RSA2COD was more demanding than the RSA5COD, considering overall metabolic power requirement (i.e., VO2-driven + [La]-driven components). Given that RSA5COD (a) mimics real game-play as sprint distance and action change frequency/direction and (b) has the same metabolic expenditure per task completion as metabolic cost, RSA5COD is a valuable option for players and coaches for training basketball-specific agility and assessing bioenergetic demands.

  5. Repeated-sprint cycling does not induce respiratory muscle fatigue in active adults: measurements from the powerbreathe® inspiratory muscle trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minahan, Clare; Sheehan, Beth; Doutreband, Rachel; Kirkwood, Tom; Reeves, Daniel; Cross, Troy

    2015-03-01

    This study examined respiratory muscle strength using the POWERbreathe® inspiratory muscle trainer (i.e., 'S-Index') before and after repeated-sprint cycling for comparison with maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) values obtained during a Mueller maneuver. The S-Index was measured during six trials across two sessions using the POWERbreathe® and MIP was measured during three trials in a single session using a custom-made manometer in seven recreationally active adults. Global respiratory muscle strength was measured using both devices before and after the performance of sixteen, 6-s sprints on a cycle ergometer. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the POWERbreathe® S-index indicated excellent (p Repeated-sprint cycling had no effect on respiratory muscle strength as measured by the POWERbreathe® (p > 0.99) and during the Mueller maneuver (p > 0.99). The POWERbreathe® S-Index is a moderately reliable, but not equivalent, measure of MIP determined during a Mueller maneuver. Furthermore, repeated-sprint cycling does not induce globalized respiratory muscle fatigue in recreationally-active adults. Key pointsThe S-Index as measured by the POWERbreathe® is a reliable measure of respiratory muscle strengthThe S-Index does not accurately reflect maximal inspiratory pressure obtained from a Mueller maneuverRepeated-sprint cycling does not induce respiratory muscle fatigue as measured by the POWERbreathe® and the Manometer.

  6. Repeated sprint ability in young basketball players: multi-direction vs. one-change of direction (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny ePadulo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the reliability of a novel multi-direction repeated sprint ability test (RSM; 10×(6×5-m compared with a repeated sprint ability test (RSA with one change of direction (10×(2×15-m, and the relationship of the RSM and RSA with Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1 and jump performances [squat jump (SJ and counter-movement-jump (CMJ]. Thirty-six (male, n=14, female n=22 young basketball players (age 16.0±0.9 yrs performed the RSM, RSA, Yo-Yo IR1, SJ and CMJ, and were re-tested only for RSM and RSA after one week. The absolute error of reliability (standard error of the measurement was lower than 0.212-s and 0.617-s for the time variables of the RSA and RSM test, respectively. Performance in the RSA and RSM test significantly correlated with CMJ and SJ. The best time, worst time and total time of the RSA and RSM test were negatively correlated with Yo-Yo IR1 distance. Based on these findings, consistent with previously published studies, it was concluded that the novel RSM test was valid and reliable.

  7. The Effect of Standard Strength vs. Contrast Strength Training on the Development of Sprint, Agility, Repeated Change of Direction, and Jump in Junior Male Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Mehréz; Negra, Yassine; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel

    2017-04-01

    Hammami, M, Negra, Y, Shephard, RJ, and Chelly, MS. The effect of standard strength vs. contrast strength training on the development of sprint, agility, repeated change of direction, and jump in junior male soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 901-912, 2017-The aim was to compare the impact of 2 differing strength training (ST) programs on the athletic performance of junior male soccer players at a critical phase during their competitive season. Participants aged 16.0 ± 0.5 years were randomly assigned between control (C, n = 12), standard ST (n = 16), and contrast strength training (CST, n = 16), each performed twice a week. Athletic performance was assessed before and after the intervention using 8 tests: 40-m sprint, 4 × 5-m sprint (S4 × 5), 9-3-6-3-9 m sprint with 180° turns (S180°), 9-3-6-3-9 m sprint with backward and forward running (SBF), repeated shuttle sprint ability (RSSA), repeated change of direction (RCOD), squat jump (SJ), and countermovement jump (CMJ). The control group's (CG) performance tended to improve in some tests and decrease in others, but these changes were not statistically significant. Both training programs enhanced all sprint performances relative to controls (p ≤ 0.05). The strength training group (SG) and the CST group (CSG) increased significantly in S180°, SBF, and S4 × 5 relative to CG, although the S4 × 5 also increased in CSG relative to SG (p ≤ 0.05). No intergroup difference of RSSA performance was observed. The RCOD parameters increased significantly in CSG relative to both SG and CG (p ≤ 0.05). The SJ and CMJ height increased significantly in both experimental groups (p < 0.000). We conclude that during the competitive season, some measures of athletic performance in male soccer players were increased more by 8 weeks of CST than by ST.

  8. Emotional responses during repeated sprint intervals performed on level, downhill and uphill surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Bertrand; Guilloux, Bertrand; Begue, Mylène; Uriac, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test emotional responses during sprint intervals performed on a level, down and up surface. Fifty trained participants performed a maximal effort during a 60-m sprint and 10 repetitions of 60 m running sprints on a level, down and up surface on a 5.9% slope. Running speeds, emotional responses and heart rate were measured. Self-selected speeds were correlated with the rating of perceived exertion, the affective balance, the desire to stop and the resources needed for the task in all conditions whereas the pleasure, the desire to continue and the capacity to realise the task were correlated with speeds only during level and uphill running. Mean values of emotional parameters were significantly different (P < 0.05) during running on a flat surface, downhill and uphill. When the gradient of running surface is changed, the pattern of emotional responses was just translated, i.e. most of the slope between the evolution of emotional parameters and the repetitions were not significantly different whereas Y-intercepts were different. Consented effort is highly correlated with the resources needed for the task (P < 0.001, r(2) = 0.72). We propose that the difference in the resources needed for the task between level, downhill and uphill running (F 2, 1499 = 166.5, P < 0.001, Eta(2) = 0.18) is the most important key that explains our results.

  9. Relationships between anthropometric measures and athletic performance, with special reference to repeated-sprint ability, in the Qatar national soccer team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocherie, Franck; Girard, Olivier; Forchino, Fabricio; Al Haddad, Hani; Dos Santos, Gilvan A; Millet, Grégoire P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine potential relationships between anthropometric parameters and athletic performance with special consideration to repeated-sprint ability (RSA). Sixteen players of the senior male Qatar national soccer team performed a series of anthropometric and physical tests including countermovement jumps without (CMJ) and with free arms (CMJwA), straight-line 20 m sprint, RSA (6 × 35 m with 10 s recovery) and incremental field test. Significant (P sprinting times and r = 0.54 for maximal sprinting speed) with the exception of the sprint decrement score (Sdec). The sum of six skinfolds and adipose mass index were largely correlated with Sdec (r = 0.68, P 0.05, respectively) or any standard athletic tests. Multiple regression analyses indicated that muscular cross-sectional area for mid-thigh, adipose index, straight-line 20 m time, maximal sprinting speed and CMJwA are the strongest predictors of Sdec (r(2) = 0.89) and TT (r(2) = 0.95) during our RSA test. In the Qatar national soccer team, players' power-related qualities and RSA are associated with a high muscular profile and a low adiposity. This supports the relevance of explosive power for the soccer players and the larger importance of neuromuscular qualities determining the RSA.

  10. EFFECT OF PRE-COOLING ON REPEAT-SPRINT PERFORMANCE IN SEASONALLY ACCLIMATISED MALES DURING AN OUTDOOR SIMULATED TEAM-SPORT PROTOCOL IN WARM CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly J. Brade

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Whether precooling is beneficial for exercise performance in warm climates when heat acclimatised is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of precooling on repeat-sprint performance during a simulated team-sport circuit performed outdoors in warm, dry field conditions in seasonally acclimatised males (n = 10. They performed two trials, one with precooling (PC; ice slushy and cooling jacket and another without (CONT. Trials began with a 30-min baseline/cooling period followed by an 80 min repeat-sprint protocol, comprising 4 x 20-min quarters, with 2 x 5-min quarter breaks and a 10-min half-time recovery/cooling period. A clear and substantial (negative; PC slower effect was recorded for first quarter circuit time. Clear and trivial effects were recorded for overall circuit time, third and fourth quarter sprint times and fourth quarter best sprint time, otherwise unclear and trivial effects were recorded for remaining performance variables. Core temperature was moderately lower (Cohen's d=0.67; 90% CL=-1.27, 0.23 in PC at the end of the precooling period and quarter 1. No differences were found for mean skin temperature, heart rate, thermal sensation, or rating of perceived exertion, however, moderate Cohen's d effect sizes suggested a greater sweat loss in PC compared with CONT. In conclusion, repeat- sprint performance was neither clearly nor substantially improved in seasonally acclimatised players by using a combination of internal and external cooling methods prior to and during exercise performed in the field in warm, dry conditions. Of practical importance, precooling appears unnecessary for repeat-sprint performance if athletes are seasonally acclimatised or artificially acclimated to heat, as it provides no additional benefit

  11. Repeated sprints, high-intensity interval training, small-sided games: theory and application to field sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, James J; Reed, Jacob P; Leiting, Keith; Chiang, Chieh-Ying; Stone, Michael H

    2014-03-01

    Due to the broad spectrum of physical characteristics necessary for success in field sports, numerous training modalities have been used develop physical preparedness. Sports like rugby, basketball, lacrosse, and others require athletes to be not only strong and powerful but also aerobically fit and able to recover from high-intensity intermittent exercise. This provides coaches and sport scientists with a complex range of variables to consider when developing training programs. This can often lead to confusion and the misuse of training modalities, particularly in the development of aerobic and anaerobic conditioning. This review outlines the benefits and general adaptations to 3 commonly used and effective conditioning methods: high-intensity interval training, repeated-sprint training, and small-sided games. The goals and outcomes of these training methods are discussed, and practical implementations strategies for coaches and sport scientists are provided.

  12. Sprint performance under heat stress: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, O; Brocherie, F; Bishop, D J

    2015-06-01

    Training and competition in major track-and-field events, and for many team or racquet sports, often require the completion of maximal sprints in hot (>30 °C) ambient conditions. Enhanced short-term (heat exposure (muscle temperature rise), can be attributed to improved muscle contractility. Under heat stress, elevations in skin/core temperatures are associated with increased cardiovascular and metabolic loads in addition to decreasing voluntary muscle activation; there is also compelling evidence to suggest that large performance decrements occur when repeated-sprint exercise (consisting of brief recovery periods between sprints, usually 39 °C). Here we also discuss strategies (heat acclimatization, precooling, hydration strategies) employed by "sprint" athletes to mitigate the negative influence of higher environmental temperatures.

  13. Effects of an In-season Plyometric Training Program on Repeated Change of Direction and Sprint Performance in the Junior Soccer Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Mehréz; Negra, Yassine; Aouadi, Ridha; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel

    2016-12-01

    Hammami, M, Negra, Y, Aouadi, R, Shephard, RJ, and Chelly, MS. Effects of an in-season plyometric training program on repeated change of direction and sprint performance in the junior soccer player. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3312-3320, 2016-We aimed to determine the gains in explosive movements of male junior soccer players induced by incorporating an 8-week plyometric training program (PTP) into a standard soccer conditioning regimen 5 months after the beginning of the competitive season. Our hypothesis was that PTP would enhance explosive movements, and thus sprint running, repeated shuttle sprint ability (RSSA), agility and the ability to make repeated changes of direction (RCOD). A group of junior soccer players were randomly divided into 2 groups: an experimental group (E, n = 15, age 15.7 ± 0.2 years) and a control group (C, n = 13, age 15.8 ± 0.2 years). The participants in E and C performed training exercises and matches together, but for an 8-week period in the latter part of the season, the experimental group replaced a part of the normal regimen (the tactical session) by a biweekly course of PTP (hurdle and drop jumps). Two familiarization sessions were held 2 weeks before definitive testing. The ability of the players was assessed by 3 agility tests (a sprint test with 180° turns, a 9-3-6-3-9 m sprint with backward and forward running, and a four 5-m sprint test with turns); 2 repeated sprint tests (RSSA and RCOD); and running times over 5-, 10-, 20-, 30-, and 40-m distances. Participants in E showed gains relative to C in sprint times (p ≤ 0.05 for 5, 10, and 20 m), and 2 of 3 the RCOD parameters (RCOD best, p ≤ 0.001; RCOD total, p ≤ 0.05). However, with the pattern of plyometric training that we adopted, and perhaps because participants were in good initial physical condition, the agility and RSSA test scores remained unchanged. Nevertheless, we conclude that our PTP can be commended to junior soccer players as a means of improving

  14. The short-term effect of whole-body vibration training on vertical jump, sprint, and agility performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Darryl J; Legg, Stephen J; Hooker, Michael J

    2004-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that short-term whole-body vibration (WBV) training produces neuromuscular improvement similar to that of power and strength training. However, it is yet to be determined whether short-term WBV exposure produces neurogenic enhancement for power, speed, and agility. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect short-term WBV training had on vertical jump, sprint, and agility performance in nonelite athletes. Twenty-four sport science students (16 men and 8 women) were randomly assigned to 2 groups: WBV training or control. Each group included 8 men and 4 women. Countermovement jump (CMJ) height, squat jump (SJ) height, sprint speed over 5, 10, and 20 m, and agility (505, up and back) were performed by each participant before and after 9 days of either no training (control) or WBV training. Perceived discomfort of every participant was recorded after daily WBV exposure and nonexposure. There were no significant differences between WBV and control groups for CMJ, SJ, sprints, and agility. Perceived discomfort differed between the first and subsequent days of WBV training (p < 0.05); however, there was no difference between the WBV and control groups. It is concluded that short-term WBV training did not enhance performance in nonelite athletes.

  15. Long-term glycine propionyl-l-carnitine supplemention and paradoxical effects on repeated anaerobic sprint performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldstein Erica R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been demonstrated that acute GPLC supplementation produces enhanced anaerobic work capacity with reduced lactate production in resistance trained males. However, it is not known what effects chronic GPLC supplementation has on anaerobic performances or lactate clearance. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term effects of different dosages of GPLC supplementation on repeated high intensity stationary cycle sprint performance. Methods Forty-five resistance trained men participated in a double-blind, controlled research study. All subjects completed two testing sessions, seven days apart, 90 minutes following oral ingestion of either 4.5 grams GPLC or 4.5 grams cellulose (PL, in randomized order. The exercise testing protocol consisted of five 10-second Wingate cycle sprints separated by 1-minute active recovery periods. Following completion of the second test session, the 45 subjects were randomly assigned to receive 1.5 g, 3.0 g, or 4.5 g GPLC per day for a 28 day period. Subjects completed a third test session following the four weeks of GPLC supplementation using the same testing protocol. Values of peak power (PP, mean power (MP and percent decrement of power (DEC were determined per bout and standardized relative to body mass. Heart rate (HR and blood lactate (LAC were measured prior to, during and following the five sprint bouts. Results There were no significant effects of condition or significant interaction effects detected for PP and MP. However, results indicated that sprint bouts three, four and five produced 2 - 5% lower values of PP and 3 - 7% lower values of MP with GPLC at 3.0 or 4.5 g per day as compared to baseline values. Conversely, 1.5 g GPLC produced 3 - 6% higher values of PP and 2 -5% higher values of MP compared with PL baseline values. Values of DEC were significantly greater (15-20% greater across the five sprint bouts with 3.0 g or 4.5 g GPLC, but the 1.5 g GPLC

  16. Effect of pre-cooling on repeat-sprint performance in seasonally acclimatised males during an outdoor simulated team-sport protocol in warm conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brade, Carly J; Dawson, Brian T; Wallman, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    Whether precooling is beneficial for exercise performance in warm climates when heat acclimatised is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of precooling on repeat-sprint performance during a simulated team-sport circuit performed outdoors in warm, dry field conditions in seasonally acclimatised males (n = 10). They performed two trials, one with precooling (PC; ice slushy and cooling jacket) and another without (CONT). Trials began with a 30-min baseline/cooling period followed by an 80 min repeat-sprint protocol, comprising 4 x 20-min quarters, with 2 x 5-min quarter breaks and a 10-min half-time recovery/cooling period. A clear and substantial (negative; PC slower) effect was recorded for first quarter circuit time. Clear and trivial effects were recorded for overall circuit time, third and fourth quarter sprint times and fourth quarter best sprint time, otherwise unclear and trivial effects were recorded for remaining performance variables. Core temperature was moderately lower (Cohen's d=0.67; 90% CL=-1.27, 0.23) in PC at the end of the precooling period and quarter 1. No differences were found for mean skin temperature, heart rate, thermal sensation, or rating of perceived exertion, however, moderate Cohen's d effect sizes suggested a greater sweat loss in PC compared with CONT. In conclusion, repeat- sprint performance was neither clearly nor substantially improved in seasonally acclimatised players by using a combination of internal and external cooling methods prior to and during exercise performed in the field in warm, dry conditions. Of practical importance, precooling appears unnecessary for repeat-sprint performance if athletes are seasonally acclimatised or artificially acclimated to heat, as it provides no additional benefit. Key PointsPre-cooling did not improve repeated sprint performance during a prolonged team-sport circuit in field conditions.If individuals are already heat acclimatised/acclimated, pre-cooling is

  17. The validity and reliability of a global positioning satellite system device to assess speed and repeated sprint ability (RSA) in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero-Alvarez, José C; Coutts, Aaron; Granda, Juan; Barbero-Alvarez, Verónica; Castagna, Carlo

    2010-03-01

    There is a limited understanding of the validity and reliability of commercially available global positioning satellite (GPS) devices for assessing repeated sprint performance in athletes. The aims of this study were to assess the convergent validity and the test-retest reliability of a GPS device for measuring repeated sprint ability test (RSAT) variables. Two groups participated in this study, a group of 21 physical education students (age: 20.2+/-2.3 years, stature: 1.75+/-0.42 m, body mass: 68.0+/-6.8kg) and a second group 14 elite junior soccer players (age: 14.5+/-1.2 years, stature: 1.60+/-0.09 m, body mass: 57.7+/-3.8kg) volunteered to participate in this study. Convergent validity was assessed as the correlation between sprint performance (15 and 30-m) using both timing lights and a portable GPS device during a RSAT (7 x 30-m sprints with 30-s of active recovery). The 7 x 30-m RSAT test-retest reliability using GPS device was assessed in elite junior soccer players repeating the test 1 week apart and expressing reliability as a coefficient of variation. Results showed a strong correlation between peak speed measures with the GPS device and RSAT performance measured with timing lights for the 15-m (r(2)=0.87, pspeed (1.7%) and peak speed (1.2%) during the 7 x 30-m RSAT, but high variation for the percentage decrement score (36.2%). These results provide evidence to support the use of the GPS device as an alternative measure to assess repeated sprint performance but suggest a percentage decrement score is not a reliable measure of RSAT performance.

  18. The use of portable NIRS to measure muscle oxygenation and haemodynamics during a repeated sprint running test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ben; Hesford, Catherine M; Cooper, Chris E

    2013-01-01

    Portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) devices were originally developed for use in exercise and sports science by Britton Chance in the 1990s (the RunMan and microRunman series). However, only recently with the development of more robust, and wireless systems, has the routine use in elite sport become possible. As with the medical use of NIRS, finding applications of the technology that are relevant to practitioners is the key issue. One option is to use NIRS to track exercise training-induced adaptations in muscle. Portable NIRS devices enable monitoring during the normal 'field' routine uses to assess fitness, such as repeat sprint shuttle tests. Knowledge about the acute physiological responses to these specific tests has practical applications within team sport training prescription, where development of both central and peripheral determinants of high-intensity intermittent exercise needs to be considered. The purpose of this study was to observe NIRS-detected parameters during a repeat sprint test. We used the PortaMon, a two wavelength spatially resolved NIR spectrometer manufactured by Artinis Inc., to assess NIR changes in the gastrocnemius muscle of both the left and right leg during high-intensity running. Six university standard rugby players were assessed (age 20 ± 1.5 years; height 183 ± 1.0 cm; weight 89.4 ± 5.8 kg; body fat 12.2 ± 3.0 %); the subjects completed nine repeated shuttle runs, which incorporated forward, backward and change of direction movements. Individual sprint time, total time to complete test, blood lactate response (BL), heart rate values (HR) and haemoglobin variables (ΔHHb, ΔtHb, ΔHbO2 and ΔTSI%) were measured. Total time to complete the test was 260 ± 20 s, final blood lactate was 14.3 ± 2.8 mM, and maximal HR 182 ± 5 bpm. NIRS variables displayed no differences between right and left legs. During the test, the group-averaged data showed a clear decrease in HbO2 (max. decrease 11.41 ± 4.95 μM), increase in HHb

  19. Effects of seated and standing cold water immersion on recovery from repeated sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, Jonathan D C; van Someren, Ken A; Bell, Phillip G; Spence, John R; Jewell, Andrew P; Gaze, David; Howatson, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two different hydrostatic pressures (seated or standing) during cold water immersion at attenuating the deleterious effects of strenuous exercise on indices of damage and recovery. Twenty four male well-trained games players (age 23 ± 3 years; body mass 81.4 ± 8.7 kg: [Formula: see text]O2max 57.5 ± 4.9 ml∙kg(-1)∙min(-1)) completed the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) and were randomly assigned to either a control, seated cold water immersion or a standing cold water immersion (14 min at 14°C). Maximal isometric voluntary contraction, counter-movement jump, creatine kinase, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) were measured before and up to 72 h following the LIST. All dependent variables showed main effects for time (P cold water immersion interventions. Seated cold water immersion was associated with lower DOMS than standing cold water immersion (effect size = 1.86; P = 0.001). These data suggest that increasing hydrostatic pressure by standing in cold water does not provide an additional recovery benefit over seated cold water immersion, and that both seated and standing immersions have no benefit in promoting recovery following intermittent sprint exercise.

  20. Effect of high-intensity intermittent cycling sprints on neuromuscular activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, F; Basset, F A; Giacomoni, M; Lemaître, F; Tricot, V; Falgairette, G

    2006-01-01

    High-intensity intermittent sprints induce changes in metabolic and mechanical parameters. However, very few data are available about electrical manifestations of muscle fatigue following such sprints. In this study, quadriceps electromyographic (EMG) responses to repeated all-out exercise bouts of short duration were assessed from maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) performed before and after sprints. Twelve men performed ten 6-s maximal cycling sprints, separated by 30-s rest. The MVC were performed pre-sprints ( pre), post-sprints ( post), and 5 min post-sprints ( post5). Values of root-mean-square (RMS) and median frequency (MF) of vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM) were recorded during each MVC. During sprints, PPO decreased significantly in sprints 8, 9, and 10, compared to sprint 1 (- 8 %, - 10 %, and - 11 %, respectively, p MVC post (- 13 %, p MVC post5 (- 10.5 %, p MVC pre. The RMS value of VL muscle increased significantly after sprints (RMS pre vs. RMS post: + 15 %, p pattern of muscle fiber recruitment, and a decrease in conduction velocity of active fibers.

  1. Turkish population data on the short tandem repeat locus TPOX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vural, B; Poda, M; Atlioglu, E;

    1998-01-01

    Allele and genotype frequencies were determined for the STR (short tandem repeat) locus TPOX in a random Turkish population sample of 200 individuals.......Allele and genotype frequencies were determined for the STR (short tandem repeat) locus TPOX in a random Turkish population sample of 200 individuals....

  2. EFFECTS OF BLOOD LACTATE ON OXYGEN UPTAKE KINETICS DURING RECOVERY AFTER SPRINT IN HUMANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokuo Yano

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of blood lactate level (La on oxygen uptake ( ·VO2 kinetics during recovery after short-term exercise with maximal effort (sprint. Three sprints were performed on a cycle ergometer with a load of 8% f body weight at maximal rotation rate. ·VO2 kinetics and oxygen debt were determined after three sprint tests: one 10-s cycling sprint, five repeated 10-s cycling sprints with 6-min intervals and one 30-s cycling sprint. There was no significant difference between peak power outputs in the 10-s sprint and five sprints. There was no difference in ·VO2 kinetics during recovery from one sprint and during recovery after five sprints. La peaked at 5 min. The peak value of La was significantly lower in one sprint (4.41 ± 0.9 mM than in five sprints (7.01 ± 2.2 mM. Thus, despite a difference in La, there was no difference between ·VO2 kinetics during recovery after one sprint and after five sprints. There was a significant difference in ·VO2 between the five sprints and 30-s sprint from 70 s to 320 s during recovery, but there were no significant differences in La after 5 min of recovery. There were two phases in ·VO2. They consisted of fast oxygen debt and slow oxygen debt. There were also no differences in slow and fast oxygen debts between the two 10-s sprints despite significant differences in blood lactate during recovery. Peak La in the five sprints was not significantly different from that in the 30-s sprint (8.68 ± 1.2 mM. However, slow oxygen debt was significantly greater in the 30-s sprint than in the five sprints. It is concluded that ·VO2 kinetics during recovery are not affected by an increase in blood lactate.

  3. Short-term effects of complex and contrast training in soccer players' vertical jump, sprint, and agility abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio Alves, José Manuel Vilaça; Rebelo, António Natal; Abrantes, Catarina; Sampaio, Jaime

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the short-term effects of complex and contrast training (CCT) on vertical jump (squat and countermovement jump), sprint (5 and 15 m), and agility (505 Agility Test) abilities in soccer players. Twenty-three young elite Portuguese soccer players (age 17.4 +/- 0.6 years) were divided into 2 experimental groups (G1, n = 9, and G2, n = 8) and 1 control group (G3, n = 6). Groups G1 and G2 have done their regular soccer training along with a 6-week strength training program of CCT, with 1 and 2 training sessions.wk, respectively. G3 has been kept to their regular soccer training program. Each training session from the CCT program was organized in 3 stations in which a general exercise, a multiform exercise, and a specific exercise were performed. The load was increased by 5% from 1 repetition maximum each 2 weeks. Obtained results allowed identifying (a) a reduction in sprint times over 5 and 15 m (9.2 and 6.2% for G1 and 7.0 and 3.1%, for G2; p < 0.05) and () an increase on squat and jump (12.6% for G1 and 9.6% for G2; p < 0.05). The results suggested that the CCT induced the performance increase in 5 and 15 m sprint and in squat jump. Vertical jump and sprint performances after CCT program were not influenced by the number of CCT sessions per week (1 or 2 sessions.wk). From the obtained results, it was suggested that the CCT is an adequate training strategy to develop soccer players' muscle power and speed.

  4. Comparison of the effect of repeated-sprint training combined with two different methods of strength training on young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Vazquez, Miguel A; Romero-Boza, Sergio; Toscano-Bendala, Francisco J; Leon-Prados, Juan A; Suarez-Arrones, Luis J; Gonzalez-Jurado, Jose A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of combining repeated-sprint training with 2 different methods of muscle strength training on physical performance variables in young players. Twenty-one soccer players with mean (± SD) age of 18.1 (± 0.8) years, weight 69.9 (± 6.5) kg, and height 177.1 (± 5.7) cm, and competing in U-19 category, were randomly assigned to 2 experimental groups: squat group (SG: n = 10) and take-off group (TG: n = 11). Intervention in both groups consisted of the combination of a weekly session of repeated-sprint training (the same for both groups), with 2 weekly sessions of strength training (different for each group), for 8 weeks in the final period of the season. The strength sessions for the SG consisted of conducting a series of full squats executed at maximum velocity in the concentric phase. Intervention in the TG was the performance of 2 specific strength exercises (take-offs and change of direction), with measurements taken before and after consideration of the following variables: repeated-sprint ability (RSA), yo-yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YYIRT1), countermovement jump (CMJ), and average velocity in full squat progressive loads test. The SG improved CMJ height in 5.28% (p ≤ 0.05) and FS37.5-47.5-67.5 (p ≤ 0.05), whereas the TG improved FS17.5-27.5-37.5-47.5-67.5 (p ≤ 0.05). There were no significant changes in the values of RSA or YYIRT1 in either group. The results seem to show that the combination of a weekly session of repeated-sprint training with 2 weekly sessions of strength training could be an insufficient stimulus to improve RSA in the final period of the season.

  5. Effects of a small-sided game-based training programme on repeated sprint and change of direction abilities in recreationally-trained football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalance-Moreno, Pascual; García-Pinillos, Felipe; Latorre-Román, Pedro Á

    2017-02-21

    To examine the effects of 6-week periodized small-sided game (SSG) training intervention on change of direction [COD], sprint and repeated sprint ability [RSA] in recreational male football players. Twenty-three young football players (age: 20.86 years) were randomized in a control group (n = 11) and an experimental group (n = 12). The SSG programme was included in the experimental group's training sessions. The players completed two variations of a SSG (i.e. 2 vs. 2 and 4 vs. 4 players) during intervention. To examine the changes in physical performance after the 6-week periodized SSG training intervention, all players were tested 6 weeks apart (i.e. pre-test and post-test) in sprint, COD ability test, and RSA shuttle test. A 2x2 ANOVA showed that 6-week SSG training intervention induced significant improvements (P0.7) in COD ability test, and variables related to both sprint test and RSA in the experimental group, whereas the control group remained unchanged (P≥0.05, ESsprint in recreationally trained football players.

  6. Diurnal variations of plasma homocysteine, total antioxidant status, and biological markers of muscle injury during repeated sprint: effect on performance and muscle fatigue--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammouda, Omar; Chtourou, Hamdi; Chahed, Henda; Ferchichi, Salyma; Kallel, Choumous; Miled, Abdelhedi; Chamari, Karim; Souissi, Nizar

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was (i) to evaluate whether homocysteine (Hcy), total antioxidant status (TAS), and biological markers of muscle injury would be affected by time of day (TOD) in football players and (ii) to establish a relationship between diurnal variation of these biomarkers and the daytime rhythm of power and muscle fatigue during repeated sprint ability (RSA) exercise. In counterbalanced order, 12 football (soccer) players performed an RSA test (5 x[6 s of maximal cycling sprint + 24 s of rest]) on two different occasions: 07:00-08:30 h and 17:00-18:30 h. Fasting blood samples were collected from a forearm vein before and 3-5 min after each RSA test. Core temperature, rating of perceived exertion, and performances (i.e., Sprint 1, Sprint 2, and power decrease) during the RSA test were significantly higher at 17:00 than 07:00 h (p RSA test. However, biomarkers of antioxidant status' resting levels (i.e., total antioxidant status, uric acid, and total bilirubin) were higher in the morning. This TOD effect was suppressed after exercise for TAS and uric acid. In conclusion, the present study confirms diurnal variation of Hcy, selected biological markers of cellular damage, and antioxidant status in young football players. Also, the higher performances and muscle fatigue showed in the evening during RSA exercise might be due to higher levels of biological markers of muscle injury and lower antioxidant status at this TOD.

  7. Repeated Sprint Ability in Young Basketball Players: Multi-direction vs. One-Change of Direction (Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padulo, Johnny; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Dello Iacono, Antonio; Attene, Giuseppe; Pizzolato, Fabio; Dal Pupo, Juliano; Zagatto, Alessandro M; Oggianu, Marcello; Migliaccio, Gian M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the reliability of a novel multi-direction repeated sprint ability (RSA) test [RSM; 10 × (6 × 5-m)] compared with a RSA with one change of direction [10 × (2 × 15-m)], and the relationship of the RSM and RSA with Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) and jump performances [squat jump (SJ) and counter-movement-jump (CMJ)]. Thirty-six (male, n = 14, female n = 22) young basketball players (age 16.0 ± 0.9 yrs) performed the RSM, RSA, Yo-Yo IR1, SJ, and CMJ, and were re-tested only for RSM and RSA after 1 week. The absolute error of reliability (standard error of the measurement) was lower than 0.212 and 0.617-s for the time variables of the RSA and RSM test, respectively. Performance in the RSA and RSM test significantly correlated with CMJ and SJ. The best time, worst time, and total time of the RSA and RSM test were negatively correlated with Yo-Yo IR1 distance. Based on these findings, consistent with previously published studies, it was concluded that the novel RSM test was valid and reliable.

  8. Comparison between traditional strength training and complex contrast training on repeated sprint ability and muscle architecture in elite soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spineti, Juliano; Figueiredo, Tiago; Bastos DE Oliveira, Viviane; Assis, Marcio; Fernandes DE Oliveira, Liliam; Miranda, Humberto; Machado DE Ribeiro Reis, Victor M; Simão, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare traditional strength training (TST) and complex contrast training (CCT) on the repeated-shuttle-sprint ability (RSSA), the countermovement squat jump (CMJ) height, the one repetition maximum (1RM) at squat on the Smith machine, and on muscle architecture in young, male elite soccer players. Twenty-two soccer players (mean age 18.4±0.4 years; mean weight 70.2±9.1 kg; mean height 179.9±7.5 cm) who belonged to the under-20 age group were randomly assigned into two groups: CCT (N.=10) or TST (N.=12). During the study period, the soccer players trained with CCT through power exercises performed before high-velocity exercises and TST based on a set-repetition format through daily, undulatory periodization. After statistical analysis (Pability (large effect size). However, the TST promoted significant changes in 1RM (large effect size) and a significant increase in the muscle thickness of the vastus intermedius (moderate effect size). The CCT protocol could be used to improve the RSSA parameters, CMJ and 1RM, and the TST developed dynamic strength and muscle growth. Coaches can choose either CCT or TST protocols according to the needs of their soccer players.

  9. Effects of heat exposure and 3% dehydration achieved via hot water immersion on repeated cycle sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Justin A; Green, James M; Bishop, Phillip A; Richardson, Mark T; Neggers, Yasmin H; Leeper, James D

    2011-03-01

    This study examined effects of heat exposure with and without dehydration on repeated anaerobic cycling. Males (n = 10) completed 3 trials: control (CT), water-bath heat exposure (∼39°C) to 3% dehydration (with fluid replacement) (HE), and similar heat exposure to 3% dehydration (DEHY). Hematocrit increased significantly from pre to postheat immersion in both HE and DEHY. Participants performed 6 × 15s cycle sprints (30s active recovery). Mean Power (MP) was significantly lower vs. CT (596 ± 66 W) for DEHY (569 ± 72 W), and the difference approached significance for HE (582 ± 76 W, p = 0.07). Peak Power (PP) was significantly lower vs. CT (900 ± 117 W) for HE (870 ± 128 W) and approached significance for DEHY (857 ± 145 W, p = 0.07). Postsprint ratings of perceived exertion was higher during DEHY (6.4 ± 2.0) and HE (6.3 ± 1.6) than CT (5.7 ± 2.1). Combined heat and dehydration impaired MP and PP (decrements greatest in later bouts) with HE performance intermediate to CT and DEHY.

  10. Comparison of shuttle and straight repeated-sprint ability tests and their relationship to anthropometrics and explosive muscular performance of lower limb in elite handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermassi, Souhail; Schwesig, René; Wollny, Rainer; Fieseler, Georg; van den Tillaar, Roland; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed S

    2017-06-21

    This study assessed inter-relationships between shuttle and straight repeated-sprint ability tests and the relationship of each measure to anthropometric and explosive lower limb performance data in elite handball players. Twenty-two elite male handball players (18.9 ± 0.2 years; body mass: 83.3 ± 1.1 kg, height: 1.79 ± 2.30 m, body fat: 12.8 ± 0.2%) completed tests that included a lower limb force-velocity test of peak power (Wpeak), jumping ability (squat and counter-movement jumps; SJ, CMJ), 1 repetition maximum (1-RM) half back squat, average sprint velocity over 5 m (V-5 m), peak velocity between 25-30 m (Vmax), and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1), and anthropometric determinations of cross-sectional areas and muscle volumes for leg and thigh muscles. Data were compared with performance on 2 repeated sprint tests; the straight test [6 × 30 m (RSA30)] and the intermittent test [6 x (2 x 15 m) shuttle sprints (RSA15)]. V-5 m; 1-RM; and thigh and leg muscle cross-sectional areas and volumes showed relevant relationships to the shuttle RSA test (r2≥0.5). The Yo-Yo IR1 explained the largest percentage of variance in RSA15 total time (60%), and V-5 m also explained 56% of the variance in RSA15 total time. RSA15% fatigue was only related to 1-RM (explained variance: 58%), and the RSA30 test showed no useful correlations with any of the investigated predictors. Multiple-regression analyses using all physical tests explained 91% of the variance in RSA15 total time (prepeated sprints over distances of 15 m or less. RSA15 is related to muscular power, maximal strength, speed and endurance performance; however, the straight repeated sprint ability test is not, and thus does not seem relevant for the testing of handball players.

  11. Repeated-Sprint Cycling Does Not Induce Respiratory Muscle Fatigue in Active Adults: Measurements from The Powerbreathe® Inspiratory Muscle Trainer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Minahan, Beth Sheehan, Rachel Doutreband, Tom Kirkwood, Daniel Reeves, Troy Cross

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined respiratory muscle strength using the POWERbreathe® inspiratory muscle trainer (i.e., ‘S-Index’ before and after repeated-sprint cycling for comparison with maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP values obtained during a Mueller maneuver. The S-Index was measured during six trials across two sessions using the POWERbreathe® and MIP was measured during three trials in a single session using a custom-made manometer in seven recreationally active adults. Global respiratory muscle strength was measured using both devices before and after the performance of sixteen, 6-s sprints on a cycle ergometer. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the POWERbreathe® S-index indicated excellent (p 0.99 and during the Mueller maneuver (p > 0.99. The POWERbreathe® S-Index is a moderately reliable, but not equivalent, measure of MIP determined during a Mueller maneuver. Furthermore, repeated-sprint cycling does not induce globalized respiratory muscle fatigue in recreationally-active adults.

  12. A passive heat maintenance strategy implemented during a simulated half-time improves lower body power output and repeated sprint ability in professional Rugby Union players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Mark; West, Daniel J; Briggs, Marc A; Bracken, Richard M; Cook, Christian J; Giroud, Thibault; Gill, Nicholas; Kilduff, Liam P

    2015-01-01

    Reduced physical performance has been observed following the half-time period in team sports players, likely due to a decrease in muscle temperature during this period. We examined the effects of a passive heat maintenance strategy employed between successive exercise bouts on core temperature (Tcore) and subsequent exercise performance. Eighteen professional Rugby Union players completed this randomised and counter-balanced study. After a standardised warm-up (WU) and 15 min of rest, players completed a repeated sprint test (RSSA 1) and countermovement jumps (CMJ). Thereafter, in normal training attire (Control) or a survival jacket (Passive), players rested for a further 15 min (simulating a typical half-time) before performing a second RSSA (RSSA 2) and CMJ's. Measurements of Tcore were taken at baseline, post-WU, pre-RSSA 1, post-RSSA 1 and pre-RSSA 2. Peak power output (PPO) and repeated sprint ability was assessed before and after the simulated half-time. Similar Tcore responses were observed between conditions at baseline (Control: 37.06±0.05°C; Passive: 37.03±0.05°C) and for all other Tcore measurements taken before half-time. After the simulated half-time, the decline in Tcore was lower (-0.74±0.08% vs. -1.54±0.06%, psprint times were 1.39±0.17% (prepeated sprint ability in professional Rugby Union players.

  13. Effects of partial sleep deprivation on proinflammatory cytokines, growth hormone, and steroid hormone concentrations during repeated brief sprint interval exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedelmalek, Salma; Souissi, Nizar; Chtourou, Hamdi; Denguezli, Meriam; Aouichaoui, Chirine; Ajina, Monia; Aloui, Asma; Dogui, Mohamed; Haddouk, Samy; Tabka, Zouhair

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) on circulating concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in relation to the secretory profiles of growth hormone (GH), cortisol, and testosterone during a repeated brief sprint interval exercise. Thirty healthy football players (mean age: 21.1 [range: 18-24] years; body mass index [BMI]: 22.6 [range: 18.47-24.46] Kg/m(2)) completed two test sessions at 08:00 h, one scheduled after a baseline night (bedtime: from 22:30 to 07:00 h) and the other after a PSD night caused by an early awakening (bedtime: from 22:30 to 03:00 h). During each session, participants performed 4 × 250-m run on a treadmill at a constant intensity of 80% of the personal maximal speed with a 3-min recovery in between. Tests session were performed at 08:00 h. Blood samples were collected before, immediately after the first and the fourth 250-m run, and 60 min after the exercise. The results showed that cortisol concentrations were not affected by the PSD. However, GH and testosterone concentrations were higher (p exercise during PSD in comparison with baseline. Likewise, plasma concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α were higher (p exercise (i.e., the first and the fourth run) and remained elevated during the recovery period (i.e., 60 min after the exercise). In conclusion, these results showed that sleep restriction increases the proinflammatory cytokine, GH, and testosterone concentrations after physical exercise but did not affect the cortisol responses.

  14. Muscle metabolism and performance improvement after two training programmes of sprint running differing in rest interval duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraslanidis, Ploutarchos; Petridou, Anatoli; Bogdanis, Gregory C; Galanis, Nikiforos; Tsalis, George; Kellis, Spiros; Mougios, Vassilis

    2011-08-01

    Repeated-sprint training often involves short sprints separated by inadequate recovery intervals. The effects of interval duration on metabolic and performance parameters are unclear. We compared the effects of two training programmes, differing in rest interval duration, on muscle (vastus lateralis) metabolism and sprint performance. Sixteen men trained three times a week for 8 weeks, each training session comprising 2-3 sets of two 80-m sprints. Sprints were separated by 10 s (n = 8) or 1 min (n = 8). Both training programmes improved performance in the 100-, 200-, and 300-m sprints, but the improvement was greater in the 10-s group during the final 100 m of the 200- and 300-m runs. Independent of interval duration, training mitigated the drop of muscle ATP after two 80-m sprints. The drop in phosphocreatine and the increases in glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate after two 80-m sprints were greater in the 10-s group. In conclusion, training with a limited number of repeated short sprints (≤10 s) may be more effective in improving speed maintenance in 200- and 300-m runs when performed with a 1:1 rather than a 1:6 exercise-to-rest ratio. This may be due to a greater activation of glycolysis caused, in part, by the limited resynthesis of phosphocreatine during the very short rest interval.

  15. Cheetahs of the deep sea: deep foraging sprints in short-finned pilot whales off Tenerife (Canary Islands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Soto, Natacha; Johnson, Mark P; Madsen, Peter T; Díaz, Francisca; Domínguez, Iván; Brito, Alberto; Tyack, Peter

    2008-09-01

    1. Empirical testing of optimal foraging models for breath-hold divers has been difficult. Here we report data from sound and movement recording DTags placed on 23 short-finned pilot whales off Tenerife to study the foraging strategies used to catch deep-water prey. 2. Day and night foraging dives had a maximum depth and duration of 1018 m and 21 min. Vocal behaviour during dives was consistent with biosonar-based foraging, with long series of echolocation clicks interspersed with buzzes. Similar buzzes have been associated with prey capture attempts in other echolocating species. 3. Foraging dives seemed to adapt to circadian rhythms. Deep dives during the day were deeper, but contained fewer buzzes (median 1), than night-time deep dives (median 5 buzzes). 4. In most deep (540-1019 m) daytime dives with buzzes, a downward directed sprint reaching up to 9 m s(-1) occurred just prior to a buzz and coincided with the deepest point in the dive, suggestive of a chase after escaping prey. 5. A large percentage (10-36%) of the drag-related locomotion cost of these dives (15 min long) is spent in sprinting (19-79 s). This energetic foraging tactic focused on a single or few prey items has not been observed previously in deep-diving mammals but resembles the high-risk/high-gain strategy of some terrestrial hunters such as cheetahs. 6. Deep sprints contrast with the expectation that deep-diving mammals will swim at moderate speeds optimized to reduce oxygen consumption and maximize foraging time at depth. Pilot whales may have developed this tactic to target a deep-water niche formed by large/calorific/fast moving prey such as giant squid.

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AEROBIC POWER AND REPEATED SPRINT ABILITY IN YOUNG SOCCER PLAYERS WITH DIFFERENT LEVELS OF VO2 MAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostam Alizadeh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In some team sports such as soccer which is interval, athletes need to prepare themselves immediatelyfor the next activity. Therefore it is very important to have enough information on characteristics of recovery phase and quick recovery to the first situation and to have the minimum speed reduction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between aerobic power and repeated sprint ability (RSA or decrementindex in young soccer players in three different levels of Vo2max. Methods: For this reason 41 volunteers were divided in to three groups with different levels of Vo2max ml.kg-1.min-1 low 37.22 ± 2.3 (n= 18, age 17.1 ± 0.9 year, height 170.6 ± 0.76 cm, weight 67.1 ± 5.05 kg medium 46.46± 1.97 ml.kg-1.min-1 (n= 13, age 17.6± 0.76year, height 173.8 ± 4.84 cm, weight 65.9 ± 4.92 kg and high 55.63 ± 1.52 ml.kg-1.min-1 (n=10, age 17.4 ±0.69 year, height 177 ± 3.23 cm, weight 71.4 ± 3.94 kg. To determine Vo2max a graded exercise test until volitional exhaustion on treadmill was used, and also RAST was used to measure RSA. The lactate accumulation was measured before and after RSA protocol. Pearson's correlation was used to determine the correlation between the aerobic power and RSA. The results indicated that there are significant relationship between Vo2max anddecremental index in low Vo2max group (r= 0.86, p= 0.001, no significant relationship medium Vo2max group (r= 0.14, p= 0.63 and negative significant relationship in high Vo2max group (r= - 0.64, p= 0.04. There are no significant relationship between Lactate accumulation and decremental index in medium (r= 0.005, p= 0.98 and high Vo2max groups (r=0.27, p= 0.45. Discussion: It is possible that the recovery of inter muscular resources relates to aerobic ability, but there are other factors effective in RSA rather than Vo2max and Lactate accumulation. The current study showed a normal curved relationship between Vo2max and RSA.

  17. A passive heat maintenance strategy implemented during a simulated half-time improves lower body power output and repeated sprint ability in professional Rugby Union players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Russell

    Full Text Available Reduced physical performance has been observed following the half-time period in team sports players, likely due to a decrease in muscle temperature during this period. We examined the effects of a passive heat maintenance strategy employed between successive exercise bouts on core temperature (Tcore and subsequent exercise performance. Eighteen professional Rugby Union players completed this randomised and counter-balanced study. After a standardised warm-up (WU and 15 min of rest, players completed a repeated sprint test (RSSA 1 and countermovement jumps (CMJ. Thereafter, in normal training attire (Control or a survival jacket (Passive, players rested for a further 15 min (simulating a typical half-time before performing a second RSSA (RSSA 2 and CMJ's. Measurements of Tcore were taken at baseline, post-WU, pre-RSSA 1, post-RSSA 1 and pre-RSSA 2. Peak power output (PPO and repeated sprint ability was assessed before and after the simulated half-time. Similar Tcore responses were observed between conditions at baseline (Control: 37.06±0.05°C; Passive: 37.03±0.05°C and for all other Tcore measurements taken before half-time. After the simulated half-time, the decline in Tcore was lower (-0.74±0.08% vs. -1.54±0.06%, p<0.001 and PPO was higher (5610±105 W vs. 5440±105 W, p<0.001 in the Passive versus Control condition. The decline in PPO over half-time was related to the decline in Tcore (r = 0.632, p = 0.005. In RSSA 2, best, mean and total sprint times were 1.39±0.17% (p<0.001, 0.55±0.06% (p<0.001 and 0.55±0.06% (p<0.001 faster for Passive versus Control. Passive heat maintenance reduced declines in Tcore that were observed during a simulated half-time period and improved subsequent PPO and repeated sprint ability in professional Rugby Union players.

  18. Influence of training intensity on adaptations in acid/base transport proteins, muscle buffer capacity, and repeated-sprint ability in active men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Cian; Bishop, David J

    2016-12-01

    McGinley C, Bishop DJ. Influence of training intensity on adaptations in acid/base transport proteins, muscle buffer capacity, and repeated-sprint ability in active men. J Appl Physiol 121: 1290-1305, 2016. First published October 14, 2016; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00630.2016-This study measured the adaptive response to exercise training for each of the acid-base transport protein families, including providing isoform-specific evidence for the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)1/4 chaperone protein basigin and for the electrogenic sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe)1. We investigated whether 4 wk of work-matched, high-intensity interval training (HIIT), performed either just above the lactate threshold (HIITΔ20; n = 8), or close to peak aerobic power (HIITΔ90; n = 8), influenced adaptations in acid-base transport protein abundance, nonbicarbonate muscle buffer capacity (βmin vitro), and exercise capacity in active men. Training intensity did not discriminate between adaptations for most proteins measured, with abundance of MCT1, sodium/hydrogen exchanger (NHE) 1, NBCe1, carbonic anhydrase (CA) II, and CAXIV increasing after 4 wk, whereas there was little change in CAIII and CAIV abundance. βmin vitro also did not change. However, MCT4 protein content only increased for HIITΔ20 [effect size (ES): 1.06, 90% confidence limits × / ÷ 0.77], whereas basigin protein content only increased for HIITΔ90 (ES: 1.49, × / ÷ 1.42). Repeated-sprint ability (5 × 6-s sprints; 24 s passive rest) improved similarly for both groups. Power at the lactate threshold only improved for HIITΔ20 (ES: 0.49; 90% confidence limits ± 0.38), whereas peak O2 uptake did not change for either group. Detraining was characterized by the loss of adaptations for all of the proteins measured and for repeated-sprint ability 6 wk after removing the stimulus of HIIT. In conclusion, 4 wk of HIIT induced improvements in each of the acid-base transport protein families, but, remarkably, a 40

  19. Kinematic analysis of sprinting pickup acceleration versus maximum sprinting speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. MANZER

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pickup acceleration and maximum sprinting speed are two essential phases of the 100-m sprint with variant sprinting speed, step length, frequency and technique. The aim of the study was to describe and compare the kinematic parameters of both sprint variants. Hypothetically it was assumed to find differences in sprinting speed, step length, flight and contact times as well as between the body angles of different key positions. From 8 female and 8 male (N=16 track and field junior athletes a double stride of both sprint variants was filmed (200 Hz from a sagittal position and the 10-m-sprint time was measured using triple light barriers. Kinematic data for sprinting speed and angles of knee, hip and ankle were compared with an analysis of variance with repeated measures. The sprinting speed was 7.7 m/s and 8.0 m/s (female and 8.4 m/s and 9.2 m/s (male with significantly higher values of step length, flight time and shorter ground contact time during maximum sprinting speed. Because of the longer flight time, it is possible to place the foot closer to the body but with a more extended knee on the ground. These characteristics can be used as orientation for technique training.

  20. Relationship Between Agility Tests and Short Sprints: Reliability and Smallest Worthwhile Difference in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division-I Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, J Bryan; Ivey, Pat A; Mayhew, Jerry L; Schumacher, Richard M; Brechue, William F

    2016-04-01

    The Pro-Agility test (I-Test) and 3-cone drill (3-CD) are widely used in football to assess quickness in change of direction. Likewise, the 10-yard (yd) sprint, a test of sprint acceleration, is gaining popularity for testing physical competency in football players. Despite their frequent use, little information exists on the relationship between agility and sprint tests as well the reliability and degree of change necessary to indicate meaningful improvement resulting from training. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and smallest worthwhile difference (SWD) of the I-Test and 3-CD and the relationship of sprint acceleration to their performance. Division-I football players (n = 64, age = 20.5 ± 1.2 years, height = 185.2 ± 6.1 cm, body mass = 107.8 ± 20.7 kg) performed duplicate trials in each test during 2 separate weeks at the conclusion of a winter conditioning period. The better time of the 2 trials for each week was used for comparison. The 10-yd sprint was timed electronically, whereas the I-Test and 3-CD were hand timed by experienced testers. Each trial was performed on an indoor synthetic turf, with players wearing multicleated turf shoes. There was no significant difference (p > 0.06) between test weeks for the I-Test (4.53 ± 0.35 vs. 4.54 ± 0.31 seconds), 3-CD (7.45 ± 0.06 vs. 7.49 ± 0.06 seconds), or 10-yd sprint (1.85 ± 0.12 vs. 1.84 ± 0.12 seconds). The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for 3-CD (ICC = 0.962) and 10-yd sprint (ICC = 0.974) were slightly higher than for the I-Test (ICC = 0.914). These values lead to acceptable levels of the coefficient of variation for each test (1.2, 1.2, and 1.9%, respectively). The SWD% indicated that a meaningful improvement due to training would require players to decrease their times by 6.6% for I-Test, 3.7% for 3-CD, and 3.8% for 10-yd sprint. Performance in agility and short sprint tests are highly related and reliable in college football players, providing quantifiable

  1. Can a Repeated Sprint Ability Test Help Clear a Previously Injured Soccer Player for Fully Functional Return to Activity? A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padulo, Johnny; Attene, Giuseppe; Ardigò, Luca P; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Maffulli, Nicola; Zagatto, Alessandro M; Dello Iacono, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the effects of fatigue induced by a repeated sprint ability (RSA) test on the neuromuscular responses of soccer players with a recent history of lower limb injuries (CH) and a matched control group in good fitness condition (GH). This was a case-control study. Nine CH and 9 GH. Allocation to CH or GH. Each player was assessed for blood lactate concentration and jumping performance [squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ)] before/after RSA. Post-RSA rate of perceived exertion (RPE) was obtained. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to calculate RSA sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing between CH and GH. Intraclass correlation coefficient was used to assess reliability. No baseline differences were found for any variable. ΔSJ before/after RSA was -14 ± 2% and -5 ± 2% in CH and GH, respectively (P Repeated sprint ability is a simple, low-cost field test potentially able to assist in clinical decision making for return to sport.

  2. A Brief Review of Short Tandem Repeat Mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Fan; Jia-You Chu

    2007-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are short tandemly repeated DNA sequences that involve a repetitive unit of 1-6 bp. Because of their polymorphisms and high mutation rates, STRs are widely used in biological research. Strand-slippage replication is the predominant mutation mechanism of STRs, and the stepwise mutation model is regarded as the main mutation model. STR mutation rates can be influenced by many factors. Moreover, some trinucleotide repeats are associated with human neurodegenerative diseases. In order to deepen our knowledge of these diseases and broaden STR application, it is essential to understand the STR mutation process in detail. In this review, we focus on the current known information about STR mutation.

  3. Validation of the short posttraumatic stress disorder rating interview (SPRINT-E in a sample of people affected by F-27 Chilean earthquake and tsunami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo C. Leiva-Bianchi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available On February 27, 2010 (F-27 there was an earthquake and a tsunami m Chile that has caused a great impact on the mental health of the population of this country, specifically in the increase of cases of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. In view of count better instruments to measure PTSD was applied for the first time since it was created, the SPRINTE scale in a population other than the U.S., specifically in 291 people who experienced the F-27. The analysis of reliability (α=. 916, concurrent validity (all items significantly correlated with the scale used as a criterion DTS and construct validity (CMIN=2.237, RMSEA=.092, NFI=.901, CFI=.942 and PNFI=.704 for two-factor model indicate that SPRINT-E is a valid and reliable scale to measure PTSD in this population. Finally, some reflections about new factor structure discovered in this analysis, which is consistent with the meaning of items and with theoretical models such as covert stimuli. It also reflects on the usefulness of a brief scale, proven valid and very good psychometric characteristics in a Spanish-speaking population prone to natural disasters such as Chilean F-27, Japan (March 11, 2011 or Spain (May 11, 2011.

  4. Repeated Sprint Ability in Young Basketball Players (Part 2): The Chronic Effects of Multidirection and of One Change of Direction Are Comparable in Terms of Physiological and Performance Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Attene, Giuseppe; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T.; Bragazzi, Nicola L.; Dello Iacono, Antonio; Pizzolato, Fabio; Zagatto, Alessandro M.; Dal Pupo, Juliano; Oggianu, Marcello; Migliaccio, Gian M.; Mannucci Pacini, Elena; Padulo, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a 5-week training program, consisting of repeated 30-m sprints, on two repeated sprint ability (RSA) test formats: one with one change of direction (RSA) and the other with multiple changes of direction (RSM). Thirty-six young male and female basketball players (age 16.1 ± 0.9 years), divided into two experimental groups, were tested for RSA, RSM, squat jump, counter-movement jump, and the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery-Level-1 (Yo-Yo IR1) test...

  5. Neurophysiological Mechanisms of Fatigue Résistance during Repeated Sprints in Hot and Hypoxic Environments: Application to Team Sports

    OpenAIRE

    Brocherie, Franck

    2016-01-01

    In team sports, characterising fatigue is complex, with the underlying processes (e.g., metabolic energy supply, intramuscular accumulation of metabolic by-products, hyperthermia, dehydration) developing as match proceeds to ultimately manifest as a decline in physical performance. Using acute and chronic manipulations of environmental stress (i.e., heat or hypoxia) and unique tools (i.e., instrumented sprint treadmill, 45-m long hypoxic marquee), the main intention of this work was to better...

  6. Repeated Sprint Ability in Young Basketball Players (Part 2): The Chronic Effects of Multidirection and of One Change of Direction Are Comparable in Terms of Physiological and Performance Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attene, Giuseppe; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Dello Iacono, Antonio; Pizzolato, Fabio; Zagatto, Alessandro M; Dal Pupo, Juliano; Oggianu, Marcello; Migliaccio, Gian M; Mannucci Pacini, Elena; Padulo, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a 5-week training program, consisting of repeated 30-m sprints, on two repeated sprint ability (RSA) test formats: one with one change of direction (RSA) and the other with multiple changes of direction (RSM). Thirty-six young male and female basketball players (age 16.1 ± 0.9 years), divided into two experimental groups, were tested for RSA, RSM, squat jump, counter-movement jump, and the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery-Level-1 (Yo-Yo IR1) test, before and after a 4-week training program and 1 week of tapering. One group performed 30-m sprints with one change of direction (RSA group, RSAG), whereas the other group performed multidirectional 30-m sprints (RSM group, RSMG). Both groups improved in all scores in the post-intervention measurements (P repeated 30-m sprints, either with one change of direction or multidirectional, induce similar physiological and performance responses in young basketball players, but have a different psycho-physiological impact.

  7. Six weeks of β-alanine supplementation did not enhance repeated-sprint ability or technical performances in young elite basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milioni, Fabio; Redkva, Paulo E; Barbieri, Fabio A; Zagatto, Alessandro M

    2017-06-01

    Supplementation with β-alanine plays an important role as a precursor of carnosine, the most effective intramuscular buffer, and has been seen as a potential ergogenic aid, especially for high-intensity modalities such as basketball. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of 6 weeks of β-alanine supplementation on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and technical performances in young elite Brazilian basketball players. In total, 27 young basketball players (17±1 years) were randomized into a β-alanine group (Gβ - 6.4 g day(-1) of β-alanine) and a placebo group (GP - 6.4 g day(-1) of dextrose). Before and after the supplementation period the athletes performed a RSA test composed of ten 30 m sprints with two 180° changes of direction interspaced by 30 s of recovery. During the recovery period (i.e., after the sprints) the athletes performed a countermovement jump (CMJ) and a set of three free throws. After 48 h they performed a Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1). Both groups increased the distance covered in the Yo-Yo IR1 after the supplementation period ( p = 0.001). On the other hand, both groups presented impairment in RSA time-performance (total time, best time, and mean time, p ≤ 0.04), while no significant changes were observed for technical task performances (i.e., CMJ and free throws) ( p ≥ 0.07). No between-group interactions were observed for any variable measured ( p ≥ 0.31). Thus, 6 weeks of β-alanine supplementation did not improve RSA or technical performances in young elite basketball players.

  8. Fully integrated, fully automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The generation of short tandem repeat profiles, also referred to as ‘DNA typing,’ is not currently performed outside the laboratory because the process requires highly skilled technical operators and a controlled laboratory environment and infrastructure with several specialized instruments. The goal of this work was to develop a fully integrated system for the automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles from buccal swab samples, to improve forensic laboratory process flow as well as to enable short tandem repeat profile generation to be performed in police stations and in field-forward military, intelligence, and homeland security settings. Results An integrated system was developed consisting of an injection-molded microfluidic BioChipSet cassette, a ruggedized instrument, and expert system software. For each of five buccal swabs, the system purifies DNA using guanidinium-based lysis and silica binding, amplifies 15 short tandem repeat loci and the amelogenin locus, electrophoretically separates the resulting amplicons, and generates a profile. No operator processing of the samples is required, and the time from swab insertion to profile generation is 84 minutes. All required reagents are contained within the BioChipSet cassette; these consist of a lyophilized polymerase chain reaction mix and liquids for purification and electrophoretic separation. Profiles obtained from fully automated runs demonstrate that the integrated system generates concordant short tandem repeat profiles. The system exhibits single-base resolution from 100 to greater than 500 bases, with inter-run precision with a standard deviation of ±0.05 - 0.10 bases for most alleles. The reagents are stable for at least 6 months at 22°C, and the instrument has been designed and tested to Military Standard 810F for shock and vibration ruggedization. A nontechnical user can operate the system within or outside the laboratory. Conclusions The integrated system represents the

  9. The Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Barometric Pressure on Short Sprint Race Times

    CERN Document Server

    Mureika, J R

    2006-01-01

    A numerical model of 100 m and 200 m world class sprinting performances is modified using standard hydrodynamic principles to include effects of air temperature, pressure, and humidity levels on aerodynamic drag. The magnitude of the effects are found to be dependent on wind speed. This implies that differing atmospheric conditions can yield slightly different corrections for the same wind gauge reading. In the absence of wind, temperature is found to induce the largest variation in times (0.01 s per $10\\dc$ increment in the 100 m), while relative humidity contributes the least (under 0.01 s for all realistic conditions for 100 m). Barometric pressure variations at a particular venue can also introduce fluctuations in performance times on the order of a 0.01 s for this race. The combination of all three variables is essentially additive, and is more important for head-wind conditions that for tail-winds. As expected, calculated corrections in the 200 m are magnified due to the longer duration of the race. The...

  10. REPEATED SPRINT ABILITY IN PROFESSIONAL SOCCER vs. PROFESSIONAL FUTSAL PLAYERS [Capacidad de realizar esprints repetidos en jugadores profesionales de fútbol vs. Fútbol sala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cuadrado-Peñafiel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the changes through repeated explosive effort sequences (20+20-m sprint with change of direction, jumping, metabolic response (lactate, as well as the relationship between these variables and fitness qualities (strength and endurance in professional futsal and soccer players. Methods: Male players (n =30, Twelve futsal and twenty soccer players completed three testing sessions. In the first session was measured VO2max on a motorized treadmill. In the second session was measured counter movement jump (CMJ and full squat RM in Smith Machine. Finally, in the third session six repeated-explosive effort sequences (RES was performed. Results: Similar values of lower limbs strength, CMJ height, LAC after RSA test and VO2max (95,12 vs. 94,73; 34,5 vs. 35,9; 13,65 vs. 14,33; 62,78 vs. 62,95 soccer vs. futsal respectively and significant differences when are analysed the loss of performance in velocity (total and between three first and three last and vertical jump height (2,67 vs. 4,4**; 1,28 vs. 2,1*; 2,88 vs. 6,1**; 9,71 vs. 14,3* soccer vs. futsal respectively. Conclusions: Professional futsal and soccer obtain significant differences in speed and vertical jump height (CMJ loss despite having similar values in squat, oxygen consumption, lactate after RSA test and CMJ height. Issue that could be attributed to the characteristics of the sport. This suggests that the volume should be increased oriented ability to perform repeated sprint actions over other type of training aimed at improving aerobic capacity especially at professional level.

  11. REPEATED SPRINT ABILITY IN PROFESSIONAL SOCCER vs. PROFESSIONAL FUTSAL PLAYERS [Capacidad de realizar esprints repetidos en jugadores profesionales de fútbol vs. Fútbol sala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cuadrado-Peñafiel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the changes through repeated explosive effort sequences (20+20-m sprint with change of direction, jumping, metabolic response (lactate, as well as the relationship between these variables and fitness qualities (strength and endurance in professional futsal and soccer players. Methods: Male players (n =30, Twelve futsal and twenty soccer players completed three testing sessions. In the first session was measured VO2max on a motorized treadmill. In the second session was measured counter movement jump (CMJ and full squat RM in Smith Machine. Finally, in the third session six repeated-explosive effort sequences (RES was performed. Results: Similar values of lower limbs strength, CMJ height, LAC after RSA test and VO2max (95,12 vs. 94,73; 34,5 vs. 35,9; 13,65 vs. 14,33; 62,78 vs. 62,95 soccer vs. futsal respectively and significant differences when are analysed the loss of performance in velocity (total and between three first and three last and vertical jump height (2,67 vs. 4,4**; 1,28 vs. 2,1*; 2,88 vs. 6,1**; 9,71 vs. 14,3* soccer vs. futsal respectively. Conclusions: Professional futsal and soccer obtain significant differences in speed and vertical jump height (CMJ loss despite having similar values in squat, oxygen consumption, lactate after RSA test and CMJ height. Issue that could be attributed to the characteristics of the sport. This suggests that the volume should be increased oriented ability to perform repeated sprint actions over other type of training aimed at improving aerobic capacity especially at professional level.

  12. Short Cycles in Repeated Exponentiation Modulo a Prime

    CERN Document Server

    Glebsky, Lev

    2009-01-01

    Given a prime $p$, we consider the dynamical system generated by repeated exponentiations modulo $p$, that is, by the map $u \\mapsto f_g(u)$, where $f_g(u) \\equiv g^u \\pmod p$ and $0 \\le f_g(u) \\le p-1$. This map is in particular used in a number of constructions of cryptographically secure pseudorandom generators. We obtain nontrivial upper bounds on the number of fixed points and short cycles in the above dynamical system.

  13. Sport-Specific Repeated Sprint Training Improves Punching Ability And Upper-Body Aerobic Power In Experienced Amateur Boxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Bruzas, Vidas; Mockus, Pranas; Stasiulis, Alvydas; Snieckus, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas

    2017-08-09

    High-intensity interval training improves endurance and performance, but it is unclear whether sprint-type upper-body interval training is similarly effective. This study explored the effects of 4-week sport-specific sprint interval training on punch characteristics and endurance capacity in boxers. Experienced male amateur boxers (n = 18) participated in this 4-week training study, and were divided into an experimental group (EG) and a control group (CG) (n = 9 per group). Both groups completed standard low-intensity training. The EG also completed 3 rounds (14 sets of 3 s all-out punching with 10 s rest) of a simulated fight using a punching bag with 1 min rest between rounds 3 times per week, while the CG performed the same 3 rounds of a simulated fight at low intensity. Three rounds of 14 sets of 3 s all-out punching of a bag ergometer with 10 s rest were performed to measure punching abilities. Peak oxygen consumption and peak power were measured during progressive arm cranking before and after training. In response to training peak oxygen consumption and peak power in arm cranking test increased in EG; also, punching force increased and maintenance of punching frequency and punch force improved during the simulated fight, which resulted in greater cumulative force throughout the 3 rounds. There were no changes in the CG. The study shows that 1 month of all-out punching training (3 sessions per week with ∼2 min of all-out punching per session) improved both upper-body aerobic power and punching abilities in experienced amateur boxers.

  14. Acute Responses to 10×15 m Repeated Sprint Ability Exercise in Adolescent Athletes: the Role of Change of Direction and Sport Specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Meletakos, Panagiotis; Tasiopoulos, Ioannis; Kostoulas, Ioannis; Ganavias, Panagiotis

    2016-06-01

    The repeated sprint ability (RSA) has been studied with protocols using distances longer than 20 m per sprint, whereas basketball players cover on average less than 20-meter distance per sprint during match. The aim of the present study was to examine the physiological impact of 10 × 15 m RSA test in straight-line (RSASL) or with change of direction (RSACOD), i.e. 10 × (7.5 + 7.5 m)) in young national level basketball players. Young basketball players (n = 11, age 17.1 (1.0) years, body mass 76 (6) kg, height 184 (4) cm, body mass index 22.6 (1.8) kgm(-2), sport experience 6.9 (2.7) years, mean (standard deviation)) and a control group consisting of high-school athletes (n = 7, 16.1 (0.7) years, 67 (6) kg, 177 (6) cm, 21.5 (1.0) kgm(-2), 7.7 (1.6) years, respectively) performed RSASL and RSACOD on a counter-balanced order. Sprints started every 30 seconds (active recovery) and there was 30 minutes break between RSA protocols; time variables were total time (TT), best time (BT) and fatigue index (FI). Countermovement jump (CMJ) was tested before and after each RSA protocol. Heart rate (HR) was continuously monitored during testing procedures. Compared with RSASL, TT and BT were worst in RSACOD (38.13 vs. 27.52 s and 3.67 vs. 2.66 s, P repeated measures ANOVA showed main effect of RSA on CMJ (pre-test vs. post-test, increase + 1.8 cm, P = 0.020, η(2) = 0.28); there was neither main effect of RSA protocols (RSASL vs. RSACOD +0.7 cm, P = 0.251, η(2) = 0.08) nor an interaction between pre-post measurements and RSA protocols (P = 0.578, η(2) = 0.02). Compared with RSASL, RSACOD induced higher mean and peak HR responses (175 vs 172 bpm, P < 0.001, and 185 vs 182 bpm, P = 0.002, respectively). No statistical difference was observed between basketball players and control group neither for TT (27.98 vs. 26.80 seconds, + 4.4%, P = 0.149) and BT (2.71 vs. 2.59 seconds, + 4.5%, P = 0.157) in RSASL nor for TT (38.55 vs. 37.47 seconds, + 2.9%, P = 0.169) and BT (3.70 vs. 3

  15. Beta-Alanine Supplementation Improves Throwing Velocities in Repeated Sprint Ability and 200-m Swimming Performance in Young Water Polo Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Gabriel Machado; Redkva, Paulo Eduardo; Brisola, Gabriel Mota Pinheiro; Malta, Elvis Sousa; de Araujo Bonetti de Poli, Rodrigo; Miyagi, Willian Eiji; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of beta-alanine supplementation on specific tests for water polo. Fifteen young water polo players (16 ± 2 years) underwent a 200-m swimming performance, repeated-sprint ability test (RSA) with free throw (shooting), and 30-s maximal tethered eggbeater kicks. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups (placebo × beta-alanine) and supplemented with 6.4g∙day(-1)of beta-alanine or a placebo for six weeks. The mean and total RSA times, the magnitude based inference analysis showed a likely beneficial effect for beta-alanine supplementation (both). The ball velocity measured in the throwing performance after each sprint in the RSA presented a very like beneficial inference in the beta-alanine group for mean (96.4%) and percentage decrement of ball velocity (92.5%, likely beneficial). Furthermore, the percentage change for mean ball velocity was different between groups (beta-alanine=+2.5% and placebo=-3.5%; p = .034). In the 30-s maximal tethered eggbeater kicks the placebo group presented decreased peak force, mean force, and fatigue index, while the beta-alanine group maintained performance in mean force (44.1%, possibly beneficial), only presenting decreases in peak force. The 200-m swimming performance showed a possibly beneficial effect (68.7%). Six weeks of beta-alanine supplementation was effective for improving ball velocity shooting in the RSA, maintaining performance in the 30-s test, and providing possibly beneficial effects in the 200-m swimming performance.

  16. Muscle coordination changes during intermittent cycling sprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Basset, Fabien A; Falgairette, Guy

    2005-06-03

    Maximal muscle power is reported to decrease during explosive cyclical exercises owing to metabolic disturbances, muscle damage, and adjustments in the efferent neural command. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of inter-muscle coordination in fatigue occurrence during 10 intermittent 6-s cycling sprints, with 30-s recovery through electromyographic activity (EMG). Results showed a decrease in peak power output with sprint repetitions (sprint 1 versus sprint 10: -11%, Pcycling sprints of short duration, decreased possibly due to the inability of muscles to maintain maximal force. This reduction in maximal power output occurred in parallel to changes in the muscle coordination pattern after fatigue.

  17. Impact of 6 consecutive days of sprint training in hypoxia on performance in competitive sprint runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Nobukazu; Mizuno, Sahiro; Ishimoto, Sayuri; Sakamoto, Etsuko; Maruta, Misato; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Kurosawa, Yuko; Goto, Kazushige

    2017-04-18

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of 6 successive days of repeated sprint training in moderate hypoxia on anaerobic capacity in 100-200-m sprint runners. Eighteen male sprint runners (age, 20.0 ± 0.3 years; height, 175.9 ± 1.1 cm; body mass, 65.0 ± 1.2 kg) performed repeated cycling sprints for 6 consecutive days in either normoxic (NOR; fraction of inspired oxygen [FiO2], 20.9%; n = 9) or hypoxic conditions (HYPO; FiO2, 14.5%; n = 9). The repeated sprint ability (10 × 6-s sprints), 30-s maximal sprint ability, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), and 60-m running time on the track were measured before and after the training period. Intramuscular PCr content (quadriceps femoris muscle) was measured by P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-MRS) before and after the training period. Both groups showed similar improvements in repeated sprint ability after the training period (Psprint test and VO2max did not change significantly after the training period in either group. Running time for 0-10m improved significantly after the training period in the HYPO only (before, 1.39 ± 0.01s; after, 1.34 ± 0.02s, Psprint training for 6 consecutive days in hypoxia or normoxia improved repeated sprint ability in competitive sprint runners.

  18. Steganalytic method based on short and repeated sequence distance statistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG GuoXin; PING XiJian; XU ManKun; ZHANG Tao; BAO XiRui

    2008-01-01

    According to the distribution characteristics of short and repeated sequence (SRS),a steganalytic method based on the correlation of image bit planes is proposed.Firstly,we provide the conception of SRS distance statistics and deduce its statistical distribution.Because the SRS distance statistics can effectively reflect the correlation of the sequence,SRS has statistical features when the image bit plane sequence equals the image width.Using this characteristic,the steganalytic method is fulfilled by the distinct test of Poisson distribution.Experimental results show a good performance for detecting LSB matching steganographic method in still images.By the way,the proposed method is not designed for specific steganographic algorithms and has good generality.

  19. Free radicals and sprint exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Alamo, D; Calbet, J A L

    2014-01-01

    Sprint exercise ability has been critical for survival. The remarkably high-power output levels attained during sprint exercise are achieved through strong activation of anaerobic, and to a lesser extent, aerobic energy supplying metabolic reactions, which generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). Sprint exercise may cause oxidative stress leading to muscle damage, particularly when performed in severe acute hypoxia. However, with training oxidative stress is reduced. Paradoxically, total plasma antioxidant capacity increases during the subsequent 2 h after a short sprint due to the increase in plasma urate concentration. The RONS produced during and immediately after sprint exercise play a capital role in signaling the adaptive response to sprint. Antioxidant supplementation blunts the normal AMPKα and CaMKII phosphorylation in response to sprint exercise. However, under conditions of increased glycolytic energy turnover and muscle acidification, as during sprint exercise in severe acute hypoxia, AMPKα phosphorylation is also blunted. This indicates that an optimal level of RONS-mediated stimulation is required for the normal signaling response to sprint exercise. Although RONS are implicated in fatigue, most studies convey that antioxidants do not enhance sprint performance in humans. Although currently controversial, it has been reported that antioxidant ingestion during training may jeopardize some of the beneficial adaptations to sprint training.

  20. Sprint Running Performance Monitoring: Methodological and Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Thomas; Buchheit, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this review is to investigate methodological concerns associated with sprint performance monitoring, more specifically the influence and magnitude of varying external conditions, technology and monitoring methodologies not directly related to human physiology. The combination of different starting procedures and triggering devices can cause up to very large time differences, which may be many times greater than performance changes caused by years of conditioning. Wind, altitude, temperature, barometric pressure and humidity can all combine to yield moderate time differences over short sprints. Sprint performance can also be affected by the athlete's clothing, principally by its weight rather than its aerodynamic properties. On level surfaces, the track compliance must change dramatically before performance changes larger than typical variation can be detected. An optimal shoe bending stiffness can enhance performance by a small margin. Fully automatic timing systems, dual-beamed photocells, laser guns and high-speed video are the most accurate tools for sprint performance monitoring. Manual timing and single-beamed photocells should be avoided over short sprint distances (10-20 m) because of large absolute errors. The validity of today's global positioning systems (GPS) technology is satisfactory for long distances (>30 m) and maximal velocity in team sports, but multiple observations are still needed as reliability is questionable. Based on different approaches used to estimate the smallest worthwhile performance change and the typical error of sprint measures, we have provided an assessment of the usefulness of speed evaluation from 5 to 40 m. Finally, we provide statistical guidelines to accurately assess changes in individual performance; i.e. considering both the smallest worthwhile change in performance and the typical error of measurement, which can be reduced while repeating the number of trials.

  1. Microchip-based forensic short tandem repeat genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Tae; Heo, Hyun Young; Oh, Shin Hye; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-08-01

    Micro total analysis system (μTAS) or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology has advanced over decades, and the high performance for chemical and biological analysis has been well demonstrated with advantages of low sample consumption, rapid analysis time, high-throughput screening, and portability. In particular, μTAS or LOC based genetic applications have been extensively explored, and the short tandem repeat (STR) typing on a chip has garnered attention in the forensic community due to its special use for human identification in the field of mass disaster and missing person investigation, paternity testing, and perpetrator identification. The STR typing process consists of sample collection, DNA extraction, DNA quantitation, STR loci amplification, capillary electrophoretic separation, and STR profiling. Recent progress of microtechnology shows its ability to substitute the conventional analytical tools, and furthermore demonstrates total integration of the whole STR processes on a single wafer for on-site STR typing. In this review article, we highlighted some representative results for fluorescence labeling techniques, microchip-based DNA purification, on-chip polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a capillary electrophoretic microdevice, and a fully integrated microdevice for STR typing.

  2. Understanding the Continuum Spectra of Short Soft Gamma Repeater Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogus, Ersin; Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Finger, Mark H.; Lenter, Geoffrey; Patel, Sandeep K.; Swank, Jean

    2006-01-01

    The spectra of short soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts at photon energies above -15 keV are often well described by an optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung model (i.e., F(E) - E^-1 * exp(-E/kT) ) with kT=20-40 keV. However, the spectral shape burst continuum at lower photon energies (down to -2 keV) is not well established. It is important to better understand the SGR burst spectral properties at lower energies since inadequate description of the burst spectral continuum could lead to incorrect conclusions, such as existence of spectral lines. Here, we present detailed spectral investigations (in 2-200 keV) of 163 bursts from SGR 1806-20, all detected with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the 2004 active episode that included the giant flare on 27 December 2004. We find that the great majority of burst spectra are well represented by the combination of a blackbody plus a OTTB models.

  3. Systematic Profiling of Short Tandem Repeats in the Cattle Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingyang; Haasl, Ryan J; Sun, Jiajie; Zhou, Yang; Bickhart, Derek M; Li, Junya; Song, Jiuzhou; Sonstegard, Tad S; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Lewin, Harris A; Liu, George E

    2017-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs), or microsatellites, are genetic variants with repetitive 2–6 base pair motifs in many mammalian genomes. Using high-throughput sequencing and experimental validations, we systematically profiled STRs in five Holsteins. We identified a total of 60,106 microsatellites and generated the first high-resolution STR map, representing a substantial pool of polymorphism in dairy cattle. We observed significant STRs overlap with functional genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL). We performed evolutionary and population genetic analyses using over 20,000 common dinucleotide STRs. Besides corroborating the well-established positive correlation between allele size and variance in allele size, these analyses also identified dozens of outlier STRs based on two anomalous relationships that counter expected characteristics of neutral evolution. And one STR locus overlaps with a significant region of a summary statistic designed to detect STR-related selection. Additionally, our results showed that only 57.1% of STRs located within SNP-based linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks whereas the other 42.9% were out of blocks. Therefore, a substantial number of STRs are not tagged by SNPs in the cattle genome, likely due to STR's distinct mutation mechanism and elevated polymorphism. This study provides the foundation for future STR-based studies of cattle genome evolution and selection.

  4. REPdenovo: Inferring De Novo Repeat Motifs from Short Sequence Reads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Chu

    Full Text Available Repeat elements are important components of eukaryotic genomes. One limitation in our understanding of repeat elements is that most analyses rely on reference genomes that are incomplete and often contain missing data in highly repetitive regions that are difficult to assemble. To overcome this problem we develop a new method, REPdenovo, which assembles repeat sequences directly from raw shotgun sequencing data. REPdenovo can construct various types of repeats that are highly repetitive and have low sequence divergence within copies. We show that REPdenovo is substantially better than existing methods both in terms of the number and the completeness of the repeat sequences that it recovers. The key advantage of REPdenovo is that it can reconstruct long repeats from sequence reads. We apply the method to human data and discover a number of potentially new repeats sequences that have been missed by previous repeat annotations. Many of these sequences are incorporated into various parasite genomes, possibly because the filtering process for host DNA involved in the sequencing of the parasite genomes failed to exclude the host derived repeat sequences. REPdenovo is a new powerful computational tool for annotating genomes and for addressing questions regarding the evolution of repeat families. The software tool, REPdenovo, is available for download at https://github.com/Reedwarbler/REPdenovo.

  5. Solar Sprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Richard; Anderson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In the "Solar Sprint" activity, students design, test, and race a solar-powered car built with Legos. The use of ratios is incorporated to simulate the actual work of scientists and engineers. This method encourages fourth-grade students to think about multiple variables and stimulates their curiosity when an activity doesn't come out as…

  6. Relationship between aerobic fitness and repeated sprint ability in soccer: protocol effect. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n2p111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Teixeira Floriano

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between physiological variables related to physical fitness determined by continuous straight running on a treadmill (peak velocity on treadmill: PVTRE, maximum oxygen uptake: VO2max, minimum velocity needed to reach VO2max: vVO2max, and velocity at the anaerobic threshold: vAT and intermittent running with directional changes (peak velocity: PV and repeated sprint ability (RSA in soccer players. Twenty-nine athletes (17.9 ± 1.0 years, 178.7 ± 5.2 cm, 73.6 ± 6.7 kg, and 11.1 ± 1.3% body fat performed the following tests on different days: 1 incremental protocol on a treadmill to determine PVTRE, VO2max, vVO2max, and vAT; 2 incremental intermittent running test to determine PV, and 3 Bangsbo test to evaluate RSA and to determine the mean time (MT, fastest time (FT, and fatigue index (FI. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used and a level of significance of 5% was adopted. PV obtained in the intermittent running test showed a higher correlation with MT and FT of the RSA test (r = -0.70, p 0.05 and PVTRE (r = -0.42, p 0.05 determined by straight running on a treadmill. In conclusion, the relationship between physical fitness and RSA depends on the type of protocol (continuous line running vs. intermittent with directional changes and the aerobic index used (capacity vs. power.

  7. Genus-specific protein binding to the large clusters of DNA repeats (short regularly spaced repeats) present in Sulfolobus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Shen, Biao

    2003-01-01

    Short regularly spaced repeats (SRSRs) occur in multiple large clusters in archaeal chromosomes and as smaller clusters in some archaeal conjugative plasmids and bacterial chromosomes. The sequence, size, and spacing of the repeats are generally constant within a cluster but vary between clusters...... that are identical in sequence to one of the repeat variants in the S. solfataricus chromosome. Repeats from the pNOB8 cluster were amplified and tested for protein binding with cell extracts from S. solfataricus. A 17.5-kDa SRSR-binding protein was purified from the cell extracts and sequenced. The protein is N...... terminally modified and corresponds to SSO454, an open reading frame of previously unassigned function. It binds specifically to DNA fragments carrying double and single repeat sequences, binding on one side of the repeat structure, and producing an opening of the opposite side of the DNA structure. It also...

  8. Effects of Pre - Season Short - Term Daily Undulating Periodized Training on Muscle Strength and Sprint Performance of Under - 20 Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Ricardo L OPES

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of daily undulating training periodization designed for maximal lower limb muscle strength and sprint performance in under - 20 soccer players. Twenty - four male athletes (age = 19.1 ± 1.2 yr; mass = 71.1 ± 6. 8 kg; height = 178.0 ± 0.1 cm participated in four weeks of a daily undulating periodized (DUP training soccer program. During the pre - and post - training periods the subjects performed a one repetition maximum (1 RM half back squat test and a 15 - meter s print. Significant training - induced changes were observed in sprint times (pre = 2.38 ± 0.01 s; post = 2.31 ± 0.02 s and 1 RM tests (pre = 107.0 ± 2.0 kg; post = 128.0 ± 2.2 kg. These results indicate that a DUP program is efficient in promoting positive neuromuscular adaptations in soccer players, even with a short - term preseason training period.

  9. Influence of Dehydration on Intermittent Sprint Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jon-Kyle; Laurent, C Matt; Allen, Kimberly E; Green, J Matt; Stolworthy, Nicola I; Welch, Taylor R; Nevett, Michael E

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the effects of dehydration on intermittent sprint performance and perceptual responses. Eight male collegiate baseball players completed intermittent sprints either dehydrated (DEHY) by 3% body mass or euhydrated (EU). Body mass was reduced through exercise in the heat with controlled fluid restriction occurring 1 day before the trial. Participants completed twenty-four 30-m sprints divided into 3 bouts of 8 sprints with 45 seconds of rest between each sprint and 3 minutes between each bout. Perceived recovery status (PRS) scale was recorded before the start of each trial. Heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) (0-10 OMNI scale), and perceived readiness (PR) scale were recorded after every sprint, and session RPE (SRPE) was recorded 20 minutes after completing the entire session. A 2 (condition) × 3 (bout of sprints) repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant main effect of condition on mean sprint time (p = 0.03), HR (p Dehydration impaired sprint performance, negatively altered perception of recovery status before exercise, and increased RPE and HR response.

  10. Exposing Students to Repeat Photography: Increasing Cultural Understanding on a Short-Term Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmons, Kelly K.; Brannstrom, Christian; Hurd, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, repeat photography has been used to analyze land cover change. This paper describes how repeat photography may be used as a tool to enhance the short-term study abroad experience by facilitating cultural interaction and understanding. We present evidence from two cases and suggest a five-step repeat photography method for educators…

  11. Exposing Students to Repeat Photography: Increasing Cultural Understanding on a Short-Term Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmons, Kelly K.; Brannstrom, Christian; Hurd, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, repeat photography has been used to analyze land cover change. This paper describes how repeat photography may be used as a tool to enhance the short-term study abroad experience by facilitating cultural interaction and understanding. We present evidence from two cases and suggest a five-step repeat photography method for educators…

  12. Endurance, aerobic high-intensity, and repeated sprint cycling performance is unaffected by normobaric "Live High-Train Low": a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejder, Jacob; Andersen, Andreas Breenfeldt; Buchardt, Rie; Larsson, Tanja Hultengren; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup

    2017-05-01

    The aim was to investigate whether 6 weeks of normobaric "Live High-Train Low" (LHTL) using altitude tents affect highly trained athletes incremental peak power, 26-km time-trial cycling performance, 3-min all-out performance, and 30-s repeated sprint ability. In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over design, seven highly trained triathletes were exposed to 6 weeks of normobaric hypoxia (LHTL) and normoxia (placebo) for 8 h/day. LHTL exposure consisted of 2 weeks at 2500 m, 2 weeks at 3000 m, and 2 weeks at 3500 m. Power output during an incremental test, ~26-km time trial, 3-min all-out exercise, and 8 × 30 s of all-out sprint was evaluated before and after the intervention. Following at least 8 weeks of wash-out, the subjects crossed over and repeated the procedure. Incremental peak power output was similar after both interventions [LHTL: 375 ± 74 vs. 369 ± 70 W (pre-vs-post), placebo: 385 ± 60 vs. 364 ± 79 W (pre-vs-post)]. Likewise, mean power output was similar between treatments as well as before and after each intervention for time trial [LHTL: 257 ± 49 vs. 254 ± 54 W (pre-vs-post), placebo: 267 ± 57 vs. 267 ± 52 W (pre-vs-post)], and 3-min all-out [LHTL: 366 ± 68 vs. 369 ± 72 W (pre-vs-post), placebo: 365 ± 66 vs. 355 ± 71 W (pre-vs-post)]. Furthermore, peak- and mean power output during repeated sprint exercise was similar between groups at all time points (n = 5). In conclusion, 6 weeks of normobaric LHTL using altitude tents simulating altitudes of 2500-3500 m conducted in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over design do not affect power output during an incremental test, a ~26-km time-trial test, or 3-min all-out exercise in highly trained triathletes. Furthermore, 30 s of repeated sprint ability was unaltered.

  13. CRISPRcompar: a website to compare clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Grissa, Ibtissem; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) elements are a particular family of tandem repeats present in prokaryotic genomes, in almost all archaea and in about half of bacteria, and which participate in a mechanism of acquired resistance against phages. They consist in a succession of direct repeats (DR) of 24–47 bp separated by similar sized unique sequences (spacers). In the large majority of cases, the direct repeats are highly conserved, while the number and nature...

  14. Improved set of short-tandem-repeat polymorphisms for screening the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Bo; Vaske, D.; Weber, J.L. [Marshfield Medical Research Foundation, WI (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Short-tandem-repeat (microsatellite) DNA polymorphisms are widely used for screening the human and other genomes in initial linkage mapping. Since the average spacing between polymorphisms in genome screens is usually {ge}10 cM and since many thousands of human short-tandem-repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) are now available, optimal subsets of STRPs must be selected for screening. Two screening sets of STRPs for humans have been described in the literature, both of which are based primarily on dinucleotide-repeat polymorphisms. Here we describe our eighth and most recent human screening set, which is based almost entirely on trinucleotide-and tetranucleotide-repeat polymorphisms. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Research Advancement of Metabolic Mechanisms about Repeated Sprint Ability for Team Ball Games Players%集体球类项目运动员反复冲刺能力的能量代谢机制的研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘小平; 程丽平

    2012-01-01

    对于集体球类项目(篮球、足球、橄榄球、手球等)来讲,运动员为了有效地完成比赛的技战术要求,取得竞争优势,必须在场上进行反复的高强度冲刺活动,所以反复冲刺的能力(Repeated-sprint ability:RSA)对运动员的竞技表现是至关重要的。本文旨在通过对国内外集体球类项目运动员反复冲刺能力的研究成果进行梳理分析,总结归纳出反复冲刺能力的能量代谢基础、测试方法及影响因素,以期能对我国竞技水平普遍不高的集体球类运动项目的科学化训练提供理论指导。%For the team ball games(basketball,football,rugby,etc.),the athlete must run high intensity sprint repeatedly in the field or court to effectively complete the game's technical and tactical requirements and get competitive advantage,therefore,repeated sprint ability(repeated-sprint ability: RSA) of the athletes is essential.This paper makes comprehensive review on research results about repeated sprint ability at home and abroad.The main purpose of this paper is to summarize physiological basis,test methods and impact factors of repeated sprint ability and provide theoretical guidance for team ball games scientific training.

  16. Analysis of genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat loci in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-15

    Mar 15, 2012 ... Short tandem repeat (STR) is widely used today for gene mapping ... minatory power for some difficult cases, such as complex kinship analysis ... Arlequin version 3.5 software (Computational and Molecular. Population ...

  17. Repeated passive stretching : Acute effect on the passive muscle moment and extensibility of short hamstrings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halbertsma, JPK; Mulder, [No Value; Goeken, LNH; Eisma, WH; Mulder, I.; Göeken, L.N.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the response of short hamstring muscles to repeated passive stretching. Design: A repeated measures design. Setting: A university laboratory for human movement analysis in a department of rehabilitation. Subjects: Students (7 men, 10 women) from the Department of Human Movement

  18. Biomechanics of sprint running. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mero, A; Komi, P V; Gregor, R J

    1992-06-01

    Understanding of biomechanical factors in sprint running is useful because of their critical value to performance. Some variables measured in distance running are also important in sprint running. Significant factors include: reaction time, technique, electromyographic (EMG) activity, force production, neural factors and muscle structure. Although various methodologies have been used, results are clear and conclusions can be made. The reaction time of good athletes is short, but it does not correlate with performance levels. Sprint technique has been well analysed during acceleration, constant velocity and deceleration of the velocity curve. At the beginning of the sprint run, it is important to produce great force/power and generate high velocity in the block and acceleration phases. During the constant-speed phase, the events immediately before and during the braking phase are important in increasing explosive force/power and efficiency of movement in the propulsion phase. There are no research results available regarding force production in the sprint-deceleration phase. The EMG activity pattern of the main sprint muscles is described in the literature, but there is a need for research with highly skilled sprinters to better understand the simultaneous operation of many muscles. Skeletal muscle fibre characteristics are related to the selection of talent and the training-induced effects in sprint running. Efficient sprint running requires an optimal combination between the examined biomechanical variables and external factors such as footwear, ground and air resistance. Further research work is needed especially in the area of nervous system, muscles and force and power production during sprint running. Combining these with the measurements of sprinting economy and efficiency more knowledge can be achieved in the near future.

  19. Detection of dispersed short tandem repeats using reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tong; Fan, Xiaodan; Li, Qiwei; Li, Shuo-Yen R

    2012-10-01

    Tandem repeats occur frequently in biological sequences. They are important for studying genome evolution and human disease. A number of methods have been designed to detect a single tandem repeat in a sliding window. In this article, we focus on the case that an unknown number of tandem repeat segments of the same pattern are dispersively distributed in a sequence. We construct a probabilistic generative model for the tandem repeats, where the sequence pattern is represented by a motif matrix. A Bayesian approach is adopted to compute this model. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms are used to explore the posterior distribution as an effort to infer both the motif matrix of tandem repeats and the location of repeat segments. Reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithms are used to address the transdimensional model selection problem raised by the variable number of repeat segments. Experiments on both synthetic data and real data show that this new approach is powerful in detecting dispersed short tandem repeats. As far as we know, it is the first work to adopt RJMCMC algorithms in the detection of tandem repeats.

  20. A2 Milk Enhances Dynamic Muscle Function Following Repeated Sprint Exercise, a Possible Ergogenic Aid for A1-Protein Intolerant Athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ben; Mitchell, Jade; Jackson, Matthew; Amirabdollahian, Farzad; Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Clifford, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Hyperaminoacidemia following ingestion of cows-milk may stimulate muscle anabolism and attenuate exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). However, as dairy-intolerant athletes do not obtain the reported benefits from milk-based products, A2 milk may offer a suitable alternative as it lacks the A1-protein. This study aimed to determine the effect of A2 milk on recovery from a sports-specific muscle damage model. Twenty-one male team sport players were allocated to three independent groups: A2 milk (n = 7), regular milk (n = 7), and placebo (PLA) (n = 7). Immediately following muscle-damaging exercise, participants consumed either A2 milk, regular milk or PLA (500 mL each). Visual analogue scale (muscle soreness), maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), countermovement jump (CMJ) and 20-m sprint were measured prior to and 24, 48, and 72 h post EIMD. At 48 h post-EIMD, CMJ and 20-m sprint recovered quicker in A2 (33.4 ± 6.6 and 3.3 ± 0.1, respectively) and regular milk (33.1 ± 7.1 and 3.3 ± 0.3, respectively) vs. PLA (29.2 ± 3.6 and 3.6 ± 0.3, respectively) (p < 0.05). Relative to baseline, decrements in 48 h CMJ and 20-m sprint were minimised in A2 (by 7.2 and 5.1%, respectively) and regular milk (by 6.3 and 5.2%, respectively) vs. PLA. There was a trend for milk treatments to attenuate decrements in MVIC, however statistical significance was not reached (p = 0.069). Milk treatments had no apparent effect on muscle soreness (p = 0.152). Following muscle-damaging exercise, ingestion of 500 mL of A2 or regular milk can limit decrements in dynamic muscle function in male athletes, thus hastening recovery and improving subsequent performance. The findings propose A2 milk as an ergogenic aid following EIMD, and may offer an alternative to athletes intolerant to the A1 protein. PMID:28134840

  1. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) for the genotyping of bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissa, Ibtissem; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) are DNA sequences composed of a succession of repeats (23- to 47-bp long) separated by unique sequences called spacers. Polymorphism can be observed in different strains of a species and may be used for genotyping. We describe protocols and bioinformatics tools that allow the identification of CRISPRs from sequenced genomes, their comparison, and their component determination (the direct repeats and the spacers). A schematic representation of the spacer organization can be produced, allowing an easy comparison between strains.

  2. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs): the hallmark of an ingenious antiviral defense mechanism in prokaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Attar, S.; Westra, E.R.; Oost, van der J.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Many prokaryotes contain the recently discovered defense system against mobile genetic elements. This defense system contains a unique type of repetitive DNA stretches, termed Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs). CRISPRs consist of identical repeated DNA sequences

  3. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs): the hallmark of an ingenious antiviral defense mechanism in prokaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Attar, S.; Westra, E.R.; Oost, van der J.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Many prokaryotes contain the recently discovered defense system against mobile genetic elements. This defense system contains a unique type of repetitive DNA stretches, termed Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs). CRISPRs consist of identical repeated DNA sequences (re

  4. [Advances in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; He, Jin; Wang, Jieping

    2011-08-01

    The recently discovered Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPRs) can protect bacteria and archaea with adaptive and heritable defense systems against the invasion of phage- and plasmid- associated mobile genetic elements. Here, we review the structure, diversity, mechanism of interference and self versus non-self discrimination of CRISPR systems. We also discuss the potential applications of this novel interference system.

  5. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRi) plasmids | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a modified Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) CRISPR/dCas9 system. Catalytically inactive dCas9 enables modular and programmable RNA-guided genome regulation in eukaryotes.

  6. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRi) plasmids | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a modified Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) CRISPR/dCas9 system. Catalytically inactive dCas9 enables modular and programmable RNA-guided genome regulation in eukaryotes.

  7. Toward Male Individualization with Rapidly Mutating Y-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Ballantyne (Kaye); A. Ralf (Arwin); R. Aboukhalid (Rachid); N.M. Achakzai (Niaz); T. Anjos (Tania); Q. Ayub (Qasim); J. Balažic (Jože); J. Ballantyne (Jack); D.J. Ballard (David); B. Berger (Burkhard); C. Bobillo (Cecilia); M. Bouabdellah (Mehdi); H. Burri (Helen); T. Capal (Tomas); S. Caratti (Stefano); J. Cárdenas (Jorge); F. Cartault (François); E.F. Carvalho (Elizeu); M. de Carvalho (Margarete); B. Cheng (Baowen); M.D. Coble (Michael); D. Comas (David); D. Corach (Daniel); M. D'Amato (Mauro); S. Davison (Sean); P. de Knijff (Peter); M.C.A. de Ungria (Maria Corazon); R. Decorte (Ronny); T. Dobosz (Tadeusz); B.M. Dupuy (Berit); S. Elmrghni (Samir); M. Gliwiński (Mateusz); S.C. Gomes (Sara); L. Grol (Laurens); C. Haas (Cordula); E. Hanson (Erin); J. Henke (Jürgen); L. Henke (Lotte); F. Herrera-Rodríguez (Fabiola); C.R. Hill (Carolyn); G. Holmlund (Gunilla); K. Honda (Katsuya); U.-D. Immel (Uta-Dorothee); S. Inokuchi (Shota); R. Jobling; M. Kaddura (Mahmoud); J.S. Kim (Jong); S.H. Kim (Soon); W. Kim (Wook); T.E. King (Turi); E. Klausriegler (Eva); D. Kling (Daniel); L. Kovačević (Lejla); L. Kovatsi (Leda); P. Krajewski (Paweł); S. Kravchenko (Sergey); M.H.D. Larmuseau (Maarten); E.Y. Lee (Eun Young); R. Lessig (Rüdiger); L.A. Livshits (Ludmila); D. Marjanović (Damir); M. Minarik (Marek); N. Mizuno (Natsuko); H. Moreira (Helena); N. Morling (Niels); M. Mukherjee (Meeta); P. Munier (Patrick); J. Nagaraju (Javaregowda); F. Neuhuber (Franz); S. Nie (Shengjie); P. Nilasitsataporn (Premlaphat); T. Nishi (Takeki); H.H. Oh (Hye); S. Olofsson (Sylvia); V. Onofri (Valerio); J. Palo (Jukka); H. Pamjav (Horolma); W. Parson (Walther); M. Petlach (Michal); C. Phillips (Christopher); R. Ploski (Rafal); S.P.R. Prasad (Samayamantri P.); D. Primorac (Dragan); G.A. Purnomo (Gludhug); J. Purps (Josephine); H. Rangel-Villalobos (Hector); K. Reogonekbała (Krzysztof); B. Rerkamnuaychoke (Budsaba); D.R. Gonzalez (Danel Rey); C. Robino (Carlo); L. Roewer (Lutz); A. de Rosa (Anna); A. Sajantila (Antti); A. Sala (Andrea); J.M. Salvador (Jazelyn); P. Sanz (Paula); C. Schmitt (Christian); A.K. Sharma (Anisha K.); D.A. Silva (Dayse); K.-J. Shin (Kyoung-Jin); T. Sijen (Titia); M. Sirker (Miriam); D. Siváková (Daniela); V. Škaro (Vedrana); C. Solano-Matamoros (Carlos); L. Souto (L.); V. Stenzl (Vlastimil); H. Sudoyo (Herawati); D. Syndercombe-Court (Denise); A. Tagliabracci (Adriano); D. Taylor (Duncan); A. Tillmar (Andreas); I.S. Tsybovsky (Iosif); C. Tyler-Smith (Chris); K. van der Gaag (Kristiaan); D. Vanek (Daniel); A. Völgyi (Antónia); D. Ward (Denise); P. Willemse (Patricia); E.P.H. Yap (Eric); Z-Y. Yong (Ze-Yie); I.Z. Pajnič (Irena Zupanič); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRelevant for various areas of human genetics, Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are commonly used for testing close paternal relationships among individuals and populations, and for male lineage identification. However, even the widely used 17-loci Yfiler set cannot resolve

  8. Turkish population data with the CODIS multiplex short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbasak, B S; Budowle, B; Reeder, D J; Redman, J; Kline, M C

    2001-12-01

    Allele frequencies for 13 tetrameric short tandem repeat (STR) loci, CSF1PO, D18S51, D3S1358, D21S11, D5S818, FGA, D7S820, HUMTH01, D8S1179, TPOX, D13S317, VWA, and D16S539 were determined on 198 Turkish blood samples.

  9. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRi) plasmids | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a modified Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) CRISPR/dCas9 system. Catalytically inactive dCas9 enables modular and programmable RNA-guided genome regulation in eukaryotes.

  10. Toward Male Individualization with Rapidly Mutating Y-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Ballantyne (Kaye); A. Ralf (Arwin); R. Aboukhalid (Rachid); N.M. Achakzai (Niaz); T. Anjos (Tania); Q. Ayub (Qasim); J. Balažic (Jože); J. Ballantyne (Jack); D.J. Ballard (David); B. Berger (Burkhard); C. Bobillo (Cecilia); M. Bouabdellah (Mehdi); H. Burri (Helen); T. Capal (Tomas); S. Caratti (Stefano); J. Cárdenas (Jorge); F. Cartault (François); E.F. Carvalho (Elizeu); M. de Carvalho (Margarete); B. Cheng (Baowen); M.D. Coble (Michael); D. Comas (David); D. Corach (Daniel); M. D'Amato (Mauro); S. Davison (Sean); P. de Knijff (Peter); M.C.A. de Ungria (Maria Corazon); R. Decorte (Ronny); T. Dobosz (Tadeusz); B.M. Dupuy (Berit); S. Elmrghni (Samir); M. Gliwiński (Mateusz); S.C. Gomes (Sara); L. Grol (Laurens); C. Haas (Cordula); E. Hanson (Erin); J. Henke (Jürgen); L. Henke (Lotte); F. Herrera-Rodríguez (Fabiola); C.R. Hill (Carolyn); G. Holmlund (Gunilla); K. Honda (Katsuya); U.-D. Immel (Uta-Dorothee); S. Inokuchi (Shota); R. Jobling; M. Kaddura (Mahmoud); J.S. Kim (Jong); S.H. Kim (Soon); W. Kim (Wook); T.E. King (Turi); E. Klausriegler (Eva); D. Kling (Daniel); L. Kovačević (Lejla); L. Kovatsi (Leda); P. Krajewski (Paweł); S. Kravchenko (Sergey); M.H.D. Larmuseau (Maarten); E.Y. Lee (Eun Young); R. Lessig (Rüdiger); L.A. Livshits (Ludmila); D. Marjanović (Damir); M. Minarik (Marek); N. Mizuno (Natsuko); H. Moreira (Helena); N. Morling (Niels); M. Mukherjee (Meeta); P. Munier (Patrick); J. Nagaraju (Javaregowda); F. Neuhuber (Franz); S. Nie (Shengjie); P. Nilasitsataporn (Premlaphat); T. Nishi (Takeki); H.H. Oh (Hye); S. Olofsson (Sylvia); V. Onofri (Valerio); J. Palo (Jukka); H. Pamjav (Horolma); W. Parson (Walther); M. Petlach (Michal); C. Phillips (Christopher); R. Ploski (Rafal); S.P.R. Prasad (Samayamantri P.); D. Primorac (Dragan); G.A. Purnomo (Gludhug); J. Purps (Josephine); H. Rangel-Villalobos (Hector); K. Reogonekbała (Krzysztof); B. Rerkamnuaychoke (Budsaba); D.R. Gonzalez (Danel Rey); C. Robino (Carlo); L. Roewer (Lutz); A. de Rosa (Anna); A. Sajantila (Antti); A. Sala (Andrea); J.M. Salvador (Jazelyn); P. Sanz (Paula); C. Schmitt (Christian); A.K. Sharma (Anisha K.); D.A. Silva (Dayse); K.-J. Shin (Kyoung-Jin); T. Sijen (Titia); M. Sirker (Miriam); D. Siváková (Daniela); V. Škaro (Vedrana); C. Solano-Matamoros (Carlos); L. Souto (L.); V. Stenzl (Vlastimil); H. Sudoyo (Herawati); D. Syndercombe-Court (Denise); A. Tagliabracci (Adriano); D. Taylor (Duncan); A. Tillmar (Andreas); I.S. Tsybovsky (Iosif); C. Tyler-Smith (Chris); K. van der Gaag (Kristiaan); D. Vanek (Daniel); A. Völgyi (Antónia); D. Ward (Denise); P. Willemse (Patricia); E.P.H. Yap (Eric); Z-Y. Yong (Ze-Yie); I.Z. Pajnič (Irena Zupanič); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRelevant for various areas of human genetics, Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are commonly used for testing close paternal relationships among individuals and populations, and for male lineage identification. However, even the widely used 17-loci Yfiler set cannot resolve ind

  11. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S. [Ott Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. The Effects of Muscular Fatigue on the Kinetics of Sprint Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Paul; Mann, Ralph V.

    1983-01-01

    To compare the kinematic and kinetic effects of fatigue on the biomechanics of sprint running, male subjects were filmed performing a short maximal exertion sprint and a long fatiguing sprint. Observable differences in the productive muscular activity of the better and the poorer sprinters occurred during the ground-phase of their strides.…

  13. Improved short adjacent repeat identification using three evolutionary Monte Carlo schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Li, Qiwei; Li, Victor O K; Li, Shuo-Yen Robert; Fan, Xiaodan

    2013-01-01

    This paper employs three Evolutionary Monte Carlo (EMC) schemes to solve the Short Adjacent Repeat Identification Problem (SARIP), which aims to identify the common repeat units shared by multiple sequences. The three EMC schemes, i.e., Random Exchange (RE), Best Exchange (BE), and crossover are implemented on a parallel platform. The simulation results show that compared with the conventional Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm, all three EMC schemes can not only shorten the computation time via speeding up the convergence but also improve the solution quality in difficult cases. Moreover, we observe that the performances of different EMC schemes depend on the degeneracy degree of the motif pattern.

  14. Novel Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Variants Detected Through the Use of Massively Parallel Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Warshauer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Massively parallel sequencing (MPS technology is capable of determining the sizes of short tandem repeat (STR alleles as well as their individual nucleotide sequences. Thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the repeat regions of STRs and variations in the pattern of repeat units in a given repeat motif can be used to differentiate alleles of the same length. In this study, MPS was used to sequence 28 forensically-relevant Y-chromosome STRs in a set of 41 DNA samples from the 3 major U.S. population groups (African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics. The resulting sequence data, which were analyzed with STRait Razor v2.0, revealed 37 unique allele sequence variants that have not been previously reported. Of these, 19 sequences were variations of documented sequences resulting from the presence of intra-repeat SNPs or alternative repeat unit patterns. Despite a limited sampling, two of the most frequently-observed variants were found only in African American samples. The remaining 18 variants represented allele sequences for which there were no published data with which to compare. These findings illustrate the great potential of MPS with regard to increasing the resolving power of STR typing and emphasize the need for sample population characterization of STR alleles.

  15. Novel Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Variants Detected Through the Use of Massively Parallel Sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David H Warshauer; Jennifer D Churchill; Nicole Novroski; Jonathan L King; Bruce Budowle

    2015-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technology is capable of determining the sizes of short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as well as their individual nucleotide sequences. Thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the repeat regions of STRs and variations in the pattern of repeat units in a given repeat motif can be used to differentiate alleles of the same length. In this study, MPS was used to sequence 28 forensically-relevant Y-chromosome STRs in a set of 41 DNA samples from the 3 major U.S. population groups (African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics). The resulting sequence data, which were analyzed with STRait Razor v2.0, revealed 37 unique allele sequence variants that have not been previously reported. Of these, 19 sequences were variations of documented sequences resulting from the presence of intra-repeat SNPs or alternative repeat unit patterns. Despite a limited sampling, two of the most frequently-observed variants were found only in African American samples. The remaining 18 variants represented allele sequences for which there were no published data with which to compare. These findings illustrate the great potential of MPS with regard to increasing the resolving power of STR typing and emphasize the need for sample population characterization of STR alleles.

  16. Short Tandem Repeats in Human Exons: A Target for Disease Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villesen Palle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years it has been demonstrated that structural variations, such as indels (insertions and deletions, are common throughout the genome, but the implications of structural variations are still not clearly understood. Long tandem repeats (e.g. microsatellites or simple repeats are known to be hypermutable (indel-rich, but are rare in exons and only occasionally associated with diseases. Here we focus on short (imperfect tandem repeats (STRs which fall below the radar of conventional tandem repeat detection, and investigate whether STRs are targets for disease-related mutations in human exons. In particular, we test whether they share the hypermutability of the longer tandem repeats and whether disease-related genes have a higher STR content than non-disease-related genes. Results We show that validated human indels are extremely common in STR regions compared to non-STR regions. In contrast to longer tandem repeats, our definition of STRs found them to be present in exons of most known human genes (92%, 99% of all STR sequences in exons are shorter than 33 base pairs and 62% of all STR sequences are imperfect repeats. We also demonstrate that STRs are significantly overrepresented in disease-related genes in both human and mouse. These results are preserved when we limit the analysis to STRs outside known longer tandem repeats. Conclusion Based on our findings we conclude that STRs represent hypermutable regions in the human genome that are linked to human disease. In addition, STRs constitute an obvious target when screening for rare mutations, because of the relatively low amount of STRs in exons (1,973,844 bp and the limited length of STR regions.

  17. [Analysis of allelic drop-out at short tandem repeat loci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-jing; Li, Yue; Wu, Xiao-jie; Zhang, Yin-ming; Liu, Su-juan; Chen, Yong; Chen, Wei-hong; Sun, Hong-yu

    2012-06-01

    To explore the cause for allelic drop-out at short tandem repeat (STR) loci upon paternity testing with a PowerPlex® 16 kit. A total of 10 642 DNA confirmed paternity testing cases (18 314 parent/child allelic transfers) were analyzed with the PowerPlex® 16 kit. Samples suspected for having allelic drop-out were verified with an Identifiler™ kit and/or locus-specific singleplex amplification systems. PCR products of null alleles were separated and directly sequenced. Eight cases of allelic drop-out were found. The overall rate of null allele in the PowerPlex® 16 system was 0.437 × 10(-3). DNA sequencing has confirmed single base variations within the binding region of published primers, in which 4 cases involved the D18S51 locus (2 cases with G>A transitions at 79 bp upstream of the repeats, 1 case with G>T transversion at 162 bp downstream of the repeats and 1 case with G>C transversion at 74 bp upstream of the repeats), 2 cases involved the D21S11 locus (1 case with C>A transversion at 17 bp upstream of the repeats and 1 case with A>G transition at 12 bp upstream of the repeats). One case involved the FGA locus (1 case with G>A transition at 142 bp downstream of the repeats) and 1 case involved TPOX locus (1 case with G>A transition at 198 bp downstream of the repeats). Base variation in the primer binding region may cause failed PCR and result in null allele reports. Alternative primer sets should be used to verify the suspected allelic drop-out. Attention should be paid to this during paternity testing and data exchange for personal identification.

  18. Quality Control of Isothermal Amplified DNA Based on Short Tandem Repeat Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroneis, Thomas; El-Heliebi, Amin

    2015-01-01

    This protocol describes the use of a 16plex PCR for the purpose assessing DNA quality after isothermal whole genome amplification (WGA). In short, DNA products, generated by amplification multiple displacement amplification, are forwarded to PCR targeting 15 short tandem repeats (STR) as well as amelogenin generating up to 32 different PCR products. After amplification, the PCR products are separated via capillary electrophoresis and analyzed based on the obtained DNA profiles. Isothermal WGA products of good DNA quality will result in DNA profiles with efficiencies of >90 % of the full DNA profile.

  19. lobSTR: A short tandem repeat profiler for personal genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Gymrek, Melissa; Golan, David; Rosset, Saharon; Erlich, Yaniv

    2012-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) have a wide range of applications, including medical genetics, forensics, and genetic genealogy. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) has the potential to profile hundreds of thousands of STR loci. However, mainstream bioinformatics pipelines are inadequate for the task. These pipelines treat STR mapping as gapped alignment, which results in cumbersome processing times and a biased sampling of STR alleles. Here, we present lobSTR, a novel method for profiling STRs in p...

  20. [Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats: structure, function and application--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yujun; Li, Yanjun; Yan, Yanfeng; Yang, Ruifu

    2008-11-01

    CRISPRs (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), the basis of spoligotyping technology, can provide prokaryotes with heritable adaptive immunity against phages' invasion. Studies on CRISPR loci and their associated elements, including various CAS (CRISPR-associated) proteins and leader sequences, are still in its infant period. We introduce the brief history', structure, function, bioinformatics research and application of this amazing immunity system in prokaryotic organism for inspiring more scientists to find their interest in this developing topic.

  1. Emerging ethical perspectives in the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats genome-editing debate

    OpenAIRE

    Camporesi, Silvia; Cavaliere, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the ethical issues in the international clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) genome editing debate from March 2015 to September 2016. We present the regulatory framework for embryo research in the UK, and explain why CRISPR is not a significant break with the past. We discuss the ethical issues arising from CRISPR applications beyond human embryos, namely the use of gene drive-engineered mosquitoes to eradicate diseases, enginee...

  2. Function and Regulation of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) / CRISPR Associated (Cas) Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Peter C Fineran; Chang, James T.; Corinna Richter

    2012-01-01

    Phages are the most abundant biological entities on earth and pose a constant challenge to their bacterial hosts. Thus, bacteria have evolved numerous ‘innate’ mechanisms of defense against phage, such as abortive infection or restriction/modification systems. In contrast, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) systems provide acquired, yet heritable, sequence-specific ‘adaptive’ immunity against phage and other horizontally-acquired elements, such as plasmids....

  3. Caffeine supplementation and multiple sprint running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, Mark; Howatson, Glyn; Abraham, Corinne S; Lockey, Richard A; Goodwin, Jon E; Foley, Paul; McInnes, Gillian

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of caffeine supplementation on multiple sprint running performance. Using a randomized double-blind research design, 21 physically active men ingested a gelatin capsule containing either caffeine (5 mg x kg(-1) body mass) or placebo (maltodextrin) 1 h before completing an indoor multiple sprint running trial (12 x 30 m; repeated at 35-s intervals). Venous blood samples were drawn to evaluate plasma caffeine and primary metabolite concentrations. Sprint times were recorded via twin-beam photocells, and earlobe blood samples were drawn to evaluate pretest and posttest lactate concentrations. Heart rate was monitored continuously throughout the tests, with RPE recorded after every third sprint. Relative to placebo, caffeine supplementation resulted in a 0.06-s (1.4%) reduction in fastest sprint time (95% likely range = 0.04-0.09 s), which corresponded with a 1.2% increase in fatigue (95% likely range = 0.3-2.2%). Caffeine supplementation also resulted in a 3.4-bpm increase in mean heart rate (95% likely range = 0.1-6.6 bpm) and elevations in pretest (+0.7 mmol x L(-1); 95% likely range = 0.1-1.3 mmol x L(-1)) and posttest (+1.8 mmol x L(-1); 95% likely range = 0.3-3.2 mmol x L(-1)) blood lactate concentrations. In contrast, there was no significant effect of caffeine supplementation on RPE. Although the effect of recovery duration on caffeine-induced responses to multiple sprint work requires further investigation, the results of the present study show that caffeine has ergogenic properties with the potential to benefit performance in both single and multiple sprint sports.

  4. RECG maintains plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing extensive recombination between short dispersed repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Odahara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of plastid and mitochondrial genome stability is crucial for photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. Recently, we have reported that RECA1 maintains mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing gross rearrangements induced by aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats in the moss Physcomitrella patens. In this study, we studied a newly identified P. patens homolog of bacterial RecG helicase, RECG, some of which is localized in both plastid and mitochondrial nucleoids. RECG partially complements recG deficiency in Escherichia coli cells. A knockout (KO mutation of RECG caused characteristic phenotypes including growth delay and developmental and mitochondrial defects, which are similar to those of the RECA1 KO mutant. The RECG KO cells showed heterogeneity in these phenotypes. Analyses of RECG KO plants showed that mitochondrial genome was destabilized due to a recombination between 8-79 bp repeats and the pattern of the recombination partly differed from that observed in the RECA1 KO mutants. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA instability was greater in severe phenotypic RECG KO cells than that in mild phenotypic ones. This result suggests that mitochondrial genomic instability is responsible for the defective phenotypes of RECG KO plants. Some of the induced recombination caused efficient genomic rearrangements in RECG KO mitochondria. Such loci were sometimes associated with a decrease in the levels of normal mtDNA and significant decrease in the number of transcripts derived from the loci. In addition, the RECG KO mutation caused remarkable plastid abnormalities and induced recombination between short repeats (12-63 bp in the plastid DNA. These results suggest that RECG plays a role in the maintenance of both plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing aberrant recombination between dispersed short repeats; this role is crucial for plastid and mitochondrial functions.

  5. CRISPRcompar: a website to compare clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissa, Ibtissem; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2008-07-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) elements are a particular family of tandem repeats present in prokaryotic genomes, in almost all archaea and in about half of bacteria, and which participate in a mechanism of acquired resistance against phages. They consist in a succession of direct repeats (DR) of 24-47 bp separated by similar sized unique sequences (spacers). In the large majority of cases, the direct repeats are highly conserved, while the number and nature of the spacers are often quite diverse, even among strains of a same species. Furthermore, the acquisition of new units (DR + spacer) was shown to happen almost exclusively on one side of the locus. Therefore, the CRISPR presents an interesting genetic marker for comparative and evolutionary analysis of closely related bacterial strains. CRISPRcompar is a web service created to assist biologists in the CRISPR typing process. Two tools facilitates the in silico investigation: CRISPRcomparison and CRISPRtionary. This website is freely accessible at http://crispr.u-psud.fr/CRISPRcompar/.

  6. A Novel Framework for Short Tandem Repeats (STRs Using Parallel String Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bala MuraliKrishna,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Short tandem repeats (STRs have become important molecular markers for a broad range of applications, such as genome mapping and characterization, phenotype mapping, marker assisted selection of crop plants and a range of molecular ecology and diversity studies. These repeated DNA sequences are found in both Plants and bacteria. Most of the computer programs that find STRs failed to report its number of occurrences of the repeated pattern, exact position and it is difficult task to obtain accurate results from the larger datasets. So we need high performance computing models to extract certain repeats. One of the solution is STRs using parallel string matching, it gives number of occurrences with corresponding line number and exact location or position of each STR in the genome of any length. In this, we implemented parallel string matching using JAVA Multithreading with multi core processing, for this we implemented a basic algorithm and made a comparison with previous algorithms like Knuth Morris Pratt, Boyer Moore and Brute force string matching algorithms and from the results our new basic algorithm gives better results than the previous algorithms. We apply this algorithm in parallel string matching using multi-threading concept to reduce the time by running on multicore processors. From the test results it is shown that the multicore processing is a remarkably efficient and powerful compared to lower versions and finally this proposed STR using parallel string matching algorithm is better than the sequential approaches.

  7. Agile Learning: Sprinting through the Semester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Guido

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces agile learning, a novel pedagogical approach that applies the processes and principles of agile software development to the context of learning. Agile learning is characterized by short project cycles, called sprints, in which a usable deliverable is fully planned, designed, built, tested, reviewed, and launched. An…

  8. Human Short Tandem Repeat (STR Markers for Paternity Testing in Pig-Tailed Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DYAH PERWITASARI-FARAJALLAH

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of human short tandem repeat (STR or microsatellite loci markers for assessing paternity and genetic structure of pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina breeding colony. Four human microsatellite primer pairs located at human map position D1S548, D3S1768, D5S820, and D2S1777, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for pig-tailed macaques. Four loci were found to be clearly and reliably amplified, and three loci exhibited high levels of genetic heterogeneity. These loci were sufficiently informative to differentiate discretely between related and unrelated pairs.

  9. Giant flares in soft gamma-ray repeaters and short GRBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zane, S

    2007-05-15

    Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are a peculiar family of bursting neutron stars that, occasionally, have been observed to emit extremely energetic giant flares (GFs), with energy release up to approximately 10(47) ergs(-1). These are exceptional and rare events. It has been recently proposed that GFs, if emitted by extragalactic SGRs, may appear at Earth as short gamma-ray bursts. Here, I will discuss the properties of the GFs observed in SGRs, with particular emphasis on the spectacular event registered from SGR 1806-20 in December 2004. I will review the current scenario for the production of the flare, within the magnetar model, and the observational implications.

  10. Heterogeneous Diversity of Spacers within CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiankui; Deem, Michael W.

    2010-09-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in bacterial and archaeal DNA have recently been shown to be a new type of antiviral immune system in these organisms. We here study the diversity of spacers in CRISPR under selective pressure. We propose a population dynamics model that explains the biological observation that the leader-proximal end of CRISPR is more diversified and the leader-distal end of CRISPR is more conserved. This result is shown to be in agreement with recent experiments. Our results show that the CRISPR spacer structure is influenced by and provides a record of the viral challenges that bacteria face.

  11. Evolutionary trend of exceptionally long human core promoter short tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohadi, M; Mohammadparast, S; Darvish, H

    2012-10-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are variable elements that play a significant role in genome evolution by creating and maintaining quantitative genetic variation. Because of their proximity to the +1 transcription start site (TSS) and polymorphic nature, core promoter STRs may be considered a novel source of variation across species. In a genome-scale analysis of the entire human protein-coding genes annotated in the GeneCards database (19,927), we analyze the prevalence and repeat numbers of different classes of core promoter STRs in the interval between -120 and +1 to the TSS. We also analyze the evolutionary trend of exceptionally long core promoter STRs of ≥6-repeats. 133 genes (~2%) had core promoter STRs of ≥6-repeats. In the majority of those genes, the STR motifs were found to be conserved across evolution. Di-nucleotide repeats had the highest representation in the human core promoter long STRs (72 genes). Tri- (52 genes), tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide STRs (9 genes) were also present in the descending prevalence. The majority of those genes (84 genes) revealed directional expansion of core promoter STRs from mouse to human. However, in a number of genes, the difference in average allele size across species was sufficiently small that there might be a constraint on the evolution of average allele size. Random drift of STRs from mouse to human was also observed in a minority of genes. Future work on the genes listed in the current study may further our knowledge into the potential importance of core promoter STRs in human evolution.

  12. Sprint vs. interval training in football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari Bravo, D; Impellizzeri, F M; Rampinini, E; Castagna, C; Bishop, D; Wisloff, U

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of high-intensity aerobic interval and repeated-sprint ability (RSA) training on aerobic and anaerobic physiological variables in male football players. Forty-two participants were randomly assigned to either the interval training group (ITG, 4 x 4 min running at 90 - 95 % of HRmax; n = 21) or repeated-sprint training group (RSG, 3 x 6 maximal shuttle sprints of 40 m; n = 21). The following outcomes were measured at baseline and after 7 weeks of training: maximum oxygen uptake, respiratory compensation point, football-specific endurance (Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test, YYIRT), 10-m sprint time, jump height and power, and RSA. Significant group x time interaction was found for YYIRT (p = 0.003) with RSG showing greater improvement (from 1917 +/- 439 to 2455 +/- 488 m) than ITG (from 1846 +/- 329 to 2077 +/- 300 m). Similarly, a significant interaction was found in RSA mean time (p = 0.006) with only the RSG group showing an improvement after training (from 7.53 +/- 0.21 to 7.37 +/- 0.17 s). No other group x time interactions were found. Significant pre-post changes were found for absolute and relative maximum oxygen uptake and respiratory compensation point (p RSA training protocol used in this study can be an effective training strategy for inducing aerobic and football-specific training adaptations.

  13. VARIATION IN FOOTBALL PLAYERS' SPRINT TEST PERFORMANCE ACROSS DIFFERENT AGES AND LEVELS OF COMPETITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Sampaio

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare sprint test performance performed by football players of different ages and levels of competition. One hundred and forty six Portuguese players from different teams completed the test (seven maximal sprints interspersed with 25 s active recovery. A 6 (level of competition: 1st national division, 2nd national division, 1st regional division, sub 16, sub 14, sub 12 7 (sprint trial: sprint 1, sprint 2, sprint 3, sprint 4, sprint 5, sprint 6, sprint 7 repeated measures ANOVA was carried out on subjects sprint times. The main effect of level of competition was statistically significant, F(5, 140 = 106.28, p < 0.001. Subjects from 1st national division were significantly faster than subjects from 2nd national division; subjects from 1st regional division obtained similar performances when compared to sub 16 and sub 14 level; subjects from sub 12 level were the slowest. The main effect of sprint trial was also statistically significant, F (6, 840 = 7.37, p < 0.001. Mean sprint times from the first trial were significantly slower than mean sprint times from the second, third and fourth trial. Results from the fifth, sixth and seventh trials were slower, denoting a decrement in performance. The two main effects were qualified by a significant level of competition x sprint trial interaction, F (30, 840 = 9.47 p < 0.001, identifying markedly different performance profiles. Coaches should be aware that normative data regarding this test can play a very important role if used frequently and consistently during the whole season.

  14. Sprint CEO遭殃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ 2007年10月8日,美国移动通信巨头Sprint Nextel公司董事会决定,罢免董事长兼首席执行官加里·福西(Gary Forsee).董事会抱怨称,自从福西实施大规模的Sprint-Nextel合并以来,公司财报结果一直不佳.

  15. Genome-wide identification of human- and primate-specific core promoter short tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushehri, A; Barez, M R Mashhoudi; Mansouri, S K; Biglarian, A; Ohadi, M

    2016-08-01

    Recent reports of a link between human- and primate-specific genetic factors and human/primate-specific characteristics and diseases necessitate genome-wide identification of those factors. We have previously reported core promoter short tandem repeats (STRs) of extreme length (≥6-repeats) that have expanded exceptionally in primates vs. non-primates, and may have a function in adaptive evolution. In the study reported here, we extended our study to the human STRs of ≥3-repeats in the category of penta and hexaucleotide STRs, across the entire human protein coding gene core promoters, and analyzed their status in several superorders and orders of vertebrates, using the Ensembl database. The ConSite software was used to identify the transcription factor (TF) sets binding to those STRs. STR specificity was observed at different levels of human and non-human primate (NHP) evolution. 73% of the pentanucleotide STRs and 68% of the hexanucleotide STRs were found to be specific to human and NHPs. AP-2alpha, Sp1, and MZF were the predominantly selected TFs (90%) binding to the human-specific STRs. Furthermore, the number of TF sets binding to a given STR was found to be a selection factor for that STR. Our findings indicate that selected STRs, the cognate binding TFs, and the number of TF set binding to those STRs function as switch codes at different levels of human and NHP evolution and speciation.

  16. The polymorphic integumentary mucin B.1 from Xenopus laevis contains the short consensus repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, J C; Hauser, F; Joba, W; Hoffmann, W

    1992-03-25

    The frog integumentary mucin B.1 (FIM-B.1), discovered by molecular cloning, contains a cysteine-rich C-terminal domain which is homologous with von Willebrand factor. With the help of the polymerase chain reaction, we now characterize a contiguous region 5' to the von Willebrand factor domain containing the short consensus repeat typical of many proteins from the complement system. Multiple transcripts have been cloned, which originate from a single animal and differ by a variable number of tandem repeats (rep-33 sequences). These different transcripts probably originate solely from two genes and are generated presumably by alternative splicing of an huge array of functional cassettes. This model is supported by analysis of genomic FIM-B.1 sequences from Xenopus laevis. Here, rep-33 sequences are arranged in an interrupted array of individual units. Additionally, results of Southern analysis revealed genetic polymorphism between different animals which is predicted to be within the tandem repeats. A first investigation of the predicted mucins with the help of a specific antibody against a synthetic peptide determined the molecular mass of FIM-B.1 to greater than 200 kDa. Here again, genetic polymorphism between different animals is detected.

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of clustered irregularly interspaced short palindromic repeat systems in the ocean metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Valery A; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Artamonova, Irena I

    2010-04-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) form a recently characterized type of prokaryotic antiphage defense system. The phage-host interactions involving CRISPRs have been studied in experiments with selected bacterial or archaeal species and, computationally, in completely sequenced genomes. However, these studies do not allow one to take prokaryotic population diversity and phage-host interaction dynamics into account. This gap can be filled by using metagenomic data: in particular, the largest existing data set, generated from the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition. The application of three publicly available CRISPR recognition programs to the Global Ocean metagenome produced a large proportion of false-positive results. To address this problem, a filtering procedure was designed. It resulted in about 200 reliable CRISPR cassettes, which were then studied in detail. The repeat consensuses were clustered into several stable classes that differed from the existing classification. Short fragments of DNA similar to the cassette spacers were more frequently present in the same geographical location than in other locations (P, CRISPR-forming events and reconstructed the likely evolutionary history of cassettes that had common spacers. Metagenomic collections allow for relatively unbiased analysis of phage-host interactions and CRISPR evolution. The results of this study demonstrate that CRISPR cassettes retain the memory of the local virus population at a particular ocean location. CRISPR evolution may be described using a limited vocabulary of elementary events that have a natural biological interpretation.

  18. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) analysis of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Ana; Canto, Ana; Leão, Célia; Cunha, Mónica V

    2015-01-01

    Typical CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat) regions are constituted by short direct repeats (DRs), interspersed with similarly sized non-repetitive spacers, derived from transmissible genetic elements, acquired when the cell is challenged with foreign DNA. The analysis of the structure, in number and nature, of CRISPR spacers is a valuable tool for molecular typing since these loci are polymorphic among strains, originating characteristic signatures. The existence of CRISPR structures in the genome of the members of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) enabled the development of a genotyping method, based on the analysis of the presence or absence of 43 oligonucleotide spacers separated by conserved DRs. This method, called spoligotyping, consists on PCR amplification of the DR chromosomal region and recognition after hybridization of the spacers that are present. The workflow beneath this methodology implies that the PCR products are brought onto a membrane containing synthetic oligonucleotides that have complementary sequences to the spacer sequences. Lack of hybridization of the PCR products to a specific oligonucleotide sequence indicates absence of the correspondent spacer sequence in the examined strain. Spoligotyping gained great notoriety as a robust identification and typing tool for members of MTBC, enabling multiple epidemiological studies on human and animal tuberculosis.

  19. Analysis of a simulated sprint competition in classical cross country skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöggl, T; Lindinger, S; Müller, E

    2007-08-01

    The objectives of this project were first to analyze the physiological response of a classical cross country (XC) skiing sprint competition, second, to examine the relationships of kinematic and physiological variables with sprint performance and third, to test the hypothesis that maximal speed in double poling (DP) and diagonal stride (DIAG) predicts sprint performance. Twelve elite skiers performed a treadmill-based simulation of a sprint competition that included two maximal speed tests (DP, DIAG), a test and three sprint heats over a 3.5-h period. VO(2), lactate, heart rate (HR) and kinematic variables were measured. Maximal DP and DIAG speed, the level of repeatedly produced lactate values and skiing technical aspects positively correlated with sprint performance. Fastest skiers produced longer cycle lengths in all techniques at equal poling frequency. VO(2) variables showed no correlation to sprint performance. VO(2), tidal volume (VT), and lactate decreased over the heats. XC-sprint performance in classical style depends on speed abilities, technique use, fatigue resistance, and anaerobic capacity. The relationship of maximal speed with sprint performance suggests (a) integrating maximal speed tests in XC sprint diagnostics and (b) emphasizing training models for XC skiing-specific speed abilities to improve performance in XC skiing sprint.

  20. High-resolution DNA melt curve analysis of the clustered, regularly interspaced short-palindromic-repeat locus of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Erin P; Smith, Helen; Huygens, Flavia; Giffard, Philip M

    2007-05-01

    A novel method for genotyping the clustered, regularly interspaced short-palindromic-repeat (CRISPR) locus of Campylobacter jejuni is described. Following real-time PCR, CRISPR products were subjected to high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis, a new technology that allows precise melt profile determination of amplicons. This investigation shows that the CRISPR HRM assay provides a powerful addition to existing C. jejuni genotyping methods and emphasizes the potential of HRM for genotyping short sequence repeats in other species.

  1. Exceptionally long 5' UTR short tandem repeats specifically linked to primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdar-Aligoodarzi, P; Mohammadparast, S; Zaker-Kandjani, B; Talebi Kakroodi, S; Jafari Vesiehsari, M; Ohadi, M

    2015-09-10

    We have previously reported genome-scale short tandem repeats (STRs) in the core promoter interval (i.e. -120 to +1 to the transcription start site) of protein-coding genes that have evolved identically in primates vs. non-primates. Those STRs may function as evolutionary switch codes for primate speciation. In the current study, we used the Ensembl database to analyze the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) between +1 and +60 of the transcription start site of the entire human protein-coding genes annotated in the GeneCards database, in order to identify "exceptionally long" STRs (≥5-repeats), which may be of selective/adaptive advantage. The importance of this critical interval is its function as core promoter, and its effect on transcription and translation. In order to minimize ascertainment bias, we analyzed the evolutionary status of the human 5' UTR STRs of ≥5-repeats in several species encompassing six major orders and superorders across mammals, including primates, rodents, Scandentia, Laurasiatheria, Afrotheria, and Xenarthra. We introduce primate-specific STRs, and STRs which have expanded from mouse to primates. Identical co-occurrence of the identified STRs of rare average frequency between 0.006 and 0.0001 in primates supports a role for those motifs in processes that diverged primates from other mammals, such as neuronal differentiation (e.g. APOD and FGF4), and craniofacial development (e.g. FILIP1L). A number of the identified STRs of ≥5-repeats may be human-specific (e.g. ZMYM3 and DAZAP1). Future work is warranted to examine the importance of the listed genes in primate/human evolution, development, and disease.

  2. Mutation analysis of 24 short tandem repeats in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dejian; Liu, Qiuling; Wu, Weiwei; Zhao, Hu

    2012-03-01

    Germline mutations of 24 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (TPOX, D3S1358, FGA, D5S818, CSF1PO, D7S820, D8S1179, TH01, vWA, D13S317, Penta E, D16S539, D18S51, Penta D, D21S11, D2S1772, D6S1043, D7S3048, D8S1132, D11S2368, D12S391, D13S325, D18S1364, and GATA198B05) were studied for 6,441 parent-child meioses taken from the paternity testing cases in Chinese Han population. In total, 195 mutations were identified at 22 of the 24 loci. Among them, 189 (96.92%) mutations were one step, five mutations (2.56%) were two step, and one mutation (0.51%) was three step. No mutation was found at the TH01 and TPOX loci. The overall mutation rate estimated was 0.0013 (95% CI 0.0011-0.0015), and the locus-specific mutation rate estimated ranged from 0 to 0.0034. There was a bias in the STR mutations that repeat gains were more common than losses (∼1.7:1). Mutation events in the male germline were more frequent than in the female germline (∼4.3:1). Furthermore, loci with a larger heterozygosity tended to have a higher mutation rate. Mutation in short alleles was biased towards expansion, whereas mutation in long alleles favored contraction. The long alleles have a higher allelic mutational probability than short alleles.

  3. Function and Regulation of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR / CRISPR Associated (Cas Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Fineran

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Phages are the most abundant biological entities on earth and pose a constant challenge to their bacterial hosts. Thus, bacteria have evolved numerous ‘innate’ mechanisms of defense against phage, such as abortive infection or restriction/modification systems. In contrast, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR systems provide acquired, yet heritable, sequence-specific ‘adaptive’ immunity against phage and other horizontally-acquired elements, such as plasmids. Resistance is acquired following viral infection or plasmid uptake when a short sequence of the foreign genome is added to the CRISPR array. CRISPRs are then transcribed and processed, generally by CRISPR associated (Cas proteins, into short interfering RNAs (crRNAs, which form part of a ribonucleoprotein complex. This complex guides the crRNA to the complementary invading nucleic acid and targets this for degradation. Recently, there have been rapid advances in our understanding of CRISPR/Cas systems. In this review, we will present the current model(s of the molecular events involved in both the acquisition of immunity and interference stages and will also address recent progress in our knowledge of the regulation of CRISPR/Cas systems.

  4. Function and regulation of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) / CRISPR associated (Cas) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Corinna; Chang, James T; Fineran, Peter C

    2012-10-19

    Phages are the most abundant biological entities on earth and pose a constant challenge to their bacterial hosts. Thus, bacteria have evolved numerous 'innate' mechanisms of defense against phage, such as abortive infection or restriction/modification systems. In contrast, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) systems provide acquired, yet heritable, sequence-specific 'adaptive' immunity against phage and other horizontally-acquired elements, such as plasmids. Resistance is acquired following viral infection or plasmid uptake when a short sequence of the foreign genome is added to the CRISPR array. CRISPRs are then transcribed and processed, generally by CRISPR associated (Cas) proteins, into short interfering RNAs (crRNAs), which form part of a ribonucleoprotein complex. This complex guides the crRNA to the complementary invading nucleic acid and targets this for degradation. Recently, there have been rapid advances in our understanding of CRISPR/Cas systems. In this review, we will present the current model(s) of the molecular events involved in both the acquisition of immunity and interference stages and will also address recent progress in our knowledge of the regulation of CRISPR/Cas systems.

  5. Role of the short telomeric repeat region in Marek's disease virus replication, genomic integration, and lymphomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Annachiara; Fester, Nadine; Engel, Annemarie T; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2014-12-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a cell-associated alphaherpesvirus that causes generalized polyneuritis and T-cell lymphomas in chickens. MDV is able to integrate its genome into host telomeres, but the mechanism of integration is poorly understood. The MDV genome harbors two arrays of telomeric repeats (TMR) at the ends of its linear genome: multiple telomeric repeats (mTMR), with a variable number of up to 100 repeats, and short telomeric repeats (sTMR), with a fixed number of 6 repeats. The mTMR have recently been shown to play an important role in MDV integration and tumor formation; however, the functions of the sTMR have remained unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of the sTMR in the MDV genome abrogates virus replication, while extensive mutation of the sTMR does not, indicating that the presence of the sTMR but not the sTMR sequence itself is important. Furthermore, we generated a panel of truncation mutants to determine the minimal length of the sTMR and observed a direct correlation between sTMR length and MDV replication. To address the role of sTMR in MDV replication, integration, and tumorigenesis, sTMR sequences were replaced by a scrambled repeated sequence (vsTMR_mut). vsTMR_mut replicated comparably to parental and revertant viruses in vitro. In vivo, however, a significant reduction in disease and tumor incidence was observed in chickens infected with vsTMR_mut that also correlated with a reduced number of viral integration sites in tumor cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the sTMR play a central role in MDV genome replication, pathogenesis, and MDV-induced tumor formation. Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic alphaherpesvirus that infects chickens and causes high economic losses in the poultry industry. MDV integrates its genetic material into host telomeres, a process that is crucial for efficient tumor formation. The MDV genome harbors two arrays of telomeric repeats (TMR) at the ends of its linear

  6. Improved haplotype analysis of human myelin basic protein short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, G; Umetsu, K; Yuasa, I; Suzuki, T

    2000-06-01

    We report an improved haplotype analysis of the human myelin basic protein gene (MBP) short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism. The polymorphic G-->A transition and 2 conventional STR polymorphisms, MBPA and MBPB, were simultaneously determined by an amplified product length polymorphism technique. After the MBPC fragments containing MBPA and MBPB were amplified, the linkage of these 2 STR loci was determined by a second amplification, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, of the isolated MBPC fragments. The present haplotype analysis dispensed with family studies for the haplotyping of MBPA and MBPB. Polymorphisms of the MBP loci studied in German and Japanese populations showed a high genomic variation. Haplotype analysis of the MBP loci showed distinct differences between the German and the Japanese populations. Consequently, haplotype analysis of the MBP loci promises to be useful in forensic identification and paternity testing.

  7. Mutations of short tandem repeat loci in cases of paternity testing in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mao; Zhang, XiaoNan; Wu, Dan; Shen, Qi; Wu, YuanMing; Fu, ShanMin

    2016-09-01

    In order to find out the characteristics of genetic mutations in 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci, 3734 parentage cases were analyzed using AmpFlSTR Sinofiler kit. The allele source, mutation rate, and mutation rule of the STR loci were determined. Seventy mutations were observed in all cases for paternity testing. Among 15 STR loci, the highest mutation rate was observed in D12S391 (0.21 %), but the D5S818 gene mutation rate was relatively low (0.02 %). One-step mutation cases accounted for 95.7 % of all of the cases monitored. And the mutations in this study mainly showed paternal mutation (64/70). The research results are of great significance for identification and paternity tests and for the improvement of genetic studies on Chinese population in the future.

  8. A study on ten short tandem repeat systems: African immigrant and Spanish population data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero, J J; Romero, J L; Gonzalez, J L; Arufe, M I; Cuesta, M I; Corte-Real, F; Carvalho, M; Anjos, M J; Vieira, D N; Vide, M C

    2000-06-05

    This work presents the results obtained from a genetic-population study for the D1S1656 system in the population of Southwest Spain (Huelva, Cádiz and Sevilla), Spaniards of Caucasian origin from North Africa (Ceuta), as well as in the black Central West African and Moroccan immigrant populations in Spain. The results of a study of the autochtonous population of the Canary Islands (n=138), and immigrant Central West African populations in Spain (n=132), obtained for nine short tandem repeat (STR) loci (D3S1358, VWA, FGA, D8S1179, D21S11, D18S51, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820), as well as the amelogenin locus, all contained in Profiler Plus (Perkin-Elmer) PCR amplification kits, are also presented. Except for the FGA and VWA data on immigrant Central West African populations in Spain, no deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were detected.

  9. [Progress of genome engineering technology via clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2013-10-04

    In survival competition with phage, bacteria and archaea gradually evolved the acquired immune system--Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), presenting the trait of transcribing the crRNA and the CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) to silence or cleaving the foreign double-stranded DNA specifically. In recent years, strong interest arises in prokaryotes primitive immune system and many in-depth researches are going on. Recently, researchers successfully repurposed CRISPR as an RNA-guided platform for sequence-specific gene expression, which provides a simple approach for selectively perturbing gene expression on a genome-wide scale. It will undoubtedly bring genome engineering into a more convenient and accurate new era.

  10. Assembling the Streptococcus thermophilus clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) array for multiplex DNA targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijun; Xu, Kun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Cunfang; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-06-01

    In addition to the advantages of scalable, affordable, and easy to engineer, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) technology is superior for multiplex targeting, which is laborious and inconvenient when achieved by cloning multiple gRNA expressing cassettes. Here, we report a simple CRISPR array assembling method which will facilitate multiplex targeting usage. First, the Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR3/Cas locus was cloned. Second, different CRISPR arrays were assembled with different crRNA spacers. Transformation assays using different Escherichia coli strains demonstrated efficient plasmid DNA targeting, and we achieved targeting efficiency up to 95% with an assembled CRISPR array with three crRNA spacers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Emerging ethical perspectives in the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats genome-editing debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Silvia; Cavaliere, Giulia

    2016-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of the ethical issues in the international clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) genome editing debate from March 2015 to September 2016. We present the regulatory framework for embryo research in the UK, and explain why CRISPR is not a significant break with the past. We discuss the ethical issues arising from CRISPR applications beyond human embryos, namely the use of gene drive-engineered mosquitoes to eradicate diseases, engineering nonhuman animals to harvest organs for human transplant and engineering crops. We discuss the experiments that have demonstrated the technical feasibility of cultivating embryos in vitro for up to 14 days, and possibly beyond this limit, and the ethical issues arising from the proposal to extend the limit beyond 14 days.

  12. [Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) site in Bacillus anthracis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqi; Wang, Dongshu; Feng, Erling; Wang, Bingxiang; Hui, Yiming; Han, Shaobo; Jiao, Lei; Liu, Xiankai; Wang, Hengliang

    2014-11-04

    To investigate the polymorphism of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in Bacillu santhracis and the application to molecular typing based on the polymorphism of CRISPR in B. anthracis. We downloaded the whole genome sequence of 6 B. anthracis strains and extracted the CRISPR sites. We designed the primers of CRISPR sites and amplified the CRISPR fragments in 193 B. anthracis strains by PCR and sequenced these fragments. In order to reveal the polymorphism of CRISPR in B. anthracis, wealigned all the extracted sequences and sequenced results by local blasting. At the same time, we also analyzed the CRISPR sites in B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. We did not find any polymorphism of CRISPR in B. anthracis. The molecular typing approach based on CRISPR polymorphism is not suitable for B. anthracis, but it is possible for us to distinguish B. anthracis from B. cereus and B. thuringiensis.

  13. Insight into microevolution of Yersinia pestis by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis, the pathogen of plague, has greatly influenced human history on a global scale. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR, an element participating in immunity against phages' invasion, is composed of short repeated sequences separated by unique spacers and provides the basis of the spoligotyping technology. In the present research, three CRISPR loci were analyzed in 125 strains of Y. pestis from 26 natural plague foci of China, the former Soviet Union and Mongolia were analyzed, for validating CRISPR-based genotyping method and better understanding adaptive microevolution of Y. pestis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using PCR amplification, sequencing and online data processing, a high degree of genetic diversity was revealed in all three CRISPR elements. The distribution of spacers and their arrays in Y. pestis strains is strongly region and focus-specific, allowing the construction of a hypothetic evolutionary model of Y. pestis. This model suggests transmission route of microtus strains that encircled Takla Makan Desert and ZhunGer Basin. Starting from Tadjikistan, one branch passed through the Kunlun Mountains, and moved to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Another branch went north via the Pamirs Plateau, the Tianshan Mountains, the Altai Mountains and the Inner Mongolian Plateau. Other Y. pestis lineages might be originated from certain areas along those routes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CRISPR can provide important information for genotyping and evolutionary research of bacteria, which will help to trace the source of outbreaks. The resulting data will make possible the development of very low cost and high-resolution assays for the systematic typing of any new isolate.

  14. CRISPRFinder: a web tool to identify clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissa, Ibtissem; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2007-07-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) constitute a particular family of tandem repeats found in a wide range of prokaryotic genomes (half of eubacteria and almost all archaea). They consist of a succession of highly conserved regions (DR) varying in size from 23 to 47 bp, separated by similarly sized unique sequences (spacer) of usually viral origin. A CRISPR cluster is flanked on one side by an AT-rich sequence called the leader and assumed to be a transcriptional promoter. Recent studies suggest that this structure represents a putative RNA-interference-based immune system. Here we describe CRISPRFinder, a web service offering tools to (i) detect CRISPRs including the shortest ones (one or two motifs); (ii) define DRs and extract spacers; (iii) get the flanking sequences to determine the leader; (iv) blast spacers against Genbank database and (v) check if the DR is found elsewhere in prokaryotic sequenced genomes. CRISPRFinder is freely accessible at http://crispr.u-psud.fr/Server/CRISPRfinder.php.

  15. Analysis of Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism in an Iranian Sadat population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, M R; Sokhansanj, A; Naghizadeh, M A; Farazmand, A

    2009-08-01

    The molecular genotyping of individuals and reconstruction of kinship through short and highly polymorphic DNA markers, so called short tandem repeats (STR), has become one of the important and efficient methods in anthropology studies and forensic science. Although many populations have been analyzed, no study has yet been carried out on Sadat populations who are putative descendents of Prophet Mohammad (peace be upon him). Polymorphisms of 6 Y-STR loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS392, and DYS393) have been studied in an unrelated population of Sadat males. The aim of this study was to find possible similarities within Sadat males, resided in Iran. Among Sadat, DYS385b was proved to be the most polymorphic (GD = 0.8588), and DYS392 showed the lowest polymorphism (GD = 0.3527). In 50 samples, 45 different haplotypes were found, of which 39 haplotypes were unique. In the study, three samples had multi-allelic patterns. Haplotype diversity, in regard to these 7 markers was 0.9942.

  16. Effects of limited peripheral vision on shuttle sprint performance of soccer players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmink, KAPM; Dijkstra, B; Visscher, C

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effect of limited peripheral vision oil the shuttle sprint performance of soccer players. Participants were 14 male soccer players of a student soccer club (M age = 22.1 yr., SD = 1.3 yr.). They performed a repeated shuttle sprint with full and limited peripheral vision. Mean

  17. Short communication: Determination of Salmonella clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) diversity on dairy farms in Wisconsin and Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehnes, C A; Rehberger, T G; Barrangou, R; Smith, A H

    2014-10-01

    Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica is a foodborne pathogen able to cause disease in both humans and animals. Diverse serovars of this pathogen exist, some of which are host specific, causing a range of clinical symptoms from asymptomatic infection through morbidity and mortality. According to a 2007 survey by the USDA National Animal Health Monitoring System, fecal shedding of Salmonella from healthy cows occurs on 39.7% of dairy farms in the United States. Certain serovars are frequently isolated from dairy farms and the majority of isolates from the National Animal Health Monitoring System study were represented by 5 serovars; however, genotypic diversity was not examined. The objective of this study was to determine the diversity of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci in Salmonella collected from 8 dairy farms with a previous history of salmonellosis. None of the cows or calves sampled on 2 of the 8 dairy farms were shedding Salmonella, although Salmonella was detected in a cow bedding sample on 1 of these farms. Salmonella populations were discrete on each farm, according to CRISPR typing, with the exception of an Anatum var. 15+ type on farms 5 and 6 and the Montevideo type on farms 1 and 2. One to 4 distinct CRISPR genotypes were identified per farm. The CRISPR typing differed within serovars, as Montevideo, Anatum var. 15+, and Muenster serovars had no overlap of spacer content, even on the same farm, reflecting between- and within-serovar genetic diversity. The dynamic nature of Salmonella populations was shown in a farm that was sampled longitudinally over 13.5 mo. Changes in serovar from 3,19:-:z27 to Montevideo was observed between the first sampling time and 8 mo later, with concomitant change in CRISPR alleles. The results indicate that Salmonella strains present in smaller dairy herds (<500 head) are specific to that farm and new Salmonella strains may emerge over time. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science

  18. Sprint conditioning of junior soccer players: effects of training intensity and technique supervision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Haugen

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to compare the effects of 1 training at 90 and 100% sprint velocity and 2 supervised versus unsupervised sprint training on soccer-specific physical performance in junior soccer players. Young, male soccer players (17 ± 1 yr, 71 ± 10 kg, 180 ± 6 cm were randomly assigned to four different treatment conditions over a 7-week intervention period. A control group (CON, n = 9 completed regular soccer training according to their teams' original training plans. Three training groups performed a weekly repeated-sprint training session in addition to their regular soccer training sessions performed at A 100% intensity without supervision (100UNSUP, n = 13, B 90% of maximal sprint velocity with supervision (90SUP, n = 10 or C 90% of maximal sprint velocity without supervision (90UNSUP, n=13. Repetitions x distance for the sprint-training sessions were 15 x 20 m for 100UNSUP and 30 x 20 m for 90SUP and 90UNSUP. Single-sprint performance (best time from 15 x 20 m sprints, repeated-sprint performance (mean time over 15 x 20 m sprints, countermovement jump and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1 were assessed during pre-training and post-training tests. No significant differences in performance outcomes were observed across groups. 90SUP improved Yo-Yo IR1 by a moderate margin compared to controls, while all other effect magnitudes were trivial or small. In conclusion, neither weekly sprint training at 90 or 100% velocity, nor supervised sprint training enhanced soccer-specific physical performance in junior soccer players.

  19. Sprint conditioning of junior soccer players: effects of training intensity and technique supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Thomas; Tønnessen, Espen; Øksenholt, Øyvind; Haugen, Fredrik Lie; Paulsen, Gøran; Enoksen, Eystein; Seiler, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare the effects of 1) training at 90 and 100% sprint velocity and 2) supervised versus unsupervised sprint training on soccer-specific physical performance in junior soccer players. Young, male soccer players (17 ± 1 yr, 71 ± 10 kg, 180 ± 6 cm) were randomly assigned to four different treatment conditions over a 7-week intervention period. A control group (CON, n = 9) completed regular soccer training according to their teams' original training plans. Three training groups performed a weekly repeated-sprint training session in addition to their regular soccer training sessions performed at A) 100% intensity without supervision (100UNSUP, n = 13), B) 90% of maximal sprint velocity with supervision (90SUP, n = 10) or C) 90% of maximal sprint velocity without supervision (90UNSUP, n=13). Repetitions x distance for the sprint-training sessions were 15 x 20 m for 100UNSUP and 30 x 20 m for 90SUP and 90UNSUP. Single-sprint performance (best time from 15 x 20 m sprints), repeated-sprint performance (mean time over 15 x 20 m sprints), countermovement jump and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) were assessed during pre-training and post-training tests. No significant differences in performance outcomes were observed across groups. 90SUP improved Yo-Yo IR1 by a moderate margin compared to controls, while all other effect magnitudes were trivial or small. In conclusion, neither weekly sprint training at 90 or 100% velocity, nor supervised sprint training enhanced soccer-specific physical performance in junior soccer players.

  20. An efficient clustering algorithm for partitioning Y-short tandem repeats data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seman Ali

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Y-Short Tandem Repeats (Y-STR data consist of many similar and almost similar objects. This characteristic of Y-STR data causes two problems with partitioning: non-unique centroids and local minima problems. As a result, the existing partitioning algorithms produce poor clustering results. Results Our new algorithm, called k-Approximate Modal Haplotypes (k-AMH, obtains the highest clustering accuracy scores for five out of six datasets, and produces an equal performance for the remaining dataset. Furthermore, clustering accuracy scores of 100% are achieved for two of the datasets. The k-AMH algorithm records the highest mean accuracy score of 0.93 overall, compared to that of other algorithms: k-Population (0.91, k-Modes-RVF (0.81, New Fuzzy k-Modes (0.80, k-Modes (0.76, k-Modes-Hybrid 1 (0.76, k-Modes-Hybrid 2 (0.75, Fuzzy k-Modes (0.74, and k-Modes-UAVM (0.70. Conclusions The partitioning performance of the k-AMH algorithm for Y-STR data is superior to that of other algorithms, owing to its ability to solve the non-unique centroids and local minima problems. Our algorithm is also efficient in terms of time complexity, which is recorded as O(km(n-k and considered to be linear.

  1. Genetic individualization of Cannabis sativa by a short tandem repeat multiplex system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Maria A; Mills, DeEtta K; Lata, Hemant; Chandra, Suman; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Almirall, Jose R

    2009-01-01

    Cannabis sativa is the most frequently used of all illicit drugs in the USA. Cannabis has been used throughout history for its stems in the production of hemp fiber, seed for oil and food, and buds and leaves as a psychoactive drug. Short tandem repeats (STRs) were chosen as molecular markers owing to their distinct advantages over other genetic methods. STRs are codominant, can be standardized such that reproducibility between laboratories can be easily achieved, have a high discrimination power, and can be multiplexed. In this study, six STR markers previously described for C. sativa were multiplexed into one reaction. The multiplex reaction was able to individualize 98 cannabis samples (14 hemp and 84 marijuana, authenticated as originating from 33 of the 50 states of the USA) and detect 29 alleles averaging 4.8 alleles per loci. The data did not relate the samples from the same state to each other. This is the first study to report a single-reaction sixplex and apply it to the analysis of almost 100 cannabis samples of known geographic origin.

  2. A repeated short educational intervention improves asthma control and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Vicente; Peiró, Meritxell; Torrejón, Montserrat; Fletcher, Monica; López-Viña, Antolín; Ignacio, José María; Quintano, José Antonio; Bardagí, Santiago; Gich, Ignasi

    2015-11-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of an asthma educational programme based on a repeated short intervention (AEP-RSI) to improve asthma control (symptom control and future risk) and quality of life. A total of 230 adults with mild-to-moderate persistent uncontrolled asthma participated in a 1-year cluster randomised controlled multicentre study. The AEP-RSI was given in four face-to-face sessions at 3-month intervals, and included administration of a written personalised action plan and training on inhaler technique. Centres were randomised to the AEP-RSI (intervention) group or usual clinical practice group. Specialised centres using a standard educational programme were the gold standard group. A significant improvement in the Asthma Control Test score was observed in all three groups (pimprovements were higher in the intervention and gold standard groups than in the usual clinical practice group (p=0.042), which also showed fewer exacerbations (mean±sd; 1.20±2.02 and 0.56±1.5 versus 2.04±2.72, respectively) and greater increases in the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire scores (0.95±1.04 and 0.89±0.84 versus 0.52±0.97, respectively). The AEP-RSI was effective in improving asthma symptom control, future risk and quality of life.

  3. Global genetic variation at nine short tandem repeat loci and implications on forensic genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangyun; McGarvey, Stephen T; Bayoumi, Riad; Mulligan, Connie J; Barrantes, Ramiro; Raskin, Salmo; Zhong, Yixi; Akey, Joshua; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Deka, Ranjan

    2003-01-01

    We have studied genetic variation at nine autosomal short tandem repeat loci in 20 globally distributed human populations defined by geographic and ethnic origins, viz., African, Caucasian, Asian, Native American and Oceanic. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the utility and applicability of these nine loci in forensic analysis in worldwide populations. The levels of genetic variation measured by number of alleles, allele size variance and heterozygosity are high in all populations irrespective of their effective sizes. Single- as well as multi-locus genotype frequencies are in conformity with the assumptions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Further, alleles across the entire set of nine loci are mutually independent in all populations. Gene diversity analysis shows that pooling of population data by major geographic groupings does not introduce substructure effects beyond the levels recommended by the National Research Council, validating the establishment of population databases based on major geographic and ethnic groupings. A network tree based on genetic distances further supports this assertion, in which populations of common ancestry cluster together. With respect to the power of discrimination and exclusion probabilities, even the relatively reduced levels of genetic variation at these nine STR loci in smaller and isolated populations provide an exclusionary power over 99%. However, in paternity testing with unknown genotype of the mother, the power of exclusion could fall below 80% in some isolated populations, and in such cases use of additional loci supplementing the battery of the nine loci is recommended.

  4. Polymorphism Profile of Nine Short Tandem Repeat Loci in the Han Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuangding Li; Chunxia Yan; Yajun Deng; Ruilin Wang; Jian Wang; Huanming Yang; Shengbin Li

    2003-01-01

    Nine short tandem repeat (STR) markers (D3S1358, VWA, FGA, THO1, TPOX,CSFIPO, D5S818, D13S317, and D7S820) and a sex-identification marker (Amel-ogenin locus) were amplified with multiplex PCR and were genotyped with afour-color fluorescence method in samples from 174 unrelated Han individuals inNorth China. The allele frequencies, genotype frequencies, heterozygosity, prob-ability of discrimination powers, probability of paternity exclusion and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations were determined. The results demonstratedthat the genotypes at all these STR loci in Han population conform to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations. The combined discrimination power (DP) was1.05 × 10-10 within nine STR loci analyzed and the probability of paternity exclusion(EPP) was 0.9998. The results indicate that these nine STR loci and the Amelo-genin locus are useful markers for human identification, paternity and maternitytesting and sex determination in forensic sciences.

  5. [Genetic variability and phylogenetic analysis of 39 short tandem repeat loci in Beijing Han population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiuyan, Ruan; Weini, Wang; Yaran, Yang; Bingbing, Xie; Jing, Chen; Yacheng, Liu; Jiangwei, Yan

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we studied the genetic polymorphisms of short tandem repeat (STR) loci from 13 CODIS and 26 non-CODIS system in Beijing Han population for the first time, and established a database of 39 STR loci whose forensic parameters were further evaluated. Our results demonstrated no significant deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of 39 STR loci and no pairwise linkage disequilibrium between them. The power of discriminations, expected heterozygosity, polymorphic information content, and power of exclusion of 39 STR loci ranged from 0.7740-0.9818, 0.6000-0.9350, 0.5317-0.9047 and 0.2909-0.8673. The cumulated discrimination power and cumulative probability of exclusion were 0.999999999999999999999999999999999999999964971 and 0.999999999973878, respectively. Moreover, the genetic distance was calculated based on allele frequency and phylogenetic tree was built using STR loci data from Beijing Han and other 11 Chinese ethnic groups.This study provides important basic data for Chinese forensic DNA database and population genetics database, and has important significance in carrying out forensic individual identification, paternity testing, and population genetic study.

  6. Single-cell forensic short tandem repeat typing within microfluidic droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Tao; Novak, Richard; Mathies, Richard A

    2014-01-07

    A short tandem repeat (STR) typing method is developed for forensic identification of individual cells. In our strategy, monodisperse 1.5 nL agarose-in-oil droplets are produced with a high frequency using a microfluidic droplet generator. Statistically dilute single cells, along with primer-functionalized microbeads, are randomly compartmentalized in the droplets. Massively parallel single-cell droplet polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is performed to transfer replicas of desired STR targets from the single-cell genomic DNA onto the coencapsulated microbeads. These DNA-conjugated beads are subsequently harvested and reamplified under statistically dilute conditions for conventional capillary electrophoresis (CE) STR fragment size analysis. The 9-plex STR profiles of single cells from both pure and mixed populations of GM09947 and GM09948 human lymphoid cells show that all alleles are correctly called and allelic drop-in/drop-out is not observed. The cell mixture study exhibits a good linear relationship between the observed and input cell ratios in the range of 1:1 to 10:1. Additionally, the STR profile of GM09947 cells could be deduced even in the presence of a high concentration of cell-free contaminating 9948 genomic DNA. Our method will be valuable for the STR analysis of samples containing mixtures of cells/DNA from multiple contributors and for low-concentration samples.

  7. [Polymorphisms of 21 short tandem repeat loci of Salar minority ethnic group in Qinghai Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Yan-bin; Li, Kai; Wang, Jian-wen

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the polymorphisms of 21 short tandem repeat (STR)loci of Salar minority ethnic group in Qinghai Province. Blood samples were collected from 120 unrelated healthy Salar individuals from Gandu town in Hualong county. DNA templates were screened by home-made AGCU21+1 kit. The findings were further compared with those of Hans in Zhejiang Province, Hans in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Tibetans in Tibet Autonomous Region, and Tujias in Hubei Province. The allele frequencies of 21 STR loci ranged 0.0042-0.4917, the genotype frequencies ranged 0.0083-0.3750, the power of discrimination ranged 0.796-0.948, the heterozygosity ranged 0.650-0.817, the polymorphism information contents ranged 0.590-0.810, and the power of exclusion ranged 0.355-0.630. The cumulative coupling probability was 1.75×10(-20), and the cumulative power of exclusion was 0.9999999. Significant differences were found at 14, 12, 12, 13 of the 21 STR loci between Salar and Hans of Zhejiang Province, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Tibetans of Tibet Autonomous Region, and Tujias of Hubei Province (Pethnic group from Qinghai Province and therefore suitable for population genetics study, screening of disease-related genes, and forensic individual identification.

  8. Hierarchical modeling of genome-wide Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers infers native American prehistory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cecil M

    2010-02-01

    This study examines a genome-wide dataset of 678 Short Tandem Repeat loci characterized in 444 individuals representing 29 Native American populations as well as the Tundra Netsi and Yakut populations from Siberia. Using these data, the study tests four current hypotheses regarding the hierarchical distribution of neutral genetic variation in native South American populations: (1) the western region of South America harbors more variation than the eastern region of South America, (2) Central American and western South American populations cluster exclusively, (3) populations speaking the Chibchan-Paezan and Equatorial-Tucanoan language stock emerge as a group within an otherwise South American clade, (4) Chibchan-Paezan populations in Central America emerge together at the tips of the Chibchan-Paezan cluster. This study finds that hierarchical models with the best fit place Central American populations, and populations speaking the Chibchan-Paezan language stock, at a basal position or separated from the South American group, which is more consistent with a serial founder effect into South America than that previously described. Western (Andean) South America is found to harbor similar levels of variation as eastern (Equatorial-Tucanoan and Ge-Pano-Carib) South America, which is inconsistent with an initial west coast migration into South America. Moreover, in all relevant models, the estimates of genetic diversity within geographic regions suggest a major bottleneck or founder effect occurring within the North American subcontinent, before the peopling of Central and South America. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. [Molecular characteristics of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat in Shigella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zerun; Wang, Yingfang; Duan, Guangcai; Yang, Haiyan; Xi, Yuanlin; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Linlin; Guo, Xiangjiao

    2015-08-01

    To detect the molecular characteristics of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR) in Shigella and to analyze the distribution of CRISPR related to the time of isolation. Of the 52 Shigella strains, 41 were isolated from Henan, 6 from Jiangxi and 5 isolated from Beijing. Both CRISPR locus of S1, S2, S3 and S4 in Shigella were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were sequenced and compared. The positive rates of CRISPR locus in Shigella were 33.69% (S1), 50.00% (S2), 82.69% (S3) and 73.08% (S4), respectively. Two subtypes were discovered in S1 and S3 locus. Three subtypes were discovered in S2 locus. Four different subtypes were discovered in S4 locus. The isolates from Henan strains were divided into two groups by the time of isolation. Distributions of S1 were different, before or after 2004, on Shigella. S1 could not be detected after 2004. There were no statistical differences of S2, S3 and S4 in two groups. Different CRISPR subtypes or Shigella were discovered. A significant correlation was noticed between the CRISPR S1 related to the time of isolation but not between S2, S3 or S4 on the time of isolation.

  10. A NORTHWEST DATABASE MODEL OF SHORT TANDEM REPEAT LOCI IN FORENSIC MEDICINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王振原; 朱波峰; 刘雅诚; 严江伟; 霍振义; 金天博; 李涛; 樊拴良; 方杰

    2003-01-01

    Objective To establish the northwest database of short tandem repeat(STR) loci in forensic medicine. Methods Bloodstains or whole blood samples were collected from the unrelated prisoners in Xi'an city. Genetic distribution for 13 STR loci and amelogenin locus were determined in prisons based on GeneScan. One primer for each locus was labeled with the fluorescent by 5-FAM, JOE, or NED. The forensic database were generated by using multiple amplification, GeneScan, genotype, and genetic distribution analysis. Results 113 alleles and 302 genotypes were observed, with the corresponding frequency between 0.0050-0.5250 and 0.0100-0.4100. The mean H was 0.7667. The accumulative DP was 0.9999999,. The accumulative EPP was 0.9999999. The scope of PIC was 0.6036-0.8562. PM was less than 10-11. The observed and expected genotype frequencies were evaluated using χ2-test and all were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). Conclusion STR loci is an ideal genetic marker with powerful polymorphism and stable heredity. It can be used for individual identification and paternity in forensic medicine. The forensic DNA database model can be established successfully.

  11. A simplified method for screening siblings for HLA identity using short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jennifer J; Hopp, Kathleen A; Pietz, Bradley C; Bick, David P; Lau, Eduardo C; Ellis, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    Identifying an HLA-matched sibling donor for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is time-consuming and expensive, and often limited by reimbursement caps imposed by insurance providers. To improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening for HLA-matched siblings, we developed an assay for determining HLA identity using a panel of nine informative short tandem repeat (STR) loci located throughout the HLA complex. The STR panel was assessed for accuracy in identifying HLA-matched siblings in 88 family workups comprising a total of 132 related donor and recipient typing comparisons. All sibling pairs with identical STR alleles were also HLA identical. Of the 48 pairs mismatched at one or more STR alleles, all were genotypically HLA non-identical at one or more loci. The sensitivity and specificity of STR analysis for identifying HLA-matched siblings were 91% and 100%, respectively. Three false negatives occurred due to an STR mutation or possible HLA-DPB1/DQB1 recombination. Additionally, STR genotyping provided additional information allowing determination of the extent of HLA identity in families where HLA haplotype inheritance was ambiguous, due to extensive homozygosity or shared parental haplotypes. The HLA STR assay is a reliable and rapid test that can be used to inexpensively screen potential sibling donors for HLA identity.

  12. Lactobacillus buchneri genotyping on the basis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) locus diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briner, Alexandra E; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2014-02-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in combination with associated sequences (cas) constitute the CRISPR-Cas immune system, which uptakes DNA from invasive genetic elements as novel "spacers" that provide a genetic record of immunization events. We investigated the potential of CRISPR-based genotyping of Lactobacillus buchneri, a species relevant for commercial silage, bioethanol, and vegetable fermentations. Upon investigating the occurrence and diversity of CRISPR-Cas systems in Lactobacillus buchneri genomes, we observed a ubiquitous occurrence of CRISPR arrays containing a 36-nucleotide (nt) type II-A CRISPR locus adjacent to four cas genes, including the universal cas1 and cas2 genes and the type II signature gene cas9. Comparative analysis of CRISPR spacer content in 26 L. buchneri pickle fermentation isolates associated with spoilage revealed 10 unique locus genotypes that contained between 9 and 29 variable spacers. We observed a set of conserved spacers at the ancestral end, reflecting a common origin, as well as leader-end polymorphisms, reflecting recent divergence. Some of these spacers showed perfect identity with phage sequences, and many spacers showed homology to Lactobacillus plasmid sequences. Following a comparative analysis of sequences immediately flanking protospacers that matched CRISPR spacers, we identified a novel putative protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM), 5'-AAAA-3'. Overall, these findings suggest that type II-A CRISPR-Cas systems are valuable for genotyping of L. buchneri.

  13. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  14. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  15. PCR typing of DNA fragments of the short tandem repeat (STR) system HUMTH01 in Danes and Greenland Eskimos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, L J; Møller, A; Morling, N

    1994-01-01

    DNA from the short tandem repeat (STR) system HUMTH01 was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analyzed by vertical electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels followed by silver staining. DNA samples from 100 unrelated Danes, 147 unrelated Greenland Eskimos, and 89 Danish mother/child...

  16. lobSTR: A short tandem repeat profiler for personal genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gymrek, Melissa; Golan, David; Rosset, Saharon; Erlich, Yaniv

    2012-06-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) have a wide range of applications, including medical genetics, forensics, and genetic genealogy. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) has the potential to profile hundreds of thousands of STR loci. However, mainstream bioinformatics pipelines are inadequate for the task. These pipelines treat STR mapping as gapped alignment, which results in cumbersome processing times and a biased sampling of STR alleles. Here, we present lobSTR, a novel method for profiling STRs in personal genomes. lobSTR harnesses concepts from signal processing and statistical learning to avoid gapped alignment and to address the specific noise patterns in STR calling. The speed and reliability of lobSTR exceed the performance of current mainstream algorithms for STR profiling. We validated lobSTR's accuracy by measuring its consistency in calling STRs from whole-genome sequencing of two biological replicates from the same individual, by tracing Mendelian inheritance patterns in STR alleles in whole-genome sequencing of a HapMap trio, and by comparing lobSTR results to traditional molecular techniques. Encouraged by the speed and accuracy of lobSTR, we used the algorithm to conduct a comprehensive survey of STR variations in a deeply sequenced personal genome. We traced the mutation dynamics of close to 100,000 STR loci and observed more than 50,000 STR variations in a single genome. lobSTR's implementation is an end-to-end solution. The package accepts raw sequencing reads and provides the user with the genotyping results. It is written in C/C++, includes multi-threading capabilities, and is compatible with the BAM format.

  17. Genetic structure of the Azores Islands: a study using 15 autosomal short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cristina; Alvarez, Luis; Aluja, Maria Pilar; Bruges-Armas, Jacome; Lima, Manuela

    2009-12-01

    The Azores archipelago (Portugal), located in the Atlantic Ocean, 1,500 km from the European mainland, is formed by nine islands of volcanic origin. The relative position of these islands allows the definition of three geographical groups: Eastern, Central and Western. Previous studies of the Azores using Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) have highlighted differences in the frequencies of several loci, when compared to Mainland Portugal or Madleira Island. Furthermore, linkage disequilibrium (LD), described for Azorean samples has been tentatively explained as reflecting the presence of genetic sub-structuring in the archipelago. To provide information concerning the genetic profile of the Azores Islands and to evaluate the presence of substructuring we have determined the allelic frequencies of 15 autosomal STR loci, using the AmpFlSTR Identifiler Kit, in representative samples from the Azorean Islands. Either considering the Azores as a whole, or analysing by island all the loci were in conformity with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Average gene diversity ranged from 0.7669 in Corvo to 0.7972 in Terceira Island. Allelic independence between loci, tested for the global sample, detected significant LD (after correction for multiple tests) for pairs D21S11/D7S820 and D3S1358/D5S818. The exact test of population differentiation, combining the information of the 15 markers analysed, revealed significant differences between the three groups of islands, and between islands. Inter-island analysis reinforces the previous data that suggested the existence of sub-structuring in the Azores archipelago. Moreover, the data generated by this study can be used in a future forensic genetic database of the Azores after the appropriate enlacement of sample size by island, preventing, in that way, misinterpretations caused by population substructuring and small sample sizes.

  18. Population genetic study of 10 short tandem repeat loci from 600 domestic dogs in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seo Hyun; Jang, Yoon-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have long shared close relationships with many humans. Due to the large number of dogs in human populations, they are often involved in crimes. Occasionally, canine biological evidence such as saliva, bloodstains and hairs can be found at crime scenes. Accordingly, canine DNA can be used as forensic evidence. The use of short tandem repeat (STR) loci from biological evidence is valuable for forensic investigations. In Korea, canine STR profiling-related crimes are being successfully analyzed, leading to diverse crimes such as animal cruelty, dog-attacks, murder, robbery, and missing and abandoned dogs being solved. However, the probability of random DNA profile matches cannot be analyzed because of a lack of canine STR data. Therefore, in this study, 10 STR loci were analyzed in 600 dogs in Korea (344 dogs belonging to 30 different purebreds and 256 crossbred dogs) to estimate canine forensic genetic parameters. Among purebred dogs, a separate statistical analysis was conducted for five major subgroups, 97 Maltese, 47 Poodles, 31 Shih Tzus, 32 Yorkshire Terriers, and 25 Pomeranians. Allele frequencies, expected (Hexp) and observed heterozygosity (Hobs), fixation index (F), probability of identity (P(ID)), probability of sibling identity (P(ID)sib) and probability of exclusion (PE) were then calculated. The Hexp values ranged from 0.901 (PEZ12) to 0.634 (FHC2079), while the P(ID)sib values were between 0.481 (FHC2079) and 0.304 (PEZ12) and the P(ID)sib was about 3.35 × 10−5 for the combination of all 10 loci. The results presented herein will strengthen the value of canine DNA to solving dog-related crimes. PMID:26645337

  19. Toward Male Individualization with Rapidly Mutating Y-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Kaye N; Ralf, Arwin; Aboukhalid, Rachid; Achakzai, Niaz M; Anjos, Maria J; Ayub, Qasim; Balažic, Jože; Ballantyne, Jack; Ballard, David J; Berger, Burkhard; Bobillo, Cecilia; Bouabdellah, Mehdi; Burri, Helen; Capal, Tomas; Caratti, Stefano; Cárdenas, Jorge; Cartault, François; Carvalho, Elizeu F; Carvalho, Monica; Cheng, Baowen; Coble, Michael D; Comas, David; Corach, Daniel; D'Amato, Maria E; Davison, Sean; de Knijff, Peter; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A; Decorte, Ronny; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Dupuy, Berit M; Elmrghni, Samir; Gliwiński, Mateusz; Gomes, Sara C; Grol, Laurens; Haas, Cordula; Hanson, Erin; Henke, Jürgen; Henke, Lotte; Herrera-Rodríguez, Fabiola; Hill, Carolyn R; Holmlund, Gunilla; Honda, Katsuya; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Inokuchi, Shota; Jobling, Mark A; Kaddura, Mahmoud; Kim, Jong S; Kim, Soon H; Kim, Wook; King, Turi E; Klausriegler, Eva; Kling, Daniel; Kovačević, Lejla; Kovatsi, Leda; Krajewski, Paweł; Kravchenko, Sergey; Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Lee, Eun Young; Lessig, Ruediger; Livshits, Ludmila A; Marjanović, Damir; Minarik, Marek; Mizuno, Natsuko; Moreira, Helena; Morling, Niels; Mukherjee, Meeta; Munier, Patrick; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Neuhuber, Franz; Nie, Shengjie; Nilasitsataporn, Premlaphat; Nishi, Takeki; Oh, Hye H; Olofsson, Jill; Onofri, Valerio; Palo, Jukka U; Pamjav, Horolma; Parson, Walther; Petlach, Michal; Phillips, Christopher; Ploski, Rafal; Prasad, Samayamantri P R; Primorac, Dragan; Purnomo, Gludhug A; Purps, Josephine; Rangel-Villalobos, Hector; Rębała, Krzysztof; Rerkamnuaychoke, Budsaba; Gonzalez, Danel Rey; Robino, Carlo; Roewer, Lutz; Rosa, Alexandra; Sajantila, Antti; Sala, Andrea; Salvador, Jazelyn M; Sanz, Paula; Schmitt, Cornelia; Sharma, Anil K; Silva, Dayse A; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Sijen, Titia; Sirker, Miriam; Siváková, Daniela; Škaro, Vedrana; Solano-Matamoros, Carlos; Souto, Luis; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Sudoyo, Herawati; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Taylor, Duncan; Tillmar, Andreas; Tsybovsky, Iosif S; Tyler-Smith, Chris; van der Gaag, Kristiaan J; Vanek, Daniel; Völgyi, Antónia; Ward, Denise; Willemse, Patricia; Yap, Eric PH; Yong, Rita YY; Pajnič, Irena Zupanič; Kayser, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Relevant for various areas of human genetics, Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are commonly used for testing close paternal relationships among individuals and populations, and for male lineage identification. However, even the widely used 17-loci Yfiler set cannot resolve individuals and populations completely. Here, 52 centers generated quality-controlled data of 13 rapidly mutating (RM) Y-STRs in 14,644 related and unrelated males from 111 worldwide populations. Strikingly, >99% of the 12,272 unrelated males were completely individualized. Haplotype diversity was extremely high (global: 0.9999985, regional: 0.99836–0.9999988). Haplotype sharing between populations was almost absent except for six (0.05%) of the 12,156 haplotypes. Haplotype sharing within populations was generally rare (0.8% nonunique haplotypes), significantly lower in urban (0.9%) than rural (2.1%) and highest in endogamous groups (14.3%). Analysis of molecular variance revealed 99.98% of variation within populations, 0.018% among populations within groups, and 0.002% among groups. Of the 2,372 newly and 156 previously typed male relative pairs, 29% were differentiated including 27% of the 2,378 father–son pairs. Relative to Yfiler, haplotype diversity was increased in 86% of the populations tested and overall male relative differentiation was raised by 23.5%. Our study demonstrates the value of RM Y-STRs in identifying and separating unrelated and related males and provides a reference database. PMID:24917567

  20. Fourteen non-CODIS autosomal short tandem repeat loci multiplex data from Taiwanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Chang, Yih-Yuan; Lee, James Chun-I; Yin, Hsiang-Yi; Tseng, Li-Hui; Su, Yi-Ning; Ko, Tsang-Ming

    2011-03-01

    Interest in the development of polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) markers unlinked to the CODIS loci is growing among forensic practitioners. We developed a multiplex system in which14 autosomal STR (D3S1744, D4S2366, D8S1110, D12S1090, D13S765, D14S608, Penta E, D17S1294, D18S536, D18S1270, D20S470, D21S1437, Penta D, and D22S683) could be amplified in one single polymerase chain reaction. DNA samples from 572 unrelated Taiwanese Han subjects were analyzed using this 14 STR multiplex system. Thirty parent-child pairs of parentage testing cases with a combined paternity index (CPI) below 1,000 and 32 parent-child pairs with single-step mutations found in AmpFℓSTR Identifiler loci were also recruited for validation of the newly developed system. DNA sequencing was performed for novel STRs and novel alleles found in these subjects. The distributions of allelic frequencies for these autosomal STRs and sequence data, allele nomenclature for the STRs, and forensic parameters are presented. The discrimination power in our multiplex loci ranged from 0.6858 (D18S536) to 0.9168 (Penta E), with a combined discrimination power of 0.999999999. It provides additional power to distinguish the possible single-step mutations in parent-child pairs and improves the ability to prove parentage by increasing the CPI. The combined power of exclusion of these 14 loci in Taiwanese Han in this study was 0.9999995913. In conclusion, this 14-autosomal STRs multiplex system provides highly informative STR data and appears useful in forensic casework and parentage testing.

  1. Linking short tandem repeat polymorphisms with cytosine modifications in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhou; Zheng, Yinan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Cong; Joyce, Brian Thomas; Kibbe, Warren A; Hou, Lifang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Inter-individual variation in cytosine modifications has been linked to complex traits in humans. Cytosine modification variation is partially controlled by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), known as modified cytosine quantitative trait loci (mQTL). However, little is known about the role of short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs), a class of structural genetic variants, in regulating cytosine modifications. Utilizing the published data on the International HapMap Project lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), we assessed the relationships between 721 STRPs and the modification levels of 283,540 autosomal CpG sites. Our findings suggest that, in contrast to the predominant cis-acting mode for SNP-based mQTL, STRPs are associated with cytosine modification levels in both cis-acting (local) and trans-acting (distant) modes. In local scans within the ±1 Mb windows of target CpGs, 21, 9, and 21 cis-acting STRP-based mQTL were detected in CEU (Caucasian residents from Utah, USA), YRI (Yoruba people from Ibadan, Nigeria), and the combined samples, respectively. In contrast, 139,420, 76,817, and 121,866 trans-acting STRP-based mQTL were identified in CEU, YRI, and the combined samples, respectively. A substantial proportion of CpG sites detected with local STRP-based mQTL were not associated with SNP-based mQTL, suggesting that STRPs represent an independent class of mQTL. Functionally, genetic variants neighboring CpG-associated STRPs are enriched with genome-wide association study (GWAS) loci for a variety of complex traits and diseases, including cancers, based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) GWAS Catalog. Therefore, elucidating these STRP-based mQTL in addition to SNP-based mQTL can provide novel insights into the genetic architectures of complex traits.

  2. Clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) diversity and virulence factor distribution in avian Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Su, Zhixin; Cheng, Yuqiang; Wang, Zhaofei; Li, Shiyu; Wang, Heng'an; Sun, Jianhe; Yan, Yaxian

    In order to investigate the diverse characteristics of clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) arrays and the distribution of virulence factor genes in avian Escherichia coli, 80 E. coli isolates obtained from chickens with avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) or avian fecal commensal E. coli (AFEC) were identified. Using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), five genes were subjected to phylogenetic typing and examined for CRISPR arrays to study genetic relatedness among the strains. The strains were further analyzed for CRISPR loci and virulence factor genes to determine a possible association between their CRISPR elements and their potential virulence. The strains were divided into five phylogenetic groups: A, B1, B2, D and E. It was confirmed that two types of CRISPR arrays, CRISPR1 and CRISPR2, which contain up to 246 distinct spacers, were amplified in most of the strains. Further classification of the isolates was achieved by sorting them into nine CRISPR clusters based on their spacer profiles, which indicates a candidate typing method for E. coli. Several significant differences in invasion-associated gene distribution were found between the APEC isolates and the AFEC isolates. Our results identified the distribution of 11 virulence genes and CRISPR diversity in 80 strains. It was demonstrated that, with the exception of iucD and aslA, there was no sharp demarcation in the gene distribution between the pathogenic (APEC) and commensal (AFEC) strains, while the total number of indicated CRISPR spacers may have a positive correlation with the potential pathogenicity of the E. coli isolates. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Use of short tandem repeat sequences to study Mycobacterium leprae in leprosy patients in Malawi and India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K Young

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate understanding of the transmission of Mycobacterium leprae makes it difficult to predict the impact of leprosy control interventions. Genotypic tests that allow tracking of individual bacterial strains would strengthen epidemiological studies and contribute to our understanding of the disease.Genotyping assays based on variation in the copy number of short tandem repeat sequences were applied to biopsies collected in population-based epidemiological studies of leprosy in northern Malawi, and from members of multi-case households in Hyderabad, India. In the Malawi series, considerable genotypic variability was observed between patients, and also within patients, when isolates were collected at different times or from different tissues. Less within-patient variability was observed when isolates were collected from similar tissues at the same time. Less genotypic variability was noted amongst the closely related Indian patients than in the Malawi series.Lineages of M. leprae undergo changes in their pattern of short tandem repeat sequences over time. Genetic divergence is particularly likely between bacilli inhabiting different (e.g., skin and nerve tissues. Such variability makes short tandem repeat sequences unsuitable as a general tool for population-based strain typing of M. leprae, or for distinguishing relapse from reinfection. Careful use of these markers may provide insights into the development of disease within individuals and for tracking of short transmission chains.

  4. Assessing variability and comparing short-term biomarkers of styrene exposure using a repeated measurements approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni, S; Manini, P; Campo, L; De Palma, G; Andreoli, R; Mutti, A; Bertazzi, P A; Rappaport, S M

    2010-01-15

    The aim of this work is to compare several short-term biomarkers of styrene exposure, namely urinary styrene (StyU), mercapturic acids (M1+M2), mandelic acid (MA), phenylglyoxylic acid (PGA), phenylglycine (PHG), and 4-vinylphenol conjugates (VP), for use as biomarkers of exposure in epidemiologic studies. A repeated measurements protocol (typically 4 measurements per worker over 6 weeks) was applied to measure airborne styrene (StyA) and urinary biomarkers in 10 varnish and 8 fiberglass reinforced plastic workers. Estimated geometric mean personal exposures to StyA were 2.96mg/m(3) in varnish workers and 15.7mg/m(3) in plastic workers. The corresponding levels of StyU, M1+M2, MA, PGA, MA+PGA, PHG and VP were 5.13microg/L, 0.111, 38.2, 22.7, 62.6, 0.978, and 3.97mg/g creatinine in varnish workers and 8.38microg/L, 0.303, 146, 83.4, 232, 2.85 and 3.97mg/g creatinine in plastic workers. Within-worker (sigma(wY)(2)) and between-worker (sigma(bY)(2)) variance components were estimated from the log-transformed data as were the corresponding fold ranges containing 95% of the respective lognormal distributions of daily levels ((w)R(0.95)) and subject-specific mean levels ((b)R(0.95)). Estimates of (w)R(0.95) (range: 4-26) were generally smaller than those of (b)R(0.95) (range: 5-790) for both environmental and biological markers; this indicates that exposures varied much more between workers than within workers in these groups. Since attenuation bias in an estimated exposure-response relationship increases with the variance ratio lambda=sigma(wY)(2)/sigma(bY)(2), we estimated values of lambda for all exposure measures in our study. Values of lambda were typically much less than one (median=0.220) and ranged from 0.089 for M1+M2 in plastic workers to 1.38 for PHG in varnish workers. Since values of lambda were 0.147 and 0.271 for StyA in varnish workers and plastic workers, respectively, compared to 0.178 and 0.210 for MA in the same groups, our results suggest that either

  5. Assessment of the upper body contribution to multiple-sprint cycling in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marie Clare; Watson, Hugh; Baker, Julien S

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of repeated cycling sprints on power profiles while assessing upper body muscle contraction. Eighteen physically active participants performed 8 × 10 s repeated sprints while muscle activity was recorded via surface electromyography (sEMG) from the brachioradialis (BR), biceps brachii (BB), triceps brachii (TB) and upper trapezius (UT). Measurements were obtained at rest, during a functional maximum contraction (FMC) while participants were positioned in a seated position on the cycle ergometer and during the repeated sprint protocol. Results suggest that mainly type I muscle fibres (MFs) are being recruited within the upper body musculature due to the submaximal and intermittent nature of the contractions. Subsequently, there is no evidence of upper body fatigue across the sprints, which is reflected in the lack of changes in the median frequency of the power spectrum (P<0·05).

  6. DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome short tandem repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.; Brenner, C.; Brinkmann, B.;

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a relat...... a relatively new area, namely Y-chromosome polymorphisms, with particular emphasis on short tandem repeats (STRs). This report addresses nomenclature, use of allelic ladders, population genetics and reporting methods Udgivelsesdato: 2001/12...

  7. A graphical simulation model of the entire DNA process associated with the analysis of short tandem repeat loci

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Peter; Curran, James; Elliot, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The use of expert systems to interpret short tandem repeat DNA profiles in forensic, medical and ancient DNA applications is becoming increasingly prevalent as high-throughput analytical systems generate large amounts of data that are time-consuming to process. With special reference to low copy number (LCN) applications, we use a graphical model to simulate stochastic variation associated with the entire DNA process starting with extraction of sample, followed by the processing associated wi...

  8. Retroviral sequence located in border region of short unique region and short terminal repeat of Md5 strain of Marek's disease virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, D; Ito, M; Cho, K O; Kon, Y; Morimura, T; Hayashi, M; Kuwabara, M

    1998-02-01

    A 246-base pair (bp) retroviral sequence, which was homologous to a long terminal repeat of avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV), was detected and cloned from Md5 strain (Md5) of Marek's disease virus type 1 (MDV1) by representational difference analysis (RDA). The retroviral sequence was thought to be located in the border region of short unique region (U(s) and short terminal repeat (TRs), but did not exist in the border region of U(s) and the inverted short repeat (IRs) of the Md5 genome. A cloned fragment of the US/TRs border region of the Md5 genome showed a construction of U-E'-R-U'-E-TRs with the regions designated as follows: E, expanded TRs reported by Jones et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 3855, 1993]; E', a partial copy of the expanded TRs; R, the retroviral sequence detected in Md5 genome; U, TRs-end sequence of U(s); U', a partial copy of TRs-end sequence of U(s). The sequence unit indicated as E'-R-U' was thought to be heterogeneously repeated in the Md5 genome. Since this retroviral sequence reportedly did not exist in the original stock of Md5, the retroviral sequence is thought to be inserted in the Md5 genome without experimental co-infection of avian cells with retrovirus and MDV1. These results suggest that RDA could be useful for the detection of retroviral sequences in the herpesvirus genome.

  9. Triumph Sprint RS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周才鸿

    2005-01-01

    我独自骑乘着Triumph Sprint RS,如图1、图2所示,在西班牙连绵的公路上奔驰了几个小时,试图抓住这辆新型Triumph跑车的感觉,但是事情好像有点不大对劲,不知道是什么原因,我无法将我的感觉与思绪整合起来。

  10. Step-to-step spatiotemporal variables and ground reaction forces of intra-individual fastest sprinting in a single session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Ryu; Mizutani, Mirai; Matsuo, Akifumi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2017-10-07

    We aimed to investigate the step-to-step spatiotemporal variables and ground reaction forces during the acceleration phase for characterising intra-individual fastest sprinting within a single session. Step-to-step spatiotemporal variables and ground reaction forces produced by 15 male athletes were measured over a 50-m distance during repeated (three to five) 60-m sprints using a long force platform system. Differences in measured variables between the fastest and slowest trials were examined at each step until the 22nd step using a magnitude-based inferences approach. There were possibly-most likely higher running speed and step frequency (2nd to 22nd steps) and shorter support time (all steps) in the fastest trial than in the slowest trial. Moreover, for the fastest trial there were likely-very likely greater mean propulsive force during the initial four steps and possibly-very likely larger mean net anterior-posterior force until the 17th step. The current results demonstrate that better sprinting performance within a single session is probably achieved by 1) a high step frequency (except the initial step) with short support time at all steps, 2) exerting a greater mean propulsive force during initial acceleration, and 3) producing a greater mean net anterior-posterior force during initial and middle acceleration.

  11. Combined glucose ingestion and mouth rinsing improves sprint cycling performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Edwin; Guelfi, Kym J; Fournier, Paul A

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated whether combined ingestion and mouth rinsing with a carbohydrate solution could improve maximal sprint cycling performance. Twelve competitive male cyclists ingested 100 ml of one of the following solutions 20 min before exercise in a randomized double-blinded counterbalanced order (a) 10% glucose solution, (b) 0.05% aspartame solution, (c) 9.0% maltodextrin solution, or (d) water as a control. Fifteen min after ingestion, repeated mouth rinsing was carried out with 11 × 15 ml bolus doses of the same solution at 30-s intervals. Each participant then performed a 45-s maximal sprint effort on a cycle ergometer. Peak power output was significantly higher in response to the glucose trial (1188 ± 166 W) compared with the water (1036 ± 177 W), aspartame (1088 ± 128 W) and maltodextrin (1024 ± 202 W) trials by 14.7 ± 10.6, 9.2 ± 4.6 and 16.0 ± 6.0% respectively (p sprint was significantly higher in the glucose trial compared with maltodextrin (p sprinting did not differ significantly between treatments (p > .05). These findings suggest that combining the ingestion of glucose with glucose mouth rinsing improves maximal sprint performance. This ergogenic effect is unlikely to be related to changes in blood glucose, sweetness, or energy sensing mechanisms in the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Genome Wide Characterization of Short Tandem Repeat Markers in Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis)

    OpenAIRE

    BISWAS, Manosh Kumar; XU, Qiang; Mayer, Christoph; Deng, Xiuxin

    2014-01-01

    Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) is one of the major cultivated and most-consumed citrus species. With the goal of enhancing the genomic resources in citrus, we surveyed, developed and characterized microsatellite markers in the ≈347 Mb sequence assembly of the sweet orange genome. A total of 50,846 SSRs were identified with a frequency of 146.4 SSRs/Mbp. Dinucleotide repeats are the most frequent repeat class and the highest density of SSRs was found in chromosome 4. SSRs are non-randomly dist...

  13. Genome Wide Characterization of Short Tandem Repeat Markers in Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis)

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Xu, Qiang; Mayer, Christoph; Deng, Xiuxin

    2014-01-01

    Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) is one of the major cultivated and most-consumed citrus species. With the goal of enhancing the genomic resources in citrus, we surveyed, developed and characterized microsatellite markers in the ≈347 Mb sequence assembly of the sweet orange genome. A total of 50,846 SSRs were identified with a frequency of 146.4 SSRs/Mbp. Dinucleotide repeats are the most frequent repeat class and the highest density of SSRs was found in chromosome 4. SSRs are non-randomly dist...

  14. Chelating resin-based extraction of DNA from dental pulp and sex determination from incinerated teeth with Y-chromosomal alphoid repeat and short tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimochi, Tsukasa; Iwasa, Mineo; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Koyama, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Ichiro; Matoba, Ryoji; Yokoi, Motoo; Nagao, Masataka

    2002-09-01

    A procedure utilizing Chelex 100, chelating resin, was adapted to extract DNA from dental pulp. The procedure was simple and rapid, involved no organic solvents, and did not require multiple tube transfers. The extraction of DNA from dental pulp using this method was as efficient, or more so, than using proteinase K and phenol-chloroform extraction. In this study, the Chelex method was used with amplification and typing at Y-chromosomal loci to determine the effects of temperature on the sex determination of the teeth. The extracted teeth were incinerated in a dental furnace for 2 minutes at 100 degrees C, 200 degrees C, 300 degrees C, 400 degrees C, and 500 degrees C. After the isolation of DNA from the dental pulp by the Chelex method, alphoid repeats, and short tandem repeats, the human Y chromosome (DYZ3), DYS19, SYS389, DYS390, and DYS393 could be amplified and typed in all samples incinerated at up to 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. The DYS389 locus in some samples could not be amplified at 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. An autopsy case is described in which genotypings of DYS19, DYS390, and DYS393 from dental pulp obtained from a burned body were needed. The data presented in this report suggest that Chelex 100-based DNA extraction, amplification, and typing are possible in burned teeth in forensic autopsy cases.

  15. Effect of intensified training on muscle ion kinetics, fatigue development and repeated short term performance in endurance trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Christensen, Peter Møller; Thomassen, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    The effects of intensified training in combination with a reduced training volume on muscle ion kinetics, transporters and work capacity were examined. Eight well-trained cyclists replaced their regular training with speed-endurance training (12x30-s sprints) 2-3 times per wk and aerobic high...

  16. Comparison of the Capacity of Different Jump and Sprint Field Tests to Detect Neuromuscular Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathercole, Rob J; Sporer, Ben C; Stellingwerff, Trent; Sleivert, Gord G

    2015-09-01

    Different jump and sprint tests have been used to assess neuromuscular fatigue, but the test with optimal validity remains to be established. The current investigation examined the suitability of vertical jump (countermovement jump [CMJ], squat jump [SJ], drop jump [DJ]) and 20-m sprint (SPRINT) testing for neuromuscular fatigue detection. On 6 separate occasions, 11 male team-sport athletes performed 6 CMJ, SJ, DJ, and 3 SPRINT trials. Repeatability was determined on the first 3 visits, with subsequent 3 visits (0-, 24-, and 72-hour postexercise) following a fatiguing Yo-Yo running protocol. SPRINT performance was most repeatable (mean coefficient of variation ≤2%), whereas DJ testing (4.8%) was significantly less repeatable than CMJ (3.0%) and SJ (3.5%). Each test displayed large decreases at 0-hour (33 of 49 total variables; mean effect size = 1.82), with fewer and smaller decreases at 24-hour postexercise (13 variables; 0.75), and 72-hour postexercise (19 variables; 0.78). SPRINT displayed the largest decreases at 0-hour (3.65) but was subsequently unchanged, whereas SJ performance recovered by 72-hour postexercise. In contrast, CMJ and DJ performance displayed moderate (12 variables; 1.18) and small (6 variables; 0.53) reductions at 72-hour postexercise, respectively. Consequently, the high repeatability and immediate and prolonged fatigue-induced changes indicated CMJ testing as most suitable for neuromuscular fatigue monitoring.

  17. Sprinting performance and resistance-based training interventions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Richard; Lyons, Mark; Harrison, Andrew J; Kenny, Ian C

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to search the scientific literature for original research, addressing the effects different forms of resistance-based training have on sprinting performance in competitive sprinters. Specific key words (Sprinters OR Sprint) NOT (Rugby, Soccer, Cycling, Swimming, Paralympic, and Nutrition) were used to search relevant databases through November 2013 for related literature. Original research was reviewed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. Five studies met the inclusion criteria: actively competitive adult male sprinters who participated in a resistance-based intervention (>4 weeks), with outcome measures in the form of 10- to 100-m sprint times. Exclusion criteria included acute studies (100-m sprint times). Three of the 5 studies used both locomotor resistance and fixed plane resistance, whereas the remaining 2 studies used more fixed plane resistance, for example, squat and leg extension. Three of the studies showed a statistical improvement in sprinting performance measures, for example, a decrease in 30-m sprint time (p = 0.044), whereas 1 study showed a decrease in sprinting performance. The analysis concluded that resistance-based training has a positive effect on sprinting performance. Varied input of locomotor resistance and fixed plane resistance has resulted in similar percentage change for sprinting performance. This review adds to the body of knowledge by strongly highlighting the dearth of literature exploring the effects of resistance-based training on sprinting performance in competitive sprinters. The short duration and wide range of exercises implemented in studies to date are of concern, but coaches should not hesitate to implement well-planned resistance programs for their sprint athletes.

  18. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs): the hallmark of an ingenious antiviral defense mechanism in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Attar, Sinan; Westra, Edze R; van der Oost, John; Brouns, Stan J J

    2011-04-01

    Many prokaryotes contain the recently discovered defense system against mobile genetic elements. This defense system contains a unique type of repetitive DNA stretches, termed Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs). CRISPRs consist of identical repeated DNA sequences (repeats), interspaced by highly variable sequences referred to as spacers. The spacers originate from either phages or plasmids and comprise the prokaryotes' 'immunological memory'. CRISPR-associated (cas) genes encode conserved proteins that together with CRISPRs make-up the CRISPR/Cas system, responsible for defending the prokaryotic cell against invaders. CRISPR-mediated resistance has been proposed to involve three stages: (i) CRISPR-Adaptation, the invader DNA is encountered by the CRISPR/Cas machinery and an invader-derived short DNA fragment is incorporated in the CRISPR array. (ii) CRISPR-Expression, the CRISPR array is transcribed and the transcript is processed by Cas proteins. (iii) CRISPR-Interference, the invaders' nucleic acid is recognized by complementarity to the crRNA and neutralized. An application of the CRISPR/Cas system is the immunization of industry-relevant prokaryotes (or eukaryotes) against mobile-genetic invasion. In addition, the high variability of the CRISPR spacer content can be exploited for phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. Despite impressive progress during the last couple of years, the elucidation of several fundamental details will be a major challenge in future research.

  19. Evaluation of statistical tools used in short-term repeated dose administration toxicity studies with rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Katsumi; Pillai, K Sadasivan; Sakuratani, Yuki; Abe, Takemaru; Kamata, Eiichi; Hayashi, Makoto

    2008-02-01

    In order to know the different statistical tools used to analyze the data obtained from twenty-eight-day repeated dose oral toxicity studies with rodents and the impact of these statistical tools on interpretation of data obtained from the studies, study reports of 122 numbers of twenty-eight-day repeated dose oral toxicity studies conducted in rats were examined. It was found that both complex and easy routes of decision trees were followed for the analysis of the quantitative data. These tools include Scheffe's test, non-parametric type Dunnett's and Scheffe's tests with very low power. Few studies used the non-parametric Dunnett type test and Mann-Whitney's U test. Though Chi-square and Fisher's tests are widely used for analysis of qualitative data, their sensitivity to detect a treatment-related effect is questionable. Mann-Whitney's U test has better sensitivity to analyze qualitative data than the chi-square and Fisher's tests. We propose Dunnett's test for analysis of quantitative data obtained from twenty-eight-day repeated dose oral toxicity tests and for qualitative data, Mann-Whitney's U test. For both tests, one-sided test with p=0.05 may be applied.

  20. Physiological responses to an acute bout of sprint interval cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Eric C; Gist, Nicholas H; Cureton, Kirk J

    2013-10-01

    Sprint interval training has been shown to improve skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and health outcomes. However, the acute physiological responses to 4-7 maximal effort intervals have not been determined. To determine the V[Combining Dot Above]O2, cardiorespiratory responses, and energy expenditure during an acute bout of sprint interval cycling (SIC), health, college-aged subjects, 6 men and 6 women, completed 2 SIC sessions with at least 7 days between trials. Sprint interval cycling was performed on a cycle ergometer and involved a 5-minute warm-up followed by four 30-second all-out sprints with 4-minute active recovery. Peak oxygen uptake (ml·kg·min) during the 4 sprints were 35.3 ± 8.2, 38.8 ± 10.1, 38.8 ± 10.6, and 36.8 ± 9.3, and peak heart rate (b·min) were 164 ± 17, 172 ± 10, 177 ± 12, and 175 ± 22. We conclude that an acute bout of SIC elicits submaximal V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and cardiorespiratory responses during each interval that are above 80% of estimated maximal values. Although the duration of exercise in SIC is very short, the high level of V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and cardiorespiratory responses are sufficient to potentially elicit adaptations to training associated with elevated aerobic energy demand.

  1. Effects of Psyching-Up on Sprint Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudi-Nassib, Sarra; Nassib, Sabri; Chtara, Moktar; Briki, Walid; Chaouachi, Anis; Tod, David; Chamari, Karim

    2017-08-01

    Hammoudi-Nassib, S, Nassib, S, Chtara, M, Briki, W, Chaouachi, A, Tod, D, and Chamari, K. Effects of psyching-up on sprint performance. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2066-2074, 2017-The present research aimed at examining whether the psyching up (PU) strategies improve performance in 30-m sprinting. Sixteen male sprinters (age, 20.6 ± 1.3 years; body mass, 77.5 ± 7.1 kg; height, 180.8 ± 5.6 cm) participated in this study. Before each experimental session, the Hooper index was used to monitor the subject's feeling for the quality of sleep of the previous night, perceived quantity of stress, delayed onset muscle soreness, and fatigue. After completing general and specific warm-up, participants had to rate their degree of self-confidence. Then, they were asked to follow 1 of these 4 conditions: Imagery (experimental PU condition), Preparatory arousal (experimental PU condition), Attention placebo (control condition), and Distraction (control condition) during the final 30 seconds of the rest period right before performing a 30-m sprint. Participants separately and randomly performed all conditions. Results showed that although the imagery and preparatory arousal strategies contributed to increase the performance in the short-distance sprints (from 0 to 10 m), the imagery strategy contributed to increase the performance in the 30-m sprints. These findings support the general view that the PU strategies could improve athletic performance.

  2. Effect of carbohydrate mouth rinsing on multiple sprint performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Research suggests that carbohydrate mouth rinsing (CMR) improves endurance performance; yet, little is known regarding the effect of CMR on multiple sprint efforts. As many sports involve multiple sprinting efforts, followed by periods of recovery, the aim of our current study was to investigate the influence of CMR on multiple sprint performance. Methods We recruited eight active males (Age; 22 ± 1 y; 75.0 ± 8.8 kg; estimated VO2max 52.0 ± 3.0 ml/kg/min) to participate in a randomly assigned, double-blind, counterbalanced study administering a CMR (6.4% Maltodextrin) or similarly flavoured placebo solution. Primary outcomes for our study included: (a) time for three repeated sprint ability tests (RSA) and (b) the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST). Time was expressed in seconds (sec). Secondary outcomes included ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and blood glucose concentration. Tertiary outcomes included two psychological assessments designed to determine perceived activation (i.e., arousal) and pleasure-displeasure after each section of the LIST. We analysed our data using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures, a Bonferroni adjusted post hoc t-test to determine significant differences in treatment, and a liberal 90% confidence interval between treatment conditions. Effect sizes were calculated between trials and interpreted as ≤ 0.2 trivial, > 0.2 small, > 0.6 moderate, > 1.2 large, > 2 very large and > 4 extremely large. Data are means ± SD. Overall statistical significance was set as P repeated, intermittent, sprint efforts. PMID:24066731

  3. Effects of Repeated Testing on Short- and Long-Term Memory Performance across Different Test Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Sundström, Anna; Jonsson, Bert

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether practice testing with short-answer (SA) items benefits learning over time compared to practice testing with multiple-choice (MC) items, and rereading the material. More specifically, the aim was to test the hypotheses of "retrieval effort" and "transfer appropriate processing" by comparing retention…

  4. High performance image processing of SPRINT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGroot, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    This talk will describe computed tomography (CT) reconstruction using filtered back-projection on SPRINT parallel computers. CT is a computationally intensive task, typically requiring several minutes to reconstruct a 512x512 image. SPRINT and other parallel computers can be applied to CT reconstruction to reduce computation time from minutes to seconds. SPRINT is a family of massively parallel computers developed at LLNL. SPRINT-2.5 is a 128-node multiprocessor whose performance can exceed twice that of a Cray-Y/MP. SPRINT-3 will be 10 times faster. Described will be the parallel algorithms for filtered back-projection and their execution on SPRINT parallel computers.

  5. Construction of a library of cloned short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as universal templates for allelic ladder preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Xing-Chun; Ye, Jian; Liu, Jin-Jie; Chen, Ting; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Jian; Ou, Yuan; Hu, Lan; Jiang, Bo-Wei; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping methods are widely used for human identity testing applications, including forensic DNA analysis. Samples of DNA containing the length-variant STR alleles are typically separated and genotyped by comparison to an allelic ladder. Here, we describe a newly devised library of cloned STR alleles. The library covers alleles X and Y for the sex-determining locus Amelogenin and 259 other alleles for 22 autosomal STR loci (TPOX, D3S1358, FGA, D5S818, CSF1PO, D7S820, D8S1179, TH01, vWA, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, D2S1338, D6S1043, D12S391, Penta E, D19S433, D11S4463, D17S974, D3S4529 and D12ATA63). New primers were designed for all these loci to construct recombinant plasmids so that the library retains core repeat elements of STR as well as 5'- and 3'-flanking sequences of ∼500 base pairs. Since amplicons of commercial STR genotyping kits and systems developed in laboratories are usually distributed from 50 to STR alleles. The sequencing results showed all repeat structures we obtained for TPOX, CSF1PO, D7S820, TH01, D16S539, D18S51 and Penta E were the same as reported. However, we identified 102 unreported repeat structures from the other 15 STR loci, supplementing our current knowledge of repeat structures and leading to further understanding of these widely used loci.

  6. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats cas systems: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Mahmud

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR system was recently identified as a bacterial defense mechanism against phages and plasmids. The CRISPR system is composed of DNA arrays containing short sequences identical to those present in phages and plasmids. These short DNAs are transcribed and processed by CRISPR associated proteins that also guide other CRISPR proteins to target the invading DNA. Only a few of the CRISPR components have been characterized to date and their mechanism of action is still largely unknown. Phage defense mechanisms probably have co-evolved against the CRISPR system, but none have yet been found. We propose to identify phage genes that counteract the CRISPR system. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(4.000: 613-622

  7. Augmenting short cheap talk scripts with a repeated opt-out reminder in choice experiment surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2014-01-01

    Hypothetical bias continues to be a major challenge for stated preference methods. Cheap Talk (CT) has been found to be an effective remedy in some applications, though empirical results are ambiguous. We discuss reasons why CT may fail to effectively remove specific types of hypothetical bias...... in Choice Experiments. We suggest augmenting CT in Choice Experiments with a so-called Opt-Out Reminder (OOR). Prior to each choice set, the OOR explicitly instructs respondents to choose the opt-out alternative, if they find the experimentally designed alternatives too expensive. In an empirical survey we...... find the OOR to significantly reduce total WTP and to some extent also marginal WTP beyond the capability of the CT applied without the OOR. This suggests that the CT practice should be adapted to fit the potentially different decision processes and repeated choices structure of the Choice Experiment...

  8. Genome wide characterization of short tandem repeat markers in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manosh Kumar Biswas

    Full Text Available Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis is one of the major cultivated and most-consumed citrus species. With the goal of enhancing the genomic resources in citrus, we surveyed, developed and characterized microsatellite markers in the ≈347 Mb sequence assembly of the sweet orange genome. A total of 50,846 SSRs were identified with a frequency of 146.4 SSRs/Mbp. Dinucleotide repeats are the most frequent repeat class and the highest density of SSRs was found in chromosome 4. SSRs are non-randomly distributed in the genome and most of the SSRs (62.02% are located in the intergenic regions. We found that AT-rich SSRs are more frequent than GC-rich SSRs. A total number of 21,248 SSR primers were successfully developed, which represents 89 SSR markers per Mb of the genome. A subset of 950 developed SSR primer pairs were synthesized and tested by wet lab experiments on a set of 16 citrus accessions. In total we identified 534 (56.21% polymorphic SSR markers that will be useful in citrus improvement. The number of amplified alleles ranges from 2 to 12 with an average of 4 alleles per marker and an average PIC value of 0.75. The newly developed sweet orange primer sequences, their in silico PCR products, exact position in the genome assembly and putative function are made publicly available. We present the largest number of SSR markers ever developed for a citrus species. Almost two thirds of the markers are transferable to 16 citrus relatives and may be used for constructing a high density linkage map. In addition, they are valuable for marker-assisted selection studies, population structure analyses and comparative genomic studies of C. sinensis with other citrus related species. Altogether, these markers provide a significant contribution to the citrus research community.

  9. Genome wide characterization of short tandem repeat markers in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Xu, Qiang; Mayer, Christoph; Deng, Xiuxin

    2014-01-01

    Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) is one of the major cultivated and most-consumed citrus species. With the goal of enhancing the genomic resources in citrus, we surveyed, developed and characterized microsatellite markers in the ≈347 Mb sequence assembly of the sweet orange genome. A total of 50,846 SSRs were identified with a frequency of 146.4 SSRs/Mbp. Dinucleotide repeats are the most frequent repeat class and the highest density of SSRs was found in chromosome 4. SSRs are non-randomly distributed in the genome and most of the SSRs (62.02%) are located in the intergenic regions. We found that AT-rich SSRs are more frequent than GC-rich SSRs. A total number of 21,248 SSR primers were successfully developed, which represents 89 SSR markers per Mb of the genome. A subset of 950 developed SSR primer pairs were synthesized and tested by wet lab experiments on a set of 16 citrus accessions. In total we identified 534 (56.21%) polymorphic SSR markers that will be useful in citrus improvement. The number of amplified alleles ranges from 2 to 12 with an average of 4 alleles per marker and an average PIC value of 0.75. The newly developed sweet orange primer sequences, their in silico PCR products, exact position in the genome assembly and putative function are made publicly available. We present the largest number of SSR markers ever developed for a citrus species. Almost two thirds of the markers are transferable to 16 citrus relatives and may be used for constructing a high density linkage map. In addition, they are valuable for marker-assisted selection studies, population structure analyses and comparative genomic studies of C. sinensis with other citrus related species. Altogether, these markers provide a significant contribution to the citrus research community.

  10. The mitochondrial genome of the legume Vigna radiata and the analysis of recombination across short mitochondrial repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Alverson

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial genomes of seed plants are exceptionally fluid in size, structure, and sequence content, with the accumulation and activity of repetitive sequences underlying much of this variation. We report the first fully sequenced mitochondrial genome of a legume, Vigna radiata (mung bean, and show that despite its unexceptional size (401,262 nt, the genome is unusually depauperate in repetitive DNA and "promiscuous" sequences from the chloroplast and nuclear genomes. Although Vigna lacks the large, recombinationally active repeats typical of most other seed plants, a PCR survey of its modest repertoire of short (38-297 nt repeats nevertheless revealed evidence for recombination across all of them. A set of novel control assays showed, however, that these results could instead reflect, in part or entirely, artifacts of PCR-mediated recombination. Consequently, we recommend that other methods, especially high-depth genome sequencing, be used instead of PCR to infer patterns of plant mitochondrial recombination. The average-sized but repeat- and feature-poor mitochondrial genome of Vigna makes it ever more difficult to generalize about the factors shaping the size and sequence content of plant mitochondrial genomes.

  11. Molecular identification and characterization of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) gene cluster in Taylorella equigenitalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yasushi; Hayashi, Kyohei; Nakajima, Takuya; Kagawa, Shizuko; Tazumi, Akihiro; Moore, John E; Matsuda, Motoo

    2013-09-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), of approximately 10,000 base pairs (bp) in length, were shown to occur in the Japanese Taylorella equigenitalis strain, EQ59. The locus was composed of the putative CRISPRs-associated with 5 (cas5), RAMP csd1, csd2, recB, cas1, a leader region, 13 CRISPR consensus sequence repeats (each 32 bp; 5'-TCAGCCACGTTCGCGTGGCTGTGTGTTTAAAG-3'). These were in turn separated by 12 non repetitive unique spacer regions of similar length. In addition, a leader region, a transposase/IS protein, a leader region, and cas3 were also seen. All seven putative open reading frames carry their ribosome binding sites. Promoter consensus sequences at the -35 and -10 regions and putative intrinsic ρ-independent transcription terminator regions also occurred. A possible long overlap of 170 bp in length occurred between the recB and cas1 loci. Positive reverse transcription PCR signals of cas5, RAMP csd1, csd2-recB/cas1, and cas3 were generated. A putative secondary structure of the CRISPR consensus repeats was constructed. Following this, CRISPR results of the T. equigenitalis EQ59 isolate were subsequently compared with those from the Taylorella asinigenitalis MCE3 isolate.

  12. Algorithm-Based Fetal Gender Determination Using X and Y Mini-Short Tandem Repeats at Early Gestational Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghanoori

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Detection of fetal DNA in maternal blood has been examined by many research groups for a few years; thereby, scientists have a shorter way to take to approach prenatal diagnosis of abnormal pregnancies. The Y chromosome sequences have recently become the most common applicable indices for fetal sex determination. Objectives We conducted an algorithmic X and Y mini-Short Tandem Repeats (STRs genotyping method that could solve the problem of false negative (no detection of Y sequences results of previous methods. Patients and Methods Blood samples were obtained from 106 pregnant women and their spouses. Conventional PCR amplified 19 mini-Short Tandem Repeats (STRs and three non-STR markers, which were subsequently genotyped by the means of Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE. Results Sensitivity and specificity of the mini-STR genotyping method for fetal DNA detection were calculated (95.9% and 98%, respectively with a confidence interval of 95%. In addition, sensitivity and informativeness were computed for each of the single mini-STR markers in our conventional PCR method. We also introduced the minimum number of mini-STRs needed to reach maximum validity for fetal gender determination in clinical settings. Conclusions Algorithm-based mini-STR genotyping method significantly increases the reliability (sensitivity and specificity of gender determination using free fetal DNA and could be applied in prenatal clinical testing.

  13. An unusual case 0020 in paternity testing: nineteen autosomal short tandem repeat typing and 12 X-chromosome markers could not clarify the case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Arash Alipour; Hejazi, Arya; Hosseini, Marzieh

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a case of disputed parentage with 2 presumptive related fathers, although using multiple genetic systems, neither of the 2 fathers may be excluded. Nineteen autosomal short tandem repeat typing and 12 X-chromosome markers could not clarify the case. We can conclude that forensic autosomic short tandem repeats included in commercial kits are not sufficient to definitively discriminate parent-offspring with related putative fathers in forensic laboratories, and supplementary investigations should be available for selected cases.

  14. Tri-allelic pattern of short tandem repeats identifies the murderer among identical twins and suggests an embryonic mutational origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Feng; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Nan; Quan, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Yuan-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Monozygotic twins can be co-identified by genotyping of short tandem repeats (STRs); however, for distinguishing them, STR genotyping is ineffective, especially in the case of murder. Here, a rarely occurring tri-allelic pattern in the vWA locus (16, 18, 19) was identified only in the DNA of one identical twin, which could help to exonerate the innocent twin in a murder charge. This mutation was defined as primary through genotyping of the family and could be detected in blood, buccal and semen samples from the individual; however, two alternative allele-balanced di-allelic patterns (16, 18 or 16, 19) were detected in hair root sheath cells. Such a kind of segregation indicates a one-step mutation occurs in cell mitosis, which is after embryonic zygote formation and during the early development of the individual after the division of the blastocyte. Sequencing revealed the insertion between the allele 18 and 19 is a repeat unit of TAGA/TCTA (plus/minus strand), which belongs to "AGAT/ATCT"-based core repeats identified from all tri-allelic pattern reports recorded in the STR base and a detailed model was proposed for STR repeat length variation caused by false priming during DNA synthesis. Our model illustrates the possible origination of allele-balanced and unbalanced tri-allelic pattern, clarifies that the genotypes of parent-child mismatches, aberrant di-allelic patterns, and type 1 or 2 tri-allelic patterns should be considered as independent, but interconnected forms of STR mutation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic variability in maned wolf based on heterologous short-tandem repeat markers from domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, D C; Akimoto, A A; Carvalho, C B; Oliveira, S F; Grisolia, C K; Moreira, J R; Klautau-Guimarães, M N

    2007-06-20

    The maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is the largest South American canid. Habitat loss and fragmentation, due to agricultural expansion and predatory hunting, are the main threats to this species. It is included in the official list of threatened wildlife species in Brazil, and is also protected by IUCN and CITES. Highly variable genetic markers such as microsatellites have the potential to resolve genetic relationships at all levels of the population structure (among individuals, demes or metapopulations) and also to identify the evolutionary unit for strategies for the conservation of the species. Tests were carried out to verify whether a class of highly polymorphic tetranucleotide repeats described for the domestic dog effectively amplifies DNA in the maned wolf. All five loci studied were amplified; however, one of these, was shown to be monomorphic in 69 maned wolf samples. The average allele number and estimated heterozygosity per polymorphic locus were 4.3 and 67%, respectively. The genetic variability found for this species, which is considered threatened with extinction, showed similar results when compared to studies of other canids.

  16. On the performance of Usain Bolt in the 100 metre sprint

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, J J Hernández; Gómez, R W

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical model of the performance of the 100 m world record sprint of Usain Bolt during the 2009 World Championships at Berlin is developed, assuming a drag force proportional to $v$ and to $v^2$. The resulting equation of motion is solved and fitted to the experimental data obtained from the International Amateur of Athletics Federations that recorded Bolt's position with a LAVEG (laser velocity guard) device. It is worth to note that our model works only for short sprints.

  17. The relationships among sprint performance, voluntary swimming activity, and social dominance in juvenile rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, D G; Keeler, R A; McFarlane, W J

    2007-01-01

    The specific objectives of this study were to determine whether sprint performance in juvenile rainbow trout is correlated with either voluntary swimming activity or aggressive behaviors and to determine the reciprocal: the effect of swimming activity and aggression on sprint performance. Sprint performance was assessed by rapidly accelerating trout (5-7-cm fork length) to a fixed velocity (40, 42, or 45 cm s(-1)) and then holding them at that velocity until fatigue. There was considerable interindividual variation in sprint performance not explained by variations in body size, but intraindividual performance was highly repeatable over at least 2 mo. Voluntary swimming was measured as the frequency of transits (voluntary transit activity, VTA) between two identical tanks via a connecting channel with two different flow regimes: zero or minimum velocity (0 or 2.5 cm s(-1)) and high velocity (84 cm s(-1)). There was a strong correlation between sprint performance and VTA in minimal current but no correlation in high current. Furthermore, sprint performance did not predict the outcome of dominance encounters. Experience with rapid acceleration, especially when voluntary, led to a pronounced improvement in sprint performance in proportion to the number of acceleration events. Social dominance encounters had a more complex effect: a significant reduction in sprint performance in previously high-performance sprinters and the reverse for low performers. We propose that there are four independent axes of interindividual variation in juvenile rainbow trout: spontaneous and rheotaxis-stimulated locomotor activity, aggressive activity, and the trainability of sprint performance. The independence of these axes has the potential to produce a much larger diversity in behavioral and ultimately physiological phenotypes than would be produced if the axes were linked.

  18. Efecto de un calentamiento con estiramientos estáticos y dinámicos sobre el salto horizontal y la capacidad para repetir esprint con cambio de dirección. [Effect of warm-up with static and dynamic stretching on the horizontal jump and repeated sprint ability with changes of direction].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sánchez-Sánchez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido comparar el efecto de tres calentamientos diferentes (calentamiento aeróbico de baja intensidad, estiramiento estático y estiramiento dinámico sobre el salto horizontal y la capacidad de repetir esprint con cambios de dirección. Diecisiete practicantes de deportes de equipo de 20.8±1.1 años realizaron 3 tipos de calentamiento (10 min: ejercicio aeróbico sin estiramiento (CAE, con estiramiento estático (CAES y con estiramiento dinámico (CAED. Se estudió el efecto agudo de cada calentamiento sobre el rendimiento en una prueba de salto horizontal (SH y un test de repetición de esprint con cambio de dirección (RSCOD. No se obtuvieron diferencias significativas (p>0,05 en ninguna de las variables en función del calentamiento realizado. El tamaño del efecto (TE indicó que probablemente el RSCODmejor sea más sensible al CAE que al CAES (TE: 0,52 y al CAED (TE: 0,44. El escaso efecto de los estiramientos estáticos sobre el rendimiento en SH y RSCOD puede ser debido a la dosis, la intensidad y el tiempo de recuperación empleado. Los estiramientos dinámicos no mejoraron el rendimiento en SH y RSCOD. Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of three different warm-ups (low intensity aerobic warm-up, static stretching and dynamic stretching on the horizontal jump and repeated sprint ability with changes of direction. Seventeen players of team sports whose age was 20.8±1.1 years old performed three types of warm up (10 minutes: aerobic exercise without stretching (WU, with static stretching (WUSS and with dynamic stretching (WUDS. The acute effect of each warming over performance was studied in a test of horizontal jump (HJ and repeat sprint test with change of direction (RSCD. No significant differences were obtained (p>0.05 in any of the variables studied according to the warming developed. The effect size (ES indicated that probably RSCDbest was more sensitive to WU than WUDS (ES

  19. ALLELE DISTRIBUTION OF FIVE X-CHROMOSOME SHORT TANDEM REPEAT LOCI IN EWENKE POPULATION OF NORTH CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-zhi Gu; Teng Chen; Qing-bo Liu; Bing Yu; Sheng-bin Li

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the allele genetic polymorphism of five short tandem repeat (STR) loci on X-chromosome in Ewenke population of north China and to provide basic data for forensic identification.Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from EDTA-whole blood of Ewenke population by Chelex-100. The DNA samples were amplified by PCR and were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The sequence length variations of DXS6799, DXS8378, DXS101, HPRTB, and DXS6789 loci on X-chromosome in 98unrelated Ewenke individuals were investigated.Results All five loci analyzed showed high polymorphism and genetic stability. The data of the five X-chromosome STR loci in Ewenke ethnic group of China was in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium by Chi-square test.Conclusion Allele polymorphism of five X-chromosome STR loci can be used as a genetic marker for forensic identification and population genetic research.

  20. Population data on 6 short tandem repeat loci in a sample of Caucasian-Mestizos from Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunis, J J; García, O; Uriarte, I; Yunis, E J

    2000-01-01

    Blood samples from 409-452 unrelated Colombian Caucasian-Mestizo individuals were amplified and typed for six short tandem repeat (STR) markers (HUMF13A01, HUMFES/FPS, HUMVWA, HUMCSF1PO, HUMTPOX, HUMTH01). The allele frequencies, genotype frequencies, heterozygosity, mean paternity exclusion chance, polymorphism information content, discrimination power, assumption of independence within and between loci and Hardy Weinberg equilibrium were determined. The results demonstrate that all markers conform to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations. In addition, the results demonstrate the assumption of independence within and between the loci analysed. The mean exclusion chance (MEC) was 0.9851 for all six STR loci analysed and the discrimination power (DP) was 0.9999973. Therefore, this Colombian population database can be used in identity testing to estimate the frequency of a multiple PCR-based locus DNA profile in forensic cases as well as in paternity testing.

  1. The HumD21S11 system of short tandem repeat DNA polymorphisms in Japanese and Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H G; Sato, K; Nishimaki, Y; Fang, L; Hasekura, H

    1997-04-18

    HumD21S11 is a short tandem repeat DNA polymorphic system with a complex basic structure of (TCTA)4-6 (TCTG)5-6 (TCTA)3 TA (TCTA)3 TCA (TCTA)2 TCCA TA (TCTA)n. Using the allelic ladder prepared by us, the distribution of alleles among Japanese and Chinese was investigated, and four new alleles 28.2, 34, 35.2, and 36.2, were discovered. DNA sequencing was performed on the newly found alleles as well as on family samples and led to the discovery of different gene structures within alleles 28 and 32. Forensic materials, including hairs and seminal stains, were tested in parallel with blood samples from the same individual and were successfully typed for D21S11.

  2. Repeated Assessment and Practice Effects of the Written Symbol Digit Modalities Test Using a Short Inter-Test Interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Diana R; Costa, Patrício; Cerqueira, João J

    2015-08-01

    The Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) is a widely used instrument to assess information processing speed, attention, visual scanning, and tracking. Considering that repeated evaluations are a common need in neuropsychological assessment routines, we explored test-retest reliability and practice effects of two alternate SDMT forms with a short inter-assessment interval. A total of 123 university students completed the written SDMT version in two different time points separated by a 150-min interval. Half of the participants accomplished the same form in both occasions, while the other half filled different forms. Overall, reasonable test-retest reliabilities were found (r = .70), and the subjects that completed the same form revealed significant practice effects (p University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A simple Duplex-PCR to evaluate the DNA quality of anthropological and forensic samples prior short tandem repeat typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Schwark, Thorsten; Harbeck, Michaela; Oehmichen, Manfred

    2004-04-01

    Typing of DNA from ancient or otherwise highly degraded material, e.g. formalin fixed tissues, can be difficult, time consuming and costly. Very often, genetic typing is not possible at all. We present an inexpensive and easy to use Duplex-PCR that amplifies a 164 bp fragment specific for nuclear DNA together with a 260 bp mitochondrial DNA fragment and that can be employed as a pretest prior to short tandem repeat (STR) typing. All together, we analyzed DNA from 20 ancient bones, 20 formalin fixed tissues and 20 other forensic samples in different concentrations. Each sample that failed in the presented Duplex-amplification was also negative for STR typing, while samples that showed strong and clear signals in the Duplex-PCR led to reproducible genetic profiles using the multiplex kits AmpFLSTR Identifiler and Powerplex ES. The Duplex-PCR worked as a reliable indicator of DNA quality in the sample.

  4. Short- and long-term effects of unpredictable repeated negative stimuli on Japanese quail's fear of humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Laurence

    Full Text Available Numerous aversive events occur in poultry production, and if repeated and unpredictable, can result in an impaired welfare. Some events such as handling can be perceived negatively and it is of interest to understand how humans' behaviour could affect poultry's behaviours and especially its avoidance of humans. Our aim was to evaluate short- and long-lasting effects of a 3-week procedure involving unpredictable repeated negative stimuli (URNS applied during the post-juvenile period on quail's reactivity to humans. We compared the reactions of two sets of quail: URNS was applied to one set (treated quail and the other set was left undisturbed (control quail. When two weeks old, treated quail were exposed to a variety of negative stimuli, either applied automatically or involving human presence. One and seven weeks after the termination of the procedure, the reactivity of control and treated quail to a passive human being was evaluated. Furthermore, the experimenter with her hand on a trough containing a mealworm assessed the propensity of quail of both groups to habituate to feed close to a human being. In the presence of a seated observer, treated quail were more inhibited and more alert than control quail. Likewise, seven weeks after the end of the URNS procedure, more treated than control quail adopted a fear posture. Moreover, whereas control quail spent as much time in the different areas of their cages, treated quail spent more time in the rear part of their cages. Finally, whereas control quail habituated gradually to feed near the experimenter's hand, treated quail did not. All these tests evidence negative short- and long-term effects on treated quail's reactivity to a passive human being and on their habituation to a human being when her presence is positively reinforced. This highlights the importance of young poultry's experience with humans in production.

  5. Short- and long-term effects of unpredictable repeated negative stimuli on Japanese quail's fear of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Agathe; Lumineau, Sophie; Calandreau, Ludovic; Arnould, Cécile; Leterrier, Christine; Boissy, Alain; Houdelier, Cécilia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous aversive events occur in poultry production, and if repeated and unpredictable, can result in an impaired welfare. Some events such as handling can be perceived negatively and it is of interest to understand how humans' behaviour could affect poultry's behaviours and especially its avoidance of humans. Our aim was to evaluate short- and long-lasting effects of a 3-week procedure involving unpredictable repeated negative stimuli (URNS) applied during the post-juvenile period on quail's reactivity to humans. We compared the reactions of two sets of quail: URNS was applied to one set (treated quail) and the other set was left undisturbed (control quail). When two weeks old, treated quail were exposed to a variety of negative stimuli, either applied automatically or involving human presence. One and seven weeks after the termination of the procedure, the reactivity of control and treated quail to a passive human being was evaluated. Furthermore, the experimenter with her hand on a trough containing a mealworm assessed the propensity of quail of both groups to habituate to feed close to a human being. In the presence of a seated observer, treated quail were more inhibited and more alert than control quail. Likewise, seven weeks after the end of the URNS procedure, more treated than control quail adopted a fear posture. Moreover, whereas control quail spent as much time in the different areas of their cages, treated quail spent more time in the rear part of their cages. Finally, whereas control quail habituated gradually to feed near the experimenter's hand, treated quail did not. All these tests evidence negative short- and long-term effects on treated quail's reactivity to a passive human being and on their habituation to a human being when her presence is positively reinforced. This highlights the importance of young poultry's experience with humans in production.

  6. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Unpredictable Repeated Negative Stimuli on Japanese Quail's Fear of Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Agathe; Lumineau, Sophie; Calandreau, Ludovic; Arnould, Cécile; Leterrier, Christine; Boissy, Alain; Houdelier, Cécilia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous aversive events occur in poultry production, and if repeated and unpredictable, can result in an impaired welfare. Some events such as handling can be perceived negatively and it is of interest to understand how humans' behaviour could affect poultry's behaviours and especially its avoidance of humans. Our aim was to evaluate short- and long-lasting effects of a 3-week procedure involving unpredictable repeated negative stimuli (URNS) applied during the post-juvenile period on quail's reactivity to humans. We compared the reactions of two sets of quail: URNS was applied to one set (treated quail) and the other set was left undisturbed (control quail). When two weeks old, treated quail were exposed to a variety of negative stimuli, either applied automatically or involving human presence. One and seven weeks after the termination of the procedure, the reactivity of control and treated quail to a passive human being was evaluated. Furthermore, the experimenter with her hand on a trough containing a mealworm assessed the propensity of quail of both groups to habituate to feed close to a human being. In the presence of a seated observer, treated quail were more inhibited and more alert than control quail. Likewise, seven weeks after the end of the URNS procedure, more treated than control quail adopted a fear posture. Moreover, whereas control quail spent as much time in the different areas of their cages, treated quail spent more time in the rear part of their cages. Finally, whereas control quail habituated gradually to feed near the experimenter's hand, treated quail did not. All these tests evidence negative short- and long-term effects on treated quail's reactivity to a passive human being and on their habituation to a human being when her presence is positively reinforced. This highlights the importance of young poultry's experience with humans in production. PMID:24668017

  7. Analysis of short tandem repeat (STR polymorphisms by the powerplex 16 system and capillary electrophoresis: application to forensic practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto O

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Allele and genotype frequencies for 15 short tandem repeat (STR polymorphisms--D3S1358, TH01, D21S11, D18S51, Penta E, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, CSF1PO, Penta D, vWA, D8S1179, TPOX and FGA--in a Japanese population were estimated. No deviations of the observed allele frequency from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations were found for any of the systems studied. Between 2 new pentanucleotide STR loci, Penta E and Penta D, for which there is only limited data regarding the allelic distribution in Japanese, the Penta E locus was found to be highly polymorphic and exhibited a tri- or tetra-modal distribution pattern having allelic peaks with 5, 11, 15 and 20 repeats. The distribution was significantly different from that of the other ethnic groups. Statistical parameters of forensic importance, the power of discrimination (PD, observed and expected heterozygosity values (H, polymorphism information content (PIC, power of discrimination (PD, matching probability (pM, power of exclusion (PE, and typical paternity index (PI, were calculated for the loci. These parameters indicated the usefulness of the loci in forensic personal identification and paternity testing among Japanese. The systems Penta E, FGA, D18S51 and D8S1179 were the most informative. This method was successfully applied to forensic personal identification and paternity testing among Japanese, thereby confirming its efficacy for forensic practice.

  8. A Case of Cellular Fibrous Histiocytoma on the Right Elbow with Repeated Relapse within a Short Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Tsunoda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular fibrous histiocytoma, a variant of fibrous histiocytoma, is a designation used for lesions showing increased cellularity with a fascicular growth pattern and frequent extension into the subcutis. Here we describe a case of cellular fibrous histiocytoma showing repeated recurrence in a 36-year-old woman who initially presented with a 2-cm cutaneous tumor on her right elbow. Histopathologically, the first resected specimen demonstrated irregularly arranged collagen fibers mixed with scattered proliferating plump to spindle-shaped fibrohistiocytes. However, examination of the resected specimens obtained after recurrence showed that the cellularity had increased, the spindle-shaped cells showing monomorphic proliferation with a fascicular and storiform growth pattern extending into the subcutis, as well as an increase of Ki-67 positivity. Since the lesion showed repeated relapse within a short period, we performed wide-field resection of the tumor with a 3-cm margin. Currently, 48 months after surgery, there has been no local recurrence or metastasis, but continuous strict follow-up will be necessary.

  9. Diversity, evolution, and functionality of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) regions in the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Smits, Theo H M; Duffy, Brion

    2011-06-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas system confers acquired heritable immunity against mobile nucleic acid elements in prokaryotes, limiting phage infection and horizontal gene transfer of plasmids. In CRISPR arrays, characteristic repeats are interspersed with similarly sized nonrepetitive spacers derived from transmissible genetic elements and acquired when the cell is challenged with foreign DNA. New spacers are added sequentially and the number and type of CRISPR units can differ among strains, providing a record of phage/plasmid exposure within a species and giving a valuable typing tool. The aim of this work was to investigate CRISPR diversity in the highly homogeneous species Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. A total of 18 CRISPR genotypes were defined within a collection of 37 cosmopolitan strains. Strains from Spiraeoideae plants clustered in three major groups: groups II and III were composed exclusively of bacteria originating from the United States, whereas group I generally contained strains of more recent dissemination obtained in Europe, New Zealand, and the Middle East. Strains from Rosoideae and Indian hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis indica) clustered separately and displayed a higher intrinsic diversity than that of isolates from Spiraeoideae plants. Reciprocal exclusion was generally observed between plasmid content and cognate spacer sequences, supporting the role of the CRISPR/Cas system in protecting against foreign DNA elements. However, in several group III strains, retention of plasmid pEU30 is inconsistent with a functional CRISPR/Cas system.

  10. Does Vibration Warm-up Enhance Kinetic and Temporal Sprint Parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, D J; Cronin, M J; Fink, P W

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of vibration warm-up to enhance sprint performance. 12 males involved in representative team sports performed 4 warm-up conditions in a randomised order performed at least 24 h apart; VbX warm-up (VbX-WU); Neural activation warm-up (Neu-WU); Dynamic warm-up (Dyn-WU) and Control (No VbX). Participants completed 5 m sprint at 30 s, 2:30 min and 5 min post warm-up where sprint time, kinetics, and temporal components were recorded. There was no significant (p>0.05) main effect or interaction effect between the split sprint times of 1 m, 2.5 m, and 5 m. There was a condition effect where vertical mean force was significantly higher (p0.05) main and interaction effects in sprint kinetic and temporal parameters existed. Overall, all 4 warm-up conditions produced comparable results for sprint performance, and there was no detrimental effect on short-duration sprint performance using VbX-WU. Therefore, VbX could be useful for adding variety to the training warm-up or be included into the main warm-up routine as a supplementary modality.

  11. Effect of two different long-sprint training regimens on sprint performance and associated metabolic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, Christine; Bernard, Olivier; Rabate, Mathieu; Claire, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze 2 different long-sprint training programs (TPs) of equal total work load, completed either with short recovery (SR) or long recovery (LR) between sets and to compare the effects of 6 long-sprint training sessions (TSs) conducted over a 2-week period on a 300-m performance. Fourteen trained subjects performed 3 pretraining maximal sprints (50-, 100-, and 300-m), were paired according to their 300-m performance, and randomly allocated to an LR or SR group, which performed 6 TSs consisting of sets of 150, 200, or 250 m. The recovery in the LR group was double that of the SR group. During the third TS and the 300-m pretest and posttest, blood pH, bicarbonate concentration ([HCO₃⁻]), excess-base (EB), and lactate concentration were recorded. Compared with a similar TS performed with SR, the LR training tends to induce a greater alteration of the acid-base balance: pH: 7.09 ± 0.08 (LR) and 7.14 ± 0.05 (SR) (p = 0.10), [HCO₃⁻]: 7.8 ± 1.9 (LR) and 9.6 ± 2.7 (SR) (p = 0.04), and EB: -21.1 ± 3.8 (LR) and -17.7 ± 2.8 (SR) (p = 0.11). A significant improvement in the 300-m performance between pre-TP and post-TP (42.45 ± 2.64 vs. 41.52 ± 2.45, p = 0.01) and significant decreases in pH (p < 0.01), EB (p < 0.001) and increase in [La] (p < 0.001) have been observed post-TP compared with those pre-TP. Although sprint training with longer recovery induces higher metabolic disturbances, both sprint training regimens allow a similar 300-m performance improvement with no concomitant significant progress in the 50- and 100-m performance.

  12. Running sprint interval training induces fat loss in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Tom J; Hamilton, Craig D; Olver, T Dylan; Lemon, Peter W R

    2014-08-01

    Data on whether sprint interval training (SIT) (repeated supermaximal intensity, short-duration exercise) affects body composition are limited, and the data that are available suggest that men respond more favourably than do women. Moreover, most SIT data involve cycling exercise, and running may differ because of the larger muscle mass involved. Further, running is a more universal exercise type. This study assessed whether running SIT can alter body composition (air displacement plethysmography), waist circumference, maximal oxygen consumption, peak running speed, and (or) the blood lipid profile. Fifteen recreationally active women (age, 22.9 ± 3.6 years; height, 163.9 ± 5.1 cm; mass, 60.8 ± 5.2 kg) completed 6 weeks of running SIT (4 to 6, 30-s "all-out" sprints on a self-propelled treadmill separated by 4 min of rest performed 3 times per week). Training decreased body fat mass by 8.0% (15.1 ± 3.6 to 13.9 ± 3.4 kg, P = 0.002) and waist circumference by 3.5% (80.1 ± 4.2 to 77.3 ± 4.4 cm, P = 0.048), whereas it increased fat-free mass by 1.3% (45.7 ± 3.5 to 46.3 ± 2.9 kg, P = 0.05), maximal oxygen consumption by 8.7% (46 ± 5 to 50 ± 6 mL/(kg·min), P = 0.004), and peak running speed by 4.8% (16.6 ± 1.7 to 17.4 ± 1.4 km/h, P = 0.026). There were no differences in food intake assessed by 3-day food records (P > 0.329) or in blood lipids (P > 0.595), except for a slight decrease in high-density lipoprotein concentration (1.34 ± 0.28 to 1.24 ± 0.24 mmol/L, P = 0.034). Running SIT is a time-efficient strategy for decreasing body fat while increasing aerobic capacity, peak running speed, and fat-free mass in healthy young women.

  13. Reliability of power output during eccentric sprint cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brughelli, Matt; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of power outputs during maximal intensity eccentric cycling over short durations (i.e., eccentric sprint cycling) on a "motor-driven" isokinetic ergometer. Fourteen physically active male subjects performed isokinetic eccentric cycling sprints at 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 revolutions per minute (rpm) on 4 separate occasions (T1-T4). Each sprint lasted for 6 seconds, and absolute measures of mean power (MP) and peak power (PP) per revolution were recorded. Significant increases in MP and PP were observed between T1 and subsequent trials, but no significant differences were identified between T2, T3, and T4. The coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated to reflect within-subject and between-session reliability of MP and PP at each cadence. The CV improved to below 10% for cadences of 60, 80, 100, and 120 rpm between T3 and T4, and the majority of ICC values improved to above 0.90. The remaining ICC values remained in the moderate range between T3 and T4 (i.e., 0.82-0.89). Coefficient of variation and ICC values for the 40 rpm cadence remained at unacceptable levels throughout the 4 trials and thus should be avoided in future investigations. The results of this study indicate that reliable power outputs may be obtained after 2 familiarization sessions during eccentric sprint cycling at cadences ranging from 60 to 120 rpm.

  14. Differential Short-Term Repeated Forearm Hyperaemic Reactivity in Coronary Artery Disease Patients Compared to Healthy Low Risk Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon L. Bacon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hyperaemic response of the forearm is a widely used technique to assess the vascular reactivity. Little is known about the short-term reproducibility and the possible exhaustion of this response in normal or diseased states. As such, the current study was conducted to assess this phenomenon using a unique nuclear medicine- (NM- based technique. 19 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD undergoing NM exercise stress tests and 15 low risk (LR participants completed 2 reactive hyperaemia tests, using a SPECT-based technique, separated by 15  min. Analyses revealed that CAD patients had lower hyperaemic responses than LR participants (P<.001, and that there was a significant group × time interaction (P<.005, such that LR participants showed a larger decrease in the reactivity (5.2±0.4 to 3.6±0.4 than the CAD patients (2.9±0.3 to 2.6±0.3. These results suggest that there is a variability, due to disease states, in the reproducibility of the hypaeremic reactivity. This needs to be taken into account in short-term repeated measure studies.

  15. Quasi-periodic oscillations in short recurring bursts of the soft gamma repeater J1550–5418

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppenkothen, D.; D' Angelo, C.; Watts, A. L.; Heil, L.; Van der Klis, M.; Van der Horst, A. J. [Astronomical Institute " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kouveliotou, C. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y. [SabancıUniversity, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra' anana 43537 (Israel); Lin, L. [François Arago Centre, APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris (France); Von Kienlin, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Younes, G., E-mail: D.Huppenkothen@uva.nl [NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al., we developed a Bayesian method for searching for QPOs in short magnetar bursts, taking into account the effects of the complicated burst structure, and have shown its feasibility on a small sample of bursts. Here we apply the same method to a much larger sample from a burst storm of 286 bursts from SGR J1550–5418. We report a candidate signal at 260 Hz in a search of the individual bursts, which is fairly broad. We also find two QPOs at ∼93 Hz, and one at 127 Hz, when averaging periodograms from a number of bursts in individual triggers, at frequencies close to QPOs previously observed in magnetar giant flares. Finally, for the first time, we explore the overall burst variability in the sample and report a weak anti-correlation between the power-law index of the broadband model characterizing aperiodic burst variability and the burst duration: shorter bursts have steeper power-law indices than longer bursts. This indicates that longer bursts vary over a broader range of timescales and are not simply longer versions of the short bursts.

  16. Effects of Cycling Versus Running Training on Sprint and Endurance Capacity in Inline Speed Skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangier, Carolin; Abel, Thomas; Mierau, Julia; Hollmann, Wildor; Strüder, Heiko K

    2016-03-01

    and finish line sprint.An 8-week low-intensity endurance training program of either cycling or running training combined with additional routine training improves classical aerobic characteristics (17% increase of VO2 peak), as well as values for acceleration and speed.Athletes who trained in the running group demonstrated a higher reliance on the fat metabolism in the sport-specific post-testing.The significant reduction in anaerobic ATP turnover during repeated sprints appears to be partially compensated by an increase in VO2 in subsequent sprint. The results revealed a close relationship between the aerobic capacity and sprint performance in inline speed skating.

  17. Sprint-based exercise and cognitive function in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon B; Bandelow, Stephan; Nute, Maria L; Dring, Karah J; Stannard, Rebecca L; Morris, John G; Nevill, Mary E

    2016-12-01

    Moderate intensity exercise has been shown to enhance cognition in an adolescent population, yet the effect of high-intensity sprint-based exercise remains unknown and was therefore examined in the present study. Following ethical approval and familiarisation, 44 adolescents (12.6 ± 0.6 y) completed an exercise (E) and resting (R) trial in a counter-balanced, randomised crossover design. The exercise trial comprised of 10 × 10 s running sprints, interspersed by 50 s active recovery (walking). A battery of cognitive function tests (Stroop, Digit Symbol Substitution (DSST) and Corsi blocks tests) were completed 30 min pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise and 45 min post-exercise. Data were analysed using mixed effect models with repeated measures. Response times on the simple level of the Stroop test were significantly quicker 45 min following sprint-based exercise (R: 818 ± 33 ms, E: 772 ± 26 ms; p = 0.027) and response times on the complex level of the Stroop test were quicker immediately following the sprint-based exercise (R: 1095 ± 36 ms, E: 1043 ± 37 ms; p = 0.038), while accuracy was maintained. Sprint-based exercise had no immediate or delayed effects on the number of items recalled on the Corsi blocks test (p = 0.289) or substitutions made during the DSST (p = 0.689). The effect of high intensity sprint-based exercise on adolescents' cognitive function was dependant on the component of cognitive function examined. Executive function was enhanced following exercise, demonstrated by improved response times on the Stroop test, whilst visuo-spatial memory and general psycho-motor speed were unaffected. These data support the inclusion of high-intensity sprint-based exercise for adolescents during the school day to enhance cognition.

  18. Sprint-based exercise and cognitive function in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon B. Cooper

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Moderate intensity exercise has been shown to enhance cognition in an adolescent population, yet the effect of high-intensity sprint-based exercise remains unknown and was therefore examined in the present study. Following ethical approval and familiarisation, 44 adolescents (12.6 ± 0.6 y completed an exercise (E and resting (R trial in a counter-balanced, randomised crossover design. The exercise trial comprised of 10 × 10 s running sprints, interspersed by 50 s active recovery (walking. A battery of cognitive function tests (Stroop, Digit Symbol Substitution (DSST and Corsi blocks tests were completed 30 min pre-exercise, immediately post-exercise and 45 min post-exercise. Data were analysed using mixed effect models with repeated measures. Response times on the simple level of the Stroop test were significantly quicker 45 min following sprint-based exercise (R: 818 ± 33 ms, E: 772 ± 26 ms; p = 0.027 and response times on the complex level of the Stroop test were quicker immediately following the sprint-based exercise (R: 1095 ± 36 ms, E: 1043 ± 37 ms; p = 0.038, while accuracy was maintained. Sprint-based exercise had no immediate or delayed effects on the number of items recalled on the Corsi blocks test (p = 0.289 or substitutions made during the DSST (p = 0.689. The effect of high intensity sprint-based exercise on adolescents' cognitive function was dependant on the component of cognitive function examined. Executive function was enhanced following exercise, demonstrated by improved response times on the Stroop test, whilst visuo-spatial memory and general psycho-motor speed were unaffected. These data support the inclusion of high-intensity sprint-based exercise for adolescents during the school day to enhance cognition.

  19. Adipose tissue extracts plasma ammonia after sprint exercise in women and men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjörnsson, Mona; Bülow, Jens; Norman, Barbara;

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates a possible contribution of adipose tissue to the elimination of plasma ammonia (NH(3)) after high-intensity sprint exercise. In 14 healthy men and women, repeated blood samples for plasma NH(3) analyses were obtained from brachial artery and from a subcutaneous abdominal vein...... before and after three repeated 30-s cycle sprints separated by 20 min of recovery. Biopsies from subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue were obtained and analyzed for glutamine and glutamate content. After exercise, both arterial and abdominal venous plasma NH(3) concentrations were lower in women than...... in men (P adipose tissue. However, the fractional extraction (a...

  20. Effect of starting stance on initial sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, John B; Green, Jonathon P; Levin, Gregory T; Brughelli, Matt E; Frost, David M

    2007-08-01

    The effect of different starting stances from a standing position on short sprint times and the subsequent variability in times was investigated in this study. A dual-beam timing light system was used to measure 5- and 10-m times for 3 different standing starts commonly found in the sporting environment: parallel (feet parallel to the start line), split (lead left foot on start line, right leg back), and false (initial parallel start, right leg drops back to split start when movement initiated). The parallel start was found to be significantly (alpha men and women. The split and false start seem to offer the best option as a movement strategy for minimizing short-distance sprint times. However, the benefits of these 2 starts are less clear if total movement time is the variable of interest.

  1. A systematic evaluation of short tandem repeats in lipid candidate genes: riding on the SNP-wave.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lamina

    Full Text Available Structural genetic variants as short tandem repeats (STRs are not targeted in SNP-based association studies and thus, their possible association signals are missed. We systematically searched for STRs in gene regions known to contribute to total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels in two independent studies (KORA F4, n = 2553 and SAPHIR, n = 1648, resulting in 16 STRs that were finally evaluated. In a combined dataset of both studies, the sum of STR alleles was regressed on each phenotype, adjusted for age and sex. The association analyses were repeated for SNPs in a 200 kb region surrounding the respective STRs in the KORA F4 Study. Three STRs were significantly associated with total cholesterol (within LDLR, the APOA1/C3/A4/A5/BUD13 gene region and ABCG5/8, five with HDL cholesterol (3 within CETP, one in LPL and one inAPOA1/C3/A4/A5/BUD13, three with LDL cholesterol (LDLR, ABCG5/8 and CETP and two with triglycerides (APOA1/C3/A4/A5/BUD13 and LPL. None of the investigated STRs, however, showed a significant association after adjusting for the lead or adjacent SNPs within that gene region. The evaluated STRs were found to be well tagged by the lead SNP within the respective gene regions. Therefore, the STRs reflect the association signals based on surrounding SNPs. In conclusion, none of the STRs contributed additionally to the SNP-based association signals identified in GWAS on lipid traits.

  2. Screening of repetitive motifs inside the genome of the flat oyster (Ostrea edulis): Transposable elements and short tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Manuel; Bello, Xabier; Álvarez-Dios, Jose-Antonio; Pardo, Belen G; Sánchez, Laura; Carlsson, Jens; Carlsson, Jeanette E L; Bartolomé, Carolina; Maside, Xulio; Martinez, Paulino

    2015-12-01

    The flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) is one of the most appreciated molluscs in Europe, but its production has been greatly reduced by the parasite Bonamia ostreae. Here, new generation genomic resources were used to analyse the repetitive fraction of the oyster genome, with the aim of developing molecular markers to face this main oyster production challenge. The resulting oyster database, consists of two sets of 10,318 and 7159 unique contigs (4.8 Mbp and 6.8 Mbp in total length) representing the oyster's genome (WG) and haemocyte transcriptome (HT), respectively. A total of 1083 sequences were identified as TE-derived, which corresponded to 4.0% of WG and 1.1% of HT. They were clustered into 142 homology groups, most of which were assigned to the Penelope order of retrotransposons, and to the Helitron and TIR DNA-transposons. Simple repeats and rRNA pseudogenes, also made a significant contribution to the oyster's genome (0.5% and 0.3% of WG and HT, respectively).The most frequent short tandem repeats identified in WG were tetranucleotide motifs while trinucleotide motifs were in HT. Forty identified microsatellite loci, 20 from each database, were selected for technical validation. Success was much lower among WG than HT microsatellites (15% vs 55%), which could reflect higher variation in anonymous regions interfering with primer annealing. All microsatellites developed adjusted to Hardy-Weinberg proportions and represent a useful tool to support future breeding programmes and to manage genetic resources of natural flat oyster beds.

  3. A Systematic Evaluation of Short Tandem Repeats in Lipid Candidate Genes: Riding on the SNP-Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamina, Claudia; Haun, Margot; Coassin, Stefan; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Gieger, Christian; Peters, Annette; Grallert, Harald; Strauch, Konstantin; Meitinger, Thomas; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Paulweber, Bernhard; Kronenberg, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Structural genetic variants as short tandem repeats (STRs) are not targeted in SNP-based association studies and thus, their possible association signals are missed. We systematically searched for STRs in gene regions known to contribute to total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels in two independent studies (KORA F4, n = 2553 and SAPHIR, n = 1648), resulting in 16 STRs that were finally evaluated. In a combined dataset of both studies, the sum of STR alleles was regressed on each phenotype, adjusted for age and sex. The association analyses were repeated for SNPs in a 200 kb region surrounding the respective STRs in the KORA F4 Study. Three STRs were significantly associated with total cholesterol (within LDLR, the APOA1/C3/A4/A5/BUD13 gene region and ABCG5/8), five with HDL cholesterol (3 within CETP, one in LPL and one inAPOA1/C3/A4/A5/BUD13), three with LDL cholesterol (LDLR, ABCG5/8 and CETP) and two with triglycerides (APOA1/C3/A4/A5/BUD13 and LPL). None of the investigated STRs, however, showed a significant association after adjusting for the lead or adjacent SNPs within that gene region. The evaluated STRs were found to be well tagged by the lead SNP within the respective gene regions. Therefore, the STRs reflect the association signals based on surrounding SNPs. In conclusion, none of the STRs contributed additionally to the SNP-based association signals identified in GWAS on lipid traits. PMID:25050552

  4. Efficacy of a Four-Week Uphill Sprint Training Intervention in Field Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakeman, John R; McMullan, Judith; Babraj, John A

    2016-10-01

    Jakeman, JR, McMullan, J, and Babraj, JA. Efficacy of a four-week uphill sprint training intervention in field hockey players. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2761-2766, 2016-Current evidence increasingly suggests that very short, supramaximal bouts of exercise can have significant health and performance benefits. Most research conducted in the area, however, uses laboratory-based protocols, which can lack ecological validity. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a high-intensity sprint training program on hockey-related performance measures. Fourteen semiprofessional hockey players either completed a 4-week high-intensity training (HIT) intervention, consisting of a total of 6 sessions of HIT, which progressively increased in volume (n = 7), or followed their normal training program (Con; n = 7). Straight-line sprint speed, with and without a hockey stick and ball, and slalom sprint speed, with and without a hockey stick and ball, were used as performance indicators. Maximal sprint speed over 22.9 m was also assessed. On completion of the 4-week intervention, straight-line sprint speed improved significantly in the HIT group (∼3%), with no changes in performance for the Con group. Slalom sprint speed, both with and without a hockey ball, was not significantly different after the training program in either group. Maximal sprint speed improved significantly (12.1%) in the HIT group, but there was no significant performance change in the Con group. The findings of this study indicate that a short period of HIT can significantly improve hockey-related performance measures and could be beneficial to athletes and coaches in field settings.

  5. Modeling Longitudinal Changes in 5 m Sprinting Performance Among Young Male Tennis Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Tamara; Valente-Dos-Santos, João; Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel J; Malina, Robert M; Huijgen, Barbara C H; Smith, Joanne; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Visscher, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Year-to-year changes in sprinting in youth tennis players were examined in a mixed-longitudinal study (256 male players, aged 10-15 years: 993 measurements). Height (h), body mass (BM), lower limb explosive strength (LLES), and a 5-m sprint were measured over five years. During that period, players were classified as elite or sub-elite. To account for the repeated measurements within the individual nature of longitudinal data, multilevel random effects regression analyses were used. Sprint performance improved with age at each additional 1 year of age, thus predicting ∼.016 sec improvement in five-meter sprint time by all variables of the model. It was possible to predict the performance of elite tennis players in the 5-m sprint (sec) for elite players (1.1493 - (0.0159 ċ centered age) - (0.009 ċ BM) - (0.044 ċ LLES) and sub-elite players (1.1493 - (0.0159 ċ centered age) + 0.0135 - (0.009 ċ BM) - (0.044 ċ LLES) - (0.0557 ċ centered age). Sprint performance differences between elite and sub-elite players was related to longitudinal changes in body size and lower limb strength up until age 13.

  6. Validity and reliability of hand and electronic timing for 40-yd sprint in college football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, J Bryan; Ivey, Pat J; Brechue, William F; Mayhew, Jerry L

    2015-06-01

    The 40-yd sprint is the premier event for evaluating sprint speed among football players at all competitive levels. Some questions remain concerning the validity of hand timing compared with electronic timing, as well as the lack of assessment and reliability of each method. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of hand timing by experienced and novice timers compared with electronic timing and to establish the reliability and smallest worthwhile difference (SWD) of each method for the 40-yd sprint. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college football players (n = 81) ran two 40-yd sprint trials, with each being timed electronically (touch pad start and infrared beam stop) and with hand-held stopwatches by 2 experienced and 4 novice timers. There was no significant difference between trials timed electronically or by experienced and novice timers. Hand timing (experienced = 4.90 ± 0.34 seconds; novice = 4.86 ± 0.33 seconds) produced a significantly faster 40-yd sprint time than electronic timing (5.12 ± 0.35 seconds) by 0.22 ± 0.07 and 0.26 ± 0.08 seconds, respectively. Relative reliability was extremely high for all comparisons with intraclass correlation coefficient >0.987. The SWD was 0.12 seconds with electronic timing and 0.14 seconds with hand timing. In conclusion, hand timing produces faster sprint times than electronic timing in college football players, independent of timer experience. Repeated 40-yd sprint trials have high relative reliability regardless of timing method. A meaningful change in 40-yd sprint performance is dependent on timing method used.

  7. Combining autosomal and Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat data in paternity testing with male child: methods and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, Imen; Mahfoudh-Lahiani, Nadia; Makni, Hafedh; Ammar-Keskes, Leila; Rebaï, Ahmed

    2007-09-01

    Paternity testing is being increasingly requested with the aim of challenging presumptive fatherhood. The ability to establish the biological father is usually based on the genotyping of autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) in alleged father, mother and child, but the use of Y-chromosomal STR has gained interest in the last few years. In this work, we propose a new probabilistic approach that combines autosomal and Y-chromosomal STR data in paternity testing with father/son pairs taking into account mutation events. We also suggest a new two-stage approach where we first type Y-STRs and possibly autosomal STR for the putative father and son, conditional on Y-STR results. We applied this approach to 22 cases. Our results show that Y-STRs can identify nonpaternity cases with high accuracy but need to be validated with autosomal STR to establish paternity. Moreover, the two-stage approach is less costly than the standard approach and is very useful in motherless cases.

  8. Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in Short Recurring Bursts of the Soft-Gamma Repeater J1550-5418

    CERN Document Server

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L; Heil, Lucy; van der Klis, Michiel; van der Horst, Alexander J; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G; Gogus, Ersin; Granot, Jonathan; Kaneko, Yuki; Lin, Lin; von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al (2013), we developed a Bayesian method for searching for QPOs in short magnetar bursts, taking into account the effects of the complicated burst structure, and have shown its feasibility on a small sample of bursts. Here, we apply the same method to a much larger sample from a burst storm of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418. We report a candidate signal at 260 Hz in a search of the individual bursts, which is fairly broad. We also find two QPOs at 93 Hz and one at 127 Hz, when averaging periodograms from a number of bursts in individual triggers, at frequencies close to QPOs previously observed in magnetar giant flares. Finally, for the first time, we explore the overall burst variability in the sample, and report a weak...

  9. Highly Effective DNA Extraction Method for Nuclear Short Tandem Repeat Testing of Skeletal Remains from Mass Graves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoren, Jon; Vanek, Daniel; Konjhodzić, Rijad; Crews, John; Huffine, Edwin; Parsons, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Aim To quantitatively compare a silica extraction method with a commonly used phenol/chloroform extraction method for DNA analysis of specimens exhumed from mass graves. Methods DNA was extracted from twenty randomly chosen femur samples, using the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) silica method, based on Qiagen Blood Maxi Kit, and compared with the DNA extracted by the standard phenol/chloroform-based method. The efficacy of extraction methods was compared by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to measure DNA quantity and the presence of inhibitors and by amplification with the PowerPlex 16 (PP16) multiplex nuclear short tandem repeat (STR) kit. Results DNA quantification results showed that the silica-based method extracted on average 1.94 ng of DNA per gram of bone (range 0.25-9.58 ng/g), compared with only 0.68 ng/g by the organic method extracted (range 0.0016-4.4880 ng/g). Inhibition tests showed that there were on average significantly lower levels of PCR inhibitors in DNA isolated by the organic method. When amplified with PP16, all samples extracted by silica-based method produced 16 full loci profiles, while only 75% of the DNA extracts obtained by organic technique amplified 16 loci profiles. Conclusions The silica-based extraction method showed better results in nuclear STR typing from degraded bone samples than a commonly used phenol/chloroform method. PMID:17696302

  10. Comparisons of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and viromes in human saliva reveal bacterial adaptations to salivary viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, David T; Salzman, Julia; Relman, David A

    2012-09-01

    Explorations of human microbiota have provided substantial insight into microbial community composition; however, little is known about interactions between various microbial components in human ecosystems. In response to the powerful impact of viral predation, bacteria have acquired potent defences, including an adaptive immune response based on the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/Cas system. To improve our understanding of the interactions between bacteria and their viruses in humans, we analysed 13 977 streptococcal CRISPR sequences and compared them with 2 588 172 virome reads in the saliva of four human subjects over 17 months. We found a diverse array of viruses and CRISPR spacers, many of which were specific to each subject and time point. There were numerous viral sequences matching CRISPR spacers; these matches were highly specific for salivary viruses. We determined that spacers and viruses coexist at the same time, which suggests that streptococcal CRISPR/Cas systems are under constant pressure from salivary viruses. CRISPRs in some subjects were just as likely to match viral sequences from other subjects as they were to match viruses from the same subject. Because interactions between bacteria and viruses help to determine the structure of bacterial communities, CRISPR-virus analyses are likely to provide insight into the forces shaping the human microbiome.

  11. VivaxGEN: An open access platform for comparative analysis of short tandem repeat genotyping data in Plasmodium vivax populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarsanto, Hidayat; Benavente, Ernest D; Noviyanti, Rintis; Utami, Retno Ayu Setya; Trianty, Leily; Pava, Zuleima; Getachew, Sisay; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Wangchuck, Sonam; Liu, Yaobao; Gao, Qi; Dowd, Simone; Cheng, Qin; Clark, Taane G; Price, Ric N; Auburn, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    The control and elimination of Plasmodium vivax will require a better understanding of its transmission dynamics, through the application of genotyping and population genetics analyses. This paper describes VivaxGEN (http://vivaxgen.menzies.edu.au), a web-based platform that has been developed to support P. vivax short tandem repeat data sharing and comparative analyses. The VivaxGEN platform provides a repository for raw data generated by capillary electrophoresis (FSA files), with fragment analysis and standardized allele calling tools. The query system of the platform enables users to filter, select and differentiate samples and alleles based on their specified criteria. Key population genetic analyses are supported including measures of population differentiation (FST), expected heterozygosity (HE), linkage disequilibrium (IAS), neighbor-joining analysis and Principal Coordinate Analysis. Datasets can also be formatted and exported for application in commonly used population genetic software including GENEPOP, Arlequin and STRUCTURE. To date, data from 10 countries, including 5 publicly available data sets have been shared with VivaxGEN. VivaxGEN is well placed to facilitate regional overviews of P. vivax transmission dynamics in different endemic settings and capable to be adapted for similar genetic studies of P. falciparum and other organisms.

  12. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats Are emm Type-Specific in Highly Prevalent Group A Streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Po-Xing; Chan, Yuen-Chi; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Wang, Shu-Ying; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are the bacterial adaptive immune system against foreign nucleic acids. Given the variable nature of CRISPR, it could be a good marker for molecular epidemiology. Group A streptococcus is one of the major human pathogens. It has two CRISPR loci, including CRISPR01 and CRISPR02. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of CRISPR-associated gene cassettes (cas) and CRISPR arrays in highly prevalent emm types. The cas cassette and CRISPR array in two CRISPR loci were analyzed in a total of 332 strains, including emm1, emm3, emm4, emm12, and emm28 strains. The CRISPR type was defined by the spacer content of each CRISPR array. All strains had at least one cas cassette or CRISPR array. More than 90% of the spacers were found in one emm type, specifically. Comparing the consistency between emm and CRISPR types by Simpson's index of diversity and the adjusted Wallace coefficient, CRISPR01 type was concordant to emm type, and CRISPR02 showed unidirectional congruence to emm type, suggesting that at least for the majority of isolates causing infection in high income countries, the emm type can be inferred from CRISPR analysis, which can further discriminate isolates sharing the same emm type.

  13. A graphical simulation model of the entire DNA process associated with the analysis of short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Peter; Curran, James; Elliot, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The use of expert systems to interpret short tandem repeat DNA profiles in forensic, medical and ancient DNA applications is becoming increasingly prevalent as high-throughput analytical systems generate large amounts of data that are time-consuming to process. With special reference to low copy number (LCN) applications, we use a graphical model to simulate stochastic variation associated with the entire DNA process starting with extraction of sample, followed by the processing associated with the preparation of a PCR reaction mixture and PCR itself. Each part of the process is modelled with input efficiency parameters. Then, the key output parameters that define the characteristics of a DNA profile are derived, namely heterozygote balance (Hb) and the probability of allelic drop-out p(D). The model can be used to estimate the unknown efficiency parameters, such as pi(extraction). 'What-if' scenarios can be used to improve and optimize the entire process, e.g. by increasing the aliquot forwarded to PCR, the improvement expected to a given DNA profile can be reliably predicted. We demonstrate that Hb and drop-out are mainly a function of stochastic effect of pre-PCR molecular selection. Whole genome amplification is unlikely to give any benefit over conventional PCR for LCN.

  14. Fifteen non-CODIS autosomal short tandem repeat loci multiplex data from nine population groups living in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Hsiao-Lin; Chang, Yih-Yuan; Lee, James Chun-I; Lin, Chun-Yen; Yin, Hsiang-Yi; Tseng, Li-Hui; Su, Yi-Ning; Ko, Tsang-Ming

    2012-07-01

    The analysis of autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci is a powerful tool in forensic genetics. We developed a multiplex system in which 15 non-Combined DNA Index System autosomal STRs (D3S1744, D4S2366, D8S1110, D10S2325, D12S1090, D13S765, D14S608, Penta E, D17S1294, D18S536, D18S1270, D20S470, D21S1437, Penta D, and D22S683) could be amplified in one single polymerase chain reaction. DNA samples from 1,098 unrelated subjects of nine population groups living in Taiwan, including Taiwanese Han, indigenous Taiwanese of Taiwan Island, Tao, mainland Chinese, Filipinos, Thais, Vietnamese, Indonesians, and Caucasians, were collected and analyzed using this system. The distributions of the allelic frequencies and the forensic parameters of each population group were presented. The combined discrimination power and the combined power of exclusion were high in all population groups tested in this study. A multidimensional scaling plot of these nine population groups based on the Reynolds' genetic distances calculated from 15 autosomal STRs was constructed, and the genetic substructure in this area was presented. In conclusion, this 15 autosomal STR multiplex system provides highly informative STR data and appears useful in forensic casework and parentage testing in different populations.

  15. A Case of Maternal Half-sisters Sharing Alleles at 18 X-chromosomal Short Tandem Repeat Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Ling Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of X-chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs is very helpful in deficiency paternity testing. Here, we reported a case of kinship analysis that showed a potentially erroneous inclusion of paternal sisters between two women. The two women shared alleles at 18 X-chromosomal STR loci spanned from 14.76cM (DXS6807 to 184.19cM (DXS7423. When their relatives were not available for testing, biostatistical analysis for the 18 X-chromosomal STR loci and 24 autosomal STR loci revealed the most possible relationship between the two women was paternal sisters. However, when the father of one woman was available, the other father-daughter possibility was excluded. In the end, the likelihood ratio of STR marker and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequences confirmed the two women were maternal sisters. This case emphasizes a cautionary interpretation of X chromosomal marker in deficiency paternity cases with female offspring. Even though large parts of the X-chromosome haplotypes shared by two females, additional relatives and extended DNA typing (such as mtDNA may be needed further to ascertain whether they are paternal or maternal sisters.

  16. Identification of an avirulent Entamoeba histolytica strain with unique tRNA-linked short tandem repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escueta-de Cadiz, Aleyla; Kobayashi, Seiki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2010-03-01

    Highly polymorphic, non-coding short tandem repeats (STR) are scattered between the tRNA genes in Entamoeba histolytica in a unique tandemly arrayed organization. STR markers that correlate with the virulence of individual E. histolytica strains have recently been reported. Here we evaluated the usefulness of tRNA-linked STR loci as genetic markers in identifying virulent and avirulent strains of E. histolytica from 37 Japanese E. histolytica samples (12 diarrheic/dysenteric, 20 amebic liver abscess (ALA), and 5 asymptomatic cases). Twenty three genotypes, assigned by combining the STR sequence types from all 6 STR loci, were identified. One to 8 new STR sequence types per locus were also discovered. Genotypes found in asymptomatic isolates were highly polymorphic (4 out of 5 genotypes were unique to this group), while in symptomatic isolates, almost half of the genotypes were shared between diarrhea/dysentery and ALA. One asymptomatic isolate (KU27) showed unique STR patterns in 4 loci. This strain, though associated with the typical pathogenic zymodeme II, failed to induce amebic liver abscess by animal challenge, which suggests that inherently avirulent E. histolytica strains exist, that are associated with unique genotypes. Furthermore, STR genotyping and in vivo challenge of 2 other asymptomatic isolates (KU14 and KU26) verified the covert virulence of these strains.

  17. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats Are emm Type-Specific in Highly Prevalent Group A Streptococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Xing Zheng

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR are the bacterial adaptive immune system against foreign nucleic acids. Given the variable nature of CRISPR, it could be a good marker for molecular epidemiology. Group A streptococcus is one of the major human pathogens. It has two CRISPR loci, including CRISPR01 and CRISPR02. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of CRISPR-associated gene cassettes (cas and CRISPR arrays in highly prevalent emm types. The cas cassette and CRISPR array in two CRISPR loci were analyzed in a total of 332 strains, including emm1, emm3, emm4, emm12, and emm28 strains. The CRISPR type was defined by the spacer content of each CRISPR array. All strains had at least one cas cassette or CRISPR array. More than 90% of the spacers were found in one emm type, specifically. Comparing the consistency between emm and CRISPR types by Simpson's index of diversity and the adjusted Wallace coefficient, CRISPR01 type was concordant to emm type, and CRISPR02 showed unidirectional congruence to emm type, suggesting that at least for the majority of isolates causing infection in high income countries, the emm type can be inferred from CRISPR analysis, which can further discriminate isolates sharing the same emm type.

  18. New Short Tandem Repeat-Based Molecular Typing Method for Pneumocystis jirovecii Reveals Intrahospital Transmission between Patients from Different Wards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Gits-Muselli

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis pneumonia is a severe opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients caused by the unusual fungus Pneumocystis jirovecii. Transmission is airborne, with both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals acting as a reservoir for the fungus. Numerous reports of outbreaks in renal transplant units demonstrate the need for valid genotyping methods to detect transmission of a given genotype. Here, we developed a short tandem repeat (STR-based molecular typing method for P. jirovecii. We analyzed the P. jirovecii genome and selected six genomic STR markers located on different contigs of the genome. We then tested these markers in 106 P. jirovecii PCR-positive respiratory samples collected between October 2010 and November 2013 from 91 patients with various underlying medical conditions. Unique (one allele per marker and multiple (more than one allele per marker genotypes were observed in 34 (32% and 72 (68% samples, respectively. A genotype could be assigned to 55 samples (54 patients and 61 different genotypes were identified in total with a discriminatory power of 0.992. Analysis of the allelic distribution of the six markers and minimum spanning tree analysis of the 61 genotypes identified a specific genotype (Gt21 in our hospital, which may have been transmitted between 10 patients including six renal transplant recipients. Our STR-based molecular typing method is a quick, cheap and reliable approach to genotype Pneumocystis jirovecii in hospital settings and is sensitive enough to detect minor genotypes, thus enabling the study of the transmission and pathophysiology of Pneumocystis pneumonia.

  19. Gene Repression in Haloarchaea Using the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas I-B System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachler, Aris-Edda; Marchfelder, Anita

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system is used by bacteria and archaea to fend off foreign genetic elements. Since its discovery it has been developed into numerous applications like genome editing and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes and bacteria. For archaea currently no tools for transcriptional repression exist. Because molecular biology analyses in archaea become more and more widespread such a tool is vital for investigating the biological function of essential genes in archaea. Here we use the model archaeon Haloferax volcanii to demonstrate that its endogenous CRISPR-Cas system I-B can be harnessed to repress gene expression in archaea. Deletion of cas3 and cas6b genes results in efficient repression of transcription. crRNAs targeting the promoter region reduced transcript levels down to 8%. crRNAs targeting the reading frame have only slight impact on transcription. crRNAs that target the coding strand repress expression only down to 88%, whereas crRNAs targeting the template strand repress expression down to 8%. Repression of an essential gene results in reduction of transcription levels down to 22%. Targeting efficiencies can be enhanced by expressing a catalytically inactive Cas3 mutant. Genes can be targeted on plasmids or on the chromosome, they can be monocistronic or part of a polycistronic operon. PMID:27226589

  20. Gene Repression in Haloarchaea Using the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas I-B System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachler, Aris-Edda; Marchfelder, Anita

    2016-07-15

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system is used by bacteria and archaea to fend off foreign genetic elements. Since its discovery it has been developed into numerous applications like genome editing and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes and bacteria. For archaea currently no tools for transcriptional repression exist. Because molecular biology analyses in archaea become more and more widespread such a tool is vital for investigating the biological function of essential genes in archaea. Here we use the model archaeon Haloferax volcanii to demonstrate that its endogenous CRISPR-Cas system I-B can be harnessed to repress gene expression in archaea. Deletion of cas3 and cas6b genes results in efficient repression of transcription. crRNAs targeting the promoter region reduced transcript levels down to 8%. crRNAs targeting the reading frame have only slight impact on transcription. crRNAs that target the coding strand repress expression only down to 88%, whereas crRNAs targeting the template strand repress expression down to 8%. Repression of an essential gene results in reduction of transcription levels down to 22%. Targeting efficiencies can be enhanced by expressing a catalytically inactive Cas3 mutant. Genes can be targeted on plasmids or on the chromosome, they can be monocistronic or part of a polycistronic operon. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Double-stranded endonuclease activity in Bacillus halodurans clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Ding, Fran; Haitjema, Charles; Huang, Qingqiu; DeLisa, Matthew P; Ke, Ailong

    2012-10-19

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system is a prokaryotic RNA-based adaptive immune system against extrachromosomal genetic elements. Cas2 is a universally conserved core CRISPR-associated protein required for the acquisition of new spacers for CRISPR adaptation. It was previously characterized as an endoribonuclease with preference for single-stranded (ss)RNA. Here, we show using crystallography, mutagenesis, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the Bacillus halodurans Cas2 (Bha_Cas2) from the subtype I-C/Dvulg CRISPR instead possesses metal-dependent endonuclease activity against double-stranded (ds)DNA. This activity is consistent with its putative function in producing new spacers for insertion into the 5'-end of the CRISPR locus. Mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed that a single divalent metal ion (Mg(2+) or Mn(2+)), coordinated by a symmetric Asp pair in the Bha_Cas2 dimer, is involved in the catalysis. We envision that a pH-dependent conformational change switches Cas2 into a metal-binding competent conformation for catalysis. We further propose that the distinct substrate preferences among Cas2 proteins may be determined by the sequence and structure in the β1-α1 loop.

  2. Sprinting patterns of National Rugby League competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sprinting demands of National Rugby League (NRL) competition and characterize the sprinting patterns of different rugby league playing positions. Thirty-seven elite rugby league players (mean ± SE age: 23.6 ± 0.5 years) underwent global positioning satellite analysis during 104 NRL appearances. The majority (67.5%) of sprint efforts were across distances of rugby league playing positions for the nature of sprint efforts and the typical distances covered during these efforts. Furthermore, the activities preceding and the recovery periods after sprint efforts were different among playing positions. These findings suggest that rugby league sprint training should be tailored to meet the individual demands of specific playing positions.

  3. 短期冲刺间歇训练对青年男子篮球运动员肌氧含量和运动能力的影响%Effects of short-term sprint interval training on the muscle oxygen content and athletic capacity of young male basketball players

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张学领

    2016-01-01

    The author observed the effects of short-term sprint interval training on the muscle oxygen content and athletic capacity of young male basketball players, so as to provide a criterion for establishing training plans in a scientific and rational way. The author divided 30 young male basketball players randomly into an experiment group (EG,n=15) and a control group (CG,n=15), let the players in group CG have normal training and let the players in group EG have 2 times of print interval training a week on the basis of normal training for 4 weeks, and respectively before and after the experiment, measured their aerobic exercise capacity by means of progressively increased load experiment, measured their anaerobic exercise capacity by means of 30s Wingate experiment, monitored the chang-ing of vastus lateralis muscle oxygen content during high intensity interval exercise experiment (repeated 5 times of 30s Wingate experiment, interval 4min) by means of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and revealed the following findings: after the experiment, as compared with those measured before the experiment, the maximum oxygen up-take and maximum aerobic power of the testees in group EG increased (P0.05); all the indexes of the testees in group CG had no significant change (P>0.05). The said findings indicated that short-term print interval training improved the aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacities of young male basketball players as well as their peripheral skeletal muscle’s oxygen uptake capacity during interval exercise.%观察短期冲刺间歇训练对运动员运动中肌氧含量以及运动能力的影响,为科学合理制定训练计划提供依据。将30名青年男子篮球运动员随机分为实验组(EG,n=15名)和对照组(CG,n=15名)。CG运动员正常训练,EG在正常训练基础上每周进行2次冲刺间歇训练,实验周期为4周。分别于实验前后利用递增负荷实验测定有氧运动能力;30 s Wingate实验测定无

  4. Maximal Strength Training Improves Surfboard Sprint and Endurance Paddling Performance in Competitive and Recreational Surfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Joseph O C; Tran, Tai T; Secomb, Josh L; Lundgren, Lina E; Farley, Oliver R L; Newton, Robert U; Sheppard, Jeremy M

    2017-01-01

    Coyne, JOC, Tran, TT, Secomb, JL, Lundgren, LE, Farley, ORL, Newton, RU, and Sheppard, JM. Maximal strength training improves surfboard sprint and endurance paddling performance in competitive and recreational surfers. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 244-253, 2017-Upper-body (UB) strength has very high correlations with faster surfboard paddling speeds. However, there is no research examining the effects of improving UB strength has on surfboard paddling ability. This study aimed to determine the influence that improvements in UB closed-kinetic chain maximal strength have on surfboard paddling in both competitive and recreational surfers. Seventeen competitive and recreational male surfers (29.7 ± 7.7 years, 177.4 ± 7.4 cm, 76.7 ± 9.9 kg) participated in a repeated-measures, parallel control study design. Anthropometry; 5-, 10-, and 15-m sprint; and 400-m endurance surfboard paddling tests along with pull-up and dip 1 repetition maximum strength tests were assessed pre- and postintervention. Subjects in the training group performed 5 weeks of maximal strength training in the pull-up and dip. Differences between the training and control groups were examined postintervention. The training group increased their speed over the 5-, 10-, and 15-m sprint, whereas the control group became slower (d = 0.71, 0.51, and 0.4, respectively). The training group also displayed faster endurance paddling performance compared with the control group (d = 0.72). Short-term exposure to maximal strength training elicits improvements in paddling performance measures. However, the magnitude of performance increases seems to be dependent on initial strength levels with differential responses between strong and weaker athletes. Although a longer maximal strength training period may have produced more significant paddling improvements in stronger subjects, practitioners are unlikely to have any more than 5 weeks in an uninterrupted block with competitive surfing athletes. This study reveals

  5. High-Resolution DNA Melt Curve Analysis of the Clustered, Regularly Interspaced Short-Palindromic-Repeat Locus of Campylobacter jejuni▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Erin P; Smith, Helen; Huygens, Flavia; Giffard, Philip M.

    2007-01-01

    A novel method for genotyping the clustered, regularly interspaced short-palindromic-repeat (CRISPR) locus of Campylobacter jejuni is described. Following real-time PCR, CRISPR products were subjected to high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis, a new technology that allows precise melt profile determination of amplicons. This investigation shows that the CRISPR HRM assay provides a powerful addition to existing C. jejuni genotyping methods and emphasizes the potential of HRM for genotyping short ...

  6. Endurance and sprint benefits of high-intensity and supramaximal interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicioni-Kolsky, Daniel; Lorenzen, Christian; Williams, Morgan David; Kemp, Justin Guy

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of two different interval training programs-high-intensity interval training (HIT) and supramaximal interval training (SMIT)-on measures of sprint and endurance performance. Physically active individuals (Females: n=32; age 19.3, s=2.2 years; mass 67.6, s=9.1 kg; stature 172.7, s=6.6 cm. Males: n=23; age 20.0, s=2.7 years; mass 71.3, s=8.3 kg; stature 176.6, s=5.8 cm) completed pre-testing that comprised (1) 3000 m time-trial, (2) 40 m sprint, and (3) repeated sprint ability (RSA-6×40 m sprints, 24 s active recovery) performance. Participants were then matched for average 3000 m running velocity (AV) and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (i) HIT, n=19, 4 min at 100% AV, 4 min passive recovery, 4-6 bouts per session; (ii) SMIT, n=20, 30 s at 130% AV, 150 s passive recovery, 7-12 bouts per session; and (iii) control group, n=16, 30 min continuous running at 75% AV. Groups trained three times per week for six weeks. When time to complete each test were compared among groups: (i) improvements in 3000 m time trial performance were greater following SMIT than continuous running, and (ii) improvements in 40 m sprint and RSA performance were greater following SMIT than HIT and continuous running. In addition, a gender effect was observed for the 3000 m time trial only, where females changed more following the training intervention than males. In summary, for concurrent improvements in endurance, sprint and repeated sprint performance, SMIT provides the greatest benefits for physically active individuals.

  7. Shuttle-run sprint training in hypoxia for youth elite soccer players: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatterer, Hannes; Philippe, Marc; Menz, Verena; Mosbach, Florian; Faulhaber, Martin; Burtscher, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of the present study were to investigate if a) shuttle-run sprint training performed in a normobaric hypoxia chamber of limited size (4.75x2.25m) is feasible, in terms of producing the same absolute training load, when compared to training in normoxia, and b) if such training improves the repeated sprint ability (RSA) and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (YYIR) test outcome in young elite soccer players. Players of an elite soccer training Centre (age: 15.3 ± 0.5 years, height: 1.73 ± 0.07 m, body mass: 62.6 ± 6.6 kg) were randomly assigned to a hypoxia or a normoxia training group. Within a 5-week period, players, who were not informed about the hypoxia intervention, performed at least 7 sessions of identical shuttle-run sprint training either in a normal training room (FiO2 = 20.95%) or in a hypoxic chamber (FiO2 = 14.8%; approximately 3300m), both equipped with the same floor. Each training session comprised 3 series of 5x10s back and forth sprints (4.5m) performed at maximal intensity. Recovery time between repetitions was 20s and between series 5min. Before and after the training period the RSA (6 x 40m shuttle sprint with 20 s rest between shuttles) and the YYIR test were performed. The size of the chamber did not restrict the training intensity of the sprint training (both groups performed approximately 8 shuttles during 10s). Training in hypoxia resulted in a lower fatigue slope which indicates better running speed maintenance during the RSA test (p = 0.024). YYIR performance increased over time (p = 0.045) without differences between groups (p > 0.05). This study showed that training intensity of the shuttle-run sprint training was not restricted in a hypoxic chamber of limited size which indicates that such training is feasible. Furthermore, hypoxia compared to normoxia training reduced the fatigue slope during the RSA test in youth soccer players. Key PointsShuttle-run sprint training is feasible in hypoxic chambers of limited size (i

  8. Comprehensive mutation analysis of 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms included in the AmpF lSTR® Yfiler® PCR amplification kit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Goedbloed (Miriam); M. Vermeulen (Mark); R.N. Fang (Rixun); M. Lembring (Maria); A. Wollstein (Andreas); K. Ballantyne (Kaye); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); S. Brauer (Silke); C. Krüger (Carmen); L. Roewer (Lutz); R. Lessig (Rüdiger); R. Ploski (Rafal); T. Dobosz (Tadeusz); J. Henke (Jürgen); M.R. Furtado (Manohar); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) polymorphisms included in the AmpF lSTR® Yfiler® polymerase chain reaction amplification kit have become widely used for forensic and evolutionary applications where a reliable knowledge on mutation properties is necessary for correct data in

  9. Improving global and regional resolution of male lineage differentiation by simple single-copy Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Vermeulen (Mark); A. Wollstein (Andreas); K. van der Gaag (Kristiaan); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); Y. Xue (Yali); Q. Wang (Qiuju); L. Roewer (Lutz); H. Knoblauch (Hans); C. Tyler-Smith (Chris); P. de Knijff (Peter); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe analyzed 67 short tandem repeat polymorphisms from the non-recombining part of the Y-chromosome (Y-STRs), including 49 rarely studied simple single-copy (ss)Y-STRs and 18 widely used Y-STRs, in 590 males from 51 populations belonging to 8 worldwide regions (HGDP-CEPH panel). Although

  10. Monitoring of residual disease and guided donor leucocyte infusion after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by chimaerism analysis with short tandem repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weger, RA; Tilanus, MGJ; Scheidel, KC; van den Tweel, JG; Verdonck, LF

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we analysed the chimaeric status of peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) in recipients of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with the use of short tandem repeat (STR) microsatellite markers for monitoring the efficacy of BMT and donor leucocyte infusions (DLIs). A set of four

  11. Effect of betaine supplementation on cycling sprint performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryor J Luke

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To examine the effect of betaine supplementation on cycling sprint performance. Methods Sixteen recreationally active subjects (7 females and 9 males completed three sprint tests, each consisting of four 12 sec efforts against a resistance equal to 5.5% of body weight; efforts were separated by 2.5 min of cycling at zero resistance. Test one established baseline; test two and three were preceded by seven days of daily consumption of 591 ml of a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage as a placebo or a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage containing 0.42% betaine (approximately 2.5 grams of betaine a day; half the beverage was consumed in the morning and the other half in the afternoon. We used a double blind random order cross-over design; there was a 3 wk washout between trials two and three. Average and maximum peak and mean power were analyzed with one-way repeated measures ANOVA and, where indicated, a Student Newman-Keuls. Results Compared to baseline, betaine ingestion increased average peak power (6.4%; p Conclusions One week of betaine ingestion improved cycling sprint power in recreationally active males and females.

  12. Short term soil erosion dynamics in alpine grasslands - Results from a Fallout Radionuclide repeated-sampling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Laura; Meusburger, Katrin; Zehringer, Markus; Ketterer, Michael E.; Mabit, Lionel; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Improper land management and climate change has resulted in accelerated soil erosion rates in Alpine grasslands. To efficiently mitigate and control soil erosion and reduce its environmental impact in Alpine grasslands, reliable and validated methods for comprehensive data generation on its magnitude and spatial extent are mandatory. The use of conventional techniques (e.g. sediment traps, erosion pins or rainfall simulations) may be hindered by the extreme topographic and climatic conditions of the Alps. However, the application of the Fallout Radionuclides (FRNs) as soil tracers has already showed promising results in these specific agro-ecosystems. Once deposited on the ground, FRNs strongly bind to fine particles at the surface soil and move across the landscape primarily through physical processes. As such, they provide an effective track of soil and sediment redistribution. So far, applications of FRN in the Alps include 137Cs (half-life: 30.2 years) and 239+240Pu (239Pu [half-life = 24110 years] and 240Pu [half-life = 6561 years]). To investigate short term (4-5 years) erosion dynamics in the Swiss Alps, the authors applied a FRNs repeated sampling approach. Two study areas in the central Swiss Alps have been investigated: the Urseren Valley (Canton Uri), where significant land use changes occurred in the last centuries, and the Piora Valley (Canton Ticino), where land use change plays a minor role. Soil samples have been collected at potentially erosive sites along the valleys over a period of 4-5 years and measured for 137Cs and 239+240Pu activity. The inventory change between the sampling years indicates high erosion and deposition dynamics at both valleys. High spatial variability of 137Cs activities at all sites has been observed, reflecting the heterogeneous distribution of 137Cs fallout after the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986. Finally, a new modelling technique to convert the inventory changes to quantitative estimates of soil erosion has

  13. Short consensus repeat domains extend the E-selectin structure in order to grab cells out of flow

    KAUST Repository

    Aleisa, Fajr

    2017-01-08

    Selectins are key adhesion molecules responsible for initiating a multistep process that leads a cell out of the blood circulation and into a tissue or organ. They are composed of an N-terminal extracellular C-type lectin like domain, followed by an Endothelial Growth Factor like domain (EGF), a defined number of short consensus repeats SCR (also called “sushi” domains), a transmembrane domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. The adhesion of cells (expressing ligands) to the endothelium (expressing the selection i.e., E-selectin) occurs through the interaction between the lectin domain of selectins and sLeX presenting ligands. Structural/function studies to date have mainly focused on investigating the influence of the lectin domain of E-selectin on its ability to bind its ligands while other domains received less atention. We prepared a number of different recombinant E-selectin proteins with changes in the SCR units. Specifically we generated wild-type E-selectin proteins as monomeric or dimeric structures, mutant proteins with varied numbers of SCRs as well as proteins where strategic residues were mutated to change the conformation of the selectin. Using a novel real time immunoprecipitation surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based in vitro binding study developed in our lab, the interaction of recombinant E-selectin proteins with immunoprecipitated endogenous ligands (i.e. CD44) captured on a CM-5 chip was assessed. These studies provided quantitative binding kinetics with on and off rates of selectin-ligand interactions and suggested that robust binding is dependent on the presence of the SCRs and oligomerization. These results provide significant implications on the functional mechanism of E-selectin binding to its ligands.

  14. Diversity of nuclear short tandem repeat loci in representative sample of North-eastern Bosnian and Herzegovina population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadžiavdić Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of nuclear microsatellite markers were analyzed in a reference sample of the population of northeast Bosnia and Herzegovina. 437 samples taken from unrelated individuals were processed and three samples of paternity proof were shown. Detection effectiveness profile of the research, points to a valid choice of method of extraction, amplification and genotyping short tandem repeat (STR loci with PowerPlextm16 kit. Genetic analysis of allelic variants of the 15 STR loci PowerPlextm16 kit detected 17 samples determined as rare allelic variants or microvariants. Samples were divided into 15 different allelic variants at 7 different loci, and are: in locus D7S820, D16S539, D3S1358, D18S51, PENTA D, PENTA E and in locus vWA. Genetic analysis of mutations in cases of paternity determined three examples of single-step mutations in the loci FGA, Penta D and D3S1358. Genetic analysis of observed STR loci detected three allelic variant of genotype combination 7/10/11.3 in locus D7S820 Type II. Population genetic analysis of STR loci in a representative sample of the population of northeast Bosnia and Herzegovina included the application of the assessment tests of within-population genetic diversity and interpopulation diversity, as well as genetic differentiation between populations: North-eastern Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH and BH general reference, then the Croatian population, Macedonian, Serbian and Slovenian. Based on the result analysis of specific forensic parameters, it can be assumed that the most informative marker is PENTA E for population genetic analysis and forensic testing in the population of northeast Bosnia and Herzegovina. Research results fit regional STR database of this part of Europe.

  15. Characterization of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats sites in Streptococcus mutans isolated from early childhood caries patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Li, Tiancheng; Zhou, Xuedong; Cheng, Lei; Huo, Yuanyuan; Zou, Jing; Li, Yuqing

    2017-07-29

    The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) sites in 45 clinical Streptococcus mutans strains and their relationship to the clinical manifestations of early childhood caries (ECC). Forty-five S. mutans strains were isolated from the plaque samples taken from sixty-three children. CRISPR sites were sequenced and BLAST was used to compare these sites to those in the CRISPRTarget database. The association between the distribution of CRISPR sites and the manifestation of caries was analyzed by Chi-Square test. Further, biofilm formation (by crystal violet staining) and the synthesis of polysaccharide (by anthrone-sulfuric method) of all clinical isolated S. mutans strains with both CRISPR sites and no CRISPR site were comapared. Finally, acidogenicity and acidurity of two typical strains were determined using pH drop and acid tolerance assays. Biofilm formation and EPS synthesis by two typical strains were compared by 3D CLSM (Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope) assays and the expression of gtf genes were evaluated using qPCR. We found that most of the spacers in the clinical S. mutans strains were derived from Streptococcus phages APCM01 and M102. The number of CRISPR sites in these strains was associated with the clinical manifestations of ECC. Moreover, we found that the biofilm formation and EPS synthesis ability of the S. mutans strains with both CRISPR sites was significant improved. An association was found between the distribution of CRISPR sites and the clinical manifestations of caries. The CRISPR sites might contribute to the cariogenic potential of S. mutans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Speed, force, and power values produced from nonmotorized treadmill test are related to sprinting performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangine, Gerald T; Hoffman, Jay R; Gonzalez, Adam M; Wells, Adam J; Townsend, Jeremy R; Jajtner, Adam R; McCormack, William P; Robinson, Edward H; Fragala, Maren S; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2014-07-01

    The relationships between 30-m sprint time and performance on a nonmotorized treadmill (TM) test and a vertical jump test were determined in this investigation. Seventy-eight physically active men and women (22.9 ± 2.7 years; 73.0 ± 14.7 kg; 170.7 ± 10.4 cm) performed a 30-second maximal sprint on the curve nonmotorized TM after 1 familiarization trial. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients produced significant (p ≤ 0.05) moderate to very strong relationships between 30-m sprint time and body mass (r = -0.37), %fat (r = 0.79), peak power (PP) (r = -0.59), relative PP (r = -0.42), time to peak velocity (r = -0.23) and TM sprint times at 10 m (r = 0.48), 20 m (r = 0.59), 30 m (r = 0.67), 40 m (r = 0.71), and 50 m (r = 0.75). Strong relationships between 30-m sprint time and peak (r = -0.479) and mean vertical jump power (r = -0.559) were also observed. Subsequently, stepwise regression was used to produce two 30-m sprint time prediction models from TM performance (TM1: body mass + TM data and TM2: body composition + TM data) in a validation group (n = 39), and then crossvalidated against another group (n = 39). As no significant differences were observed between these groups, data were combined (n = 72) and used to create the final prediction models (TM1: r = 0.75, standard error of the estimate (SEE) = 0.27 seconds; TM2: r = 0.84, SEE = 0.22 seconds). These final movement-specific models seem to be more accurate in predicting 30-m sprint time than derived peak (r = 0.23, SEE = 0.48 seconds) and mean vertical jump power (r = 0.31, SEE = 0.45 seconds) equations. Consequently, sprinting performance on the TM can significantly predict short-distance sprint time. It, therefore, may be used to obtain movement-specific measures of sprinting force, velocity, and power in a controlled environment from a single 30-second maximal sprinting test.

  17. What Research Tells the Coach About Sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintiman, George B.

    This booklet on sprinting is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 "Introduction," provides an analysis of the 100-meter dash, summarizes world records, and discusses the reliability of timing the sprint race. Chapter 2, "Describing the Sprinter," discusses the following topics: anatomical characteristics, flexibility, reaction, strength/power,…

  18. The Influence of Serial Carbohydrate Mouth Rinsing on Power Output during a Cycle Sprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Shaun M; Findlay, Scott; Kavaliauskas, Mykolas; Grant, Marie Clare

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the influence of serial administration of a carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinse on performance, metabolic and perceptual responses during a cycle sprint. Twelve physically active males (mean (± SD) age: 23.1 (3.0) years, height: 1.83 (0.07) m, body mass (BM): 86.3 (13.5) kg) completed the following mouth rinse trials in a randomized, counterbalanced, double-blind fashion; 1. 8 x 5 second rinses with a 25 ml CHO (6% w/v maltodextrin) solution, 2. 8 x 5 second rinses with a 25 ml placebo (PLA) solution. Following mouth rinse administration, participants completed a 30 second sprint on a cycle ergometer against a 0.075 g·kg(-1) BM resistance. Eight participants achieved a greater peak power output (PPO) in the CHO trial, resulting in a significantly greater PPO compared with PLA (13.51 ± 2.19 vs. 13.20 ± 2.14 W·kg(-1), p sprint and lower for the remainder of the sprint compared with the PLA trial (p > 0.05). No significant between-trials difference was reported for fatigue index, perceived exertion, arousal and nausea levels, or blood lactate and glucose concentrations. Serial administration of a CHO mouth rinse may significantly improve PPO during a cycle sprint. This improvement appears confined to the first 5 seconds of the sprint, and may come at a greater relative cost for the remainder of the sprint. Key pointsThe paper demonstrates that repeated administration of a carbohydrate mouth rinse can significantly improve peak power output during a single 30 second cycle sprint.The ergogenic effect of the carbohydrate mouth rinse may relate to the duration of exposure of the oral cavity to the mouth rinse, and associated greater stimulation of oral carbohydrate receptors.The significant increase in peak power output with the carbohydrate mouth rinse may come at a relative cost for the remainder of the sprint, evidenced by non-significantly lower mean power output and a greater fatigue index in the carbohydrate vs. placebo

  19. Effects of Sled Towing on Peak Force, the Rate of Force Development and Sprint Performance During the Acceleration Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Valencia María Asunción

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Resisted sprint training is believed to increase strength specific to sprinting. Therefore, the knowledge of force output in these tasks is essential. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of sled towing (10%, 15% and 20% of body mass (Bm on sprint performance and force production during the acceleration phase. Twenty-three young experienced sprinters (17 men and 6 women; men = 17.9 ± 3.3 years, 1.79 ± 0.06 m and 69.4 ± 6.1 kg; women = 17.2 ± 1.7 years, 1.65 ± 0.04 m and 56.6 ± 2.3 kg performed four 30 m sprints from a crouch start. Sprint times in 20 and 30 m sprint, peak force (Fpeak, a peak rate of force development (RFDpeak and time to RFD (TRFD in first step were recorded. Repeated-measures ANOVA showed significant increases (p ≤ 0.001 in sprint times (20 and 30 m sprint for each resisted condition as compared to the unloaded condition. The RFDpeak increased significantly when a load increased (3129.4 ± 894.6 N·s−1, p ≤ 0.05 and 3892.4 ± 1377.9 N·s−1, p ≤ 0.01. Otherwise, no significant increases were found in Fpeak and TRFD. The RFD determines the force that can be generated in the early phase of muscle contraction, and it has been considered a factor that influences performance of force-velocity tasks. The use of a load up to 20% Bm might provide a training stimulus in young sprinters to improve the RFDpeak during the sprint start, and thus, early acceleration.

  20. Effects of Sled Towing on Peak Force, the Rate of Force Development and Sprint Performance During the Acceleration Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Valencia, María Asunción; Romero-Arenas, Salvador; Elvira, José L.L.; González-Ravé, José María; Navarro-Valdivielso, Fernando; Alcaraz, Pedro E.

    2015-01-01

    Resisted sprint training is believed to increase strength specific to sprinting. Therefore, the knowledge of force output in these tasks is essential. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of sled towing (10%, 15% and 20% of body mass (Bm)) on sprint performance and force production during the acceleration phase. Twenty-three young experienced sprinters (17 men and 6 women; men = 17.9 ± 3.3 years, 1.79 ± 0.06 m and 69.4 ± 6.1 kg; women = 17.2 ± 1.7 years, 1.65 ± 0.04 m and 56.6 ± 2.3 kg) performed four 30 m sprints from a crouch start. Sprint times in 20 and 30 m sprint, peak force (Fpeak), a peak rate of force development (RFDpeak) and time to RFD (TRFD) in first step were recorded. Repeated-measures ANOVA showed significant increases (p ≤ 0.001) in sprint times (20 and 30 m sprint) for each resisted condition as compared to the unloaded condition. The RFDpeak increased significantly when a load increased (3129.4 ± 894.6 N·s−1, p ≤ 0.05 and 3892.4 ± 1377.9 N·s−1, p ≤ 0.01). Otherwise, no significant increases were found in Fpeak and TRFD. The RFD determines the force that can be generated in the early phase of muscle contraction, and it has been considered a factor that influences performance of force-velocity tasks. The use of a load up to 20% Bm might provide a training stimulus in young sprinters to improve the RFDpeak during the sprint start, and thus, early acceleration. PMID:26240657

  1. Effects of Sled Towing on Peak Force, the Rate of Force Development and Sprint Performance During the Acceleration Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Valencia, María Asunción; Romero-Arenas, Salvador; Elvira, José L L; González-Ravé, José María; Navarro-Valdivielso, Fernando; Alcaraz, Pedro E

    2015-06-27

    Resisted sprint training is believed to increase strength specific to sprinting. Therefore, the knowledge of force output in these tasks is essential. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of sled towing (10%, 15% and 20% of body mass (Bm)) on sprint performance and force production during the acceleration phase. Twenty-three young experienced sprinters (17 men and 6 women; men = 17.9 ± 3.3 years, 1.79 ± 0.06 m and 69.4 ± 6.1 kg; women = 17.2 ± 1.7 years, 1.65 ± 0.04 m and 56.6 ± 2.3 kg) performed four 30 m sprints from a crouch start. Sprint times in 20 and 30 m sprint, peak force (Fpeak), a peak rate of force development (RFDpeak) and time to RFD (TRFD) in first step were recorded. Repeated-measures ANOVA showed significant increases (p ≤ 0.001) in sprint times (20 and 30 m sprint) for each resisted condition as compared to the unloaded condition. The RFDpeak increased significantly when a load increased (3129.4 ± 894.6 N·s-1, p ≤ 0.05 and 3892.4 ± 1377.9 N·s-1, p ≤ 0.01). Otherwise, no significant increases were found in Fpeak and TRFD. The RFD determines the force that can be generated in the early phase of muscle contraction, and it has been considered a factor that influences performance of force-velocity tasks. The use of a load up to 20% Bm might provide a training stimulus in young sprinters to improve the RFDpeak during the sprint start, and thus, early acceleration.

  2. Different responses of skeletal muscle following sprint training in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbjörnsson Liljedahl, M; Holm, I; Sylvén, C; Jansson, E

    1996-01-01

    Six male and ten female physically active students performed 30-s sprint training on a cycle ergometer three times a week for 4 weeks, to investigate the training responses of skeletal muscle and to evaluate possible sex differences in this respect. Three repeated sprint tests with a 20-min rest in between were performed and muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were taken before and after the training period. Mean power (average of sprint I-III) and type IIB cross-sectional fibre area increased only in the women (7% and 25% respectively) following sprint training, resulting in a decreased sex difference. There was an increase in total lactate dehydrogenase (LD) activity following sprint training in both sexes, although the levels were lower in the women both before and after training. Glycogen content increased and the activity of LD iso-enzyme 1 decreased in the women, but not in men. It was hypothesised that both the smaller areas of type II fibres and lower activity of LD generally seen in women may be due in part to less frequent activation of type II fibres in women than in men. If this were the case, the women should respond to sprint training (a type of training that activates type II fibres) to a relatively greater extent than men. That the observed increase in type IIB fibre area in response to sprint training was greater in the women than in men supported the hypothesis of the study. However, the results for LD activity, which showed a similar response in the men and the women, did not support the hypothesis.

  3. Effects of sprint and plyometrics training on field sport acceleration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Callaghan, Samuel J; Jeffriess, Matthew D

    2014-07-01

    The mechanisms for speed performance improvement from sprint training and plyometrics training, especially relating to stance kinetics, require investigation in field sport athletes. This study determined the effects of sprint training and plyometrics training on 10-m sprint time (0-5, 5-10, and 0-10 m intervals), step kinematics (step length and frequency, contact and flight time), and stance kinetics (first, second, and last contact relative vertical [VF, VI], horizontal [HF, HI], and resultant [RF, RI] force and impulse; resultant ground reaction force angle [RFθ]; ratio of horizontal to resultant force [RatF]) during a 10-m sprint. Sixteen male field sport athletes were allocated into sprint training (ST) and plyometrics training (PT) groups according to 10-m sprint time; independent samples t-tests (p ≤ 0.05) indicated no between-group differences. Training involved 2 sessions per week for 6 weeks. A repeated measures analysis of variance (p ≤ 0.05) determined within- and between-subject differences. Both groups decreased 0-5 and 0-10 m time. The ST group increased step length by ∼15%, which tended to be greater than step length gains for the PT group (∼7%). The ST group reduced first and second contact RFθ and RatF, and second contact HF. Second contact HI decreased for both groups. Results indicated a higher post-training emphasis on VF production. Vertical force changes were more pronounced for the PT group for the last contact, who increased or maintained last contact VI, RF, and RI to a greater extent than the ST group. Sprint and plyometrics training can improve acceleration, primarily through increased step length and a greater emphasis on VF.

  4. Short tandem repeat sequences in the Mycoplasma genitalium genome and their use in a multilocus genotyping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillis Rebecca

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several methods have been reported for strain typing of Mycoplasma genitalium. The value of these methods has never been comparatively assessed. The aims of this study were: 1 to identify new potential genetic markers based on an analysis of short tandem repeat (STR sequences in the published M. genitalium genome sequence; 2 to apply previously and newly identified markers to a panel of clinical strains in order to determine the optimal combination for an efficient multi-locus genotyping system; 3 to further confirm sexual transmission of M. genitalium using the newly developed system. Results We performed a comprehensive analysis of STRs in the genome of the M. genitalium type strain G37 and identified 18 loci containing STRs. In addition to one previously studied locus, MG309, we chose two others, MG307 and MG338, for further study. Based on an analysis of 74 unrelated patient specimens from New Orleans and Scandinavia, the discriminatory indices (DIs for these three markers were 0.9153, 0.7381 and 0.8730, respectively. Two other previously described markers, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the rRNA genes (rRNA-SNPs and SNPs in the MG191 gene (MG191-SNPs were found to have DIs of 0.5820 and 0.9392, respectively. A combination of MG309-STRs and MG191-SNPs yielded almost perfect discrimination (DI = 0.9894. An additional finding was that the rRNA-SNPs distribution pattern differed significantly between Scandinavia and New Orleans. Finally we applied multi-locus typing to further confirm sexual transmission using specimens from 74 unrelated patients and 31 concurrently infected couples. Analysis of multi-locus genotype profiles using the five variable loci described above revealed 27 of the couples had concordant genotype profiles compared to only four examples of concordance among the 74 unrelated randomly selected patients. Conclusion We propose that a combination of the MG309-STRs and MG191-SNPs is

  5. Authentication of newly established human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (YM-1) using short tandem repeat (STR) profiling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyoob, Khosravi; Masoud, Khoshnia; Vahideh, Kazeminejad; Jahanbakhsh, Asadi

    2016-03-01

    Cross-contamination during or early after establishment of a new cell line could result in the worldwide spread of a misidentified cell line. Therefore, newly established cell lines need to be authenticated by a reference standard method. This study was conducted to investigate the authenticity of a newly established epithelial cell line of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) called YM-1 using short tandem repeat (STR) DNA profiling method. Primary human ESCC epithelial cells were cultured from the fresh tumor tissue of an adult female patient. Growth characteristics and epithelial originality of YM-1 cells were studied. Genomic DNA was isolated from YM-1 cells harvested at passage 22 and ESCC donor tumor sample on two different days to prevent probable DNA contamination. STR profiling was performed using AmpFℓSTR® Identifiler® Plus PCR Amplification Kit. To address whether YM-1 cells undergo genetic alteration as the passage number increases, STR profiling was performed again on harvested cells at passage 51. YM-1 cells grew as a monolayer with a population doubling time of 40.66 h. Epithelial originality of YM-1 cells was confirmed using ICC/IF staining of cytokeratins AE1/AE3. The STR profile of the ESCC donor tumor sample was the same with YM-1 cells at passage 22. However, STR profile of the donor tumor sample showed an off-ladder (OL) allele in their D7S820 locus. Also, re-profiling of YM-1 cells at passage 51 showed a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at D18S51 locus. This suggests that long-term culture of cell lines may alter their DNA profile. Comparison of the DNA fingerprinting results in DSMZ, and ATCC STR profiling databases confirmed unique identity of YM-1 cell line. This study provides an easy, fast, and reliable procedure for authentication of newly established cell lines, which helps in preventing the spread of misidentified cells and improving the reproducibility and validity of experiments, consequently.

  6. Use of NIRS to assess effect of training on peripheral muscle oxygenation changes in elite rugby players performing repeated supramaximal cycling tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Benjamin; Cooper, C E

    2014-01-01

    In most team sports, intermittent high intensity sprint efforts combined with short recovery periods have been identified as a key factor of physical performance; the ability to repeat these efforts at a sustained level is of great importance. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been proposed as a tool to monitor muscle oxygenation changes during such sprint efforts. The purpose of this study was to observe muscle reoxygenation rate (reoxy rate) (% s⁻¹) between sprint efforts in a repeat sprint cycle test. A two wavelength spatially resolved NIR spectrometer (Portamon, Artinis Inc.) was used to assess reoxy rate changes in the vastus lateralis of the dominant leg before and after a training stimulus. Eight UK premiership academy level rugby players were assessed (age 20.6 ± 0.9) years; height 187 ± 0.6 cm; weight 109.5 ± 8.6 kg; quadriceps skin fold 16.6 ± 4.5 mm); the subjects completed ten repeated 10-s cycle sprints interspersed with 40 s recovery, upon a Wattbike Pro cycle. Hemoglobin variables (ΔHHb, ΔtHb, ΔO₂Hb, ΔTSI %) during the sprint and the post-sprint reoxygenation rate (%TSI s⁻¹) were measured. During both cycle tests all subjects experienced a drop in muscle oxygen saturation (Pre-Δ - 12.39 ± 6.01 %), Post-Δ - 14.83 ± 3.88 %). Post-training, there was an increase in the extent of desaturation (drop in TSI %) in the group means, both for the biggest single change and the average of all ten changes. Seven out of eight players showed an increase based on the maximum change and six based on the average of their ten tests. Additionally, seven out of eight players showed a significant increase in ΔHHb (Pre-Δ + 76.80 ± 61.92, Post-Δ + 121.28 ± 69.76) (p < 0.01) (including the one player who did not show a significant effect on the TSI measure). Players who exercised at the highest power tended to decrease their muscle oxygenation to a greater extent. The number of bike training sessions undertaken correlated with improvements in

  7. Energy system contributions and determinants of performance in sprint cross-country skiing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, E; Björklund, G; Holmberg, H-C

    2017-01-01

    To improve current understanding of energy contributions and determinants of sprint-skiing performance, 11 well-trained male cross-country skiers were tested in the laboratory for VO2max , submaximal gross efficiency (GE), maximal roller skiing velocity, and sprint time-trial (STT) performance....... The STT was repeated four times on a 1300-m simulated sprint course including three flat (1°) double poling (DP) sections interspersed with two uphill (7°) diagonal stride (DS) sections. Treadmill velocity and VO2 were monitored continuously during the four STTs and data were averaged. Supramaximal GE...... during the STT was predicted from the submaximal relationships for GE against velocity and incline, allowing computation of metabolic rate and O2 deficit. The skiers completed the STT in 232 ± 10 s (distributed as 55 ± 3% DP and 45 ± 3% DS) with a mean power output of 324 ± 26 W. The anaerobic energy...

  8. Metatarsophalangeal joint function during sprinting: a comparison of barefoot and sprint spike shod foot conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Grace; Lake, Mark; Lees, Adrian

    2014-04-01

    The metatarsophalangeal joint is an important contributor to lower limb energetics during sprint running. This study compared the kinematics, kinetics and energetics of the metatarsophalangeal joint during sprinting barefoot and wearing standardized sprint spikes. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether standard sprinting footwear alters the natural motion and function of the metatarsophalangeal joint exhibited during barefoot sprint running. Eight trained sprinters performed maximal sprints along a runway, four sprints in each condition. Three-dimensional high-speed (1000 Hz) kinematic and kinetic data were collected at the 20 m point. Joint angle, angular velocity, moment, power and energy were calculated for the metatarsophalangeal joint. Sprint spikes significantly increase sprinting velocity (0.3 m/s average increase), yet limit the range of motion about the metatarsophalangeal joint (17.9% average reduction) and reduce peak dorsiflexion velocity (25.5% average reduction), thus exhibiting a controlling affect over the natural behavior of the foot. However, sprint spikes improve metatarsophalangeal joint kinetics by significantly increasing the peak metatarsophalangeal joint moment (15% average increase) and total energy generated during the important push-off phase (0.5 J to 1.4 J). The results demonstrate substantial changes in metatarsophalangeal function and potential improvements in performance-related parameters due to footwear.

  9. A physical model of sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, S

    2014-09-22

    A new physical model of all-out sprinting is presented. The first models for the applied forces in the block, drive and maintenance phases, as well as for braking forces, are proposed and are based on experimental observations. The applied forces and the aerodynamic drag forces along with the speed and position of the sprinter are calculated by the model as functions of time. The model's unknown parameters are physically relevant and are quantitatively comparable to quantities measured experimentally. A novel mathematical method, not based on curve fitting, is proposed along with the model which requires two observable quantities, time of first step and start of maintenance phase, and four time splits. The model was validated by modeling several elite sprints from available split data, as well as measured splits for non-elite sprinters, over 100 m and 200 m distances. Excellent agreement between the split times and the simulated times was obtained and the model was shown to accurately predict 100 m times from 60 m splits for non-elite runners and 200 m times from 100 m splits for elite sprinters. The model was also applied to the study of wind and altitude effects for elite sprinters in 100 and 200 m sprints. The model presented in this paper may also be useful as a coaching tool for non-elite sprinters by enabling comparisons with elite sprinters, the identification of weaknesses (comparing phases, braking coefficient) and by allowing predictions of 100 m times based on 60 m (indoor) performances and 200 m times based on 100 m splits.

  10. Molecular mechanisms for maintenance of G-rich short tandem repeats capable of adopting G4 DNA structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagama, Hitoshi [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)]. E-mail: hnakagam@gan2.res.ncc.go.jp; Higuchi, Kumiko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Tanaka, Etsuko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Naoto [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Nakashima, Katsuhiko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Katahira, Masato [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Fukuda, Hirokazu [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2006-06-25

    Mammalian genomes contain several types of repetitive sequences. Some of these sequences are implicated in various specific cellular events, including meiotic recombination, chromosomal breaks and transcriptional regulation, and also in several human disorders. In this review, we document the formation of DNA secondary structures by the G-rich repetitive sequences that have been found in several minisatellites, telomeres and in various triplet repeats, and report their effects on in vitro DNA synthesis. d(GGCAG) repeats in the mouse minisatellite Pc-1 were demonstrated to form an intra-molecular folded-back quadruplex structure (also called a G4' structure) by NMR and CD spectrum analyses. d(TTAGGG) telomere repeats and d(CGG) triplet repeats were also shown to form G4' and other unspecified higher order structures, respectively. In vitro DNA synthesis was substantially arrested within the repeats, and this could be responsible for the preferential mutability of the G-rich repetitive sequences. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using NIH3T3 cell extracts revealed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 and A3, which were tightly and specifically bound to d(GGCAG) and d(TTAGGG) repeats with K {sub d} values in the order of nM. HnRNP A1 unfolded the G4' structure formed in the d(GGCAG) {sub n} and d(TTAGGG) {sub n} repeat regions, and also resolved the higher order structure formed by d(CGG) triplet repeats. Furthermore, DNA synthesis arrest at the secondary structures of d(GGCAG) repeats, telomeres and d(CGG) triplet repeats was efficiently repressed by the addition of hnRNP A1. High expression of hnRNPs may contribute to the maintenance of G-rich repetitive sequences, including telomere repeats, and may also participate in ensuring the stability of the genome in cells with enhanced proliferation. Transcriptional regulation of genes, such as c-myc and insulin, by G4 sequences found in the promoter regions could be an intriguing field of

  11. Effects of six warm-up protocols on sprint and jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Rheba E

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 6 warm-up protocols, with and without stretches, on 2 different power maneuvers: a 30-m sprint run and a vertical countermovement jump (CJ). The 6 protocols were: (a) walk plus run (WR); (b) WR plus exercises including small jumps (EJ); (c) WR plus dynamic active stretch plus exercises with small jumps (DAEJ); (d) WR plus dynamic active stretch (DA); (e) WR plus static stretch plus exercises with small jumps (SSEJ); and (f) WR plus static stretch (SS). Twenty-six college-age men (n = 14) and women (n = 12) performed each of 6 randomly ordered exercise routines prior to randomly ordered sprint and vertical jump field tests; each routine and subsequent tests were performed on separate days. A 2 x 6 repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant overall linear trend (p hoc analysis pairwise comparisons showed the WR protocol produced higher jumps than did SS (p = 0.003 protocols on sprint run performance (p > or = 0.05). No significant interaction occurred between gender and protocol. There were significant differences between men and women on CJ and sprint trials; as expected, in general men ran faster and jumped higher than the women did. The data indicate that a warm-up including static stretching may negatively impact jump performance, but not sprint time.

  12. IMPACT OF EXERCISE INDUCED MUSCLE DAMAGE ON SPRINT AND AGILITY PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şengül AKDENİZ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of exercise induced muscle damage on sprint and agility performance.Methods: Eleven healthy male soccer players [( ±SD age: 21.63 ± 1.91 years; stature: 176.63 ± 5.31cm; body mass: 70.36 ± 3.72kg] who did not perform any high intensity physical training during last 3 months volunteered to participate in this study. Agility and sprint running times were measured, following determination of athletes muscle soreness level using visual analog scale (VAS, before (baseline and at 1st, 24th, 48th, 72nd and 96th hours after muscle damaging exercise protocol. Five sets of 20 repetitions drop jumps were performed as a muscle damage exercise protocol. Repeated measure ANOVA was used for statistical analysis.Results: Repeated measures ANOVA showed significant changes in muscle soreness [F(5-50= 196.65, p≤0.01], agility [F(5-50= 32.034, p≤0.01] and sprint running times [F(5-50= 9.28, p≤0.01] relevant with time intervals. Muscle soreness and agility test times were significantly (p≤0.05 higher than baseline values at all time intervals (1st, 24th, 48th, 72nd and 96th hours. Sprint running time was significantly (p≤0.05 increased at 1st, 24th, and 48th hours compared to baseline values.Conclusion: Consequently, results of the study revealed that exercise induced muscle damage affect agility and sprint performance negatively. The respondents should be careful in including unfamiliar exercises and exercises including intense eccentric contractions during the process of training planning for sports branches, where agility and sprint are important features.

  13. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    OpenAIRE

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and ra...

  14. Extension of recovery time from fatigue by repeated rest with short-term sleep during continuous fatigue load: Development of chronic fatigue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Akinori; Okauchi, Takashi; Hu, Di; Shingaki, Tomotaka; Katayama, Yumiko; Koyama, Hidenori; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Cui, Yilong

    2016-05-01

    Homeostasis is known to be involved in maintaining the optimal internal environment, helping to achieve the best performance of biological functions. At the same time, a deviation from optimal conditions often attenuates the performance of biological functions, and such restricted performance could be considered as individual fatigue, including physical and mental fatigue. The present study seeks to develop an animal model of chronic or subacute fatigue in which the recovery time is extended through the gradual disruption of homeostasis. We show that repeated short-term rest periods with certain lengths of sleep during continuous fatigue loading extend recovery from spontaneous nighttime activity but not physical performance in comparison with a continuous fatigue-loading procedure. Furthermore, the immobility time in a forced swimming test was extended by repeated short-term rests. These results suggest that repeated short-term rest with certain lengths of sleep during continuous fatigue loading is able to extend the recovery from mental fatigue but not from physical fatigue and that this effect might occur via the disruption of a homeostatic mechanism that is involved in restoring the optimal internal environment.

  15. Analysis of Short Tandem Repeat and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Loci From Single-Source Samples Using a Custom HaloPlex Target Enrichment System Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Frank R; Zeng, Xiangpei; Churchill, Jennifer D; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-06-01

    Short tandem repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are used to individualize biological evidence samples. Short tandem repeat alleles are characterized by size separation during capillary electrophoresis (CE). Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) offers an alternative that can overcome limitations of the CE. With MPS, libraries are prepared for each sample, entailing target enrichment and bar coding, purification, and normalization. The HaloPlex Target Enrichment System (Agilent Technologies) uses a capture-based enrichment system with restriction enzyme digestion to generate fragments containing custom-selected markers. It offers another possible workflow for typing reference samples. Its efficacy was assessed using a panel of 275 human identity SNPs, 88 short tandem repeats, and amelogenin. The data analyzed included locus typing success, depth of sequence coverage, heterozygote balance, and concordance. The results indicate that the HaloPlex Target Enrichment System provides genetic data similar to that obtained by conventional polymerase chain reaction-CE methods with the advantage of analyzing substantially more markers in 1 sequencing run. The genetic typing performance of HaloPlex is comparable to other MPS-based sample preparation systems that utilize primer-based target enrichment.

  16. Effect of Different Sprint Training Methods on Sprint Performance Over Various Distances: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, Michael C; Lockie, Robert G; Cronin, John B; Jalilvand, Farzad

    2016-06-01

    Rumpf, MC, Lockie, RG, Cronin, JB, and Jalilvand, F. Effect of different sprint training methods on sprint performance over various distances: a brief review. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1767-1785, 2016-Linear sprinting speed is an essential physical quality for many athletes. There are a number of different training modalities that can be used to improve sprint performance. Strength and conditioning coaches must select the most appropriate modalities for their athletes, taking into consideration the sprint distances that typically occur during competition. The study purpose was to perform a brief review as to the effect of specific (free sprinting; resisted sprinting by sleds, bands, or incline running; assisted sprinting with a towing device or a downhill slope), nonspecific (resistance and plyometric training), and combined (a combination of specific and nonspecific) training methods on different sprint distances (0-10, 0-20, 0-30, and 31+ m). A total of 48 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria, resulting in 1,485 subjects from a range of athletic backgrounds. The training effects associated with specific sprint training were classified as moderate (effect size [ES] = -1.00; %change = -3.23). Generally, the effect of specific sprint training tended to decrease with distance, although the largest training effects were observed for the 31+ m distance. The greatest training effects (ES = -0.43; %change = -1.65) of nonspecific training were observed for the 31+ m distance. The combined training revealed greatest effects (ES = -0.59; %change = -2.81) for the 0-10 m distance. After this review, specific sprint training methods seem the most beneficial over the investigated distances. However, the implementation of nonspecific training methods (e.g., strength and power training) could also benefit speed and athletic performance.

  17. Repeated short climatic change affects the epidermal differentiation program and leads to matrix remodeling in a human organotypic skin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutrand, Laetitia-Barbollat; Thépot, Amélie; Muther, Charlotte; Boher, Aurélie; Robic, Julie; Guéré, Christelle; Vié, Katell; Damour, Odile; Lamartine, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Human skin is subject to frequent changes in ambient temperature and humidity and needs to cope with these environmental modifications. To decipher the molecular response of human skin to repeated climatic change, a versatile model of skin equivalent subject to “hot–wet” (40°C, 80% relative humidity [RH]) or “cold–dry” (10°C, 40% RH) climatic stress repeated daily was used. To obtain an exhaustive view of the molecular mechanisms elicited by climatic change, large-scale gene expression DNA microarray analysis was performed and modulated function was determined by bioinformatic annotation. This analysis revealed several functions, including epidermal differentiation and extracellular matrix, impacted by repeated variations in climatic conditions. Some of these molecular changes were confirmed by histological examination and protein expression. Both treatments (hot–wet and cold–dry) reduced the expression of genes encoding collagens, laminin, and proteoglycans, suggesting a profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Strong induction of the entire family of late cornified envelope genes after cold–dry exposure, confirmed at protein level, was also observed. These changes correlated with an increase in epidermal differentiation markers such as corneodesmosin and a thickening of the stratum corneum, indicating possible implementation of defense mechanisms against dehydration. This study for the first time reveals the complex pattern of molecular response allowing adaption of human skin to repeated change in its climatic environment.

  18. Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Short Recurring Bursts of the Soft Gamma Repeater J1550-5418

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Huppenkothen; C. D'Angelo; A.L. Watts; L.M. Heil; M. van der Klis; A.J. van der Horst; C. Kouveliotou; M.G. Baring; E. Gögüs; J. Granot; Y. Kaneko; L. Lin; A. von Kienlin; G. Younes

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al., we

  19. Short (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telleman, Gerdien; den Hartog, Laurens

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This systematic review assessed the implant survival rate of short (<10 mm) dental implants installed in partially edentulous patients. A case report of a short implant in the posterior region have been added. Materials and methods: A search was conducted in the electronic databases of MEDLINE

  20. Short (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telleman, Gerdien; den Hartog, Laurens

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This systematic review assessed the implant survival rate of short (<10 mm) dental implants installed in partially edentulous patients. A case report of a short implant in the posterior region have been added. Materials and methods: A search was conducted in the electronic databases of MEDLINE

  1. Short-term captivity influences maximal cold-induced metabolic rates and their repeatability in summer-acclimatized American goldfinches Spinus tristis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David L.SWANSON; Marisa O.KING

    2013-01-01

    Studies of metabolic variation in birds have involved both wild and captive individuals,but few studies have investigated whether captivity directly influences metabolic rates,despite such variation potentially confounding conclusions regarding how metabolic rates respond to the conditions under study.In addition,whether short-term captivity influences metabolic rate repeatability in birds is currently uninvestigated.In this study,we measured Msum (maximal cold-induced metabolic rates) in summer acclimatized American goldfinches Spinus tristis directly after capture from wild populations,after approximately 2 weeks of indoor captivity (Captive 1),and again after an additional 1-2 weeks of captivity (Captive 2).Msum increased significantly (16.9%) following the initial captive period,but remained stable thereafter.Body mass (Mb) also increased significantly (9.2%) during the initial captive period but remained stable thereafter,suggesting that muscle growth and/or remodeling of body composition produced the observed metabolic variation.Mb and Msum were not significantly repeatable between wild and Captive 1 birds,but were significantly repeatable between Captive 1 and Captive 2 groups.These data suggest that caution must be exercised when extrapolating metabolic rates from short-term captive to wild populations.In addition,Msum was a repeatable trait for birds under conditions where mean metabolic rates remained stable,but Msum repeatability disappeared during acclimation to conditions promoting phenotypically flexible metabolic responses.This suggests that the capacity for phenotypic flexibility varies among individuals,and such variation could have fitness consequences.

  2. Sprint acceleration mechanics: the major role of hamstrings in horizontal force production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Benoit eMORIN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent literature supports the importance of horizontal ground reaction force (GRF production for sprint acceleration performance. Modeling and clinical studies have shown that the hip extensors are very likely contributors to sprint acceleration performance. We experimentally tested the role of the hip extensors in horizontal GRF production during short, maximal, treadmill sprint accelerations. Torque capabilities of the knee and hip extensors and flexors were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer in 14 males familiar with sprint running. Then, during 6-s sprints on an instrumented motorized treadmill, horizontal and vertical GRF were synchronized with electromyographic (EMG activity of the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and gluteus maximus averaged over the first half of support, entire support, entire swing and end-of-swing phases. No significant correlations were found between isokinetic or EMG variables and horizontal GRF. Multiple linear regre