WorldWideScience

Sample records for repeated nursing courses

  1. Applying constructivism to nursing education in cultural competence: a course that bears repeating.

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    Hunter, Jennifer L

    2008-10-01

    A graduate course on culture, diversity, and cultural competence was developed based on constructivist learning theory and Campinha-Bacote's constructs of cultural awareness, knowledge, skill, and encounters. The epistemology, structure, assignments, and activities used in both online and classroom courses were highly effective and well received by the students. Student course evaluations and outcome assessments of students' cultural competence levels, as compared to precourse levels, provided supportive evidence that the course design produced intended outcomes. Course resources are shared, making them available for use by others in cultural competence education.

  2. Who Repeats Algebra, and How Does Initial Performance Relate to Improvement When the Course Is Repeated?

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    Fong, Anthony; Jaquet, Karina; Finkelstein, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The information provided in this report shows how students perform when they repeat algebra I and how the level of improvement varies depending on initial course performance and the academic measure (course grades or CST scores). This information can help inform decisions and policies regarding whether and under what circumstances students should…

  3. Transcultural nursing course in Tanzania, Africa.

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    Owens, Rhoda

    2012-06-01

    A transcultural nursing course in Tanzania was offered in fall 2010 at Williston State College, located in North Dakota. Madeleine Leininger's Culture Care: Diversity and Universality Theory (Principles of Developing Cultural Competence) was the framework used for the experience. The course provided nursing students the opportunity to learn about the culture, health, and illness beliefs of Tanzanians; their values and practices; the prevalence of HIV/AIDS; and the differences and similarities between the healthcare systems, hospice/palliative care, and home visits in Tanzania as compared to the United States.

  4. Postgraduates courses offered to nursing

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    Pedro Jorge Araujo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To know the official masters that the Spanish Universities have offered during the academic course 2010/2011.Material and methods: Descriptive observational and transversal court study, in which it has analysed 170 university official masters and in which it has used a questionnaire with a total of 15 questions elaborated for this work.Results: 52 Spanish Universities of the 75 that there is have offered during the academic course 2010/2011 official masters that can realise for graduated in infirmary. By areas, the official masters more offered have been the ones of nutrition and alimentary security. 76,33% of the official masters have a length of 1 academic year. Almost the half of the official masters have an orientation researcher-professional and almost 40% researcher. 62,65% of the masters give of face-to-face way. In 52,1% of the official masters do not realise external practices and 86,2% has continuity with the doctorate.Conclusions: It has seen that it is necessary that expand the number of masters including other fields of study that contribute to a main specialisation of the professionals of the infirmary. An important percentage of official masters give in face-to-face modality, and there is very few offered on-line or to distance.

  5. Can Completing a Mental Health Nursing Course Change Students' Attitudes?

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    Hastings, Todd; Kroposki, Margaret; Williams, Gail

    2017-05-01

    Nursing program graduates rarely choose mental health nursing as a career. A quasi-experimental study was conducted to examine attitudes of 310 nursing students towards persons with mental illness. Students completed surveys on the first and last days of their program's psychiatric mental health nursing course. The pre- and post-test survey analysis indicated that students improved their attitude, knowledge and preparedness to care for persons with mental illness. However, students maintained little interest in working as a mental health nurse. Modifications in mental health nursing courses could be made to improve students' interest in choosing a career in mental health nursing.

  6. Nursing Distance Learning Course Comparison of Assignments and Examination Scores

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    Mundine, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Nursing programs have embraced distance learning in their curricula, but discussion is ongoing about course assignments and grading criteria to increase examination scores in nursing distance learning courses. Because course examinations are a predictor of success on the postgraduate licensing examination (NCLEX-RN), the purpose of this study was…

  7. El portafolio como recurso de aprendizaje e instrumento de evaluación de estudiantes repetidores de enfermería The portfolio as a learning resource and evaluation tool for course repeating students of the nursing school

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    Manuel L. Vera Cortés

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de la experiencia educativa descrita en este artículo, es la utilización del portafolios como recurso para impulsar la autodirección de los estudiantes en el proceso de aprender a aprender y potenciar la construcción personal del conocimiento. Material y métodos: La experiencia se desarrolló durante tres cursos académicos en la Escuela Universitaria de Enfermería La Paz (Universidad Autónoma. Madrid. El portafolios fue elaborado por 21 estudiantes matriculados en la asignatura Ecología Humana y Salud Comunitaria, que no la habían superado en el curso anterior. Se llevó a cabo en dos fases, una de diseño y otra de aplicación de este recurso. Resultados: A excepción de un alumno, todos progresaron, con diferentes grados de excelencia, en la construcción del conocimiento y en la capacidad de autodirigir su aprendizaje, destacando la utilidad del portafolios para comprender los conceptos fundamentales de la asignatura y adquirir competencias como aprendices autodirigidos. Conclusiones: Se han logrado los objetivos planteados al iniciar la experiencia y consideramos conveniente realizarla con estudiantes repetidores ya que la evaluación formativa y el aprendizaje a través del diálogo con el profesor y sus compañeros les facilita la progresiva construcción de nuevos conocimientos e incrementa sus destrezas metacognitivas. Para utilizar el portafolios con un número elevado de alumnos, sería necesario que lo elaboraran en pequeños grupos y que se implicaran varios tutores para el seguimiento del proceso de aprendizaje de los estudiantes.The goal of this educative experience is to use the portfolio as a tool to drive self-direction in the learning to learn process and to stimulate individual knowledge construction. Material and methods: The experience was undertaken throughout three academic years at the Nursing School of La Paz (Universidad Autónoma. Madrid. The portfolio was made for twenty one students enrolled in

  8. Malaysian nurses' evaluation of transnational higher education courses.

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    Arunasalam, Nirmala

    The internationalisation of higher education has led some UK and Australian universities to deliver transnational higher education (TNHE) post-registration top-up nursing degree courses in Malaysia. These are bridging courses that allow registered nurses to upgrade their diploma qualifications to degree level. What is not sufficiently explored in the literature is nurses' evaluation of these courses and the impact of TNHE qualifications. A hermeneutic phenomenology approach was used to explore the views of 18 Malaysian nurses from one Australian and two UK TNHE universities. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to enable the Malaysian nurses to evaluate the courses. Data were analysed by thematic analysis. Findings showed a gap between Malaysian and Western teaching and learning outlook, professional values and clinical practices. The data give important insights at a time when the aim of Malaysia's investment in TNHE courses is to attain a graduate workforce with changed mindsets and enhanced patient care.

  9. Gerontology course in the nursing undergraduate curricula

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    Samira AlSenany

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explores nursing faculty members’ attitudes towards older people, their thoughts about gerontological nursing education. Method Five focus groups and a survey were used with nursing faculty members 132 at the three nursing schools to explore their attitudes towards the care of older people and the perceived status of gerontological nursing education. The survey was given to 132 faculty members, including 76 clinical instructors, 40 associate professors and 16 professors. The nursing faculty in general had a positive attitude toward older people (M=3.36, SD 0.25, and teachers’ attitudes were higher than those of their nursing students (M=3.18, SD0.29. Results This study results suggests that Saudi nursing curricula should include more extensive gerontology content and clinical experience with older people. Conclusion This is the first time in Saudi Arabia that research has listened to their voices and examined their commitments toward gerontology education.

  10. Who Is Repeating Anatomy? Trends in an Undergraduate Anatomy Course

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    Schutte, Audra F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy courses frequently serve as prerequisites or requirements for health sciences programs. Due to the challenging nature of anatomy, each semester there are students remediating the course (enrolled in the course for a second time), attempting to earn a grade competitive for admissions into a program of study. In this retrospective study,…

  11. Blended Learning Versus Traditional Lecture in Introductory Nursing Pathophysiology Courses.

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    Blissitt, Andrea Marie

    2016-04-01

    Currently, many undergraduate nursing courses use blended-learning course formats with success; however, little evidence exists that supports the use of blended formats in introductory pathophysiology courses. The purpose of this study was to compare the scores on pre- and posttests and course satisfaction between traditional and blended course formats in an introductory nursing pathophysiology course. This study used a quantitative, quasi-experimental, nonrandomized control group, pretest-posttest design. Analysis of covariance compared pre- and posttest scores, and a t test for independent samples compared students' reported course satisfaction of the traditional and blended course formats. Results indicated that the differences in posttest scores were not statistically significant between groups. Students in the traditional group reported statistically significantly higher satisfaction ratings than students in the blended group. The results of this study support the need for further research of using blended learning in introductory pathophysiology courses in undergraduate baccalaureate nursing programs. Further investigation into how satisfaction is affected by course formats is needed. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Nursing student evaluation of NIOSH workplace violence prevention for nurses online course.

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    Brann, Maria; Hartley, Dan

    2017-02-01

    As primary targets of workplace violence in health care settings, nurses may suffer negative physical and psychological consequences. NIOSH created an online course to educate nurses about violence prevention techniques. A mixed-methods approach assessed workplace violence awareness and knowledge among nursing students. A pre/post/post-test survey and focus group discussions evaluated participant awareness and knowledge, assessed course design, and solicited recommendations for increasing participation and strategies for improving message retention. The mean awareness scores differed significantly between pre-course and both post-course time points (Wilk's λ=0.319, F(2, 46)=49.01, pviolence from pre-course scores (M=0.75, SD=0.438) to immediate post-course (M=2.13, SD=0.789) and four-week post-course (M=1.96, SD=0.771) scores on a 3-item measure. Similarly, mean knowledge scores increased between pre-course and both post-course time points (Wilk's λ=0.495, F(1.57, 73.66)=37.26, pviolence from pre-course scores (M=6.65, SD=1.45) to immediate post-course (M=8.56, SD=1.32) and four-week post-course (M=8.19, SD=1.42) scores on a 10-item measure. Qualitative data from the focus groups reinforced the quantitative findings. Participants citing benefits from the content strongly recommended including the course in nursing curriculums. Incorporating the course early in the nursing educational experience will better prepare students to deal with workplace violence when they enter health care professions. The results indicate that NIOSH and its partners created an effective online workplace violence awareness and prevention course. Practical applications: Nursing students and professionals can be effectively educated about workplace violence using an online format. Copyright © 2016 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Educational achievement of nurses who completed the nursing education and the nursing administration certificate courses of the Department of Nursing Studies, University of Edinburgh, 1958-1975.

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    Sinclair, H C; Hardy, L K; Hughes, J

    1984-11-01

    This paper describes the educational activity of a group of 149 nurse teachers and administrators following completion of the nursing education and nursing administration certificate courses of the University of Edinburgh (1958-1975). The data were obtained by a postal questionnaire and three particular types of courses reported by the respondents are discussed. Emphasis is given to the analysis involving degree courses as this was a prominent educational activity, especially among nurse teachers. The conclusion discusses the potential of an all graduate nurse teacher group and suggests some implications for the nursing profession.

  14. Predictors of Improvement in Critical Thinking Skills among Nursing Students in an Online Graduate Nursing Research Course

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    Riccio, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine predictors of improvement in critical thinking skills among online graduate nursing students in a graduate nursing research course. Thirty-five students who had taken an online Nursing research course within the prior 12 months and who were currently enrolled in the online graduate Nursing program at…

  15. Course-embedded assessment in Korean nursing baccalaureate education

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    Hyun Kyoung Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the program outcome in nursing baccalaureate in Korea. The analysis based on course embedded assessment. The concrete objectives were establishment of program outcome assessment, confirmation of student competency through weighting of program outcomes, and using the results of the evaluation in the circular feedback process in a nursing school in Korea. Methods: This study was conducted with a nursing education curriculum in a Korean nursing school. Data were collected through 28 students’ program outcome measurement from January 2013 to December 2014. Data were analyzed using a pairwise comparison method and analytic hierarchy process. Results: There were 1 to 3 direct and indirect assessment tools and for each program outcomes and each tool had measurable rubrics. There were 1 to 3 direct assessment tools for each program outcome, and each tool had measurable rubrics. This model derived rank of program outcomes from "care integration" to "global perception" through weight calculation. All direct assessment results were over 70%. The indirect assessment results were over the cutoff except for program outcomes 4 and 7. Conclusion: Each step of course embedded assessment was adaptive in nursing program outcome measure. The achievement of learning outcome provided reasonable tools for faculty and students.

  16. "I Want to Be a Nurse!": A Qualitative Descriptive Study on the Impact of an "Introduction to Nursing" Course

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    Edmonds, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of nursing students is not the issue. Each year, nursing programs across the country turn away highly qualified applicants due to faculty shortage and limited clinical space. Therefore, it is imperative to retain those who secure one of these valuable spots as a nursing student. An "Introduction to Nursing" course was offered…

  17. Simulation in an Undergraduate Nursing Pharmacology Course: A Pilot Study.

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    Tinnon, Elizabeth; Newton, Rebecca

    This study examined the effectiveness of simulation as a method of teaching pharmacological concepts to nursing students; perceptions of satisfaction with simulation as a teaching strategy were also evaluated. Second-semester juniors participated in three simulations and completed the National League for Nursing Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning Questionnaire and the Student Evaluation of Educational Quality Survey; a control group received traditional lectures. A unit exam on anticoagulant therapy content was administered to measure effectiveness. Findings support that simulation is as effective as traditional lecture for an undergraduate pharmacology course.

  18. Repeated scenario simulation to improve competency in critical care: a new approach for nursing education.

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    Abe, Yukie; Kawahara, Chikako; Yamashina, Akira; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, nursing education is being reformed to improve nurses' competency. Interest in use of simulation-based education to increase nurses' competency is increasing. To examine the effectiveness of simulation-based education in improving competency of cardiovascular critical care nurses. A training program that consisted of lectures, training in cardiovascular procedures, and scenario simulations was conducted with 24 Japanese nurses working at a university hospital. Participants were allocated to 4 groups, each of which visited 4 zones and underwent scenario simulations that included debriefings during and after the simulations. In each zone, the scenario simulation was repeated and participants assessed their own technical skills by scoring their performance on a rubric. Before and after the simulations, participants also completed a survey that used the Teamwork Activity Inventory in Nursing Scale (TAINS) to assess their nontechnical skills. All the groups showed increased rubric scores after the second simulation compared with the rubric scores obtained after the first simulation, despite differences in the order in which the scenarios were presented. Furthermore, the survey revealed significant increases in scores on the teamwork scale for the following subscale items: "Attitudes of the superior" (P Job satisfaction" (P = .01), and "Confidence as a team member" (P = .004). Our new educational approach of using repeated scenario simulations and TAINS seemed not only to enhance individual nurses' technical skills in critical care nursing but also to improve their nontechnical skills somewhat.

  19. Role Playing Game (RPG on nursing undergraduate course: educational potentials

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    Amanda Nathale Soares

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of a Role Playing Game as an educational strategy in Undergraduate Nursing course, emphasizing its subjective implications in understanding aspects of the profession. This is a qualitative study, conducted through an evaluative research, of deployment analysis type. Nursing students of the 3rd period participated. The instrument to collection was Memories of Game, reports prepared by students after game sessions. The game is a non-traditional educational strategy that enabled approach to students through professional practice, active participation, self-reflection and reflection on professional practice. This strategy favored individualization processes, allowing students to experience situations similar to the nursing practice and exercise skills such as teamwork and creativity. The expansion of studies that address the subjective processes in higher education, through simulation games, can contribute to better design of health development processes.

  20. Teaching a Course in Abnormal Psychology and Behavior Intervention Skills for Nursing Home Aides.

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    Glenwick, David S.; Slutzsky, Mitchel R.; Garfinkel, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Describes an 11-week course given at a nursing home to nursing home aides that focused on abnormal psychology and behavior intervention skills. Discusses the course goals, class composition, and course description. Addresses the problems and issues encountered with teaching this course to a nontraditional population in an unconventional setting.…

  1. Cognitive outcome in adolescents and young adults after repeat courses of antenatal corticosteroids.

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    Stålnacke, Johanna; Diaz Heijtz, Rochellys; Norberg, Hanna; Norman, Mikael; Smedler, Ann-Charlotte; Forssberg, Hans

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether repeat courses of antenatal corticosteroids have long-term effects on cognitive and psychological functioning. In a prospective cohort study, 58 adolescents and young adults (36 males) who had been exposed to 2-9 weekly courses of betamethasone in utero were assessed with neuropsychological tests and behavior self-reports. Unexposed subjects (n = 44, 25 males) matched for age, sex, and gestational age at birth served as a comparison group. In addition, individuals exposed in utero to a single course (n = 25, 14 males) were included for dose-response analysis. Group differences were investigated using multilevel linear modeling. Mean scores obtained in 2 measures of attention and speed were significantly lower in subjects exposed to 2 or more antenatal corticosteroids courses (Symbol Search, P = .009; Digit Span Forward, P = .02), but these were not dose-dependent. Exposure to repeat courses of antenatal corticosteroids was not associated with general deficits in higher cognitive functions, self-reported attention, adaptability, or overall psychological function. Although this study indicates that repeat exposure to antenatal corticosteroids may have an impact on aspects of executive functioning, it does not provide support for the prevailing concern that such fetal exposure will have a major adverse impact on cognitive functions and psychological health later in life. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of the Community Health Nursing Course of First Year Proficiency Certificate Level Nursing in Nepal

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    Mandira Shahi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Community health is very much important in nursing education. It is essential because it maximizes the health status of individuals, families, groups and the community through direct approach with them. The main purpose of the study was to identify the gap in Community Health Nursing I course in Proficiency Certificate Level first year nursing program in Nepal. METHODS: Mix methods of research having qualitative and quantitative method were used in the study. Data were collected from 12 subject teachers, 35 nursing graduates and 61 Proficiency Certificate Level first year nursing students. The study used structured, five-point rating scale and open ended questions according to Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats analysis for the self-administered questionnaire. FINDINGS: Common view points of the three sector's respondents (student, nursing graduate and teachers regarding the strengths of curriculum are: curriculum is based on Primary Health Care approach and covers preventive and promotive aspects of health. Regarding weaknesses, they said that there is inadequate time for practice, there is lack of innovative methods and materials, the course didn't cover new trends of environmental pollution and changes, global warming, greenhouse effect, climate change and deforestation etc. Similarly, they added that curriculum is not revised regularly and there is insufficient supervision in field. Likewise, regarding opportunities, they said that there is job opportunity in social organization as Community Health Nursing/Public Health Nurse. Moreover, they said that there is lack of employment scope as threats point. CONCLUSION: The paper concludes that new issues and trends of community health nursing should be added, and curriculum should be revised regularly.

  3. Effects of an intensive clinical skills course on senior nursing students' self-confidence and clinical competence: A quasi-experimental post-test study.

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    Park, Soohyun

    2018-02-01

    To foster nursing professionals, nursing education requires the integration of knowledge and practice. Nursing students in their senior year experience considerable stress in performing the core nursing skills because, typically, they have limited opportunities to practice these skills in their clinical practicum. Therefore, nurse educators should revise the nursing curricula to focus on core nursing skills. To identify the effect of an intensive clinical skills course for senior nursing students on their self-confidence and clinical competence. A quasi-experimental post-test study. A university in South Korea during the 2015-2016 academic year. A convenience sample of 162 senior nursing students. The experimental group (n=79) underwent the intensive clinical skills course, whereas the control group (n=83) did not. During the course, students repeatedly practiced the 20 items that make up the core basic nursing skills using clinical scenarios. Participants' self-confidence in the core clinical nursing skills was measured using a 10-point scale, while their clinical competence with these skills was measured using the core clinical nursing skills checklist. Independent t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze the data. The mean scores in self-confidence and clinical competence were higher in the experimental group than in the control group. This intensive clinical skills courses had a positive effect on senior nursing students' self-confidence and clinical competence for the core clinical nursing skills. This study emphasizes the importance of reeducation using a clinical skills course during the transition from student to nursing professional. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Visiting Again? Subjective Well-Being of Children in Elementary School and Repeated Visits to School Health Nurses

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    Leaver, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Children with vague complaints are without chronic illness, and who repeatedly visit the school nurse may be at risk for limited academic success. This study compares student reports of subjective well-being between children who do and do not repeatedly visit the school nurse with vague complaints. Methods: Children in grades 4 through…

  5. Use of a blog in an undergraduate nursing leadership course.

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    Reed, Shelly J; Edmunds, Debra

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the use of a blog in a senior leadership clinical nursing course was analyzed qualitatively through two means; focus group interviews of those using the blog, and analysis of blog content. Initial feelings expressed by students were annoyance and intimidation concerning the blogging assignment. These feelings quickly dissipated, with students verbalizing many positive aspects related to the blog, including having a place to reflect, feeling connected as a group, valuing feedback provided by their peers, and learning from theirs and others' experiences. The mechanics of having to synthesize their thoughts in written form, in a shared venue was also identified by students to be helpful for their learning. Blog posts were primarily related to student experiences, with students identifying a "lesson learned" in most posts. Student comments were geared to providing support of fellow students, through words of encouragement or through sharing similar experiences. Instructors felt the blog, in addition to helping students to synthesize their thoughts, helped to monitor how students were learning and progressing throughout the semester, and helped them to transition from nursing student to practicing professional. The researchers concluded that blogging in a senior leadership clinical nursing course promotes reflection is an effective way to enhance student learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Using distance technology to learn across borders: a virtual travel course in nursing.

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    Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Block, Derryl; Rojas, Yrene Esperanza Urbina; Birkholz, Lorri; Melgar Morán, Carlos Christian

    2011-08-01

    A 6-week online course was developed and delivered to nursing students and instructors at universities in two countries. The course exposed students and faculty to nursing and health concerns in both countries. All course communications were conducted in both English and Spanish, with support from online translation software as needed. Course content covered professional nursing, global health issues, and nursing interventions used with clinical problems. Although students were initially intimidated by the course language requirements, students valued the opportunity to learn about cultural and health issues. Faculty experienced a learning curve as well and enjoyed this international experience. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Effects of Didactic Instruction and Test-Enhanced Learning in a Nursing Review Course.

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    Tu, Yu-Ching; Lin, Yi-Jung; Lee, Jonathan W; Fan, Lir-Wan

    2017-11-01

    Determining the most effective approach for students' successful academic performance and achievement on the national licensure examination for RNs is important to nursing education and practice. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare didactic instruction and test-enhanced learning among nursing students divided into two fundamental nursing review courses in their final semester. Students in each course were subdivided into low-, intermediate-, and high-score groups based on their first examination scores. Mixed model of repeated measure and two-way analysis of variance were applied to evaluate students' academic results and both teaching approaches. Intermediate-scoring students' performances improved more through didactic instruction, whereas low-scoring students' performances improved more through test-enhanced learning. Each method had differing effects on individual subgroups within the different performance level groups of their classes, which points to the importance of considering both the didactic and test-enhanced learning approaches. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(11):683-687.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. [Survey on public health nursing education-in the comparison of nursing education courses, universities, advanced courses for public health nurse with junior nursing colleges, and public health nursing school].

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    Hirano, Kayoko; Ikeda, Nobuko; Kanagawa, Katuko; Shiomi, Sigeki; Suzuki, Akira; Hirayama, Tomoko; Furuya, Akie; Ymazaki, Kyoko; Yasumura, Seiji

    2005-08-01

    Changes in public health nursing education have been consideration. Theses changes include a dramatic increase in the number of public health nurses (PHNs) who have enrolled for nursing courses at university. This study was conducted to assess the current status and future of public health nursing education as perceived by teachers and students at three types of schools: universities offering nursing courses, advanced courses for PHNs with junior nursing colleges, and public health nursing schools. Questionnaires were distributed to teachers and students by mail. The questions that were sent to teachers asked which subjects were required to become a certified PHN, which lecture methods were employed to teach public health-particularly community health assessment methods, and what was the level of awareness of the activities of PHNs. Students were asked about their motivation to be a PHN, their understanding of public health, their views of public health activities and their images of PHNs. Responses were analyzed and differences between questionnaires from different schools were noted. These included the number of subjects and the total number of hours spent doing practical training and field experience in universities and the other types of schools, and the number of teachers. Differences also were noted among students at three types of schools about their age, methods of public health activities, knowledge about activities undertaken by PHNs, and their images of PHNs. No differences were observed among the schools with respect to the students' conceptual understanding of public health. Student age, practical training and field experience were found to contribute to their level of understanding of public health and public health nursing. It is thus necessary to consider the teaching methods employed by universities that administer nursing courses and the effectiveness of courses offered by graduate schools.

  9. CONSIDERATIONS ON THE HUMAN DIMENSION IN A NURSING UNDERGRADUATE COURSE

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    Sandra Fogaça Rosa Ribeiro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Health care is the main goal in an Undergraduate Nursing Course, extending health beyond biological body care. Thus, the objective of this study was to analyze the conception of human dimension according to the professors and the Political-Pedagogical Project of a public college, located in a city the Northern State of Paraná. The research was qualitative. The participants of the research were 13 professors of the Nursing course of the studied institution. Semi-structured interviews and documentary analysis were used as collection instruments. Analysis and interpretation of the data were performed from the interdisciplinary theoretical reference, articulating knowledge of Collective Health, Social Psychology and Education, in order to express the human dimension through these lenses, allowing to perceive the specificity of the phenomena studied and its relations with the educational situation. The results were presented in five categories: Relationship Political-Pedagogical Project and activities developed, Interpersonal Relations in the teaching-learning process, Interpersonal relations in the approaches between teaching and services, Interactions among professors, Human dimension. Human dimension was conceived as a priority; however, the lack of integration among professors, a dissociated understanding of the human and technical aspects of training, and suboptimal conditions prevented their potentialization.

  10. Evaluation of undergraduate nursing students' attitudes towards statistics courses, before and after a course in applied statistics.

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    Hagen, Brad; Awosoga, Olu; Kellett, Peter; Dei, Samuel Ofori

    2013-09-01

    Undergraduate nursing students must often take a course in statistics, yet there is scant research to inform teaching pedagogy. The objectives of this study were to assess nursing students' overall attitudes towards statistics courses - including (among other things) overall fear and anxiety, preferred learning and teaching styles, and the perceived utility and benefit of taking a statistics course - before and after taking a mandatory course in applied statistics. The authors used a pre-experimental research design (a one-group pre-test/post-test research design), by administering a survey to nursing students at the beginning and end of the course. The study was conducted at a University in Western Canada that offers an undergraduate Bachelor of Nursing degree. Participants included 104 nursing students, in the third year of a four-year nursing program, taking a course in statistics. Although students only reported moderate anxiety towards statistics, student anxiety about statistics had dropped by approximately 40% by the end of the course. Students also reported a considerable and positive change in their attitudes towards learning in groups by the end of the course, a potential reflection of the team-based learning that was used. Students identified preferred learning and teaching approaches, including the use of real-life examples, visual teaching aids, clear explanations, timely feedback, and a well-paced course. Students also identified preferred instructor characteristics, such as patience, approachability, in-depth knowledge of statistics, and a sense of humor. Unfortunately, students only indicated moderate agreement with the idea that statistics would be useful and relevant to their careers, even by the end of the course. Our findings validate anecdotal reports on statistics teaching pedagogy, although more research is clearly needed, particularly on how to increase students' perceptions of the benefit and utility of statistics courses for their nursing

  11. Nursing Librarians Cultivating Evidence-Based Practice Through an Asynchronous Online Course.

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    Mears, Kim; Blake, Lindsay

    2017-09-01

    In response to a request from the Nursing Shared Governance Evidence-Based Practice Council, librarians created an online evidence-based practice (EBP) continuing education course for clinical nurses. The curriculum was adapted from a previously created face-to-face course and was offered online through a learning management system. Although many nurses registered for the course, only a small sample was able to complete all modules. Feedback revealed that nurses appreciated the ease of online use, but they experienced technical barriers. Overall, nurses completing the course agreed that all learning objectives were met. An online asynchronous course for nurses is a viable option for teaching EBP, but hospital computer limitations must be taken into account to allow for participants' full immersion into the material. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(9):420-424. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. The study of nursing students’ learning initiative in the course reform of aged caring

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    Sun Wenjing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Analyzing the influence of nursing students’ learning initiative in the course reform of aged caring. Discuss the way of the aged care reform. Method: To reform the course of aged care in our school level 2013 88 nursing undergraduate. The specific content: learning aged care theory, learning Japanese care technology basic knowledge, adding Japanese and Taiwan’s nursing concepts to the traditional aged care teaching, performing sitcoms about old people’s disease and nursing way , reporting the plan of aged care by PowerPoint, organizing student volunteers to visit the nursing home and so on. The specific content lasted four months. Adopting the learning initiative (ALS scale developed by Zang Yuli and others after course reform. Measure the students’ learning initiative before and after the teaching. Result: Nursing student’s self-study ability was in the middle and lower level before the course reform(59.26±7.38; After the course reform, nursing student gain higher score than before learning on the three aspects contain “Learning motivation”,“Learning goals” and “Solid study”. The difference has statistically significant.(P<0.05.Conclusion: Through the aged care course reform, nursing students strengthen the study enthusiasm and initiative; enhance nursing student’s self-study ability. It is conducive to improve the learning interest of aged care course for nursing students.

  13. Research and Development for a Course in Ethics in Nursing Practice for Community College Associate Degree Nursing Students. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, Jeanette

    A project was undertaken to research and acquire the instructional sources needed for a course in ethics for community college associate degree nursing students and to develop such a course. Addressed in the individual units of the course were the following topics: bioethics and ethical decision making, basic ethical concepts and principles,…

  14. Effectiveness of an evidence-based practice (EBP) course on the EBP competence of undergraduate nursing students: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzafa-Martínez, María; López-Iborra, Lidón; Armero Barranco, David; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús

    2016-03-01

    International nursing institutions and experts recommend evidence-based practice (EBP) as a core component of the curriculum for nurses. However, the impact of EBP training on the competence of undergraduate nursing students remains unclear. To evaluate the effectiveness of an EBP course on the EBP competence undergraduate nursing students'. Quasi-experimental study carried out in non-randomized intervention and control groups. The study was conducted in a Spanish public university in 2010. Out of 420 second- and third-year nursing students, 75 were enrolled in the EBP course, forming the intervention group, and 73 were not enrolled in this course were recruited as controls. The educational intervention was a 15-week course designed to teach EBP competence. The EBP Competence Questionnaire (EBP-COQ) was administered before and after the intervention. Repeated-measure ANOVA was used to compare intervention and control group scores before and at two months after the 15-week intervention period. At 2months after the EBP course, mean EBP-COQ scores of the intervention group were significantly improved versus baseline in attitude (4.28 vs. 3.33), knowledge (3.92 vs. 2.82) and skills (4.01 vs. 2.75) dimensions, whereas little change was observed in control group scores over the same time period. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant effect of Time ×Group interaction on global competence and all three EBP-COQ dimensions. Undergraduate nursing students experience positive changes in EBP competence, knowledge, skills, and attitude as the result of a 15-week educational intervention on EBP. This EBP course may provide nursing school educators and policymakers with a useful model for integrating EBP teaching within the nursing curriculum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Applying Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) model to develop an online English writing course for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Hung-Cheng; Pan, Mei-Yu; Lee, Bih-O

    2015-06-01

    Learning English as foreign language and computer technology are two crucial skills for nursing students not only for the use in the medical institutions but also for the communication needs following the trend of globalization. Among language skills, writing has long been ignored in the curriculums although it is a core element of language learning. To apply the TPACK (Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge) model to design an online English writing course for nursing students, and to explore the effects of the course to the students' learning progress as well as their satisfactions and perceptions. A single-group experimental study, utilizing the CEEC (College Entrance Examination Center) writing grading criteria and a self-designed course satisfaction questionnaire, is used. Fifty one nursing students who were in their first/four semesters of the two year vocational pre-registration nursing course in a Taiwan university were selected using convenience sampling. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and repeated measure MANOVA. Qualitative data were analyzed by content analysis. Students' writing competence had been improved significantly in every dimension after the instruction. Only half of the learners preferred online writing compared to the traditional way of writing by hand. Additionally, participants reported that they would prefer to receive feedback from the teacher than peers, yet they did not like the indirect feedback. The teacher perceived the course as meaningful but demanding for both learning and teaching sides. To implement the peer review activities and give feedback on time were two major challenges during the cycles. The TPACK model suggests a comprehensive and effective teaching approach that can help enhance nursing students' English writing performance. Teachers are advised to consider its implementation when designing their syllabus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The gene expression and immunohistochemical time-course of diphenylcyclopropenone induced contact allergy in healthy humans following repeated epicutaneous challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, K F; Burton, M; Thomassen, M

    2017-01-01

    challenges with DPCP to find the predominant gene expression pattern, ii) the time-course of cell infiltration following repeated DPCP challenges, and iii) the transcriptome of a repeated CA exposure model. We obtained punch biopsies from control and DPCP exposed skin from ten DPCP sensitized individuals...

  17. Fear and loathing: undergraduate nursing students' experiences of a mandatory course in applied statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Brad; Awosoga, Oluwagbohunmi A; Kellett, Peter; Damgaard, Marie

    2013-04-23

    This article describes the results of a qualitative research study evaluating nursing students' experiences of a mandatory course in applied statistics, and the perceived effectiveness of teaching methods implemented during the course. Fifteen nursing students in the third year of a four-year baccalaureate program in nursing participated in focus groups before and after taking the mandatory course in statistics. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis to reveal four major themes: (i) "one of those courses you throw out?," (ii) "numbers and terrifying equations," (iii) "first aid for statistics casualties," and (iv) "re-thinking curriculum." Overall, the data revealed that although nursing students initially enter statistics courses with considerable skepticism, fear, and anxiety, there are a number of concrete actions statistics instructors can take to reduce student fear and increase the perceived relevance of courses in statistics.

  18. Improving Nursing Students' Learning Outcomes in Fundamentals of Nursing Course through Combination of Traditional and e-Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhaboumasoudi, Rouhollah; Bagheri, Maryam; Hosseini, Sayed Abbas; Ashouri, Elaheh; Elahi, Nasrin

    2018-01-01

    Fundamentals of nursing course are prerequisite to providing comprehensive nursing care. Despite development of technology on nursing education, effectiveness of using e-learning methods in fundamentals of nursing course is unclear in clinical skills laboratory for nursing students. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of blended learning (combining e-learning with traditional learning methods) with traditional learning alone on nursing students' scores. A two-group post-test experimental study was administered from February 2014 to February 2015. Two groups of nursing students who were taking the fundamentals of nursing course in Iran were compared. Sixty nursing students were selected as control group (just traditional learning methods) and experimental group (combining e-learning with traditional learning methods) for two consecutive semesters. Both groups participated in Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and were evaluated in the same way using a prepared checklist and questionnaire of satisfaction. Statistical analysis was conducted through SPSS software version 16. Findings of this study reflected that mean of midterm (t = 2.00, p = 0.04) and final score (t = 2.50, p = 0.01) of the intervention group (combining e-learning with traditional learning methods) were significantly higher than the control group (traditional learning methods). The satisfaction of male students in intervention group was higher than in females (t = 2.60, p = 0.01). Based on the findings, this study suggests that the use of combining traditional learning methods with e-learning methods such as applying educational website and interactive online resources for fundamentals of nursing course instruction can be an effective supplement for improving nursing students' clinical skills.

  19. An "XL" endodontics intervention for dental students required to repeat the course: changing frustration to improved grades and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcota, Marcela; Fuenzalida, Alejandra; Barrientos, Claudia; Garrido, Mauricio; Ruiz de Gauna, Pilar; González, Fermín E

    2015-04-01

    Given the psychological and financial costs involved with failing a clinical course, especially in developing countries, an alternative educational method was tested with students who had to repeat the year-long endodontic course at the University of Chile Faculty of Dentistry. The objectives of the intervention were to deepen theoretical knowledge and practical experiences, as well as to reinforce personal confidence in an endodontic clinical setting for students who failed the regular endodontic course. The aim of this study was to evaluate the success of this new model of educational intervention. In the study, 28 students who had failed the endodontic course repeated it with an alternative teaching method. The students attended patients immediately following practical competence exams, and they had access to simulated models that used rotary instruments and access cavities and had emergency care practice. Feedback sessions were held after each clinical session. Final grades were compared with those of other students who repeated the course without the intervention from 2007 to 2009. A survey was administered to understand the causes of initial failure and their opinions of the intervention. Students who participated in the alternative course did significantly better than their counterparts from previous years who did not receive the intervention (5.7±0.3 vs. 5.4±0.2; pendodontics, a contrasting perspective to the frustration students usually express after repeating the course. The results of this study support the introduction of similar interventions in endodontics and perhaps other courses.

  20. Student satisfaction with a Website designed for three nursing courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolski, K

    2000-01-01

    . Creating and maintaining a web page is labor intensive, but it is, in my opinion, worth the effort. I strongly urge nurse educators to explore the possibilities of developing websites to accompany individual courses and to consider even more interactive web pages that include online discussion groups and provide space for posting student work. An active website needs frequent maintenance and updates. I recommend that academic administrators recognize web authoring as a valid and legitimate activity and provide nursing faculty with necessary support. This might include workshops on web authoring or Internet use, released time or credited time for initial website design, and credit allocation for site maintenance. The Internet is the most extensive collection of information available. As webmaster and pathophysiology expert, I am guiding my students; as a teacher, I am both assuming and recognizing a new role. As a teacher, I need to assume the responsibility for guiding students to worthwhile resources in the subject area. The website is a portal to the world, but a portal that I oversee.

  1. Building confidence: an exploration of nurses undertaking a postgraduate biological science course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wissen, Kim; McBride-Henry, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the impact of studying biological science at a postgraduate level and how this impacted on nursing practice. The term biological sciences in this research encompasses elements of physiology, genetics, biochemistry and pathophysiology. A qualitative research study was designed, that involved the dissemination of a pre- and post-course semi-structured questionnaire for a biological science course, as part of a Master of Nursing programme at a New Zealand University, thus exploring the impact of undertaking a postgraduate biological sciences course. The responses were analysed into themes, based on interpretive concepts. The primary themes revealed improvement in confidence as: confidence in communication, confidence in linking nursing theoretical knowledge to practice and confidence in clinical nursing knowledge. This study highlights the need to privilege clinically-derived nursing knowledge, and that confidence in this nursing knowledge and clinical practice can be instilled through employing the model of theory-guided practice.

  2. [The nursing course of Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora: 1977-1979].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Mariangela Aparecida Gonçalves; Baptista, Suely de Souza

    2009-01-01

    Historic-social research aiming at: characterize the nursing superior teaching in Juiz de Fora city and to discuss the reason and motivations which determined the creation of Nursing Course of the Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora. Primary source: written documents and oral testimony. The results discussion was guided by Pierre Bourdieu. In the 1970's, Education Ministry Department of University Subjects undertook efforts to create nursing courses in federal universities. As the process of negotiation meant to incorporate Hermantina Beraldo Nursing College to Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora failed, in 1978 a Department of Nursing was bind to UFJF Medical College and, in 1970, the Nursing Course of this same university started functioning.

  3. Effects of holistic nursing course: a paradigm shift for holistic health practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Marty

    2007-06-01

    A study of an undergraduate course in holistic nursing was conducted to determine its impact on personal and professional health care practices. A mixed method design was used to examine responses on a sample of 200 participants. Results indicated a positive personal impact with continued application of concepts into professional health practices. Personal and professional nursing practices were influenced from 1 to 7 years after completing the holistic nursing course. After introduction of the concepts of self-care and holistic approaches to health, students and graduates experienced a shift in values and beliefs related to their own health practices. Continued exposure to holistic practices creates a pattern of awareness toward health that affects future personal and professional nursing practice, creating a paradigm shift for emerging nursing students and graduates from the course. This affects the manner in which nurses meet the needs of their clients in a variety of settings.

  4. Qualitative assessment of a blended learning intervention in an undergraduate nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling

    2012-12-01

    Nurses are experiencing new ethical issues because of global developments and changes in the healthcare environment. Blended learning is one of the various methods used to deliver meaningful learning experiences. Well-designed, properly administered nursing ethics education is essential for nursing students to visualize the role of professional nurses. However, a literature review shows that only a few existing studies have touched on the subject of nursing student experiences with blended learning in a nursing ethics course. This study examines how undergraduate nursing students respond to a blended learning approach in a nursing ethics course and how blended learning affects the learning process. We used a qualitative research design with in-depth interviews. Participants included 28 female undergraduate nursing students who had completed the nursing ethics course. Each interview lasted 50-100 minutes. The researcher conducted all interviews in 2009. The researcher identified six major themes and 13 subthemes from the data. The six themes included (a) enhancing thinking ability, (b) improving problem-solving skills, (c) reflecting in and on practice, (d) perceiving added workload, (e) encouraging active learning, and (f) identifying the value of nursing. Participants felt that the blended learning experience was a generally positive experience. Most participants appreciated the opportunity to take a more active role in the learning process, think about issues profoundly and critically, and exercise metacognitive powers in the thinking and decision-making process. Study findings may suggest productive ideas for fine-tuning blended learning models.

  5. Construction of evaluation indicators of the learning process for a nursing course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzmarina Aparecida Doretto Braccialli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to build process assessment indicators for a nursing undergraduate course. The indicators were validated after three stages of a consensus conference, developed by experts based on an initial matrix with 209 indicators, in four areas of competence of the course. The analysis, performed with the mean and standard deviation of each indicator, led to the final matrix, comprising 87 indicators. The experts agreed that all indicators should be in the four stages of the nursing course program, considering the degree of autonomy of the undergraduate in each stage, and the fact that it is an integrated course, oriented by competences. The indicators may support local managers in the process assessment of the nursing course, as well as help other course managers in the health area use a program oriented by competences and active learning and teaching methodologies.

  6. The incidence of technological stress among baccalaureate nurse educators using technology during course preparation and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Mary S

    2009-01-01

    The concept of technology-related stress was first introduced in the 1980s when computers became more prevalent in the business and academic world. Nurse educators have been impacted by the rapid changes in technology in recent years. A review of the literature revealed no research studies that have been conducted to investigate the incidence of technological stress among nurse educators. The purpose of this descriptive-correlational study was to describe the technological stressors that Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators experienced while teaching nursing theory courses. A researcher-developed questionnaire, the nurse educator technostress scale (NETS) was administered to a census sample of 311 baccalaureate nurse educators in Louisiana. Findings revealed that Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators are experiencing technological stress. The variable, perceived administrative support for use of technology in the classroom, was a significant predictor in a regression model predicting Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators' technological stress (F=14.157, p<.001).

  7. [Evidence-based practice in nursing curricula: the experience of nursing degree course of Reggio Emilia. A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotto, Stefano; Chiesi, Ivens; Mecugni, Daniela; Casali, Patrizia; Doro, Lucia Maria Grazia; Lusetti, Simona

    2010-01-01

    Given the lack of evidence in literature concerning the presence of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in nursing curricula, but considering its importance in order to educate future nurses to use critical thinking and to base their practice on scientific evidence, tutors and nursing teachers of the Nursing Degree Course of Reggio Emilia (Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia), have decided to introduce a three-year laboratory of EBP. The purposes of this project are: to describe the three-year EBP laboratory of Nursing Degree, its objectives, its structure, its integration with practical training and nursing subjects and its students evaluation strategies; to get students verify the perception of the usefulness of the three-year EBP laboratory regarding the elaboration of the graduation thesis, the search for appropriatem answers for patients met during clinical trainings and the usefulness of the EBP process in view of the development of their professional career. The design of research of this pilot study is correlation-descriptive. It has been selected a sample of convenience consisting of 56 nurses graduated in the autumn session of the academic year 2007-2008. For data collection we have used an electronic questionnaire (Microsoft Word with closed fields) structured for the purpose. The laboratory has been effective in learning to use the database to search for evidences and to use the database to search for evidences related to nursing problems met in training placements. Finally, graduated nurses consider the EBP process an essential element of professional nursing luggage. Although the sample is restricted the results indicates the good educational choice made by our Nursing Degree Course of integrating the EBP Laboratory in the curriculum.

  8. Review of pain content in three-year preregistration pediatric nursing courses in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twycross, Alison; Roderique, Lynda

    2013-12-01

    The results of several studies suggest that gaps remain in nurses' knowledge about pain in children, and particularly regarding pain assessment, analgesic drugs, and nondrug methods, suggesting a need to explore the pain content of preregistration nursing curricula. Over the past decade, the way nurse education is delivered has changed with the advent of the internet and the use of virtual learning environments. This study, therefore, explored the depth and breadth of pain content in 3-year preregistration pediatric nursing courses across the U.K. as well as ascertaining how this content is delivered. The leads for pediatric nursing at all 56 U.K. higher education institutions running the 3-year preregistration pediatric nursing course were e-mailed a questionnaire. Participants were asked to indicate whether topics are covered in the program, and if so how it was delivered. Results suggest that preregistration pediatric nursing courses in the U.K. do not always equip students to manage pain effectively in clinical practice. There appears to be limited content on pain in nursing curricula, with several institutions not covering key topics. Most teaching is delivered face to face with limited workbooks and virtual learning activities. Further research is needed in this area to ascertain the impact of this on the quality of care provided. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of the Effects of Flipped Learning of a Nursing Informatics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jina; Kim, Shin-Jeong; Kim, Sunghee; Vasuki, Rajaguru

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of flipped learning in a nursing informatics course. Sixty-four undergraduate students attending a flipped learning nursing informatics course at a university in South Korea participated in this study in 2013. Of these, 43 students participated at University A, and 46 students participated at University B, as a comparison group. Three levels of Kirkpatrick's evaluation model were used: level one (the students' satisfaction), level two (achievement on the course outcomes), and level three (self-perceived nursing informatics competencies). Students of the flipped learning course reported positive effects above the middle degree of satisfaction (level one) and achieved the course outcomes (level two). In addition, self-perceived nursing informatics competencies (level three) of the flipped learning group were higher than those of the comparison group. A flipped learning nursing informatics course is an effective teaching strategy for preparing new graduate nurses in the clinical setting. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(8):477-483.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. [Abandonment of nursing courses: a survey regarding the motivations which lead the students to the abandonment of the nursing degree course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destrobecq, Anne; Destefani, Chiara; Sponton, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The Authors made a survey regarding the motivations which make the students leave the nursing degree course (NDC). The statistical data regarding the abandonment of university courses in Italy say that a 19/20% of the students leave the courses. As regards the whole University of Milan, the amount of those students (18,3%) lays under the national average. The authors made a survey about the motivations which lead the students of nursing to the abandonment of their academic path; via the offices of the nursing schools they collected the telephone numbers of the students enroled between 2000 and 2006, then they made a structured telephonic interview. An 87,7% of the interviewed students said that he/she had abandoned during the first year; the motivations are the following, in order of frequency: Too much engagement (30.1%), Other (26%), this item offers several answers, for example pregnancy, emotive problems, personal problems, Change of the academic path (23,3%) Expectations Disappointment (12,4%), Economic problems (8.2%). The survey is qualitative; it wants to be a first-step study to deeply analyze a topic of major interest in the field of nursing courses management.

  11. Learning experience of Chinese nursing students in an online clinical English course: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Anson C Y; Wong, Nick; Wong, Thomas K S

    2015-02-01

    The low English proficiency of Chinese nurse/nursing students affects their performance when they work in English-speaking countries. However, limited resources are available to help them improve their workplace English, i.e. English used in a clinical setting. To this end, it is essential to look for an appropriate and effective means to assist them in improving their clinical English. The objective of this study is to evaluate the learning experience of Chinese nursing students after they have completed an online clinical English course. Focus group interview was used to explore their learning experience. 100 students in nursing programs at Tung Wah College were recruited. The inclusion criteria were: (1) currently enrolled in a nursing program; and (2) having clinical experience. Eligible participants self-registered for the online English course, and were required to complete the course within 3 months. After that, semi-structured interviews were conducted on students whom completed the whole and less than half of the course. One of the researchers joined each of the interviews as a facilitator and an observer. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Finally, 7 themes emerged from the interviews: technical issues, adequacy of support, time requirement, motivation, clarity of course instruction, course design, and relevancy of the course. Participants had varied opinions on the 2 themes: motivation and relevancy of the course. Overall, results of this study suggest that the online English course helped students improve their English. Factors which support their learning are interactive course design, no time constraint, and relevancy to their work/study. Factors which detracted from their learning are poor accessibility, poor technical and learning support and no peer support throughout the course. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Electronic Portfolios for Distance Learning: A Case from a Nursing Clinical Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephsen, Jayne

    2012-01-01

    Clinical nursing courses can already be challenging, in the traditional context of placements and hours spent in a health care setting. These types of courses are additionally problematic when offered via distance learning, due to geographic separation of students, lack of clinical placement sites in the student's community, and lack of…

  13. Intravenous Fluid Therapy Course for the Licensed Practical Nurse. Instructor Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 10-unit intravenous (IV) therapy course for licensed practical nurses. Units contain from one to nine lessons. The first unit provides an introduction and orientation to the course. Subsequent units concern documentation, anatomy and physiology as applied to IV therapy, fundamental aspects of fluid…

  14. Nurse teacher candidates learned to use social media during the international teacher training course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Leena; Gustafsson, Marja-Liisa; Vilén, Liisa; Fuster, Pilar; Istomina, Natalja; Papastavrou, Evridiki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the nurse teacher candidates' learning outcomes and experiences in social media during the international nurse teacher training course, Empowering learning environments in nursing education, Intensive Program (EleneIP). The pre-post research design was used. The data was collected before and after the course, with the questionnaire consisting of structured and open questions. Altogether, 24 nurse teacher candidates from four different European countries participated in the course and this study. The results showed that the knowledge of using social media applications increased during the course from 5.2 (range 1-9) to 8.1 (range 4-10), and their skills increased from 4.5 (range 1-8) to 7.6 (range 4-10).The main topics learnt during the course were divided in two categories: subjects of the course and teaching and learning methods. The students' experiences concerning the EleneIP course were positive in both categories. The international group created during EleneIP course also allowed the students to achieve another important aim, learning from a collaborative group the importance and possibilities of different learning environments, considering the cultural and social characteristics of each country participating in it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Managing parental groups: personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the experience and personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses. During their child's first year, all parents in Sweden are invited to participate in parental groups within the child health service; however, only 49% choose to participate. Despite extensive experience, child healthcare nurses find managing parental groups challenging and express a need for training in group dynamics and group leadership. The study was designed as a controlled study with a pretest/post-test design where the participants form their own control group. A group leadership course was given to 56 child healthcare nurses and evaluated in a pre- and postintervention questionnaire, a course evaluation and an interview with the course leaders. The child healthcare nurses felt their group leadership skills were strengthened and the majority (96%) felt that the course had changed their way of leading parental groups. They felt that the group leader role had been clarified and that they had obtained several new tools to use in their groups. Clarifying the role of group leader and adding knowledge about group leadership and dynamics seems to have increased the self-confidence for child healthcare nurses in group leadership. Improved confidence in group management might motivate the child healthcare nurses to further develop parental groups to attract the parents who currently choose not to participate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Development of an online nursing management course: successful experience between Brazil and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronchin, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Lima, Antônio Fernandes Costa; Alavarce, Débora Cristina; Prata, Ana Paula; Santos, Margarida Reis; Aroldi, Juscilynne Barros da Costa

    2015-12-01

    Objective To describe the experience of planning and developing online refresher courses in nursing management for nurses in the contexts of Brazil and Portugal. Method The instructional design was based on meaningful learning theory, andragogy, and dialectical methodology, so it valued interaction between the actors, emphasizing the scenarios of practice and applying the concepts covered. The course structure is divided into nine theoretical units, four case studies, and an essay exam. Results The course was positively evaluated by the participants, who reported opportunities for acquisition of new knowledge, interaction and exchange of experiences, motivation to study the topics, and self-learning. Conclusion It is expected that description of this experience will stimulate proposals for new courses and programs in distance education modalities, improving the processes of teaching and learning so as to give support to future analyses of their impact on the development and enhancement of management skills in nursing.

  17. Influence of Nursing Faculty Discussion Presence on Student Learning and Satisfaction in Online Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claywell, Lora; Wallace, Cara; Price, Jill; Reneau, Margaret; Carlson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the relationships between faculty participation in online discussions with student satisfaction and perceived learning in online RN-BSN and MSN courses. Analysis of faculty participation in online courses (n = 280) demonstrated a relationship between faculty participation and student satisfaction and perceived learning. The results of this study offer guidance on the minimal faculty participation necessary in online discussions in nursing courses.

  18. Incorporating electronic-based and computer-based strategies: graduate nursing courses in administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graveley, E; Fullerton, J T

    1998-04-01

    The use of electronic technology allows faculty to improve their course offerings. Four graduate courses in nursing administration were contemporized to incorporate fundamental computer-based skills that would be expected of graduates in the work setting. Principles of adult learning offered a philosophical foundation that guided course development and revision. Course delivery strategies included computer-assisted instructional modules, e-mail interactive discussion groups, and use of the electronic classroom. Classroom seminar discussions and two-way interactive video conferencing focused on group resolution of problems derived from employment settings and assigned readings. Using these electronic technologies, a variety of courses can be revised to accommodate the learners' needs.

  19. Evaluation of an interactive web-based nursing course with streaming videos for medication administration skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowan, Azizeh K; Idhail, Jamila Abu

    2014-08-01

    Nursing students should exhibit competence in nursing skills in order to provide safe and quality patient care. This study describes the design and students' response to an interactive web-based course using streaming video technology tailored to students' needs and the course objectives of the fundamentals of nursing skills clinical course. A mixed-methodology design was used to describe the experience of 102 first-year undergraduate nursing students at a school of nursing in Jordan who were enrolled in the course. A virtual course with streaming videos was designed to demonstrate medication administration fundamental skills. The videos recorded the ideal lab demonstration of the skills, and real-world practice performed by registered nurses for patients in a hospital setting. After course completion, students completed a 30-item satisfaction questionnaire, 8 self-efficacy scales, and a 4-item scale solicited their preferences of using the virtual course as a substitute or a replacement of the lab demonstration. Students' grades in the skill examination of the procedures were measured. Relationships between the main variables and predictors of satisfaction and self-efficacy were examined. Students were satisfied with the virtual course (3.9 ± 0.56, out of a 5-point scale) with a high-perceived overall self-efficacy (4.38 ± 0.42, out of a 5-point scale). Data showed a significant correlation between student satisfaction, self-efficacy and achievement in the virtual course (r = 0.45-0.49, p students accessed the course from home and some faced technical difficulties. Significant predictors of satisfaction were ease of access the course and gender (B = 0.35, 0.25, CI = 0.12-0.57, 0.02-0.48 respectively). The mean achievement score of students in the virtual class (7.5 ± 0.34) was significantly higher than that of a previous comparable cohort who was taught in the traditional method (6.0 ± 0.23) (p students believed that the virtual course is a sufficient

  20. Repeated CT studies of a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis during his entire clinical course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Masahiro; Fukui, Keiji; Takeda, Sadanori; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Hideki; Sakaki, Saburo.

    1985-01-01

    We encountered a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis whose cerebral lesions were studied by repeated CT scannings during his entire clinical course. The purpose of this paper is to report the earliest lesions of the brain as revealed by CT scans. A 63-year-old man was admitted to our clinic complaining of headache, nausea, fever, and disorientation. On admission, a physical examination showed a high fever, while a neurological examination revealed a stiff neck, a positive Kernig's sign, and disorientation. Laboratory examinations revealed a pleocytosis of the cerebrospinal fluid. Electroencephalograms showed the so-called ''periodic sharp-and-slow-waves complex''. The complement fixation titer for herpes simplex virus was x32 in the serum and x128 in the cerebrospinal fluid, suggesting the diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis. We treated him with adenine arabinoside and gamma-globulin, but the patient did not recover; rather, he died of pneumonia and gastrointestinal bleeding three months later. Plain CT scans taken on the 12th day after the onset revealed a low-density area with signs of a slight mass in the region from the right island of Reil to the right uncus. Contrast-enhanced CT scans revealed an irregular enhancement in the low-density area. CT scans taken on the 19th day after the onset showed an extensive low-density area with a streak-like enhancement in the right temporal lobe, which is in aggreement with the findings reported by others as characteristic CT findings for herpes simplex encephalitis. In order to make an early diagnosis of a patient, we should pay attention to a low-density area with an irregular contrast enhancement in the region from the island of Reil to the uncus on a CT scan. (author)

  1. Gamification: An Innovative Teaching-Learning Strategy for the Digital Nursing Students in a Community Health Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Black, Crystal; Merrill, Earline B; Konzelman, Lois; Williams, Tammie T; Hart, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Serious games have "re-emerged" as innovative teaching-learning strategies that researchers have shown to be effective in improving student learning outcomes. "Serious games" refer to games that are driven by educational goals, not entertainment. The use of serious games as part of the teaching-learning experience in nursing education fits into the philosophy and strategies of active learning. The "digital" nursing student needs engagement, stimulation, realism, and entertainment not more readings and Powerpoint supplements in the classroom to support learning. Nursing faculty at a mid-Atlantic Historical Black College and University introduced "serious gaming" technology into a Community Health Nursing course by using two web-based gamed simulations, Outbreak at WatersEdge: A Public Health Discovery Game, and EnviroRisk. This innovation proved to be effective in reinforcing learning and improving student learning outcomes.

  2. Applying the Flipped Learning Model to an English-Medium Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heeseung; Kim, Jeongeun; Bang, Kyung Sook; Park, Yeon Hwan; Lee, Nam Ju; Kim, Chanhee

    2015-12-01

    An emerging trend in Asian higher education is English-medium instruction (EMI), which uses English as the primary instructional language. EMI prepares domestic students for international leadership; however, students report difficulty in learning, and educators have raised questions concerning the effectiveness of EMI. The flipped learning model (FLM), in which lecture and homework activities for a course are reversed, was applied to an English-medium course offered by a college of nursing in Korea. The aims of this study were to: 1) revise an existing English-medium nursing course using the FLM; 2) explore students' learning experiences and their acceptance of the FLM; and 3) identify key factors in the success of FLM. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional, mixed-methods design and the participants were students at one nursing school in Korea. A series of course development meetings with faculties from the nursing school and the center for teaching and learning were used to develop the course format and content. We conducted course evaluations using the Flipped Course Evaluation Questionnaire with open-ended questions and focus group interviews. Students (N=75) in a 15-week nursing course responded to a survey after completing the course. Among them, seven students participated in one of two focus groups. Overall, students accepted and favored the flipped learning strategy, and indicated that the method enhanced lecture content and their understanding of it. Factors associated with effective instruction included structured monitoring systems and motivational environments. The FLM requires sufficient preparation to facilitate student motivation and maximize learning outcomes.

  3. Online training course on critical appraisal for nurses: adaptation and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reviriego, Eva; Cidoncha, María Angeles; Asua, José; Gagnon, Marie Pierre; Mateos, Maider; Gárate, Lucía; de Lorenzo, Elena; González, Rosa María

    2014-07-05

    Research is an essential activity for improving quality and efficiency in healthcare. The objective of this study was to train nurses from the public Basque Health Service (Osakidetza) in critical appraisal, promoting continuous training and the use of research in clinical practice. This was a prospective pre-post test study. The InfoCritique course on critical appraisal was translated and adapted. A sample of 50 nurses and 3 tutors was recruited. Educational strategies and assessment instruments were established for the course. A course website was created that contained contact details of the teaching team and coordinator, as well as a course handbook and videos introducing the course. Assessment comprised the administration of questionnaires before and after the course, in order to explore the main intervention outcomes: knowledge acquired and self-learning readiness. Satisfaction was also measured at the end of the course. Of the 50 health professionals recruited, 3 did not complete the course for personal or work-related reasons. The mean score on the pre-course knowledge questionnaire was 70.5 out of 100, with a standard deviation of 11.96. In general, participants' performance on the knowledge questionnaire improved after the course, as reflected in the notable increase of the mean score, to 86.6, with a standard deviation of 10.00. Further, analyses confirmed statistically significant differences between pre- and post-course results (p tools for research, promote a research culture, and encourage critical thinking for evidence-based decision making.

  4. Graduates from dual qualification courses, registered nurse and health visitor: a career history study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Vari M; Porter, Elizabeth M J; Grant, Robert L

    2013-08-01

    Educationalists and managers internationally are challenged to find ways of preparing, recruiting early in their careers, and retaining nurses into public health roles in primary care. Public health nursing qualifications are post-initial nurse registration in the United Kingdom as in some other countries. In the mid twentieth century there were a number of innovative programmes of dual qualification: registered nurse and health visitor (the United Kingdom term for public health nurse). To investigate the career histories of graduates from courses integrating both nursing and health visitor qualifications. An observational, survey study. The United Kingdom. A purposive sample of graduates from integrated registered nurse and health visitor programmes, 1959-1995, from one University. Self completed, anonymous, survey sent to graduates, with contact details known to the University and through snowballing techniques, in 2011. Forty five women (56%), graduates in all four decades, returned the survey. A significant majority (82%) had taken up health visitor posts on completing the course. Over their careers, 42% of all jobs held were as health visitors. Only four never worked in a post that required a health visiting qualification. Most had undertaken paid work throughout their careers that focused on aspects of public health, often linked to child, maternal and/or family wellbeing. Many held teaching/lecturing and management posts at some point in their career. Those holding management posts were more likely to report leaving them as a result of organisational re-structuring or redundancy than those in non-management posts. Courses that prepare students to be both nurses and health visitors result in a majority of graduates who take up posts as health visitors on qualification and subsequently. Nurse education planners may find this evidence of value in determining ways of providing a future workforce for public health nursing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All

  5. Integrated lecturing within clerkship course, a new learning method in nurse-anesthesia teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Akhlaghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Traditional lecture-based teaching has been long used to transit theoretical knowledge to the participants. Due to some problems of this didactic approach, some believe that integration within an active method is more valuable in nursing education. In this study, we hypothesized that integrating lecture-based teaching within clerkship course would enhance nurse-anesthesia students’ knowledge.Methods: A prospective randomized study was conducted. Twenty four students of two-year nurse-anesthesia participated in the study. All of the students received either didactic lectures or integrated lectures within clerkship course during a four-month semester of their educational curriculum. Their knowledge of anesthesia course was assessed at the end of the course using Wilcoxon Rank test.Results: The integrated method improved students’ final scores at the end of the semester (p=0.004. Moreover, their scores was much better when taxonomy-2 questions were compared (p=0.001.Conclusion: Incorporating didactic lecture within anesthesia clerkship course improves participants’ knowledge of anesthesia course.Keywords:  Anesthesia, Lecture, Knowledge, Anesthesia course, Clerkship course

  6. Repeated Courses of Oral Ibuprofen in Premature Infants with Patent Ductus Arteriosus: Efficacy and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haşim Olgun

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: A second course of OIBU seems effective and safe for use in preterm infants with hsPDA. Although a third course of OIBU results in PDA closure in some additional patients, the difference is not significant. Thus, surgical ligation should be considered after the second course, especially in patients with signs of severe heart failure.

  7. Teaching Argumentation in a Philosophy Course for Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Jim

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I introduce the background situation that triggered the need for a particular project offered in a senior undergraduate course in health care ethics. Background information is provided to support the rationale of the project in the course. Then, the argument that opens the challenge to the students is outlined, followed by a…

  8. THE CONCEPTION OF NURSING WORK BY STUDENTES AND TEACHERS FROM A TECHNICAL COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amailson Sandro Barros

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at presenting the conception of work envisioned by students and teachers from a technical course on nursing. For that end, we interviewed 12 students and 03 teachers from the course. The data was collected through structured interviews. The data obtained pointed to a concept of work relied on pleasure and satisfaction for caring, as well as source of remuneration, which is related to the ideological background perpetuated that associates nursing to dedication, obedience and material detachment. The speech of the participants disregards the shock between capital and labor and the social construction and historical exploitation of the workforce, keeping strongly the dogma of charity in the field of nursing. The reports pointed to the dual character of the work which comprises the abstract and concrete conceptions, leading to a division between intellectual labor versus manual work and precarization of labor in nursing and teaching.

  9. Managing parental groups: personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses.

    OpenAIRE

    Lefevre, Åsa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate the experience and personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses.BACKGROUND: During their child's first year, all parents in Sweden are invited to participate in parental groups within the child health service; however, only 49% choose to participate. Despite extensive experience, child healthcare nurses find managing parental groups challenging and express a need for training in group dynamics and group leadership.DESIGN: The stu...

  10. Proceedings of a course on veterinary nursing, Massey University 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, G.V.

    1991-01-01

    This conference proceedings consists of 15 papers by 15 authors, which deal with veterinary nursing around the world, skills required for dealing with clients and selling drugs, safe handling of animals, samples and drugs, radiation safety, monitoring anaesthesia and post-operative monitoring, canine diabetes mellitus, cleaning, disinfection and sterilization and collection of blood and urine samples from dogs, cats and birds

  11. The power of nursing: An innovative course in values clarification and self-discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Lisa; Ziehm, Scott R; Jessup, Martha A; Amedro, Pattie; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Derouin, Anne; Kennedy, Betsy Babb; Manahan, Sally; Parish, Abby Luck; Remen, Rachel Naomi

    Teaching for a practice is more than the dissemination of knowledge and information to the learner. Professional nursing education requires teachers to facilitate students' self-reflection and awareness and assimilation of core professional and personal values in order for the new nurse to anchor and internalize these values as part of a professional identity. To achieve this, nursing educators recognize the importance of learning opportunities centered in the affective domain and the importance of teaching for professional formation that supports nursing students' commitment to the values of their chosen community of practice. This paper describes the development, implementation and evaluation of a learning innovation for pre-RN students. The Power of Nursing: Embracing the Healer's Art, a five-session, 15-hour discovery model course that uses guided reflection and personal sharing is described, as are course outcomes for 68 students from four nursing schools in the U.S. Overall students' reports were strongly favorable and the learning experience was valued and identified as unique within the nursing curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term effects on nursing alumni: Assessing a course in public and global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Sheri P; Lundberg, Karen; de la Cruz, Karen; Corbett, Cheryl; Heaston, Sondra; Reed, Shelly; Williams, Mary

    The impact of a cultural awareness course among nursing students may affect the particular person for years to come. Cultural awareness can be taught via many methods, often requiring study abroad and/or extreme investment of time, money and effort. There is little research on sustained effects on nursing alumni from such a course. The purpose of this descriptive survey study was to determine the long term outcomes of a cultural awareness course and 2) compare the long term effects between alumni who went abroad and those who chose to complete the course locally. One hundred and twenty-one nursing alumni completed the International Education Survey (IES) (Zorn, 1996) with additional open-ended questions. Quantitative and qualitative results concluded: 1) nursing alumni were influenced long term by a course dedicated to public and global health and 2) all alumni had statistically significant IES scores but alumni who studied abroad had the greatest increase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mortality of rats under repeated +Gz acceleration in the course of radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnicki, T.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of repeated +10G z acceleration on the mortality of rats after acute total-body irradiation was studied. No conclusive evidence was found to the effect that daily repeated exposures to 5 or 7.5 min of +10G z inertial forces essentially influence the mortality of rats after acute irradiation in the dose range 0.206-0.309 C/kg. 7 refs. (author)

  14. The Impact of Nursing Students' Prior Chemistry Experience on Academic Performance and Perception of Relevance in a Health Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddey, Kerrie; de Berg, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students have typically found the study of chemistry to be one of their major challenges in a nursing course. This mixed method study was designed to explore how prior experiences in chemistry might impact chemistry achievement during a health science unit. Nursing students (N = 101) studying chemistry as part of a health science unit were…

  15. A Corpus-Based Evaluation on Two Different English for Nursing Purposes (ENP) Course Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Alif Fairus Nor; Puteh, Sharifah Nor

    2017-01-01

    It is difficult for most of the second language learners in Malaysia to function proficiently in English language due to limited vocabulary knowledge. It has also been challenging for TESL graduates to fit in as ENP teachers due to the lack of specialized vocabulary knowledge in nursing field. Thus, a course books has always been a highly…

  16. Web course on medication administration strengthens nursing students' competence prior to graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettiäinen, Sari; Luojus, Katja; Salminen, Satu; Koivula, Meeri

    2014-08-01

    Nursing students' competence has been found inadequate in mastering of pharmacotherapy regulations and prescriptions, pharmacology, medical calculations, fractional and decimal numbers, and mathematics on the whole. The study investigated the efficacy of an additional medication administration web course in increasing nursing students' self-evaluated competence on medication administration. Finnish nursing students self-evaluated their medication administration competence before and after the web-based medication course. Design was quasi-experimental. 244 students answered the questionnaire before and 192 after the web course. An online self-evaluation questionnaire was developed to measure students' competence on basic pharmacotherapy, intravenous medication and infusion, blood transfusion and epidural medication. The data was analysed with SPSS 18.0 software using descriptive analyses and comparing sum variables with Man-Whitney U-test. The medication administration web course, which took 8 h on average, significantly improved self-evaluated competence of nursing students in all the fields. Prior to the education most defects were found in matters concerning compatibility and adverse effects of pharmaceuticals and solutions and in epidural medication competency. The education strengthened all these competencies. It is necessary to revise medication administration before graduation and web-based learning can be used in it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluating a Web-based Graduate Level Nursing Ethics Course: Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Heather; Lockerbie, Linda; Ramsay, Deyanne; Beaman, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Student and teacher opinions were obtained regarding a Web-based ethics course for nursing graduate students. Both groups had positive views of online discussions; critical and reflective thinking was enhanced; technical difficulties were overcome with the help of expert support services; compressed time frame was a drawback; and ways to enhance…

  18. [The development and effects of a comprehensive communication course for nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunah; Park, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Hyun-Hwa

    2004-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (a) develop a comprehensive communication course combined with a group program for improving communication skills; and (b) examine the effects of the comprehensive communication course on interpersonal communication, relationship change, self-esteem, and depression in nursing students. The experimental group consisted of 82 nursing students, and the control group, 108 nursing students. Both groups each took communication courses from March to June, 2002 and 2003. A group program for improving communication skills was conducted for each 8 subgroups of the experimental group for 90 minutes once a week during the 6 weeks, while the existing communication lecture was conducted for the control group. Both groups were post-tested after the intervention for verifying the difference of variables between the two groups, and the experimental group was also pre-tested for verifying the difference between before and after the treatment. Interpersonal communication score of the post-test in the experimental group was significantly higher than in the control group and the depression score of the post-test in the experimental group was significantly lower than in the control group. Interpersonal communication, relationship change and self-esteem scores were significantly increased and the depression score was significantly decreased in experimental group after the treatment. In conclusion, the comprehensive communication course that was developed in this study had positive effects on communication skills in nursing students.

  19. Implementing the educational units of the nursing course of FAFEMA: an experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia T. Alves Rezende

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at reporting the curriculum development along the four grades of the Nursing Course of Marília Medical School (FAMEMA in 2003. The method used was the reflection about the pedagogical practice, from the documental analysis of the teaching-learning programs in each grade. The results show some points to be worked in the political-pedagogical project, such as: redefinition of the professors' and the nurse's roles from the health services; different understanding about the reference of the methodology of problematization and competence; professors' insecurity working with uncertainty in the teaching-learning process. It's also possible to identify changes that contributed to the implementation of the project, which are: the strengthening of the partnership between teaching and service; the relation between the medical and nursing courses; the use of the principles of the meaningful learning; introduction of the continuous education process, enabling the evaluation of the curriculum processes and strategies.

  20. Nursing students’ experiences, perceptions and behavior in a flipped-classroom anatomy and physiology course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Thomas Raundahl

    2015-01-01

    with teacher-produced learning material, typically videos. This frees up time in class, which can instead be spent on various student-centered, active-learning activities. Only very few studies on the use of flipped classroom in nursing education have been published. Methods: Videos and active......-learning activities were developed and used in a course with forty-eight first-year, first-semester nursing students at the School of Nursing, Campus Holstebro, VIA University College, Denmark. After completing the course, students were invited to participate in a survey. In addition, students’ use of videos...... believed that the videos were better than face-to-face lectures with regard to learning outcome, 56% felt they were of equal benefit, and only 18% benefited most from face-to-face lectures. Only a small minority (18%) preferred traditional teaching over flipped classroom teaching, 41% preferred flipped...

  1. Expansion of undergraduate courses in nursing: dilemmas and contradictions facing the labor market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenia Lara Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We sought to analyze, from the perspective of professors and students, the reasons and consequences of the expansion of undergraduate courses in nursing, discussing the dilemmas and the contradictions confronting the labor market. It was a qualitative study with data obtained from focus groups, conducted in 18 undergraduate nursing courses in the state of Minas Gerais, during the period of February to October of 2011. The narratives were submitted to critical discourse analysis. The results indicated that the education of the nurse was permeated by insecurity as to the future integration into the labor market. The insecurity translates into dilemmas that referred to employability and the precariousness of the working conditions. In this context, employment in the family health strategy emerges as a mirage. One glimpses the need for a political agenda with the purpose of discussion about education, the labor market and the determinants of these processes.

  2. Nursing. A Basic Course Outline for Health Careers I (Grade 11). A Four Year "2+2" Articulated Curriculum for the Occupation of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Barbara; Stevenson, Nancy

    This course outline provides materials for the first course in a series of four courses that are included in a "2+2" curriculum for the occupation of registered nurse. It is part of a planned and articulated 4-year curriculum that spans the junior and senior years of high school and the freshman and sophomore years of the postsecondary…

  3. Nursing. A Basic Course Outline for Health Careers II (Grade 12). A Four Year "2+2" Articulated Curriculum for the Occupation of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Nancy; Robertson, Barbara

    This course outline provides materials for the second course in a series of four courses that are included in a "2+2" curriculum for the occupation of registered nurse. It is part of a planned and articulated 4-year curriculum that spans the junior and senior years of high school and the freshman and sophomore years of the postsecondary…

  4. Actions improving the image of a nurse in electronic media. Opinion of students at medical courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowska Klaudia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of study was to define actions improving the image of nurses in electronic media. Material and method. 219 women and 44 men took part in a survey. They were the students of the following courses: nursing, medical rescue, obstetrics, medicine, dentistry, pharmaceutics, physiotherapy, public health. The studies were undertaken with use of own questionnaire in 2015. Results. Majority of respondents 64,6% (n=169 stated that improvement of image of their own profession belongs to the nurses, and only 35,4% (n=93 respondents indicated that the professional organizations of nurses and midwives have their impact on it. According to the students, the most crucial action that should be undertaken by professional organizations in order to improve the image of profession in electronic media was the improvement of wages and working conditions (72,2%, n=189 and better promotion of the profession in electronic media (73,8%, n=193. The nurses can influence the improvement of their image in media by taking care of the good opinion about the profession by setting good example (32%, n=84, and also by creating blogs, social forum, online information services, etc. (26,2%, n=69. Conclusions. According to the respondents, the image of a nurse in electronic media is shaped by the television and radio. The mentioned media tend to present nursing environment in a negative light. The data analysis shows that according to the respondents, the professional organizations of nurses and midwives and nurses themselves should be responsible for improvement of the situation. In order to improve the image, the nurses should promote professional achievements, change the stereotype used in shows and movies, and familiarize the public with the profession. The following branches of mass media should be used: internet websites, television and radio.

  5. Desperately seeking sociology: nursing student perceptions of sociology on nursing courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgley, Alison; Timmons, Stephen; Crosbie, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present the findings of a qualitative study exploring the perceptions of students confronted by a requirement to learn sociology within a nursing curriculum. Those teaching sociology have a variety of explanations (more or less desperate), seeking to justify its place on the nursing curriculum. While there may be no resolution to the debate, the dispute thus far, has largely been between sociology and nursing academics. Absent from this debate are the voices of students 'required' to learn both nursing and sociology. What do students make of this contested territory? When students are trying to learn their trade, and know how to practice safely and efficaciously what do they make of the sociological imagination? How realistic is it to expect students to grasp both the concrete and practical with the imaginative and critical? Findings from this qualitative, focus group study suggest that students do indeed find learning sociology within a nursing curriculum "unsettling". It would seem that students cope in a number of ways. They fragment and compartmentalise knowledge(s); they privilege the interception of experiential learning on the path between theory and practice; and yet they appear to employ sociological understanding to account for nursing's gendered and developing professional status.

  6. Opposite patterns of change in perception of imagined and physically induced pain over the course of repeated thermal stimulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gács, B; Szolcsányi, T; Csathó, Á

    2017-08-01

    Individuals frequently show habituation to repeated noxious heat. However, given the defensive function of human pain processing, it is reasonable to assume that individuals anticipate that they would become increasingly sensitive to repeated thermal pain stimuli. No previous studies have, however, been addressed to this assumption. Therefore, in the current study, we investigated how healthy human individuals imagine the intensity of repeated thermal pain stimulations, and compared this with the intensity ratings given after physically induced thermal pain trials. Healthy participants (N = 20) gave pain intensity ratings in two conditions: imagined and real thermal pain. In the real pain condition, thermal pain stimuli of two intensities (minimal and moderate pain) were delivered in four consecutive trials. The duration of the peak temperature was 20 s, and stimulation was always delivered to the same location. In each trial, participants rated the pain intensity twice, 5 and 15 s after the onset of the peak temperature. In the imagined pain condition, participants were subjected to a reference pain stimulus and then asked to imagine and rate the same sequence of stimulations as in the induced pain condition. Ratings of imagined pain and physically induced pain followed opposite courses over repeated stimulations: Ratings of imagined pain indicated sensitization, whereas ratings for physically induced pain indicated habituation. The findings were similar for minimal and moderate pain intensities. The findings suggest that, rather than habituating to pain, healthy individuals imagine that they would become increasingly sensitive to repeated thermal pain stimuli. This study identified opposite patterns of change in perception of imagined pain (sensitization) and physically induced pain (habituation). The findings show that individuals anticipate that they would become increasingly sensitive to repeated pain stimuli, which might also have clinical implications.

  7. Team-Based Learning in a Community Health Nursing Course: Improving Academic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jane M; Larson, Kim L; Swanson, Melvin

    2017-07-01

    Population health concepts, such as upstream thinking, present challenging ideas to undergraduate nursing students grounded in an acute care orientation. The purpose of this study was to describe how team-based learning (TBL) influenced academic outcomes in a community health nursing course. A descriptive correlational design examined the relationship among student scores on individual readiness assurance tests (iRATs), team readiness assurance tests (tRATs), and the final examination. The sample included 221 nursing students who had completed the course. A large positive correlation was found between iRAT and final examination scores. For all students, the mean tRAT score was higher than the mean iRAT score. A moderate positive correlation existed between tRAT and final examination scores. The study contributes to understanding the effects of TBL pedagogy on student academic outcomes in nursing education. TBL is a valuable teaching method in a course requiring the application of challenging concepts. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(7):425-429.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Impact of a Nursing in Psychiatry Course on Students' Attitudes Toward Mental Health Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbanas, Goran; Bosnjak, Dina; Sabo, Tamara

    2018-03-01

    Negative attitudes toward patients with mental illnesses are not uncommon among health professionals, and lead to poorer quality and outcomes of care. Because attitudes are formed early in life, the current study aimed to investigate if teaching psychiatry in secondary school nursing students (i.e., adolescents) changes attitudes toward three prevalent psychiatric disorders: schizophrenia, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depression. A pilot quasi-experimental study was conducted with 51 fourth-year students in secondary nursing school who completed a questionnaire regarding attitudes toward these disorders on the first and last day of their Nursing in Psychiatry course. Results show that the stigma attached to all three disorders was significantly reduced after students completed the course. Students attached greater stigma to schizophrenia than PTSD, and to PTSD than depression, before and after the course. The study indicates that education in psychiatry helps reduce negative attitudes toward PTSD, schizophrenia, and depression. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 56(3), 45-51.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. A college course for nurses on the utilization of library resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, K P; Kruse, K W

    1977-04-01

    Library user instruction has been a no-man's-land between librarian and educator. Each assumes that the other has offered the student some necessary preparation before his assignments requiring library consultation. Too often, this is not the case. Reference librarians at the Duke University Medical Center Library are currently offering a ten-week, 1 1/2-hour credit library instruction course for nursing baccalaureate candidates. "Introduction to Library Resources in the Nursing Field" is designed not so much to orient students to a specific library facility, but rather, to provide them with background material on library organization and services and to familiarize them with basic bibliographic tools relevant to the nursing profession. Lectures are supplemented through the use of homework questions, bibliographies, handouts, in-class exercises, and on-line demonstrations. Very positive feedback from both students and faculty has attested to the value of such a course in the nursing curriculum and has resulted in its being offered four times to date. The library staff is exploring methods for offering additional library instruction not only to nursing students but to other user groups in Duke's medical complex.

  10. The effect of an e-learning course on nursing staff's knowledge of delirium: a before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Steeg, Lotte; IJkema, Roelie; Wagner, Cordula; Langelaan, Maaike

    2015-02-05

    Delirium is a common condition in hospitalized patients, associated with adverse outcomes such as longer hospital stay, functional decline and higher mortality, as well as higher rates of nursing home placement. Nurses often fail to recognize delirium in hospitalized patients, which might be due to a lack of knowledge of delirium diagnosis and treatment. The objective of the study was to test the effectiveness of an e-learning course on nurses' delirium knowledge, describe nursing staff's baseline knowledge about delirium, and describe demographic factors associated with baseline delirium knowledge and the effectiveness of the e-learning course. A before-and-after study design, using an e-learning course on delirium. The course was introduced to all nursing staff of internal medicine and surgical wards of 17 Dutch hospitals. 1,196 invitations for the e-learning course were sent to nursing staff, which included nurses, nursing students and healthcare assistants. Test scores on the final knowledge test (mean 87.4, 95% CI 86.7 to 88.2) were significantly higher than those on baseline (mean 79.3, 95% CI 78.5 to 80.1). At baseline, nursing staff had the most difficulty with questions related to the definition of delirium: what are its symptoms, course, consequences and which patients are at risk. The mean score for this category was 74.3 (95% CI 73.1 to 75.5). The e-learning course significantly improved nursing staff's knowledge of delirium in all subgroups of participants and for all question categories. Contrary to other studies, the baseline knowledge assessment showed that, overall, nursing staff was relatively knowledgeable regarding delirium. The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR). NTR 2885 , 19 April 2011.

  11. Associations Between Negative and Positive Life Events and the Course of Depression: A Detailed Repeated-Assessments Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonski, Simon C; Conradi, Henk Jan; Oldehinkel, Albertina J; Bos, Elisabeth Henriette; de Jonge, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Although the effects of life events on the onset of depression are well documented, little is known regarding their effects on the course of symptoms in depressed persons. We prospectively examined the associations between negative and positive life events and the course of depressive symptomatology in depressed primary care patients. A total of 267 depressed patients were followed for 3 years using a repeated-assessments design consisting of 36 monthly assessments of the 9 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders depression symptoms and positive and negative life events. We examined whether the severity of depressive symptomatology changed directly after the occurrence of a life event. Negative events were not associated with short-term changes in depressive symptomatology. In contrast, positive events were followed by a significant decrease in depressive symptoms one and two months after their occurrence. These findings may translate into emphasis during treatment on engagement in activities that may increase the chance of positive life experiences.

  12. The causes and the nursing interventions of the complications due to repeated embolization therapy for huge cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lingfang; Sun Ge

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the causes of the complications occurred after repeated embolization therapy for huge cerebral arteriovenous malformations and to discuss their nursing interventions. Methods: A total of 54 embolization procedures were performed in 17 patients with huge cerebral arteriovenous malformations. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The causes of complications were carefully examined and the preventive measures were discussed. The prompt and necessary nursing interventions were formulated in order to prevent the complications or serious consequences. Results: Among the total 17 patients, one patient gave up the treatment because of the cerebral hemorrhage which occurred two months after receiving 3 times of embolization therapy. One patient experienced cerebral vascular spasm during the procedure, which was relieved after antispasmodic medication and no neurological deficit was left behind. Two patients developed transient dizziness and headache, which were alleviated spontaneously. One patient presented with nervousness, fear and irritability, which made him hard to cooperate with the operation and the basis intravenous anesthesia was employed. No complications occurred in the remaining cases. Conclusion: The predictive nursing interventions for the prevention of complications are very important for obtaining a successful repeated embolization therapy for huge cerebral arteriovenous malformations, which will ensure that the patients can get the best treatment and the complications can be avoided. (authors)

  13. Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shultz, David B.; Modlin, Leslie A.; Jayachandran, Priya; Von Eyben, Rie; Gibbs, Iris C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Choi, Clara Y.H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, California (United States); Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Li, Gordon; Adler, John R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Hancock, Steven L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Soltys, Scott G., E-mail: sgsoltys@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), for distant intracranial recurrences and identify factors associated with prolonged overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively identified 652 metastases in 95 patients treated with 2 or more courses of SRS for brain metastases, deferring WBRT. Cox regression analyzed factors predictive for OS. Results: Patients had a median of 2 metastases (range, 1-14) treated per course, with a median of 2 courses (range, 2-14) of SRS per patient. With a median follow-up after first SRS of 15 months (range, 3-98 months), the median OS from the time of the first and second course of SRS was 18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-24) and 11 months (95% CI 6-17), respectively. On multivariate analysis, histology, graded prognostic assessment score, aggregate tumor volume (but not number of metastases), and performance status correlated with OS. The 1-year cumulative incidence, with death as a competing risk, of local failure was 5% (95% CI 4-8%). Eighteen (24%) of 75 deaths were from neurologic causes. Nineteen patients (20%) eventually received WBRT. Adverse radiation events developed in 2% of SRS sites. Conclusion: Multiple courses of SRS, deferring WBRT, for distant brain metastases after initial SRS, seem to be a safe and effective approach. The graded prognostic assessment score, updated at each course, and aggregate tumor volume may help select patients in whom the deferral of WBRT might be most beneficial.

  14. Facilitating the Transition of Nurse Clinician to Nurse Scientist: Significance of Entry PhD Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Deborah K; McCurry, Mary; Dluhy, Nancy M

    Transitioning into the role of nurse scientist requires the acquisition of new knowledge but also involves the development of new scholarly skills and the appropriation of the unique values and goals of the new role. Students engaged in doctor of philosophy education in all practice disciplines are confronted with a necessary shift in perspective and identity from that of the practice expert to the research scientist and experience a tension referred to as the research-practice dualism. The purpose of this article is to examine the ramifications of this identity shift in nursing doctor of philosophy education and to detail one program's strategy to address the inherent tension. This transition into the role of nurse scientist includes learning to value scholarly literature, expanding one's philosophical and disciplinary vocabulary, cultivating disciplinary inquisitiveness, learning scholarly communication and dissemination skills, and developing new collegial relationships. It is essential that this process of transitioning from clinician to scholar be purposively supported from the outset of the program. Faculty must critically examine current educational strategies and design new approaches to more effectively integrate the practice and science worlds, thereby enhancing program completion and graduating nurse scientists who are equipped to contribute to the knowledge of the discipline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The gene expression and immunohistochemical time-course of diphenylcyclopropenone-induced contact allergy in healthy humans following repeated epicutaneous challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Kristian F; Burton, Mark; Thomassen, Mads

    2017-01-01

    DPCP challenges to find the predominant gene expression pattern, (ii) the time-course of cell infiltration following repeated DPCP challenges and (iii) the transcriptome of a repeated CA exposure model. We obtained punch biopsies from control and DPCP-exposed skin from ten DPCP sensitized individuals...

  16. Nursing students' attitudes toward statistics: Effect of a biostatistics course and association with examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekkas, Panagiotis; Panagiotarou, Aliki; Malja, Alvaro; Tahirai, Daniela; Zykai, Rountina; Bakalis, Nick; Stefanopoulos, Nikolaos

    2015-12-01

    Although statistical knowledge and skills are necessary for promoting evidence-based practice, health sciences students have expressed anxiety about statistics courses, which may hinder their learning of statistical concepts. To evaluate the effects of a biostatistics course on nursing students' attitudes toward statistics and to explore the association between these attitudes and their performance in the course examination. One-group quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test design. Undergraduate nursing students of the fifth or higher semester of studies, who attended a biostatistics course. Participants were asked to complete the pre-test and post-test forms of The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics (SATS)-36 scale at the beginning and end of the course respectively. Pre-test and post-test scale scores were compared, while correlations between post-test scores and participants' examination performance were estimated. Among 156 participants, post-test scores of the overall SATS-36 scale and of the Affect, Cognitive Competence, Interest and Effort components were significantly higher than pre-test ones, indicating that the course was followed by more positive attitudes toward statistics. Among 104 students who participated in the examination, higher post-test scores of the overall SATS-36 scale and of the Affect, Difficulty, Interest and Effort components were significantly but weakly correlated with higher examination performance. Students' attitudes toward statistics can be improved through appropriate biostatistics courses, while positive attitudes contribute to higher course achievements and possibly to improved statistical skills in later professional life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Student learning styles in anatomy and physiology courses: Meeting the needs of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A N B; Hamill, J; Barton, M J; Baldwin, S; Percival, J; Williams-Pritchard, G; Salvage-Jones, J; Todorovic, M

    2015-11-01

    Anatomy and Physiology is a core course in pre-registration nursing programs, yet many students have difficulty successfully negotiating the large volume of content and the complex concepts in these bioscience courses. Typically students perform poorly in these 'threshold' courses', despite multiple interventions to support student engagement. Investigation of the shortcomings in these courses, based on feedback from students indicated several key areas of difficulty in the course, especially focused around a relative lack of hands-on 'concrete' activities in laboratories and tutorials. To attempt to address this, academic and technical staff developed activities for students that promoted discussion and allowed students to interact easily and repetitively with content. Interactive tables and posters that needed to be labelled or 'filled-in' using pre-prepared Velcro dots, as well as pre-prepared flash cards to promote group work, were some examples of the activities used to enhance student experiences and promote hands-on learning. Over the academic year of 2013 these activities were introduced into the laboratory and tutorial classes for first year Bachelor of Nursing anatomy and physiology students. Staff and student participants positively rated implementation of these new activities on surveys, as they allowed them to explore the difficult aspects of anatomy and physiology, utilising various learning styles that may have been neglected in the past. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of a Web-based course on nursing skills and knowledge learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Der-Fa; Lin, Zu-Chun; Li, Yun-Ju

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effectiveness of supplementing traditional classroom teaching with Web-based learning design when teaching intramuscular injection nursing skills. Four clusters of nursing students at a junior college in eastern Taiwan were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. A total of 147 students (80 in the experimental group, 67 in the control group) completed the study. All participants received the same classroom lectures and skill demonstration. The experimental group interacted using a Web-based course and were able to view the content on demand. The students and instructor interacted via a chatroom, the bulletin board, and e-mail. Participants in the experimental group had significantly higher scores on both intramuscular injection knowledge and skill learning. A Web-based design can be an effective supplementing learning tool for teaching nursing knowledge and skills.

  19. Self-study program on HTML browser--application to Clinical Nursing General Remarks Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, N; Sota, Y; Ezumi, H

    1997-01-01

    We created a self-study program using HTML browser on the Clinical Nursing General Remarks Course, Eighty-three students each selected a published book on a personal history (written personal reflections from individuals who had undergone medical treatment and hospitalization), read it and submitted reports of their impressions of the histories. Their reports were arranged from a nursing perspective and entered on the home page of our college using HTML browser. We intended that the students would become more interested in reading of the personal histories, and that they would acquire new self-study skills and increase their interest in Internet through use of our program. In addition, we hoped that this program would encourage positive communication and mutual sharing of information. The students were able to easily refer to a personal history according to their interest from a nursing perspective. Therefore this program realized the mutual learning among students and other users.

  20. The design process of a multimodal module that synthesized knowledge across nursing courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Linda; Rutar, Pamela; Delgado, Cheryl; Niederriter, Joan

    2017-05-01

    Nursing faculty are being challenged to increase the use of technology in the classroom. Use of technology addresses multiple learning styles, increases student engagement, encourages active learning and improves students' attention. Evaluate student satisfaction to a faculty designed multimedia teaching strategy. Cross sectional design with data collected over six semesters from six cohorts of nursing students. An urban university in the Midwest United States. 154 sophomore generic and accelerated BSN students enrolled in Fundamentals of Nursing; Ninety-nine participants were female (66.9%) and 49 (31.8%) were male. Eighty-three percent were less than 20years to 30years in age. A multimedia teaching strategy developed by three faculty integrating narrated case study, questioning and animation of skills and pathophysiology was implemented during the class session on infection control. At the conclusion, questionnaires were distributed to collect evaluation data. 120 students (77.9%) stated that the animated pathophysiology helped them understand the pathophysiological processes better than lecture alone. When combined with lecture, 121 students or 78.6% reported a better understanding of the material than if presented as lecture alone. 123 (79.9%) of the students stated that watching the animated video improved their understanding of the lecture content. As stated by one student, "I liked the visualization because it helped me further understand the material." 104 (67.5%) stated that presenting course content from multiple courses into one format facilitated the importance of these courses; "I liked that different aspect[s] of nursing were brought together." Use of multimedia in the classroom engages students in the learning process by actively involving students in the learning process as well as facilitating the delivery of difficult course content. Overall, students voiced a preference for all instructional materials to be presented in an animated format

  1. A urinary incontinence continuing education online course for community health nurses in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gagne, Jennie C; Park, Sunah; So, Aeyoung; Wu, Bei; Palmer, Mary H; McConnell, Eleanor S

    2015-04-01

    Although urinary incontinence is prevalent among older women living in rural Korea, a lack of awareness and education exists in this population and among health professionals. Geographic isolation and limited resources also contribute to having few educational offerings for rural nurses. The authors' aim was to develop an online continuing education course on continence care for community health nurses and to examine its effectiveness. A one-group, pretest-posttest design was used to detect changes in knowledge and attitudes after taking the online education course. Participant satisfaction was also measured at the end of the training. A significant improvement in knowledge and attitudes toward continence care was noted. More than 95% of participants responded that they would recommend the online program to other health care providers and indicated the program would be helpful regarding continence care in their practice. The continuing education online course is a feasible strategy to support rural community health nurses' learning to improve knowledge and attitudes toward urinary incontinence management and care. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Learning With E-books and Project-based Strategy in a Community Health Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Tien-Wen; Wu, Ting-Ting

    2018-03-01

    With advances in information technology, "information-assisted instruction" has been gradually introduced to nursing education curricula. Specifically, the integration of an e-book system can effectively enhance nursing students' attention and interest. Most studies on nursing education that incorporated e-books have focused on the advantages of convenience and assistance provided by e-books. Few studies have addressed community health nursing and off-campus practice activities in relation to suitable teaching strategies for learning activities. This study involved designing and planning a multimedia e-book learning system with a project-based learning activity that conforms to the curriculum and practical requirements of a community health nursing course. The purpose was to reduce the gap between theory and practice and realize an effective learning process. For learning evaluations, a final examination analysis with an independent sample t test; a scoring scheme with intrateam, interteam, and expert ratings; and Bloom's taxonomy-based analysis were conducted. The evaluation results indicated that the comprehension and learning abilities of the experimental group using the e-book system with a mobile device were effectively improved. In addition, the exploratory process involved in project-based learning can develop multiple cognitive skills and problem-solving ability, thereby realizing effective learning.

  3. Development, implementation, and effects of an integrated web-based teaching model in a nursing ethics course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, S-Y; Chang, Y-C; Yang, S C; Clark, M J

    2017-08-01

    Ethical competence, which is reflected in the ability to detect ethical challenges in clinical situations and engage in deliberate thinking on ethical actions, is one of the core competencies of nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to develop and implement an interactive situational e-learning system, integrating nursing ethical decisions into a nursing ethics course, and to evaluate the effects of this course on student nurses' ethical decision-making competence. The project was designed to be carried out in two phases. In the first phase, an interactive situated e-learning system was developed and integrated into the nursing ethics course. The second phase involved implementing the course and evaluating its effects in a quasi-experimental study. The course intervention was designed for 2h per week over one semester (18weeks). A total of 100 two-year technical college nursing students in their second year of the program participated in the study, with 51 in the experimental group and 49 in the control group. After completing the course, the students in the experimental group showed significant improvement in nursing ethical decision-making competence, including skills in "raising questions," "recognizing differences," "comparing differences," "self-dialogue," "taking action," and "identifying the implications of decisions made," compared to their performance prior to the class. After controlling for factors influencing learning effects, students in the experimental group showed superiority to those in the control group in the competency of "recognizing differences." The students in the experimental group reported that the course pushed them to search for and collect information needed to resolve the ethical dilemma. The interactive situational e-learning system developed by our project was helpful in developing the students' competence in ethical reasoning. The e-learning system and the situational teaching materials used in this study may be applicable

  4. The effectiveness of an e-learning course on medication calculation in nursing students: a clustered quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, Aurélie; Baldewijns, Katleen; Verhaeghe, Rik; Robays, Hugo; Buyle, Franky; Colman, Roos; Van Hecke, Ann

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an e-learning course compared with a face-to-face lecture on medication calculation. The current knowledge on medication calculation of nursing students and nurses is insufficient to provide safe care. A stratified-clustered quasi-experimental study. A random selection of nursing schools were allocated to the e-learning course (intervention group) (seven schools; 189 students) or face-to-face lecture (control group) (six schools, 222 students). Students in both groups completed a validated medication calculation test (maximum score: 16) prior to the course (T0), immediately after the course (T1) and 3 months later (T2). A linear mixed model was used for data analysis. Medication calculation skills improved significantly more by the face-to-face lecture than e-learning course. Students in both groups significantly improved in medication calculation skills immediately after the course (T1) and 3 months later. The results flattened at T2 with a significant decline in the intervention group between T1 and T2 and a non-significant decline in the control group. Based on a subgroup analysis, improvement in medication calculation skills at T2 could only be observed in vocational-level (sub degree) nursing students receiving a face-to-face course. Both medication calculation courses had a positive effect on medication calculation skills. Students receiving traditional face-to-face lecture improved significantly more than the students receiving the e-learning course. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The effects of an online basic life support course on undergraduate nursing students' learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobase, Lucia; Peres, Heloisa H C; Gianotto-Oliveira, Renan; Smith, Nicole; Polastri, Thatiane F; Timerman, Sergio

    2017-08-25

    To describe learning outcomes of undergraduate nursing students following an online basic life support course (BLS). An online BLS course was developed and administered to 94 nursing students. Pre- and post-tests were used to assess theoretical learning. Checklist simulations and feedback devices were used to assess the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills of the 62 students who completed the course. A paired t-test revealed a significant increase in learning [pre-test (6.4 ± 1.61), post-test (9.3 ± 0.82), p online course was significant (plearning differences (p=0.475) had been observed between 1st and 2nd year (9.20 ± 1.60), and between 3rd and 4th year (9.67 ± 0.61) students. A CPR simulation was performed after completing the course: students checked for a response (90%), exposed the chest (98%), checked for breathing (97%), called emergency services (76%), requested for a defibrillator (92%), checked for a pulse (77%), positioned their hands properly (87%), performed 30 compressions/cycle (95%), performed compressions of at least 5 cm depth (89%), released the chest (90%), applied two breaths (97%), used the automated external defibrillator (97%), and positioned the pads (100%). The online course was an effective method for teaching and learning key BLS skills wherein students were able to accurately apply BLS procedures during the CPR simulation. This short-term online training, which likely improves learning and self-efficacy in BLS providers, can be used for the continuing education of health professionals.

  6. Implementation of case studies in undergraduate didactic nursing courses: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Danette K

    2013-07-04

    The implementation of unfolding scenario-based case studies in the didactic classroom is associated with learner-centered education. The utilization of learner-centered pedagogies, such as case studies, removes the focus from the instructor and instead places it on the student. Learner-centered pedagogies are believed to improve students' levels of cognition. The purpose of this study was to examine how nurse educators are implementing the pedagogies of case studies in their undergraduate didactic courses. The goal was to examine, document, report, and, ultimately, implement the strategies. Purposeful sampling was utilized in this qualitative, multisite-designed study. For each of the four participants, three separate site visits were completed. Observations and post-observational interviews took place at each site visit. Transcribed data from interviews, observations, and course documents were imported into the computer program Nvivo8. Repetitive comparative analysis was utilized to complete the data coding process. The guiding research question of this study sought to investigate the implementation strategies of case studies in didactic nursing courses. The implementation of case studies by the participants reflected two primary patterns: Formal Implementation (FI) and Informal Implementation (II) of case studies. The FI of case studies was further divided into two subcategories: Formal Implementation of case studies used Inside the Classroom setting (FIIC) and Formal Implementation of cases studies used Outside of the Classroom (FIOC). Results of this investigation have led to an increased understanding of implementation strategies of unfolding scenario-based case studies in undergraduate nursing didactic courses. Data collected were rich in the description of specific methodologies for utilization of case studies and may serve as a resource for faculty in development of creative strategies to enhance the didactic classroom experience.

  7. The juggling act: Do student nurses who care for dependants need an adapted course? An applied policy research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Matthew D; Proud, Carole; Jackson, Sue

    2015-11-01

    In line with many countries worldwide, the Department of Health mandate to Health Education England seeks to promote the diversity of applicants by widening participation in nurse education. A number of studies have explored the experience of non-traditional students undertaking nursing courses. This study aimed to explore and understand the experiences of student nurses undertaking their nurse education whilst caring for dependant family. The study used an applied qualitative research approached based on methods developed for applied social policy research. The study was undertaken in an institution of higher education in the North East of England. The study population consisted of a convenience sample of 14 respondents, 13 female and 1 male. Ten respondents lived with partners and 3 had disabled dependants within the family. The age range of dependent children ranged from 3months to 19years. Data was collected through focus groups and telephone interviews using a semi-structured interview schedule. Framework analysis was used to analyse the data. Three superordinate themes were identified, Altruism and Commitment, Maturity and Family and Social Mobility, that best encapsulate the characteristics that enable this group to function well and complete their nurse education. Analysis identified a highly motivated group of students who's individual accounts showed that their lives, whilst in nurse education, were a constant series of compromises and 'juggling' between the demands of the course and the demands of their families. This group of students do not need an adapted course, but instead wish for a realistic nursing course where expectations are managed in an honest way. Basic common sense and good management of nursing courses will help ensure that this motivated group of people achieve their goals with minimum hardship or difficulties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of collaborative testing on learning and retention of course content in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivaz, Mozhgan; Momennasab, Marzieh; Shokrollahi, Paymaneh

    2015-10-01

    Collaborative testing is a learning strategy that provides students with the opportunity to learn and practice collaboration. This study aimed to determine the effect of collaborative testing on test performance and retention of course content in nursing students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. This quasi-experimental study was carried out on 84 students enrolled in the course of Medical-Surgical 2 in Spring 2013 and Fall 2013 semesters. The control group consisting of 39 students participated in the first mid-term exam in an individual format. The intervention group, on the other hand, consisted of 45 students who took the test in a two-stage process. The first stage included an individual testing, while the second stage was a collaborative one given in groups of five individuals chosen randomly. Four weeks later, in order to investigate retention of the course content, both groups took part in the second mid-term exam held individually. The study findings showed significant difference between the mean scores in the intervention group in the Fall 2013 semester (p=0.001). Besides, a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups regarding the tests mean scores (p=0.001). Moreover, retention of course content improved in the collaborative group (p=0.001). The results indicated an increase in test performance and a long-term learning enhancement in collaborative testing compared with the traditional method. Collaborative testing, as an active learning technique and a valuable assessment method, can help nursing instructors provide the alumni with strong problem-solving and critical thinking abilities at healthcare environments.

  9. Validity, reliability and utility of the Irish Nursing Minimum Data Set for General Nursing in investigating the effectiveness of nursing interventions in a general nursing setting: A repeated measures design.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morris, Roisin

    2013-08-06

    Internationally, nursing professionals are coming under increasing pressure to highlight the contribution they make to health care and patient outcomes. Despite this, difficulties exist in the provision of quality information aimed at describing nursing work in sufficient detail. The Irish Minimum Data Set for General Nursing is a new nursing data collection system aimed at highlighting the contribution of nursing to patient care.

  10. [The Positionality of Caring Action: Small Group Dialogue in a Course on Nursing Ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2016-12-01

    The content of nursing-ethics education has typically focused on the external standards of caring behavior and neglected the relationship between the ethical attitudes and internal experiences of caregivers. To explore the embodied experience in order to define the positionality of caring action, which is necessary to enrich the content of nursing ethics through small-group-learning-based dialogue. The researcher, as a participant observer, teaches a course on nursing ethics. Reflective analysis was used to analyze the data from the process of small group learning, a reflective group of faculty members, and 30 reflective journals submitted by 10 students. The results identified three items that were related to the positionality of caring action: the attitudes of belief, including the choice to belief and deep understanding; articulating the value system, including exploring affectivity and positionality; and cultivating the self through self-dialogues and dialogues with others. The attitudes of belief promote trust in interpersonal relationships. Articulating the value system deepens the meaning of caring. Cultivating the self may facilitate the ethical self.

  11. Knowledge and Skill Retention of In-Service versus Preservice Nursing Professionals following an Informal Training Program in Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Repeated-Measures Quasiexperimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhuma Sankar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to compare the impact of a training program in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR on the knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses at prespecified time points. This repeated-measures quasiexperimental study was conducted in the pediatric emergency and ICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital between January and March 2011. We assessed the baseline knowledge and skills of nursing staff (in-service nurses and final year undergraduate nursing students (preservice nurses using a validated questionnaire and a skill checklist, respectively. The participants were then trained on pediatric CPR using standard guidelines. The knowledge and skills were reassessed immediately after training and at 6 weeks after training. A total of 74 participants—28 in-service and 46 preservice professionals—were enrolled. At initial assessment, in-service nurses were found to have insignificant higher mean knowledge scores (6.6 versus 5.8, P=0.08 while the preservice nurses had significantly higher skill scores (6.5 versus 3.2, P<0.001. Immediately after training, the scores improved in both groups. At 6 weeks however, we observed a nonuniform decline in performance in both groups—in-service nurses performing better in knowledge test (10.5 versus 9.1, P=0.01 and the preservice nurses performing better in skill test (9.8 versus 7.4, P<0.001. Thus, knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses in pediatric CPR improved with training. In comparison to preservice nurses, the in-service nurses seemed to retain knowledge better with time than skills.

  12. The course of apraxia and ADL functioning in left hemisphere stroke patients treated in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    OpenAIRE

    Donkervoort, M.; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the course of apraxia and daily life functioning (ADL) in left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. SUBJECTS: One hundred and eight left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia, hospitalized in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. MEASURES: ADL-observations, Barthel ADL Index, Apraxia Test, Motricity Index. RESULTS: During the study period of 20 weeks, patients showed small improv...

  13. Evaluating a nursing communication skills training course: The relationships between self-rated ability, satisfaction, and actual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, Barbara A; Kothe, Emily J

    2010-11-01

    Effective communication is a vital component of nursing care, however, nurses often lack the skills to communicate with patients, carers and other health care professionals. Communication skills training programs are frequently used to develop these skills. However, there is a paucity of data on how best to evaluate such courses. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between student self rating of their own ability and their satisfaction with a nurse training course as compared with an objective measure of communication skills. 209 first year nursing students completed a communication skills program. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected and associations between measures were investigated. Paired samples t-tests showed significant improvement in self-rated ability over the course of the program. Students generally were very satisfied with the course which was reflected in both qualitative and quantitative measures. However, neither self-rated ability nor satisfaction was significantly correlated with the objective measure of performance, but self-rated ability and satisfaction were highly correlated with one another. The importance of these findings is discussed and implications for nurse education are proposed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Co-ordinate groups: reflexion in the light of the National Curriculum Guidings of the Nursing Graduation Course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Denise Bouttelet; Fernandes, Carla Natalina da Silva

    2004-04-01

    The goal of this reflexion is to discuss about the necessary nurse characteristics as group co-ordinater and analyse, in the New National Curriculum Guidings of the Nursing Graduation Course, aspects that are necessary in this specific knowledge. For this, we base on the specific literature about the subject and in the official document of MEC about the Curriculum Guidings. It was possible to identify many points where this knowledge seams necessary to the development of the nurse abilities and competences in the management of people, groups and teams, even so signalize some indicators to make stronger the professional formation in this direction.

  15. Development and evaluation of a learner-centered training course on communication skills for baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ying; Wang, Wenru

    2013-12-01

    There is no standardized or formal communication skills training in the current nursing curriculum in Macao, China. To develop and evaluate a learner-centered communication skills training course. Both qualitative and quantitative designs were used in two separate stages. A randomized sample and a convenience sample were taken from students on a four-year bachelor's degree program at a public institute in Macao. Stage I consisted of developing a learner-centered communication skills training course using four focus groups (n=32). Stage II evaluated the training's efficacy by comparing communication skills, clinical interaction, interpersonal dysfunction, and social problem-solving abilities using a quasi-experimental longitudinal pre-post design among 62 nursing students. A course evaluation form was also used. Content analysis was used to evaluate the essential themes in order to develop the specific content and teaching strategies of the course. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed significant improvement in all post-training scores for communication ability, content of communication, and handling of communication barriers. According to the mean scores of the course evaluation form, students were generally very satisfied with the course: 6.11 to 6.74 on a scale of 1 to 7. This study showed that the course was effective in improving communication skills, especially in terms of the content and the handling of communication barriers. The course filled an important gap in the training needs of nursing students in Macao. The importance of these findings and their implications for nursing education are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 'Tech' versus 'talk': a comparison study of two different lecture styles within a Master of Science nurse practitioner course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Jason W; Wong, Adrian; Roberts, Susan J

    2012-07-01

    Generation Y students have a strong preference for technology that has caused educators to re-evaluate their instructional techniques. Limited published literature exists evaluating the benefits of electronic lecture delivery to students enrolled within nursing degree programs, with no publications to date comparing traditional to blended learning modalities. To retrospectively compare student outcomes, including overall course grade and individual examination scores, between two cohorts of students utilizing two distinctly different methods of lecture delivery, traditional and blended. IRB approval was granted to retrospectively compare student outcomes from fifty-two students enrolled within Northeastern University's Master of Science Nurse Practitioner degree program. A total of 23 students were enrolled in the traditional section taught in 2010 and 29 students were enrolled in the blended section taught in 2011. Student'st-test was used to compare studied outcomes between each section. A p-value of ≤0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. The students enrolled within blended course scored statistically significantly higher than their counterparts within the traditional course for three of the four studied outcomes, including overall course score. This study demonstrates that nursing students enrolled within a more technologically advanced course may have improved performance over students enrolled in courses with traditional lecture styles given their generational preferences for learning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Evaluation of the handwashing technique held by students from the nursing graduation course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Carla Cristiane Paz; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the execution and verify the compliance with the handwashing techniques by students in an undergraduate Nursing course. The study was performed with 113 students enrolled in internship programs in healthcare institutions in the city of São Paulo. Data collection occurred through direct observation, using a check-list instrument with the steps of the technique. Students in their 2nd and 3rd year had better results in most steps of the technique, with a statistically significant difference when compared to the 4th year. Compliance with the steps of the technique by the students was very low, since their compliance with half the handwashing steps was lower than 50%. The average amount of students who executed all the steps of the technique correctly was very low, 8.8%. The observed students did not execute the handwashing techniques according to the recommendations.

  18. [Digital educational materials in nursing: assessment by professors from an undergraduate course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo, Ana Luísa Petersen; Pedro, Eva Néri Rubim; da Silva, Ana Paula Scheffer Schell; Schatkoski, Aline Modelski; Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Alves, Rosa Helena Kreutz

    2009-06-01

    This study addresses the use of digital learning materials in the format of hypertext, educational games and simulations about oxygen therapy with professors of an Undergraduate Nursing Course. It is a cross-sectional exploratory study that was carried out at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul in 2006 with 10 intentionally selected professors. Data collection was performed by means of a questionnaire, using a Likert scale to assess the suitability of the content, visual presentation and use of learning materials. Descriptive statistics was used to organize and process the data. Results showed that the professors approved of the presentation of educational materials, they agreed with the suitability of the contents presented and with using the materials with the content regarding oxygen therapy. There was no significant relation between the professors' opinion and their age group, nor with their computer technology knowledge, their time in teaching and the addressed contents.

  19. Evaluation of Life and Death Studies Course on Attitudes Toward Life and Death Among Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Lih Hwang

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate attitudes toward life and death among nursing students after attending the life and death studies (LDS program. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to collect data. The pretest-posttest control group design randomly assigned students to an experimental (n = 47 or control group (n = 49. The 13-week course included lectures, video appraisal, games, simulations, films, books, assignments and group sharing. Statistical and content analysis were used to analyze qualitative and quantitative data. The findings showed a significant improvement in perception of the meaningfulness of life in four categories of improvement: expanded viewpoint, sadness about death, treating life sincerely, and instilling hope in life. The qualitative data indicated that a positive change in meaning of life was associated with interaction with others and self-reflection.

  20. Evaluation of life and death studies course on attitudes toward life and death among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Huei-Lih; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Tin

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate attitudes toward life and death among nursing students after attending the life and death studies (LDS) program. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to collect data. The pretest-posttest control group design randomly assigned students to an experimental (n = 47) or control group (n = 49). The 13-week course included lectures, video appraisal, games, simulations, films, books, assignments and group sharing. Statistical and content analysis were used to analyze qualitative and quantitative data. The findings showed a significant improvement in perception of the meaningfulness of life in four categories of improvement: expanded viewpoint, sadness about death, treating life sincerely, and instilling hope in life. The qualitative data indicated that a positive change in meaning of life was associated with interaction with others and self-reflection.

  1. The participant's perspective: learning from an aggression management training course for nurses. Insights from a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckemann, Birgit; Breimaier, Helga Elisabeth; Halfens, Ruud J G; Schols, Jos M G A; Hahn, Sabine

    2016-09-01

    Aggression management training for nurses is an important part of a comprehensive strategy to reduce patient and visitor aggression in healthcare. Although training is commonplace, few scientific studies examine its benefits. To explore and describe, from a nurse's perspective, the learning gained from attending aggression management training. This was a descriptive qualitative interview study. We conducted semi-structured individual interviews with seven nurses before (September/October 2012) and after they attended aggression management training (January/February 2013). Interview transcripts were content-analysed qualitatively. The study plan was reviewed by the responsible ethics committees. Participants gave written informed consent. Aggression management training did not change nurses' attitude. Coping emotionally with the management of patient and visitor aggression remained a challenge. Nurses' theoretical knowledge increased, but they did not necessarily acquire new strategies for managing patient/visitor aggression. Instead, the course refreshed or activated existing knowledge of prevention, intervention and de-escalation strategies. The training increased nurses' environmental and situational awareness for early signs of patient and visitor. They also acquired some strategies for emotional self-management. Nurses became more confident in dealing with (potentially) aggressive situations. While the training influenced nurses' individual clinical practice, learning was rarely shared within teams. Aggression management training increases skills, knowledge and confidence in dealing with patient or visitor aggression, but the emotional management remains a challenge. Future research should investigate how aggression management training courses can strengthen nurses' ability to emotionally cope with patient and visitor aggression. More knowledge is needed on how the theoretical and practical knowledge gained from the training may be disseminated more effectively

  2. Online teaching and learning in a graduate course In nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NS Gwele

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Information technology has a potential to be the answer to one of Africa’s most pressing problems- providing education to a number of geographically dispersed learners, who currently have to leave their countries for a number of years in order to pursue their studies elsewhere. The School of Nursing at the University of Natal launched an online graduate course in nursing education at the beginning of the year 2000 for the first time as part of a masters degree programme. A number of lessons have been learned from this experience. Firstly, it took too long to arrive at ‘closure’ on discussion of any one particular theme. There seemed to be a perpetual feeling of never “completing” teaching/learning tasks. Ordinarily, in a face-to-face (f2f classroom, a particular theme or topic is scheduled for a particular lecture period. More often than not, whether clarity and/or resolution has been attained, the discussion moves on to the next theme, or topic. This has not been easy to do in computer mediated communication (CMC. The students’ contributions, however, seemed more thought out and more focused than had been the case in the f2f classes. Secondly, the essentiality/importance of structure became apparent very early. After an initial tentative and slow start, once the students felt comfortable with the computer “classroom” , the bulletin board was flooded with messages, necessitating re-thinking the original structure.

  3. Online teaching and learning in a graduate course in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwele, N S

    2000-09-01

    Information technology has a potential to be the answer to one of Africa's most pressing problems-providing education to a number of geographically dispersed learners, who currently have to leave their countries for a number of years in order to pursue their studies elsewhere. The School of Nursing at the University of Natal launched an online graduate course in nursing education at the beginning of the year 2000 for the first time as part of a masters degree programme. A number of lessons have been learned from this experience. Firstly, it took too long to arrive at 'closure' on discussion of any one particular theme. There seemed to be a perpetual feeling of never "completing" teaching/learning tasks. Ordinarily, in a face-to-face (f2f) classroom, a particular theme or topic is scheduled for a particular lecture period. More often than not, whether clarity and/or resolution has been attained, the discussion moves on to the next theme, or topic. This has not been easy to do in computer mediated communication (CMC). The students' contributions, however, seemed more thought out and more focused than had been the case in the f2f classes. Secondly, the essentiality/importance of structure became apparent very early. After an initial tentative and slow start, once the students felt comfortable with the computer "classroom", the bulletin board was flooded with messages, necessitating re-thinking the original structure.

  4. The course of apraxia and ADL functioning in left hemisphere stroke patients treated in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkervoort, M.; Dekker, J.; Deelman, B.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the course of apraxia and daily life functioning (ADL) in left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. SUBJECTS: One hundred and eight left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia, hospitalized

  5. Attrition and success rates of accelerated students in nursing courses: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggrell, Sheila Anne; Schaffer, Sally

    2016-01-01

    There is a comprehensive literature on the academic outcomes (attrition and success) of students in traditional/baccalaureate nursing programs, but much less is known about the academic outcomes of students in accelerated nursing programs. The aim of this systematic review is to report on the attrition and success rates (either internal examination or NCLEX-RN) of accelerated students, compared to traditional students. For the systematic review, the databases (Pubmed, Cinahl and PsychINFO) and Google Scholar were searched using the search terms 'accelerated' or 'accreditation for prior learning', 'fast-track' or 'top up' and 'nursing' with 'attrition' or 'retention' or 'withdrawal' or 'success' from 1994 to January 2016. All relevant articles were included, regardless of quality. The findings of 19 studies of attrition rates and/or success rates for accelerated students are reported. For international accelerated students, there were only three studies, which are heterogeneous, and have major limitations. One of three studies has lower attrition rates, and one has shown higher success rates, than traditional students. In contrast, another study has shown high attrition and low success for international accelerated students. For graduate accelerated students, most of the studies are high quality, and showed that they have rates similar or better than traditional students. Thus, five of six studies have shown similar or lower attrition rates. Four of these studies with graduate accelerated students and an additional seven studies of success rates only, have shown similar or better success rates, than traditional students. There are only three studies of non-university graduate accelerated students, and these had weaknesses, but were consistent in reporting higher attrition rates than traditional students. The paucity and weakness of information available makes it unclear as to the attrition and/or success of international accelerated students in nursing programs. The

  6. Knowledge of undergraduate nursing course teachers on the prevention and care of peristomal skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Magela Salomé

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the knowledge of undergraduate nursing course teachers on peristomal skin care in individuals with intestinal stoma. Methods: This is an exploratory, analytical and cross-sectional study, conducted with undergraduate nursing course teachers from two private universities in the city of São Paulo, named A and B. The sample consisted of 42 teachers/nurses, being 22 from University A and 20 from University B, who supervised the internship at Hospital Vila Nova Cachoeirinha. With the aim to collect data, a structured questionnaire consisting of 10 questions (checklist was used; each question in the checklist had correct and wrong answers. The teachers had to indicate with “x” the correct answer. The questionnaire was delivered to teachers/nurses on a predetermined day. Data collection was carried out on August 2006. Results: The majority of study participants know that stoma demarcation must be performed preoperatively, and that it is important to educate the patient about surgery, care for the stoma and on the collecting device, as well as to perform a sensitivity test for the equipment. The hygiene should be performed with mild soap and water and with a piece of clean, soft, damp cotton cloth without rubbing, and the skin must be kept dry. The hair removal should be done with curved tip scissors, cutting close to the abdominal wall. Conclusion: The results showed that, although most of the participants have a basic knowledge about stomized patients care, updating and improvement are needed. Resumo: Objetivo: Avaliar o conhecimento de docentes do curso de graduação em enfermagem sobre os cuidados com da pele periestomal nos indivíduos com estomas intestinais. Métodos: Trata-se de um estudo exploratório, analítico e transversal realizado com os docentes dos Cursos de Graduação em Enfermagem de duas Universidades privadas da cidade de São Paulo, denominadas A e B. A amostra foi constituída de 42 docentes

  7. School nurses' attitudes towards and experiences of the Swedish school-based HPV vaccination programme - A repeated cross sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grandahl

    Full Text Available The aim was to investigate school nurses' attitudes towards, and experiences of vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV, and compare the results with a similar study three years earlier. School nurses (n = 736 from all counties in Sweden completed a questionnaire in spring 2016, four years after the implementation of the national HPV vaccination programme, and three years after the previous survey. Overall, the school nurses had more favourable attitudes towards the HPV vaccination programme compared to the study in 2013 (p = 0.015. More than half of the nurses (n = 415, 56% strongly agreed that boys should also be offered the vaccine (p<0.001. There were no differences in school nurses' perceived knowledge about HPV in order to inform and to answer questions about the vaccine from the girls or from the parents. More than half of the nurses (n = 409, 56% reported that they needed more education about HPV. Almost all nurses (n = 659, 90% had been contacted by parents with questions about the vaccine, and most questions were related to vaccine safety. School nurses have a more favourable attitude towards the vaccination programme against HPV compared to three years earlier, although almost all nurses had been contacted by parents with diverse questions and concerns. The nurses believed that they needed more education about HPV. Thus, it is essential to provide ongoing education and training for school nurses who are key healthcare professionals for providing information about HPV and HPV vaccination to parents and to pupils.

  8. Associations between negative and positive life events and the course of depression : A detailed repeated-assessments study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blonski, Simon C; Conradi, Henk Jan; Oldehinkel, Albertina J; Bos, Elisabeth Henriette; de Jonge, Peter

    Although the effects of life events on the onset of depression are well documented, little is known regarding their effects on the course of symptoms in depressed persons. We prospectively examined the associations between negative and positive life events and the course of depressive symptomatology

  9. School nurses' attitudes towards and experiences of the Swedish school-based HPV vaccination programme - A repeated cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandahl, Maria; Larsson, Margareta; Tydén, Tanja; Stenhammar, Christina

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to investigate school nurses' attitudes towards, and experiences of vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), and compare the results with a similar study three years earlier. School nurses (n = 736) from all counties in Sweden completed a questionnaire in spring 2016, four years after the implementation of the national HPV vaccination programme, and three years after the previous survey. Overall, the school nurses had more favourable attitudes towards the HPV vaccination programme compared to the study in 2013 (p = 0.015). More than half of the nurses (n = 415, 56%) strongly agreed that boys should also be offered the vaccine (pHPV in order to inform and to answer questions about the vaccine from the girls or from the parents. More than half of the nurses (n = 409, 56%) reported that they needed more education about HPV. Almost all nurses (n = 659, 90%) had been contacted by parents with questions about the vaccine, and most questions were related to vaccine safety. School nurses have a more favourable attitude towards the vaccination programme against HPV compared to three years earlier, although almost all nurses had been contacted by parents with diverse questions and concerns. The nurses believed that they needed more education about HPV. Thus, it is essential to provide ongoing education and training for school nurses who are key healthcare professionals for providing information about HPV and HPV vaccination to parents and to pupils.

  10. Nurse practitioner preferences for distance education methods related to learning style, course content, and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrusyszyn, M A; Cragg, C E; Humbert, J

    2001-04-01

    The relationships among multiple distance delivery methods, preferred learning style, content, and achievement was sought for primary care nurse practitioner students. A researcher-designed questionnaire was completed by 86 (71%) participants, while 6 engaged in follow-up interviews. The results of the study included: participants preferred learning by "considering the big picture"; "setting own learning plans"; and "focusing on concrete examples." Several positive associations were found: learning on own with learning by reading, and setting own learning plans; small group with learning through discussion; large group with learning new things through hearing and with having learning plans set by others. The most preferred method was print-based material and the least preferred method was audio tape. The most suited method for content included video teleconferencing for counseling, political action, and transcultural issues; and video tape for physical assessment. Convenience, self-direction, and timing of learning were more important than delivery method or learning style. Preferred order of learning was reading, discussing, observing, doing, and reflecting. Recommended considerations when designing distance courses include a mix of delivery methods, specific content, outcomes, learner characteristics, and state of technology.

  11. Graduates from dual qualification courses, registered nurse and health visitor: a career history study

    OpenAIRE

    Drennan, Vari M; Porter, Elizabeth M J; Grant, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Educationalists and managers internationally are challenged to find ways of preparing, recruiting early in their careers, and retaining nurses into public health roles in primary care. Public health nursing qualifications are post-initial nurse registration in the United Kingdom as in some other countries. In the mid twentieth century there were a number of innovative programmes of dual qualification: registered nurse and health visitor (the United Kingdom term for public health n...

  12. The effects of cooperative learning on students enrolled in a level 1 medical-surgical nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbs, J

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to create an environment that the literature contends will be more conducive to learning and one that will build the necessary social skills impacting students' performance. These social skills are essential if a nurse is to be effective in her role as a competent provider of care as well as an effective member of the inter-disciplinary health care team. The concept of cooperative learning was applied to nursing theoretical content in an effort to (a) decrease attrition rates in a first level medical-surgical nursing course, (b) increase student's knowledge and (c) enhance student's patient-teaching skills. Increased knowledge was assessed by student's performance on teacher-made paper and pencil examinations. The Classroom Life Instrument questionnaire was used for feedback on the teaching strategy and the Griffin tool was the basis for the pre-test and post-test assessment and implementation of the patient teaching plan.

  13. The effectiveness of clinical teaching of mental health courses in nursing using clinical supervision and Kirkpatrick's model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddineshat, Maryam; Hashemi, Mitra; Besharati, Reza; Gholami, Sepideh; Ghavidel, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    Clinical experience associated with the fear and anxiety of nursing students in the psychiatric unit. Mental health nursing instructors find it challenging to teach nursing students to deal with patients with mental disorders in an environment where they need to provide patient teaching and clinical decision-making based on evidence and new technology. To measure the effectiveness of clinical teaching of mental health courses in nursing using clinical supervision and Kirkpatrick's model evaluation in the psychiatry unit of Imam Reza Hospital, Bojnurd, Iran. This cross-sectional study was carried out from 2011 to 2016 on 76 nursing students from a university as part of a clinical mental health course in two semesters. The students were selected by a non-probable convenient sampling method. After completing their clinical education, each student responded to checklist questions based on the four-level Kirkpatrick's model evaluation and open questions relating to clinical supervision. Finally, all data was analyzed using the SPSS version 16. The students have evaluated clinical supervision as a useful approach, and appreciated the instructor's supportive behavior during teaching and imparting clinical skills. This has made them feel relaxed at the end of the clinical teaching course. In addition, in the evaluation through Kirkpatrick's model, more than 70% of the students have been satisfied with the method of conducting the teaching and average score of nursing students' attitude toward mental health students: Their mean self-confidence score was 18.33±1.69, and the mean score of their performance in the study was evaluated to be 93.74±5.3 from 100 points. The results of clinical mental health teaching through clinical supervision and Kirkpatrick's model evaluation show that the satisfaction, self-esteem, attitude, and skill of nursing students are excellent, thereby portraying the effectiveness of clinical teaching. But this program still needs to be reformed. To

  14. The effects of scenario-based simulation course training on nurses' communication competence and self-efficacy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Chang, Wen-Hui; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that an underappreciation of the importance of person-centered communication and inappropriate communication training could result in unsatisfactory communication performance from nurses. There are a large number of studies about communication training for nurses, but not so many about communication training in early stages of nursing career. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of a traditional course versus scenario-based simulation training on nurses' communication competency, communication self-efficacy, and communication performance in discharge planning Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). A randomized controlled trial was used with a pretest and two posttests. The experimental group underwent the scenario-based simulation course, whereas the control group received the traditional course. A convenience sample of 116 nurses with qualifications ranging from N0 level (novice nurses) to N2 level (competent nurses) in Taiwan's clinical nursing ladder system was recruited from a medical center in northern Taiwan. Analysis of covariance was used to determine between-subjects effects on communication competency and self-efficacy, whereas independent t test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to examine between-subjects effects on learner satisfaction and discharge planning communication performance. Paired t test was used to determine communication self-efficacy. In this study, the nurses and independent raters found scenario-based simulation training more effective than traditional communication course. However, standardized patients reported no significant difference in communication performance between the two groups of nurses. Despite that traditional classroom lectures and simulation-based communication training could both produce enhanced communication competency and self-efficacy among nurses, this study has established that the latter may be better than the former in terms of learner satisfaction and communication

  15. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  16. The perceived benefits of belonging to an extra curricular group within a pre-registration nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Sabina; Billington, John

    2014-05-01

    This study describes a qualitative research design that focuses on nursing students who were aligned to different extra-curricular groups (a student representative committee, a Nurses' Day Committee and a magazine editorial team) within the School of Health. The study explores the nursing students' experiences and perceptions of belonging to an extra-curricular group within a pre-registration nursing course. Data were collected using focus groups. The findings of this study suggest that students who are members of extra-curricular groups perceive group membership to have many positive benefits. The findings were grouped into three main themes namely: employability, retention and personal gain. The findings suggest that students are clearly aware of their career development and expressed how group membership meant they were able to develop skills around employability. Students highlighted that they gained support and built lasting relationships through the groups which supported and reassured them which it was felt enabled them to progress successfully through the course. These themes reinforce the value of having established groups within a pre-registration curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A pilot study on conducting mobile learning activities for clinical nursing courses based on the repertory grid approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Han; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Chen, Ya-Chun; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2011-11-01

    In clinical nursing courses, students are trained to identify the status of the target patients. The mastery of such ability and skills is very important since patients frequently need to be cared for immediately. In this pilot study, a repertory grid-oriented clinical mobile learning system is developed for a nursing training program. With the assistance of the mobile learning system, the nursing school students are able to learn in an authentic learning scenario, in which they can physically face the target patients, with the personal guidance and supplementary materials from the learning system to support them. To show the effectiveness of this innovative approach, an experiment has been conducted on the "respiratory system" unit of a nursing course. The experimental results show that the innovative approach is helpful to students in improving their learning achievements. Moreover, from the questionnaire surveys, it was found that most students showed favorable attitudes toward the usage of the mobile learning system and their participation in the training program. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Discipline-based Career Course on Nursing Students' Career Search Self-efficacy, Career Preparation Behavior, and Perceptions of Career Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonjoo Park, RN, PhD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: The discipline-based career course was effective in decreasing perceptions of career barriers and increasing career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior among nursing students.

  19. [A Study on the Cognitive Learning Effectiveness of Scenario-Based Concept Mapping in a Neurological Nursing Course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui-Ching; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2015-12-01

    The multiple levels of knowledge related to the neurological system deter many students from pursuing studies on this topic. Thus, in facing complicated and uncertain medical circumstances, nursing students have diffi-culty adjusting and using basic neurological-nursing knowledge and skills. Scenario-based concept-mapping teaching has been shown to promote the integration of complicated data, clarify related concepts, and increase the effectiveness of cognitive learning. To investigate the effect on the neurological-nursing cognition and learning attitude of nursing students of a scenario-based concept-mapping strategy that was integrated into the neurological nursing unit of a medical and surgical nursing course. This quasi-experimental study used experimental and control groups and a pre-test / post-test design. Sopho-more (2nd year) students in a four-year program at a university of science and technology in Taiwan were convenience sampled using cluster randomization that was run under SPSS 17.0. Concept-mapping lessons were used as the intervention for the experimental group. The control group followed traditional lesson plans only. The cognitive learning outcome was measured using the neurological nursing-learning examination. Both concept-mapping and traditional lessons significantly improved post-test neurological nursing learning scores (p learning attitude with regard to the teaching material. Furthermore, a significant number in the experimental group expressed the desire to add more lessons on anatomy, physiology, and pathology. These results indicate that this intervention strategy may help change the widespread fear and refusal of nursing students with regard to neurological lessons and may facilitate interest and positively affect learning in this important subject area. Integrating the concept-mapping strategy and traditional clinical-case lessons into neurological nursing lessons holds the potential to increase post-test scores significantly

  20. A Cross-sectional, Descriptive, Quality Improvement Project to Assess Undergraduate Nursing Students' Clinical Exposure to Patients With Wounds in an Introductory Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Keves-Foster, Mary Kathryn; Ashare, JoAnn; Zugcic, Mary; Albdour, Maha; Albdour, Dalia

    2016-04-01

    Because nurses frequently participate in decisions related to wound care, learning about wounds and their care during undergraduate education is critical. A cross-sectional, descriptive, quality improvement project was conducted in an introductory baccalaureate nursing course to identify: 1) the types of patients with wounds assigned to beginning students, 2) patient wound care procedures and dressings, and 3) student level of participation in wound care. Data were collected from the weekly notes recorded about students' (N = 49) patient care experiences in 3 acute care hospitals for 9 clinical days during 1 semester. Data were recorded on a paper-and-pencil form by instructors at the end of the clinical day and included type of wound, wound irrigation, dressing, technique of care, and student's participation. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the frequency and distribution of the wound characteristics and care assessed. Of the 284 patients assigned to students, 75 (26.4%) had a wound. The most common wound was a surgical incision (49, 65%) and was closed (36, 73.5%). Twenty-six (26) patients had a pressure ulcer, most commonly Stage II. The most common dressing was dry gauze (29). Damp gauze was used on 18 wounds. Wound irrigation was recorded for 24 wound protocols and performed with a bulb syringe or by pouring the solution from a container. Generally, nonsterile wound care was performed. Twenty-five (25) students performed wound care with the instructor, 16 watched the care performed by another clinician, and 10 participated with another nurse in the wound care. For 22 patients, the wound care was neither observed nor performed because either it was not time for the dressing to be changed or it was only to be changed by a medical team. From these data, it was concluded beginning nursing students had some, but limited, clinical experience with patients with wounds. Students' wound care experiences need further examination, especially across multiple

  1. The construction and validation of an instrument for the assessment of graduates of undergraduate nursing courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Maria Aparecida; Ohara, Conceição Vieira da Silva; Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes de

    2016-06-14

    to construct an instrument for the assessment of graduates of undergraduate nursing courses and to validate this instrument through the consensus of specialists. methodological study. In order to elaborate the instrument, documental analysis and a literature review were undertaken. Validation took place through use of the Delphi Conference, between September 2012 and September 2013, in which 36 specialists from Brazilian Nursing participated. In order to analyze reliability, the Cronbach alpha coefficient, the item/total correlation, and the Pearson correlation coefficient were calculated. the instrument was constructed with the participation of specialist nurses representing all regions of Brazil, with experience in lecturing and research. The first Delphi round led to changes in the first instrument, which was restructured and submitted to another round, with a response rate of 94.44%. In the second round, the instrument was validated with a Cronbach alpha of 0.75. the final instrument possessed three dimensions related to the characterization of the graduate, insertion in the job market, and evaluation of the professional training process. This instrument may be used across the territory of Brazil as it is based on the curricular guidelines and contributes to the process of regulation of the quality of the undergraduate courses in Nursing. construir um instrumento para a avaliação de egressos de cursos de graduação em enfermagem e validar esse instrumento pelo consenso de especialistas. estudo metodológico. Para a elaboração do instrumento, realizou-se análise documental e revisão de literatura. A validação ocorreu por Conferência Delphi, entre setembro de 2012 e setembro de 2013, da qual participaram 36 especialistas da Enfermagem brasileira. Para a análise de confiabilidade, calculou-se o coeficiente alfa de Cronbach, a correlação item/total e o coeficiente de correlação de Pearson. o instrumento foi construído com a participação de

  2. Factors Associated With Nursing Students' Resilience: Communication Skills Course, Use of Social Media and Satisfaction With Clinical Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalit, Warshawski; Sivia, Barnoy; Michal, Itzhaki

    The purpose of this study was to explore the (a) associations between students' personal and group resilience to their utilization of social networking platforms and formally taught communication skills, (b) students' personal and clinical characteristics that are related to personal and group resilience and the perceived helpfulness of communication course, and (c) factors that contribute to students' satisfaction with their clinical placement. Data were collected from 149 second year nursing students learning in a major university in the country of Israel with the use of a self-administered structured questionnaire. Students' satisfaction from their clinical placement was measured using 1 open-ended question, analyzed through qualitative methods. Results demonstrated positive correlations between students' use of social networking to their personal and group resilience (Pmedia use, religion, and clinical placement characteristics were related to resilience and to the perceived helpfulness of the communication course (P<.01). Students' satisfaction with their clinical placement was based primarily on the clinical instructors' personal and professional skills. In conclusion, social networking can and should be used as a learning tool to promote resilience among nursing students. Faculty and nurse managers should be aware of the central role of the clinical instructor and initiate collaborative and supporting initiatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nursing students' preferences of strategies surrounding cinenurducation in a first year child growth and development courses: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jina; Steefel, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Use of film in the classroom (cinenurducation) promotes nursing students' motivation and understanding of concepts about child growth and development; however, consensus has not been reached regarding students' preferred strategies and what they view as effective. To identify nursing students' preferences for pedagogical strategies surrounding film use in a Child Growth and Development course. A mixed methods study encompassing a concurrent triangulation strategy was undertaken. Eighty-three students attending the first year nursing class in the fall semester 2012 at a private University in South Korea participated. Films or film clips were shown either before or after pedagogical strategies including lecture, presentation, personal essay, group report, or group discussion, followed by a questionnaire to assess student preferences and their opinions on the impact of strategies on motivation and learning. A focus group with 10 participants provided their opinions. Although the preference for the time when films were watched showed no significant difference (t=.388, p=.699), participants preferred the following pedagogical methods: watching films with a group, saying this was more effective compared to watching films alone (t=5.488, pstrategies surrounding cinenurducation helped them gain conceptual knowledge in a Child Growth and Development course. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in nursing students' perceptions of research and evidence-based practice after completing a research course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keib, Carrie N; Cailor, Stephanie M; Kiersma, Mary E; Chen, Aleda M H

    2017-07-01

    Nurses need a sound education in research and evidence-based practice (EBP) to provide patients with optimal care, but current teaching methods could be more effective. To evaluate the changes in nursing students 1) perceptions of research and EBP, 2) confidence in research and EBP, and 3) interest in research participation after completing a course in research and EBP. A pre-post assessment design was utilized to compare changes in students. This project was conducted at a small, private liberal arts institution with Bachelor of Science (BSN) students. Two cohorts of third-year BSN students (Year 1 N=55, Year 2 N=54) who were taking a required, semester-long Nursing Research and EBP course. Students' perceptions of and confidence in research and EBP were assessed pre- and post-semester using the Confidence in Research and EBP survey, which contained 7 demographic items, 9 Research Perceptions items, and 19 Confidence in Research items (5-point Likert scale; 1=Not at all confident, 5=Extremely confident). Two years of data were collected and analyzed in SPSS v.24.0. Wilcoxon signed-ranks tests and Mann-Whitney-U tests were utilized to examine the data. Students had significant improvements in perceptions of and confidence in research and EBP (pnursing practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Nursing and midwifery students' experiences with the course of infertility and assisted reproductive techniques: A focus group study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbir, Gozde Gokçe; Ozan, Yeter Durgun

    2018-01-01

    Nurses and midwifes without sufficient knowledge of infertilitare not likely to provide counseling and support for people suffering from infertility. This study aimed to evaluate nursing and midwifery students' experiences with the Course on Infertility and Assisted Reproductive Techniques. Our study had a qualitative descriptive design. Total number of the participants was 75. The analysis revealed five primary themes and twenty-one sub-themes. The themes were (1) action, (2) learner centered method, (3) interaction, (4) nursing competencies, and (5) evaluation. The active learning techniques enabled the students to retrieve the knowledge that they obtained for a long time, contributed to social and cultural development and improved skills required for selfevaluation, communication and leadership, enhanced critical thinking, skills increased motivation and satisfaction and helped with knowledge integration. Infertility is a biopsychosocial condition, and it may be difficult for students to understand what infertile individuals experience. The study revealed that active learning techniques enabled the students to acquire not only theoretical knowledge but also an emotional and psychosocial viewpoint and attitude regarding infertility. The content of an infertility course should be created in accordance with changes in the needs of a given society and educational techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Can Genetics and Genomics Nursing Competencies Be Successfully Taught in a Prenursing Microbiology Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Michele

    2011-01-01

    In recognition of the entry into the era of personalized medicine, a new set of genetics and genomics competencies for nurses was introduced in 2006. Since then, there have been a number of reports about the critical importance of these competencies for nursing practices and about the challenges of addressing these competencies in the preservice…

  7. The Design and Implementation of Authentic Learning with Mobile Technology in Vocational Nursing Practice Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Ying-Hung; Wu, Ting-Ting; Chiu, Po-Sheng; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, along with the development of mobile technology, vocational nursing education has improved greatly. In light of this emerging mobile technology, it brings the clinical practice of vocational nursing education closer to authentic learning than ever. In fact, some studies revealed that learners' learn states and learning outcomes…

  8. Let's talk about society: A Critical Discourse Analysis of sociology courses in pre-registration nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Tomas F; Leal, Valentina J; Ayala, Ricardo A

    2016-01-01

    The discussion of teaching and learning in nursing has been prolific. Whereas most of the debate tends to focus on core contents of nursing programmes, little has been discussed about the teaching in 'supporting subjects' with relevance to both nursing education and nursing practice. This article offers a perspective on sociology scholarship for applied professions by using the case of nursing programmes. Syllabus is a rich source of data, and in its representational capacity it becomes both a discursive construction and a vehicle of ideology. Accordingly, we present a Critical Discourse Analysis of syllabi of nursing schools in Chile as to identify core contents and ideologies, and implied challenges for nursing education. We argue that while the syllabus as a discourse discloses a significant cleavage, the biggest challenge is precisely to challenge the ideologies constructed by and embedded in the syllabi. Our reflection thus points to a better interdisciplinary dialogue as to enhance the actual contribution of sociology to nursing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. What Can We Learn From Point-of-Care Blood Glucose Values Deleted and Repeated by Nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corl, Dawn; Yin, Tom; Ulibarri, May; Lien, Heather; Tylee, Tracy; Chao, Jing; Wisse, Brent E

    2018-03-01

    Hospitals rely on point-of-care (POC) blood glucose (BG) values to guide important decisions related to insulin administration and glycemic control. Evaluation of POC BG in hospitalized patients is associated with measurement and operator errors. Based on a previous quality improvement (QI) project we introduced an option for operators to delete and repeat POC BG values suspected as erroneous. The current project evaluated our experience with deleted POC BG values over a 2-year period. A retrospective QI project included all patients hospitalized at two regional academic medical centers in the Pacific Northwest during 2014 and 2015. Laboratory Medicine POC BG data were reviewed to evaluate all inpatient episodes of deleted and repeated POC BG. Inpatient operators choose to delete and repeat only 0.8% of all POC BG tests. Hypoglycemic and extreme hyperglycemic BG values are more likely to be deleted and repeated. Of initial values values (18% of all values) are errors. Of values >400 mg/dL, 40% of deleted values (5% of all values) are errors. Not all repeated POC BG values are first deleted. Optimal use of the option to delete and repeat POC BG values values that are measurement/operator errors. Eliminating these errors significantly reduces documented rates of severe hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, and has the potential to improve patient safety.

  10. Correlates of Stress and Coping among Jordanian Nursing Students during Clinical Practice in Psychiatric/Mental Health Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas

    2016-10-01

    Training in psychiatric settings is stressful for nursing students. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlations between the students' characteristics, their stress degrees, stressors and types of coping strategies they experience during training in psychiatric course. A descriptive, correlational, longitudinal design was used. Sixty-five undergraduate nursing students were recruited randomly from five Jordanian universities. Self-report questionnaires were administered at the second semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. The findings showed that students who utilized avoidance or transference strategies reported high stress degrees. Moreover, the results showed that those students who were in the fourth year, with a low family income, who avoid extracurricular activities, with a low academic grade or who registered in other clinical course(s) reported high stress degrees. These findings present a worthy data for the clinical instructors that facilitate students training in psychiatric settings and promote their psychosocial well-being. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Nursing expertise: a course of ambiguity and evolution in a concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Marie; Higson, Mary; Cleary, Michelle; Jackson, Debra

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we clarify and describe the nature of nursing expertise and provide a framework to guide its identification and further development. To have utility and rigour, concept-driven research and theories of practice require underlying concepts that are robust, valid and reliable. Advancing understanding of a concept requires careful attention to explicating its knowledge, metaphors and conceptual meaning. Examining the concepts and metaphors of nursing expertise, and how they have been interpreted into the nursing discourse, we aimed to synthesise definitions and similarities between concepts and elicit the defining characteristics and properties of nursing expertise. In clarifying the concept, we sought to move beyond the ambiguity that currently surrounds expertise in nursing and unravel it to make explicit the characteristics of nursing expertise from published peer-reviewed studies and structured literature synthesis. Findings indicate a lack of clarity surrounding the use of the term expertise. Traditional reliance upon intuition as a way of explaining expert performance is slowly evolving. Emerging from the analysis is a picture of expertise as the relationship between networks of contextual reasoning, understanding and practice. Striking absences in the discourse include limited explication of ethical reasoning and theorising a broader interpretation of expertise reflective of contemporary forms of nursing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Development and application of course-embedded assessment system for program outcome evaluation in the Korean nursing education: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jee Won; Seo, Eun Ji; You, Mi-Ae; Song, Ju-Eun

    2016-03-01

    Program outcome evaluation is important because it is an indicator for good quality of education. Course-embedded assessment is one of the program outcome evaluation methods. However, it is rarely used in Korean nursing education. The study purpose was to develop and apply preliminarily a course-embedded assessment system to evaluate one program outcome and to share our experiences. This was a methodological study to develop and apply the course-embedded assessment system based on the theoretical framework in one nursing program in South Korea. Scores for 77 students generated from the three practicum courses were used. The course-embedded assessment system was developed following the six steps suggested by Han's model as follows. 1) One program outcome in the undergraduate program, "nursing process application ability", was selected and 2) the three clinical practicum courses related to the selected program outcome were identified. 3) Evaluation tools including rubric and items were selected for outcome measurement and 4) performance criterion, the educational goal level for the program, was established. 5) Program outcome was actually evaluated using the rubric and evaluation items in the three practicum courses and 6) the obtained scores were analyzed to identify the achievement rate, which was compared with the performance criterion. Achievement rates for the selected program outcome in adult, maternity, and pediatric nursing practicum were 98.7%, 100%, and 66.2% in the case report and 100% for all three in the clinical practice, and 100%, 100%, and 87% respectively for the conference. These are considered as satisfactory levels when compared with the performance criterion of "at least 60% or more". Course-embedded assessment can be used as an effective and economic method to evaluate the program outcome without running an integrative course additionally. Further studies to develop course-embedded assessment systems for other program outcomes in nursing

  13. Attrition and success rates of accelerated students in nursing courses: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Doggrell, Sheila Anne; Schaffer, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a comprehensive literature on the academic outcomes (attrition and success) of students in traditional/baccalaureate nursing programs, but much less is known about the academic outcomes of students in accelerated nursing programs. The aim of this systematic review is to report on the attrition and success rates (either internal examination or NCLEX-RN) of accelerated students, compared to traditional students. Methods For the systematic review, the databases (Pubmed, Cinah...

  14. "From resistance to challenge": child health service nurses experiences of how a course in group leadership affected their management of parental groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2017-01-01

    All parents in Sweden are invited to child health service (CHS) parental groups, however only 49% of the families participate. The way the parental groups are managed has been shown to be of importance for how parents experience the support and CHS nurses describe feeling insecure when running the groups. Lack of facilitation, structure and leadership might jeopardise the potential benefit of such support groups. This study describes CHS nurses' experiences of how a course in group leadership affected the way they ran their parental groups. A course in group leadership given to 56 CHS nurses was evaluated in focus group interviews 5-8 months after the course. The nurses felt strengthened in their group leader role and changed their leadership methods. The management of parental groups was after the course perceived as an important work task and the nurses included time for planning, preparation and evaluation, which they felt improved their parental groups. Parental participation in the activities in the group had become a key issue and they used their new exercises and tools to increase this. They expressed feeling more confident and relaxed in their role as group leaders and felt that they could adapt their leadership to the needs of the parents. Specific training might strengthen the CHS nurses in their group leader role and give them new motivation to fulfil their work with parental groups.  Clinical Trials.gov ID: NCT02494128.

  15. Impact of a critical care postgraduate certificate course on nurses' self-reported competence and confidence: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Rebecca; Edvardsson, David

    2018-06-01

    Postgraduate education is said to support the development of nurses' professional competence and confidence, essential to the delivery of safe and effective care. However, there is a shortness of empirical evidence to demonstrate an increase to nurses' self-reported confidence and competence on completion of critical care postgraduate certificate-level education. To explore the impact of a critical care postgraduate certificate course on nurses' self-reported competence and confidence. To explore the psychometric properties and performance of the Critical Care Competence and Confidence Questionnaire. A quasi-experimental pre/post-test design. A total population sample of nurses completing a critical care postgraduate certificate course at an Australian University. The Critical Care Competence and Confidence Questionnaire was developed for this study to measure nurses' self-reported competence and confidence at baseline and follow up. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to explore sample characteristics and changes between baseline and follow-up. Reliability of the questionnaire was explored using Cronbach's Alpha and item-total correlations. There was a statistically significant increase in competence and confidence between baseline and follow-up across all questionnaire domains. Satisfactory reliability estimates were found for the questionnaire. Completion of a critical care postgraduate certificate course significantly increased nurses' perceived competence and confidence. The Critical Care Competence and Confidence Questionnaire was found to be psychometrically sound for measuring nurses' self-reported competence and confidence. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Embedding High-Fidelity Simulation Into a Foundations of Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Megan Sary

    2015-01-01

    Delay in recognizing the need for and initiating lifesaving measures is unacceptable in health care. It is never too early to teach novice nursing students to recognize and respond to early warning signs of patient deterioration. The rapid response system was developed to expedite recognition of and response to changes in a patient's condition. Use of high-fidelity simulation by beginning nursing students to practice recognizing and responding to patient deterioration is vital to both the welfare of patients and the edification of students. Recognizing and responding quickly to patients' early warning signs of deterioration can determine a patient's outcome. This article discusses the importance of instructing beginning nursing students in identifying and reacting appropriately to early signs of patient deterioration and in following the chain of command to activate the rapid response team.

  17. Impact of eLearning course on nurses' professional competence in seclusion and restraint practices: 9-month follow-up results of a randomized controlled study (ISRCTN32869544).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, R; Hätönen, H; Joffe, G; Pitkänen, A; Lahti, M; Välimäki, M

    2013-04-01

    eLearning may facilitate continuing vocational education, but data on the long-term effects of an eLearning course are lacking. The aim of this study was to explore the long-term impact of an eLearning course entitled ePsychNurse.Net on psychiatric nurses' professional competence in practicing seclusion and restraint and on their job satisfaction and general self-efficacy at 9-month follow-up. In a randomized controlled study, 12 wards were randomly assigned to the ePsychNurse.Net (intervention) or training as usual (control). Baseline and 9-month follow-up data on nurses' knowledge of coercion-related legislation, physical restraint and seclusion, their attitudes towards physical restraint and seclusion, job satisfaction and general self-efficacy were analysed for 137 completers (those who participated in the 9-month follow-up assessment). No between-group differences were found on any variable, with the exception of a change in attitude to seclusion in favour of the control group. The findings of the long-term effects did not differ from the immediate outcomes (3-month follow-up) and the improved level of knowledge acquired and further consolidation of that knowledge did not take place in the 6-month period after the 3-month ePsychNurse.Net course. The ePsychNurse.Net should be further developed and its future modifications will require additional studies, probably with some new outcome measures. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  18. Can a Web-Based Course Improve Communicative Competence of Foreign-Born Nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schaik, Eileen; Lynch, Emily M.; Stoner, Susan A.; Sikorski, Lorna D.

    2014-01-01

    In the years since World War II, the United States has grown increasingly dependent on foreign-born healthcare personnel at all levels of the healthcare system. Foreign-born nurses report that while they may feel clinically competent, they often feel unprepared for the use of English in the healthcare setting (Davis & Nichols, 2002; Guttman,…

  19. Hand hygiene technique quality evaluation in nursing and medicine students of two academic courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Škodová

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: because they are health professionals, nursing and medical students' hands during internships can function as a transmission vehicle for hospital-acquired infections.Method: a descriptive study with nursing and medical degree students on the quality of the hand hygiene technique, which was assessed via a visual test using a hydroalcoholic solution marked with fluorescence and an ultraviolet lamp.Results: 546 students were assessed, 73.8% from medicine and 26.2% from nursing. The area of the hand with a proper antiseptic distribution was the palm (92.9%; areas not properly scrubbed were the thumbs (55.1%. 24.7% was very good in both hands, 29.8% was good, 25.1% was fair, and 20.3% was poor. The worst assessed were the male, nursing and first year students. There were no significant differences in the age groups.Conclusions: hand hygiene technique is not applied efficiently. Education plays a key role in setting a good practice base in hand hygiene, theoretical knowledge, and in skill development, as well as good practice reinforcement.

  20. Experiences of service users involved in recruitment for nursing courses: A phenomenological research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Katie; Bernal, Cathy; Devis, Kate; Southgate, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into service users' experiences of participating in recruitment for Adult, Mental Health and Child nursing studies at the authors' university; to establish potential motivations behind such participation; and to make suggestions for improved future practice. The involvement of service users in nurse education and recruitment has for some years been required by the Nursing and Midwifery Council, but there is a dearth of publications on the meaning of that involvement to participating service users. It is hoped that this study will contribute to this body of knowledge. A phenomenological approach was selected, field-specific focus groups of service users being facilitated using a semi-structured interview format; these were audio recorded and transcribed. The data was analysed using thematic analysis. Participation was subject to the service users having been involved in recruitment to nursing studies at the authors' university and the focus groups took place either at the university or at the child participants' school. Themes identified demonstrated largely positive experiences and a sense of meaningful involvement for all concerned. Findings indicated a close link between the values of the participants and those of the wider NHS, benefits to a sense of wellbeing and achievement, as well as the need for greater ownership of the recruitment process by service users. Potential lessons for academics wishing to promote greater service user involvement in student recruitment are articulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An Evaluation of Effective Factors in Learning Transfer of Nursing On-the-Job Training Courses in Work-Environment Based on Holton’s Transfer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi mohammadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background of Objective: Nursing is one of the health care jobs. In addition to health care, they need to continue education for individual development and be aware of the latest medical science achievements. The main purpose of this study was an evaluation of effective factors in learning transfer of nursing on the job training courses in work environment based on Holton’s transfer model. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study in which the population was all of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences nurses. Passing on-the-job training courses in 2015 was inclusion criterion. Using random sampling method and Cocran formula, 95 nurses were selected. Research instrument was learning transfer system inventory that was distributed after its validity and reliability were calculated. Data was analyzed by inferential statistical methods and SPSS21. Results: The results showed that effective individual, organizational and educational factors in learning transfer of on-the-job training courses in work environment are important. Also, they showed that individual was the most dominant effective factor (P< 0.05. Conclusion: With special attention to the nurse's on- the -job training courses, it is possible to transfer learning to work environment.

  2. Nurse-Driven Training Courses: Impact on Implementation of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    F?lez-Carrob?, Estel; Sagarra-Ti?, Maria; Romero, Araceli; Rubio, Montserrat; Planas, Lourdes; P?rez-Lucena, Mar?a Jos?; Baiget, Montserrat; Cabista?, Cristina; F?lez, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) predicts cardiovascular risk and identifies white-coat and masked hypertension, efficacy of treatment and the circadian cycle of hypertensive patients. Objective: To analyze the effectiveness of ABPM implementation thoughtout a nurse-driven training program. Materials and Methodology: Twenty eight professionals were involved in the study carried out in the primary care center of the metropolitan area of Barcelona that serves 34,289 inhab...

  3. Innovative instructional strategy using cinema films in an undergraduate nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Norlyn B; Fife, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Educators can develop innovative instructional strategies to engage students within the philosophical framework of Constructivism. To that end, the authors used films--Hollywood movies--to enhance their curriculum on neurological and psychopathological illnesses. During the fourth quarter of a seven-quarter associate degree nursing program, students developed case studies of the disorders portrayed in selected films. The authors outline the methods used to implement this approach and discuss evaluations from student and faculty perspectives.

  4. [Psychiatric consultations for nursing-home residents: aspects and course of such consultations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbeek, M; van Baarsen, C; Koekkoek, B

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric symptoms occur frequently in nursing-home residents. The psychiatric expertise and support available to residents vary from one nursing home to another. International studies show that psychiatric consultations can be effective, but in the Netherlands very little research has been done on this topic. To list the types of psychiatric problems and symptoms for which consultations are requested and to determine whether a psychiatric consultation can have positive results for nursing-home residents and staff. The psychiatric consultations requested were tabulated and were analysed. Details of 71 psychiatric consultations were recorded. The percentage of women (average age 74 years) was slightly higher than the percentage of men. More than 75% of the patients suffered from agitation/aggression or irritability, 65% suffered from depression, 63% from anxiety and 56% from dysinhibition. A post-intervention assessment was performed in 54 patients (76%). In this group psychiatric symptoms were found to be greatly reduced, with regard to both frequency and severity. In addition, nursing staff seemed to suffer less of the stress and strain in their work. The patients for whom a consultation was requested seemed to suffer from serious psychiatric symptoms and were often aggressive. It was possible to achieve substantial progress as a result of a simple intervention. A possible explanation for this effect is probably the nature of the psychiatric consultation used; it was structured, multi-disciplinary and time-consuming. However, since no control group was involved, it is impossible to say with certainty that the reduction in symptoms can be attributed solely to the consultation.

  5. A leadership program in an undergraduate nursing course in Western Australia: building leaders in our midst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Joyce M; Cope, Vicki C; Harris, Maureen

    2010-04-01

    This paper discusses a leadership program implemented in the School of Nursing at Edith Cowan University to develop leadership in fourth semester nursing students enrolled in a three year undergraduate nursing degree to prepare them for the dynamic 'changing world' environment of healthcare. Students were invited to apply to undertake the program in extracurricular time. Nineteen students applied to the program and ten were chosen to participate in the program. The numbers were limited to ten to equal selected industry leader mentors. The leadership program is based on the belief that leadership is a function of knowing oneself, having a vision that is well communicated, building trust among colleagues, and taking effective action to realize one's own potential. It is asserted that within the complexity of health care it is vital that nurses enter the clinical setting with leadership capabilities because graduate nurses must take the lead to act autonomously, make decisions at the point of service, and develop a professional vision that fits with organizational and professional goals Thus, the more practice students have with leadership skills, the more prepared they will be to enter the workforce. The program consists of three components: leadership knowledge, leadership skills and leadership-in-action. The leadership program focuses on the student-participant's ability to be self reflective on personal leadership qualities, critically appraise, and work within a team as well as to take responsibility for ensuring the achievement of team goals as leader. The program is practical and is reliant on the involvement of leader mentors who hold positions of leadership with the health industry in Western Australia. Students completed a pre and post program questionnaire related to abilities and skills in leadership. This paper discusses pre and post evaluation data against program outcomes. The findings demonstrate that participants of the program increased their ability

  6. Use of the 5E learning cycle model combined with problem-based learning for a fundamentals of nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Won Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Park, Han Jong; Chang, Ae Kyung; Kim, Mi Ja

    2013-12-01

    The 5E learning cycle model has shown a positive effect on student learning in science education, particularly in courses with theory and practice components. Combining problem-based learning (PBL) with the 5E learning cycle was suggested as a better option for students' learning of theory and practice. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of the traditional learning method with the 5E learning cycle model with PBL. The control group (n = 78) was subjected to a learning method that consisted of lecture and practice. The experimental group (n = 83) learned by using the 5E learning cycle model with PBL. The results showed that the experimental group had significantly improved self-efficacy, critical thinking, learning attitude, and learning satisfaction. Such an approach could be used in other countries to enhance students' learning of fundamental nursing. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. The course of apraxia and ADL functioning in left hemisphere stroke patients treated in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkervoort, Mireille; Dekker, Joost; Deelman, Betto

    2006-12-01

    To study the course of apraxia and daily life functioning (ADL) in left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia. Prospective cohort study. Rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. One hundred and eight left hemisphere stroke patients with apraxia, hospitalized in rehabilitation centres and nursing homes. ADL-observations, Barthel ADL Index, Apraxia Test, Motricity Index. During the study period of 20 weeks, patients showed small improvements in apraxia (standardized mean differences of 0.19 and 0.33) and medium-sized improvements in ADL functioning (standardized mean differences from 0.37 to 0.61). About 88% of the patients were still apraxic at week 20. Less improvement in apraxia was observed in initially less severe apraxic patients. Less improvement in ADL functioning was found to be associated with more severe apraxia, a more independent initial ADL score, higher age, impaired motor functioning and longer time between stroke and first assessment. Apraxia in stroke patients is a persistent disorder, which has an adverse influence on ADL recovery.

  8. Long-term benefits by a mind-body medicine skills course on perceived stress and empathy among medical and nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Marja; Jong, Mats; Jong, Miek C

    2017-07-01

    A significant number of medical students suffer from burnout symptoms and reduced empathy. This controlled, quasi-experimental study aimed to investigate whether a mind-body medicine (MBM) skills course could reduce perceived stress and increase empathy and self-reflection in medical and nursing students. The MBM course (consisting of experiential sessions of mind-body techniques and group reflections) was piloted among Dutch medical students and Swedish nursing students. Main outcome variables were perceived stress (PSS), empathy (IRI subscales perspective taking, fantasy, empathic concern, and personal distress), and self-reflection (GRAS). Participating and control students completed questionnaires at baseline, post-intervention, at 6 and 12 months follow-up. Seventy-four medical and 47 nursing students participated in the course. Participating medical students showed significantly increased empathic concern [1.42 (95% CI 0.05, 2.78), p = 0.042], increased fantasy [3.24 (95% CI 1.58, 4.90), p nursing students showed significantly decreased levels of perceived stress [-5.09 (95% CI -8.37, -1.82), p = 0.002] and decreased personal distress [-5.01 (95% CI -6.97, -3.06), p stress and empathy in medical and nursing students.

  9. Failure of a repeat course of cyclooxygenase inhibitor to close a PDA is a risk factor for developing chronic lung disease in ELBW infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrouche-Amrani Lynda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal treatment regimen or protocol for managing a persistent patent ductus arteriosus (PDA in extremely low birth weight (ELBW infants has not been well established. This study was aimed at evaluating the failure rate of a cyclooxygenase (COX inhibitor (COI for PDA closure and to determine the incidence of a PDA requiring ligation in ELBW infants. We examined the clinical characteristics and risk factors that may predict the clinical consequences of failure of PDA closure by COI. Methods Medical information on 138 infants with birth weight (BW 48 hours was retrieved. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients whose PDAs closed with COI were compared with those who did not close. Results Of the 138 patients, 112 survived to discharge. Eighty (71.4% of those who survived received 1-3 courses of COI treatment for a symptomatic PDA. A total of 32 (40% failed COI treatment and underwent PDA ligation. Multivariable logistic regression analysis suggests that the observed differences in the outcomes in infants with or without symptomatic PDA can be explained by the babies with symptomatic PDA being more immature and sicker. No significant difference was seen in the incidence of chronic lung disease (CLD in infants whose PDA was treated medically versus those who failed medical treatment and then underwent ligation. However, after adjusting for disease severity and other known risk factors, the odds ratio of developing CLD for surviving babies with a persistent PDA compared to those whose PDA was successfully closed with 1-2 courses of COI is 3.24 (1.07-9.81; p = 0.038. Conclusions When successfully treated, PDA in ELBW infants did not contribute significantly to the adverse outcomes such as CLD, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP and age at discharge. This suggests that it is beneficial for a hemodynamically significant PDA to be closed. The failure of a repeat course of COI to close a PDA is a major risk factor for

  10. Nursing Students' Perceptions of the Educational Learning Environment in Pediatric and Maternity Courses Using DREEM Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusaad, Fawzia El Sayed; Mohamed, Hanan El-Sayed; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady

    2015-01-01

    Background: Educational surroundings is one of the most vital factors in figuring out the fulfillment of an powerful curriculum and gaining of knowledge. Aim: To compare students' perceptions of the academic learning environment in Pediatric and Maternity courses using DREEM Questionnaire. Design: This is a comparative study. Subjects: Five…

  11. Designing, Implementing and Evaluating Preclinical Simulation Lab for Maternity Nursing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALFozan, Haya; El Sayed, Yousria; Habib, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Background: The opportunity for students to deliver care safely in today's, complex health care environment is limited. Simulation allows students to practice skills in a safe environment. Purpose: to assess the students' perception, satisfaction, and learning outcomes after a simulation based maternity course. Method: a quasi experimental design…

  12. A course for nurses to handle difficult communication situations. A randomized controlled trial of impact on self-efficacy and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Daniel; Copeland, H Liesel; Bush, Donna; Stein, Linda; Thompson, Scott

    2011-01-01

    to evaluate the impact of a communication skills course for nurses on how to handle difficult communication situations in their daily work. a 7-h course was developed using a construct of "Awareness, Feelings, Listen, Solve" (AFLS). A pedagogy of experiential, learner-centered learning was adopted. The course evaluation used a randomized controlled design with pre- and post-measures of self-efficacy and performance. forty-one nurses volunteered and thirty-three nurses completed all assigned parts of the study. On self-assessment, there was significant improvement for self-efficacy (F=24.43, pperformance, there was no significant improvement between intervention and control groups (F=3.46, p=0.073). a short course for nurses on handling difficult communication situations achieved significant improvements in self-efficacy but not in performance. teaching communication skills in community-based settings is important for the safety and effectiveness of patient care. Sponsoring organizations should weigh trade-offs between feasibility and achievement of measurable improvements in performance. One possible approach is to focus on specific communication skills rather than a full suite of skills. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Staying the course: Examining enablers and barriers to student success within undergraduate nursing programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Boyd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In line with current trends towards a positive and enhancement-led perspective, this account of a research project carried out in a Scottish university considers the student nurse experience as a lens for examining retention enablers. Two phases of interviews with final year students from a diverse cohort, many of whom were adult learners, informed the development of a series of themes and recommendations for better understanding factors which encourage persistence. A combination of grounded theory thematic analysis and narrative interpretation was used in this research to encourage a rich biographical component.

  14. Can an e-learning course improve nursing care for older people at risk of delirium: a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Steeg, Lotte; IJkema, Roelie; Langelaan, Maaike; Wagner, Cordula

    2014-05-27

    Delirium occurs frequently in older hospitalised patients and is associated with several adverse outcomes. Ignorance among healthcare professionals and a failure to recognise patients suffering from delirium have been identified as the possible causes of poor care. The objective of the study was to determine whether e-learning can be an effective means of improving implementation of a quality improvement project in delirium care. This project aims primarily at improving the early recognition of older patients who are at risk of delirium. In a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial an e-learning course on delirium was introduced, aimed at nursing staff. The trial was conducted on general medical and surgical wards from 18 Dutch hospitals. The primary outcome measure was the delirium risk screening conducted by nursing staff, measured through monthly patient record reviews. Patient records from patients aged 70 and over admitted onto wards participating in the study were used for data collection. Data was also collected on the level of delirium knowledge of these wards' nursing staff. Records from 1,862 older patients were included during the control phase and from 1,411 patients during the intervention phase. The e-learning course on delirium had a significant positive effect on the risk screening of older patients by nursing staff (OR 1.8, p-value e-learning course also showed a significant positive effect on nurses' knowledge of delirium. Nurses who undertook a delirium e-learning course showed a greater adherence to the quality improvement project in delirium care. This improved the recognition of patients at risk and demonstrated that e-learning can be a valuable instrument for hospitals when implementing improvements in delirium care. The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR). NTR2885.

  15. Nurse-Driven Training Courses: Impact on Implementation of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félez-Carrobé, Estel; Sagarra-Tió, Maria; Romero, Araceli; Rubio, Montserrat; Planas, Lourdes; Pérez-Lucena, María José; Baiget, Montserrat; Cabistañ, Cristina; Félez, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) predicts cardiovascular risk and identifies white-coat and masked hypertension, efficacy of treatment and the circadian cycle of hypertensive patients. Objective: To analyze the effectiveness of ABPM implementation thoughtout a nurse-driven training program. Materials and Methodology: Twenty eight professionals were involved in the study carried out in the primary care center of the metropolitan area of Barcelona that serves 34,289 inhabitants. The ABPM implementation program was driven by two nurses that held four education sessions. After a 2-year follow-up period, we assessed the outcome of attendance at the educational sessions. First, we evaluated whether the program increased the number of orders of ABPM. Second, we used a survey to evaluate to what extent the input of our educational sessions was understood by attendants. Third, we analyzed the effect ABPM results had on the treatment of patients with a bad control of their hypertension. Results: After the training sessions we found a 6-fold increase in the number of patients undergoing ABPM. We analyzed 204 hypertensive individuals: 41% dippers, 34% were non-dippers, 20% were risers and 5% were extremely dippers. According to our survey, 100% of attendants had a good practice regarding ABPM management. However only 27% of riser patients were studied with a second ABPM. Conclusions: Specific training processes are needed for implementation of ABPM and an even more concentrated effort should be focused on training in the correct interpretation of ABPM results. PMID:23750185

  16. Using VoiceThread to Promote Collaborative Learning in On-Line Clinical Nurse Leader Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ola H

    The movement to advance the clinical nurse leader (CNL) as an innovative new role for meeting higher health care quality standards continues with CNL programs offered on-line at colleges and universities nationwide. Collaborative learning activities offer the opportunity for CNL students to gain experience in working together in small groups to negotiate and solve care process problems. The challenge for nurse educators is to provide collaborative learning activities in an asynchronous learning environment that can be considered isolating by default. This article reports on the experiences of 17 CNL students who used VoiceThread, a cloud-based tool that allowed them to communicate asynchronously with one another through voice comments for collaboration and sharing knowledge. Participants identified benefits and drawbacks to using VoiceThread for collaboration as compared to text-based discussion boards. Students reported that the ability to hear the voice of their peers and the instructor helped them feel like they were in a classroom communicating with "real" instructor and peers. Students indicated a preference for on-line classes that used VoiceThread discussions to on-line classes that used only text-based discussion boards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An evaluation of the effectiveness of a dedicated health and well being course on nursing students' health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Sharry, Patricia; Timmins, Fiona

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have shown that the transition to college can have a negative effect on students' life style choices resulting in weight gain, increasing inactivity and stress. Additionally while this issue is well recognised there have been only limited attempts at targeted interventions aimed at the university student population. The establishment of poor behavioural choices at this stage in the student's life can lead to consistency of unhealthy lifestyle practices, ultimately placing students at risk of heart disease and other lifestyle related health issues. This is more problematic for nursing students who are identified within the public domain as health promoters and as such ought to model, or at least not grossly contradict, healthy lifestyle choices. The current intervention is proposed as a possible mechanism to interrupt this process and establish healthy lifestyle choices at this crucial time in students' life in the hope that this will have lifelong health benefits. This is an innovative study aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of a health and well being module on nursing students' health. Teaching on Health and Well-Being, a new course in the University, was provided to all first year undergraduate students at one university site in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) (n=110). Approximately half the sample (Nursing students) underwent an intervention while the other half served as a comparison group, health behaviours of both groups were compared using pre and post-test measures. The most important finding from the study was a statistically significant increase in psychological well-being in the intervention group with a corresponding decrease in psychological well-being in the comparison group. Findings also indicated an initial significant increase in physical activity in the intervention group although this was not maintained over time. Targeted health behavioural interventions that include stress management skills ought to be provided as mandatory to

  18. Registered nurses' thoughts on blended learning in a postgraduate course in cancer care--content analyses of web surveys and a focus group interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arving, Cecilia; Wadensten, Barbro; Johansson, Birgitta

    2014-06-01

    Purpose of the research was to describe registered nurses' (RNs) (n = 53) thoughts on the blended learning format in a 'specialist nursing programme in cancer care'. The study was conducted in autumn 2007 and 2008. A content analysis of answers to open-ended questions in a web-based questionnaire and a focus group interview were carried out. The analysis revealed that the RNs appreciated blended learning. The web lectures facilitated learning and gave RNs access to the education at any time. However, according to the RNs, knowledge is gained through interaction between RNs and teachers, and this aspect needed to be improved. The RNs also thought that the content of the seminars on campus should focus on evidence-based nursing knowledge and practical skills, not just taught as stable facts and procedures. The result from the present study could help to improve the design and content of advanced nursing courses using a blended learning format.

  19. Textbooks on tap: using electronic books housed in handheld devices in nursing clinical courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Margaret G; Dittmer, Arlis

    2009-01-01

    Changing technology is creating new ways to approach nursing education and practice. Beginning in 2003, using a quasi-experimental design, this project introduced personal digital assistants (PDAs) as a clinical tool to five experimental and control groups of students and faculty. The handheld device, or PDA, was loaded with e-books for clinical practice. Differences in learning styles and preferences emerged during the different phases of the study. Students were quickly able to master the technology and use the device effectively, reporting that they liked the concise nature of the information obtained. No students expressed dissatisfaction or regret at being in the experimental group. Results and implications for clinical practice, education, and library resources are discussed.

  20. The effects of linguistic modification on ESL students' comprehension of nursing course test items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosher, Susan; Bowles, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that language may be a source of construct-irrelevant variance for non-native speakers of English, or English as a second language (ESL) students, when they take exams. As a result, exams may not accurately measure knowledge of nursing content. One accommodation often used to level the playing field for ESL students is linguistic modification, a process by which the reading load of test items is reduced while the content and integrity of the item are maintained. Research on the effects of linguistic modification has been conducted on examinees in the K-12 population, but is just beginning in other areas. This study describes the collaborative process by which items from a pathophysiology exam were linguistically modified and subsequently evaluated for comprehensibility by ESL students. Findings indicate that in a majority of cases, modification improved examinees' comprehension of test items. Implications for test item writing and future research are discussed.

  1. The Impact of an Educational Intervention on Knowledge and Competency Levels for Students Enrolled in a Forensic Nursing Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stacy A.

    2014-01-01

    Forensic nursing is an emerging nursing specialty recognized by the American Nursing Association. However, nurses often do not have the basic knowledge or practical competence to provide the appropriate level of forensic care. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in knowledge or practical competence existed between students…

  2. Could Nursing Educational Courses Change the Attitudes of Students to Mental Disorders stigma? A Quasi- Experimental Study in Alborz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Kordlou

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence mental disorders and its burden in the world is one of the most important challenges for health system and service delivery to people with mental disorders need enough and trained manpower. Stigma of mental disorders not only influence patients and their families but also is a barrier for delivering mental health services to the patients, hence beyond the knowledge and expertise, health care providers must have an appropriate attitude especially toward the stigma of mental disorder. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of mental health related courses of nursing curriculum on the nursing student’s attitude about mental disorders in Alborz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: A quasi-experimental study with before and after design was used. All 197 nursing students who had one of the related courses of mental health, were studied for attitudes about mental disorder stigma before and after the semester. Farsi version of OMSHC questionnaire was used to measure nursing student’s attitude. One way ANOVAs, Pearson Correlation and Paired T-Test used for Data analysis. Results: Student’s attitude about mental health stigma didn’t improve after the course lessons. Mental health attitude score was different based on gender (P<0/035 and marital status (P<0.006. There was a weak negative correlation between age and attitude score (r=-0.22, P<0/003. Conclusion: The current educational course and lessons can’t improve the nursing student’s attitudes about the stigma of mental disorders. To get desired outcomes, changing lesson plans and the presentation styles must be considered.

  3. Can an e-learning course improve nursing care for older people at risk of delirium: a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Delirium occurs frequently in older hospitalised patients and is associated with several adverse outcomes. Ignorance among healthcare professionals and a failure to recognise patients suffering from delirium have been identified as the possible causes of poor care. The objective of the study was to determine whether e-learning can be an effective means of improving implementation of a quality improvement project in delirium care. This project aims primarily at improving the early recognition of older patients who are at risk of delirium. Methods In a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial an e-learning course on delirium was introduced, aimed at nursing staff. The trial was conducted on general medical and surgical wards from 18 Dutch hospitals. The primary outcome measure was the delirium risk screening conducted by nursing staff, measured through monthly patient record reviews. Patient records from patients aged 70 and over admitted onto wards participating in the study were used for data collection. Data was also collected on the level of delirium knowledge of these wards’ nursing staff. Results Records from 1,862 older patients were included during the control phase and from 1,411 patients during the intervention phase. The e-learning course on delirium had a significant positive effect on the risk screening of older patients by nursing staff (OR 1.8, p-value e-learning course also showed a significant positive effect on nurses’ knowledge of delirium. Conclusions Nurses who undertook a delirium e-learning course showed a greater adherence to the quality improvement project in delirium care. This improved the recognition of patients at risk and demonstrated that e-learning can be a valuable instrument for hospitals when implementing improvements in delirium care. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR). Trial number: NTR2885. PMID:24884739

  4. Consistent bone marrow-derived cell mobilization following repeated short courses of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: results from a multicenter prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarella, Corrado; Rutella, Sergio; Gualandi, Francesca; Melazzini, Mario; Scimè, Rosanna; Petrini, Mario; Moglia, Cristina; Ulla, Marco; Omedé, Paola; Bella, Vincenzo La; Corbo, Massimo; Silani, Vincenzo; Siciliano, Gabriele; Mora, Gabriele; Caponnetto, Claudia; Sabatelli, Mario; Chiò, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the feasibility and safety of bone marrow-derived cell (BMC) mobilization following repeated courses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Between January 2006 and March 2007, 26 ALS patients entered a multicenter trial that included four courses of BMC mobilization at 3-month intervals. In each course, G-CSF (5 microg/kg b.i.d.) was administered for four consecutive days; 18% mannitol was also given. Mobilization was monitored by flow cytometry analysis of circulating CD34(+) cells and by in vitro colony assay for clonogenic progenitors. Co-expression by CD34(+) cells of CD133, CD90, CD184, CD117 and CD31 was also assessed. Twenty patients completed the four-course schedule. One patient died and one refused to continue the program before starting the mobilization courses; four discontinued the study protocol because of disease progression. Overall, 89 G-CSF courses were delivered. There were two severe adverse events: one prolactinoma and one deep vein thrombosis. There were no discontinuations as a result of toxic complications. Circulating CD34(+) cells were monitored during 85 G-CSF courses and were always markedly increased; the range of median peak values was 41-57/microL, with no significant differences among the four G-CSF courses. Circulating clonogenic progenitor levels paralleled CD34(+) cell levels. Most mobilized CD34(+) cells co-expressed stem cell markers, with a significant increase in CD133 co-expression. It is feasible to deliver repeated courses of G-CSF to mobilize a substantial number of CD34(+) cells in patients with ALS; mobilized BMC include immature cells with potential clinical usefulness.

  5. Effects of Discipline-based Career Course on Nursing Students' Career Search Self-efficacy, Career Preparation Behavior, and Perceptions of Career Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonjoo

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a discipline-based career course on perceptions of career barriers, career search self-efficacy, and career preparation behavior of nursing students. Differences in career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior by the students' levels of career barriers were also examined. The study used a modified one-group, pretest-posttest design. The convenience sample consisted of 154 undergraduate nursing students in a university. The discipline-based career course consisted of eight sessions, and was implemented for 2 hours per session over 8 weeks. The data were collected from May to June in 2012 and 2013 using the following instruments: the Korean Career Indecision Inventory, the Career Search Efficacy Scale, and the Career Preparation Behavior Scale. Descriptive statistics, paired t test, and analysis of covariance were used to analyze the data. Upon the completion of the discipline-based career course, students' perceptions of career barriers decreased and career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior increased. Career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior increased in students with both low and high levels of career barriers. The difference between the low and high groups was significant for career search self-efficacy but not for career preparation behavior. The discipline-based career course was effective in decreasing perceptions of career barriers and increasing career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior among nursing students. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. AANA Journal Course: update for nurse anesthetists. Arrhythmia management devices and electromagnetic interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Emily

    2005-04-01

    The technological complexity of implantable arrhythmia management devices, specifically pacemakers and defibrillators, has increased dramatically since their introduction only a few decades ago. Patients with such devices are encountered much more frequently in hospitals and surgery centers, yet anesthesia provider knowledge of safe and proper management is often incomplete. Anesthesia textbooks and references may provide only short paragraphs on arrhythmia management devices that do not address important perioperative management strategies for this ever-growing patient population. It is no longer satisfactory to simply place a magnet over an implanted device during surgery and assume that this action protects the patient from harm due to electromagnetic interference from inappropriate device function. This AANA Journal course serves as a concise review of basic device function, the sources and effects of electromagnetic interference in the operative setting, and patient management recommendations from current literature.

  7. Impact of eLearning course on nurses' professional competence in seclusion and restraint practices: a randomized controlled study (ISRCTN32869544).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, R; Lahti, M; Pitkänen, A; Joffe, G; Putkonen, H; Hätönen, H; Katajisto, J; Välimäki, M

    2011-11-01

    Education on the care of aggressive and disturbed patients is fragmentary. eLearning could ensure the quality of such education, but data on its impact on professional competence in psychiatry are lacking. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of ePsychNurse.Net, an eLearning course, on psychiatric nurses' professional competence in seclusion and restraint and on their job satisfaction and general self-efficacy. In a randomized controlled study, 12 wards were randomly assigned to ePsychNurse.Net (intervention) or education as usual (control). Baseline and 3-month follow-up data on nurses' knowledge of coercion-related legislation, physical restraint and seclusion, their attitudes towards physical restraint and seclusion, job satisfaction and general self-efficacy were analysed for 158 completers. Knowledge (primary outcome) of coercion-related legislation improved in the intervention group, while knowledge of physical restraint improved and knowledge of seclusion remained unchanged in both groups. General self-efficacy improved in the intervention group also attitude to seclusion in the control group. In between-group comparison, attitudes to seclusion (one of secondary outcomes) favoured the control group. Although the ePsychNurse.Net demonstrated only slight advantages over conventional learning, it may be worth further development with, e.g. flexible time schedule and individualized content. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  8. Comparing the effects of problem-based learning and the traditional lecture method on critical thinking skills and metacognitive awareness in nursing students in a critical care nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Mohammad; Moghadam, Parastou Kordestani; Mohammadipoor, Fatemeh; Tarahi, Mohammad Javad; Sak, Mandana; Toulabi, Tahereh; Pour, Amir Hossein Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method used to develop cognitive and metacognitive skills in nursing students. The present study was conducted to compare the effects of PBL and the traditional lecture method on critical thinking skills and metacognitive awareness in nursing students in a critical care nursing course. The present study was conducted with a quasi-experimental, single group, pretest-posttest design. A group of third-year nursing students (n=40) were recruited from Khorramabad School of Nursing and Midwifery in the west of Iran. The lecture method was used in one group over the first eight weeks of the first semester and PBL was adopted in the second eight weeks. Standardized self-report questionnaires including The California Critical Thinking Skills Test-B (CCTST-B) and the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI) were administered before and after the use of each of the instruction methods. Data were analyzed in SPSS using the paired t-test. No significant changes were observed in the students' critical thinking skills and metacognitive awareness after performing the lecture method. However, a significant increase was observed in the overall critical thinking score (Pmethod. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationships of Academic Preparedness, Age, Gender, and Ethnicity to Success in a Community College Fundamentals of Nursing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayno, Marisue

    2010-01-01

    Nursing student attrition in community colleges negatively affects students, faculty, colleges, and the nursing profession. The purpose of this quantitative correlational retrospective research study was to examine the possible relationships between each of the independent variables of academic preparedness (as measured by NET mathematics and…

  10. The effect of an e-learning course on nursing staff's knowledge of delirium: a before-and-after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Steeg, L.; Ijkema, R.; Wagner, C.; Langelaan, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Delirium is a common condition in hospitalized patients, associated with adverse outcomes such as longer hospital stay, functional decline and higher mortality, as well as higher rates of nursing home placement. Nurses often fail to recognize delirium in hospitalized patients, which

  11. The effect of an e-learning course on nursing staff's knowledge of delirium: A before-and-after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Van De Steeg (Lotte); R.I. Jkema (Roelie I); C. Wagner (Cordula); M. Langelaan (Maaike)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Delirium is a common condition in hospitalized patients, associated with adverse outcomes such as longer hospital stay, functional decline and higher mortality, as well as higher rates of nursing home placement. Nurses often fail to recognize delirium in hospitalized

  12. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  13. The Impact of a Rigorous Multiple Work Shift Schedule and Day Versus Night Shift Work on Reaction Time and Balance Performance in Female Nurses: A Repeated Measures Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brennan J; Stock, Matt S; Banuelas, Victoria K; Akalonu, Chibuzo C

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a demanding work schedule involving long, cumulative work shifts on response time and balance-related performance outcomes and to evaluate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders between day and night shift working nurses. A questionnaire was used to identify the prevalence of past (12-month) and current (7-day) musculoskeletal disorders. Nurses worked three 12-hour work shifts in a 4-day period. Reaction time and balance tests were conducted before and after the work period. The work period induced impairments for reaction time, errors on reaction time tasks, and balance performance, independent of shift type. Musculoskeletal symptom prevalence was high in workers of both work shifts. Compressed work shifts caused performance-based fatigue in nurses. Reaction time and balance tests may be sensitive fatigue identification markers in nurses.

  14. [The effect of a scenario-based simulation communication course on improving the communication skills of nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Hsuan; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2014-04-01

    Limited disease knowledge is frequently the cause of disease-related anxiety in myocardial infarction patients. The ability to communicate effectively serves multiple purposes in the professional nursing practice. By communicating effectively with myocardial infarction patients, nurses may help reduce their anxiety by keeping them well informed about their disease and teaching them self-care strategies. This research evaluates the communication skills of nurses following scenario-based simulation education in the context of communication with myocardial infarction patients. This study used an experimental design and an educational intervention. The target population comprised nurses of medicine (clinical qualified level N to N2 for nursing) working at a municipal hospital in Taipei City, Taiwan. A total 122 participants were enrolled. Stratified block randomization divided participants into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group received clinical scenario-based simulation education for communication. The control group received traditional class-based education for communication. Both groups received a pre-test and a Communication Skills Checklist post-test assessment. Results were analyzed using SPSS 17.0 for Windows software. A t-test showed significant increases in communication skills (p skills following the education intervention. The results indicate that clinical scenario-based simulation education for communication is significantly more effective than traditional class-based education in enhancing the ability of nurses to communicate effectively with myocardial infarction patients.

  15. Saúde e educação: cursos alternativos para desenvolvimento do pessoal de enfermagem Health and education: alternative courses for the development of nursing personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creusa Guimarães Madeira

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Promover atividades educacionais terapêuticas para o pessoal de enfermagem visando a diminuição do stress, a melhoria do relacionamento interpessoal e a busca do auto-conhecimento, são objetivos dos cursos promovidos pelo Departamento de Enfermagem da FCM e Serviço de Enfermagem em Educação Continuada do Hospital das Clínicas da UNICAMP. Através dos cursos: O Hospital e o Relacionamento Humano; Dança e Criatividade; Yoga e Relaxamento Mental, foram ministradas técnicas de respiração, relaxamento, sensibilização e conscientização corporal e de interpretação teatral. A estratégia empregada foi a "vivência grupal", com participação de atendentes, auxiliares e técnicos de enfermagem e enfermeiras, durante o horário de trabalho, em 15 a 20 encontros por curso. Como instrumento desta pesquisa foram utilizados os "depoimentos individuais", escritos pelos participantes, tendo como metodologia a análise de conteúdo. A avaliação demonstrou que a "Vivência" facilitou o relacionamento entre os membros da equipe de trabalho; abriu, espaço para comunicação efetiva; favoreceu o auto-conhecimento; e ajudou na solução de problemas. Ficou evidente a importância da continuidade de cursos alternativos para auxiliar o funcionário na melhoria da relação consigo mesmo, com o outro, com o trabalho e valorizar a sua saúde/aprendizagem.To promote therapeutic educational activities for nursing personnel in order to decrease stress, to improve interpersonal relations and the search for self-knowledge are the objectives of the courses promoted by the Departament of Nursing of FCM and by The Continued Education Nursing Service of the University Hospital of UNICAMP. Respiration, relaxation, body sensibilization and awareness, and theater interpretation techniques were taught in the following courses: The Hospital and Human Relations, Dance and Creativity, Yoga and Mental Relaxation. The estrategy employed was "group experience", with

  16. Peer Tutoring and Clinical Stage: analysis of experience and potential applications in the First Level Degree Course in Nursing, section of Desenzano Del Garda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Biondo, Paolo; Avino, Nicola; Podavini, Enrica; Prandelli, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Among the various methods of learning and experience in the literature, the methodology of Peer Tutoring is particularly important for the formation of the student nurses. The Peer Tutoring identifies a model of cooperative learning, aiming to activate a spontaneous process to transfer knowledge, emotions and experiences from some members of a group to other members of equal status but with a difference in the knowledge and cognitive skills or relational. The First level degree course in Nursing, section of Desenzano del Garda (Brescia, Italy) has been applying a methodology that can be defined as Peer Tutoring for the last four years. The applicability of the method is based on the coupling of an expert student of the 3rd year of the course to a group of students from the 1st or 2nd year. The study has the main objective to analyze the experience in the branch of Desenzano del Garda and see if the learning method of the Peer Tutoring is valid within the context of clinical internship. The study, of descriptive-observational type, was conducted in the academic year 2013-2014. The samples in the research are two: the first sample consisted of 53 students in their first year of studies, 46 students of the 2nd year of the course and 30 students of the 3rd year of the course who attended the experience as tutoring students (students tutors), for a total of 129 students; the second sample consisted of 15 students of the 3rd year of the course who attended the experience of the Peer Tutoring applied to the Stage clinical students as tutors (students Tutor). The research allowed important information to be gathered regarding the utility and interventions to improve the quality of the project of Peer tutoring. Peer Tutoring is a learning methodology that works and that can be applied in learning pathways for nursing students. The training of students Tutor is a matter of considerable importance: in fact the students ask to be trained to respect the structure and functions

  17. Effectiveness of asthma principles and practice course in increasing nurse practitioner knowledge and confidence in the use of asthma clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Fishwick, Judith C; Okafor, Maureen; Fletcher, Monica

    2015-04-01

    The Asthma Principle and Practice (APP) course, an evidence-based blended distance-learning educational encounter, was designed to aid in the dissemination of the 2007 asthma clinical guidelines (EPR-3) and priority messages, increase knowledge of content of the guidelines as well as create an environment to enable participants to apply knowledge and skills into clinical practice. Students received a self-study binder 6-week period prior to attendance at an interactive study day. The APP is grounded in adult education principle and practices. A questionnaire was completed before reading the study binder and post study day to measure demographic variables as well as awareness of and changes in knowledge and confidence in key attributes of the clinical guidelines including patient education. The results showed that by taking the APP course confidence levels related to knowledge of asthma and its management increased with specific reference to the asthma clinical guidelines. Confidence in the use of patient education/communication strategies improved as well as the use of pulmonary function tests and the interpretation of test results. Nurse practitioners are an important audience to target in the dissemination of clinical guidelines and benefit from educational materials based on adult education strategies. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  18. Effectiveness of a training course for general practice nurses in motivation support in type 2 diabetes care: a cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Lise; Maindal, Helle T; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Frydenberg, Morten; Sandbaek, Annelli

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a common metabolic disease with the potential for prevention of complications. The prevention requires a high level of lasting actions from the patients, which may be burdensome. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a training course for general practice nurses in motivation support at 18 months follow-up in the affiliated type 2 diabetes population. Forty general practices with nurse-led diabetes consultations from the area of Aarhus, Denmark were randomised 1∶1 to either intervention or usual practice. Intervention practices were offered a 16-hour Self-determination theory-based course including communication training for general practice nurses delivered over 10 months. The affiliated diabetes populations (aged 40-74 years) were identified from registers (intervention n = 2,005; usual n = 2,029). Primary outcomes were register-based glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) -, total cholesterol levels, and well-being measured by the Problem Areas In Diabetes scale (PAID) and the mental component summary score, SF12 (SF12, mcs). Intention-to-treat analyses were performed. Predefined subgroups analyses were performed. The differences between the intervention- and the control practices' mean HbA1c and total cholesterol at follow-up adjusted for baseline values and clustering were respectively: -0.02%-points (95% CI: -0.11 to 0.07; p: 0.67); 0.08 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.15; p: 0.02). Differences in median scores adjusted for clustering were for PAID: 1.25; p = 0.31 and SF12, mcs: 0.99; p = 0.15. Women in intervention practices differed from women in usual practices on mean HbA1c: -0.12%-points (-0.23 to -0.02; p = 0.02) and SF12, mcs: 2.6; p = 0.01. Offering a training course for general practice nurses in applying the Self-determination theory in current type 2 diabetes care had no effect compared with usual practice measured by HbA1c and total cholesterol levels and the well-being at 18 months of follow-up in

  19. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    evaluating the deployment repeatability builds upon the testing or analysis of deployment kinematics (Chapter 6) and adds repetition. Introduction...material yield or failure during a test. For the purposes of this chapter, zero shift will refer to permanent changes in the structure, while reversible ...the content of other chapters in this book: Gravity Compensation (Chapter 4) and Deployment Kinematics and Dynamics (Chapter 6). Repeating the

  20. Survey compare team based learning and lecture teaching method, on learning-teaching process nursing student\\'s, in Surgical and Internal Diseases course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Vaezi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effect of teaching methods on learning process of students will help teachers to improve the quality of teaching by selecting an appropriate method. This study aimed to compare the team- based learning and lecture teaching method on learning-teaching process of nursing students in surgical and internal diseases courses. Method: This quasi-experimental study was carried on the nursing students in the School of Nursing and Midwifery in Yazd and Meybod cities. Studied sample was all of the students in the sixth term in the Faculty of Nursing in Yazd (48 persons and the Faculty of Nursing in Meybod (28 persons. The rate of students' learning through lecture was measured using MCQ tests and teaching based on team-based learning (TBL method was run using MCQ tests (IRAT, GRAT, Appeals and Task group. Therefore, in order to examine the students' satisfaction about the TBL method, a 5-point Likert scale (translated questionnaire (1=completely disagree, 2= disagree, 3=not effective, 4=agree, and 5=completely agree consisted of 22 items was utilized. The reliability and validity of this translated questionnaire was measured. The collected data were analyzed through SPSS 17.0 using descriptive and analytical statistic. Result: The results showed that the mean scores in team-based learning were meaningful in individual assessment (17±84 and assessment group (17.2±1.17. The mean of overall scores in TBL method (17.84±0.98% was higher compared with the lecture teaching method (16±2.31. Most of the students believed that TBL method has improved their interpersonal and group interaction skills (100%. Among them, 97.7% of students mentioned that this method (TBL helped them to understand the course content better. The lowest levels of the satisfaction have related to the continuous learning during lifelong (51.2%. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the TBL method led to improving the communication skills, understanding

  1. The effectiveness of a specialized trauma course in the knowledge base and level of job satisfaction in emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kate; Swinyer, Michelle; Bard, Michael; Sparrow, Vicki; Deegan, Jennifer; Small, Karen; Janssen, Robert; Bailey, Brian; Toschlog, Eric; Sagraves, Scott; Goettler, Claudia; Rotondo, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the level of job satisfaction of the emergency department nurses that care for trauma patients. The hospital is a Level I trauma center and tertiary care center that provides multiple services to more than 1.2 million people in 29 counties. The Trauma Service and the Emergency Department (ED) must define and maintain the same expectations. The level of job satisfaction of the emergency department nurses will define the success of safe and effective patient care in a Level I Trauma Center.

  2. County level socioeconomic position, work organization and depression disorder: a repeated measures cross-classified multilevel analysis of low-income nursing home workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntaner, Carles; Li, Yong; Xue, Xiaonan; Thompson, Theresa; O'Campo, Patricia; Chung, Haejoo; Eaton, William W

    2006-12-01

    This study simultaneously tests the effect of county, organizational, workplace, and individual level variables on depressive disorders among low-income nursing assistants employed in US nursing homes. A total of 482 observations are used from two waves of survey data collection, with an average two-year interval between initial and follow-up surveys. The overall response rate was 62 percent. The hierarchically structured data was analyzed using multilevel modeling to account for cross-classifications across levels of data. Nursing assistants working in nursing homes covered by a single union in three states were asked about aspects of their working conditions, job stress, physical and mental health status, individual and family health-care needs, household economics and household strain. The 241 nursing assistants who participated in this study were employed in 34 nursing homes and lived in 49 counties of West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky. The study finds that emotional strain, related to providing direct care to elderly and disabled clients, is associated with depressive disorder, as is nursing home ownership type (for-profit versus not-for-profit). However, when controlling for county level socioeconomic variables (Gini index and proportion of African Americans living in the county), neither workplace nor organizational level variables were found to be statistically significant associated with depressive disorder. This study supports previous findings that emotional demand in health-care environments is an important correlate of mental health. It also adds empirical evidence to support a link between financial strain and depression in US women. While this study does not find that lack of a seniority wage benefits--a factor that can conceivably exacerbate financial strain over time--is associated with depressive disorder among low-income health-care workers, it does find county level measures of poverty to be statistically significant predictors of depressive

  3. A Framework for Understanding Student Nurses' Experience of Chemistry as Part of a Health Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddey, Kerrie; de Berg, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Twenty-seven first-year nursing students, divided across six focus groups formed on the basis of their past chemistry experience, were interviewed about their chemistry experience as a component of a Health Science unit. Information related to learning and academic performance was able to be established from student conversations resulting in…

  4. Feasibility of PBL implementation in clinical courses of nursing and midwifery from the viewpoints of faculty members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahidi R.Gh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: PBL, as a teaching method, has a basic role in promoting education level and combining the theoretical and practical knowledge. But there still exist serious obstacles to implementing this educational method Purpose: To recognize the impediments an obstacle preventing PBL method implementation. Methods: The Subjects studied in this research are all the tutors who taught basic and clinical courses in the faculty of nursing and midwifery in the first and second terms of the year 2001-2002. Choosing subjects was done by using census method and the number of subjects was 33 basic course teachers and 20 clinical course teachers. A questionnaire developed based on the studies’ goals was the tool used for collecting data. Data was analysed by means of SPSS/Win 10 Soft ware using descriptive statistics Results: The 95% of basic course teachers and 93.9% clinical course teachers think of the conditions and facilities needed for implementing PBL as of medium level. Tutors believe that most of the impediments are related to student's lack of group work skills, and the skills needed for making correct communication, and the need for students practical participation in PBL for making them ready and receptive. They also relate most of the strong points to PBL's being efficient in training community – oriented students. The tutors state that performing PBL does not decrease their motivation at all, due to the change in their role from lecturer to facilitator. Conclusion: The Although findings of this research indicate that the conditions needed for implementing PBL exist at present, still there are many obstacles to its performance such as student's lack of group work skills and their disability in making correct interaction, costliness of beginning and marinating PBL, large number of students and lack of tutors Keywords: PBL IMPLEMENTATION, MEDICAL EDUCATION

  5. The long-term course of temporal lobe epilepsy: From unilateral to bilateral interictal epileptiform discharges in repeated video-EEG monitorings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollwitzer, Stephanie; Scott, Catherine A; Farrell, Fiona; Bell, Gail S; de Tisi, Jane; Walker, Matthew C; Wehner, Tim; Sander, Josemir W; Hamer, Hajo M; Diehl, Beate

    2017-03-01

    Bilateral interictal epileptiform discharges (IED) and ictal patterns are common in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and have been associated with decreased chances of seizure freedom after epilepsy surgery. It is unclear whether secondary epileptogenesis, although demonstrated in experimental models, exists in humans and may account for progression of epilepsy. We reviewed consecutive video-EEG recordings from 1992 to 2014 repeated at least two years apart (mean interval 6.14years) in 100 people diagnosed with TLE. Ictal EEG patterns and IED remained restricted to one hemisphere in 36 people (group 1), 46 exhibited bilateral abnormalities from the first recording (group 2), 18 progressed from unilateral to bilateral EEG pathology over time (group 3). No significant differences between the three groups were seen with respect to age at epilepsy onset, duration, or underlying pathology. Extra-temporal IED during the first EEG recording were associated with an increased risk of developing bilateral epileptiform changes over time (hazard ratio 3.67; 95% CI 1.4, 9.4). Our findings provide some support of progression in TLE and raise the possibility of secondary epileptogenesis in humans. The development of an independent contra-lateral epileptogenic focus is known to be associated with a less favorable surgical outcome. We defined reliable EEG markers for an increased risk of progression to more widespread or independent bitemporal epileptogenicity at an early stage, thus allowing for individualized pre-surgical counselling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Repeat CT assessed CTV variation and PTV margins for short- and long-course pre-operative RT of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Swellengrebel, Maurits; Hollmann, Birgit; Jong, Rianne de; Marijnen, Corrie; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Triest, Baukelien van; Herk, Marcel van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the inter-fraction shape variation of the CTV in rectal-cancer patients treated with 5 × 5 (SCRT) and 25 × 2 Gy (LCRT) and derive PTV margins. Methods and materials: Thirty-three SCRT with daily repeat CT scans and 30 LCRT patients with daily scans during the first week followed by weekly scans were included. The CTV was delineated on all scans and local shape variation was calculated with respect to the planning CT. Margin estimation was done using the local shape variation to assure 95% minimum dose for at least 90% of patients. Results: Using 482 CT scans, systematic and random CTV shape variation was heterogeneous, ranging from 0.2 cm close to bony structures up to 1.0 cm SD at the upper-anterior CTV region. A significant reduction in rectal volume during LCRT resulted in an average 0.5 cm posterior shift of the upper-anterior CTV. Required margins ranged from 0.7 cm close to bony structures up to 3.1 and 2.3 cm in the upper-anterior region for SCRT and LCRT, respectively. Conclusions: Heterogeneous shape variation demands anisotropic PTV margins. Required margins were substantially larger in the anterior direction compared to current clinical margins. These larger margins were, however, based on strict delineated CTVs, resulting in smaller PTVs compared to current practice.

  7. Interprofessionality in the model courses of study for healthcare and nursing professions in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany / Interprofessionalität in den Modellstudiengängen der Pflege- und Gesundheitsberufe in Nordrhein-Westfalen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallwaß Anke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional cooperation is attributed a special significance in overcoming new challenges in the health system. For the educational system, this means the development of innovative teaching and learning formats that encourages interaction between students from different professions within healthcare. In Germany in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW, eleven model courses of study for healthcare and nursing professions have been developed and evaluated. Evaluation reports do not tell whether social interaction between students of different professions is promoted. The following study investigates to what extent interprofessionality is incorporated into the model courses of study for healthcare and nursing professions in NRW and to what extent the courses of study include social interaction between students of different professions. In addition, an analysis is made as to what extent structural and organisational conditions and the course management influence the (further development of the courses with a view to interprofessionality. Structured expert interviews have been carried out with those responsible for the courses of study, for a total of seven model courses. These have then been evaluated using qualitative content analysis. The promotion of interprofessional expertise is incorporated into all model study courses that were considered and is generally governed by international standards. Six of the seven courses of study offer social interaction between students of different professions. Valuable hints for interprofessional education at colleges for health could be achieved.

  8. Learning Sterile Procedures Through Transformative Reflection: Use of iPad Videos in a Nursing Laboratory Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernusca, Dan; Thompson, Shila; Riggins, Janet

    2018-01-12

    This project was implemented to determine if the combination of video recording and reflection could enhance student learning of specific nursing skills. Students' answers to open-ended questions validated the importance of iPad videos for their skill improvement. The findings confirmed that iPad videos provided an effective tool for students to evaluate their performance and reflect on methods for improvement.

  9. Do commencing nursing and paramedicine students differ in interprofessional learning and practice attitudes: evaluating course, socio-demographic and individual personality effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Karen T; Livesay, Karen; Morda, Romana; Sharples, Jenny; Jones, Andi; de Courten, Maximilian

    2016-03-03

    Interprofessional education (IPE) requires health students to learn with, from and about each other in order to develop a modern workforce with client-centred care at its core. Despite the client centred focus of IPE, training programs often utilize standard approaches across student cohorts without consideration of discipline, sociodemographic and personality variability that attract students to different health disciplines. Knowing the students who engage in IPE to tailor training may prove as beneficial as knowing the client to delivered individualized client centred care in interprofessional practice (IPP). This research investigates whether students commencing undergraduate nursing and paramedicine degrees ener training with existing demographic and personality differences and, if these are associated with different attitudes towards health care teams and interprofessional education. This online study recruited 160 nursing and 50 paramedicine students in their first week of their undergraduate course. Students completed questionnaires regarding their background, personality (General Perceived Self Esteem Scale, International Mini Markers) and the attitudes towards health care teams scale (ATHCTS) and interprofessional education perception scale (IEPS). Results show that commencing nursing and paramedicine students are demographically different on education, gender, speaking a language other than English at home (LOTE) and their own experience with healthcare. The results further demonstrate that LOTE, discipline being studied and personality factors play a role in perceptions regarding interprofessional training whilst discipline being studied impacted on attitudes towards health care teams in the workforce. These results highlight a number of existing personal and psychological differences between individuals who choose to train in these selected professions. This suggests a need for tertiary education IPE programs to move towards tailoring their education to

  10. Repeating Marx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Christian; Monticelli, Lara

    2018-01-01

    This introduction sets out the context of the special issue “Karl Marx @ 200: Debating Capitalism & Perspectives for the Future of Radical Theory”, which was published on the occasion of Marx’s bicentenary on 5 May 2018. First, we give a brief overview of contemporary capitalism’s development...... and its crises. Second, we argue that it is important to repeat Marx today. Third, we reflect on lessons learned from 200 years of struggles for alternatives to capitalism. Fourth, we give an overview of the contributions in this special issue. Taken together, the contributions in this special issue show...... that Marx’s theory and politics remain key inspirations for understanding exploitation and domination in 21st-century society and for struggles that aim to overcome these phenomena and establishing a just and fair society. We need to repeat Marx today....

  11. Analysis of stress-causing factors in the final undergraduate year of the nursing course - doi 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v34i2.9209

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Hirata Soares

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An exploratory and descriptive study that analyzed the intensity of stress caused by different situations is provided. The sample consisted of 47 final-year nursing students at the State University of Londrina and was carried out between July and September 2009. Data, obtained by a seven-item visual analogue scale and by a single open question on the perception of other stress sources, were analyzed through rating scores and resulted in a data table. Most students were rated at intensity 3 (38.3% and 4 (36.2%, or rather, maximum overload stress for academic studies. Lack of leisure time and fear of unemployment after graduation were regarded as stress-causing situations, coupled to a feeling of being unprepared to exercise one’s profession. Financial difficulties led to lower intensity but medium-significance factors for stress development. Interpersonal relationships received the lowest intensity scores. Results indicated future changes in the curriculum of the nursing course to minimize the suffering and harm to the students’ mental health and to provide the full development of their emotional maturity.  

  12. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    large cohort of trials to spot unusual cases. However, deployment repeatability is inherently a nonlinear phenomenon, which makes modeling difficult...and GEMS tip position were both tracked during ground testing by a laser target tracking system. Earlier SAILMAST testing in 2005 [8] used...recalls the strategy used by SRTM, where a constellation of lights was installed at the tip of the boom and a modified star tracker was used to track tip

  13. Technology in the Nursing Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siktberg, Linda L.; Dillard, Nancy L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes nursing education integrating the Internet at Ball State University: (1) redesign of a professional-issues course; (2) electronic conferencing and computer quizzes in a health-appraisal course; (3) Internet tools used in an introductory associate-degree course; and (4) redesign of the required registered nurse-completion course. (SK)

  14. Comparison of student outcomes and preferences in a traditional vs. World Wide Web-based baccalaureate nursing research course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leasure, A R; Davis, L; Thievon, S L

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare student outcomes in an undergraduate research course taught using both World Wide Web-based distance learning technology and traditional pedagogy. Reasons given for enrolling in the traditional classroom section included the perception of increased opportunity for interaction, decreased opportunity to procrastinate, immediate feedback, and more meaningful learning activities. Reasons for selecting the Web group section included cost, convenience, and flexibility. Overall, there was no significant difference in examination scores between the two groups on the three multiple-choice examinations or for the course grades (t = -.96, P = .343). Students who reported that they were self-directed and had the ability to maintain their own pace and avoid procrastination were most suited to Web-based courses. The Web-based classes can help provide opportunities for methods of communication that are not traditionally nurtured in traditional classroom settings. Secondary benefits of the World Wide Web-based course were to increase student confidence with the computer, and introduce them to skills and opportunities they would not have had in the classroom. Additionally, over time and with practice, student's writing skills improved.

  15. The Development, Field Testing and Evaluation of Three Hierarchies of Behaviorally Stated Objectives for the Chemistry Content of a Course of Instruction in Physical Science for Pre-Service Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Robert Alden

    The purpose of this research was to develop hierarchies of behavioral objectives for the chemistry content of a one-semester course in physical science for preservice associate degree nursing students. Each of three content objectives was expressed by a series of behaviorally stated objectives which included a terminal objective for a unit of…

  16. Competências gerenciais do enfermeiro nas perspectivas de um curso de graduação de enfermagem e do mercado de trabalho Nurse managerial competencies from the perspectives of an undergraduate nursing course and of the work market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Maris Peres

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A formação de competências gerenciais do enfermeiro e conteúdos de disciplinas de Administração em Enfermagem motivaram reflexões sobre as relações entre o projeto político-pedagógico de um curso de graduação e o perfil do egresso proposto nas Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais com o mercado de trabalho de enfermeiros em Curitiba, no Paraná. Na pesquisa descritivo-exploratória e qualitativa, objetivou-se apontar convergências e divergências entre as expectativas identificadas no projeto político-pedagógico e as de gerentes que contratam enfermeiros. As políticas de educação e de saúde no Brasil foram apresentadas como determinantes de modelos de formação e de ensino de Administração, na área de enfermagem. A análise hermenêutico-dialética das competências gerenciais esperadas nos âmbitos do ensino e do mercado de trabalho norteou-se pelos eixos dos determinantes: da dimensão estrutural, que abrangem essas políticas; da dimensão particular, representada pelo mercado de trabalho local e pela instituição de ensino; e da dimensão singular, pertinentes ao âmbito do ensino de Administração em Enfermagem. Os resultados mostram a necessidade de o ensino estreitar relações com o mercado de trabalho, no sentido de ampliar a valorização de competências gerenciais do enfermeiro para além da dimensão técnica, contemplando as dimensões: comunicativas, ética, política e de desenvolvimento da cidadania.Developing nurse managerial competencies and Nursing Administration syllabuses led to reflections on the relationship between a political and pedagogical project for a graduate course and the profile of those who graduate from it, as proposed in the National Curricular Guidelines, and the nurse work market in Curitiba, in the Brazilian state of Paraná. The purpose of the descriptive-exploratory and qualitative survey was to identify convergences and divergences between the expectations identified in the

  17. Does a 3-week critical research appraisal course affect how students perceive their appraisal skills and the relevance of research for clinical practice? A repeated cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsness-Jørgensen, Lars-Petter

    2015-01-01

    Research utilisation is essential in developing evidence-based practices; although many students may be generally able to adopt such skills, there are reports of barriers related to critical appraisal skills. To explore how students perceive the relevance of research to future clinical practice and patients, and to what extent they read research (including reading pattern). Additionally, the objective was to explore whether a three-week intensive course in critical appraisal of research could affect these variables. A cross-sectional survey design, with a pre- and post-test. One large university college in Southeastern Norway. 196 multidisciplinary healthcare students at baseline and 147 after three weeks. A purposely-designed 21 item questionnaire was used to quantify students' attitudes towards using research and critical thinking. The questionnaire was based on themes emerging from prior focus group interviews with 10 nursing and social educator students as well as from the existing literature. At baseline, 6.1% and 7.1% of respondents perceived the research to be of little or very little importance for their future work and patients, respectively. Furthermore, 83.2% reported that they seldom or very seldom read scientific papers. At baseline, 40 different patterns of reading a scientific paper were identified. Additionally, 7.1% of respondents reported to read the introduction, methods and conclusion in combination. Significantly improved scores were found after completing the three-week course related to a) relevance of research for future work (pskills in critical appraisal (pstudents' practical critical appraisal skills improved their view of the relevance of research for patients, future work as well as their own critical appraisal skills. Prospective studies are warranted to explore the effects of such teaching modules in the long-term. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A collaborative effort of medical and educational facilities for radiation safety training of nurses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Naoki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takao, Hideaki

    2004-01-01

    The radiation safety training course has been conducted for nurses of the university hospital by the collaboration of medical and educational staffs in Nagasaki University. This course was given for 6 hours covering basics of radiation, effects on human body, tips for radiation protection in clinical settings, and practical training, to more than 350 nurses overall. The pre-instruction survey by questionnaire revealed that 60% of nurses felt fears about radiation when they care for patients, which reduced to less than 15% in the post-instruction survey. The course also motivated nurses to give an answer patients' questions about radiation safety. In contrast, more than 30% of nurses were aware of neither their glass badge readings nor the maximum dose limit of radiation exposure even after the course. These results suggested that medical-educational collaborative training for nurses were effective on reducing nurses' fears about radiation and that repeated and continuous education would be necessary to establish their practice for radiation protection. (author)

  19. Content Analysis of Student Essays after Attending a Problem-Based Learning Course: Facilitating the Development of Critical Thinking and Communication Skills in Japanese Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itatani, Tomoya; Nagata, Kyoko; Yanagihara, Kiyoko; Tabuchi, Noriko

    2017-08-22

    The importance of active learning has continued to increase in Japan. The authors conducted classes for first-year students who entered the nursing program using the problem-based learning method which is a kind of active learning. Students discussed social topics in classes. The purposes of this study were to analyze the post-class essay, describe logical and critical thinking after attended a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) course. The authors used Mayring's methodology for qualitative content analysis and text mining. In the description about the skills required to resolve social issues, seven categories were extracted: (recognition of diverse social issues), (attitudes about resolving social issues), (discerning the root cause), (multi-lateral information processing skills), (making a path to resolve issues), (processivity in dealing with issues), and (reflecting). In the description about communication, five categories were extracted: (simple statement), (robust theories), (respecting the opponent), (communication skills), and (attractive presentations). As the result of text mining, the words extracted more than 100 times included "issue," "society," "resolve," "myself," "ability," "opinion," and "information." Education using PBL could be an effective means of improving skills that students described, and communication in general. Some students felt difficulty of communication resulting from characteristics of Japanese.

  20. Evaluation of the clinical effect of an on-line course for community nurses on post-partum emotional distress: a community-based longitudinal time-series quasi-experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Marga; Orlygsdottir, Brynja; Elvarsson, Bjarki Thor

    2012-09-01

    About 14% of Icelandic women suffer post-partum from frequent depressive symptoms, and of those, 12% also report a high degree of parenting stress. Education of nurses and midwives on post-partum distress is crucial in reducing its degree. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the clinical effect of an on-line course for community nurses on post-partum emotional distress. A community-based, longitudinal, time-series quasi-experiment was conducted in four stages from 2001 to 2005. Mothers attending 16 health centres throughout Iceland and scoring ≥ 12 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at the 9th week post-partum were eligible to participate. Health centres were divided into experimental (EHC) and control centres (CHC), and control centres were crossed over to experimental centres the following year and new control centres recruited. Nurses at EHC attended an on-line course on post-partum emotional distress. Participating mothers answered the EPDS; the Parenting Stress Index/Short form and the Fatigue Scale. Nursing diagnoses and interventions were recorded at all study centres. Of the women who were eligible (n = 163), 57% (n = 93) participated. At baseline, 9 weeks post-partum, there were no significant differences between groups of women in the rate of depressive symptoms, fatigue or parenting stress. Women in all groups improved on all distress indicators over time; however, those from the EHC improved statistically and clinically significantly more on depressive symptoms than those from the CHC. Documentation of particular nursing diagnoses and interventions was significantly more frequent at the EHC, but referrals to specialists were significantly less frequent. On-line education for nurses on post-partum emotional distress is feasible and is related to improvement in post-partum depressive symptoms. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  1. Programas tutoriais para os cursos de enfermagem Programas tutoriales para los cursos de enfermería Tutorial programs for nursing courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita Saupe

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available A implementação dos Projetos Político-Pedagógicos, impulsionada pelas políticas de educação e saúde, gerou a necessidade de incorporar à matriz curricular vários programas para atender aos interesses e necessidades emanados dos cursos de graduação. Um deles é o Programa Tutorial, destinado a amparar o aluno como sujeito da educação e do cuidado. Nessa perspectiva, este estudo objetiva contribuir com a proposição e avaliação de um modelo tutorial, que possa preencher as lacunas detectadas no processo de construção dos Projetos Político-Pedagógicos. Para tanto, o artigo descreve o modelo teórico idealizado, com vistas a sua inclusão nos cursos de graduação.La implementación de los proyectos político-pedagógicos, impulsados por las políticas de educación y salud, generó la necesidad de incorporar a la matriz curricular varios programas para atender los intereses y necesidades que surgieron de los cursos de formación universitaria. Uno de ellos es el Programa Tutor, destinado a amparar al alumno como sujeto principal de la educación y del cuidado. En ésta perspectiva, este estudio tiene por objetivo contribuir con la proposición y evaluación de un modelo tutorial, que pueda llenar los vacíos detectados en el proceso de la construcción de los Proyectos político-pedagógicos. Para esto, este articulo describe el modelo teórico idealizado, con la perspectiva de ser incluido en los cursos de pregrado.The implementation of political-pedagogical projects, encouraged by health and education policies, generated the need to incorporate in nursing curricula several programs to attend the interests and necessities of undergraduate courses. One of these is the Tutorial Program that aims at considering the student as the subject of the education and care. In this way, this study aimed at contributing to the evaluation of a tutorial model in order to fill in gaps found in the process of construction of political

  2. Programs that Internationalize Nursing Curricula in Baccalaureate Schools of Nursing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Gay J.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a national survey of baccalaureate nursing programs are presented concerning programs for study abroad, international exchange programs, and other approaches to internationalizing nursing curricula, including courses dealing with health care and nursing in foreign countries. (Author/MSE)

  3. A collaborative effort of medical and educational facilities for radiation safety training of nurses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Naoki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takao, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    radiation safety as well as to ask radiologists or technologists when they felt any fears about radiation. In contrast, more than 30% of nurses were aware of neither their exposed dose obtained from a personal dosimeter nor the maximum dose limit of radiation exposure even after the course. These results suggested that medical-educational collaborative training for nurses were effective on reducing nurses' fears about radiation by educating proper knowledge of radiation. In addition, repeated and continuous education would be necessary to establish their practice for radiation protection. (author)

  4. A consistent course of events or a series of coincidences: nursing in Poland from the 19(th) to the 21(st) century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Anna; Ziarko, Ewa; Zalewska-Puchała, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    The development of nursing began in Poland much later than it did elsewhere, for instance in the United Kingdom, the United States, or Germany, and it came up against difficult conditions. After a brief twenty-year period of development between 1918 and 1939, it almost stalled during the war (1939-45), only to be followed by nearly twenty years of chaos. Nursing started to come out of this difficult period at the beginning of the 1960s. The turn of the 21st century saw the emergence of extensive professional development and training opportunities for nurses. This change was brought about as much by political, social and economic issues, health care requirements, and the advancement of science, medicine, the birth of humanitarism, the growth of the feminist movement, the European Agreement on the Instruction and Education of Nurses, the WHO European Strategy for Nursing and Midwifery Education, the Bologna declaration, as well as the activities undertaken by the European Union, the International Council of Nurses, the American and Polish Red Cross, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Polish Association of Nurses, and the professional self-governing body. The transformation of nursing into an independent profession was further boosted by physicians deeply involved in the issue and female pioneers of nursing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Planning and application of a valutation methodology in UNI EN ISO 9001:2000 quality system, for the analysis satisfaction level of third-year student University of Bologna, Bachelor of Nursing Course, CRI School of Nursing formative section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, M G; Scalorbi, Sandra; Burrai, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    The quality of nursing assistance is closely related to the quality of training. In the certification UNI EN ISO 9001:2000 in 2004 of the Bologna nursing school regarding Planning and performance of theoretical-practical nursing training a continual improvement of the product/service is implicit. A method was therefore devised to evaluate the degree of satisfaction in third-year nursing students in Bologna which demonstrated a medium/high level of satisfaction regarding all teaching-related procedures. By monitoring satisfaction levels , it is possible to identify any critical areas and to implement improvement where needed.

  6. The Effect of Clinical Simulation with Debriefing for Meaningful Learning in Courses of Nursing Theory and Practicum on Student Knowledge and Perception of Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Nursing students are expected to apply knowledge from lectures and laboratories to the clinical setting. One major challenge of nursing educators is facilitating the transfer of knowledge to the clinical-practice setting. Simulation-based education provides students with an experiential-learning activity within the context of a simulated clinical…

  7. Promotion or marketing of the nursing profession by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, I; Biran, E; Telem, L; Steinovitz, N; Alboer, D; Ovadia, K L; Melnikov, S

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, much effort has been invested all over the world in nurse recruitment and retention. Issues arising in this context are low job satisfaction, the poor public image of nursing and the reluctance of nurses to promote or market their profession. This study aimed to examine factors explaining the marketing of the nursing profession by nurses working at a general tertiary medical centre in Israel. One hundred sixty-nine registered nurses and midwives from five clinical care units completed a structured self-administered questionnaire, measuring (a) professional self-image, (b) job satisfaction, (c) nursing promotional and marketing activity questionnaire, and (d) demographic data. The mean scores for the promotion of nursing were low. Nurses working in an intensive cardiac care unit demonstrated higher levels of promotional behaviour than nurses from other nursing wards in our study. Nurse managers reported higher levels of nursing promotion activity compared with first-line staff nurses. There was a strong significant correlation between job satisfaction and marketing behaviour. Multiple regression analysis shows that 15% of the variance of promoting the nursing profession was explained by job satisfaction and job position. Nurses are not inclined to promote or market their profession to the public or to other professions. The policy on the marketing of nursing is inadequate. A three-level (individual, organizational and national) nursing marketing programme is proposed for implementation by nurse leadership and policy makers. Among proposed steps to improve marketing of the nursing profession are promotion of the image of nursing by the individual nurse in the course of her or his daily activities, formulation and implementation of policies and programmes to promote the image of nursing at the organizational level and drawing up of a long-term programme for promoting or marketing the professional status of nursing at the national level. © 2015

  8. Training the trainer: An educational course for training pain nursing specialists supported by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing; Zhou, Lingjun; Zhang, Lingjuan; Li, Li; Zhao, Jijun

    2013-12-01

    To train pain nursing specialists through a pain education program, 20 nurses from six hospitals in Shanghai Province and seven in six provinces of China received the training of 2-month pain education and 4-month clinical practice. This nonrandomized pilot study examined the results of tests before and after the program, case report evaluations, future plan evaluations, clinical practice, and satisfaction questionnaire. After the program, the score of the test increased significantly compared with that before the program (44.1 ± 3.19; paired-sample t = 10.363; p pain management, 17 (85%) thought that the program had improved their skills in clinical practice, and 15 (75%) thought that the program had played a role in enhancing their research abilities. Considering the whole program, most students (n = 17; 85%) were quite satisfied, and 3 (15%) were simply satisfied. By content analysis of the opening questions, we found that the participants had deeper and broader ideas about nurses' role and pain nursing specialists' responsibilities in pain management. The program improved nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and skills in pain management. The participants recognized pain nursing specialists' responsibilities in pain management more clearly. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stress in Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout a Nursing academic course, students are confronted by situations that generate stress. Students from professionalizing Nursing courses are especially demanded at practical skills, such asperforming invasive procedures with venous punctures, bandaging, hygiene, and comfort care in patients with different degrees of illness. For these students, stress levels may render learning difficulty with the possibility of leading to errors, lack of concentration and oscillation of attention levels.

  10. Online market for nursing essays bigger than ever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Berry, Stephanie

    2016-11-16

    Plagiarism, or submitting unacknowledged work as your own, is by far the biggest reason nursing students face disciplinary action on preregistration nursing courses, according to an exclusive survey by Nursing Standard.

  11. Dermatology nursing in a rural area - the Overberg experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nurse short course at Groote Schuur. Hospital. On completion of the course. I returned ... nursing service at primary healthcare level ... to provide adequate dermatology care at .... Healthcare workers can motivate better adherence to treatment.

  12. Washington State Nursing Home Administrator Model Curriculum. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Florence Kelly

    The course outlines presented in this final report comprise a proposed Fort Steilacoom Community College curriculum to be used as a statewide model two-year associate degree curriculum for nursing home administrators. The eight courses described are introduction to nursing, home administration, financial management of nursing homes, nursing home…

  13. O ensino de história da enfermagem nos cursos de graduação de Santa Catarina Nursing history education on graduation courses in Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Itayra C. de S. Padilha

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Partindo da idéia de que o ensino da história da enfermagem é fundamental para a formação dos alunos do curso de graduação e de que a forma como se ministra o seu conteúdo proporciona ou não a aderência a este conhecimento, esta pesquisa pretende estabelecer uma rede de contatos com todas as escolas de enfermagem de Santa Catarina para traçar um diagnóstico do ensino de história da enfermagem. Este poderá subsidiar a criação de uma política para nortear a reformulação curricular da disciplina, face às necessidades do Estado. A metodologia é qualitativa e a coleta de dados inicial identificou, a partir de 15 escolas de enfermagem do Estado, o modus operandi do desenvolvimento da disciplina ao longo do curso. Uma análise inicial indica que as estratégias educacionais e curriculares são variadas, havendo interfaces entre elas. Percebe-se um avanço relativo à carga horária e às estratégias de ensino-aprendizagem, porém a inserção do conteúdo em questão ainda carece de reflexão coletiva sobre a sua importância no currículo dos cursos.Concerning to the idea that the nursing history education is fundamental to the development of students of graduation course and that the way this instruction is given determines if its content provides or not the adherence to this information, this research aims to establish a network with all Nursing Schools of Santa Catarina to determine a education diagnosis of nursing history education. This may be a subsidy for a policy creation to guide the curricular reformulation of this subject, in view of the State needs. The methodology is qualitative and the initial data collection identified, from 15 nursing schools of the State, the modus operandi of the subject development along the course. An initial analysis indicates that the educational and curricular strategies are varied, and there are interfaces between them. We note an advance related to the grade hours and to learning

  14. AORN sales professional course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, R; Thompson, J

    1996-04-01

    The sales professional course "Introduction to the Operating Room" offered by the AORN Center for Nursing Practice, Health Policy, and Research is an introductory program in OR etiquette. Its purpose is to provide sales professionals a working knowledge of OR protocol for them to function appropriately in OR settings. Sales professionals who have completed this course establish mutually beneficial perioperative partnerships with OR personnel. Sales professionals' effectiveness is strengthened as a result of their newly acquired knowledge of OR protocol, and patient safety is protected. An AORN Certificate of Recognition is awarded on completion of the course.

  15. Nursing and spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael de Brito Pedrão

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the spiritual well-being of nurses; to appraise their opinions as to the importance of offering patients spiritual assistance, and to verify whether nurses received any specific type of preparation during their professional training for giving spiritual assistance to patients. Methods: This is an exploratory and descriptive study, carried out with a sample of 30 nurses who worked at the Stepdown Unit and Oncology Unit of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, using the application of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWS and a questionnaire prepared by the authors. Results: On the Spiritual Well-Being Scale, 76.6% of nurses produced positive scores. On the Existential Well-Being subscale, 80% had positive scores, and on the Religious Well-Being subscale, 76.6% had positive scores. On the SWBS, the general average score was 107.26, and for the Existential and Religious ones, the average scores were 54.4 and 53.2, respectively. Most nurses responded affirmatively as to the importance of offering patients spiritual assistance, and 40% of nurses offered as rationale “to provide well-being and comfort to the patient”. Most nurses reported not having received professional training for giving spiritual assistance to patients in any of the nursing courses they had done. Conclusions: The results indicate the need for professional training and/or continued education courses in nursing to extend the reflection and discussion on spirituality and spiritual assistance to patients.

  16. The use of genetically marked infection cohorts to study changes in establishment rates during the time course of a repeated Ascaridia galli infection in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferdushy, Tania; Luna Olivares, Luz Adilia; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the changes in establishment rates during the time course of a 6week trickle infection of chickens with Ascaridia galli at two different dose levels, using a molecular marker. To differentiate early and late infection, two different egg cohorts (haplotype a and haplotype b...

  17. Bringing nursing to the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazis, Cornelia; Schwendimann, René

    2009-11-01

    For the past 5 years, an unusual program has been evolving in the University of Basel's Institute of Nursing Science master's program in Basel, Switzerland. A special course designed to help nurses master public communication skills requires students to play the roles of journalist, exhibition curator, conference organizer, radio reporter, and news producer. Two faculty members, an experienced radio and newspaper journalist and a nurse scientist, teach and support the students. By developing their competence in media relations, participants prepare themselves to tackle the course's long-term goal of bringing the nursing profession into the public eye. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Problem solving strategies integrated into nursing process to promote clinical problem solving abilities of RN-BSN students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Jy; Lo, Chi-Hui Kao; Ku, Ya-Lie

    2004-11-01

    A set of problem solving strategies integrated into nursing process in nursing core courses (PSNP) was developed for students enrolled in a post-RN baccalaureate nursing program (RN-BSN) in a university in Taiwan. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to evaluate the effectiveness of PSNP on students' clinical problem solving abilities. The one-group post-test design with repeated measures was used. In total 114 nursing students with 47 full-time students and 67 part-time students participated in this study. The nursing core courses were undertaken separately in three semesters. After each semester's learning, students would start their clinical practice, and were asked to submit three written nursing process recordings during each clinic. Assignments from the three practices were named post-test I, II, and III sequentially, and provided the data for this study. The overall score of problem solving indicated that score on the post-test III was significantly better than that on post-test I and II, meaning both full-time and part-time students' clinical problem solving abilities improved at the last semester. In conclusion, problem-solving strategies integrated into nursing process designed for future RN-BSN students are recommendable.

  19. Master’s programs in advanced nursing practice: new strategies to enhance course design for subspecialty training in neonatology and pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Colin Morgan,1,2 Catherine Barry,1,2 Katie Barnes2,31Liverpool Women’s Hospital, Crown Street, Liverpool, UK; 2Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK; 3Liverpool Community Health, Liverpool, UKAbstract: The advanced nurse practitioner (ANP role first developed in the USA in the 1960s in primary care. Since then, it has evolved in many different countries and subspecialties, creating a variety of challenges for those designing and implementing master’s programs for this valuable professional group. We focus on ANPs in the neonatal and pediatric intensive care setting to illustrate the complexity of issues faced by both faculty and students in such a program. We review the impact of limited resources, faculty recruitment/accreditation, and the relationship with the medical profession in establishing a curriculum. We explore the evidence for the importance of ANP role definition, supervision, and identity among other health professionals to secure a successful role transition. We describe how recent advances in technology can be used to innovate with new styles of teaching and learning to overcome some of the difficulties in running master’s programs for small subspecialties. We illustrate, through our own experience, how a thorough assessment of the available literature can be used to innovate and develop strategies to create an individual MSc programs that are designed to meet the needs of highly specialized advanced neonatal and pediatric nursing practice.Keywords: master’s program, advanced nurse practitioner, advanced practice, neonatal, pediatric, intensive care

  20. Úlcera venosa e terapia compressiva para enfermeiros: desenvolvimento de curso online Úlcera venosa y terapia compresiva para enfermeros: desarrollo de un curso online Venous ulcer and compression therapy for nurses: development of online course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Mateus Queiroz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a elaboração de um curso on-line sobre úlcera venosa, com enfoque em terapia compressiva, para capacitação de enfermeiros. MÉTODOS: O desenvolvimento do curso on-line seguiu as fases de análise, design, desenvolvimento, implementação e avaliação, baseadas no design instrucional contextualizado. RESULTADOS: O curso dividiu-se em dez módulos estruturados no ambiente virtual de aprendizagem Moodle. Caracterizou-se por uma proposta construtivista, visando ampliar a participação do aluno, disponibilizar as principais referências, revisões e consensos, bem como utilizar objetos multimídia e recursos didáticos interativos. CONCLUSÃO: O curso possibilita a capacitação profissional do enfermeiro em terapia compressiva de maneira inovadora, flexível, interativa em diversos ambientes de cuidado.OBJETIVO: Describir la elaboración de un curso online sobre úlcera venosa, con enfoque en terapia compresiva, para la capacitación de enfermeros. MÉTODOS: El curso online se desarrolló siguiendo las fases de análisis, diseño, desarrollo, implementación y evaluación, basadas en el diseño instruccional contextualizado. RESULTADOS: El curso se dividió en diez módulos estructurados en el ambiente virtual de aprendizaje Moodle. Se caracterizó por una propuesta constructivista, pretendiendo ampliar la participación del alumno, poner a disposición las principales referencias, revisiones y consensos, así como utilizar objetos multimedia y recursos didácticos interactivos. CONCLUSIÓN: El curso permite la capacitación profesional del enfermero en terapia compresiva de manera innovadora, flexible, interactiva en diversos ambientes de cuidado.OBJECTIVE: To describe the development of an online course about venous ulcer, with a focus on compression therapy, for the educating of nurses. METHODS: The development of an online course followed the phases of analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation, based

  1. Nursing doctoral education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Meryem

    2004-10-01

    Quality health care is an issue of concern worldwide, and nursing can and must play a major and global role in transforming the healthcare environment. Doctorally prepared nurses are very much needed in the discipline to further develop and expand the science, as well as to prepare its future educators, scholars, leaders, and policy makers. In 1968, the Master of Science in Nursing Program was initiated in Turkey, followed by the Nursing Doctoral Education Program in 1972. Six University Schools of Nursing provide nursing doctoral education. By the graduating year of 2001, 154 students had graduated with the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (Ph.D.), and 206 students were enrolled in related courses. Many countries in the world are systematically building various collaborative models in their nursing doctoral education programs. Turkey would like to play an active role in creating collaborative nursing doctoral education programs with other countries. This paper centres on the structure and model of doctoral education for nurses in Turkey. It touches on doctoral programs around the world; describes in detail nursing doctoral education in Turkey, including its program structure, admission process, course units, assessment strategies and dissertation procedure; and discusses efforts to promote Turkey as a potential partner in international initiatives to improve nursing doctoral education.

  2. Repeated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tokuuye, Koichi; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Igaki, Hiroshi; Hata, Masaharu; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the safety and effectiveness of repeated proton beam therapy for newly developed or recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From June 1989 through July 2000, 225 patients with HCC underwent their first course of proton beam therapy at University of Tsukuba. Of them, 27 with 68 lesions who had undergone two or more courses were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Median interval between the first and second course was 24.5 months (range 3.3-79.8 months). Median total dose of 72 Gy in 16 fractions and 66 Gy in 16 fractions were given for the first course and the rest of the courses, respectively. Results: The 5-year survival rate and median survival period from the beginning of the first course for the 27 patients were 55.6% and 62.2 months, respectively. Five-year local control rate for the 68 lesions was 87.8%. Of the patients, 1 with Child-Pugh class B and another with class C before the last course suffered from acute hepatic failure. Conclusions: Repeated proton beam therapy for HCC is safe when the patient has a target in the peripheral region of the liver and liver function is Child-Pugh class A

  3. [Nurses and nephrology in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pietro, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    An acceleration in the professionalization of Italian nurses has taken place in recent years. This pattern, together with the increasing prevalence of kidney diseases and the decreasing number of active nephrologists, makes a new collaborative structure between nurses and nephrologists both possible and welcome. This article describes the recent changes and future prospects of the Italian nursing profession. Observations about nephrology are based on interviews conducted with key opinion leaders of nursing in nephrology and dialysis. Italian nurses have recently acquired a status of professional autonomy. Nursing training is now fully integrated in the university system and nurses have obtained more responsibilities and a higher status within healthcare organizations. Future developments may be related to the internal articulation of the profession, supported by master courses and specialist training. Another possible evolution refers to the ongoing restructuring of the healthcare system with an emphasis on nursing activities and skills rather than medical specialties, which will lead to new and stronger managerial roles for nurses. The increase in the prevalence of kidney diseases and the declining number of nephrologists will result in a change in the distribution and utilization of nephrology services. The professionalization of nurses allows a new work division with a task shift from doctors to nurses. Italian nephrologists should seek a preferential relationship with the nursing profession, also considering the nursing shortage in several regions. Possible means to accomplish this preferential relationship could be, in addition to task shifting, nurses' involvement in research, and support for postgraduate training.

  4. Nurses On-Line: Career Mobility for Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Barbara S.; Renner, Alice

    2000-01-01

    Describes how adult learning theory was used to restructure registered nurse courses for online instruction. Hardware/software needs, technical support, instructional model, teaching-learning considerations, and evaluation are discussed. (SK)

  5. Career Commitment in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    A longitudinal, repeated-measures descriptive survey used to measure career commitment and its relationship to turnover and work performance in 320 newly employed registered nurses at one hospital found that career commitment is not a stable phenomenon. The direct association between career commitment and turnover and with job performance is weak.…

  6. Why the history of nursing ethics matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Marsha D

    2017-05-01

    Modern American nursing has an extensive ethical heritage literature that extends from the 1870s to 1965 when the American Nurses Association issued a policy paper that called for moving nursing education out of hospital diploma programs and into colleges and universities. One consequence of this move was the dispersion of nursing libraries and the loss of nursing ethics textbooks, as they were largely not brought over into the college libraries. In addition to approximately 100 nursing ethics textbooks, the nursing ethics heritage literature also includes hundreds of journal articles that are often made less accessible in modern databases that concentrate on the past 20 or 30 years. A second consequence of nursing's movement into colleges and universities is that ethics was no longer taught by nursing faculty, but becomes separated and placed as a discrete ethics (later bioethics) course in departments of philosophy or theology. These courses were medically identified and rarely incorporated authentic nursing content. This shift in nursing education occurs contemporaneously with the rise of the field of bioethics. Bioethics is rapidly embraced by nursing, and as it develops within nursing, it fails to incorporate the rich ethical heritage, history, and literature of nursing prior to the development of the field of bioethics. This creates a radical disjunction in nursing's ethics; a failure to more adequately explore the moral identity of nursing; the development of an ethics with a lack of fit with nursing's ethical history, literature, and theory; a neglect of nursing's ideal of service; a diminution of the scope and richness of nursing ethics as social ethics; and a loss of nursing ethical heritage of social justice activism and education. We must reclaim nursing's rich and capacious ethics heritage literature; the history of nursing ethics matters profoundly.

  7. Microbiology Education in Nursing Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Durrant, Robert J.; Doig, Alexa K.; Buxton, Rebecca L.; Fenn, JoAnn P.

    2017-01-01

    Nurses must have sufficient education and training in microbiology to perform many roles within clinical nursing practice (e.g., administering antibiotics, collecting specimens, preparing specimens for transport and delivery, educating patients and families, communicating results to the healthcare team, and developing care plans based on results of microbiology studies and patient immunological status). It is unclear whether the current microbiology courses required of nursing students in the...

  8. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  9. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  10. Simulation and Advanced Practice Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Dawn I.

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study compared changes in level of confidence resulting from participation in simulation or traditional instructional methods for BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing) to DNP (Doctor of Nursing Practice) students in a nurse practitioner course when they entered the clinical practicum. Simulation has been used in many disciplines…

  11. Quantum repeated games revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frąckiewicz, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2 × 2 games based on Marinatto and Weber’s approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study the twice repeated Prisoner’s Dilemma game. We show that results not available in the classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games proposed by Iqbal and Toor. We point out the drawbacks that make their results unacceptable. (paper)

  12. Effects of Teaching Critical Thinking within an Integrated Nursing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown Basone', Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Nursing students need to think critically in order to pass their nursing courses and the critical thinking portion of the national licensure exam. To improve students' critical thinking skills, a nursing program in the southern United States recently required that 4th semester students take a 1-credit critical thinking course. This study evaluated…

  13. Why do student nurses want to be nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Paula; Perkinton, Louise; Davies, Fiona

    Nursing became an all graduate entry profession in September 2013; this move and the publication of the Francis report have brought the debate around nurse education and nurses' capacity to care into sharper focus. There is much debate over what makes a good nurse and whether graduate nurses lack care and compassion. We asked a cohort of pre-registration student nurses on the first day of their course about their motivations to join the profession, what being a nurse meant to them and which aspects of nursing they valued most. The demographics of the degree student group were similar to those of diploma students. Reasons cited for entering the profession and views on the nurse's role showed that students' motivations and perceptions focused on nursing as a caring rather than a technical profession. The characteristics of the degree students, their strong motivation to care and perception of nursing in altruistic terms contradict the media image of student nurses as being primarily academically, technically and career driven.

  14. Nuclear education in public health and nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winder, A.E.; Stanitis, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-three public health schools and 492 university schools of nursing were surveyed to gather specific information on educational programs related to nuclear war. Twenty public health schools and 240 nursing schools responded. Nuclear war-related content was most likely to appear in disaster nursing and in environmental health courses. Three schools of public health report that they currently offer elective courses on nuclear war. Innovative curricula included political action projects for nuclear war prevention

  15. Repeat migration and disappointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, E K; Vanderkamp, J

    1986-01-01

    This article investigates the determinants of repeat migration among the 44 regions of Canada, using information from a large micro-database which spans the period 1968 to 1971. The explanation of repeat migration probabilities is a difficult task, and this attempt is only partly successful. May of the explanatory variables are not significant, and the overall explanatory power of the equations is not high. In the area of personal characteristics, the variables related to age, sex, and marital status are generally significant and with expected signs. The distance variable has a strongly positive effect on onward move probabilities. Variables related to prior migration experience have an important impact that differs between return and onward probabilities. In particular, the occurrence of prior moves has a striking effect on the probability of onward migration. The variable representing disappointment, or relative success of the initial move, plays a significant role in explaining repeat migration probabilities. The disappointment variable represents the ratio of actural versus expected wage income in the year after the initial move, and its effect on both repeat migration probabilities is always negative and almost always highly significant. The repeat probabilities diminish after a year's stay in the destination region, but disappointment in the most recent year still has a bearing on the delayed repeat probabilities. While the quantitative impact of the disappointment variable is not large, it is difficult to draw comparisons since similar estimates are not available elsewhere.

  16. Seguimento dos enfermeiros egressos dos cursos de especialização em enfermagem em cuidados intensivos Seguimiento de los enfermeros egresos de los cursos de especialización en enfermería en cuidados intensivos Following up nurses that finished the specialization course on nursing in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verlaine Andrade

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo busca analisar a contribuição trazida pelos Cursos de Especialização em Cuidados Intensivos realizados na Escola de Enfermagem da USP, cujos objetivos foram: 1 caracterizar a trajetória dos enfermeiros quanto à continuidade do trabalho em UTI; 2 avaliar a contribuição oferecida pelo curso. A população foi composta por 38 enfermeiros egressos, sendo que, destes, 60,5% não mais atuavam na UTI, devido ao fato de assumirem outro cargo na instituição e apresentarem problemas pessoais diversos. Quanto à contribuição oferecida pelo curso, a principal avaliação recaiu na aquisição de conhecimentos (91,7%. No entanto, 74,2% dos enfermeiros afirmaram que o curso não contribuiu para o aumento salarial, o que não os têm impedido de investir no seu aperfeiçoamento profissional.Este estudio busca analizar la contribución de los Cursos de Especialización en Cuidados Intensivos ofrecidos por la Escuela de Enfermería de la Universidad de São Paulo. Los objetivos fueron: 1 caracterizar la trayectoria de los enfermeros en cuanto a la continuidad del trabajo en Unidade de Tratamiento Intensivo (UTI; 2 evaluar la contribución ofrecida por el Curso. La población fue de 38 enfermeros egresados de los Cursos, el 60,5% no estaban trabajando en UTI por estar ejerciendo otro cargo y también por problemas personales. En cuanto a la contribución ofrecida por el Curso, el principal resultado de la evaluación apunta para la aquisición de conocimientos (91,7%, el 74,2% de los enfermeros dijeron que el Curso no contribuyó para la mejoría de la remuneración; sin embargo, eso no constituyó motivo para que esos enfermeros dejaran de invertir en el progreso profesional.The purpose of this study was to analyse the contribution of the Extension Courses in the Intensive Care held at the Nursing School from USP, with the aim to: 1 Follow up nurses in their work at the ICU. 2 Evaluate the contribution offered by the course. The

  17. Pharmacology Goes Concept-Based: Course Design, Implementation, and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, Amelia; Davis, Rebecca G

    Although concept-based curricula are frequently discussed in the nursing education literature, little information exists to guide the development of a concept-based pharmacology course. Traditionally, nursing pharmacology courses are taught with an emphasis on drug class where a prototype drug serves as an exemplar. When transitioning pharmacology to a concept-based course, special considerations are in order. How can educators successfully integrate essential pharmacological content into a curriculum structured around nursing concepts? This article presents one approach to the design and implementation of a concept-based undergraduate pharmacology course. Planning methods, supportive teaching strategies, and course evaluation procedures are discussed.

  18. Changing negative stereotypes regarding aging in undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabia-Cobo, C M; Castanedo Pfeiffer, C

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the modification of stereotypes and myths regarding aging among third-year nursing students before and after undergoing an Aging Nursing course. A within-subject repeated-measures descriptive study was conducted. The Negative Stereotypes Questionnaire about Aging (CENVE) was used. The overall prevalence of negative stereotypes was 62.0% pre-intervention (P1) and 12.3% post-intervention (P2) measured; these values were 63.5% (P1) and 9.2% (P2) for the health factor, 43.1% (P1) and 4.9% (P2) for the motivation and social factors and 58.3% (P1) and 3.8% (P2) for the character-personality factor. Paired Student's t tests confirmed that the differences were statistically significant. There was a high prevalence of negative stereotypes toward aging among the nursing students, even though they had conducted clinical practice and were in their third year. The course was demonstrated to be effective in modifying these stereotypes. The proper training of future professionals markedly contributes the dispensation of proper care and the eradication of ageism, which remains prevalent in the healthcare system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assistência de enfermagem perioperatória: ensino em cursos de enfermagem Enseñanza de enfermería perioperatoria en los cursos de Pre grado en enfermería The teaching of the perioperatory nursing assistance in undergraduate courses in Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Querido Avelar

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Buscou-se no presente estudo, retratar a realidade do ensino da assistência de enfermagem perioperatória, analisando e delineando suas tendências entre docentes de cursos de graduação em enfermagem que ministram esse conteúdo. A assistência de enfermagem perioperatória como processo realizado por profissionais de enfermagem, em uma fase específica de atenção ao paciente, frente ao procedimento anestésico-cirúrgico, envolve estratégias e orientações expressas na práxis do enfermeiro. Aqui o ensino da assistência de enfermagem perioperatória, como atividade dinâmica das ações dos docentes de Enfermagem em Centro Cirúrgico, desenvolvida num processo coletivo, emerge como práxis ritual no mundo do sistema, da razão técnica instrumental, distanciando-se do entendimento consensual, da razão comunicativa e do fomento às alternativas voltadas à práxis social/emancipatória.En el presente estudio se buscó retratar la realidad de la enseñanza de la asistencia de enfermería perioperatoria, analizando y delineando sus tendencias entre los docentes de enfermería perioperatoria. Como proceso realizado por los profesionales de enfermería en una fase específica de atención al paciente frente al procedimiento anestésico-quirúrgico, involucra estrategias y orientaciones expresadas en la praxis del enfermero. Se puede concluir que la enseñanza de la asistencia de enfermería perioperatoria, como actividad dinámica de las acciones de los docentes de Enfermería en Centro Quirúrgico, desarrollada en un proceso colectivo, emerge como praxis ritual en el mundo del sistema, de la razón técnica instrumental, distanciándose del entendimiento consensual de la razón comunicativa y de fomento de alternativas relativas a la praxis social/emancipadora.In the present study, the authors describe the reality of the perioperatory nursing assistance, analyzing and outlining its trends among professors of undergraduate courses in

  20. Final Narrative Report on Nursing Ethics at Delta College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Raymond S.

    This four-part report describes a project undertaken by Delta College to implement two required bioethics courses for nursing students: an introductory course in ethical theories and an advanced course in applications of these theories in nursing. After Part I relates how funding for the project was secured and used, Part II delineates the…

  1. [Transition in nursing education and research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuchika, H

    1997-09-01

    Health needs of the people of Japan are diversified and today's nursing is required to display expert functions which exceed the borders of health prevention, medical service, and welfare. Nursing education, which has recently become a four-year university course, has as its purpose the development of its specialties and science, and a systematization of them. Most nursing researchers attempt to develop nursing models from the traditional medical model, and intend to apply the nursing model to their social responsibilities and practices of nursing.

  2. [Emotion and the nurse-patient relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how emotion affects the nurse-patient relationship. The discussion is derived from a qualitative research study that examined the nurse-patient relationship in humanistic care by observing courses of introduction to nursing and nursing ethics. First, the meaning of the caring relationship is addressed. Secondly, the relationship between empathy and self transcendence is examined. Finally, the nurse's emotion as a tool for healing the other is illustrated. Thoughtful work discussions also seem to identify nurses' awareness of their own emotion as not only promoting self transcendence, but also promoting the healing process.

  3. Multidisciplinary education in geriatrics: an experimental course at the Middlesex Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beynon, G P; Wedgwood, J; Newman, J; Hutt, A

    1978-11-01

    For two years mixed groups of medical, nursing and physiotherapy students have taken part in an experimental course in geriatric medicine. The course organization and content are described and the students' evaluation of the course is discussed.

  4. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  5. Factors Influencing Student Nurses' Performance in the Final ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors Influencing Student Nurses' Performance in the Final Practical Examination ... Staff development courses can be held to coordinate the work of the school ... to authentic individual nursing care of patients so that they use the individual ...

  6. The Place of Nursing History in an Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lait, Margaret E.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a standalone undergraduate course in nursing history in terms of rationale, purpose, and content. Discusses arguments for inclusion of nursing history in the curriculum and problems associated with teaching it. (SK)

  7. United States Air Force Nurse Crops Captains' Perceived Leadership Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Randall, Marjorie

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived leadership effectiveness of nurses who attended the United States Air Force Nursing Service Management residence course with the perceived leadership...

  8. The "old internationals": Canadian nurses in an international nursing community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeyre, Jaime; Nelson, Sioban

    2010-12-01

    The vast devastation caused by both the First World War and the influenza pandemic of 1918 led to an increased worldwide demand for public health nurses. In response to this demand, a number of new public health training programs for nurses were started at both national and international levels. At the international level, one of two influential programs in this area included a year-long public health nursing course offered by the League of Red Cross Societies, in conjunction with Bedford College in London, England. In total, 341 nurses from 49 different countries have been documented as participants in this initiative throughout the interwar period, including 20 Canadians. Using archival material from the Canadian Nurses Association and the Royal College of Nursing, as well as articles from the journals Canadian Nurse, American Journal of Nursing and British Journal of Nursing, this paper examines these nurses' commitment to internationalism throughout their careers and explores the effect of this commitment on the development of nursing education and professionalization at the national level.

  9. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Fajardo, J. Eduardo; Fiser, Andras; Roderick, Steven L.; Takiff, Howard E.; Blanchard, John S.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S,T,A,V][D,N][L,F]-[S,T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Myc...

  10. Effect of e-Learning and Repeated Performance Feedback on Spirometry Test Quality in Family Practice: A Cluster Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R.; Akkermans, Reinier P.; Crockett, Alan J.; van Montfort, Marian; Grootens-Stekelenburg, Joke; Stout, Jim W.; Pieters, Willem

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. METHODS Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention or control conditions through minimization. Intervention consisted of e-learning and bimonthly feedback reports to practice nurses. Control practices received only the joint baseline workshop. Spirometry quality was assessed by independent lung function technicians. Two outcomes were defined, with the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable and repeatable blows being the primary outcome and the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable blows being the secondary outcome. We used multilevel logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for an adequate test in intervention group practices. RESULTS We analyzed 1,135 tests. Rate of adequate tests was 33% in intervention and 30% in control group practices (OR = 1.3; P=.605). Adequacy of tests did not differ between groups but tended to increase with time: OR = 2.2 (P = .057) after 3 and OR = 2.0 (P = .086) in intervention group practices after 4 feedback reports. When ignoring test repeatability, these differences between the groups were slightly more pronounced: OR = 2.4 (P = .033) after 3 and OR=2.2 (P = .051) after 4 feedback reports. CONCLUSIONS In the course of 1 year, we observed a small and late effect of e-learning and repeated feedback on the quality of spirometry as performed by family practice nurses. This intervention does not seem to compensate the lack of rigorous training and experience in performing spirometry tests in most practices. PMID:21747104

  11. Effect of e-learning and repeated performance feedback on spirometry test quality in family practice: a cluster trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R; Akkermans, Reinier P; Crockett, Alan J; van Montfort, Marian; Grootens-Stekelenburg, Joke; Stout, Jim W; Pieters, Willem

    2011-01-01

    Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention or control conditions through minimization. Intervention consisted of e-learning and bimonthly feedback reports to practice nurses. Control practices received only the joint baseline workshop. Spirometry quality was assessed by independent lung function technicians. Two outcomes were defined, with the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable and repeatable blows being the primary outcome and the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable blows being the secondary outcome. We used multilevel logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for an adequate test in intervention group practices. We analyzed 1,135 tests. Rate of adequate tests was 33% in intervention and 30% in control group practices (OR = 1.3; P=.605). Adequacy of tests did not differ between groups but tended to increase with time: OR = 2.2 (P = .057) after 3 and OR = 2.0 (P = .086) in intervention group practices after 4 feedback reports. When ignoring test repeatability, these differences between the groups were slightly more pronounced: OR = 2.4 (P = .033) after 3 and OR=2.2 (P = .051) after 4 feedback reports. In the course of 1 year, we observed a small and late effect of e-learning and repeated feedback on the quality of spirometry as performed by family practice nurses. This intervention does not seem to compensate the lack of rigorous training and experience in performing spirometry tests in most practices.

  12. The compact Erlangen Active Simulator for Interventional Endoscopy: a prospective comparison in structured team-training courses on "endoscopic hemostasis" for doctors and nurses to the "Endo-Trainer" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberger, J; Euler, K; Naegel, A; Hahn, E G; Maiss, J

    2004-09-01

    In 1997 Hochberger and Neumann presented the "Erlangen Biosimulation Model" (commercialized as the "Erlangen Endo-Trainer") at various national and international meetings. The new compactEASIE is a simplified version of the original "Biosimulation Model" (Endo-Trainer) and is specially designed for easy handling. CompactEASIE is reduced in its features, focusing exclusively on flexible endoscopy training. The acceptance of training in endoscopic hemostasis is accepted by workshop participants, as evaluated by a questionnaire on both models. Eleven structured courses on endoscopic hemostasis for doctors and nurses organized by the same endoscopists from 3/1998 to 5/1999 were evaluated using one of both models. The questionnaires were filled in by 207/291 trainees (71%). The Endo-Trainer was used in 4 (n = 103) and the compactEASIE in 7 courses (n = 104). Both simulators were equipped with identical types of specially prepared pig-organ packages consisting of esophagus, stomach and duodenum, including artificial sewn-in vessels, polyps and varices. Blood perfusion was done with a roller pump connected to the sewn-in vessels and blood surrogate. All workshops were identical concerning the course structure: a 30-min theoretical introduction on ulcer bleeding was followed by 2 h of practical training in injection techniques and hemoclip application. The second part of variceal therapy consisted of a 30-min theoretical introduction prior to 2 h of practical training on sclerotherapy, band ligation and cyanoacrylate application. Finally, a questionnaire on the trainees' pre-experience and their rating of the different workshop sections was handed out to each participant. Previous endoscopic experience was comparable in both groups. The training in both simulators was highly accepted by the trainees (compactEASIE 95% excellent and good versus EASIE (Endo-Trainer) 97%) and did not show any significant difference (P = 0.493). Even in the assessment of the single techniques

  13. A imagem do enfermeiro no decorrer de sua trajetória histórico-social - The image of nurses in the course of its history and social history

    OpenAIRE

    Lara Barata, Jaqueline Marques; PUC Minas; Kallás, Aline da Rocha; PUC Minas; Romero, Camila Sabino; PUC Minas; Ursino, Nathalia Henrique; PUC Minas; Silveira, Nayara Cristina; PUC Minas

    2010-01-01

    Objetivo   Identificar as imagens do Enfermeiro no decorrer de sua trajetória histórico-social.  Descritores: História da Enfermagem; Percepção; Enfermagem; Papel do Profissional de Enfermagem.   Descriptors: History of Nursing; Perception; Nursing; Nurse's Role.

  14. Repeated Causal Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmayer, York; Meder, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    Many of our decisions refer to actions that have a causal impact on the external environment. Such actions may not only allow for the mere learning of expected values or utilities but also for acquiring knowledge about the causal structure of our world. We used a repeated decision-making paradigm to examine what kind of knowledge people acquire in…

  15. simple sequence repeat (SSR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, 78 mapped simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers representing 11 linkage groups of adzuki bean were evaluated for transferability to mungbean and related Vigna spp. 41 markers amplified characteristic bands in at least one Vigna species. The transferability percentage across the genotypes ranged ...

  16. Problems of practical teaching of nurses from the perspective of students and nurses

    OpenAIRE

    VLČKOVÁ, Darina

    2013-01-01

    The education of nurses, as well as other non-doctor medical workers, has seen significant changes in the course of the past twenty years. In compliance with current legislation, the studies of general nurses only take place at universities and colleges these days.The schooling of nurses consists of theoretical and practical education. Both of them mingle and supplement each other during the complete course of the studies. Theoretical part consists of general as well as special subjects which...

  17. Nursing students' attitudes toward science in the nursing curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroo, Jill Deanne

    The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students' attitudes and their performance in a subject (Osborne, Simon, & Collins, 2003). However, little research exists on the overall attitude of nursing students toward science. At the time of my study there existed no large scale quantitative study on my topic. The purpose of my study was to identify potential obstacles nursing students face, specifically, attitude and motivation toward learning science. According to research the nation will soon face a nursing shortage and students cite the science content as a reason for not completing the nursing program. My study explored nursing students' attitudes toward science and reasons these students are motivated to learn science. I ran a nationwide mixed methods approach with 1,402 participants for the quantitative portion and 4 participants for the qualitative portion. I validated a questionnaire in order to explore nursing students' attitudes toward science, discovered five different attitude scales in that questionnaire and determined what demographic factors provided a statistically significant prediction of a student's score. In addition, I discovered no statistical difference in attitude exists between students who have the option of taking nursing specific courses and those who do not have that option. I discovered in the qualitative interviews that students feel science is necessary in nursing but do not feel nurses are scientists. My study gives a baseline of the current attitude of nursing students toward science and why these students feel the need to learn the science.

  18. Food Service Course. Bilingual Vocational Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Cox, Guadalupe

    This course in food services, one of a series of bilingual English-Spanish vocational education courses, is designed to familiarize the student with the food service operation of a restaurant, cafeteria, fast-food operation, hospital, nursing home, industrial or educational facility, food caterer, or bakery. The student should become versatile in…

  19. Emotional intelligence increases over time: A longitudinal study of Australian pre-registration nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kim; Fethney, Judith; McKenzie, Heather; Fisher, Murray; Harkness, Emily; Kozlowski, Desirée

    2017-08-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with positive outcomes for nursing students. Higher EI is associated with personal wellbeing and stress management, higher academic performance, stronger nursing leadership and practice performance, and greater patient safety. While there is an increasing body of evidence on nursing students' EI, there is minimal evidence on EI over time during pre-registration programs. To measure EI in pre-registration nursing students from program commencement to conclusion to ascertain EI over time and examine the relationship between EI and academic performance. Longitudinal repeated measures study between March 2010-February 2013 at a metropolitan university in Australia. 111 nursing students (74.8% female) contributed data on at least two occasions. Participants were enrolled in a pre-registration Master of Nursing degree. Half the cohort (55.0%) comprised Graduate Entry students who completed the course in two years full time. The other 45% were enrolled in an undergraduate degree in arts, science or health science, combined with the same pre-registration Master of Nursing Degree. These students completed their Combined Degree program in four years full time. Participants had a mean age of 24.7years (SD=7.36). EI was measured for commencing students (T1) using the Assessing Emotions Scale (AES), then a further three times: end of first year (T2; 9 months follow up); beginning of second year (12 months follow up; T3) and end of the program (T4; 24/36 months follow up). Students' EI was found to increase across the program; one subscale of EI (managing others' emotions) was related to higher academic performance; and there was a significant increase in the Utilising Emotions subscale scores over time. Pre-registration nurse education contributes to strengthening students' EI over time. Specific EI education scaffolded throughout programs is recommended in pre-registration curricula. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. [Analysis of interventions designed to improve clinical supervision of student nurses in Benin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otti, André; Pirson, Magali; Piette, Danielle; Coppieters T Wallant, Yves

    2017-12-05

    The absence of an explicit and coherent conception of the articulation between theory and practice in the reform of nursing training in Benin has resulted in poor quality clinical supervision of student nurses. The objective of this article is to analyze two interventions designed to improve the quality of supervision. A student welcome booklet developed by means of a consultative and provocative participatory approach was tested with twelve student nurses versus a control group. Content analysis of the data collected by individual semi-directed interviews and during two focus groups demonstrated the value of this tool. Student nurses were also taught to use to training diaries inspired by the ?experiential learning? Training diaries were analysed using a grid based on the descriptive elements of the five types of Scheepers training diaries (2008). According to the student nurses, the welcome booklet provided them with structured information to be used as a reference during their training and a better understanding of their teachers, and allowed them to situate the resources of the training course with a lower level of stress. Fifty-eight per cent of the training diaries were are mosaics, reflecting the reflective practice and self-regulated learning of student nurses. This activity also promoted metacognitive dialogue with their supervisors. The student welcome booklet appeared to facilitate integration of student nurses into the clinical setting and promoted professional and organizational socialization. The training diary improved the quality of clinical learning by repeated reflective observation of student nurses and helped to maintain permanent communication with the supervisors.

  1. TECHNICAL COURSES

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Technical Training; Monique Duval - Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    C++ for Particle Physicists By Paul KUNZ Please note that Paul Kunz will be giving his very popular and highly recommended C++ course again on 20 ­ 24 November. The course costs 200 CHF, and advance registration is required. People with CERN EDH accounts can apply electronically directly from the Web course description page : C++ for Particle Physicists Team Visitors should ask their Group Leader to send an e-mail to the DTO of EP Division, M. Burri, referring to the ‘C++ for Particle Physicists’ course and giving their name, CERN ID number, the Team account number to which the course fee should be charged, and VERY IMPORTANTLY an email address to which an invitation to the course can be sent.

  2. NEW COURSES

    CERN Document Server

    Enseignement Technique; Tél. 74924; Technical Training; Monique Duval; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    C++ for Particle Physicists By Paul KUNZ Please note that Paul Kunz will be giving his very popular and highly recommended C++ course again on 20-24 November. The course costs 200 CHF, and advance registration is required. People with CERN EDH accounts can apply electronically directly from the Web course description page : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ENSTEC/P9798/Software/cpppp_e.htm Team Visitors should ask their Group Leader to send an e-mail to the DTO of EP Division, M. Burri, referring to the ‘C++ for Particle Physicists’ course and giving their name, CERN ID number, the Team account number to which the course fee should be charged, and VERY IMPORTANTLY an email address to which an invitation to the course can be sent.

  3. TECHNICAL COURSES

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    C++ for Particle Physicists By Paul KUNZ Please note that Paul Kunz will be giving his very popular and highly recommended C++ course again on 20 ­ 24 November. The course costs 200 CHF, and advance registration is required. People with CERN EDH accounts can apply electronically directly from the Web course description page : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ENSTEC/P9798/Software/cpppp_e.htm Team Visitors should ask their Group Leader to send an e-mail to the DTO of EP Division, M. Burri, referring to the ‘C++ for Particle Physicists’ course and giving their name, CERN ID number, the Team account number to which the course fee should be charged, and VERY IMPORTANTLY an email address to which an invitation to the course can be sent.

  4. Nationwide peritoneal dialysis nurse training in Thailand: 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaiyuenwong, Jutiporn; Mahatanan, Nanta; Jiravaranun, Somsong; Boonyakarn, Achara; Rodpai, Somrak; Eiam-Ong, Somchai; Tungsanga, Kriang; Dhanakijcharoen, Prateep; Kanjanabuch, Talerngsak

    2011-09-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) center is not possible to operate if there is no availability of dedicated PD nurse. Generally, the nurse has to play many roles, including educator coordinator, and sometimes leader. As professionalism, the PD nurses need to have both theoretical and practical skills. With the tremendous leap of PD population after the launch of "PD First" policy in Thailand, the shortage of skillful PD nurse is concerned. Hence, the nationwide PD nurse training course was established with the collaborations of many organizations and institutes. Until now, 3 generations of 225 PD nurses are the productions of the course. This number represents 80 percent of PD nurses distributed throughout the whole nation. The survey operated in the year 2010 demonstrated that the output of the course was acceptable in terms of quality since most of the trained PD nurses had a confidence in taking care of PD patients. The quality of patient care is good as indicated by KPIs.

  5. Forensic nursing in secure environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    There are few well-designed studies of corrections or prison nursing roles. This study seeks to describe the corrections or prison role of forensic nurses in the United States who provide care in secure environments. National data detailing the scope of practice in secure environments are limited. This pencil and paper survey describes the roles of 180 forensic nurses from 14 states who work in secure environments. Descriptive statistics are utilized. A repeated measures ANOVA with post hoc analyses was implemented. These nurses were older than average in age, but had 10 years or less experience in forensic nursing practice. Two significant roles emerged to "promote and implement principles that underpin effective quality and practice" and to "assess, develop, implement, and improve programs of care for individuals." Significant roles varied based upon the security classification of the unit or institution in which the nurses were employed. Access to information about these nurses and their nursing practice was difficult in these closed systems. Minimal data are available nationally, indicating a need for collection of additional data over time to examine changes in role. It is through such developments that forensic nursing provided in secure environments will define its specialization and attract the attention it deserves.

  6. The impact of nursing education and job characteristics on nurse's perceptions of their family nursing practice skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun; Sigurdardottir, Anna Olafia; Konradsdottir, Elisabet; Tryggvadottir, Gudny Bergthora

    2018-04-25

    Implementing family system nursing in clinical settings is on the rise. However, little is known about the impact of graduate school education as well as continuing education in family systems nursing (FSN) on nurses' perceptions of their family nursing practice. To evaluate the level of nursing education, having taken a continuing hospital educational course in family system nursing (FN-ETI programme), and the impact of job characteristics on nurses' perceptions of their family nursing practice skills. Participants were 436 nurses with either a BSc degree or graduate degree in nursing. The Job Demand, Control and Support model guided the study (R. Karasek and T. Theorell, 1992, Healthy Work: Stress, Productivity, and the Reconstruction of Working Life, Basic Books, New York, NY). Scores for the characteristics of job demands and job control were created to categorise participants into four job types: high strain (high demand, low control), passive (low demand, low control), low strain (low demand, high control) and active (high demand, high control). Nurses with a graduate education who had taken the FN-ETI programme scored significantly higher on the Family Nursing Practice Scale than nurses with an undergraduate education. Nurses who were characterised as low strain or active scored significantly higher on the Family Nursing Practice Scale than the nurses who were characterised as high strain. Further, the interaction of education by job type was significant regarding family nursing practice skills. Hierarchical regression revealed 25% of the variance in family nursing practice skills was explained by job control, family policy on the unit, graduate education and employment on the following divisions: Maternal-Child, Emergency, Mental Health or Internal Medicine. Graduate education plus continuing education in FSN can offer nurses increased job opportunities more control over one's work as well as increased skills working with families in clinical settings.

  7. What an ambulance nurse needs to know: a content analysis of curricula in the specialist nursing programme in prehospital emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölin, Helena; Lindström, Veronica; Hult, Håkan; Ringsted, Charlotte; Kurland, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    In Sweden, ambulances must be staffed by at least one registered nurse. Twelve universities offer education in ambulance nursing. There is no national curriculum for detailed course content and there is a lack of knowledge about the educational content that deals with the ambulance nurse practical professional work. The aim of this study was to describe the content in course curricula for ambulance nurses. A descriptive qualitative research design with summative content analysis was used. Data were generated from 49 courses in nursing and medical science. The result shows that the course content can be described as medical, nursing and contextual knowledge with a certain imbalance with largest focus on medical knowledge. There is least focus on nursing, the registered nurses' main profession. This study clarifies how the content in the education for ambulance nurses in Sweden looks today but there are reasons to discuss the content distribution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nursing students inclusion of family system nursing in their bachelorette thesis from 2012-2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voltelen, Barbara; Terkelsen, Anne Seneca

    course was not established due to organizational issues. Conclusion: Participation in family system nursing education could increase interest in family inclusion for nursing students. Further targeted evaluations are needed to measure student output from these family system nursing courses eg. by surveys......Background: Serious illness is a family affair. Since 2013 family system nursing, beyond paediatrics, was introduced in the undergraduate curriculum at a School of Nursing. Students were introduced to “think family” and had the opportunity to attend a longer optional course during the last half...... year of their education. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore if students choice of content has evolved towards more family inclusion in their bachelorette thesis after implementation of family system nursing in the curriculum. Methods: We used a descriptive quantitative retrospective approach...

  9. Evaluating trauma nursing education: An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Min; Metcalfe, Helene; Gallagher, Olivia; Hamdorf, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    A review of the current literature evaluating trauma nursing education. A variety of trauma nursing courses exist, to educate nurses working in trauma settings, and to maintain their continuing professional development. Despite an increase in the number of courses delivered, there appears to be a lack of evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of trauma nursing education and in particular the justification for this resource allocation. Integrative literature review. A search of international literature on trauma nursing education evaluation published in English from 1985 to 2015 was conducted through electronic databases CINAHL Plus, Google Scholar, PubMed, Austhealth, Science Citation Index Expanded (Web of Science), Sciverse Science Direct (Elsevier) & One file (Gale). Only peer reviewed journal articles identifying trauma course and trauma nursing course evaluation have been included in the selection criteria. An integrative review of both quantitative and qualitative literature guided by Whittemore and Knafl's theoretical framework using Bowling's and Pearson's validated appraisal checklists, has been conducted for three months. Only 17 studies met the inclusion criteria, including 14 on trauma course evaluation and 3 on trauma nursing course evaluation. Study findings are presented as two main themes: the historical evolution of trauma nursing education and evaluation of trauma nursing education outcomes. Trauma nursing remains in its infancy and education in this specialty is mainly led by continuing professional development courses. The shortage of evaluation studies on trauma nursing courses reflects the similar status in continuing professional development course evaluation. A trauma nursing course evaluation study will address the gap in this under researched area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The application of nursing process method in training nurses working in the department of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Daihui; Wang Hongjuan; Yang Yajuan; Ye Rui; Qu Juan; Li Xinying; Xu Ying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the training procedure,typical training method and the clinical effect of nursing process method which was used to cultivate nurses working in the interventional ward. Methods: According to the evaluation index, the authors made a detail assessment of each nurse and found out individually the problems which needed to be perfected, then, the practicable measures were made for each individual nurse, after the training course the clinical results were evaluated. Results: After the nurses on different technical levels were cultivated with nursing process method, the comprehensive quality of each nurse was improved in different degree, and the general nursing quality of entire Department was also markedly improved. Conclusion: By using the nursing process method the cultivating period can be effectively shortened, the possible waste of time, manpower, material and energy cause by the blind training plan can be avoided. (authors)

  11. A Favorable Course of Palliative Sedation: Searching for Indicators Using Caregivers' Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkkemper, T.; Rietjens, J.A.C.; Deliens, L.; Ribbe, M.W.; Swart, S.J.; Loer, S.A.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; Perez, R.S.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Comparing characteristics of a favorable sedation course during palliative sedation to a less favorable course based on the reports Dutch physicians and nurses.Results:Cases identified as having a favorable sedation course less often concerned a male patient (P = .019 nurses' cases),

  12. Continuing dental education in radiation protection: knowledge retention following a postgraduate course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absi, E G; Drage, N A; Thomas, H S; Newcombe, R G; Cowpe, J

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate medium-term knowledge retention of dental personnel following attendance at a postgraduate course in radiation protection. Knowledge was measured using identical pre- and post-course validated single best-answer multiple-choice instruments, administered immediately before and after training and at follow-up at 6 or 12 months. These comprise 16 questions each with 5 choices. The range of possible scores was from 0 to 16, and scores were scaled to percentages. Participants were predominantly dental practitioners, but a minority consisted of dental care professionals (dental nurses, hygienists and therapists). Of 285 participants, 272 (95.4%) completed both pre- and post-course questionnaires. One hundred and seventeen (43%) of these also completed the follow-up test, but only 109 (40%) individuals could be linked to the original course. Mean (standard deviation) pre-, post-course and follow-up-corrected percentage scores were 39.1 (16.1), 74.6 (16.9) and 58.9 (22.7), respectively. There was attrition in knowledge at follow-up: the average increase in adjusted score after training was 35.5 points, but only 56% of this was retained at follow-up. Paired t-tests confirmed that the mean score at follow-up was firmly intermediate between the pre- and post-course scores. Of the 109 participants, 7 (6%) achieved a satisfactory score pre-training, 82 (75%) immediately post-training and 41 (38%) at follow-up. There were gross differences between the levels of performance achieved for the eight subject areas tested. Immediate post-course assessments have indicated that current postgraduate courses in radiation protection are effective. However, a substantial amount of knowledge is lost by 6-12 months following course attendance. To achieve long-term knowledge retention, early or repeated reinforcement may be necessary. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Nurses who work outside nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Pallas, Linda O'Brien; Aitken, Leanne M

    2004-09-01

    The desire to care for people, a family history of professional health care work, and security in career choice are documented reasons for entering nursing. Reasons for leaving include workload, unsafe work environments and harassment. The relationship between these factors and the time nurses spend in the profession has not been explored. This paper reports a study with people who have left nursing, to investigate why they became a nurse, how long they stayed in nursing, and their reasons for leaving. A questionnaire was mailed to Registered Nurses currently working outside nursing, seeking respondents' reasons for entering and leaving nursing, and perceptions of the skills gained from nursing and the ease of adjustment to working in a non-nursing environment. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, correlational analysis and linear and multiple regression analysis. A model incorporating the factors 'altruistic reasons', 'default choice' and 'stepping stone' explained 36.2% of the variance in reasons for becoming a nurse. A model incorporating the factors 'legal and employer', 'external values and beliefs about nursing', 'professional practice', 'work life/home life' and 'contract requirements' explained 55.4% of the variance in reasons for leaving nursing. Forty-eight per cent of the variance in tenure in nursing practice was explained through personal characteristics of nurses (36%), reasons for becoming a nurse (7%) and reasons for leaving (6%). The reasons why nurses entered or left the profession were varied and complex. While personal characteristics accounted for a large component of tenure in nursing, those managing the nursing workforce should consider professional practice issues and the balance between work life and home life.

  14. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation (MLI) has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five Glenn Research Center (GRC) provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4% whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0%. A second group of 10 coupons has been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, the repeatability between coupons has been shown to be +/- 15-25%. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  15. Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Kim, Jeongeun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jungha; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Shinae; Jun, Jooyeon; Song, Healim; On, Jeongah; Jung, Hyesil; Hong, Yeong Joo; Yim, Suran

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study presents the current status of nursing informatics education, the content covered in nursing informatics courses, the faculty efficacy, and the barriers to and additional supports for teaching nursing informatics in Korea. Methods A set of questionnaires consisting of an 18-item questionnaire for nursing informatics education, a 6-item questionnaire for faculty efficacy, and 2 open-ended questions for barriers and additional supports were sent to 204 nursing schools via email and the postal service. Nursing schools offering nursing informatics were further asked to send their syllabuses. The subjects taught were analyzed using nursing informatics competency categories and other responses were tailed using descriptive statistics. Results A total of 72 schools (35.3%) responded to the survey, of which 38 reported that they offered nursing informatics courses in their undergraduate nursing programs. Nursing informatics courses at 11 schools were taught by a professor with a degree majoring in nursing informatics. Computer technology was the most frequently taught subject (27 schools), followed by information systems used for practice (25 schools). The faculty efficacy was 3.76 ± 0.86 (out of 5). The most frequently reported barrier to teaching nursing informatics (n = 9) was lack of awareness of the importance of nursing informatics. Training and educational opportunities was the most requested additional support. Conclusions Nursing informatics education has increased during the last decade in Korea. However, the proportions of faculty with degrees in nursing informatics and number of schools offering nursing informatics courses have not increased much. Thus, a greater focus is needed on training faculty and developing the courses. PMID:27200224

  16. Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Kim, Jeongeun; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jungha; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Shinae; Jun, Jooyeon; Song, Healim; On, Jeongah; Jung, Hyesil; Hong, Yeong Joo; Yim, Suran

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the current status of nursing informatics education, the content covered in nursing informatics courses, the faculty efficacy, and the barriers to and additional supports for teaching nursing informatics in Korea. A set of questionnaires consisting of an 18-item questionnaire for nursing informatics education, a 6-item questionnaire for faculty efficacy, and 2 open-ended questions for barriers and additional supports were sent to 204 nursing schools via email and the postal service. Nursing schools offering nursing informatics were further asked to send their syllabuses. The subjects taught were analyzed using nursing informatics competency categories and other responses were tailed using descriptive statistics. A total of 72 schools (35.3%) responded to the survey, of which 38 reported that they offered nursing informatics courses in their undergraduate nursing programs. Nursing informatics courses at 11 schools were taught by a professor with a degree majoring in nursing informatics. Computer technology was the most frequently taught subject (27 schools), followed by information systems used for practice (25 schools). The faculty efficacy was 3.76 ± 0.86 (out of 5). The most frequently reported barrier to teaching nursing informatics (n = 9) was lack of awareness of the importance of nursing informatics. Training and educational opportunities was the most requested additional support. Nursing informatics education has increased during the last decade in Korea. However, the proportions of faculty with degrees in nursing informatics and number of schools offering nursing informatics courses have not increased much. Thus, a greater focus is needed on training faculty and developing the courses.

  17. French Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister.

  18. Motivations to nurse: an exploration of what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enter nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Kim; West, Caryn; Macmanus, Mary; Waqa, Silina; Stewart, Lee; Henry, Renee; Lindsay, David; Conaglen, Jo; Hall, Julianne; McAuliffe, Marie; Redman-MacLaren, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the motivations of student nurses enrolled in nursing courses across a variety of Pacific Island countries. The image of nursing, the desire to help others, family and friends in the profession, personal experience, security, travel opportunities and flexibility have all been identified as motivators for people to enter nursing. To date, what motivates students in Pacific Island countries to enrol in a nursing course has not been investigated. An exploratory qualitative approach using focus group interviews with 152 nursing students was undertaken. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis, revealing four themes: (i) helping others; (ii) 'making a difference for my people'; (iii) following in the footsteps of others; and (iv) financial and professional gain. In a time of health and nursing workforce shortages, developing a deeper understanding of what drives people can be used to improve recruitment strategies in the future. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Partners in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigginton, M A; Miracle, V A; Sims, J M; Mitchell, K A

    1994-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the efforts of several hospitals in a large southern city to collaborate on continuing education projects to meet the needs of the nursing staff. In 1985, four hospitals formed a health maintenance organization. An outgrowth was the formation of a critical care consortium whose main objective was to develop an entry level critical care course. The authors discuss the development of this course, the advantages and disadvantages of a partnership, and the results of 7 years of experience.

  20. Development of leadership behaviors in undergraduate nursing students: a service-learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foli, Karen J; Braswell, Melanie; Kirkpatrick, Jane; Lim, Eunjung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine leadership behaviors developed by nursing students and peers before and after a service-learning experience. Nurses have been called to fill growing needs in the health care setting, rendering care to vulnerable and diverse populations in a wide range of organizations. Leadership behaviors are therefore essential. Baccalaureate students (N = 65) completed the Student Leadership Practices Inventory-Self at the beginning and end of the semester. The students also rated peers using the Leadership Practices Inventory-Observer and answered six questions about service-learning. Repeated measures of analysis of variance for pre- and posttests revealed that leadership behaviors improved (p leadership course is an effective approach to the development of leadership behaviors.

  1. Exploring Nurse Communication About Spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Ragan, Sandra L; Ferrell, Betty

    2017-07-01

    Although spiritual care is considered one of the pillars of palliative care, many health-care providers never receive formal training on how to communicate about spirituality with patients and families. The aim of this study was to explore the spiritual care experiences of oncology nurses in order to learn more about patient needs and nurse responses. A survey was circulated at a communication training course for oncology nurses in June 2015. Nurses recalled a care experience that included the initiation of a spiritual care topic and their response to the patient/family. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Nurses reported that communication about spirituality was primarily initiated by patients, rather than family members, and spiritual topics commonly emerged during the end of life or when patients experienced spiritual distress. Nurses' experiences highlighted the positive impact spiritual conversations had on the quality of patient care and its benefit to families. Spiritual communication was described as an important nursing role at the end of patients' lives, and nonverbal communication, listening, and discussing patients' emotions were emphasized as important and effective nurse communication skills during spiritual care conversations. Approximately one-third of nurses in the sample reported sharing their own personal spiritual or religious backgrounds with patients, and they reported that these sharing experiences strengthened their own faith. It is evident that patients want to discuss spiritual topics during care. Study findings illustrate the need to develop a spiritual communication curriculum and provide spiritual care communication training to clinicians.

  2. Multilevel library instruction for emerging nursing roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, B W; Fisher, C C

    1995-10-01

    As new nursing roles emerge that involve greater decision making than in the past, added responsibility for outcomes and cost control, and increased emphasis on primary care, the information-seeking skills needed by nurses change. A search of library and nursing literature indicates that there is little comprehensive library instruction covering all levels of nursing programs: undergraduate, returning registered nurses, and graduate students. The University of Florida is one of the few places that has such a multilevel, course-integrated curriculum in place for all entrants into the nursing program. Objectives have been developed for each stage of learning. The courses include instruction in the use of the online public access catalog, printed resources, and electronic databases. A library classroom equipped with the latest technology enables student interaction with electronic databases. This paper discusses the program and several methods used to evaluate it.

  3. Feminist pedagogy: a framework for nursing education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezekiah, J

    1993-02-01

    This article describes the feminist pedagogical strategies used in a nursing course in the post-RN Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN) program, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan. A variety of concepts that have direct relevance for nurses were discussed within small groups. These settings provided the venue for an examination of the issues that nurses, as primarily female, face in a patriarchal Muslim society and an androcentric health care system. Emphasis is on the process used in terms of feminist pedagogical practices and its relationship to feminist theory and critical pedagogy. The five process goals suggested by Schniedewind (1983) formed the basis for an exploration of this relationship through an analysis of the content and practices used in the course. It is demonstrated that the teaching practices advocated by feminist pedagogy hold much promise for nursing education to empower nurses and to make an impact on the health care system.

  4. Nurses' training and confidence on deep venous catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liachopoulou, A P; Synodinou-Kamilou, E E; Deligiannidi, P G; Giannakopoulou, M; Birbas, K N

    2008-01-01

    The rough estimation of the education and the self-confidence of nurses, both students and professionals, regarding deep venous catheterization in adult patients, the evaluation of the change in self-confidence of one team of students who were trained with a simulator on deep venous catheterization and the correlation of their self-confidence with their performance recorded by the simulator. Seventy-six nurses and one hundred twenty-four undergraduate students participated in the study. Fourty-four University students took part in a two-day educational seminar and were trained on subclavian and femoral vein paracentesis with a simulator and an anatomical model. Three questionnaires were filled in by the participants: one from nurses, one from students of Technological institutions, while the University students filled in the previous questionnaire before their attendance of the seminar, and another questionnaire after having attended it. Impressive results in improving the participants' self-confidence were recorded. However, the weak correlation of their self-confidence with the score automatically provided by the simulator after each user's training obligates us to be particularly cautious about the ability of the users to repeat the action successfully in a clinical environment. Educational courses and simulators are useful educational tools that are likely to shorten but in no case can efface the early phase of the learning curve in clinical setting, substituting the clinical training of inexperienced users.

  5. Ethical climate and nurse competence - newly graduated nurses' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Isoaho, Hannu; Meretoja, Riitta

    2015-12-01

    is also a need for knowledge of newly graduated nurses' views of factors which act as enhancers or barriers to positive ethical climates to develop. Interventions, continuing education courses, and discussions designed to promote positive ethical climates should be developed for managers, nurses, and multi-professional teams. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  7. 78 FR 65594 - Vehicular Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... coordinators estimate the effect on coordination fees? Does the supposed benefit that mobile repeater stations... allow the licensing and operation of vehicular repeater systems and other mobile repeaters by public... email: [email protected] or phone: 202-418- 0530 or TTY: 202-418-0432. For detailed instructions for...

  8. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Nursing Homes Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... Reason For Living in A Nursing Home Some type of disability with activities of daily living (ADLs) ...

  9. English courses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    New courses University of Cambridge ESOL examination course We will be starting two new courses in October leading to the Cambridge First Certificate in English (level B2 of the European Framework) and the Cambridge Advanced English (level C1) examinations. These courses will consist of two semesters of 15 weeks with two two-hourly classes per week. There will be an average of eight students per class. Normally the examination will be taken in June 2011 but strong participants could take it earlier. People wishing to take these courses should enrol: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9:1927376177842004::NO::X_COURSE_ID,X_STATUS:4133%2CD and they will then be required to take a placement test to check that their level of English is of an appropriate level. Please note that we need a minimum of seven students enrolled to open a session. For further information please contact Tessa Osborne 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: From 4th October 2010 to 5th Feb...

  10. Nursing Reclaims its Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the nurses' role: what the nurse is, what the nurse does, how the nurse is viewed by society, why nurses suffer burnout, nursing costs, and health care system reform. (CT)

  11. Neonatal Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Doreen; Morris, Maryke

    1994-01-01

    "Neonatal Nursing" offers a systematic approach to the nursing care of the sick newborn baby. Nursing actions and responsibilities are the focus of the text with relevant research findings, clinical applications, anatomy, physiology and pathology provided where necessary. This comprehensive text covers all areas of neonatal nursing including ethics, continuing care in the community, intranatal care, statistics and pharmokinetics so that holistic care of the infant is described. This book shou...

  12. Wireless Handhelds to Support Clinical Nursing Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Chin-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports our implementation and evaluation of a wireless handheld learning environment used to support a clinical nursing practicum course. The learning environment was designed so that nursing students could use handhelds for recording information, organizing ideas, assessing patients, and also for interaction and collaboration with…

  13. Nursing curriculums may hinder a career in gerontological nursing: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbrah, William; Välimäki, Tarja; Palovaara, Marjo; Kankkunen, Päivi

    2017-09-01

    knowledgeable and enthusiastic about issues related to older people must teach gerontological nursing courses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Nurses' Occupational Trauma Exposure, Resilience, and Coping Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sherry Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Nursing education courses and professional development (PD) do not include coping and resilience training for registered nurses (RNs) who work in emergency departments (EDs). Exposure to traumatic events, death, and dying may lead to health issues, substance abuse, stress symptoms, nursing staff turnover, and compassion fatigue among ED RNs.…

  15. Life History and Zimbabwean Nursing Student: "Global Boarder"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Sue

    2005-01-01

    A considerable number of students undertaking pre-registration nurse education in the UK are international students from Zimbabwe. The traditional strength of nursing education in Zimbabwe itself has been the large labour pool available for recruitment into the programmes. However, the numbers of recruits to UK nursing courses from Zimbabwe…

  16. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as advanced practice nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification ... NP training emphasizes disease prevention, reduction of health risks, and thorough patient education. Like doctors, NPs are ...

  17. Restraint reduction in a nursing home and its impact on employee attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundel, M; Garrett, R M; Horn, R D

    1994-04-01

    To reduce physical restraint use in a nursing home and increase employee support for the restraint-reduction program. A one-group pretest-posttest design with repeated measures was used to determine changes in restraint use with participants over a 14-month interval. All individuals employed at the nursing home were surveyed at two time periods to determine their opinions on restraint use. A 265-bed private, non-profit nursing home in Dallas, Texas. A restrained cohort of 170 residents with a mean age of 84 years; 84% were female. A total of 182 employees participated in the first survey and 209 in the second. Formation of a project team that planned and supervised restraint removal. Inservice training on restraint use was conducted for all employees. Type and frequency of restraint use among the restrained cohort at four evaluation points within a 14-month interval. The frequency of restraint use in the nursing home population was also recorded. Survey measures included employee responses to a 16-item closed-end questionnaire before and after training. The mean number of restraints used with each resident in the restrained cohort decreased from 1.56 to 0.67. The number of residents on restraints in the nursing home was reduced during the course of the study (67.5% vs. 36.7%, P reduction program in a nursing home can produce positive results in terms of decreased restraint use and supportive employee attitudes. More practical alternatives to restraints need to be developed for application in the training of nursing home employees. Future studies on resident, employee, and family attitudes about restraint use are suggested.

  18. The Trajectory of Professional Education of the Nursing Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Regina Ulian Manzato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the technical courses offered in Brazil, the field of nursing corresponds to 49.6% of the healthcare sector. From this total, 57% are Nursing Assistant courses. The formation of mid-level human resources has been discussed by nursing teachers and by the institutions that offer nursing-professional training, with special emphasis on the issues related to the quality of technical courses. In this context, a brief historical review of Brazilian legislation on the education and practice of these professionals, including regulations related to this education and to professional nursing practice, is presented chronologically in this paper, examining the laws and the political factors that contributed to guide the trajectory and evolution of professional Nursing Assistant Education. A comparison of the offer of mid-level courses in the field of healthcare and the quantitative of workers reveals the dimensions of Education Institutions' challenge for health sector.

  19. Mobile Augmented Reality as Usability to Enhance Nurse Prevent Violence Learning Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Han-Jen; Weng, Wei-Kai; Chou, Yung-Lang; Huang, Pin-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Violence in hospitals, nurses are at high risk of patient's aggression in the workplace. This learning course application Mobile Augmented Reality to enhance nurse to prevent violence skill. Increasingly, mobile technologies introduced and integrated into classroom teaching and clinical applications. Improving the quality of learning course and providing new experiences for nurses.

  20. Teaching Professionalism in Nursing: A Quantitative Survey of Beginning Student Nurse Perceptions of Professional Values Interpreted within a Leadership Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrao, Jocelyn J.

    2016-01-01

    The researcher designed this quantitative dissertation research to explore the perceptions of beginning nursing students toward professionalism in nursing, specific to professional values within the context of curriculum delivery for a leadership and management course in one baccalaureate nursing program. In addition, the researcher reviewed the…

  1. Nursing Informatics Competencies Among Nursing Students and Their Relationship to Patient Safety Competencies: Knowledge, Attitude, and Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdrbo, Amany Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    With implementation of information technology in healthcare settings to promote safety and evidence-based nursing care, a growing emphasis on the importance of nursing informatics competencies has emerged. This study assessed the relationship between nursing informatics and patient safety competencies among nursing students and nursing interns. A descriptive, cross-sectional correlational design with a convenience sample of 154 participants (99 nursing students and 55 interns) completed the Self-assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies and Patient Safety Competencies. The nursing students and interns were similar in age and years of computer experience, and more than half of the participants in both groups had taken a nursing informatics course. There were no significant differences between competencies in nursing informatics and patient safety except for clinical informatics role and applied computer skills in the two groups of participants. Nursing informatics competencies and patient safety competencies were significantly correlated except for clinical informatics role both with patient safety knowledge and attitude. These results provided feedback to adjust and incorporate informatics competencies in the baccalaureate program and to recommend embracing the nursing informatics course as one of the core courses, not as an elective course, in the curriculum.

  2. Repeated causal decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmayer, York; Meder, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Many of our decisions refer to actions that have a causal impact on the external environment. Such actions may not only allow for the mere learning of expected values or utilities but also for acquiring knowledge about the causal structure of our world. We used a repeated decision-making paradigm to examine what kind of knowledge people acquire in such situations and how they use their knowledge to adapt to changes in the decision context. Our studies show that decision makers' behavior is strongly contingent on their causal beliefs and that people exploit their causal knowledge to assess the consequences of changes in the decision problem. A high consistency between hypotheses about causal structure, causally expected values, and actual choices was observed. The experiments show that (a) existing causal hypotheses guide the interpretation of decision feedback, (b) consequences of decisions are used to revise existing causal beliefs, and (c) decision makers use the experienced feedback to induce a causal model of the choice situation even when they have no initial causal hypotheses, which (d) enables them to adapt their choices to changes of the decision problem. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Development of a blended model of teaching and learning for nursing students on rostered placement to ensure competence in information and communication technology for professional practice in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creedon, Sile A; Cummins, Ann Maria

    2012-05-01

    Experiences gained from delivering a Health Informatics for Nurses course in a school of nursing and midwifery in a university teaching hospital in Ireland suggest that Web-based courses may facilitate an enhanced understanding of course content. Nursing education must recognize the importance of information and communication technology in nursing to prepare the nursing and midwifery profession to embrace current advances in information and communication technology in healthcare in Ireland, and ultimately to benefit patient care.

  4. Development of a Modularized and Mediated Course Design in Altered Physiological Systems: An Exercise in Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garten, Edward D.

    An innovative, off-campus course offered by the nursing department at Moorhead State University in Minnesota is described. The course was implemented to meet the requirements of nursing students living in rural towns located some distance from the university department of nursing. This curriculum innovation is examined as a change process that was…

  5. Transformation of admission interview to documentation for nursing practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højskov, Ida E; Glasdam, Stinne

    2014-01-01

    's preconception of how to live a good life, with or without disease. Often, the patient tended to become an object in the nurse's report. It is concluded that in practice, the applied documentation system, VIPS, comes to act as the framework for what is important to the nurse to document rather than a tool......The admission interview is usually the first structured meeting between patient and nurse. The interview serves as the basis for personalised nursing and care planning and is the starting point for the clinic's documentation of the patient and his course of treatment. In this way, admission...... interviews constitute a basis for reporting by each nurse on the patient to nursing colleagues. This study examined how, by means of the admission interview, nurses constructed written documentation of the patient and his course of treatment for use by fellow nurses. A qualitative case study inspired...

  6. English course

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next sessions will take place: From 3rd October 2011 to beginning of February 2012 (break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. 70896. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 3rd October 2011 to beginning of February 2012 (break at Christmas). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. 70896. Writing Professional Documents in English - Administrative Wr...

  7. Language Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) More details Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good le...

  8. NEW COURSES

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Hands-on Training Support for the Windows 2000 Migration Please note that the set of hands-on courses listed below has been added to the Technical Training Programme to support the labwide migration to Windows 2000. If there is enough demand it is planned to organise sessions throughout the summer period. Anyone interested is asked to register for the course(s) of their choice by accessing the web course description from : http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/Welcome.html As soon as a minimum number of applications have been received dates will be fixed and published in the weekly bulletin and on the web. Please note that in order to get maximum benefit from these courses it is important to have Windows 2000 installed on your computer either before or immediately after you attend the session. People who do not have access to a Windows 2000 PC are strongly recommended to plan their training to coincide with the migration of their PC. A migration plan has been prepared in agreement with the NICE 2000 divisiona...

  9. French courses

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 2nd May to 6th July 2012. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister.   Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 2nd May to 6th July 2012.   Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 2nd May to ...

  10. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 5 May to 11 July 2014. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://hr-training.web.cern.ch/hr-training/ or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch). Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 5 May to 11 July 2014. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session...

  11. French courses

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July 2013. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch). Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July 2013. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July...

  12. Tangled ruptures: discursive changes in Danish psychiatric nursing 1965-75

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, N

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing and psychiatric nurses have been referred to in various ways over the course of history. These articulations reflect and constitute the ways in which nursing is comprehended during specific periods. A rupture in these descriptions and conceptions of Danish psychiatric nursing ...

  13. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  14. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  15. Entrepreneurship Course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    +++++++ Turn your idea into a company +++++++ Starting date: Thursday 23 October 2003 Timing: Every Thursday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Venue: University of Geneva, Sciences II Duration: 1 semester Registration: http://www.startupcafe.ch/learn More Information: info@createswitzerland.ch Deadline to submit the application: 10 October 2003. Check the CREATE website for alternative dates and venues. The course is restricted to 30 pre-selected participants. The course covers important aspects of launching a business from initial idea to growth and international expansion and addresses two kind of skills requested to start a high tech company which are divided into personal skills (entrepreneur skills) and those to start a company (Start-up tools). The 14 week course is free of charge. For any question, please, contact Ilias.Goulas@cern.ch from the Technology Transfer Group (http://cern.ch/ttdb).

  16. Presentation Skills Workshops for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinn, S.; Kenyon, M.

    2002-01-01

    Workshops were held to prepare nurses (n=87) to present results of professional activities. One year after the course, 20 had made oral and 30 written presentations. The workshops increased their confidence and were considered practical, informal, and nonthreatening. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  17. [The application of creative thinking teaching in nursing education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Chang, Ching-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Lin; Sheu, Sheila

    2010-04-01

    Nursing education is increasingly expected to cultivate nursing student creative abilities in line with general Ministry of Education promotion of greater creativity within education and the greater leeway for creativity won domestically for nurses by professional nursing organizations. Creative thinking has been named by education experts in the United States as the third most important goal of nursing education. However, nursing students in Taiwan have been shown to test lower in terms of creativity than students enrolled in business management. Leaders in nursing education should consider methods by which to improve the creative thinking capabilities of nursing students. Articles in the literature indicate that courses in creative studies are concentrated in the field of education, with few designed specifically for nursing. The teaching of constructing creative thinking is particularly weak in the nursing field. The purpose of this article was to review literature on education and nursing in order to explore current definitions, teaching strategies, and evaluation approaches related to creativity, and to develop a foundation for teaching creativity in nursing. The authors hope that an appropriate creative thinking course for nursing students may be constructed by referencing guidance provided in this in order to further cultivate creative thinking abilities in nursing students that will facilitate their application of creative thinking in their future clinical practicum.

  18. Nursing 450: The History and Physical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Lynn

    A description is provided of a third-year registered nursing course entitled "The History and Physical," designed to help the student acquire knowledge and skills in the areas of taking the history of an individual and physical assessment. The opening sections present information on course prerequisites, grading procedures, and meeting times;…

  19. Gaming in Nursing Education: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pront, Leeanne; Müller, Amanda; Koschade, Adam; Hutton, Alison

    The aim of this research was to investigate videogame-based learning in nursing education and establish how videogames are currently employed and how they link to the development of decision-making, motivation, and other benefits. Although digital game-based learning potentially offers a safe and convenient environment that can support nursing students developing essential skills, nurse educators are typically slow to adopt such resources. A comprehensive search of electronic databases was conducted, followed by a thematic analysis of the literature. Evaluations of identified games found generally positive results regarding usability and effectiveness of videogames in nursing education. Analysis of advantages of videogames in nursing education identified potential benefits for decision-making, motivation, repeated exposure, logistical, and financial value. Despite the paucity of games available and the methodological limitations identified, findings provide evidence to support the potential effectiveness of videogames as a learning resource in nursing education.

  20. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julie

    2016-08-02

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and prioritise care delivery effectively. This article explores the need for assertiveness skills in this role in response to Australian research, and outlines the pedagogic interventions implemented during the SPQ DN course to enhance this skill. Assertiveness scores were monitored for the duration of the course and demonstrated a significant increase-a topic that is now the subject of a future, funded study.

  1. Course Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    2015-01-01

    Welcome to your first DESIGN course: ‘Mapping Meals and their Spaces’. I hope you are ready to learn about the emerging discipline of Food Design and the so‐called “Design Thinking” perspective, as well as how to implement the interdisciplinary knowledge characterizing your new education Integrated...

  2. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses: The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. Oral Expression: This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. Writing professional documents in French: These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. Cours d'anglais général et professionnel: La prochaine session se déroulera du 7 octobre 2013 au 31 janvier 2014 (interruption à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Oral Expression: F...

  3. Course Layout

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    present roll Presentation roll Interactive Media Element This is an interactive diagram of a MATLAB course layout covering 16 topics in 4 different main areas: Basics of MATLAB, Numerical Methods in MATLAB, Symbolic Manipulations in MATLAB, Mathematical Modeling in MATLAB and Simulink AE2440 Introduction to Digital Computation

  4. Language Courses

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 week's break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 week's break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-play, etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to e...

  5. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next...

  6. A writing intensive introductory course for RN to BSN students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesh, Anita S; Hyde, Yolanda M; Kautz, Donald D

    2014-01-01

    This article describes learning strategies used with RN to BSN students in their 1st nursing course to successfully learn how to write formal papers using the American Psychological Association (APA) format. This 1st nursing course, a writing intensive, requires 4 short papers with self, peer, and teacher critiques and opportunities to rewrite. Students learn the style of professional nursing discourse, mastery of APA format, and development of additional skills in following directions and in critiquing their own work. An additional benefit is to enhance learning about professional nursing topics. By mastering writing skills in this initial course, students are able to successfully complete writing assignments in future courses and, in some cases, move on to publication.

  7. Film repeats in radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwan, A. Z.; Al-Shakharah, A. I

    1997-01-01

    During a one year period, 4910 radiographs of 55780 films were repeated. The objective of our study was to analyse and to classify the causes in order to minimize the repeats, cut the expenses and to provide optimal radiographs for accurate diagnosis. Analysis of the different factors revealed that, 43.6% of film repeats in our service were due to faults in exposure factors, centering comprises 15.9% of the repeats, while too much collimation was responsible for 7.6% of these repeats. All of which can be decreased by awareness and programmed training of technicians. Film blurring caused by patient motion was also responsible for 4.9% for radiographs reexamination, which can be minimized by detailed explanation to the patient and providing the necessary privacy. Fogging of X-Ray films by improper storage or inadequate handling or processing faults were responsible for 14.5% in repeats in our study. Methods and criteria for proper storage and handling of films were discussed. Recommendation for using modern day-light and laser processor has been high lighted. Artefacts are noticeably high in our cases, due to spinal dresses and frequent usage of precious metals for c osmotic purposes in this part of the world. The repeated films comprise 8.8% of all films We conclude that, the main factor responsible for repeats of up to 81.6% of cases was the technologists, thus emphasizing the importance of adequate training of the technologists. (authors). 15 refs., 9 figs., 1 table

  8. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  9. Repeated Prescribed Burning in Aspen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Perala

    1974-01-01

    Infrequent burning weather, low flammability of the aspen-hardwood association, and prolific sprouting and seeding of shrubs and hardwoods made repeated dormant season burning a poor tool to convert good site aspen to conifers. Repeat fall burns for wildlife habitat maintenance is workable if species composition changes are not important.

  10. Nurses stand by, on standby

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    Nursing profession consists of never-ending diagnostic work and she has to treat smells, visual cues and noises from people and machines as being potentially relevant next attention and action spaces A nurse needs to have a broad perspective on the daily routines: which patient is next in line...... for surgery, does any colleague need assistance, and so on. To do this diagnostic work, nurses move within and between different hospital spaces and, at the same time, their level of attention (Norris, 2004) shifts between local, often occasioned, sites of engagement (Scollon & Scollon, 2004) or contextual...... configurations (Goodwin, 2000) and more overall activities (that are, of course, also accomplished locally). In the professional literature, this alertness is often ‘hidden’ in the definition of nursing as a symbiosis of communication, ethics for the patient and technical skills. With this study we want to fill...

  11. Tevatron serial data repeater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducar, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    A ten megabit per second serial data repeater system has been developed for the 6.28km Tevatron accelerator. The repeaters are positioned at each of the thirty service buildings and accommodate control and abort system communications as well as distribution of the Tevatron time and energy clocks. The repeaters are transparent to the particular protocol of the transmissions. Serial data are encoded locally as unipolar two volt signals employing the self-clocking Manchester Bi-Phase code. The repeaters modulate the local signals to low-power bursts of 50 MHz rf carrier for the 260m transmission between service buildings. The repeaters also demodulate the transmission and restructure the data for local utilization. The employment of frequency discrimination techniques yields high immunity to the characteristic noise spectrum

  12. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  13. Repeatability of visual acuity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasch, T W; Bailey, I L; Bullimore, M A

    1998-05-01

    This study investigates features of visual acuity chart design and acuity testing scoring methods which affect the validity and repeatability of visual acuity measurements. Visual acuity was measured using the Sloan and British Standard letter series, and Landolt rings. Identifiability of the different letters as a function of size was estimated, and expressed in the form of frequency-of-seeing curves. These functions were then used to simulate acuity measurements with a variety of chart designs and scoring criteria. Systematic relationships exist between chart design parameters and acuity score, and acuity score repeatability. In particular, an important feature of a chart, that largely determines the repeatability of visual acuity measurement, is the amount of size change attributed to each letter. The methods used to score visual acuity performance also affect repeatability. It is possible to evaluate acuity score validity and repeatability using the statistical principles discussed here.

  14. Nursing informatics and nursing ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer

    2013-01-01

    All healthcare visions, including that of The TIGER (Technology-Informatics-Guiding-Educational-Reform) Initiative envisage a crucial role for nursing. However, its 7 descriptive pillars do not address the disconnect between Nursing Informatics and Nursing Ethics and their distinct communities......-of-(care)-decision. Increased pressure for translating 'evidence-based' research findings into 'ethically-sound', 'value-based' and 'patient-centered' practice requires rethinking the model implicit in conventional knowledge translation and informatics practice in all disciplines, including nursing. The aim is to aid 'how...... nurses and other health care scientists more clearly identify clinical and other relevant data that can be captured to inform future comparative effectiveness research. 'A prescriptive, theory-based discipline of '(Nursing) Decisionics' expands the Grid for Volunteer Development of TIGER's newly launched...

  15. [Occupational nursing specialization: proposed change of paradigm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, M Y

    1998-01-01

    The course of Labour Nursing aimed at preparing nurses for companies security and workers health. It started in 1974 as a result of the efforts of DESP/EEAN/UFRJ and ABEn close to the Ministry of Labour in Rio de Janeiro and based on the Resolution 112/59--OMS/OIT. Later, this course was spread out to other Universities and Brazil's regions and 13 courses have been provided until 1985. In the beginning, the courses follwed the orientation and control of FUNDACENTRO, until 1996 and were directed to the industry. From this time on, these courses register was sent to CORENs and accomplished independently at Nursing Schools, based on Resolution 12/86--MEC, Rec. 161/93--OIT. Instructions from the Ministry of Labour and Ministry of Health. At the EEAN, up to 1995, 11 Specialisation Courses have been accomplished, based on ANENT orientations and fundamental by the subjects: Scientific Investigation Methodology, Methodology of Nursing Teaching and Education for Health; Worker's Health Politics; Labour Organisational and Social Sciences; Environment Sanitation; Work Safety and Hygiene and Human Ecology; Ergonomy; Labour Process; Occupational Risks; Labour Accidents and Illnesses; Labour Legislation; Labour Nursing; Technical Visits and Practice in Workers Health Services at Companies Programmes and Public Health. The course enables nurses of essential, educative, managing and investigative activities and their formation culminates with a dissertation that has as a study object, emerging problems of nursing practice for workers. This programme has been studied by the author herself aiming at a better adjustment for these professionals insertion into the work market.

  16. Communication competencies of oncology nurses in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskor, Nor Aida; Krauss, Steven Eric; Muhamad, Mazanah; Nik Mahmood, Nik Hasnaa

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on part of a large study to identify competencies of oncology nurses in Malaysia. It focuses on oncology nurses' communications-related competency. As an important cancer care team member, oncology nurses need to communicate effectively with cancer patients. Literature shows that poor communication can make patients feel anxious, uncertain and generally not satisfied with their nurses' care. This paper deliberates on the importance of effective communication by oncology nurses in the context of a public hospital. Four focus group discussions were used in this study with 17 oncology/cancer care nurses from Malaysian public hospitals. The main inclusion criterion was that the nurses had to have undergone a post-basic course in oncology, or have work experience as a cancer care nurse. The findings indicated that nurses do communicate with their patients, patients' families and doctors to provide information about the disease, cancer treatment, disease recurrence and side effects. Nurses should have good communication skills in order to build relationships as well as to provide quality services to their patients. The paper concludes by recommending how oncology nursing competencies can be improved.

  17. Engaging Nursing Students: Integrating Evidence-Based Inquiry, Informatics, and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiffer, Melanie R

    2017-12-05

    The nursing research class requires faculty to create a spirit of inquiry while integrating technology, flexibility, and responsiveness to student needs. This article discusses new pedagogies to actively engage students in the evidence-based nursing process and the achievement of course learning outcomes. Through course exemplar, the author demonstrates a creative method to engage traditional baccalaureate nursing students in a nursing project that links evidence to improved patient outcomes.

  18. Nursing students' attitudes about home health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestia, Mindy; Murphy, Susan; Yoder, Marian

    2008-09-01

    In an effort to address the home care nursing shortage, this pilot study was designed to measure nursing students' attitudes toward home health nursing and to test the Home Health Attitude Questionnaire developed specifically for this study based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Senior undergraduate nursing students and registered nursing to bachelor of science in nursing students completed the questionnaire.

  19. Fostering nursing ethics for practical nursing

    OpenAIRE

    森田, 敏子; モリタ, トシコ; Morita, Toshiko

    2014-01-01

    Higher nursing ethics can raise nursing quality. The author attempts to define theproblem from the seedling of sensibility in practical nursing and focuses on the clinical environment surrounding nursing ethics from its pedagogical and historicalaspects. On the basis of these standpoints, the author discusses issues on the practical nursing as a practitioner of nursing ethics.

  20. Aderência dos Cursos de Graduação em Enfermagem às Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais Adherencia de los Cursos de Pregrado en Enfermería a las Pautas Curriculares Nacionales Adherece of Nursing Graduation Courses to the National Curricular Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lopes Neto

    2007-12-01

    una mejor vinculación entre las bases epistemológicas presentes en las DCN/ENF y las propuestas en los PPC/ENF.The objective of this study was to evaluate the adherence of the Pedagogic Projects of Nursing Graduation Courses (PPC/ENF to the National Guidelines for the Curriculum of Nursing Graduation Courses (DCN/ENF. It was a descriptive study that compared the information obtained from the reports of the PPC/ENF and the proposals of DCN/ENF, using data collected by INEP/MEC and made available for this study. The data base consisted of all reports from 110 nursing graduation courses that were seeking accreditation or renewal between 2002 and 2006. Sixty aspects of the evaluation were selected and 10. The study reports that the rate of adherence of the nursing courses to the DCN/ENF guidelines was low, 72%. These findings indicate there is a need for nursing courses/schools to adjust the epistemological bases of the DCN/ENF to the proposals of PPC/ENF.

  1. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standards Nursing Quality Ethics / Genetics & Genomics Code of Ethics Workplace Safety / Safe Patient Handling Needlestick Prevention Environmental Health Policy & Advocacy / Take Action Position Statements Member ...

  2. Back to the future: A practice led transition program from Assistant in Nursing to Enrolled Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faithfull-Byrne, Annette; Thompson, Lorraine; Welch, Tony; Williamson, Moira; Schafer, Keppel; Hallinan, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Continuing professional development is an essential element in professional nursing practice. In our Hospital and Health service, a gap in existing nursing pathways was identified for Assistants in Nursing (AINs), who wished to further their career in nursing and progress to Enrolled Nurse (EN). There is also little in the literature that addresses Assistants in Nursing wishing to progress their career to Enrolled Nurses. This article describes a quality improvement project designed to address this gap. The project was a collaborative venture between a Queensland Hospital and Health Service and an Institute of Tertiary and Further Education (TAFE). The focus was on creating a flexible career path for Assistants in Nursing, wishing to become Enrolled Nurses. The project resulted in the Diploma of Nursing program (theory and practice) being delivered within the hospital setting by nurse educators and clinical nurse consultants. This is unusual in that the program is normally delivered in the tertiary setting, by academic staff from the Institute of Further Education. Program implementation is described along with the challenges encountered. Outcomes from the project were: 78% completion rate; 100% employment on completion of their course of study; and 18% progressing to further their education such as Advance Enrolled Nurse or Registered Nurse. Student satisfaction regarding the program was also positive. The initiative established a local career path for Assistants in Nursing wishing to progress to Enrolled Nurse. This quality project demonstrates that collaborative ventures between the tertiary sector and hospital and health services, can create innovative flexible solutions for staff wishing to further their career in nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrating YouTube into the nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharoff, Leighsa

    2011-08-17

    Nurse educators need to be innovative, stimulating, and engaging as they teach future nursing professionals. The use of YouTube in nursing education classes provides an easy, innovative, and user-friendly way to engage today's nursing students. YouTube presentations can be easily adapted into nursing courses at any level, be it a fundamentals course for undergraduate students or a theoretical foundations course for graduate students. In this article I will provide information to help educators effectively integrate YouTube into their course offerings. I will start by reviewing the phenomenon of social networking. Next I will discuss challenges and strategies related to YouTube learning experiences, after which I will share some of the legal considerations in using YouTube. I will conclude by describing how to engage students via YouTube and current research related to YouTube.

  4. Nurse prescribing in Spain: The law and the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Collado, Angel; Raurell-Torreda, Marta; Zabaleta-Del-Olmo, Edurne; Rascon-Hernan, Carolina; Homs-Romero, Erica

    2017-09-01

    In this cross-sectional study, we explored course content related to pharmacology and/or healthcare products and supplies in all nursing degree programs in Spain. Changes in nurse-prescribing legislation in Spain require that nurses take a certification course before prescribing over-the-counter products and medications. Using a cross-sectional descriptive study, between July and September 2014, the degree programs of all centers that offer a degree in nursing in Spain were examined, selecting those with course information available online. All centers offered at least one pharmacology course. One-third of the required courses had content related to pharmacology and healthcare products/supplies. The analysis showed that the course content and training received during the current nursing degree program provides the knowledge and skills needed to prescribe healthcare products/supplies and medications that do not now require a doctor's prescription, without the need for additional training and certification. It is essential that government regulation of nursing education be aligned with nursing competencies, curriculum standards, clinical practice, and evidence-based research to provide the maximum level of confidence for nursing professionals and their patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Who will educate our nurses? A strategy to address the nurse faculty shortage in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerolamo, Angela M; Overcash, Amy; McGovern, Jennifer; Roemer, Grace; Bakewell-Sachs, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The nurse faculty shortage hampers the capacity of the nursing workforce to respond to the demands of the evolving health care system. As a strategy to address the shortage in New Jersey, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation implemented the New Jersey Nursing Initiative Faculty Preparation Program to prepare nurses for the faculty role. This article highlights program implementation successes and challenges, scholar and faculty perceptions of the program, and provides recommendations for others interested in preparing nurse faculty. This evaluation uses data from scholar surveys and focus groups, interviews with grantees, and grantee reports. Findings suggest that a program that includes generous monetary support, socialization to the nurse faculty role, and formal education courses produces graduates who readily assume a faculty position and are committed to at least a part-time career in nursing education. This evaluation emphasizes the need to carefully design programs that integrate faculty preparation and advanced clinical training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Learning styles of registered nurses enrolled in an online nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Technological advances assist in the proliferation of online nursing programs which meet the needs of the working nurse. Understanding online learning styles permits universities to adequately address the educational needs of the professional nurse returning for an advanced degree. The purpose of this study was to describe the learning styles of registered nurses (RNs) enrolled in an online master's nursing program or RN-bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) program. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. Kolb's learning style inventory (Version 3.1) was completed by 217 RNs enrolled in online courses at a Southeastern university. Descriptive statistical procedures were used for analysis. Thirty-one percent of the nurses were accommodators, 20% were assimilators, 19% were convergers, and 20% were divergers. Accommodators desire hand-on experiences, carrying out plans and tasks and using an intuitive trial-and-error approach to problem solving. The learning styles of the RNs were similar to the BSN students in traditional classroom settings. Despite their learning style, nurses felt that the online program met their needs. Implementing the technological innovations in nursing education requires the understanding of the hands-on learning of the RN so that the development of the online courses will satisfactorily meet the needs of the nurses who have chosen an online program. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of repeated measures data

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M Ataharul

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad range of statistical techniques to address emerging needs in the field of repeated measures. It also provides a comprehensive overview of extensions of generalized linear models for the bivariate exponential family of distributions, which represent a new development in analysing repeated measures data. The demand for statistical models for correlated outcomes has grown rapidly recently, mainly due to presence of two types of underlying associations: associations between outcomes, and associations between explanatory variables and outcomes. The book systematically addresses key problems arising in the modelling of repeated measures data, bearing in mind those factors that play a major role in estimating the underlying relationships between covariates and outcome variables for correlated outcome data. In addition, it presents new approaches to addressing current challenges in the field of repeated measures and models based on conditional and joint probabilities. Markov models of first...

  8. Repeated DNA sequences in fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, S K

    1974-11-01

    Several fungal species, representatives of all broad groups like basidiomycetes, ascomycetes and phycomycetes, were examined for the nature of repeated DNA sequences by DNA:DNA reassociation studies using hydroxyapatite chromatography. All of the fungal species tested contained 10 to 20 percent repeated DNA sequences. There are approximately 100 to 110 copies of repeated DNA sequences of approximately 4 x 10/sup 7/ daltons piece size of each. Repeated DNA sequence homoduplexes showed on average 5/sup 0/C difference of T/sub e/50 (temperature at which 50 percent duplexes dissociate) values from the corresponding homoduplexes of unfractionated whole DNA. It is suggested that a part of repetitive sequences in fungi constitutes mitochondrial DNA and a part of it constitutes nuclear DNA. (auth)

  9. Primeira década do curso de enfermagem na Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora: 1979 -1989 Primera década del curso de enfermería en la Universidad Federal de Juiz de Fora: 1979-1989 First decade of the nursing course at Federal University of Juiz de Fora: 1979-1989

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Pinto de Jesus

    2012-06-01

    course was established at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora in 1979 with the incorporation of the social delegation at the School of Nursing Hermantina Beraldo. This study of social-historical approach aimed to discuss nursing formation in the first decade (1979 a 1989 after the creation of the nursing graduation course at Federal University of Juiz de Fora. The primary sources were composed by archived documents and testimonies from teachers who went through this historic moment. The data were collected in 2009, organized and classified in accordance with the historical method to light of Pierre Bourdieu's theory. The data analysis allowed evidence the strategically actions by the nursing teachers interested in preserving the characteristics of the Nursing School teaching Hermantina Beraldo in the first decade of course establishment at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora.

  10. Curso de Enfermagem da Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora: 1977-1979 Curso de Enfermería de la Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora: 1977-1979 The Nursing Course of Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora: 1977-1979

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Aparecida Gonçalves Figueiredo

    2009-08-01

    which determined the creation of Nursing Course of the Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora. Primary source: written documents and oral testimony. The results discussion was guided by Pierre Bourdieu. In the 1970's, Education Ministry Department of University Subjects undertook efforts to create nursing courses in federal universities. As the process of negotiation meant to incorporate Hermantina Beraldo Nursing College to Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora failed, in 1978 a Department of Nursing was bind to UFJF Medical College and, in 1970, the Nursing Course of this same university started functioning.

  11. The Effects of Teacher Collective Responsibility on the Mathematics Achievement of Students Who Repeat Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Chicas, Jessica; Agger, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors use the national High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) dataset to explore (a) if repeating algebra in the eighth grade was associated with overall mathematics grades and course-taking patterns by twelfth grade, (b) if repeating algebra in the eighth grade was associated with students' final grade in algebra,…

  12. [A Study of the Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Competence of Nurses and Its Clinical Applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Huang, Ya-Hsuan

    2015-10-01

    Nurses must develop competence in evidence-based nursing in order to provide the best practice medical care to patients. Evidence-based nursing uses issue identification, data mining, and information consolidation from the related medical literature to help nurses find the best evidence. Therefore, for medical institutions to provide quality clinical care, it is necessary for nurses to develop competence in evidence-based nursing. This study aims to explore the effect of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course, as a form of educational intervention, on the development of evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice in nurse participants. Further the competence of these nurses in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice. This quasi-experimental study used a pre-post test design with a single group of participants. A convenience sample of 34 nurses from a municipal hospital in northern Taiwan received 8 hours of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course over a two-week period. Participants were asked to complete four questionnaires before and after the intervention. The questionnaires measured the participants' basic demographics, experience in mining the medical literature, evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, outcome expectations of evidence-based practice, competence in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice, and learning satisfaction. Collected data was analyzed using paired t, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and McNemar tests to measure the differences among participants' evidence-based nursing knowledge and practice activities before and after the workshop. The nurses demonstrated significantly higher scores from pre-test to post-test in evidence-based nursing knowledge II, self-efficacy in evidence-based nursing practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice

  13. Principles and practices of social entrepreneurship for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Mattia J

    2013-11-01

    Although social justice and action for change are among the nursing profession's core values, curricular content on social entrepreneurship for nurses is not as well developed as it is in the educational programs for students in business, engineering, or public policy. This article describes an undergraduate honors elective course in social entrepreneurship offered at New York University College of Nursing. The course uses a seminar format and incorporates content from the humanities, business, and service-learning, with the goal of promoting participants' understanding of the sources of inequality in the United States and providing the requisite skills to promote effective nursing action for social change. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Memória da implantação da graduação em enfermagem na Unicamp Memoria de la implantación del curso de graduación en enfermería en la Universidad de Campinas Creation memory of the nursing undergraduate course at the University of Campinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Martins Zulske

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se reconstituir a história de implantação da Graduação em Enfermagem na Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, ocorrida em 1978, através de história oral, pela insuficiência de fontes documentais pertinentes. Enfermeiros que participaram direta e ativamente nesse processo foram os sujeitos de pesquisa. A faculdade de enfermagem, legalmente prevista desde 1966, nunca foi efetivada. Para responder à mínima organização necessária, instituiu-se apenas um Departamento de Enfermagem, quatro anos após o início do curso. O interesse e a iniciativa de instalação do curso partiu de um enfermeiro titulado, externo à universidade, contratado especificamente para esse fim. Este fato explica a marca pessoal, pouco institucional, que caracterizou, de forma predominante, o momento de instalação e a continuidade desse curso.El objetivo de este artículo es reconstituir la implantación de la graduación en enferemería de la Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, de la Universidad Estadual de Campinas, que ocurrió en 1978, por medio de la historia hablada, por no haber fuentes documentales pertinentes. Los enfermeros que participaron directa y activamente en ese proceso fueron los sujetos de la pesquisa. La Facultad de Enfermería, legalmente prevista desde 1966, nunca fue efectivada. Para responder a la mínima organización necesaria, solamente se instituyó un Departamento de Enfermería, cuatro años después del inicio del curso. El interés y la iniciativa de la instalación del curso ocurrió por un enfermero graduado, externo a la faculdad, contratado especialmente para este trabajo. Este facto explica la marca personal y no institucional, que caracterizó de manera predominante el momento de la instalación y de la continuidad de este curso.The objective of this study was to reconstitute the history of the creation of the Nursing Undergraduate Course at the Medical Sciences School, University of

  15. Fostering repeat donations in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Ofori, S; Asenso-Mensah, K; Boateng, P; Sarkodie, F; Allain, J-P

    2010-01-01

    Most African countries are challenged in recruiting and retaining voluntary blood donors by cost and other complexities and in establishing and implementing national blood policies. The availability of replacement donors who are a cheaper source of blood has not enhanced repeat voluntary donor initiatives. An overview of activities for recruiting and retaining voluntary blood donors was carried out. Donor records from mobile sessions were reviewed from 2002 to 2008. A total of 71,701 blood donations; 45,515 (63.5%) being voluntary donations with 11,680 (25%) repeat donations were collected during the study period. Donations from schools and colleges contributed a steady 60% of total voluntary whilst radio station blood drives increased contribution from 10 to 27%. Though Muslim population is less than 20%, blood collection was above the 30-donation cost-effectiveness threshold with a repeat donation trend reaching 60%. In contrast Christian worshippers provided donations. Repeat donation trends amongst school donors and radio blood drives were 20% and 70% respectively. Repeat donations rates have been variable amongst different blood donor groups in Kumasi, Ghana. The impact of community leaders in propagating altruism cannot be overemphasized. Programs aiming at motivating replacement donors to be repeat donors should be developed and assessed. Copyright 2009 The International Association for Biologicals. All rights reserved.

  16. New forms of nurse teacher preparation 1989-1992 : Development and evaluation.

    OpenAIRE

    Race, Angela J.

    1995-01-01

    Radical reform of the arrangements for pre-registration nurse education and the recommendation that nurse teaching become a graduate profession prompted a reappraisal of the arrangements for nurse teacher preparation. This thesis reports an evaluation of a new form of preparation for nurse teaching. The new courses were intended to combine advanced study of nursing with educational theory and practice, and led to an honours degree and a teaching qualification recordable on the professional re...

  17. Learning Opportunities for Nurses Working within Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Solveig

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore home care nurses' experience of learning in a multicultural environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study was based on qualitative research design. Data were collected through repeated interviews with registered home care nurses working in a multicultural area. The data were analyzed through a…

  18. Nurse education. A fair assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutliffe, J; Mackay, R

    We believe that ward-based assessors are integral to good nurse education. The higher the quality of assessor, the better the standard of student produced. Of course, this ultimately improves the quality of patient care. As skills, attitudes and knowledge in nursing are continually evaluated and updated, so, too, should practices of assessment. If we bear in mind the following statement by Cox et al. we believe we will not go far wrong: 'The teacher must be seen to cherish what he transmits, to gain strength and status from it, else the interchange between generations becomes ineffective and lifeless'.

  19. Naturalistic nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    Where nurse education aims to provide an overarching intellectual framework, this paper argues that it should be the framework of naturalism. After an exposition of the chief features of naturalism and its relationship to science and morality, the paper describes naturalistic nursing, contrasting it with some other perspectives. There follows a defence of naturalism and naturalistic nursing against several objections, including those concerning spirituality, religion, meaning, morality, and alternative sources of knowledge. The paper ends with some of the advantages of the naturalistic approach. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. English Course

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    Cours d'anglais général et professionnel : La prochaine session se déroulera : du 27 février au 22 juin 2012. Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tél. 70896. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 27 February to 22 June, 2012.  This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web page: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. ...

  1. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Cours d’anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera du 22 septembre au 12 décembre. Ces cours s’adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu’à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages web : http://cern.ch/Training. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 29 September to 5 December. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Writing Professional Documents in English – Administrative Writing Professional Documents in English – Technical The next session will take place from 29 September to 5 December. These courses are...

  2. English courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera du 4 mars jusqu’au 21 juin 2013. Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages web. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 4 March to 21 June 2013. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. More information here. Writing Professional Documents in English - Administrative Writing Professional Documents in English - Technical The next sessions will take place from 4 March to 21 June 2013. These courses are designed for people with a goo...

  3. Implementation and evaluation of an interprofessional simulation-based education program for undergraduate nursing students in operating room nursing education: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongmei; Shi, Nianke; Bai, Jinbing; Zheng, Yaguang; Zhao, Yue

    2015-07-09

    The present study was designed to implement an interprofessional simulation-based education program for nursing students and evaluate the influence of this program on nursing students' attitudes toward interprofessional education and knowledge about operating room nursing. Nursing students were randomly assigned to either the interprofessional simulation-based education or traditional course group. A before-and-after study of nursing students' attitudes toward the program was conducted using the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale. Responses to an open-ended question were categorized using thematic content analysis. Nursing students' knowledge about operating room nursing was measured. Nursing students from the interprofessional simulation-based education group showed statistically different responses to four of the nineteen questions in the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale, reflecting a more positive attitude toward interprofessional learning. This was also supported by thematic content analysis of the open-ended responses. Furthermore, nursing students in the simulation-based education group had a significant improvement in knowledge about operating room nursing. The integrated course with interprofessional education and simulation provided a positive impact on undergraduate nursing students' perceptions toward interprofessional learning and knowledge about operating room nursing. Our study demonstrated that this course may be a valuable elective option for undergraduate nursing students in operating room nursing education.

  4. Extending Teach and Repeat to Pivoting Wheelchairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Del Castillo

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper extends the teach-and-repeat paradigm that has been successful for the control of holonomic robots to nonholonomic wheelchairs which may undergo pivoting action over the course of their taught movement. Due to the nonholonomic nature of the vehicle kinematics, estimation is required -- in the example given herein, based upon video detection of wall-mounted cues -- both in the teaching and the tracking events. In order to accommodate motion that approaches pivoting action as well as motion that approaches straight-line action, the estimation equations of the Extended Kalman Filter and the control equations are formulated using two different definitions of a nontemporal independent variable. The paper motivates the need for pivoting action in real-life settings by reporting extensively on the abilities and limitations of estimation-based teach-and-repeat action where pivoting and near-pivoting action is disallowed. Following formulation of the equations in the near-pivot mode, the paper reports upon experiments where taught trajectories which entail a seamless mix of near-straight and near-pivot action are tracked.

  5. Developing future nurse educators through peer mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenau PA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patricia A Rosenau, Rita F Lisella, Tracey L Clancy, Lorelli S NowellFaculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanadaBackground: The nursing workforce and nursing education demographic trends reinforce the urgency to cultivate future nursing leaders, educators, and mentors. The changing realities of health care environments, involving crowded student placements, overtaxed clinical mentors and preceptors, and inexperienced staff, hamper student learning and professional development. Peer mentoring has been used successfully in nursing education to enhance student engagement and the quality of the student learning experience. Although various terms like peer mentor have been used to describe the role of senior students facilitating junior student learning, the literature is silent about how peer mentoring fosters the development of future nursing education leaders.Objectives: The aim of this study was to understand how peer mentorship fosters the development of nursing education leadership in senior undergraduate nursing students enrolled in an elective undergraduate peer-mentoring credit course, Introductory Concepts in Nursing Education and Leadership Through Peer-Led Learning.Design and method: This phenomenological study explored the development of nursing education leadership in senior undergraduate students through the analysis of critical reflections of individual senior students and online discussions between triads of senior students teaching/learning across diverse junior-level theory and practice courses.Participants: Seventeen senior undergraduate nursing students enrolled in the elective course participated in the study.Results: From the critical reflections and online discussions, four themes emerged: "developing teaching philosophies and pedagogies", "learning teaching strategies", "supportive peer relationship", and "benefits of the peer mentorship program".Conclusion: The creation and promotion of peer leadership

  6. The Availability of Education on Death and Dying: A Survey of U.S. Nursing Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, John C.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A sample of nursing schools was surveyed to determine extent and nature of current death education training. Data revealed that five percent reported offering required death courses, while 39.5 percent indicated courses were available as electives. (Author)

  7. Becoming a web-based learner: registered nurses' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atack, Lynda

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe Registered Nurses' experiences when taking a web-based course from either the workplace or home, and the impact of their learning on clinical practice. Little is known about the web-based learners' experience, particularly when courses are accessed from the nursing practice setting. Even less is known about whether nurses transfer their web-based learning to clinical practice. A qualitative design employing focus group interviews was used. Participants included hospital and community nurses from three Canadian provinces and one territory. Data were collected at three points over a 6-month period and analysed using a thematic analysis process. These findings emanate from a larger study using survey method and focus group interviews. The focus group interviews captured the hurdles nurses faced during the first weeks when they struggled with technology, re-framed their views of teaching and adjusted to web-based learning from home and work. These first stressful weeks were followed by a period during which nurses developed relationships with the teacher and peers that enabled them to focus on learning and prevented attrition. Most nurses reported the web course was convenient and that they would be interested and comfortable using technology for learning and work purposes in the future. Six weeks after the course was completed, nurses articulated a number of ways the course had improved their practice. Initial weeks in a web-based course can be very challenging for novice Internet users, however, most nurses who completed the course reported a positive learning experience. Nurses, employers and educators should evaluate computer skills, computer access and the learning environment when preparing for web-based learning.

  8. Demystifying Nursing Theory: A Christian Nursing Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Sandau, Kristin; Missal, Bernita

    How does nursing theory apply to nursing practice? Nursing theory can explain the why and how of nursing practice, guide nursing interventions, and provide a framework for measuring outcomes. This article briefly explains nursing theory, provides examples for applying theory to nursing practice, and proposes questions for examining the consistency of nursing theories with Christian perspectives. A helpful table illustrating grand, middle-range, and situation-specific theories and their application to nursing practice and research, along with references, is provided online as supplemental digital content. Three caring theories are analyzed from biblical beliefs.

  9. Safety after extended repeated use of ulipristal acetate for uterine fibroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Bart C J M; Donnez, Jacques; Bouchard, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess long term safety of extended repeated 3-month courses of ulipristal acetate (UPA) 10 mg/day, for up to 8 courses, with focus on endometrial and laboratory safety parameters. METHODS: This long-term, multi-center, open-label cohort, follow up study consisted of up to 8 consecu...

  10. The Effect of Concept Mapping on the Learning Levels of Students in Taking the Course of "Nursing Care of Patients With Glandular Diseases Subject" in Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghakhani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Studies show that traditional teaching methods, such as lecturing, do not lead to in-depth learning. Concept maps have been used for a long time by researchers and teachers to facilitate learning. Objectives The present study aimed to investigate the effect of concept mapping on the learning levels of students in nursing care of patients with glandular diseases subject in Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods In a quasi-experimental study with a pre-test/post-test design, 28 nursing students were selected and divided into two groups: the experimental and the control groups. After administration of pre-test, the students in the experimental group participated in classes on designing concept maps. Next, lessons on glands and nursing were presented to the students in the experimental and control groups through concept maps and lectures, respectively. At the end of the semester, the learning levels of the students in both groups were evaluated by the post-test. Results The means of the scores of the students as determined by results of the pre-test revealed insignificant statistical difference between the two groups. However, the learning level of the students in the experimental group was significantly higher (P < 0.05. As a metacognitive intervention, concept mapping can contribute to in-depth learning of nursing students. Conclusions According to the findings, it is recommended that concept mapping should be used for teaching and evaluation. Further studies are needed to compare the effect of concept mapping with those of other metacognition approaches on different types of learners.

  11. Effects of a blended learning module on self-reported learning performances in baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2011-11-01

    This article is a report of a quasi-experimental study of the effects of blended modules on nursing students' learning of ethics course content. There is yet to be an empirically supported mix of strategies on which a working blended learning model can be built for nursing education. This was a two-group pretest and post-test quasi-experimental study in 2008 involving a total of 233 students. Two of the five clusters were designated the experimental group to experience a blended learning model, and the rest were designated the control group to be given classroom lectures only. The Case Analysis Attitude Scale, Case Analysis Self-Evaluation Scale, Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale, and Metacognition Scale were used in pretests and post-tests for the students to rate their own performance. In this study, the experimental group did not register significantly higher mean scores on the Case Analysis Attitude Scale at post-test and higher mean ranks on the Case Analysis Self-Evaluation Scale, the Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale, and the Metacognition Scale at post-test than the control group. Moreover, the experimental group registered significant progress in the mean ranks on the Case Analysis Self-Evaluation Scale and the Metacognition Scale from pretest to post-test. No between-subjects effects of four scales at post-test were found. Newly developed course modules, be it blended learning or a combination of traditional and innovative components, should be tested repeatedly for effectiveness and popularity for the purpose of facilitating the ultimate creation of a most effective course module for nursing education. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Mentoring disadvantaged nursing students through technical writing workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Molly K; Symes, Lene; Bernard, Lillian; Landson, Margie J; Carroll, Theresa L

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a problematic gap for nursing students between terse clinical writing and formal academic writing. This gap can create a potential barrier to academic and workplace success, especially for disadvantaged nursing students who have not acquired the disciplinary conventions and sophisticated writing required in upper-level nursing courses. The authors demonstrate the need for writing-in-the-discipline activities to enhance the writing skills of nursing students, describe the technical writing workshops they developed to mentor minority and disadvantaged nursing students, and provide recommendations to stimulate educator dialogue across disciplines and institutions.

  13. Gladys Carter - an advocate of higher education for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, R I

    Gladys Carter was once well-known as an author of midwifery and nursing texts and articles. She was appointed the first Boots Scholar in Nursing Research at the University of Edinburgh in 1952. The outcome of her work, the Carter Report (unpublished) lent weight to the reform of the Nurse Tutors' course offered at that time by the RCN Scottish Board and to the establishment of the Department of Nursing Studies at the University of Edinburgh. This paper discusses the contributions made by Miss Carter to the case for higher education for nurses.

  14. Teaching statistics to nursing students: an expert panel consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Matthew J; Eckardt, Patricia; Higgins, Melinda; Kim, MyoungJin; Schmiege, Sarah J

    2013-06-01

    Statistics education is a necessary element of nursing education, and its inclusion is recommended in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing guidelines for nurse training at all levels. This article presents a cohesive summary of an expert panel discussion, "Teaching Statistics to Nursing Students," held at the 2012 Joint Statistical Meetings. All panelists were statistics experts, had extensive teaching and consulting experience, and held faculty appointments in a U.S.-based nursing college or school. The panel discussed degree-specific curriculum requirements, course content, how to ensure nursing students understand the relevance of statistics, approaches to integrating statistics consulting knowledge, experience with classroom instruction, use of knowledge from the statistics education research field to make improvements in statistics education for nursing students, and classroom pedagogy and instruction on the use of statistical software. Panelists also discussed the need for evidence to make data-informed decisions about statistics education and training for nurses. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Qualified nurses' rate new nursing graduates as lacking skills in key clinical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missen, Karen; McKenna, Lisa; Beauchamp, Alison; Larkins, Jo-Ann

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of qualified nurses on the abilities of newly registered nursing graduates to perform a variety of clinical skills. Evidence from the literature suggests that undergraduate nursing programmes do not adequately prepare nursing students to be practice-ready on completion of their nursing courses. A descriptive quantitative design was used. Participants were recruited through the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation, Victorian branch. A brief explanation of the study and a link to the survey were promoted in their monthly e-newsletter. A total of 245 qualified nurses in the state of Victoria, Australia participated in this study. A survey tool of 51 clinical skills and open-ended questions was used, whereby participants were asked to rate new nursing graduates' abilities using a 5-point Likert scale. Overall participants rated new nursing graduates' abilities for undertaking clinical skills as good or very good in 35·3% of skills, 33·3% were rated as adequate and 31·4% rated as being performed poorly or very poorly. Of concern, essential clinical skills, such as critical thinking and problem solving, working independently and assessment procedures, were found to be poorly executed and affecting new registered nurses graduates' competence. The findings from this study can further serve as a reference for nursing education providers to enhance nursing curricula and work collaboratively with healthcare settings in preparing nurses to be competent, safe practitioners on completion of their studies. Identifying key areas in which new nursing graduates are not yet competent means that educational providers and educators from healthcare settings can focus on these skills in better preparing our nurses to be work ready. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Designing courses for the Internet. A conceptual approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, K H; Ryan, M E; Siktberg, L L

    1998-01-01

    One current higher education paradigm shift is the movement from traditional classroom settings and interactive television satellite transmission to course and program delivery via the World Wide Web (WWW). The authors describe the experiences of faculty in reconceptualizing and redesigning course and program delivery via the Internet. An electronic "template" has been collaboratively developed by multidisciplinary university partners to facilitate this work. The template incorporates an advanced nursing practice conceptual framework based on American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) core educational essentials for advanced practice combined with a continuum of electronic course tools. Strategies, tools, and applications are discussed.

  17. The nurse manager: job satisfaction, the nursing shortage and retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Diane Randall; Dziegielewski, Sophia F

    2005-07-01

    A critical shortage of registered nurses exists in the United States and this shortage is expected to worsen. It is predicted that unless this issue is resolved, the demand for nursing services will exceed the supply by nearly 30% in 2020. Extensive analysis of this pending crisis has resulted in numerous recommendations to improve both recruitment and retention. The purpose of this article is to clearly outline the issues contributing to this problem, and to provide the nurse manager with information regarding specific influences on job satisfaction as it relates to job turnover and employee retention. To accomplish this, an analysis of the literature using both national and international sources is used to formulate the lessons learned as well as strategies and future courses of action designed to address this shortage.

  18. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Virgil; Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H.; ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2014-02-01

    The Gd5Ge2Si2 alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni50Mn35In15 Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd5Ge2Si2 and Ni50Mn35In15 alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  19. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provenzano, Virgil; Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H.; ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2014-01-01

    The Gd 5 Ge 2 Si 2 alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni 50 Mn 35 In 15 Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd 5 Ge 2 Si 2 and Ni 50 Mn 35 In 15 alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis

  20. A family of DNA repeats in Aspergillus nidulans has assimilated degenerated retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.L.; Hermansen, T.D.; Aleksenko, Alexei Y.

    2001-01-01

    In the course of a chromosomal walk towards the centromere of chromosome IV of Aspergillus nidulans, several cross- hybridizing genomic cosmid clones were isolated. Restriction mapping of two such clones revealed that their restriction patterns were similar in a region of at least 15 kb, indicati......) phenomenon, first described in Neurospora crassa, may have operated in A. nidulans. The data indicate that this family of repeats has assimilated mobile elements that subsequently degenerated but then underwent further duplications as a part of the host repeats....... the presence of a large repeat. The nature of the repeat was further investigated by sequencing and Southern analysis. The study revealed a family of long dispersed repeats with a high degree of sequence similarity. The number and location of the repeats vary between wild isolates. Two copies of the repeat...

  1. The global Filipino nurse: An integrative review of Filipino nurses' work experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montayre, Jed; Montayre, Jasmine; Holroyd, Eleanor

    2018-05-01

    To understand the work-related experiences of Philippine-trained nurses working globally. The Philippines is a major source country of foreign-trained nurses located globally. However, there is paucity of research on professional factors and career related issues affecting foreign-trained nurses' work experiences. An integrative review through a comprehensive search of literature was undertaken from November 2015 and was repeated in August 2016. Seven articles satisfied the selection criteria. Filipino nurses experienced differences in the practice of nursing in terms of work process, roles and autonomy. Moreover, they encountered challenges such as work-related discrimination and technical difficulties within the organisation. A clear understanding of Filipino nurses' work experiences and the challenges they have encountered suggests identification of important constructs influencing effective translation of nursing practice across cultures and health systems, which then form the basis for support strategies. It is critical to recognize foreign-trained nurses' experience of work-related differences and challenges as these foster favorable conditions for the management team to plan and continually evaluate policies around recruitment, retention and support offered to these nurses. Furthermore, findings suggest internationalization of nursing framework and standards integrating a transcultural paradigm among staff members within a work organisation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Nursing students' experience of patient's death

    OpenAIRE

    Rulíková, Klára

    2016-01-01

    Reflections on student nurse's experience with death of a patient during their studies were collected in form of questionnaires. Theory and practice were compared and research conducted into the needs of students, who experienced patient's death during their studies. Research concluded with recommendation for widening the nursing course programme and adding opportunities for students to share their feelings and experiences after their patients death. Key terms: death, dying patient, study, te...

  3. Features of nursing care provided for breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery. Comparison of nursing practices between certified nurses in breast cancer nursing and non-specialist nurses working with breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Takahira, Yumi; Ichikawa, Kayo; Horikoshi, Masataka; Futawatari, Tamae

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to identifying features of nursing care provided for breast cancer patients during the course of radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery and improve the quality of nursing care. Subjects were certified nurses in breast cancer nursing (CN) and non-specialist nurses working with breast cancer patients (NS). An anonymous survey questionnaire on nursing care and other practices provided before, during, and after radiotherapy was conducted by postal mail and the results were compared between CN and NS. Valid responses were obtained from 40 CN (41.2%) and 102 NS (56.7%). Significant differences between CN and NS were observed for 15 of 27 (55.6%) care items before radiotherapy, 18 of 18 (100%) items during radiotherapy, and 9 of 20 (45.0%) items after radiotherapy. Among the items with significant differences, significantly more NS than CN performed all nursing care items during the course of radiotherapy, except for one item provided before radiotherapy. These results demonstrate that it is necessary to facilitate enhanced collaboration and coordination between CN and NS providing nursing care for breast cancer patients in order to improve the quality of nursing care delivered to patients. (author)

  4. Nurses and Aides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, John

    1976-01-01

    Gerontological nursing (the care of the elderly) as a specialization for registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nursing aides is discussed with respect to training and qualifications, employment outlook, and earnings for each group. (JT)

  5. Primary Nurse - Role Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundinger, Mary O'Neil

    1973-01-01

    Primary nursing means that each patient has an individual nurse who is responsible for assessing his nursing needs and planning and evaluating his nursing care. The article describes the advantages and problems connected with this approach to patient care. (AG)

  6. The evolution of pediatric critical care nursing: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, Dorothy C; Milonovich, Lisa M

    2011-06-01

    Although current nursing literature is overflowing with information related to the history of nursing in general, and even pediatric nursing, very little is published about PICU nursing. The evolution of pediatric critical care nursing is presented based on a historical context, the current state, and future projections. More specifically, this treatise focuses on the environment, the patient and family, and of course, the PICU nurse. Concluding remarks provide an insight into how health care reforms and how the use of clinical information technology will affect the role of the pediatric critical care nurse in the future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Prince Edward Island Conceptual Model for Nursing: a nursing perspective of primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, M; Gallant, M; MacKinnon, M; Dell, G; Herbert, R; MacNutt, G; McCarthy, M J; Murnaghan, D; Robertson, K

    2000-06-01

    The philosophy of primary health care (PHC) recognizes that health is a product of individual, social, economic, and political factors and that people have a right and a duty, individually and collectively, to participate in the course of their own health. The majority of nursing models cast the client in a dependent role and do not conceptualize health in a social, economic, and political context. The Prince Edward Island Conceptual Model for Nursing is congruent with the international move towards PHC. It guides the nurse in practising in the social and political environment in which nursing and health care take place. This model features a nurse/client partnership, the goal being to encourage clients to act on their own behalf. The conceptualization of the environment as the collective influence of the determinants of health gives both nurse and client a prominent position in the sociopolitical arena of health and health care.

  8. Value of intensified nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Raymann, Cornelia; Konta, Brigitte; Prusa, Nina; Frank, Wilhelm

    2006-01-01

    The concept "intensified nursing" is mentioned in differentiation to concepts of "nursing care" or "nursing" which intensifies resources or patient contact. Especially psychic and social needs of patients are very appreciated in nursing. A similar type of nursing is known under the concept "advanced nursing practice" (ANP) which means, that a specialised, academically trained nurse offers an extended nursing care in which a focus on the published knowledge of evidence based research is made. ...

  9. How to master the fine art of nursing politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Following pilots in Manchester and London, the RCN is rolling out its political leadership programme, targeting nursing and health professionals at band 8 or above. The new course is very different to its predecessor, which was aimed at RCN activists.

  10. Knowledge of primary care nurses regarding domestic violence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of primary care nurses regarding domestic violence. ... It included also knowledge about prevalence of DV, and four main aspects relevant to DV, namely deprivation, psychological, ... schools, training courses and conferences.

  11. Coordination in continuously repeated games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeren, A.J.T.M.; Schumacher, J.M.; Engwerda, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we propose a model to describe the effectiveness of coordination in a continuously repeated two-player game. We study how the choice of a decision rule by a coordinator affects the strategic behavior of the players, resulting in more or less cooperation. Our model requires the analysis

  12. Repeated checking causes memory distrust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hout, M.; Kindt, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper attempts to explain why in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) checkers distrust in memory persists despite extensive checking. It is argued that: (1) repeated checking increases familiarity with the issues checked; (2) increased familiarity promotes conceptual processing which inhibits

  13. Ethics in Turkish nursing education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgülü, Refia Selma; Dinç, Leyla

    2007-11-01

    This descriptive study investigated the current status of ethics instruction in Turkish nursing education programs. The sample for this study comprised 39 nursing schools, which represented 51% of all nursing schools in Turkey. Data were collected through a postal questionnaire. The results revealed that 18 of these nursing schools incorporated an ethics course into undergraduate and three into graduate level programs. Most of the educators focused on the basic concepts of ethics, deontological theory, ethical principles, ethical problems in health care, patient rights and codes of ethics for nurses. More than half of the educators believed that students' theoretical knowledge of ethics is applied to their clinical experiences. The teaching methods used included discussion in class, lectures, case studies, small group discussion, dramatization and demonstration. Assessment was carried out by means of written essays and written examinations.

  14. Project Management: Essential Skill of Nurse Informaticists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipes, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    With the evolution of nursing informatics (NI), the list of skills has advanced from the original definition that included 21 competencies to 168 basic competencies identified in the TIGER-based Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies (TANIC) and 178 advanced skills in the Nursing Informatics Competency Assessment (NICA) L3/L4 developed by Chamberlain College of Nursing, Nursing Informatics Research Team (NIRT). Of these competencies, project management is one of the most important essentials identified since it impacts all areas of NI skills and provides an organizing framework for processes and projects including skills such as design, planning, implementation, follow-up and evaluation. Examples of job roles that specifically require project management skills as an essential part of the NI functions include management, administration, leadership, faculty, graduate level master's and doctorate practicum courses. But first, better understanding of the NI essential skills is vital before adequate education and training programs can be developed.

  15. Social media use in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Terri L; Sims-Giddens, Susan S; Booth, Richard G

    2012-09-30

    As technological advances continue to expand connectivity and communication, the number of patients and nurses engaging in social media increases. Nurses play a significant role in identification, interpretation, and transmission of knowledge and information within healthcare. Social media is a platform that can assist nursing faculty in helping students to gain greater understanding of and/or skills in professional communication; health policy; patient privacy and ethics; and writing competencies. Although there are barriers to integration of social media within nursing education, there are quality resources available to assist faculty to integrate social media as a viable pedagogical method. This article discusses the background and significance of social media tools as pedagogy, and provides a brief review of literature. To assist nurse educators who may be using or considering social media tools, the article offers selected examples of sound and pedagogically functional use in course and program applications; consideration of privacy concerns and advantages and disadvantages; and tips for success.

  16. [Profile and professional expectations for nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonín, M; Ballester, D; Esteve, J; Guilera, A; Pérez, I; Ortega, O; Tarruella, M; Peya, M; Guitard, M L; Ricomà, R; Teixidor, M; Ubiergo, I; Valls, M; Zabalegui, A

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the profile corresponding to students enrolled in first, second and third year courses to become registered nurses in Catalonia, along with their professional and job expectations; the authors examine students' perceptions of the university environment. This information will be a great aid to, on the one hand, update the performances and initiatives taken by those responsible for nursing schools, and on the other hand, to obtain a preliminary view on future nursing professionals. At the same time, this information will provide useful elements for students themselves to reflect on their studies and their future as professionals.

  17. Creating library tutorials for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Heidi

    2010-04-01

    This article describes one librarian's experiences with creating, promoting, and assessing online library tutorials. Tutorials were designed to provide on-demand and accessible library instruction to nursing students at Michigan State University. Topics for tutorials were chosen based on the librarian's liaison experiences and suggestions from nursing faculty. The tutorials were created using Camtasia and required the application of several tools and techniques. Tutorials were promoted through Web pages, the ANGEL course management system, blog posts, librarian interactions, e-mails, and more. In order to assess the tutorials' perceived effectiveness, feedback was gathered using a short survey. Future plans for the nursing tutorials project are also discussed.

  18. A Simple Evaluation Tool (ET-CET) Indicates Increase of Diagnostic Skills From Small Bowel Capsule Endoscopy Training Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, J.G.; Humbla, O.; McAlindon, M.E.; Davison, C.; Seitz, U.; Fraser, C.; Hagenmüller, F.; Noetzel, E.; Spada, C.; Riccioni, M.E.; Barnert, J.; Filmann, N.; Keuchel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) has become a first line diagnostic tool. Several training courses with a similar format have been established in Europe; however, data on learning curve and training in SBCE remain sparse. Between 2008 and 2011, different basic SBCE training courses were organized internationally in UK (n = 2), Italy (n = 2), Germany (n = 2), Finland (n = 1), and nationally in Germany (n = 10), applying similar 8-hour curricula with 50% lectures and 50% hands-on training. The Given PillCam System was used in 12 courses, the Olympus EndoCapsule system in 5, respectively. A simple evaluation tool for capsule endoscopy training (ET-CET) was developed using 10 short SBCE videos including relevant lesions and normal or irrelevant findings. For each video, delegates were required to record a diagnosis (achievable total score from 0 to 10) and the clinical relevance (achievable total score 0 to 10). ET-CET was performed at baseline before the course and repeated, with videos in altered order, after the course. Two hundred ninety-four delegates (79.3% physicians, 16.3% nurses, 4.4% others) were included for baseline analysis, 268 completed the final evaluation. Forty percent had no previous experience in SBCE, 33% had performed 10 or less procedures. Median scores for correct diagnosis improved from 4.0 (IQR 3) to 7.0 (IQR 3) during the courses (P endoscopy may be useful before attending an SBCE course. PMID:26512623

  19. [Education in operating room nursing: transformation of the discipline at University of São Paulo School of Nursing (Brazil)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Costa, Ana Lucia Siqueira; Peniche, Aparecida de Cassia Giani; Bianchi, Estela Regina Ferraz; Cianciarullo, Tâmara Iwanow

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of this paper are to present a summary of the evolution of the content of perioperative nursing at the University of São Paulo School of Nursing (EEUSP) and reflect on the National Curriculum Directives (NCD) for the nursing course. The study was developed from a brief history of the practice of perioperative nursing and the inclusion of this topic in the nursing curriculum at EEUSP. The National Curriculum Directives are important because they permit undergraduate schools to determine the amount of teaching time for each course that will comprise their curriculum, but the competencies and skills proposed are nonspecific. We believe that the general nurse should have theoretical and practical learning opportunities to work in every area and level of healthcare.

  20. Course Convenience, Perceived Learning, and Course Satisfaction across Course Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Douglas; Ross, Douglas; Rosenbloom, Alfred; Singer, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Students' desire for course convenience may lead to their preference for online courses. But in their desire for convenience, are students sacrificing satisfaction or perceived learning? This article investigates the moderating impact of course format on the relationship between convenience and both perceived learning and satisfaction. Moderated…

  1. Bologna Process and Basic Nursing Education in 21 European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humar, L; Sansoni, J

    2017-01-01

    The Bologna Process and the Directives of the European Union have had a profound impact on nursing education in Europe. The aim of this study was to identify the similarities and differences within nursing education framework at entry level in 2014 in European countries. A questionnaire was devised by the researchers and distributed via e-mail to the nursing associations/nursing regulatory bodies of 30 European countries. Data were collected from January to May 2014. Responses were received from 21 European Countries. Results indicated that while a completion of 12 years of general education was a requirement to access nursing education in almost all respondent countries, other admission requirements differed between countries. Nursing courses were offered mostly by Faculties of Nursing and Faculties of Health Sciences (in higher education Institutions) and lecturers and management staff were mainly nurses. The results indicated significant different educational requirements for nurse educators. A foreign language was mandatory in half of the respondent countries. Nursing profession was represented at government level in just over half of the respondent countries, often with a Directorate position. The Bologna Process has helped harmonise initial nursing education in Europe but clear standards for nursing education need to be set up. Therefore, the research about the influence of the Bologna process on the development of the nursing profession should be further encouraged.

  2. The impact of nursing students on the health-related quality of life and perceived social support of a rural population in Ecuador: effects of a service-based learning course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcott, Rebecca L; Murcia, Angela M; Berry, Gloria M; Juna, Christian F; Roldós, María Isabel; Corso, Phaedra S

    2018-02-02

    Students seeking degrees in healthcare in Ecuador participate in community improvement projects and provide free health services under the supervision of faculty health professionals. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of a community-based intervention delivered by nursing students on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and perceived social support of a rural population in Ecuador. A quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design study was conducted in two rural communities in Tumbaco, Ecuador. Families from one rural community were invited to participate in the intervention, receiving 8 weekly home visits from nursing students. Families from a neighboring community were similarly recruited as wait-list controls. One member of each family was consented into the study; the final sample included 43 intervention participants and 55 control participants. HRQoL and perceived social support were assessed before and after the intervention in both groups. The SF-12 was used to measure HRQoL, including eight domain scores and two composite scores, and the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List was used as an indicator of perceived social support. Difference-in-differences (DD) analyses were conducted to mitigate the effects of any baseline differences in the non- equivalent control group design. When compared to the control group, the intervention group realized significant improvements in the physical component summary score of the SF-12 (4.20, p based learning on recipient populations.

  3. Exploring Variation in Nurse Educators' Perceptions of the Inclusive Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a study into how nurse educators view the notion of an inclusive curriculum within their discipline. UK nurse education is professionally accredited, with substantial levels of work-based learning. Therefore, this analysis should be useful to practitioners on other professional courses. The study was based on a…

  4. [Educational needs assessment on research ethics among nursing researchers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ihn Sook; Gu, Mee Ock; Kim, Keum Soon; Lee, Kwang Ja; Yang, Soo

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the educational needs of research ethics among nursing researchers. Convenience sample of 161 nursing professors and 262 master or doctoral nursing students participated in the study. Data was collected with self-reported questionnaire from June to August 2009, and analyzed with descriptive statistics using SPSS WIN (version 14.0). Among 161 nursing professors, about 31.7% has educated nursing ethics in the postgraduate course. The most common course was nursing research or methodology (62.7%), and median education time was 2 hr. Areas that showed difficulty in understanding was the conflict of interest and plagiarism for professors and falsification and fabrication for graduate students. Average knowledge on the research ethics was 75.4 points for professors and 61.6 points for students based on the 100 points. Educational needs of research ethics among nursing professors and students in the postgraduate course was high. We recommend both basic and advanced research ethics educational programs for the nursing researchers. The basic course should be at least 6 hr and include various cases and something to discuss.

  5. Apheresis training for nurses and physicians around the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyrinck, Marleen; Vrielink, Hans

    2015-02-01

    A training program for apheresis nurses in leukocyte collection and therapeutic apheresis was developed by the Joint Task Force for Apheresis Education and Certification. This is a modular program with theoretical and practical information and knowledge. On request of the Indonesian authorities, in the capital of Indonesia Jakarta, a certification course for apheresis nurses/operators based on the training program described above was organized in December 2013. The course existed of themes related to apheresis, such as hematology, anatomy, physiology, calculations, adverse events, basics of apheresis, nursing aspects, quality, collection of cells for cellular therapies, pediatrics, and therapeutic collections (cell reductions and exchange procedures). A pretest and post-test regarding the knowledge and judgment in the themes described was taken in Bahasa Indonesia or in English. In total, 38 apheresis nurses and 32 physicians participated in the course. In the post-test, the nurses scored in a mean 72/100 and the physicians 77/100 (nurses vs. physicians: P = 0.005), which was significantly better than the results of the pretest (54/100 and 53/100, respectively (P nurses/operators proved a significant increase of knowledge in the theory behind apheresis. This educational program provides an approach to educate and certificate apheresis nurses. It is also shown that also for physicians working in the field of apheresis, this course is of use increasing their knowledge regarding apheresis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Scandinavian Nurse Specialist Group/Cystic Fibrosis (SNSG/CF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Erwander, Inger

    2006-01-01

    /CF comprises one CF nurse from each of the centers. The board meets twice a year to plan workshops and courses. SNSG/CF is part of the International Nurse Specialist Group/Cystic Fibrosis (INSG/CF). Results: Within the framework of SNSG/CF a 2-day workshop is held every second year for approximately 40...

  7. Hearing Nurses' Voices through Reflection in Women's Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Frances M.; Cameron, Catherine C.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of reflective papers by nursing students in women's studies courses revealed these themes: women's ambivalence about feminism, raised consciousness, empowerment, and desire for change. The importance of women's studies to the female-dominated profession of nursing was stressed. (SK)

  8. When does nursing burnout begin? An investigation of the fatigue experience of Australian nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Samantha; Winwood, Peter C; Lushington, Kurt

    2009-11-01

    Investigation of chronic maladaptive fatigue evolution among a large group of Australian Bachelor of Nursing (BN) degree students. The training of Australian nurses has changed from a salaried, 'apprenticeship' structure (usually including accommodation) to a University-based (fee paying) degree. Relatively little is known about how these changes have impacted on the strain and fatigue experience of nursing students. A large group of Australian nursing students across 3 years of a BN course (n = 431) participated in an internet-based cross-sectional design study. Levels of maladaptive fatigue, and poor recovery, increased across the course. By its completion, up to 20% of graduates were reporting signs of serious maladaptive fatigue/stress. Contemporary nurse training places many students under significant psycho-social stress. Need to work for personal support as well as study and absence of adequate training in managing these strains appears to underpin this experience. Nurse Managers need to be alert to the fact that new Graduate Nurse Probationer (GNP) year (or its local equivalent) nurses may already be suffering from significant stress/fatigue. To prevent this progressing to more severe states and potential premature quitting the profession, provision of adequate mentoring and guidance in effective stress management may be essential.

  9. Long-term Course of Alzheimer Disease in Patients Treated According to the Dutch Dementia Guideline at a Memory Clinic: A "Real-Life" Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droogsma, Erika; van Asselt, Dieneke; van Steijn, Jolanda; Diekhuis, Marjolein; Veeger, Nic; De Deyn, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    There is little knowledge of the long-term course of Alzheimer disease (AD) in light of current pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions provided in a "real-life" setting. The Frisian Alzheimer's Disease Cohort study is a "real-life" study of the course of AD in patients (n=576) treated with pharmacological (ie, cholinesterase inhibitors) and nonpharmacological (ie, case management, respite care) interventions. Disease course was described by changes in cognition (Mini Mental State Examination, clock-drawing test) and number of types of professional care applying a repeated-measures analysis using a marginal model (population-based average model). In addition, behavioral and psychological symptoms, and proportions of nursing home admissions and deaths were investigated. During 3.5 years, the average Mini Mental State Examination decreased from 22.24 to 18.91, the clock-drawing test score increased from 3.38 to 4.05, the number of types of professional care increased from 0.85 to 2.64, and the patients with behavioral and psychological symptoms increased from 29.0% to 70.2%. The proportion of patients admitted to a nursing home was 40.8% and 41.0% died. Cognition and behaviour of AD patients deteriorated accompanied with an increase in care-dependency during 3.5 years. Nevertheless, compared with the precholinesterase inhibitor era, current pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions appear to slow cognitive decline, which emphasizes that they seem to have a favorable effect.

  10. Criminalistics and the forensic nursing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ann Wolbert; Piatelli, Michael J; Pasqualone, Georgia

    2011-06-01

    Students learn science by actually performing science activities. The 12 laboratories described in this article assist students in applying the fundamental techniques germane to the field of forensic science to "solve" contrived cases and present "evidence" in a mock trial. Moreover, students are also confronted with some of the legal and ethical issues concerning the validity, reliability, and application of some forensic techniques. The pedagogical design of the laboratory course provides a rich, challenging, and interdisciplinary academic experience intended to augment and compliment the didactic forensic lecture portion of the course. This laboratory course was designed to engender, embody, and articulate one of the University's directive goals to support interdisciplinary teaching, research, and programming. Because we developed the laboratories on minimal funds, we demonstrated that it could be cost-effective. And thus, we recommend a laboratory science course be included as part of the curriculum of all forensic nursing students and practitioners. © 2011 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  11. A favorable course of palliative sedation: searching for indicators using caregivers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkkemper, Tijn; Rietjens, Judith A C; Deliens, Luc; Ribbe, Miel W; Swart, Siebe J; Loer, Stephan A; Zuurmond, Wouter W A; Perez, Roberto S G M

    2015-03-01

    Comparing characteristics of a favorable sedation course during palliative sedation to a less favorable course based on the reports Dutch physicians and nurses. Cases identified as having a favorable sedation course less often concerned a male patient (P = .019 nurses' cases), reached the intended sedation depth significantly quicker (P sedation (P = .015 physicians' cases), and had a shorter total duration of sedation compared (P sedation course. A favorable course during palliative sedation seems more probable when health care professionals report on a (relatively) shorter time to reach the required depth of sedation and when a deeper level of sedation can be obtained. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Treating Nurses and Student Nurses with Chemical Dependency: Revising Policy in the United States for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Todd; Pearson, Frances

    2009-01-01

    For more than a century, the US nursing profession has been aware of substance abuse problems among its practitioners and student nurses but has generally dealt with the issue by taking disciplinary action rather than pursuing nonpunitive options. The latter course would allow more healthcare providers, following successful rehabilitation, to…

  13. Effects of using the developing nurses' thinking model on nursing students' diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesoro, Mary Gay

    2012-08-01

    This quasi-experimental study tested the effectiveness of an educational model, Developing Nurses' Thinking (DNT), on nursing students' clinical reasoning to achieve patient safety. Teaching nursing students to develop effective thinking habits that promote positive patient outcomes and patient safety is a challenging endeavor. Positive patient outcomes and safety are achieved when nurses accurately interpret data and subsequently implement appropriate plans of care. This study's pretest-posttest design determined whether use of the DNT model during 2 weeks of clinical postconferences improved nursing students' (N = 83) diagnostic accuracy. The DNT model helps students to integrate four constructs-patient safety, domain knowledge, critical thinking processes, and repeated practice-to guide their thinking when interpreting patient data and developing effective plans of care. The posttest scores of students from the intervention group showed statistically significant improvement in accuracy. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Innovations in occupational health nursing education, including a distance learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowis, A; Ellington, H

    1991-07-01

    The results of a survey in the United Kingdom in the late 1980s indicated that many occupational health nurses were not being sent for formal training because of the length of time nurses needed to be away from their employment and the difficulty employers had in finding nurse replacements during training. To meet the needs of occupational health nurses and their employers, the Robert Gordon Institute of Technology (RGIT) instituted a modular training course that offers full time attendance or distance learning options. RGIT's course consists of six modules over a 1 to 3 year period, which students can take in any order after completing a short Return to Study course. Using the innovative distance learning option, occupational health nurses can earn a Diploma in Occupational Health Nursing while completing most of their courses at the workplace, thus avoiding conflicts between training and work schedules.

  15. Peer tutoring program for academic success of returning nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryer, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    High attrition rates among students in associate degree nursing programs are a concern for faculty, administrators, and students. Programs offering academic and emotional support for students at risk for failing a clinical course may decrease attrition rates and improve academic performance. A peer tutoring program was developed for returning nursing students who were unsuccessful in a previous clinical course. Peer tutors met with returning students weekly to review course work, complete case studies and practice NCLEX questions. Trusting, supportive relationships developed among students and a significant increase in grades was noted at the end of the course for 79% of students. Implementation of peer tutoring was beneficial for returning students, tutors, and the nursing program and may be valuable in other courses where academic achievement is a concern.

  16. Introducing a feminist perspective to nursing curricula: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughn, S; Wang, H

    1994-03-01

    Feminist concerns of the nursing profession are examined and it is argued that feminism provides the ideology and impetus for social change. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the attitudes and beliefs of nursing students who take a feminist-oriented women's health course. The course went beyond a scientific model of women's health and examined women's health issues as they are related to the concerns of women as consumers and providers. A questionnaire assessing the effects of the course was administered at the beginning and again at the end of the course. Results indicated that the course produced significant changes in the attitudes and beliefs of the experimental subjects in areas of professional activism; high regard for self, nurses, and women; and social activism against sexism in the media and violence against women.

  17. [A comparison on general education curriculum of 4-year and 3-year nursing schools in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sook-Young; Joung, Sun-Ei; Hwang, Chung-Il

    2011-02-01

    This study was done to comparatively analyze the general education curriculum of 4-yr and 3-yr nursing schools in Korea. Ten university 4-yr nursing schools were selected based on universities in Korean Accreditation Board of Nursing 2010 or "2009 Korea's Best Universities-Top 10" published by Joong-Ang Daily. Ten college 3-yr nursing schools were selected based on colleges in Korean Accreditation Board of Nursing 2010. 1) Generally 4-yr nursing schools maintained the relationships between organizational philosophy/purposes and subjects in the general education curriculum. But 3-yr nursing schools did not. 2) In 4-yr nursing schools there was a relatively higher credits ratio of general education curriculum and selective courses than in 3-yr nursing schools. 3) In 4-yr nursing schools variety of courses was relatively higher than 3-yr nursing schools. 4) In 4-yr nursing schools, operating conditions were relatively better (number of tenure professors, ratio of professors to students, Identification of exclusive organization in charge of the general education curriculum) for the general education curriculum than 3-yr nursing schools. The results identify significant differences in the general education curriculum of 4-yr and 3-yr nursing schools in Korea, indicating that 3-yr nursing schools should make efforts to improve the good quality of general education curriculum.

  18. Online learning in repeated auctions

    OpenAIRE

    Weed, Jonathan; Perchet, Vianney; Rigollet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by online advertising auctions, we consider repeated Vickrey auctions where goods of unknown value are sold sequentially and bidders only learn (potentially noisy) information about a good's value once it is purchased. We adopt an online learning approach with bandit feedback to model this problem and derive bidding strategies for two models: stochastic and adversarial. In the stochastic model, the observed values of the goods are random variables centered around the true value of t...

  19. A repeating fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  20. [Nurse practitioner's capability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chen-Hsiu; Chen, Shih-Chien

    2007-10-01

    Nurse practitioner development affirms the social value of nursing staff and promotes the professional image of nursing. As the medical environment and doctor-patient relations change, how should a nurse practitioner carry out clinical care? Apart from having foundations in medical knowledge and high-quality nursing techniques, nurse practitioners must have other clinical skills, in order to break out of their former difficult position, promote nursing competitiveness, provide a multi -dimensional service, win the people's acclamation and develop international links.

  1. Beginnings of nursing education and nurses’ contribution to nursing professional development in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlaisavljević Željko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The oldest records of developmental beginnings of patients’ healthcare relate to the first hospital founded by St. Sava at the monastery Studenica in 1199. The profile of the Kosovian girl became the hallmark of nursing profession in Serbia. The first school for midwives was founded in 1899 at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the General State Hospital in Belgrade. However, there were no other schools for nurses in Serbia until the foundation of the School for Midwives of the Red Cross Society in 1021. Until then the healthcare of patients and the injured was carried out by self-taught volunteer nurses with completed short courses of patients’ healthcare. The first course for male and female nurses was organized by the Serbian Red Cross at the beginning of the First Serbian-Turkish War in 1876. During wars with Serbian participation in 19th and 20th centuries with Serbian participation, nurses gave a remarkable contribution being exposed to extreme efforts and often sacrificing their own lives. In war times great merit belongs to the members of the humanitarian society the Circle of Serbian Sisters founded in Belgrade in 1903, which was the resource of a great number of nurses who became the pride of nursing profession. Generations of nurses were educated on their example. In 2004 the annual award “Dušica Spasić” was established which is awarded to the best medical nurse in Serbia. Dušica Spasić was a medical nurse that died at her workplace, when aged 23 years, nursing the sick from variola.

  2. Neuropharmacology and mental health nurse prescribers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skingsley, David; Bradley, Eleanor J; Nolan, Peter

    2006-08-01

    To outline the development and content of a 'top-up' neuropharmacology module for mental health nurse prescribers and consider how much pharmacology training is required to ensure effective mental health prescribing practice. Debate about the content of prescribing training courses has persisted within the United Kingdom since the mid-1980s. In early 2003 supplementary prescribing was introduced and gave mental health nurses the opportunity to become prescribers. The challenge of the nurse prescribing curriculum for universities is that they have only a short time to provide nurses from a range of backgrounds with enough knowledge to ensure that they meet agreed levels of competency for safe prescribing. There is growing concern within mental health care that the prescribing of medication in mental health services falls short of what would be deemed good practice. Over the past two decades, nurse training has increasingly adopted a psychosocial approach to nursing care raising concerns that, although nurses attending prescribing training may be able to communicate effectively with service users, they may lack the basic knowledge of biology and pharmacology to make effective decisions about medication. Following the completion of a general nurse prescribing course, mental health nurses who attended were asked to identify their specific needs during the evaluation phase. Although they had covered basic pharmacological principles in their training, they stated that they needed more specific information about drugs used in mental health; particularly how to select appropriate drug treatments for mental health conditions. This paper describes how the nurses were involved in the design of a specific module which would enable them to transfer their theoretical leaning to practice and in so doing increase their confidence in their new roles. The findings of this study suggest that the understanding and confidence of mental health nurse prescribers about the drugs they

  3. Designing Online Education Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentin, Guglielmo

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the main elements that characterize online course design. Topics include design constraints; analysis of learning needs; defining objectives; course prerequisites; content structuring; course flexibility; learning strategies; evaluation criteria; course activities; course structure; communication architecture; and design evaluation.…

  4. The challenge of the standardization of nursing specializations in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchal, A; Jolley, M J; Keogh, J; Lepiesová, M; Rasku, T; Zeller, S

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of health care is driving the need for specialist nursing knowledge. Specialist nurses have undertaken a formal training that focuses on a specific clinical area or population and are legitimated by a professional award or legal status. Specialist nurses are better able to provide the most specific and most appropriate care for both people and populations. This paper considers nursing's loose understanding of 'specialization' and the impact this has on those who seek employment outside their own nation but within the family of nations known as the European Union (EU). There is a lack of standardization for nursing specializations across the European Union that leads to lack of mobility across countries. Reports were reviewed from within the European Union, including specialist nursing groups and regulatory nursing bodies. Nurse specialists can be regarded as operating at nursing's 'leading edge'; however, it is here that nursing lacks organization and common standards. This is readily apparent in a EU bound together by the principle of freedom of movement and common professional and academic standards. It is now time for European Union nurses to look beyond the common standards for pre-registration courses and to consider the development of common standards for specialist nursing. Historical attempts to achieve common standards for specialist nursing have largely been unsuccessful due to the diversity of approaches to nurse specialization. It is time now for this challenge to be re-addressed so that specialist nurses can more freely work throughout the European Union. There is a pressing need for policy makers to define specialist nursing and to enable European Union-wide standards. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  5. Bioethics education of nursing curriculum in Korea: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Kwisoon; Kang, Youngmi; Lee, Woon-Yong

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the current profile of bioethics education in the nursing curriculum as perceived by nursing students and faculty in Korea. A convenience sampling method was used for recruiting 1223 undergraduate nursing students and 140 nursing faculty in Korea. Experience of Bioethics Education, Quality of Bioethics Education, and Demand for Bioethics Education Scales were developed. The Experience of Bioethics Education Scale showed that the nursing curriculum in Korea does not provide adequate bioethics education. The Quality of Bioethics Education Scale revealed that the topics of human nature and human rights were relatively well taught compared to other topics. The Demand for Bioethics Education Scale determined that the majority of the participants believed that bioethics education should be a major requirement in the nursing curriculum. The findings of this study suggest that bioethics should be systemically incorporated into nursing courses, clinical practice during the program, and during continuing education.

  6. Inductions Buffer Nurses' Job Stress, Health, and Organizational Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Caroline; Medisauskaite, Asta; Lopes, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Nurses suffer disproportionate levels of stress and are at risk of sickness-absence and turnover intentions, but there is a lack of research clarifying preventions. This study investigated the impact of inductions (job preparation courses) about mental health for nurses' job stress, general health, and organizational commitment. Data from 6,656 nurses were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM), showing that mental health inductions increase nurses' job satisfaction, which reduces their occupational stress and improves their health. SEM showed that these occupational health benefits increase the nurses' commitment to the organization. Job satisfaction (feeling valued, rewarded) also had a direct effect on nurses' intentions to continue working for the organization. Mental health inductions are therefore beneficial beyond job performance: they increase occupational health in the nursing profession.

  7. Digital story telling in social justice nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Raeann G

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and evaluate how digital stories integrated into public health nursing education can teach social justice concepts essential for nurse leadership. Four digital stories were selected and incorporated into a public health nursing course. Students were asked to reflect on these stories. A retrospective qualitative analysis was completed on the student narrative reflections and analyzed for themes. A total of 108 narrative reflections of public health nursing students were included from 2015 to 2016. Themes were identified based on analysis and include-Encountering Vulnerability, Questioning Systems and Choosing Moral Courage. Digital stories offer an innovative medium to convey the importance of story, advance social justice as an essential practice of nursing, and create opportunities that addresses social justice in nursing and in developing nursing leaders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Using Mobile Devices in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Black, Crystal; Merrill, Earlene B

    2015-01-01

    The use of mobile device technology in nursing education is growing. These devices are becoming more important in the health care environment with an advantage of providing a compendium of drug, nursing procedures and treatments, and disease information to nursing students. Senior baccalaureate nursing students traditionally are prohibited from medication administration during psychiatric-mental health clinical rotations, but they are required to participate in simulated medication discussions and administration experiences. The incorporation of this mobile device technology to augment clinical learning experiences has advantages including potential reduction of medication errors, and improved patient safety during students' clinical rotation. The purpose of this project is to explain how the mobile device (iPod Touch, 4th generation wireless media player) may be used to enhance and augment comprehensive nursing care in a psychiatric-mental health clinical setting. Thirty-four (34) baccalaureate senior nursing students enrolled in a clinical psychiatric-mental nursing course at a mid-Atlantic public university school of nursing were used. Each student was provided a loaner mobile device with appropriate software and the necessary training. Data were collected on the student's ability to simulate medication administration to a psychiatric-mental health client. Surveys were administered before distribution, at mid-point and at the end of two (2) seven week semesters.

  9. What's wrong with John? a randomised controlled trial of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training with nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Sharyn; Crawford, Gemma; Hallett, Jonathan; Hunt, Kristen; Chih, Hui Jun; Tilley, P J Matt

    2017-03-23

    The prevalence of mental health problems have been found to be higher among university students compared to their non-student peers. Nursing students in particular face a range of additional stressors which may impact their undergraduate performance and their careers. Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) aims to increase mental health literacy and to reduce stigma and may positively impact on the student population. This paper describes a MHFA randomised controlled trial targeting nursing students at a large Australian university. This study aimed to measure the impact of the MHFA course on mental health literacy, mental health first aid intentions, confidence in helping someone with a mental health problem and stigmatising attitudes including social distance. Participants were first year nursing students (n = 181) randomly allocated to the intervention (n = 92) or control (n = 89) group. Intervention group participants received the standardised MHFA course for nursing students. Online self-report questionnaires were completed at three time intervals: baseline (one week prior to the intervention: T 1 ) (n = 140), post intervention (T 2 ) (n = 120), and two months post intervention (T 3 ) (n = 109). Measures included demographics, mental health knowledge, recognition of depression, confidence in helping, mental health first aid intentions and stigmatising attitudes including social distance. Repeated measures ANOVA was computed to measure if the impact of time (T 1 , T 2 , T 3 ) and group (intervention and control) on the outcome variables. There was a significant improvement among intervention compared to control group participants across the three time periods for knowledge scores (p mental health first aid intentions (p mental health literacy and reduce stigmatising attitudes and social distance. While this course has particular salience for nursing and other health science students, there are broader benefits to the general university population that

  10. Do problem-solving skills affect success in nursing process applications? An application among Turkish nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayindir Çevik, Ayfer; Olgun, Nermin

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between problem-solving and nursing process application skills of nursing. This is a longitudinal and correlational study. The sample included 71 students. An information form, Problem-Solving Inventory, and nursing processes the students presented at the end of clinical courses were used for data collection. Although there was no significant relationship between problem-solving skills and nursing process grades, improving problem-solving skills increased successful grades. Problem-solving skills and nursing process skills can be concomitantly increased. Students were suggested to use critical thinking, practical approaches, and care plans, as well as revising nursing processes in order to improve their problem-solving skills and nursing process application skills. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  11. Improving critical thinking and clinical reasoning with a continuing education course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Dina Monteiro; Pimenta, Cibele Mattos; Lunney, Margaret

    2009-03-01

    Continuing education courses related to critical thinking and clinical reasoning are needed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis. This study evaluated a 4-day, 16-hour continuing education course conducted in Brazil.Thirty-nine nurses completed a pretest and a posttest consisting of two written case studies designed to measure the accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. There were significant differences in accuracy from pretest to posttest for case 1 (p = .008) and case 2 (p = .042) and overall (p = .001). Continuing education courses should be implemented to improve the accuracy of nurses' diagnoses.

  12. Advancing nursing scholarship: the Mozambique model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Judith C; Dippenaar, Joan; Schmollgruber, Shelley; Mphuthi, David D; Huiskamp, Agnes

    2017-01-01

    Despite the importance of Human Resources for Health for the development and functioning of health systems worldwide, many countries continue to be plagued by poor health systems and a lack of adequate health care. Health systems failures may be attributed to both quantitative and qualitative nursing shortages including the lack of advanced skills to lead health initiatives, to conduct research and to educate other nurses. The response by development partners is usually framed around the production of skilled nurses through the processes of up-skilling and scaling-up. The outcome is expanded practice but with scant attention to the professional advancement of nurses. In this paper we present a two-phased capacity development model that adopted professionalization strategies to advance nursing scholarship and consequent postgraduate specialization of the first cohort of nurses in Mozambique. The main objectives were to: develop and implement a clinical course work master's degree in nursing; and ensure sustainability by capacitating the host institution to continue with the master's programme following graduation. Rigorous processes for project discussions, negotiations and monitoring were necessary amid limited resources and a challenging political climate. Forging in-country partnerships, sustaining alliances and government investment are thus key to the success of the Mozambique model. Notwithstanding some difficulties, the process unfolded over a five-year period, graduating the first cohort of 11 senior nurses with a master's degree, specializing either in critical care and trauma nursing, or maternal and neonatal health. Bridging the skills gap between generalist and specialist nurses is essential for them to manage complex and high acuity cases and to reverse associated morbidity and mortality. We conclude that this model serves as a professionalization strategy to advance nurses' scholarship of clinical practice, research and teaching.

  13. Men student nurses: the nursing education experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadus, Robert J; Twomey, J Creina

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of being a male in a predominately female-concentrated undergraduate baccalaureate nursing program. Men remain a minority within the nursing profession. Nursing scholars have recommended that the profile of nursing needs to change to meet the diversity of the changing population, and the shortfall of the worldwide nursing shortage. However, efforts by nursing schools and other stakeholders have been conservative toward recruitment of men. Using Giorgi's method, 27 students from a collaborative nursing program took part in this qualitative, phenomenological study. Focus groups were undertaken to gather data and to develop descriptions of the experience. Five themes highlighted men students' experience of being in a university nursing program: choosing nursing, becoming a nurse, caring within the nursing role, gender-based stereotypes, and visible/invisible. The experiences of the students revealed issues related to gender bias in nursing education, practice areas, and societal perceptions that nursing is not a suitable career choice for men. Implications for nurse educators and strategies for the recruitment and retention of men nursing students are discussed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Nursing shortages and international nurse migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, S J; Polsky, D; Sochalski, J

    2005-12-01

    The United Kingdom and the United States are among several developed countries currently experiencing nursing shortages. While the USA has not yet implemented policies to encourage nurse immigration, nursing shortages will likely result in the growth of foreign nurse immigration to the USA. Understanding the factors that drive the migration of nurses is critical as the USA exerts more pull on the foreign nurse workforce. To predict the international migration of nurses to the UK using widely available data on country characteristics. The Nursing and Midwifery Council serves as the source of data on foreign nurse registrations in the UK between 1998 and 2002. We develop and test a regression model that predicts the number of foreign nurse registrants in the UK based on source country characteristics. We collect country-level data from sources such as the World Bank and the World Health Organization. The shortage of nurses in the UK has been accompanied by massive and disproportionate growth in the number of foreign nurses from poor countries. Low-income, English-speaking countries that engage in high levels of bilateral trade experience greater losses of nurses to the UK. Poor countries seeking economic growth through international trade expose themselves to the emigration of skilled labour. This tendency is currently exacerbated by nursing shortages in developed countries. Countries at risk for nurse emigration should adjust health sector planning to account for expected losses in personnel. Moreover, policy makers in host countries should address the impact of recruitment on source country health service delivery.

  15. Nursing of patients with hyperthyroidism treated by using iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dongju; Cao Guoxiang

    2002-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism was a common endocrine disease, its clinic treatment mainly include anti thyroid drug treatment, surgical operation and iodine-131 therapy. The latter have unique superiority, which was adapted by clinic doctors. The nursing method was distinguished from that of others because the principle of iodine-131 therapy was different from other therapy in course of the treatment of hyperthyroidism. Combining the nursing experiences with related documents, this article was about to sum up briefly the nursing and matters needing attention in course of treatment of iodine-131 in patients with hyperthyroidism

  16. Leaders from Nursing's History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondiller, Shirley H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Looks at the lives and accomplishments of four leaders in professional nursing: (1) Loretta Ford, who championed the cause of nurse practitioners; (2) Mable Staupers, a pioneer in community health and nursing; (3) Janet Geister, a leader in private nursing; and (4) Isabel Stewart, who led the movement to standardize nursing education. (JOW)

  17. Improving repeatability by improving quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ackers, Mark; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla; Brink, Mundy

    1998-12-31

    Time lapse (4-D) seismic is a promising tool for reservoir characterization and monitoring. The method is apparently simple: to acquire data repeatedly over the same reservoir, process and interpret the data sets, then changes between the data sets indicate changes in the reservoir. A problem with time lapse seismic data is that reservoirs are a relatively small part of the earth and important reservoir changes may cause very small differences to the time lapse data. The challenge is to acquire and process economical time lapse data such that reservoir changes can be detected above the noise of varying acquisition and environment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Telomerase Repeated Amplification Protocol (TRAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-11-20

    Telomeres are found at the end of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, and proteins that bind to telomeres protect DNA from being recognized as double-strand breaks thus preventing end-to-end fusions (Griffith et al. , 1999). However, due to the end replication problem and other factors such as oxidative damage, the limited life span of cultured cells (Hayflick limit) results in progressive shortening of these protective structures (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex telomerase-consisting of a protein catalytic component hTERT and a functional RNA component hTR or hTERC - counteracts telomere shortening by adding telomeric repeats to the end of chromosomes in ~90% of primary human tumors and in some transiently proliferating stem-like cells (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). This results in continuous proliferation of cells which is a hallmark of cancer. Therefore, telomere biology has a central role in aging, cancer progression/metastasis as well as targeted cancer therapies. There are commonly used methods in telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) (Mender and Shay, 2015b), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this detailed protocol we describe Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP). The TRAP assay is a popular method to determine telomerase activity in mammalian cells and tissue samples (Kim et al. , 1994). The TRAP assay includes three steps: extension, amplification, and detection of telomerase products. In the extension step, telomeric repeats are added to the telomerase substrate (which is actually a non telomeric oligonucleotide, TS) by telomerase. In the amplification step, the extension products are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers (TS upstream primer and ACX downstream primer) and in the detection step, the presence or absence of telomerase is

  19. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  20. Kansas Nursing Home Medication Aide Curriculum. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Myrna J.; Fornelli, Linda K.

    This curriculum guide is designed to aid Kansas instructors in conducting a course for teaching nursing home medication aides. Covered first are various introductory topics such as the role and responsibilities of medication aides, pharmacodynamics, forms in which medication is now available, common medical abbreviations, mathematics and weights…

  1. Series of selenoid valve pneumatic AC 220 volts with disposable contra angle as a replacement for micromotor in preclinic laboratory (experimental study on the health ministry of health polytechnic course D-III department of dental nursing Tasikmalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiyat Miko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To report on the essential performance characteristics of disposable air turbine handpiece and on aspect of their convenience and safety for preclinical use. The disposable handpiece is not recommended drilling in oral cavity. We use for student practical  in Operative Dentistry at preclinic laboratory. The other side micromotor low speed handpiece used as bur device on the phantom, the problem usually found in preclinik laboratory on practical conservation with the use of micromotor frequent damage to the handpiece (contra angel. Micromotor tend to heat up faster and have a low-speed, so it took a long time to complete the drilling, using the micromotor tend to be less safe because of the power generated from the flow of electricity at any time could damage. The price of  micromotor also is quite expensive. The limitations of the budget funds for maintenance, repair and procurement of mikromotor also became a problem. Based on these problems, the research team made a solution in the form of a replacement tool (substitute micromotor with the aim to resolve the existing problems as well as creating practices preclinic more effectively and efficiently. The use of a simple drill tool in the form of a series of Pneumatic Valve 220 volt (include electric compressor and Selenoid Disposible Handpiece Contra-angles as a new innovation in the laboratory of Dental Nursing. Majors preclinik Health Polytechnic Tasikmalaya  have been applied for last 3 years and have been able to more efficient cost of procurement tool of 70%. This disposible tool is apparently able to drill up to 20 times preparasicavity. This research uses descriptive method. Data collection techniques are used through the question form or questionnaire. Population and sample the study is a students collage 2nd years D-III of department of dental nursing Health Polytechnic Tasikmalaya. From the results of research that the majority of students expressed pleased and satisfied. This

  2. Barriers to nursing home staff accessing CPD must be broken down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    A study on priorities for the professional development of registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes published in Age and Ageing ( page 6 ) has identified that staff shortages, lack of access to NHS courses and lack of paid study time are the main reasons why RNs do not access continuing professional development (CPD) activities. Specialist gerontological education for care home nurses was, however, seen as a means to ensure that care home nursing attracts the best people.

  3. [Parents and nursing staff's expectations regarding the nurse's work in a NICU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Ivone; Rocha, Semíramis Melani Melo

    2006-09-01

    The general purpose of this investigation was to identify parent and nursing staff expectations regarding the nurse's role in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). A descriptive study was carried out using a qualitative approach and interviews were conducted at a NICU in the interior of the State of São Paulo. Results showed new expectations on the part of parents and professionals regarding the role of NICU nurses. The knowledge identified as necessary were a family-centered approach, interpersonal relations techniques, and differentiation between technology and scientific knowledge. The conclusion is that NICU nurses need to play a more incisive role in the nursing care process, adjusting the use of technological advances to human knowledge, particularly in the area of interpersonal relationships between family members and staff, which includes activities of continuing education, such as specialization courses.

  4. Transformational leadership training programme for charge nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duygulu, Sergul; Kublay, Gulumser

    2011-03-01

    This paper is a report of an evaluation of the effects of a transformational leadership training programme on Unit Charge Nurses' leadership practices. Current healthcare regulations in the European Union and accreditation efforts of hospitals for their services mandate transformation in healthcare services in Turkey. Therefore, the transformational leadership role of nurse managers is vital in determining and achieving long-term goals in this process. The sample consisted of 30 Unit Charge Nurses with a baccalaureate degree and 151 observers at two university hospitals in Turkey. Data were collected using the Leadership Practices Inventory-Self and Observer (applied four times during a 14-month study process from December 2005 to January 2007). The transformational leadership training programme had theoretical (14 hours) and individual study (14 hours) in five sections. Means, standard deviations and percentages, repeated measure tests and two-way factor analysis were used for analysis. According the Leadership Practices Inventory-Self and Observer ratings, leadership practices increased statistically significantly with the implementation of the programme. There were no significant differences between groups in age, length of time in current job and current position. The Unit Charge Nurses Leadership Practices Inventory self-ratings were significantly higher than those of the observers. There is a need to develop similar programmes to improve the leadership skills of Unit Charge Nurses, and to make it mandatory for nurses assigned to positions of Unit Charge Nurse to attend this kind of leadership programme. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Using a first-year seminar to introduce nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennenga, Heidi A; Tschetter, Lois

    2013-01-01

    First-year seminar courses designed to aid the transition of freshmen students to the collegiate experience are commonplace requirements at many 4-year institutions. The authors describe the development, implementation, and outcomes of a first-year seminar course with introductory nursing content.

  6. Association between Nurses' Education about Research and Their Research Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, Lynn; Brown, G. Ted

    2003-01-01

    Responses from 178 of 528 pediatric nurses showed that higher education levels or courses in research design and use were associated with positive attitudes toward research. Higher education levels were associated with self-reported research use; completing research-related courses was not independently associated with higher research use.…

  7. Introductory Anatomy and Physiology in an Undergraduate Nursing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S. J.; White, S.; Power, N.

    2017-01-01

    Using an educational data mining approach, first-year academic achievement of undergraduate nursing students, which included two compulsory courses in introductory human anatomy and physiology, was compared with achievement in a final semester course that transitioned students into the workplace. We hypothesized that students could be grouped…

  8. Student nurses as school nurse extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Carol L; Dood, Florence V; Squires, Darcy A

    2012-12-01

    The severe underuse of school nurses leaves students with unaddressed health needs that impact their safety and learning ability. An undergraduate pediatric clinical focusing on nursing students and the role of a school nurse in an elementary school setting can be a unique approach to combining the needs of school children and educating student nurses. One school of nursing created such a project to help address these needs and collect data on the activities student nurses performed in school nurse role and their impact on student health. This project serves as both a practice improvement project and an innovation in pediatric clinical education. The purposes of this project were to quantify baccalaureate nursing student activities related to the school nurse role and to evaluate the results that have the potential to impact on student health in an urban elementary school. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nurse leader certification preparation: how are confidence levels impacted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junger, Stacey; Trinkle, Nicole; Hall, Norma

    2016-09-01

    The aim was to examine the effect of a nurse leader certification preparation course on the confidence levels of the participants. Limited literature is available regarding nurse leader development and certifications. Barriers exist related to lack of confidence, high cost, time and lack of access to a preparation course. Nurse leaders (n = 51) completed a pre- and post-survey addressing confidence levels of participants related to the topics addressed in the nurse leader certification preparation course. There were statistically significant increases in confidence levels related to all course content for the participants. At the time of the study, there were 31.4% of participants intending to sit for the certification examination, and 5 of the 51 participants successfully sat for and passed the examination. A nurse leader certification preparation course increases confidence levels of the participants and removes barriers, thereby increasing the number of certifications obtained. The health-care climate is increasingly complex and nurse leaders need the expertise to navigate the ever-changing health-care environment. Certification in a specialty, such as leadership, serves as an indicator of a high level of competence in the field. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Concept formation: a supportive process for early career nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Tracey; West, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    Individuals come to understand abstract constructs such as that of the 'expert' through the formation of concepts. Time and repeated opportunity for observation to support the generalisation and abstraction of the developing concept are essential if the concept is to form successfully. Development of an effective concept of the 'expert nurse' is critical for early career nurses who are attempting to integrate theory, values and beliefs as they develop their clinical practice. This study explores the use of a concept development framework in a grounded theory study of the 'expert nurse'. Qualitative. Using grounded theory methods for data collection and analysis, semi-structured interviews were conducted with registered nurses. The participants were asked to describe their concept of the 'expert nurse' and to discuss their experience of developing this. Participants reported forming their concept of the 'expert nurse', after multiple opportunities to engage with nurses identified as 'expert'. This identification did not necessarily relate to the designated position of the 'expert nurse' or assigned mentors. When the early career nurse does not successfully form a concept of the 'expert nurse', difficulties in personal and professional development including skill/knowledge development may arise. To underpin development of their clinical practice effectively, early career nurses need to be provided with opportunities that facilitate the purposive formation of their own concept of the 'expert nurse'. Formation of this concept is not well supported by the common practice of assigning mentors. Early career nurses must be provided with the time and the opportunity to individually develop and refine their concept of the 'expert nurse'. To achieve this, strategies including providing opportunities to engage with expert nurses and discussion of the process of concept formation and its place in underpinning personal judgments may be of assistance. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing

  11. Um olhar sobre as avaliações de Cursos de Graduação em Enfermagem Una mirada sobre las evaluaciones de los Cursos de Graduación en Enfermería An overview of the evaluation of Nursing Graduation Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lopes Neto

    2008-02-01

    /ENF.This study aimed, starting from the index of adherence of the Pedagogical Projects of the Undergraduate Nursing Courses to the National Curriculum Rules for these Courses, to analyze qualitatively potentialities and weak points of the courses. It is a descriptive, comparative study, between the present data in the PP/UNC and the proposed in the NCR/UNC, having as basis the reports of the evaluation processes conducted by the INEP/MEC. The sample was composed by the reports used for approval and reapproval, conducted in the period from 2002 through 2006, concerning 12 undergraduate courses. One analyzed 8 courses located in the superior part and 4 in the inferior. The study revealed strong and weak points of the courses in the three dimensions of the evaluation reports, and shows needs in the colleges/courses to search for a better use of the epistemologic bases present in the NCR/UNC and proposed in the PP/UNC.

  12. A grounded theory of faculty's use of humanization to create online course climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Davenport, Rebecca A

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the way faculty establish course social presence in an online course. The community of inquiry model by Garrison, Anderson, and Archer distinguished the area of social presence as an important component of online learning, and this study sought to understand how faculty perceive and create social presence in their online classroom. By employing a grounded theory approach, a substantive theory was developed to explain the way in which faculty create and maintain an online course climate. The sample consisted of 10 nursing faculty teaching various master's in nursing courses. Through a rigorous qualitative process using nursing faculty interviews and online course analysis, humanization was found to be the core category in setting online course climate. Faculty's efforts to humanize the climate lead each member of the community to view the other members as real, thereby enabling the establishment of online social presence.

  13. Reverse case study: to think like a nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Deborah A

    2011-01-01

    Reverse case study is a collaborative, innovative, active learning strategy that nurse educators can use in the classroom. Groups of students develop a case study and a care plan from a list of medications and a short two- to three-sentence scenario. The students apply the nursing process to thoroughly develop a complete case study written as a concept map. The strategy builds on previous learned information and applies the information to new content, thus promoting critical thinking and problem solving. Reverse case study has been used in both associate and baccalaureate nursing degree theory courses to generate discussion and assist students in thinking like a nurse. 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Changes in nursing students' expectations of nursing clinical faculties' competences: A longitudinal, mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Robert; Prlić, Nada; Milutinović, Dragana; Marjanac, Igor; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2017-12-01

    Changes in nursing students' expectations of their clinical nursing faculty competences over the course of time are an insufficiently researched phenomenon. To explore what competences BSc nursing students expect from their clinical faculties during their clinical training, and whether their expectations changed during their three-year studies. Furthermore, to survey factors which influenced their expectations and whether the fulfilment levels of their expectations influenced their feelings, learning, and behaviour. A two-phase, mixed-methods design was used. The Higher Nursing Education Institution in Osijek, Croatia, European Union. A cohort of 34 BSc nursing students, who were followed over the course of their three-year studies. In Phase I, in each year, prior to their clinical training, participants responded to the same modified Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory questionnaire about their expectations of clinical faculties' competences (52 items representing six categories of competences). In Phase II, seven days after their graduation, participants wrote reflections on the aforementioned expectations during their studies. The results show that Clinical faculties' evaluation of student was the category in which participants had the highest expectations in all three years. Results of Wilcoxon signed rank test indicate a significant increase of participants' expectations in all categories of clinical nursing faculties' competences during their study. Participants' reflections confirm these results and indicate that actual competences of clinical faculties and behaviour have the most significant effects on the change in these expectations. Participants reported that expectations, if fulfilled, facilitate their learning and motivation for better performance. BSc nursing students' expectations of clinical nursing faculty competences represent an important concept, as they obviously determine the quality of faculty practice. Hence, they should be

  15. Preparing British Military nurses to deliver nursing care on deployment. An Afghanistan study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Alan; Finnegan, Sara; Bates, David; Ritsperis, Debra; McCourt, Kath; Thomas, Mike

    2015-01-01

    This paper forms part of the first British Armed forces qualitative nursing research study undertaken on deployment. To provide an analysis of the impact and effectiveness of the pre-deployment educational preparation and clinical placements provided for military nurses. A Constructivist Grounded Theory was utilised with data collected through semi-structured interviews with 18 nurses based in Camp Bastion Hospital, Afghanistan during 2013. Initial coding indicated 21 educational preparation and clinical placement categories that influenced the delivery of nursing care. Analysis of these elements led to the identification of four major clusters: Military Nursing Care; Military Nurse Education; Unique Hospital Environment and Clinical Placements. Educational preparation consists of completing deployable operational nursing competencies, specialist training and individual tailored courses. This strategy was viewed as proving the appropriate academic requirement. However, training would be enhanced by introducing a formalised military preceptorship programme focussing on fundamental nursing skills. Caring for children was a particular concern, and it was emphasised that educational courses must be combined with a standardised clinical placement policy. Adequate clinical exposure can be challenging as nurses are not routinely exposed to War Zone levels of trauma in the UK. Clinical placements need to be standardised and harmonised, and located in areas where nurses cared for patients with similar injury patterns to those witnessed on deployment. Current NHS Trust placements can reduce the opportunities for employment in suitable clinical environments and diminishing the openings for collective military training. Better use should be made of clinical rotation programmes, including high dependency units, elective surgery, medical assessment units, paediatrics, and outreach teams such as burns and plastic surgery and pain management. Practice Educators should be utilised

  16. [Reducing occupational burnout and enhancing job performance in new nurses: the efficacy of "last mile" programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Liu, Pei-Fen; Ho, Hsueh-Hua; Chen, Ping-Ling; Chao, Hui-Lin; Chen, Hsiao-Lien

    2012-08-01

    New nurses undergo a stressful and challenging transition process in the nursing workplace. Lack of patient care knowledge and skills and work adaption difficulties lead to a high turnover rate that drains essential new talent away from the nursing profession and further exacerbates professional staffing shortages in the healthcare sector. The "last mile" program is a program developed jointly by a nursing school and hospital as a mechanism to bridge classroom learning to clinical practice and smooth the transition of nursing students into nursing professionals. The purpose of this study was to understand the effect of the "last mile" program on job performance and occupational burnout among new nurses. We conducted a quasi-experimental study in 2009 on a convenience sample of new nurses in a medical center. Participants were assigned into two groups, namely those enrolled in the last mile program (n = 29) and those not enrolled in the program (n = 94). Research team members and several collaborative universities developed the last mile program used in this study; Seven experts established content validity; The last mile program included 84 hours of lecture courses and 160 hours of clinical practice. Data was collected using the nursing job performance scale developed in 2007 by Greenslade and Jimmieson and translated ÷ back translated into an equivalent Chinese version. Exploratory factor analysis showed all items aggraded into 8 factors, which could be divided into task performance and contextual performance concept categories. Task performance concepts included: social support, information, coordination of care, and technical care; Contextual performance concepts included: interpersonal support, job-task support, volunteering for additional duties and compliance. The Cronbach's α for the 8 factors were .70-.95. The occupational burnout inventory included the 4 subscales of personal burnout, work-related burnout, client-related burnout, and over

  17. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join Now International Welcome to PENS The Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society (PENS) is committed to the development ... nurses in the art and science of pediatric endocrinology nursing. Learn More Text1 2018 PENS Call for ...

  18. [Research priorities and research topics for cardiovascular nursing: the Swiss Research Agenda for Nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Imhof, Lorenz

    2008-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are worldwide a major challenge for the health care system and the number one reason for premature mortality and lost life years. Many accomplishments to reduce risk factors and improve treatment in acute and chronic disease and rehabilitation have been initiated by medical research but were also embraced by nursing research, which provided valuable knowledge about supporting risk factor modification and patients' self-management. Nursing research in the cardiovascular field has a long tradition in the US. In Europe cardiovascular nursing research also developed over the past decade, with increasing participation of Swiss nurse researchers. Efforts in this field of cardiovascular nursing have been made to convey projects in nursing research that help to enhance the health of the population sustainably and improve well-being in patients with acute and chronic courses of cardiovascular disease. Scientific knowledge is pivotal in developing evidence-based nursing interventions. Since both the German and the French speaking part of Switzerland have been lacking a literature-based and expert-supported agenda for nursing research, the aim of the Swiss Research Agenda for Nursing (SRAN) project was to develop an agenda providing researchers, funding agencies, and politics with orientation. This article takes the seven priorities of the SRAN project and links them to the topics of risk factor modification, rehabilitation programs, self-care, and patient education. The article presents the first agenda for cardiovascular nursing for the years 2007 to 2017. The agenda will serve to develop an action plan and to promote nursing research projects in the field of cardiovascular nursing in Switzerland.

  19. Care for the Caregiver: Evaluation of Mind-Body Self-Care for Accelerated Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Barbara L; Motter, Tracey; Ross, Ratchneewan; Goliat, Laura M; Sharpnack, Patricia A; Govoni, Amy L; Bozeman, Michelle C; Rababah, Jehad

    2016-01-01

    Stress affects the well-being of both nursing students and the individuals with whom they work. With the theory of cognitive appraisal as a framework for this study, it is proposed that mind-body self-care strategies promote stress management by stabilization of emotions. Outcomes will be a perception of less stress and more mindful engagement with the environment. Objective of the study was to describe an evaluation of student perceived stress and mindfulness to 1-hour per week of class time dedicated to mind-body self-care (yoga, mindful breathing, Reiki, and essential oil therapy). It was a quasi-experimental study; data collection took place at 4 time points. Participants were entry-level accelerated nursing students from 3 US universities: 50 in the treatment group, 64 in the comparison group. Data included health-promoting practices using Health-Promoting Promotion Lifestyle Profile II as a control variable, stress and mindfulness (Perceived Stress Scale [PSS] and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale [MAAS]), and demographic information; analysis using mixed-design repeated-measures analysis of variances. There was a statistically significant interaction between intervention and time on PSS scores, F(3, 264) = 3.95, P = .009, partial η(2) = 0.043, with PSS scores of the intervention group decreasing from baseline to T3 when intervention ended whereas PSS scores of the comparison group increased from baseline. The average scores on the MAAS did not differ significantly. Evaluation of an embedded mind-body self-care module in the first nursing course demonstrated promising improvements in stress management. The findings support the appropriateness of integrating mind-body self-care content into nursing curricula to enhance students' ability to regulate stress.

  20. Career choice and perceptions of nursing among healthcare students in higher educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Sok Ying; Wu, Ling Ting; Chow, Yeow Leng; Lim, Siriwan; Tan, Khoon Kiat

    2017-05-01

    Due to the ageing population and competition from other healthcare courses, a greater demand in the healthcare workforce has made it challenging for educational institutions to attract school leavers to enter nursing courses. Understanding the considerations of students who have chosen non-nursing healthcare courses and their perceptions of nursing can help identify specific strategies to enhance the attractiveness of nursing course. This study aims to examine the differences between healthcare career choices and perceptions of nursing as a career choice among first-year non-nursing healthcare students. A descriptive survey design was conducted at the beginning of the healthcare courses of seven healthcare groups and from four higher educational institutions in Singapore. A total of 451 students responded, yielding an overall response rate of 52.7%. The online survey was administered using a valid and reliable 35-item parallel scale, known as the Healthcare Career Choice and Nursing Career Choice. The participants perceived prior healthcare exposure as the most influential factor and self-efficacy as the least influential factor when choosing nursing as a career. In comparison to their own healthcare career choices, nursing was perceived to have greater gender stigma and, as nurses, they would be less likely to achieve higher qualifications and career advancements, and they would be less likely to enjoy fulfilling careers. They also perceived that they would be less likely to gain their parents' support to pursue nursing and to make their parents proud. This study provides educators and policy-makers with vital information to develop key strategies to improve nursing enrolment in educational institutions. These strategies include early exposure to nursing as a rewarding career during school years, addressing the issue of gender stigma, and promoting information on the career and educational advancement of a registered nurse to parents of school leavers. Copyright

  1. Experiences of first-year nursing students during an education redesign: findings from the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrogorsky, Tanya L; Raber, Anjanette M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to summarize first-year students' (n = 908) experience during a nursing education redesign. Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education (OCNE) began its redesign of nursing education in 2000, long before the current national calls for nursing education reform. As OCNE moved from planning to implementation, a comprehensive evaluation of the students, the program, and curriculum ensued. Data were collected from first-year nursing students each spring from 2007-2010 using a standardized survey instrument that included demographic, attitudinal, and opinion-based survey items. Results indicated fellow students, course lectures and interaction, and faculty and courses were rated areas of satisfaction. Areas needing improvement included advising and facilities, administration, quality of instruction and curriculum, and overall program effectiveness. Mean scaled and open-ended responses from each area are reported.

  2. Nursing students attitudes across the suicidal behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Cristiane Lappann Bott

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Examine the attitudes of nursing students with the suicidal behavior before and after a training course on the subject. Methodology. Performed quantitative, cross-sectional study, with 58 nursing students from a public university in Minas Gerais (Brazil who participated in training on the theme. For data collection were used the Questionnaire of Attitudes Before Suicidal Behavior. The questionnaire was applied just before the start and the end of the training measuring attitudes toward suicidal behavior. Results. Were found statistically significant differences in negative feelings factors on the patient and perception of professional competence (p <0.05. The right factor to suicide was not significantly different among nursing students. Conclusion. The academic training may have influenced positively the desired changes regarding the attitudes of nursing students across the suicidal behavior.

  3. [Family groups in nursing graduation teaching practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis, Aisllan Diego; da Silva, Priscila Patrícia; Claudino, Talita Xavier; de Oliveira, Alice Guimarães Bottaro

    2010-09-01

    The centers of psychosocial care (CAPS, acronym in Portuguese) are strategic devices for mental health care currently available in Brazil. Nurses are professionals required to compose the minimum staff of this device, which values the group activities involving users. This study presents a report of the experience of nursing undergraduates from Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (UFMT) on their conducting waiting-room group sessions with relatives of users of a CAPS from Cuiabá, Mato Grosso state. This experience is justified by the fact that nursing students have few opportunities to develop group approach abilities during their graduation course, which focuses mainly on clinical individual care. The aim of the experience was to provide theoretical-practical learning of all the work stages of group work: recognizing the need and possibility of conducting the activity, planning, coordination and group evaluation. The results confirm the need and possibility of performing group experiences in mental health care and in nursing education.

  4. Factors affecting assertiveness among student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sanaa Abd El Azim

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the factors affecting assertiveness among student nurses. The study was carried out at Faculty of Nursing, Port-Said University, on 207 student nurses from four different grades. Rathus Assertiveness Schedule, consisted of 30 items, was used to measure the students' assertiveness level and a 12-item scale developed by Spreitzer was used to measure students' psychological empowerment. The study results showed that 60.4% of the students were assertive, while about half of the students were empowered. A positive relation between student assertiveness and psychological empowerment was detected. Moreover, positive relations regarding family income and students' assertiveness and psychological empowerment were determined. The study recommended introduction of specific courses aiming at enhancing the acquisition of assertiveness skills, in addition, nurse educators must motivate their students to express their opinion and personal rights and also they must pay attention for students' empowerment and enhance students' autonomy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Developing nursing care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Helen

    2016-02-24

    This article aims to enhance nurses' understanding of nursing care plans, reflecting on the past, present and future use of care planning. This involves consideration of the central theories of nursing and discussion of nursing models and the nursing process. An explanation is provided of how theories of nursing may be applied to care planning, in combination with clinical assessment tools, to ensure that care plans are context specific and patient centred.

  6. Nonparametric additive regression for repeatedly measured data

    KAUST Repository

    Carroll, R. J.; Maity, A.; Mammen, E.; Yu, K.

    2009-01-01

    We develop an easily computed smooth backfitting algorithm for additive model fitting in repeated measures problems. Our methodology easily copes with various settings, such as when some covariates are the same over repeated response measurements

  7. Nursing education in Turkey: from past to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahçecik, Nefise; Alpar, Sule Ecevit

    2009-10-01

    Nursing education in Turkey first began in 1912 with the introduction of a 6-month course to train voluntary medical attendants, with Dr. Besim Omer Pasha's advice to the Red Crescent Association regarding the inadequacy of healthcare services, as a crucial need for nursing services resulted due to significant losses given during Tripoli (1911) and the Balkan (1912) wars. Carrying out their duties in battlefields and hospitals with great devotion, the first nurses graduated from the course played a significant role in promoting the nursing profession and its importance. Nursing education which used to continue at the secondary and high-school levels increased to bachelor's level in 1955. Master's program in nursing was opened in 1968, and Ph.D. programs was opened in 1972. Professional members of the practice, well-equipped in accordance with the requirements of the age, who conduct their studies at the national and international levels, are trained as the consequence of the recent developments in nursing education. The number of nurses at the universities who offered higher levels of academic degree, and especially the number of nurses who gained 'science expert' title at the inpatient medical establishments has increased. This situation and globalization, which ensures an easier access to nursing literature through internet, enable a more systematic and of a better quality healthcare. This article explains the nursing education in Turkey from past to present. The developments in nursing education which have taken place in Turkey are expressed in a chronological order, starting from the Ottoman Empire, until the present. Compared with other countries, nursing education is given on different levels in Turkey. Recently, however, the obstacles regarding the differences especially at the bachelor's degree level were overcome, appropriate changes were made, and education melioration efforts gained speed.

  8. Badminton: Course Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, David G.

    A proposal is presented for a Community College of Philadelphia Life Sciences and Allied Health Services course in Badminton. Following a standard cover form, a statement of purpose explains that the course is designed to introduce students to the techniques, knowledge, and strategies of badminton. Next, course goals and a course outline are…

  9. Nursing specialty and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Laura; Ryan, Carey S; Thomas, Scott; Greenberg, Martin; Rolniak, Susan

    2007-03-01

    We examined the relationship between perceived control and burnout among three nursing specialties: nurse practitioners, nurse managers, and emergency nurses. Survey data were collected from 228 nurses from 30 states. Findings indicated that emergency nurses had the least control and the highest burnout, whereas nurse practitioners had the most control and the least burnout. Mediational analyses showed that expected control, hostility, and stressor frequency explained differences between specialties in burnout. The implications of these findings for interventions that reduce burnout and promote nursing retention are discussed.

  10. Exploring the Dominant Discourse of Baccalaureate Nursing Education in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannik, Ahmadreza; Yousefy, Alireza; Mohammadi, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Understanding how academic dominant discourse is implicated in the shaping of nursing identity, professional aspirations and socialization of nursing students is useful as it can lead to strategies that promote nursing profession. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative research conducted through discourse analysis approach. Semi-structured interviews, focus group, and direct observation of undergraduate theoretical and clinical courses were used to collect the data. Participants were 71 nursing students, 20 nursing educators, and 5 nursing board staffs from five universities in Iran. Results: Data analysis resulted in the development of four main themes that represent essential discourses of nursing education. The discourses explored are theoretical and scientific nursing, domination of biomedical paradigm, caring as an empty signifier, and more than expected role of research in nursing education discourse. Conclusions: The results indicated that academics attempt to define itself based on “scientific knowledge” and faculties seek to socialize students by emphasizing the scientific/theoretical basis of nursing and research, with the dominance of biomedical discourse. It fails to conceptually grasp the reality of nursing practice, and the result is an untested and impoverished theoretical discourse. The analysis highlights the need for the formation of a strong and new discourse, which contains articulation of signifiers extracted from the nature of the profession. PMID:28382053

  11. Fear of repeated injections in children younger than 4 years receiving subcutaneous allergy immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Gabriele; Shankar, Viswanathan; Nazari, Ramin; Kooragayalu, Shravan; Smith, Mitchell; Wiznia, Andrew; Rosenstreich, David

    2012-12-01

    Allergy immunotherapy during early childhood may have potential benefits for the prevention of asthma and allergy morbidity. However, subcutaneous immunotherapy has not yet been prospectively researched in children younger than 4 years, primarily because of safety concerns, including the fear and psychological distress young children may experience with repeated needle injections. To quantify fear in atopic children younger than 4 years with a history of wheezing who are receiving subcutaneous immunotherapy. Fear of injection was graded during a total of 788 immunotherapy injection visits in 18 children (age, 37 months; SD, 9 months) receiving subcutaneous allergy immunotherapy. The parent and the injection nurse assigned fear scores on a scale of 0 to 10 after each injection visit. At the time of analysis, children had a median of 49 injection visits (range, 12-88) during a median study period of 81.5 weeks (range, 15-165 weeks). Fifteen children (83%) lost their fear of injections during the study. A fear score of 0 was achieved after a mean of 8.4 visits (SD, 7.4). The more injection visits were missed, the more likely children were to retain fear of injections (hazard ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-1.02; P=.05). Age, adverse events, number of injections at each visit, and change of injection personnel were not associated with increased fear. Our analysis suggests that most children receiving weekly subcutaneous immunotherapy lose their fear of injections during the treatment course. Children with increased intervals between visits may be at higher risk of experiencing fear of injections. clinicaltrial.gov identifier NCT01028560. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transnational nursing programs: models, advantages and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael

    2002-07-01

    Conducting transnational programs can be a very rewarding activity for a School, Faculty or University. Apart from increasing the profile of the university, the conduct of transnational programs can also provide the university with openings for business opportunities, consultative activities, and collaborative research. It can also be a costly exercise placing an enormous strain on limited resources with little reward for the provider. Transnational ventures can become nonviable entities in a very short period of time due to unanticipated global economic trends. Transnational courses offered by Faculties of Business and Computing are commonplace, however, there is a growing number of health science programs, particularly nursing that are being offered transnational. This paper plans an overview of several models employed for the delivery of transnational nursing courses and discusses several key issues pertaining to conducting courses outside the host university's country.

  13. Topological characteristics of helical repeat proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Barford, D

    The recent elucidation of protein structures based upon repeating amino acid motifs, including the armadillo motif, the HEAT motif and tetratricopeptide repeats, reveals that they belong to the class of helical repeat proteins. These proteins share the common property of being assembled from tandem

  14. Digital storage of repeated signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prozorov, S.P.

    1984-01-01

    An independent digital storage system designed for repeated signal discrimination from background noises is described. The signal averaging is performed off-line in the real time mode by means of multiple selection of the investigated signal and integration in each point. Digital values are added in a simple summator and the result is recorded the storage device with the volume of 1024X20 bit from where it can be output on an oscillograph, a plotter or transmitted to a compUter for subsequent processing. The described storage is reliable and simple device on one base of which the systems for the nuclear magnetic resonapce signal acquisition in different experiments are developed

  15. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Kovács

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried out in the morning and afternoon in order to decrease the effect of the distant temporal correction. To further increase the accuracy, on-site dIdD variometer has also been installed near the Aggtelek station, in the Baradla cave, during the survey of the easternmost sites. The paper presents the technical details and the results of our last campaign. The improvement of the accuracy of the temporal reduction by the use of the local variometer is also reported.

  16. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility

  17. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  18. Hybrid FRC under repeated loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komlos, K.; Babal, B.; Nuernbergerova, T.

    1993-01-01

    Fibre reinforced concretes (FRC) containing several volume fractions in different ratios of two types of fibres - polypropylene and steel, were tested under repeated loading. Mechanical properties of specimens - cubes 150/150/150 mm (for compressive strength), prisms 100/100/400 (for flexural strength), short cylinders 150/60 mm (for impact strength) have been experimentally investigated before and after cyclic loading at the age of 28 days curing time. Mix proportions were designed after DIN 1045 with max. aggregate size 8 mm and grading curve B 8. Portland Cement PC 400 in the amount of 450 kg. m -3 was applied and W/C ratio 0.55. Workability of mixes was measured by Vebe method and regulated by plasticizing admixture Ligoplast Na. Maximum hybrid fibre volume fraction (polypropylene + steel) was 1.0%. Dynamic forces generated in Schenck testing machine with frequency 16 Hz had sinusoidal wave form varying between 0.7 and 0.1 of static mechanical characteristics. The number of cycles in all tests was 10 5 . The residual MOR at static four point bending test and working diagram force-deflection was carried out as well. The impact properties after repeated loading in compression were tested by means of falling weight test. Relationships between composition of fibre composites with different combination of polypropylene (0.2, 0.3, 0.5% by volume) and steel (0.5, 0.7, and 0.8% by volume) fibre content were obtained and technological properties of mixes as well. (author)

  19. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  20. The process of community health nursing clinical clerkship: A grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ildarabadi, Eshagh; Karimi Moonaghi, Hossein; Heydari, Abbas; Taghipour, Ali

    2013-11-01

    The performance of the community health nurse depends on a combination of scientific and practical competencies acquired by educational experiences during the nursing course. Curriculum planners of nursing education need to understand nursing education to train professional and community-oriented nurses. The aim of this article is to explore the experiences of nursing students during their community health nursing clinical clerkship courses. A grounded theory approach was used to conduct this study. Twelve nursing students, 13 health-care staff members, and 10 nursing instructors were interviewed individually in 2011-2012. The interviews were tape-recorded and later transcribed verbatim. The transcriptions were analyzed using the method of Strauss and Corbin. AMBIVALENCE OF MOTIVATION WAS THE MAIN CATEGORY AND INCLUDED FIVE SUBCATEGORIES: Professional identity, educational atmosphere, educational management, motivation-based approaches, and inadequate productivity. This paper presents the aspects of the community health nursing clerkship course from the viewpoint of students in areas such as the role of the community health nurse, attitude toward the course, medical orientation, prerequisite skills/knowledge, poor administrative planning, rotation of students, insufficient activity for students, passiveness, providing service to clients, responsibility, and inproductivity. These categories could explain the nature of the community health nursing clerkship of the Mashhad Faculty of Nursing and probably others in Iran. The findings revealed inadequate productivity of the community health nursing education; so, it is suggested to define a position for nurses in this setting and remove barriers and provide conditions for them to play more important roles in the promotion of community health.