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Sample records for repeated fluoroscopic examinations

  1. Estimation of breast doses and breast cancer risk associated with repeated fluoroscopic chest examinations of women with tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, J.D. Jr.; Rosenstein, M.; Trout, E.D.

    1978-01-01

    A methodology is presented to estimate cumulative breast dose and breast cancer risk for women exposed to repeated fluoroscopic chest examinations during air collapse therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis. Medical record abstraction, physician interview, patient contact, machine exposure measurements, and absorbed dose computations were combined to estimate average breast doses for 1047 Massachusetts women who were treated between 1930 and 1954. The methodology presented considers breast size and composition, patient orientation, x-ray field size and location, beam quality, type of examination, machine exposure rate, and exposure time during fluoroscopic examinations. The best estimate for the risk of radiation-induced cancer for the women living longer than 10 years after initial fluoroscopic exposure is 6.2 excess breast cancers per million woman-year-rad with 90% confidence limits of 2.8 and 10.7 cancers/10 6 WY-rad. When breast cancer risk is considered as a function of absorbed dose in the breast, instead of as a function of the number of fluoroscopic examinations, a linear dose--response relationship over the range of estimated doses is consistent with the data. However, because of the uncertainty due to small-sample variability and because of the wide range of assumptions regarding certain fluoroscopy conditions, other dose--response relationships are compatible with the data

  2. Cancer mortality in women after repeated fluoroscopic examinations of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, J.D.; Monson, R.R.; Rosenstein, M.

    1981-01-01

    Among 1,047 women fluoroscopically examined in average of 102 times during pneumothorax therapy for tuberculosis and followed up to 45 years (average . 27 yr), no increase in the total number of cancer deaths occurred when these women were compared to 717 women who received other treatments [relative risk (RR) . 0.8]. However, elevated risks of mortality from stomach cancer (RR . 2.3), rectal cancer (RR . 3.8), breast cancer (RR . 1.2), lung cancer (RR . 1.8), and leukemia (RR . 1.2) were observed, but none was statistically significant and all were based on very small numbers of deaths. These increases were balanced by decreases of genital cancer (RR . 0.2), pancreatic cancer (RR . 0.9), lymphoma (RR . 0.6), and all other cancers (RR . 0.1). Average cumulative absorbed doses were 110 rads for the lungs, 33 rads for the trunk, 13 rads for the active bone marrow, and 7 rads for the stomach. The following upper levels of excess risk could be excluded with 95% confidence: 3.5 deaths/10(6) woman-year (WY)-rad for lung cancer, 4.8 deaths/10(6) WY-rad for lymphoma, and 12 deaths/10(6) WY-rad for leukemia. These findings indicated that the carcinogenic effect of multiple low-dose X-ray exposures was not greater than that currently assumed

  3. Pre-procedural scout radiographs are unnecessary for routine pediatric fluoroscopic examinations

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    Creeden, Sean G.; Rao, Anil G.; Eklund, Meryle J.; Hill, Jeanne G.; Thacker, Paul G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Although practice patterns vary, scout radiographs are often routinely performed with pediatric fluoroscopic studies. However few studies have evaluated their utility in routine pediatric fluoroscopy. To evaluate the value of scout abdomen radiographs in routine barium or water-soluble enema, upper gastrointestinal (GI) series, and voiding cystourethrogram pediatric fluoroscopic procedures. We retrospectively evaluated 723 barium or water-soluble enema, upper GI series, and voiding cystourethrogram fluoroscopic procedures performed at our institution. We assessed patient history and demographics, clinical indication for the examination, prior imaging findings and impressions, scout radiograph findings, additional findings provided by the scout radiograph that were previously unknown, and whether the scout radiograph contributed any findings that significantly changed management. We retrospectively evaluated 723 fluoroscopic studies (368 males and 355 females) in pediatric patients. Of these, 700 (96.8%) had a preliminary scout radiograph. Twenty-three (3.2%) had a same-day radiograph substituted as a scout radiograph. Preliminary scout abdomen radiographs/same-day radiographs showed no new significant findings in 719 (99.4%) studies. New but clinically insignificant findings were seen in 4 (0.6%) studies and included umbilical hernia, inguinal hernia and hip dysplasia. No findings were found on the scout radiographs that would either alter the examination performed or change management with regard to the exam. Pre-procedural scout abdomen radiographs are unnecessary in routine barium and water-soluble enema, upper GI series, and voiding cystourethrogram pediatric fluoroscopic procedures and can be substituted with a spot fluoroscopic last-image hold. (orig.)

  4. Development of a method to calculate organ doses for the upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleiman, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    A method was developed to quantitatively measure the upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examination in order to calculate organ doses. The dynamic examination was approximated with a set of discrete x-ray fields. Once the examination was segmented into discrete x-ray fields appropriate organ dose tables were generated using an existing computer program for organ dose calculations. This, along with knowledge of the radiation exposures associated with each of the fields, enabled the calculation of organ doses for the entire dynamic examination. The protocol involves videotaping the examination while fluoroscopic technique factors, tube current and tube potential, are simultaneously recorded on the audio tracks of the videotape. Subsequent analysis allows the dynamic examination to be segmented into a series of discrete x-ray fields uniquely defined by field size, projection, and anatomical region. The anatomical regions associated with the upper gastrointestinal examination were observed to be the upper, middle, and lower esophagus, the gastroesophageal junction, the stomach, and the duodenum

  5. Mortality from breast cancer after irradiation during fluoroscopic examinations in patients being treated for tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.B.; Howe, G.R.; Sherman, G.J.; Lindsay, J.P.; Yaffe, M.J.; Dinner, P.J.; Risch, H.A.; Preston, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing use of mammography to screen asymptomatic women makes it important to know the risk of breast cancer associated with exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. We examined the mortality from breast cancer in a cohort of 31,710 women who had been treated for tuberculosis at Canadian sanatoriums between 1930 and 1952. A substantial proportion (26.4 percent) had received radiation doses to the breast of 10 cGy or more from repeated fluoroscopic examinations during therapeutic pneumothoraxes. Women exposed to greater than or equal to 10 cGy of radiation had a relative risk of death from breast cancer of 1.36, as compared with those exposed to less than 10 cGy (95 percent confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.67; P = 0.001). The data were most consistent with a linear dose-response relation. The risk was greatest among women who had been exposed to radiation when they were between 10 and 14 years of age; they had a relative risk of 4.5 per gray, and an additive risk of 6.1 per 10(4) person-years per gray. With increasing age at first exposure, there was substantially less excess risk, and the radiation effect appeared to peak approximately 25 to 34 years after the first exposure. Our additive model for lifetime risk predicts that exposure to 1 cGy at the age of 40 increases the number of deaths from breast cancer by 42 per million women. We conclude that the risk of breast cancer associated with radiation decreases sharply with increasing age at exposure and that even a small benefit to women of screening mammography would outweigh any possible risk of radiation-induced breast cancer

  6. Radiotherapy verification film for estimating cumulative entrance skin exposure for fluoroscopic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geise, R.A.; Ansel, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of skin entrance exposures during fluoroscopic procedures is complicated by the use of automatic exposure control devices and the presence of contrast media. Due to variability in positioning spot films from patient to patient, standard dosimeters, such as thermoluminescent, cannot be properly placed on the skin prior to examination. Prepackaged film of the type used for portal verification in radiation therapy held next to the patient's skin in a specially modified patient examination gown was found to be useful for determining the entrance skin exposure from both fluoroscopy and spot films during air contrast barium enema exams. The usable sensitivity range of this film has been found satisfactory for exposure measurements at exposures and kVps typically used for gastrointestinal fluoroscopic procedures. Errors in exposure estimates due to changes in film speed and contrast with kVp are less than 5% for the range of kVps used. Errors from variations in beam quality due to the adjacency of scattering material are approximately 5%. Entrance exposures determined with film agreed with those determined from TLD measurements to within 21%, with an average difference of 9%

  7. The child fluoroscopic examination in the I.I.-DR. Reduction of radiation exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Takayuki

    2001-01-01

    This examination for I.I.-DR conditions was done for the purpose of reducing radiation exposure dose in child gastrointestinal fluoroscopy. Fluoroscopic apparatus used was Toshiba MAX-1000A with imaging recorder DDX-1000A. Dose was measured with a thimble ionization chamber Radcal Corporation Model 9015. Examinations for conditions were performed with the standard dose determined, the digital value 300, giving the plateau contrast ratio of acryl plate/barium sulfate. Reduction to about 10% dose (57 μGy/min for pulse fluoroscopy and 6.8 μGy/film for filming) relative to the usual method (764 μGy/min and 36.0 μGy/film, respectively) was found attained with additional filter of Al 0.5 mm + Cu 0.2 mm and IRIS diameter 100 with acryl thickness of 10 cm. Actual images of 6 months old baby were presented. (K.H.)

  8. Estimation of entrance dose during selected fluoroscopic examinations in some hospitals in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Heba Abdalkareem Osman

    2016-01-01

    A diagnostic fluoroscopy is a modality that involves visualizing the anatomy using radiation in real time. Therefore, patients doses have a potential for being great, increasing the chance of the radiation induced carcinogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine the mean entrance surface dose (ESD) from selected fluoroscopic examinations namely, hysterosalpingography (HSG) and ascendingurethogram (ASU) in three hospitals in Khartoum State. A total of 87 and 110 patents for HSG and ASU respectively were examined. The data were collected over four months. The mean ESD for patients who underwent HSG were 16.2 mGy, 20.6 mGy and 25.9 mGY respectively, while the ESD for patient who underwent ascendingurethrogram for AP view were 3.5mGy, 2.9mGy and 11.9mGy and for OB view 15.9 mGy, 18.3 mGy and 25.4 mGy. Patient doses were calculated using mathematical equation and the results were compared with the ESDs calculated using mathematical equation and the results were found to be comparable with the ESDs reported in previous studies and within the guidance level established by the ICRP. Fluoroscopy time, operator skills, x-ray machine type and clinical complexity of the procedures were shown to be major contributors to the variations reported in the measured ESDs. The study demonstrated the need for standardization of techniques throughout the hospitals and suggested that there ia a need to optimize the procedures.(Author)

  9. Patient dose measurements in fluoroscopic examinations, aiming to the establishment of reference levels in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canevaro, L.; Drexler, G.

    2001-01-01

    This work was performed to investigate the actual exposure levels of the patients submitted to fluoroscopic procedures in diagnostic radiology. The data will be useful for a baseline in the establishment of local reference levels for fluoroscopic procedures, as recommended by the European Commission and IAEA. At present time there are no internationally accepted definitions for references levels for fluoroscopic complex procedures. Dose-area product (DAP) meters were employed in a pilot survey expressing the radiation exposures in terms of this quantity. This class of instrumentation has not yet been employed in Brazil. Parameters recorded were radiographic technique, fluoroscopy time, number of images, fluoroscopic and radiographic field sizes and DAPs. For fluoroscopy practice, a reference parameters set is recommended, instead of one diagnostic reference level. High patient exposures were found, calling for joined actions of health authorities, physicians, medical physicists, technicians and manufacturers. Monitoring of patient exposure, optimizing the radiation protection and establishing quantitative assessments of the exposition to the population in Brazil in this kind of procedure is important. (author)

  10. Relationship between source-surface distance and patient dose in fluoroscopic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shoichi; Asada, Yasuki; Nishi, Kazuta; Mizuno, Emiko; Hara, Natsue; Orito, Takeo; Kamei, Tetsuya; Koga, Sukehiko

    2000-01-01

    The International Electrotechnical Commission, IEC provided in its standard IEC 60601-1-3 (1994) to prevent the use during radioscopic irradiation of focal spot to skin distances less than 20 cm if the X-RAY EQUIPMENT is specified for RADIOSCOPY during surgery or 30 cm for other specified applications. This standard was reflected in the Japanese Industrial Standard JIS Z 4701-1997, which provided the minimum distance from focal spot to skin to be 30 cm for the use of a fluoroscopic and radiographic table (Under-table type). However, JIS had formerly provided the minimum distance to be 40 cm and so does the current Medical Treatment Law. The draft revision for the Medical Treatment Law currently discussed has consideration to adopt the value 30 cm in accordance with the current JIS. Our research intended to investigate the impact on the entrance surface dose for the change of the focal spot to skin distance from 40 cm to 30 cm. The result was 20-30% increase of the entrance surface dose for the focal spot to skin distance 30 cm. Taking patient exposure dose into account, we need further and more sufficient discussion with this result before adopting this value to the Medical Treatment Law. (author)

  11. Contrast media for fluoroscopic examinations of the GI and GU tracts: current challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federle, Michael P; Jaffe, Tracy A; Davis, Peter L; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M; Levine, Marc S

    2017-01-01

    One of the significant challenges facing radiologists who perform and interpret studies of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems have been periodic interruptions in the availability of barium and iodinated contrast media specially formulated for gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) studies. These interruptions are due to the US Food and Drug Administration's recent requirement for more stringent documentation of the safety and efficacy of contrast media and the consolidation among contrast manufacturers. Therefore, radiologists may be required to recommend an alternative means of evaluation, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance, or endoscopy, or they may need to substitute a different formulation of a contrast agent not specifically developed for GI or GU use, for example the utilization of an agent designed and marketed for vascular use. This article reviews the current status of fluoroscopic contrast media, and provides suggestions and recommendations for the optimal and alternative use of contrast media formulations.

  12. Dosimetry measurements of X-Ray machine operating at ordinary radiology and fluoroscopic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayad, M.; Bakazi, A.; Elharby, H.

    2002-01-01

    An assessment of radiation dose levels inside diagnostic radiology rooms at King Khalid University Hospital was made. The measurements were taken using lithium Flouride detectors Also, an assessment of doses received by patients during some radiographic examinations especially at fluoroscopy has been measured. It has been noted that when rare-earth image intensifying screens were used the radiation dose received by the patient was reduced by 60%. It has been shown that a lead glass viewer caused a reduction of the radiation intensity by more than 50%. The variation of dose rate with the operating conditions of the X-ray tube has been studied, as well as the machine factor (P)

  13. Repeatability and reproducibility of decisions by latent fingerprint examiners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford T Ulery

    Full Text Available The interpretation of forensic fingerprint evidence relies on the expertise of latent print examiners. We tested latent print examiners on the extent to which they reached consistent decisions. This study assessed intra-examiner repeatability by retesting 72 examiners on comparisons of latent and exemplar fingerprints, after an interval of approximately seven months; each examiner was reassigned 25 image pairs for comparison, out of total pool of 744 image pairs. We compare these repeatability results with reproducibility (inter-examiner results derived from our previous study. Examiners repeated 89.1% of their individualization decisions, and 90.1% of their exclusion decisions; most of the changed decisions resulted in inconclusive decisions. Repeatability of comparison decisions (individualization, exclusion, inconclusive was 90.0% for mated pairs, and 85.9% for nonmated pairs. Repeatability and reproducibility were notably lower for comparisons assessed by the examiners as "difficult" than for "easy" or "moderate" comparisons, indicating that examiners' assessments of difficulty may be useful for quality assurance. No false positive errors were repeated (n = 4; 30% of false negative errors were repeated. One percent of latent value decisions were completely reversed (no value even for exclusion vs. of value for individualization. Most of the inter- and intra-examiner variability concerned whether the examiners considered the information available to be sufficient to reach a conclusion; this variability was concentrated on specific image pairs such that repeatability and reproducibility were very high on some comparisons and very low on others. Much of the variability appears to be due to making categorical decisions in borderline cases.

  14. Fluoroscopic digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynes, D.M.; Rowlands, J.A.; Edmonds, E.W.; Porter, A.J.; Toth, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have been working with three different developmental systems, exploring the clinical benefits of digital recording of the fluoroscopic image. This educational exhibit describes the components of such systems and emphasizes the strengths and weaknesses of each. Specific technical reference is made to the image intensifier, TV camera, 1,024/sup 2/ image store, hard copy devices, and the mechanics of operation in the general fluoroscopic environment. All observations indicate that the problems of resolution, motion blur, noise, field size, and dose can be solved. The findings are supported by clinical examples

  15. Intra-examiner repeatability and agreement in accommodative response measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antona, B; Sanchez, I; Barrio, A; Barra, F; Gonzalez, E

    2009-11-01

    Clinical measurement of the accommodative response (AR) identifies the focusing plane of a subject with respect to the accommodative target. To establish whether a significant change in AR has occurred, it is important to determine the repeatability of this measurement. This study had two aims: First, to determine the intraexaminer repeatability of AR measurements using four clinical methods: Nott retinoscopy, monocular estimate method (MEM) retinoscopy, binocular crossed cylinder test (BCC) and near autorefractometry. Second, to study the level of agreement between AR measurements obtained with the different methods. The AR of the right eye at one accommodative demand of 2.50 D (40 cm) was measured on two separate occasions in 61 visually normal subjects of mean age 19.7 years (range 18-32 years). The intraexaminer repeatability of the tests, and agreement between them, were estimated by the Bland-Altman method. We determined mean differences (MD) and the 95% limits of agreement [coefficient of repeatability (COR) and coefficient of agreement (COA)]. Nott retinoscopy and BCC offered the best repeatability, showing the lowest MD and narrowest 95% interval of agreement (Nott: -0.10 +/- 0.66 D, BCC: -0.05 +/- 0.75 D). The 95% limits of agreement for the four techniques were similar (COA = +/- 0.92 to +/-1.00 D) yet clinically significant, according to the expected values of the AR. The two dynamic retinoscopy techniques (Nott and MEM) had a better agreement (COA = +/-0.64 D) although this COA must be interpreted in the context of the low MEM repeatability (COR = +/-0.98 D). The best method of assessing AR was Nott retinoscopy. The BCC technique was also repeatable, and both are recommended as suitable methods for clinical use. Despite better agreement between MEM and Nott, agreement among the remaining methods was poor such that their interchangeable use in clinical practice is not recommended.

  16. [Computer optical topography: a study of the repeatability of the results of human body model examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnadskiĭ, V N

    2007-01-01

    The problem of repeatability of the results of examination of a plastic human body model is considered. The model was examined in 7 positions using an optical topograph for kyphosis diagnosis. The examination was performed under television camera monitoring. It was shown that variation of the model position in the camera view affected the repeatability of the results of topographic examination, especially if the model-to-camera distance was changed. A study of the repeatability of the results of optical topographic examination can help to increase the reliability of the topographic method, which is widely used for medical screening of children and adolescents.

  17. Fluoroscopic screen which is optically homogeneous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A high efficiency fluoroscopic screen for X-ray examination consists of an optically homogeneous crystal plate of fluorescent material such as activated cesium iodide, supported on a transparent protective plate, with the edges of the assembly beveled and optically coupled to a light absorbing compound. The product is dressed to the desired thickness and provided with an X-ray-transparent light-opaque cover. (Auth.)

  18. Quality assurance in diagnostic radiology - assessing the fluoroscopic image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabakov, S.

    1995-01-01

    The X-ray fluoroscopic image has a considerably lower resolution than the radiographic one. This requires a careful quality control aiming at optimal use of the fluoroscopic equipment. The basic procedures for image quality assessment of Image Intensifier/TV image are described. Test objects from Leeds University (UK) are used as prototypes. The results from examining 50 various fluoroscopic devices are shown. Their limiting spatial resolution varies between 0.8 lp/mm (at maximum II field size) and 2.24 lp/mm (at minimum field size). The mean value of the limiting spatial resolution for a 23 cm Image Intensifier is about 1.24 lp/mm. The mean limits of variation of the contrast/detail diagram for various fluoroscopic equipment are graphically expressed. 14 refs., 1 fig. (author)

  19. Fluoroscopic Imaging Systems. Chapter 8

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    Jones, A. K. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Fluoroscopy refers to the use of an X ray beam and a suitable image receptor for viewing images of processes or instruments in the body in real time. Fluoroscopic imaging trades the high signal to noise ratio (SNR) of radiography for high temporal resolution, as factors that maintain patient dose at an acceptable level must be used.

  20. General-purpose radiographic and fluoroscopic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Noritaka

    1982-01-01

    A new series of diagnostic tables, Model DT-KEL, was developed for general-purpose radiographic and fluoroscopic systems. Through several investigations, the table was so constructed that the basic techniques be general radiography and GI examination, and other techniques be optionally added. The diagnostic tables involve the full series of the type for various purposes and are systematized with the surrounding equipment. A retractable mechanism of grids was adopted first for general use. The fine grids with a density of 57 lines per cm, which was adopted in KEL-2, reduced the X-ray doses by 16 percent. (author)

  1. Study of problems associated with the ultrasonic examination of repeatedly repaired austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaratnam, R.; Palaniappan, M.; Baskaran, A.; Chandramohan, R.

    1994-01-01

    In recent years the ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weldments has gained increased importance as an NDE technique for the volumetric examination in the nuclear power plant construction and other industries. A study has been undertaken to evaluate the effects of multiple repairs on austenitic stainless steel weldments, for the successful ultrasonic examination. The test welds have been subjected to repeated welding cycles and the ultrasonic parameters including the defect characterization have been evaluated for analysis. The paper discusses the approach followed, analysis, results obtained and the recommendations based on the above. 1 fig., 2 tabs

  2. Validation of Diagnostic Imaging Based on Repeat Examinations. An Image Interpretation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isberg, B.; Jorulf, H.; Thorstensen, Oe.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an interpretation model, based on repeatedly acquired images, aimed at improving assessments of technical efficacy and diagnostic accuracy in the detection of small lesions. Material and Methods: A theoretical model is proposed. The studied population consists of subjects that develop focal lesions which increase in size in organs of interest during the study period. The imaging modality produces images that can be re-interpreted with high precision, e.g. conventional radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. At least four repeat examinations are carried out. Results: The interpretation is performed in four or five steps: 1. Independent readers interpret the examinations chronologically without access to previous or subsequent films. 2. Lesions found on images at the last examination are included in the analysis, with interpretation in consensus. 3. By concurrent back-reading in consensus, the lesions are identified on previous images until they are so small that even in retrospect they are undetectable. The earliest examination at which included lesions appear is recorded, and the lesions are verified by their growth (imaging reference standard). Lesion size and other characteristics may be recorded. 4. Records made at step 1 are corrected to those of steps 2 and 3. False positives are recorded. 5. (Optional) Lesion type is confirmed by another diagnostic test. Conclusion: Applied on subjects with progressive disease, the proposed image interpretation model may improve assessments of technical efficacy and diagnostic accuracy in the detection of small focal lesions. The model may provide an accurate imaging reference standard as well as repeated detection rates and false-positive rates for tested imaging modalities. However, potential review bias necessitates a strict protocol

  3. Brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury: an exploratory study by repeated magnetic resonance examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannsjö, Marianne; Raininko, Raili; Bustamante, Mariana; von Seth, Charlotta; Borg, Jörgen

    2013-09-01

    To explore brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury by repeated magnetic resonance examination. A prospective follow-up study. Nineteen patients with mild traumatic brain injury presenting with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 14-15. The patients were examined on day 2 or 3 and 3-7 months after the injury. The magnetic resonance protocol comprised conventional T1- and T2-weighted sequences including fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), two susceptibility-weighted sequences to reveal haemorrhages, and diffusion-weighted sequences. Computer-aided volume comparison was performed. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE). At follow-up, 7 patients (37%) reported ≥  3 symptoms in RPQ, 5 reported some anxiety and 1 reported mild depression. Fifteen patients reported upper level of good recovery and 4 patients lower level of good recovery (GOSE 8 and 7, respectively). Magnetic resonance pathology was found in 1 patient at the first examination, but 4 patients (21%) showed volume loss at the second examination, at which 3 of them reported GOSE scores of 8. Loss of brain volume, demonstrated by computer-aided magnetic resonance imaging volumetry, may be a feasible marker of brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury.

  4. Variation in quantitative CT air trapping in heavy smokers on repeat CT examinations

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    Mets, Onno M.; Gietema, Hester A.; Jong, Pim A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, Postbus 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Isgum, Ivana; Mol, Christian P. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Zanen, Pieter [University Medical Center Utrecht, Pulmonology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, Postbus 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    To determine the variation in quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of air trapping in low-dose chest CTs of heavy smokers. We analysed 45 subjects from a lung cancer screening trial, examined by CT twice within 3 months. Inspiratory and expiratory low-dose CT was obtained using breath hold instructions. CT air trapping was defined as the percentage of voxels in expiratory CT with an attenuation below -856 HU (EXP{sub -856}) and the expiratory to inspiratory ratio of mean lung density (E/I-ratio{sub MLD}). Variation was determined using limits of agreement, defined as 1.96 times the standard deviation of the mean difference. The effect of both lung volume correction and breath hold reproducibility was determined. The limits of agreement for uncorrected CT air trapping measurements were -15.0 to 11.7 % (EXP{sub -856}) and -9.8 to 8.0 % (E/I-ratio{sub MLD}). Good breath hold reproducibility significantly narrowed the limits for EXP{sub -856} (-10.7 to 7.5 %, P = 0.002), but not for E/I-ratio{sub MLD} (-9.2 to 7.9 %, P = 0.75). Statistical lung volume correction did not improve the limits for EXP{sub -856} (-12.5 to 8.8 %, P = 0.12) and E/I-ratio{sub MLD} (-7.5 to 5.8 %, P = 0.17). Quantitative air trapping measures on low-dose CT of heavy smokers show considerable variation on repeat CT examinations, regardless of lung volume correction or reproducible breath holds. (orig.)

  5. New Jersey's Thomas Edison and the fluoroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselos, G D

    1995-11-01

    Thomas Edison played a major role in the development of early x-ray technology in 1896, notably increasing tube power and reliability and making the fluoroscope a practical instrument. Eventually, Edison would move x-ray technology from the laboratory to the marketplace.

  6. Radiation dose exposure in patients affected by lymphoma undergoing repeat CT examinations: how to manage the radiation dose variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Dore, Antonio; Aringhieri, Giacomo; Caramella, Davide

    2018-03-01

    To assess the variability of radiation dose exposure in patients affected by lymphoma undergoing repeat CT (computed tomography) examinations and to evaluate the influence of different scan parameters on the overall radiation dose. A series of 34 patients (12 men and 22 women with a median age of 34.4 years) with lymphoma, after the initial staging CT underwent repeat follow-up CT examinations. For each patient and each repeat examination, age, sex, use of AEC system (Automated Exposure Control, i.e. current modulation), scan length, kV value, number of acquired scans (i.e. number of phases), abdominal size diameter and dose length product (DLP) were recorded. The radiation dose of just one venous phase was singled out from the DLP of the entire examination. All scan data were retrieved by our PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) by means of a dose monitoring software. Among the variables we considered, no significant difference of radiation dose was observed among patients of different ages nor concerning tube voltage. On the contrary the dose delivered to the patients varied depending on sex, scan length and usage of AEC. No significant difference was observed depending on the behaviour of technologists, while radiologists' choices had indirectly an impact on the radiation dose due to the different number of scans requested by each of them. Our results demonstrate that patients affected by lymphoma who undergo repeat whole body CT scanning may receive unnecessary overexposure. We quantified and analyzed the most relevant variables in order to provide a useful tool to manage properly CT dose variability, estimating the amount of additional radiation dose for every single significant variable. Additional scans, incorrect scan length and incorrect usage of AEC system are the most relevant cause of patient radiation exposure.

  7. Efficacy of repeated 5-fluorouracil needling for failing and failed filtering surgeries based on simple gonioscopic examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashad MA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad A RashadOphthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, EgyptPurpose: To evaluate the success rate of a modified bleb needling technique in eyes with previous glaucoma surgery that had elevated intraocular pressure.Methods: A retrospective study of 24 eyes of 24 patients that underwent repeated bleb needling performed for failing and failed blebs on slit lamp with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU injections on demand. This was performed after gonioscopic examination to define levels of filtration block.Results: There was significant reduction of mean IOP from 36.91 mmHg to 14.73 mmHg at the final follow-up (P < 0.001. The overall success rate was 92%.Conclusion: Repeated needling with adjunctive 5-FU proved a highly effective, safe alternative to revive filtration surgery rather than another medication or surgery.Keywords: bleb, failure, 5-FU, needling, gonioscopy

  8. Radiation exposure from shoe-fitting fluoroscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    It is 40 years ago that a very popular X-ray device disappeared in German shoe shops: the shoe-fitting fluoroscope or Pedoskop. Since the 1930s, these X-ray machines were an integral part of any good shoe business. Following the entry into force X-Ray Regulation (RoeV 1973) the use of these devices was prohibited in Germany.

  9. Trial manufacture of round mask for TV fluoroscopic unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Shoji; Matsumoto, Yukio

    1977-01-01

    Demands for revision of existing medical law were described together with an introduction of TV fluoroscopic unit. Round mask, which does not always press out the bottom face of used x-ray beam from the effective primary fluorescent face of photomultiplier inspite of shifting of a spot in time of TV fluoroscopy, was manufactured for trial, and it was furnished with already established fluoroscopic stand. It is used in daily examination without any trouble. Round mask was divided into two parts, and opened upward and downward quickly by lod motor in time of photographing. Multiple iris was operated in order to fit to film size, and round mask was closed at the same time of the finishment of photographing and fluoroscopy was performed again. Item 3 of Para 2 of Art 30 of the existing medical low states that it is good not to press out, the distance between x-ray focus and fluorescent screen, and used x-ray beam from fluorescent screen. However, a regulation, which states that x-ray beam should not be pressed out from effective primary fluorescent face in x-ray fluoroscopy using photomultiplier, must be added. Improvement of the existing unit is expected, and decrease of unnecessary exposure even in small amount is proposed. (Tsunoda, M.)

  10. Diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases by digital fluoroscopic angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Hirota, Yoshihisa; Tsuchigame, Naotoshi

    1982-01-01

    Digital fluoroscopic angiography (DFA) is a recently developed angiocardiographic technique, which consists of digitization and real-time subtraction of X-ray transmission data from an image intensifier and television fluoroscopic system. A prototype unit based on this principle was developed and installed at our hospital and initial clinical trial has been performed. Fifty-three examinations were performed on 49 patients with various cardiovascular conditions. DFA was useful in demonstration of intracardiac shunt, and valvular diseases secondary to congenital heart diseases. In ischemic heart diseases, DFA noninvasively demonstrated the heart wall motion, making it possible to evaluate dyskinesis, akinesis and ventricular aneurysm. DFA was also valuable in visualizing disproportionate enlargement of cardiac chambers, stasis, and frequently regurgitation of contrast media in valvular heart diseases. Abnormal mediastinal enlargement and aortic aneurysm were differentiated from other conditions to good advantage. DFA will be used more widely in the above conditions because of non-invasive and simple procedures. Future effort should be directed towards improvement of spatial resolution and development of new algorithm for hemodynamic evaluation. (author)

  11. Foreign body extraction from soft tissue by using CT and fluoroscopic guidance: a new technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Lesbats-Jacquot, Virginie; Fonquerne, Marie-Eve; Maratos, Yvonne [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice, Radiology Department, Nice (France); Hauger, Olivier [Hopital Pellegrin, Unite d' Imagerie Osteo-articulaire, CHU de Bordeaux (France); Hovorka, Istvan; Boileau, Pascal [Centre Hopitalier Universitaire de Nice, Orthopaedic Department, Nice (France)

    2010-01-15

    We report on a new minimally invasive technique for the retrieval of a surgical pin fragment after accidental migration into the soft tissue of the shoulder in two patients. The technique is performed under local anaesthesia and uses combined CT and fluoroscopic guidance. The materials used were simple, combining a bone biopsy needle and an endoscopy clamp. Pin displacement was confirmed under fluoroscopic guidance and the clamp was used to withdraw the pin to the cutaneous entry point under CT (step-by-step) guidance. The CT slices provide perfect visualisation of the vascular or nervous structures as well as perfect positioning of the extremity of the trocar relative to the material to be removed. This intervention avoids a second surgical intervention with a longer incision and avoided repeated general anaesthesia. (orig.)

  12. Complement consumption by double culture of Paramecium caudatum and Aerobacter cloacae in repeated examination in relation to the individual radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernasovsky, I; Cabadaj, S; Praslicka, M; Chlebovska, K [Univerzita P.J. Safarika, Kosice (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Vseobecnej Biologie

    1976-01-01

    Two sets of rats were repeatedly examined by the complement consumption test with a double culture of Paramecium caudatum and Aerobacter cloacae (DPA). The first set was examined 11 days and 1 day before irradiation with 0.15 C/kg, the second 6 days before and 4 days after irradiation with 0.15 C/kg. The intensity of reaction and thus the relative titres of the examined antibodies were expressed numerically by the NMHD symbol, i.e., by the number of minimal hemolytical complement doses consumed in the reaction. This reaction is known as the NMHD test. The proportion of rats with a high NMHD which survived 30 days after irradiation was higher than that of rats with low reaction values. Rats having in one examination a high NMHD value and in the second a low one (the sequence high-low or low-high is not important) were more radioresistant than those with permanently low reaction values and did not basically differ from the animals with permanently high NMHD values. Bacteriae Aerobacter cloacae represent the antigenically effective substance of DNA.

  13. Complement consumption by double culture of Paramecium caudatum and Aerobacter cloacae in repeated examination in relation to the individual radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernasovsky, I.; Cabadaj, S.; Praslicka, M.; Chlebovska, K.

    1976-01-01

    Two sets of rats were repeatedly examined by the complement consumption test with a double culture of Paramecium caudatum and Aerobacter cloacae (DPA). The first set was examined 11 days and 1 day before irradiation with 0.15 C/kg, the second 6 days before and 4 days after irradiation with 0.15 C/kg. The intensity of reaction and thus the relative titres of the examined antibodies were expressed numerically by the NMHD symbol, i.e., by the number of minimal hemolytical complement doses consumed in the reaction. This reaction is known as the NMHD test. The proportion of rats with a high NMHD which survived 30 days after irradiation was higher than that of rats with low reaction values. Rats having in one examination a high NMHD value and in the second a low one (the sequence high-low or low-high is not important) were more radioresistant than those with permanently low reaction values and did not basically differ from the animals with permanently high NMHD values. Bacteriae Aerobacter cloacae represent the antigenically effective substance of DNA. (author)

  14. Fluoroscopic tomography. [for body section synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baily, N. A.; Crepeau, R. L.; Lasser, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    A fluoroscopic tomography system capable of synthesizing body sections at a number of levels within the body has been developed. The synthesized body sections may lie either in a range of planes parallel to, tilted with respect to, skewed with respect to, or both tilted and skewed with respect to the plane of motion of the X-ray tube target. In addition, body sections can be presented which are contoured to the patient's anatomy. That is to say, they may even encompass such complex surfaces as a quadratic hyperplane. In addition, tomograms of organs in motion can be imaged.

  15. The value of the repeated examination of BRAF V600E mutation status in diagnostics of papillary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiša, Augustas; Beiša, Virgilijus; Stoškus, Mindaugas; Ostanevičiūtė, Elvyra; Griškevičius, Laimonas; Strupas, Kęstutis

    2016-01-01

    Nodular thyroid disease is one of the most frequently diagnosed pathologies of the adult population in iodine-deficient regions. Approximately 30% of thyroid aspirates are classified as nondiagnostic/unsatisfactory or indeterminate. However, patients with indeterminate cytology still undergo surgery. The object of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of re-examining the BRAF V600E mutation in papillary thyroid carcinoma patients. All patients underwent ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration of a thyroid nodule. They were assigned to one of the four groups (indeterminate or positive for malignant cells) of the Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology. Genetic investigation of the BRAF V600E mutation was performed for all of the fine-needle aspiration cytology specimens. All of the patients underwent surgery. Subsequently, histological investigation of the removed tissues was performed. Additional analysis of the BRAF V600E mutation from the histology specimen was then performed for the initially BRAF-negative cases. Two hundred and fourteen patients were involved in the study. One hundred and six (49.53%) patients were diagnosed with thyroid cancer. Of these 106 patients, 95 (89.62%) patients were diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer. The BRAF V600E mutation was positive in 62 (65.26%) and negative in 33 (34.74%) histologically confirmed papillary thyroid cancer cases. After the genetic investigation, a total of 74 (77.89%) papillary thyroid cancer cases were positive for the BRAF V600E mutation and 21 (22.11%) were negative. Repeated examination of the BRAF V600E mutation status in the fine-needle aspiration may potentially increase the sensitivity of papillary thyroid cancer diagnostics.

  16. Lower radiation burden in state of the art fluoroscopic cystography compared to direct isotope cystography in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haid, Bernhard; Becker, Tanja; Koen, Mark; Berger, Christoph; Langsteger, Werner; Gruy, Bernhard; Putz, Ernst; Haid, Stephanie; Oswald, Josef

    2015-02-01

    filling until calculated bladder capacity, mean radiation burden accounted to .07 mSv (median 0.07 mSv) and the values were less scattered. As it had to be expected from literature, radiation dose from fVCUG, if modern image acquisition techniques are used, is even less than from DIC. In our protocol, according to nuclear medicine standards, bladders were filled until calculated capacity. This resulted in a longer examination time for the patients with a higher functional capacity, resulting in relatively higher radiation burden. However, also if the protocol is changed or only the patients with relatively fast bladder emptying are considered, radiation burden conferred by DIC is higher (at least × 2.9, comparing the "worst" case for fVCUG with the "best" case for DIC). Absolute radiation burden conferred by either exam is extremely low compared to other medical radiation exposures as well as to environmental radiation. Consequently it is most probably not relevant for the individual childs future risk for cancer or other radiation damage. However, because of repeated investigations with correspondingly higher radiation burden in this patient group the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle should lead to a optimized use of fVCUG rather than an uncritical use of DIC, given that modern acquisition standards are available and radiation measurement is performed. Also, fVCUG provides more information concerning anatomical details compared to DIC. Contrary to common beliefs, effective radiation dose conferred during fluoroscopic voiding cystourethrography is significantly lower than during direct isotope cystography. The prerequisite for our findings, however, is the use of modern image acquisition tools and an optimized protocol. Both exams confer low radiation doses probably only relevant to children undergoing repeated radiation exposure. Nevertheless, this findings should be considered in indication for either exam in order to reduce the radiation burden to a

  17. Fluoroscopic extraction of esophageal foreign body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chon, Su Bin; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Sohn, Myung Hee; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul; Song, Young Ho; Choi, Yeon Wha

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report our 5 year experience with fluoroscopic removal of blunt esophageal foreign body or impacted food in 15 consecutive patients who were referred by endoscopists because they couln't remove it endoscopically. The foreign body or impacted food was a piece of meat, a bean, a badug stone or a beef bone. Thirteen patients had underlying disease (11 of corrosive stricture, 2 of postopertive stricture) but 2 patient did not. We removed the object using one of the following 4 techniques: Basket extraction technique. Foley catheter technique, single balloon technique (dilatation of stenosis for passing the food into the stomach and for the treatment of the stricture as well), double balloon technique (removal of the foregin body by trapping it with two valvuloplasty balloons). Removal was successful in all patients. Esophageal performation occurred in one patient using the sibgle balloon technique, who treated nonoperatively by means of fasting, antibiotics and parenteral alimentation. No procedure related death occurred in these series. In conclusion, fliuroscopic removal of blunt esophageal foreign bodies of impacted food with various techniques is promising alternative to esophagoscopic removal

  18. Examination of the effect of the annealing cation on higher order structures containing guanine or isoguanine repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Sarah E.; Wang, Junmei; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan; Hamilton, Andrew D.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    Isoguanine (2-oxo-6-amino-guanine), a natural but non-standard base, exhibits unique self-association properties compared to its isomer, guanine, and results in formation of different higher order DNA structures. In this work, the higher order structures formed by oligonucleotides containing guanine repeats or isoguanine repeats after annealing in solutions containing various cations are evaluated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The guanine-containing strand (G9) consistently formed quadruplexes upon annealing, whereas the isoguanine strand (Ig9) formed both pentaplexes and quadruplexes depending on the annealing cation. Quadruplex formation with G9 showed some dependence on the identity of the cation present during annealing with high relative quadruplex formation detected with six of ten cations. Analogous annealing experiments with Ig9 resulted in complex formation with all ten cations, and the majority of the resulting complexes were pentaplexes. CD results indicated most of the original complexes survived the desalting process necessary for ESI-MS analysis. In addition, several complexes, especially the pentaplexes, were found to be capable of cation exchange with ammonium ions. Ab initio calculations were conducted for isoguanine tetrads and pentads coordinated with all ten cations to predict the most energetically stable structures of the complexes in the gas phase. The observed preference of forming quadruplexes versus pentaplexes as a function of the coordinated cation can be interpreted by the calculated reaction energies of both the tetrads and pentads in combination with the distortion energies of tetrads. PMID:19746468

  19. Clinical application of transnasal feeding tube placement under fluoroscopic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Kunyuan; Ni Caifang; Liu Yizhi; Zhu Xiaoli; Zou Jianwei; Jin Yonghai; Chen Long; Sun Ge; Sun Lingfang; Zhang Dong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of duodenal feeding tube placement under fluoroscopic guidance and its clinical application. Methods: The transnasal duodenal nutriment tubes placement under fluoroscopic guidance were performed in 59 patients from June 3th, 2003 to August 17th, 2007. The successful placement of the feeding tube was defined as that of the tube tip was fixed at or distal to the duodenojejunal junction. Results: 57 out of 59 patients were successfully managed by feeding tube placement, with primary successful rate of 96.6% (57/59). The remaining two failures were due to overdistention of the stomach and were further managed after gastrointestinal decompression thoroughly. The mean fluoroscopy time of the procedure was 17.8 minutes with no severe immediate or delayed complications. Conclusion: The transnasal duodenal nutrient feeding tube placement under fluoroscopic guidance is a safe,economic, and effective management for enteral nutrition, providing extensive clinical utilization. (authors)

  20. A re-examination of the mere exposure effect: The influence of repeated exposure on recognition, familiarity, and liking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, R Matthew; Horton, Robert S; Vevea, Jack L; Citkowicz, Martyna; Lauber, Elissa A

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the veracity of models of the mere exposure effect and to understand the processes that moderate the effect, we conducted a meta-analysis of the influence of repeated exposure on liking, familiarity, recognition, among other evaluations. We estimated parameters from 268 curve estimates drawn from 81 articles and revealed that the mere exposure effect was characterized by a positive slope and negative quadratic effect consistent with an inverted-U shaped curve. In fact, such curves were associated with (a) all visual, but not auditory stimuli; (b) exposure durations shorter than 10 s and longer than 1 min; (c) both homogeneous and heterogeneous presentation types; and (d) ratings that were taken after all stimuli were presented. We conclude that existing models for the mere exposure effect do not adequately account for the findings, and we provide a framework to help guide future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... equipment, patient and equipment supports, component parts, and accessories. (b) Classification. Class II...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... display equipment, patient and equipment supports, component parts, and accessories. (b) Classification...

  3. Experiences upgrading a fluoroscopic system to digital specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, T.; Fenzl, G.

    1995-01-01

    In 1993, an undertable fluoroscopic system was retrofitted with a Fluorospot HC digital system at the radiological clinic of the Knappschaftskrankenhaus in Puettlingen, Germany. The experiences and possibilities resulting from this digital upgrade are related by the authors, whose narrative is also accompanied by examples of clinical images. The costs involved are also discussed in this article. (orig.)

  4. Adjustable radiation protection device of the fluoroscope DG 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, D.

    1980-01-01

    In cooperation with the 'VEB Transformatoren- und Roentgenwerk Hermann Matern', Dresden, an adjustable radiation protection device has been developed. This supplementary equipment for fluoroscopes ensures a sufficient protection of the gonads against undesirable X radiation, can be handled easily and does not annoy patients, esp. children

  5. Measurements for testing of fluoroscopic screens, including the photofluorographic units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balfanz, R.

    1986-01-01

    Image quality control measurements for fluoroscopic screens and photofluorographs have shown that both types of equipment have a long operating life, so that constancy and technical performance tests are absolutely necessary. It is recommended to conclude in-service maintenance contracts with the manufacturers. (DG) [de

  6. Technique of Peritoneal Catheter Placement under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aal, A.K.; Gaddikeri, S.; Saddekni, S.

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal catheters are mainly used for peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Other uses of this catheter include intraperitoneal chemotherapy and gene therapy for ovarian cancer and draining of uncontrolled refractory ascites in patients with liver cirrhosis. Traditionally, surgeons place most of these peritoneal catheters either by laparoscopy or open laparotomy. We detail our percutaneous approach to placing peritoneal catheters using fluoroscopic guidance. We emphasize the use of additional ultrasound guidance, including gray scale and color Doppler ultrasound, to determine the safest puncture site and to guide the initial needle puncture in order to avoid bowel perforation and injury to epigastric artery. We present our experience in placing peritoneal catheters using this technique in 95 patients with various indications. Fluoroscopic guided percutaneous placement of peritoneal catheters is a safe, minimally invasive, and effective alternative to open surgical or laparoscopic placement.

  7. Clinical application of percutaneous gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy under fluoroscopic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianping; Wang Zhongmin; Liu Tao; Chen Kemin; Gong Ju; Zheng Yunfeng; Chen Zhijin; Shen Jieyun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous gastrostomy (PRG) and gastrojejunostomy (PRGJ) under fluoroscopic guidance, and to discuss its technical manipulation, the indications and contraindications as well as the complications. Methods: During the period from May 2002 to June 2010 in authors' hospital fluoroscopically-guided PRG or PRGJ was carried out in 40 patients. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. With Seldinger technique and under fluoroscopic guidance, a 14 F radiopaque gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy feeding catheter was successfully placed. The indications, operation procedures, clinical success rate, procedure-related complications, and tube indwelling time, etc. were discussed and analyzed. Results: PRG was conducted in 30 patients. The reasons for performing PRG included neurologic disease (n=13), recurrent aspiration pneumonia (n=6), gastroesophageal reflux due to disfunction of gastrointestinal tract (n=3), subtotal gastrectomy (n=2), esophagomediastinal fistula (n=1) and esophageal carcinoma (n=5). PRGJ was carried out in 10 patients. The disorders included bulbar paralysis (n=3), malignant duodenal obstruction (n=4) and previous gastrostomy-related complications (n=3). Two anchors were used in all patients receiving PRG or PRGJ. Clinical success was achieved in all study patients. No procedure-related or severe complications occurred. Minor complications were observed in four patients (10%), which included local soft tissue infection (n=1), severe puncture site pain (n=1), gastrostomy tube dislodgement (n=1) and obstruction of gastrojejunostomy tube (n=1). During the follow-up period, no aggravation of gastroesophageal reflux or aspiration pneumonia was observed in all patients. The tube indwelling time was 115 to 585 days (mean of 150 days) after tube placement. Conclusion: Fluoroscopically-guided percutaneous gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy is a safe, simple and minimally-invasive technique. This

  8. A rapid method of evaluating fluoroscopic system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprawls, P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a study to develop a method for the rapid evaluation and documentation of fluoroscopic image quality. All objects contained within a conventional contrast-detail test phantom (Leeds TO-10) are displayed in an array format according to their contrast and size. A copy of the display is used as the data collection form and a permanent record of system performance. A fluoroscope is evaluated by viewing the test phantom and marking the visible objects on the display. A line drawn through the objects with minimum visibility in each size group forms a contrast-detail curve for the system. This is compared with a standard or reference line, which is in the display.Deviations in curve position are useful indicators of specific image quality problems, such as excessive noise or blurring. The use of a special object-visibility array format display makes it possible to collect data, analyze the results, and create a record of fluoroscopic performance in less than 2 minutes for each viewing mode

  9. Fluoroscopically guided fallopian tube recanalization with a simplified set of instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz-Rode, T.; Guenther, R.W.; Neulen, J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Fluoroscopically guided transcervical fallopian tube recanalization is recognized as an important step in the workup of female infertility. In the present study, a simplified set of recanalization instruments was tested. Materials and Methods: Forty-two women with infertility and sonographically confirmed or suspected uni- or bilateral tubal occlusion were examined. After vaginal placement of a plastic speculum and fixation of a tenaculum, a 4F glide catheter with a 0.89 mm glidewire was advanced transcervically. After documentation of tubal occlusion by hysterosalpingography, the uterotubal junction was catheterized with the same instruments. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the glidewire was negotiated beyond the intramural portion of the tube. Selective salpingography documented the outcome of the recanalization. Results: Hysterosalpingography confirmed tubal occlusions in 26 of 42 patients (in 12 cases unilateral and in 14 cases bilateral). Fallopian tube recanalization was successful in 23 of 26 patients (technical success rate of 88%). The resulting fertility rate was 30% (7/23), without any ectopic pregnancy. Complications such as tubal perforation, infection, or bleeding did not occur. Tubal catheterization was straightforward and smooth in 17/23 cases. For a hyperflexed uterus (6/23), a curved tip of the catheter was helpful in tubal probing. (orig.)

  10. The need for using fluoroscopic guidance to obtain gastric biopsies when in search of Helicobacter pylori with a nonendoscopic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Greg N.; Mullins, Daniel J.; Makuch, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Nonendoscopic, fluoroscopic biopsy of the gastric mucosa, following barium examination of the stomach, has gained attention with its ease of performance and cost savings potential over endoscopy. Endoscopic research concerning the efficacy of biopsy sites has revealed an increased sensitivity of antral biopsies over greater curvature biopsies for the detection of Helicobacter pylori. Fluoroscopically guided biopsies of the gastric mucosal are studied to determine whether such a difference between site sensitivity held true. If not, blind biopsy through a nasogastric tube, which traditionally samples only the greater curvature, might prove an even less expensive alternative. Materials and methods: Seventy-two patients underwent nonendoscopic, fluoroscopically guided, mucosal biopsy of both the gastric antrum and the greater curvature of the stomach. Pathologic reports from both sites, using each patient as their own control, are compared to assess site sensitivity in the diagnosis of H. pylori gastritis. Results: The sensitivity for the detection of H. pylori gastritis by antral biopsy is 89% whereas the sensitivity of greater curvature biopsy is 62%. The difference is considered clinically significant at P≤0.05. Conclusions: This study confirms the need for antral biopsies when desiring a nonendoscopic approach to gastric mucosal sampling, in order to obtain a reasonable yield of data in dyspeptic patients with H. pylori gastritis. Blind techniques cannot reliably reach the antrum. Fluoroscopy can, and remains a less expensive alternative to endoscopy

  11. The need for using fluoroscopic guidance to obtain gastric biopsies when in search of Helicobacter pylori with a nonendoscopic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Greg N.; Mullins, Daniel J.; Makuch, Richard S

    1999-12-01

    Purpose: Nonendoscopic, fluoroscopic biopsy of the gastric mucosa, following barium examination of the stomach, has gained attention with its ease of performance and cost savings potential over endoscopy. Endoscopic research concerning the efficacy of biopsy sites has revealed an increased sensitivity of antral biopsies over greater curvature biopsies for the detection of Helicobacter pylori. Fluoroscopically guided biopsies of the gastric mucosal are studied to determine whether such a difference between site sensitivity held true. If not, blind biopsy through a nasogastric tube, which traditionally samples only the greater curvature, might prove an even less expensive alternative. Materials and methods: Seventy-two patients underwent nonendoscopic, fluoroscopically guided, mucosal biopsy of both the gastric antrum and the greater curvature of the stomach. Pathologic reports from both sites, using each patient as their own control, are compared to assess site sensitivity in the diagnosis of H. pylori gastritis. Results: The sensitivity for the detection of H. pylori gastritis by antral biopsy is 89% whereas the sensitivity of greater curvature biopsy is 62%. The difference is considered clinically significant at P{<=}0.05. Conclusions: This study confirms the need for antral biopsies when desiring a nonendoscopic approach to gastric mucosal sampling, in order to obtain a reasonable yield of data in dyspeptic patients with H. pylori gastritis. Blind techniques cannot reliably reach the antrum. Fluoroscopy can, and remains a less expensive alternative to endoscopy.

  12. Role of fluoroscopic guided self expandable metallic stents in the management of malignant esophageal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shaker

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Fluoroscopic guided esophageal stenting is a highly effective and safe method for palliating dysphagia in patients with obstructing esophageal cancer with significant clinical improvement.

  13. Fluoroscopic and arthrographic evaluation of carpal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Louis, D.S.; Greene, T.L.; Hankin, F.M.

    1985-06-01

    The efficacy of a diagnostic protocol involving videotape fluoroscopy of carpal motion and radiocarpal arthrography was evaluated in patients with wrist pain unexplained by physical examination and conventional radiographs. Videotape fluoroscopy was performed as the first study in 68 consecutive cases and was positive in 44 (66%). Radiocarpal arthrography was performed after videotape fluoroscopy in 39 of the cases (57%), including the 24 in which videotape fluoroscopy was normal and 15 others in which further information was desired in spite of positive videotape fluoroscopy. The addition of radiocarpal arthrography to videotape fluoroscopy increased the diagnostic yield to 52 (76%) of the 68 cases and excluded significant anatomic or dynamic abnormality in the others. The diagnosis was proven surgically in 25 cases. This protocol was efficacious for ligament tears of the proximal carpal row, triangular fibrocartilage tears, and proximal and midcarpal instability.

  14. [Routine fluoroscopic investigations after primary bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, D; Ernst, A; Fedtke, K; Jenkner, J; Schöttler, A; Reimer, P; Blüher, M; Schön, M R

    2016-03-01

    Staple line and anastomotic leakages are life-threatening complications after bariatric surgery. Upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract X-ray examination with oral administration of a water-soluble contrast agent can be used to detect leaks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of routine upper GI tract fluoroscopy after primary bariatric surgery. Between January 2009 and December 2014 a total of 658 bariatric interventions were carried out of which 442 were primary bariatric operations. Included in this single center study were 307 sleeve gastrectomies and 135 Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses. Up to December 2012 upper GI tract fluoroscopy was performed routinely between the first and third postoperative days and the detection of leakages was evaluated. In the investigation period 8 leakages (2.6 %) after sleeve gastrectomy, 1 anastomotic leakage in gastrojejunostomy and 1 in jejunojejunostomy after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass occurred. All patients developed clinical symptoms, such as abdominal pain, tachycardia or fever. In one case the leakage was detected by upper GI fluoroscopy and in nine cases radiological findings were unremarkable. No leakages were detected in asymptomatic patients. Routine upper GI fluoroscopy is not recommended for uneventful postoperative courses after primary bariatric surgery.

  15. Common fluoroscopic studies in radiology : conduct and analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valverde Sanchez, Allan

    2011-01-01

    A countless number of radiological procedures, that have involved the use of fluoroscopy and contrast media of different indole, have been carried out in all radiology services and medical images of Costa Rica for the diagnosis of diseases or conditions, in both adults and in children. Fluoroscopic studies, often called special or contrast studies, have had particular conditions for its realization. Some from the medical point of view: adequate training in the technical and cognitive development when evaluating the images to not miss important details. Other by the patient: adequate preparation to achieve the best images for optimal diagnosis. For example, adequate bowel preparation is essential for a barium enema, to cooperation by the patient to meet specific indications that the physician dictates when swallowing postures or just when you are prompted. Criteria have been met and unified for contrast studies in different hospitals and clinics. The indications, contra, method, technique of procedure, points to remember, number of images or projections minimum required in the interpretation of contrast studies, as well as a report template of standard and ideal study are presented in a simple, systematic and logical. The manual is intended for residents and attending physicians specialists in radiology and medical imaging including contrast studies more common. Spaces are promoted with current technology studies to set aside more complicated and less sophisticated as have been the fluoroscopic studies; however, in the national reality, access to computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is not as easy. Radiological studies with fluoroscopy performed by trained staff led the treating physician to make sound decisions based on studies relatively simple and easy to do. The tests with the use of fluoroscopic have been named: the esophagogram, gastroduodenal series, gastro intestinal transit, the hysterosalpingography, the cystography and the

  16. Fluoroscopic guidance of retrograde exchange of ureteral stents in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ruey-Sheng; Liang, Huei-Lung; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Wang, Po-Chin; Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Hong; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to review our experience with fluoroscopically guided retrograde exchange of ureteral stents in women. During a 48-month period, 28 women (age range, 38-76 years) were referred to our department for retrograde exchange of a ureteral stent. The causes of urinary obstruction were tumor compression in 26 patients and benign fibrotic stricture in two patients. A large-diameter snare catheter (25-mm single loop or 18- to 35-mm triple loop) or a foreign body retrieval forceps (opening width, 11.3 mm) was used to grasp the bladder end of the stent under fluoroscopic guidance. The technique entailed replacement of a patent or occluded ureteral stent with a 0.035- or 0.018-inch guidewire with or without the aid of advancement of an angiographic sheath. A total of 54 ureteral stents were exchanged with a snare catheter in 42 cases or a forceps in 12 cases. One stent misplaced too far up the ureter was replaced successfully through antegrade percutaneous nephrostomy. Ten occluded stents, including one single-J stent, were managed with a 0.018-inch guidewire in three cases, advancement of an angiographic sheath over the occluded stent into the ureter in five cases, and recannulation of the ureteral orifice with a guidewire in two cases. No complications of massive hemorrhage, ureter perforation, or infection were encountered. With proper selection of a snare or forceps catheter, retrograde exchange of ureteral stents in women can be easily performed under fluoroscopic guidance with high technical success and a low complication rate.

  17. Management of pediatric radiation dose using GE fluoroscopic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belanger, Barry; Boudry, John

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we present GE Healthcare's design philosophy and implementation of X-ray imaging systems with dose management for pediatric patients, as embodied in its current radiography and fluoroscopy and interventional cardiovascular X-ray product offerings. First, we present a basic framework of image quality and dose in the context of a cost-benefit trade-off, with the development of the concept of imaging dose efficiency. A set of key metrics of image quality and dose efficiency is presented, including X-ray source efficiency, detector quantum efficiency (DQE), detector dynamic range, and temporal response, with an explanation of the clinical relevance of each. Second, we present design methods for automatically selecting optimal X-ray technique parameters (kVp, mA, pulse width, and spectral filtration) in real time for various clinical applications. These methods are based on an optimization scheme where patient skin dose is minimized for a target desired image contrast-to-noise ratio. Operator display of skin dose and Dose-Area Product (DAP) is covered, as well. Third, system controls and predefined protocols available to the operator are explained in the context of dose management and the need to meet varying clinical procedure imaging demands. For example, fluoroscopic dose rate is adjustable over a range of 20:1 to adapt to different procedure requirements. Fourth, we discuss the impact of image processing techniques upon dose minimization. In particular, two such techniques, dynamic range compression through adaptive multiband spectral filtering and fluoroscopic noise reduction, are explored in some detail. Fifth, we review a list of system dose-reduction features, including automatic spectral filtration, virtual collimation, variable-rate pulsed fluoroscopic, grid and no-grid techniques, and fluoroscopic loop replay with store. In addition, we describe a new feature that automatically minimizes the patient-to-detector distance, along with an

  18. Comparing radiation exposure during percutaneous vertebroplasty using one- vs. two-fluoroscopic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yen-Yao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV requires relatively lengthy fluoroscopic guidance, which might lead to substantial radiation exposure to patients or operators. The two-fluoroscopic technique (two-plane radiographs obtained using two fluoroscopes during PV can provide simultaneous two-planar projections with reducing operative time. However, the two-fluoroscopic technique may expose the operator or patient to increased radiation dose. The aim of this study was to quantify the amount of radiation exposure to the patient or operator that occurs during PV using one- vs. two-fluoroscopic technique. Methods Two radiation dosimeters were placed on the right flank of each patient and on the upper sternum of each operator during 26 single-level PV procedures by one senior surgeon. The use of two-fluoroscopic technique (13 patients and one-fluoroscopic technique (13 patients were allocated in a consecutive and alternative manner. The operative time and mean radiation dose to each patient and operator were monitored and compared between groups. Results Mean radiation dose to the patient was 1.97 ± 1.20 mSv (95% CI, 0.71 to 3.23 for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 0.95 ± 0.34 mSv (95% CI, 0.85 to 1.23 for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P =0.031. Mean radiation dose to the operator was 0.27 ± 0.12 mSv (95% CI, 0.17–0.56 for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 0.25 ± 0.14 mSv (95% CI, 0.06–0.44 for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P = 0.653. The operative time was significantly different between groups: 47.15 ± 13.48 min (range, 20–75 for the one-fluoroscopic technique group vs. 36.62 ± 8.42 min (range, 21–50 for the two-fluoroscopic technique group (P =0.019. Conclusion Compared to the one-fluoroscopic technique, the two-fluoroscopic technique used during PV provides not only shorter operative times but also reduces the radiation exposure to the patient. There was no

  19. Eye lens dosimetry for fluoroscopically guided clinical procedures: practical approaches to protection and dose monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    Doses to the eye lenses of clinicians undertaking fluoroscopically guided procedures can exceed the dose annual limit of 20 mSv, so optimisation of radiation protection is essential. Ceiling-suspended shields and disposable radiation absorbing pads can reduce eye dose by factors of 2-7. Lead glasses that shield against exposures from the side can lower doses by 2.5-4.5 times. Training in effective use of protective devices is an essential element in achieving good protection and acceptable eye doses. Effective methods for dose monitoring are required to identify protection issues. Dosemeters worn adjacent to the eye provide the better option for interventional clinicians, but an unprotected dosemeter worn at the neck will give an indication of eye dose that is adequate for most interventional staff. Potential requirements for protective devices and dose monitoring can be determined from risk assessments using generic values for dose linked to examination workload. (author)

  20. Use of guiding sheaths in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jae-Ik; Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Yoon, Chang Jin; Nam, Deok Ho; Choi, Won-Chan; Lim, Jin-Oh

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose was to assess the safety and usefulness of guiding sheaths in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement. Two types of guiding sheath were made from straight polytetrafluoroethylene tubes. Type A was 80 cm in length, 4 mm in outer diameter and 3 mm in inner diameter. Type B was 70 cm in length, 6 mm in outer diameter and 5 mm in inner diameter. The type A sheath was used in 18 patients in whom a catheter-guide wire combination failed to pass through a stricture. The type B sheath was used in 22 patients in whom a stent delivery system failed to pass through the stricture due to loop formation within the gastric lumen. The overall success rate for guiding a catheter-guide wire through a stricture after using the type A sheath was 89%. The overall success rate for passing a stent delivery system through a stricture after using the type B sheath was 100%. All procedures were tolerated by the patients without any significant complications. The guiding sheaths were safe and useful in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement. (orig.)

  1. Nonsurgical Fluoroscopically Guided Dacryocystoplasty of Common Canalicular Obstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, Kai E; Hofer, Ulrich; Textor, Hans J [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Boeker, Thorsten [Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Strunk, Holger; Schild, Hans H [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany)

    2000-01-15

    Purpose: To assess dacryocystoplasty in the treatment of epiphora due to obstructions of the common canaliculus.Methods: Twenty patients with severe epiphora due to partial (n = 16) or complete (n = 4) obstruction of the common canaliculus underwent fluoroscopically guided dacryocystoplasty. In all cases of incomplete obstruction balloon dilation was performed. Stent implantation was attempted in cases with complete obstruction. Dacryocystography and clinical follow-up was performed at intervals of 1 week, and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after the procedure. The mean follow-up was 6 months (range 3-18 months).Results: Balloon dilation was technically successfully performed in all patients with incomplete obstructions (n = 16). In three of four patients with complete obstruction stent implantation was performed successfully. Subsequent to failure of stent implantation in one of these patients balloon dilation was performed instead. The long-term primary patency rate in patients with incomplete obstructions was 88% (n = 14/16). In three of four cases with complete obstruction long-term patency was achieved during follow-up. Severe complications, infections, or punctal splitting were not observed.Conclusion: Fluoroscopically guided balloon dacryocystoplasty is a feasible nonsurgical therapy in canalicular obstructions with good clinical results that may be used as an alternative to surgical procedures. In patients with complete obstructions stent placement is possible but further investigations are needed to assess the procedural and long-term results.

  2. Nonsurgical Fluoroscopically Guided Dacryocystoplasty of Common Canalicular Obstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, Kai E.; Hofer, Ulrich; Textor, Hans J.; Boeker, Thorsten; Strunk, Holger; Schild, Hans H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess dacryocystoplasty in the treatment of epiphora due to obstructions of the common canaliculus.Methods: Twenty patients with severe epiphora due to partial (n = 16) or complete (n = 4) obstruction of the common canaliculus underwent fluoroscopically guided dacryocystoplasty. In all cases of incomplete obstruction balloon dilation was performed. Stent implantation was attempted in cases with complete obstruction. Dacryocystography and clinical follow-up was performed at intervals of 1 week, and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after the procedure. The mean follow-up was 6 months (range 3-18 months).Results: Balloon dilation was technically successfully performed in all patients with incomplete obstructions (n = 16). In three of four patients with complete obstruction stent implantation was performed successfully. Subsequent to failure of stent implantation in one of these patients balloon dilation was performed instead. The long-term primary patency rate in patients with incomplete obstructions was 88% (n = 14/16). In three of four cases with complete obstruction long-term patency was achieved during follow-up. Severe complications, infections, or punctal splitting were not observed.Conclusion: Fluoroscopically guided balloon dacryocystoplasty is a feasible nonsurgical therapy in canalicular obstructions with good clinical results that may be used as an alternative to surgical procedures. In patients with complete obstructions stent placement is possible but further investigations are needed to assess the procedural and long-term results

  3. Cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Brost, Alexander; Jakob, Carolin; Mewes, Philip W.; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation has become the preferred treatment option for atrial fibrillation. Although the standard ablation procedure involves ablation points set by radio-frequency catheters, cryo-balloon catheters have even been reported to be more advantageous in certain cases. As electro-anatomical mapping systems do not support cryo-balloon ablation procedures, X-ray guidance is needed. However, current methods to provide support for cryo-balloon catheters in fluoroscopically guided ablation procedures rely heavily on manual user interaction. To improve this, we propose a first method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images based on a blob detection algorithm. Our method is evaluated on 24 clinical images from 17 patients. The method successfully detected the cryoballoon in 22 out of 24 images, yielding a success rate of 91.6 %. The successful localization achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm +/- 0.44 mm. Even though our methods currently fails in 8.4 % of the images available, it still offers a significant improvement over manual methods. Furthermore, detecting a landmark point along the cryo-balloon catheter can be a very important step for additional post-processing operations.

  4. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-02: Occupational Conceptus Doses From Fluoroscopically-Guided Interventional Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damilakis, J; Perisinakis, K; Solomou, G [University of Crete (Greece); Stratakis, J [University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this method was to provide dosimetric data on conceptus dose for the pregnant employee who participates in fluoroscopically-guided interventional procedures. Methods: Scattered air-kerma dose rates were obtained for 17 fluoroscopic projections involved in interventional procedures. These projections were simulated on an anthropomorphic phantom placed on the examination table supine. The operating theater was divided into two grids relative to the long table sides. Each grid consisted of 33 cells spaced 0.50 m apart. During the simulated exposures, at each cell, scatter air-kerma rate was measured at 110 cm from the floor i.e. at the height of the waist of the pregnant worker. Air-kerma rates were divided by the dose area product (DAP) rate of each exposure to obtain normalized data. For each projection, measurements were performed for 3 kVp and 3 filtration values i.e. for 9 different x-ray spectra. All measurements were performed by using a modern C-arm angiographic system (Siemens Axiom Artis, Siemens, Germany) and a radiation meter equipped with an ionization chamber. Results: The results consist of 153 iso-dose maps, which show the spatial distribution of DAP-normalized scattered air-kerma doses at the waist level of a pregnant worker. Conceptus dose estimation is possible using air-kerma to embryo/fetal dose conversion coefficients published in a previous study (J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol, Vol. 16, pp. 1–8, July 2005). Using these maps, occupationally exposed pregnant personnel may select a working position for a certain projection that keeps abdominal dose as low as reasonably achievable. Taking into consideration the regulatory conceptus dose limit for occupational exposure, determination of the maximum workload allowed for the pregnant personnel is also possible. Conclusion: Data produced in this work allow for the anticipation of conceptus dose and the determination of the maximum workload for a pregnant worker from any

  5. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-02: Occupational Conceptus Doses From Fluoroscopically-Guided Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damilakis, J; Perisinakis, K; Solomou, G; Stratakis, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this method was to provide dosimetric data on conceptus dose for the pregnant employee who participates in fluoroscopically-guided interventional procedures. Methods: Scattered air-kerma dose rates were obtained for 17 fluoroscopic projections involved in interventional procedures. These projections were simulated on an anthropomorphic phantom placed on the examination table supine. The operating theater was divided into two grids relative to the long table sides. Each grid consisted of 33 cells spaced 0.50 m apart. During the simulated exposures, at each cell, scatter air-kerma rate was measured at 110 cm from the floor i.e. at the height of the waist of the pregnant worker. Air-kerma rates were divided by the dose area product (DAP) rate of each exposure to obtain normalized data. For each projection, measurements were performed for 3 kVp and 3 filtration values i.e. for 9 different x-ray spectra. All measurements were performed by using a modern C-arm angiographic system (Siemens Axiom Artis, Siemens, Germany) and a radiation meter equipped with an ionization chamber. Results: The results consist of 153 iso-dose maps, which show the spatial distribution of DAP-normalized scattered air-kerma doses at the waist level of a pregnant worker. Conceptus dose estimation is possible using air-kerma to embryo/fetal dose conversion coefficients published in a previous study (J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol, Vol. 16, pp. 1–8, July 2005). Using these maps, occupationally exposed pregnant personnel may select a working position for a certain projection that keeps abdominal dose as low as reasonably achievable. Taking into consideration the regulatory conceptus dose limit for occupational exposure, determination of the maximum workload allowed for the pregnant personnel is also possible. Conclusion: Data produced in this work allow for the anticipation of conceptus dose and the determination of the maximum workload for a pregnant worker from any

  6. Diagnostic value of the fluoroscopic triggering 3D LAVA technique for primary liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Yong; Chai, Chun-Hua; Xiao, Wen-Bo; Wang, Qi-Dong

    2010-04-01

    Primary liver cancer (PLC) is one of the common malignant tumors. Liver acquisition with acceleration volume acquisition (LAVA), which allows simultaneous dynamic enhancement of the hepatic parenchyma and vasculature imaging, is of great help in the diagnosis of PLC. This study aimed to evaluate application of the fluoroscopic triggering 3D LAVA technique in the imaging of PLC and liver vasculature. The clinical data and imaging findings of 38 adults with PLC (22 men and 16 women; average age 52 years), pathologically confirmed by surgical resection or biopsy, were collected and analyzed. All magnetic resonance images were obtained with a 1.5-T system (General Electrics Medical Systems) with an eight-element body array coil and application of the fluoroscopic triggering 3D LAVA technique. Overall image quality was assessed on a 5-point scale by two experienced radiologists. All the nodules and blood vessel were recorded and compared. The diagnostic accuracy and feasibility of LAVA were evaluated. Thirty-eight patients gave high quality images of 72 nodules in the liver for diagnosis. The accuracy of LAVA was 97.2% (70/72), and the coincidence rate between the extent of tumor judged by dynamic enhancement and pathological examination was 87.5% (63/72). Displayed by the maximum intensity projection reconstruction, nearly all cases gave satisfactory images of branches III and IV of the hepatic artery. Furthermore, small early-stage enhancing hepatic lesions and the parallel portal vein were also well displayed. Sequence of LAVA provides good multi-phase dynamic enhancement scanning of hepatic lesions. Combined with conventional scanning technology, LAVA effectively and safely displays focal hepatic lesions and the relationship between tumor and normal tissues, especially blood vessels.

  7. Identification of arteries and veins in cerebral angiography fluoroscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andra Tache, Irina

    2017-11-01

    In the present study a new method for pixels tagging into arteries and veins classes from temporal cerebral angiography is presented. This need comes from the neurosurgeon who is evaluating the fluoroscopic angiography and the magnetic resonance images from the brain in order to locate the fistula of the patients who suffer from arterio-venous malformation. The method includes the elimination of the background pixels from a previous segmentation and the generation of the time intensity curves for each remaining pixel. The later undergo signal processing in order to extract the characteristic parameters needed for applying the k-means clustering algorithm. Some of the parameters are: the phase and the maximum amplitude extracted from the Fourier transform, the standard deviation and the mean value. The tagged classes are represented into images which then are re-classified by an expert into artery and vein pixels.

  8. High-speed rotary atherectomy under fluoroscopic and angioscopic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, L.S.; Ahn, S.S.; Yeatman, L.A.; Marcus, D.R.; Auth, D.P.; Moore, W.S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes thirteen stenotic arteries treated by high-speed rotary abrasive burr atherectomy performed in the operating room under fluoroscopic-angioscopic control by a multidisciplinary team consisting of a vascular surgeon, an interventional radiologist, and an interventional cardiologist. Incrementally sized atherectomy burrs were used in each patient (1.75-4.0 mm in diameter). Rotary artherectomy was successful in 11 of 13 arteries ranging from 1 to 40 cm (median, 5 cm) with stenoses ranging from 50% to 99% (median, 90%), which improved to less than 30% in all 11 successfully atherectomized segments. Two early posttreatment failures (intimal dissection, burr shaft disruption), two posttreatment thromboses (unrelated to atherectomy), and two late failures (restenosis) occurred

  9. Fluoroscopically guided percutaneous jejunostomy: outcomes in 25 consecutive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Z.Q.; Shin, J.H.; Song, H.-Y.; Kwon, J.H.; Kim, J.-W.; Kim, K.R.; Kim, J.-H.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To assess the feasibility and safety of fluoroscopically guided percutaneous jejunostomy. Material and methods: Between May 1999 and August 2006 percutaneous jejunostomy was attempted in 25 patients. A 5 F vascular catheter (n = 20) or a 7.5 F multifunctional coil catheter (n = 5) was used to insufflate the jejunum. The distended jejunum was punctured using a 17 G needle (n = 19) or a 21 G Chiba needle (n = 6) with the inserted catheter as a target. A 12 or 14 F loop feeding tube was inserted after serial dilations. The technical success, complications, 30-day mortality, and in-dwelling period of the feeding tube placement were evaluated. Results: The technical success rate was 92% (23/25). Technical failures (n = 2) resulted from the inability to insufflate the jejunum secondary to failure to pass the catheter through a malignant stricture at the oesophagojejunostomy site and thus subsequent puncture of the undistended jejunum failed, or failure to introduce the Neff catheter into the jejunum. Pericatheter leakage with pneumoperitoneum was a complication in three patients (12%) and was treated conservatively. The 30-day mortality was 13% (3/23); however, there was no evidence that these deaths were attributed to the procedure. Except for four patients who were lost to follow-up and two failed cases, 15 of the 19 jejunostomy catheters were removed because of patient death (n = 12) or completion of treatment (n = 3), with a mean and median in-dwelling period of 231 and 87 days, respectively. Conclusions: Fluoroscopically guided percutaneous jejunostomy is a feasible procedure with a high technical success and a low complication rate. In addition to a 17 G needle, a 21 G needle can safely be used to puncture the jejunum

  10. Lung tumor tracking in fluoroscopic video based on optical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B.

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory gating and tumor tracking for dynamic multileaf collimator delivery require accurate and real-time localization of the lung tumor position during treatment. Deriving tumor position from external surrogates such as abdominal surface motion may have large uncertainties due to the intra- and interfraction variations of the correlation between the external surrogates and internal tumor motion. Implanted fiducial markers can be used to track tumors fluoroscopically in real time with sufficient accuracy. However, it may not be a practical procedure when implanting fiducials bronchoscopically. In this work, a method is presented to track the lung tumor mass or relevant anatomic features projected in fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers based on an optical flow algorithm. The algorithm generates the centroid position of the tracked target and ignores shape changes of the tumor mass shadow. The tracking starts with a segmented tumor projection in an initial image frame. Then, the optical flow between this and all incoming frames acquired during treatment delivery is computed as initial estimations of tumor centroid displacements. The tumor contour in the initial frame is transferred to the incoming frames based on the average of the motion vectors, and its positions in the incoming frames are determined by fine-tuning the contour positions using a template matching algorithm with a small search range. The tracking results were validated by comparing with clinician determined contours on each frame. The position difference in 95% of the frames was found to be less than 1.4 pixels (∼0.7 mm) in the best case and 2.8 pixels (∼1.4 mm) in the worst case for the five patients studied.

  11. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    evaluating the deployment repeatability builds upon the testing or analysis of deployment kinematics (Chapter 6) and adds repetition. Introduction...material yield or failure during a test. For the purposes of this chapter, zero shift will refer to permanent changes in the structure, while reversible ...the content of other chapters in this book: Gravity Compensation (Chapter 4) and Deployment Kinematics and Dynamics (Chapter 6). Repeating the

  12. Robust fluoroscopic tracking of fiducial markers: exploiting the spatial constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Rui; Sharp, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Two new fluoroscopic fiducial tracking methods that exploit the spatial relationship among the multiple implanted fiducial to achieve fast, accurate and robust tracking are proposed in this paper. The spatial relationship between multiple implanted markers are modeled as Gaussian distributions of their pairwise distances over time. The means and standard deviations of these distances are learned from training sequences, and pairwise distances that deviate from these learned distributions are assigned a low spatial matching score. The spatial constraints are incorporated in two different algorithms: a stochastic tracking method and a detection based method. In the stochastic method, hypotheses of the ‘true’ fiducial position are sampled from a pre-trained respiration motion model. Each hypothesis is assigned an importance value based on image matching score and spatial matching score. Learning the parameters of the motion model is needed in addition to learning the distribution parameters of the pairwise distances in the proposed stochastic tracking approach. In the detection based method, a set of possible marker locations are identified by using a template matching based fiducial detector. The best location is obtained by optimizing the image matching score and spatial matching score through non-serial dynamic programming. In this detection based approach, there is no need to learn the respiration motion model. The two proposed algorithms are compared with a recent work using a multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) algorithm which is denoted by MHT, Tang et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 4081–98). Phantom experiments were performed using fluoroscopic videos captured with known motion relative to an anthropomorphic phantom. The patient experiments were performed using a retrospective study of 16 fluoroscopic videos of liver cancer patients with implanted fiducials. For the motion phantom data sets, the detection based approach has the smallest tracking error (

  13. Role of fluoroscopic guided self expandable metallic stents in the management of malignant esophageal strictures

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Shaker; Ahmed Deif; Amr Abdelaal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of fluoroscopic guided self expanding metallic stents in the management of dysphagia caused by malignant esophageal strictures. Materials and methods: During the period between April 2010 and October 2012, 31 patients with malignant esophageal strictures were subjected to fluoroscopic guided self expanding metallic stent application. The study included 22 males and 9 females ranging in age between 22 and 75 years old with mean age of 56.8 years. Lesions wer...

  14. Fluoroscopic study of the normal gastrointestinal motility and measurements in the Hispaniolan Amazon parrot (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Nevarez, Javier; Taylor, W Michael; Jankowski, Gwendolyn; Rademacher, Nathalie; Gaschen, Lorrie; Pariaut, Romain; Tully, Thomas N

    2010-01-01

    Contrast fluoroscopy is a valuable tool to examine avian gastrointestinal motility. However, the lack of a standardized examination protocol and reference ranges prevents the objective interpretation of motility disorders and other gastrointestinal abnormalities. Our goals were to evaluate gastrointestinal motility in 20 Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) by contrast fluoroscopy. Each parrot was crop-fed an equal part mixture of barium sulfate and hand-feeding formula and placed in a cardboard box for fluoroscopy. Over a 3-h period, 1.5 minute segments of lateral and ventrodorsal fluoroscopy were recorded every 30 min. The gastric cycle and patterns of intestinal motility were described. The frequency of crop contractions, esophageal boluses, and gastric cycles were determined in lateral and ventrodorsal views. A range of 3.4-6.6 gastric cycles/min was noted on the lateral view and 3.0-6.6 gastric cycles/min on the ventrodorsal view. Circular measurements of the proventriculus diameter, ventriculus width, and length were obtained using the midshaft femoral diameter as a standard reference unit. The upper limits of the reference ranges were 3.6 and 4.7 femoral units for the proventriculus diameter in the lateral and ventrodorsal view, respectively. Two consecutive measurements were obtained and the measurement technique was found to have high reproducibility. In this study, we established a standardized protocol for contrast fluoroscopic examination of the gastrointestinal tract and a reliable measurement method of the proventriculus and ventriculus using femoral units in the Hispaniolan Amazon parrot.

  15. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, L E; Badawy, M K

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care. (paper)

  16. Radiation dose to the operator during fluoroscopically guided spine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roccatagliata, Luca; Pravata, Emanuele; Cianfoni, Alessandro [Department of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Lugano (Switzerland); Presilla, Stefano [Unita di Fisica Medica, Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale (EOC), Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2017-09-15

    Fluoroscopy is widely used to guide diagnostic and therapeutic spine procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantify radiation incident on the operator (operator Air Kerma) during a wide range of fluoroscopy-guided spine procedures and its correlation with the amount of radiation incident on the patient (Kerma Area Product - KAP). We retrospectively included 57 consecutive fluoroscopically guided spine procedures. KAP [Gy cm{sup 2}] and total fluoroscopy time were recorded for each procedure. An electronic dosimeter recorded the operator Air Kerma [μGy] for each procedure. Operator Air Kerma for each procedure, correlation between KAP and operator Air Kerma, and between KAP and fluoroscopy time was obtained. Operator Air Kerma was widely variable across procedures, with median value of 6.4 μGy per procedure. Median fluoroscopy time and median KAP per procedure were 2.6 min and 4.7 Gy cm{sup 2}, respectively. There was correlation between operator Air Kerma and KAP (r{sup 2} = 0.60), with a slope of 1.6 μGy Air Kerma per unit Gy cm{sup 2} KAP incident on the patient and between fluoroscopy time and KAP (r{sup 2} = 0.63). Operator Air Kerma during individual fluoroscopy-guided spine procedures can be approximated from the commonly and readily available information of the total amount of radiation incident on the patient, measured as KAP. (orig.)

  17. Fluoroscopically guided fallopian tube recanalization with a simplified set of instruments; Durchleuchtungsgesteuerte Eileiter-Rekanalisation mit vereinfachtem Instrumentarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz-Rode, T.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Neulen, J. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Frauenklinik fuer gynaekologische Endokrinologie und Reproduktionsmedizin

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: Fluoroscopically guided transcervical fallopian tube recanalization is recognized as an important step in the workup of female infertility. In the present study, a simplified set of recanalization instruments was tested. Materials and Methods: Forty-two women with infertility and sonographically confirmed or suspected uni- or bilateral tubal occlusion were examined. After vaginal placement of a plastic speculum and fixation of a tenaculum, a 4F glide catheter with a 0.89 mm glidewire was advanced transcervically. After documentation of tubal occlusion by hysterosalpingography, the uterotubal junction was catheterized with the same instruments. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the glidewire was negotiated beyond the intramural portion of the tube. Selective salpingography documented the outcome of the recanalization. Results: Hysterosalpingography confirmed tubal occlusions in 26 of 42 patients (in 12 cases unilateral and in 14 cases bilateral). Fallopian tube recanalization was successful in 23 of 26 patients (technical success rate of 88%). The resulting fertility rate was 30% (7/23), without any ectopic pregnancy. Complications such as tubal perforation, infection, or bleeding did not occur. Tubal catheterization was straightforward and smooth in 17/23 cases. For a hyperflexed uterus (6/23), a curved tip of the catheter was helpful in tubal probing. (orig.)

  18. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, L. C.; Vano, E.; Gutierrez, F.; Rodriguez, C.; Gilarranz, R.; Manzanas, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm2 respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  19. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, L C; Vano, E; Gutierrez, F; Rodriguez, C; Gilarranz, R; Manzanas, M J

    2007-01-01

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for 2 respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers

  20. Repeating Marx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Christian; Monticelli, Lara

    2018-01-01

    This introduction sets out the context of the special issue “Karl Marx @ 200: Debating Capitalism & Perspectives for the Future of Radical Theory”, which was published on the occasion of Marx’s bicentenary on 5 May 2018. First, we give a brief overview of contemporary capitalism’s development...... and its crises. Second, we argue that it is important to repeat Marx today. Third, we reflect on lessons learned from 200 years of struggles for alternatives to capitalism. Fourth, we give an overview of the contributions in this special issue. Taken together, the contributions in this special issue show...... that Marx’s theory and politics remain key inspirations for understanding exploitation and domination in 21st-century society and for struggles that aim to overcome these phenomena and establishing a just and fair society. We need to repeat Marx today....

  1. Application of a repeat-measure biomarker measurement error model to 2 validation studies: examination of the effect of within-person variation in biomarker measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, Sarah Rosner; Spiegelman, Donna; Zhao, Barbara Bojuan; Moshfegh, Alanna; Baer, David J; Willett, Walter C

    2011-03-15

    Repeat-biomarker measurement error models accounting for systematic correlated within-person error can be used to estimate the correlation coefficient (ρ) and deattenuation factor (λ), used in measurement error correction. These models account for correlated errors in the food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and the 24-hour diet recall and random within-person variation in the biomarkers. Failure to account for within-person variation in biomarkers can exaggerate correlated errors between FFQs and 24-hour diet recalls. For 2 validation studies, ρ and λ were calculated for total energy and protein density. In the Automated Multiple-Pass Method Validation Study (n=471), doubly labeled water (DLW) and urinary nitrogen (UN) were measured twice in 52 adults approximately 16 months apart (2002-2003), yielding intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.43 for energy (DLW) and 0.54 for protein density (UN/DLW). The deattenuated correlation coefficient for protein density was 0.51 for correlation between the FFQ and the 24-hour diet recall and 0.49 for correlation between the FFQ and the biomarker. Use of repeat-biomarker measurement error models resulted in a ρ of 0.42. These models were similarly applied to the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition Study (1999-2000). In conclusion, within-person variation in biomarkers can be substantial, and to adequately assess the impact of correlated subject-specific error, this variation should be assessed in validation studies of FFQs. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.

  2. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    large cohort of trials to spot unusual cases. However, deployment repeatability is inherently a nonlinear phenomenon, which makes modeling difficult...and GEMS tip position were both tracked during ground testing by a laser target tracking system. Earlier SAILMAST testing in 2005 [8] used...recalls the strategy used by SRTM, where a constellation of lights was installed at the tip of the boom and a modified star tracker was used to track tip

  3. Clinical significance of fluoroscopic patterns specific for the mitotic spindle in patients with reumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Todesco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: we proposed to determine the clinical significance of anti-NuMA and anti-HsEg5 antibodies in a group of patients affected with rheumatic diseases. Materials and methods: indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2000 cells at serum dilution of 1:40 was used to examin 26 sera which had previously showed a “mitotic spindle” fluoroscopic pattern type during laboratory routine. Results: 21 sera (80,7% were identified with NuMA and 5 (19,3% with HsEg5 patterns alone or associated with other ANA patterns. However only patients with isolated positiveness and that is 15 with NuMA and 4 with HsEg5 stainings were included in this study. Of the NuMA positive patients 5 were affected with arthropathies associated to different forms of thyroiditis, 2 with seronegative arthritis, 2 with antiphospholipid syndrome, 1 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, 1 with rheumatoid arthritis, 1 with sicca syndrome, 1 with undifferentiated connective tissue disease, 1 with Mycoplasma pneumaniae infection and 1 with retinal thrombosis. Of the HsEg5 positive patients 3 were affected with SLE and 1 with seronegative arthritis. Conclusions: NuMA does not prevail in any defined rheumatic disease, while HsEg5 staining were more frequent (75% in patients affected with SLE all of whom showing high antibody titres.

  4. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  5. Dosimetry in endoscopic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldred, Martha Aurelia; Paes, Walter Siqueira; Fausto, Agnes M.F.; Nucci, Jose Roberto; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Okuno, Emico; Maruta, Luis Massuo

    1996-01-01

    Equivalent and effective doses in occupational exposures are evaluated considering that some specific endoscopic examinations, radiographic and fluoroscopic images of patients are taken with the medical staff near to the radiation field. Examinations are simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom as a member of the medical staff. Thermoluminescent dosemeters are attached in several positions of the phantom in order to determine some organ doses. From the comparison between the doses experimentally determined and the International and the Brazilian recommended occupational dose limits, the maximum number of examination that any member of the staff can perform was calculated

  6. Patient radiation dose audits for fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, Stephen; Rosenstein, Marvin; Miller, Donald L.; Schueler, Beth; Spelic, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Quality management for any use of medical x-ray imaging should include monitoring of radiation dose. Fluoroscopically guided interventional (FGI) procedures are inherently clinically variable and have the potential for inducing deterministic injuries in patients. The use of a conventional diagnostic reference level is not appropriate for FGI procedures. A similar but more detailed quality process for management of radiation dose in FGI procedures is described. Methods: A method that takes into account both the inherent variability of FGI procedures and the risk of deterministic injuries from these procedures is suggested. The substantial radiation dose level (SRDL) is an absolute action level (with regard to patient follow-up) below which skin injury is highly unlikely and above which skin injury is possible. The quality process for FGI procedures collects data from all instances of a given procedure from a number of facilities into an advisory data set (ADS). An individual facility collects a facility data set (FDS) comprised of all instances of the same procedure at that facility. The individual FDS is then compared to the multifacility ADS with regard to the overall shape of the dose distributions and the percent of instances in both the ADS and the FDS that exceed the SRDL. Results: Samples of an ADS and FDS for percutaneous coronary intervention, using the dose metric of reference air kerma (K a,r ) (i.e., the cumulative air kerma at the reference point), are used to illustrate the proposed quality process for FGI procedures. Investigation is warranted whenever the FDS is noticeably different from the ADS for the specific FGI procedure and particularly in two circumstances: (1) When the facility's local median K a,r exceeds the 75th percentile of the ADS and (2) when the percent of instances where K a,r exceeds the facility-selected SRDL is greater for the FDS than for the ADS. Conclusions: Analysis of the two data sets (ADS and FDS) and of the

  7. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Cai, W; Rottmann, J; Williams, C; Wagar, M; Berbeco, R; Lewis, J H; Mishra, P; Li, R; Ionascu, D

    2015-01-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we developed and performed initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and used these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparison to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT-based and 4DCT-based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery. (paper)

  8. A review of two methods used in the USA to assess HE during fluoroscopic-based radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig Yoder, R.; Salasky, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Dosemeter results for ∼81 500 people performing fluoroscopic and interventional radiology procedures were examined to identify differences between groups monitored either by using two dosemeters, one placed at the collar above the apron and a second placed under the apron on the torso (EDE1) or by using one single dosemeter placed at the collar above the apron (EDE2). The median annual HE was 0.17 mSv for those monitored using the EDE1 protocol and 0.26 mSv for the group using the EDE2 protocol. The EDE2 method was used most frequently with the EDE1 method preferred for those more highly exposed. Approximately, 22 % of dosemeter results for EDE1 were inconsistent with expected norms based on over and under apron dosemeter relationships. (authors)

  9. Scattered radiation dose to radiologist's cornea, thyroid and gonads while performing some x-ray fluoroscopic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougle, Arun

    1993-01-01

    The mankind has been immensely benefited from discovery of X-ray and it has found wide spread application in diagnosis and treatment. Radiation is harmful and can produce somatic and genetic effects in the exposed person. International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has recommended a system of dose limitation based on principle of ALARA. All the efforts should be made to keep the radiation dose to the radiation worker as low as possible. Fluoroscopy gives maximum dose to the patient and staff and hence we have attempted to quantify the scattered radiation dose to the cornea, thyroid and gonads of the radiologist performing fluoroscopic examinations such as barium meal, barium swallow, barium enema, myelography, histerosalpingography and fracture reduction. Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) method using CaSO 4 :Dy TLD disc was employed for these measurements. Use of lead apron has reduced the dose to radiologist's gonad. (author). 3 refs., 4 tabs

  10. Repeated Causal Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmayer, York; Meder, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    Many of our decisions refer to actions that have a causal impact on the external environment. Such actions may not only allow for the mere learning of expected values or utilities but also for acquiring knowledge about the causal structure of our world. We used a repeated decision-making paradigm to examine what kind of knowledge people acquire in…

  11. Objective masurement of image quality in fluoroscopic x-ray equipment FluoroQuality

    CERN Document Server

    Tapiovaara, M

    2003-01-01

    The report describes FluoroQuality, a computer program that is developed in STUK and used for measuring the image quality in medical fluoroscopic equipment. The method is based on the statistical decision theory (SDT) and the main measurement result is given in terms of the accumulation rate of the signal-to-noise ratio squared (SNR sup 2 sub r sub a sub t sub e). In addition to this quantity several other quantities are measured. These quantities include the SNR of single image frames, the spatio-temporal noise power spectrum and the temporal lag. The measurement method can be used, for example, for specifying the image quality in fluoroscopic images, for optimising the image quality and dose rate in fluoroscopy and for quality control of fluoroscopic equipment. The theory behind the measurement method is reviewed and the measurement of the various quantities is explained. An example of using the method for optimising a specified fluoroscopic procedure is given. The User's Manual of the program is included a...

  12. Selecting appropriate gastroenteric contrast media for diagnostic fluoroscopic imaging in infants and children: a practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael J; Talmadge, Jennifer M; MacDougall, Robert D; Kleinman, Patricia L; Taylor, George A; Buonomo, Carlo

    2017-04-01

    In our experience, questions about the appropriate use of enteric contrast media for pediatric fluoroscopic studies are common. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of enteric contrast media used for pediatric fluoroscopy, highlighting the routine use of these media at a large tertiary care pediatric teaching hospital.

  13. Reducing radiation exposure in an electrophysiology lab with introduction of newer fluoroscopic technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munish Sharma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of fluoroscopic devices exposes patients and operators to harmful effects of ionizing radiation in an electrophysiology (EP lab. We sought to know if the newer fluoroscopic technology (Allura Clarity installed in a hybrid EP helps to reduce prescribed radiation dose. We performed radiation dose analysis of 90 patients who underwent various procedures in the EP lab at a community teaching hospital after the introduction of newer fluoroscopic technology in June of 2016.Watchman device insertion, radiofrequency ablation procedures, permanent pacemaker (PPM/implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD placement and battery changes were included in the study to compare radiation exposure during different procedures performed commonly in an EP lab. In all cases of watchman device placement, radiofrequency ablation procedures, PPM/ICD placement and battery changes, there was a statistically significant difference (<0.05 in radiation dose exposure. Significant reduction in radiation exposure during various procedures performed in an EP lab was achieved with aid of newer fluoroscopic technology and better image detection technology.

  14. 28 CFR 552.13 - X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or surgical intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false X-ray, major instrument, fluoroscope, or... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Searches of Housing Units, Inmates, and Inmate Work Areas § 552.13 X-ray, major... reasons only, with the inmate's consent. (b) The institution physician may authorize use of an X-ray for...

  15. Video dosimetry: evaluation of X-radiation dose by video fluoroscopic image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nova, Joao Luiz Leocadio da; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu

    1996-01-01

    A new methodology to evaluate the entrance surface dose on patients under radiodiagnosis is presented. A phantom is used in video fluoroscopic procedures in on line video signal system. The images are obtained from a Siemens Polymat 50 and are digitalized. The results show that the entrance surface dose can be obtained in real time from video imaging

  16. Fluoroscopic and CT enteroclysis in children: initial experience, technical feasibility, and utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Shanaree; Applegate, Kimberly E.; Sandrasegaran, Kumar; Jennings, S.G.; Garrett, Joshua; Maglinte, Dean T.; Skantharajah, Arunan

    2008-01-01

    Partial small-bowel obstruction can be difficult to diagnose on clinical examination. These obstructions might not be detected on routine abdominal/pelvic CT. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and techniques of fluoroscopic enteroclysis (FE) and CT enteroclysis (CTE), and to review their indications and findings in children. We retrospectively reviewed all enteroclysis studies in children younger than 18 years performed between January 2002 and March 2007. We correlated the results with other abdominal imaging and surgical and pathological findings. The review revealed 112 FE and 74 CTE studies performed in 175 children (mean age 14 years, range 3-18 years). FE and CTE studies were performed most commonly for evaluation of known Crohn disease (FE 38%, CTE 29%) and abdominal pain (FE 26%, CTE 26%). One FE study was terminated because of patient anxiety, and one CTE study was terminated because of patient discomfort. No complications of FE or CTE were reported. The findings were normal in 54% of the FE studies and 46% of the CTE studies. The most common small bowel diagnoses were Crohn disease (FE 34%, CTE 28%) and partial small bowel obstruction (FE 3%, CTE 10%). Two FE studies (2%) and 14 CTE studies (19%) showed abnormalities outside the small bowel. In 54 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, 11 FE studies and 25 CTE studies showed additional bowel abnormalities. Overall, 14 and 21 patients had surgery as a result of the findings of FE and CTE, respectively. FE and CTE are safe, feasible, and accurate in depicting small-bowel pathology in children. These techniques can be particularly useful in children with Crohn disease involving the small bowel. (orig.)

  17. An engineering development of fluoroscopic X-ray medical equipment based-on fluorescent screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferry Suyatno; I Putu Susila; Djoko Sukmono

    2011-01-01

    Fluoroscopic x-ray medical equipment uses fluorescent screen to capture structural image of organs. Unlike conventional x-ray equipment which uses film, in the fluoroscopic x-ray, the resulting image is visualized on the fluorescent screen and directly observed by physicians in the patients' rooms. In this study, we developed an image capture system that transforms the image on the fluorescent screen into digital data, which is then transferred to computer for visualization and further processing. By using this system, the observation of the resulting image can be done on a computer that is placed in the control room. The image can also be stored easily and at low cost compared to conventional film. The experiment shows that the system could be used to capture image of the object. However, its quality needs to be improved. In the future, the system will be modified and tested with different types of cameras to obtain better results. (author)

  18. Fluoroscopic dose reduction by acquisition frame rate reduction and image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, S.L.; Mirvis, S.E.; Pals, S.O.

    1986-01-01

    A new design for fluoroscopic exposure reduction incorporates pulsed x-ray exposure, progressive scan video acquisition at frame rates below 30 Hz, interlaced video display at 30 Hz, and a video rate image processing. To evaluate this design, a variety of phantom systems have been developed to measure the impact of low frame rate pulsed digital fluoroscopy on the performance of several clinical tasks (e.g., catheter placement). The authors are currently using these phantoms with a digital fluoroscopy system using continuous x-ray, interlaced video acquisition and variable acquisition frame rate. The design of their target digital fluoroscopic system, sample image sequences, and the results of some preliminary phantom studies are reported

  19. Edge enhancement algorithm for low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Seok; Park, Chul Hee; Kang, Moon Gi

    2017-12-01

    Low-dose X-ray fluoroscopy has continually evolved to reduce radiation risk to patients during clinical diagnosis and surgery. However, the reduction in dose exposure causes quality degradation of the acquired images. In general, an X-ray device has a time-average pre-processor to remove the generated quantum noise. However, this pre-processor causes blurring and artifacts within the moving edge regions, and noise remains in the image. During high-pass filtering (HPF) to enhance edge detail, this noise in the image is amplified. In this study, a 2D edge enhancement algorithm comprising region adaptive HPF with the transient improvement (TI) method, as well as artifacts and noise reduction (ANR), was developed for degraded X-ray fluoroscopic images. The proposed method was applied in a static scene pre-processed by a low-dose X-ray fluoroscopy device. First, the sharpness of the X-ray image was improved using region adaptive HPF with the TI method, which facilitates sharpening of edge details without overshoot problems. Then, an ANR filter that uses an edge directional kernel was developed to remove the artifacts and noise that can occur during sharpening, while preserving edge details. The quantitative and qualitative results obtained by applying the developed method to low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic images and visually and numerically comparing the final images with images improved using conventional edge enhancement techniques indicate that the proposed method outperforms existing edge enhancement methods in terms of objective criteria and subjective visual perception of the actual X-ray fluoroscopic image. The developed edge enhancement algorithm performed well when applied to actual low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic images, not only by improving the sharpness, but also by removing artifacts and noise, including overshoot. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. SU-F-I-76: Fluoroscopic X-Ray Beam Profiles for Spectra Incorporating Copper Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderle, K [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Godley, A; Shen, Z; Dong, F [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rakowski, J [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to characterize and quantify X-ray beam profiles for fluoroscopic x-ray beam spectra incorporating spectral (copper) filtration. Methods: A PTW (Freiburg, Germany) type 60016 silicon diode detector and PTW MP3 water tank were used to measure X-ray beam profiles for 60, 80, 100 and 120 kVp x-ray beams at five different copper filtration thicknesses ranging from 0–0.9 mm at 22 and 42 cm fields of view and depths of 1, 5, and 10 cm in both the anode-cathode axis (inplane) and cross-plane directions. All measurements were acquired on a Siemens (Erlangen, Germany) Artis ZeeGo fluoroscope inverted from the typical orientation providing an x-ray beam originating from above the water surface with the water level set at 60 cm from the focal spot. Results: X-ray beam profiles for beam spectra without copper filtration compared well to previously published data by Fetterly et al. [Med Phys, 28, 205 (2001)]. Our data collection benefited from the geometric orientation of the fluoroscope, providing a beam perpendicular to the tank water surface, rather than through a thin side wall as did the previously mentioned study. Profiles for beams with copper filtration were obtained which have not been previously investigated and published. Beam profiles in the anode-cathode axis near the surface and at lower x-ray energy exhibited substantial heel effect, which became less pronounced at greater depth. At higher energy with copper filtration in the beam, the dose falloff out-of-field became less pronounced, as would be anticipated given higher scatter photon energy. Conclusion: The x-ray beam profile data for the fluoroscopic x-ray beams incorporating copper filtration are intended for use as reference data for estimating doses to organs or soft tissue, including fetal dose, involving similar beam qualities or for comparison with mathematical models.

  1. Radiofrequency catheter ablation: Relationship between fluoroscopic time and skin doses according to diagnoses. Basis to establish a quality assurance programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotelo, E.; Pouso, J.; Reyes, W.

    2001-01-01

    Radiofrequency Cardiac Catheter Ablation is an Interventional Radiology procedure of great complexity because the cardiologist needs a simultaneous evaluation of fluoroscopic images and electrophysiologic information. Therefore, the procedure typically involves extended fluoroscopic time that may cause radiation-skin injures to patients. Skin doses depend on many factors: equipment design features and its proper use, cardiologist practice, fluoroscopic time, irradiated areas, application of radiation protection recommendations, etc. We evaluate fluoroscopic time in relation to pathology and we estimate skin doses on 233 procedures at the Electrophysiology Laboratory in Casa de Galicia, Montevideo, Uruguay. Significant differences among the medians of fluoroscopic time were found in those procedures depending on diagnoses and results. Higher fluoroscopic time was found in flutter and auricular tachycardia (median was 83 minutes, p=0.0001). In successful procedures (almost 90%), median skin doses was 2.0 Grays (p=0.0001). On the basis of records information, the standard operating procedure and the clinical protocol, expanding close cooperation between the cardiologists and the experts in Radiation Protection will secure the establishment of an Assurance Quality Program. (author)

  2. Echocardiographic and Fluoroscopic Fusion Imaging for Procedural Guidance: An Overview and Early Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaden, Jeremy J; Sanon, Saurabh; Geske, Jeffrey B; Eleid, Mackram F; Nijhof, Niels; Malouf, Joseph F; Rihal, Charanjit S; Bruce, Charles J

    2016-06-01

    There has been significant growth in the volume and complexity of percutaneous structural heart procedures in the past decade. Increasing procedural complexity and accompanying reliance on multimodality imaging have fueled the development of fusion imaging to facilitate procedural guidance. The first clinically available system capable of echocardiographic and fluoroscopic fusion for real-time guidance of structural heart procedures was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2012. Echocardiographic-fluoroscopic fusion imaging combines the precise catheter and device visualization of fluoroscopy with the soft tissue anatomy and color flow Doppler information afforded by echocardiography in a single image. This allows the interventionalist to perform precise catheter manipulations under fluoroscopy guidance while visualizing critical tissue anatomy provided by echocardiography. However, there are few data available addressing this technology's strengths and limitations in routine clinical practice. The authors provide a critical review of currently available echocardiographic-fluoroscopic fusion imaging for guidance of structural heart interventions to highlight its strengths, limitations, and potential clinical applications and to guide further research into value of this emerging technology. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Correction of malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Ryong; Baek, Kyong Hee; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk; Rim, Hark

    1997-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of correction of a malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance. Between November 1994 and March 1997, we performed 15 manipulations in 12 patients in whom a dual-cuff, straight Tenckhoff peritoneal dialysis catheter had been implanted due to chronic renal failure. The causes of catheter malfunctioning were inadequate drainage of the dialysate(n=14) and painful dialysis(n=1). Under fluoroscopic guidance, adhesiolysis and repositioning of the malfunctioning catheter were performed with an Amplatz Super Stiff guidewire and the stiffener from a biliary drainage catheter. The results of procedures were categorized as either immediate or durable success, this latter being defined as adequate catheter function for at least one month after the procedure. Immediate success was achieved in 14 of 15 procedures (93%), and durable success in 7 of 15(47%). The mean duration of catheter function was 157 (range, 30 to 578) days. After manipulation, abdominal pain developed in eight patients and peritonitis in two, but with conservative treatment, these symptoms improved. The correction of a malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance is an effective means of restoring catheter function and may be an effective alternative to surgical reimplantation of the catheter, or hemodialysis

  4. Fluoroscopically-guided foam sclerotherapy with sodium morrhuate for the treatment of lower extremity varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiting; Jiang Zhongpu; Zhou Yi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate fluoroscopically-guided foam sclerotherapy with injection of domestic sodium morrhuate in treating lower extremity varices. Methods: A total of 30 cases (39 diseased lower limbs) with lower extremity varices were enrolled in this study. Under fluoroscopic guidance foam sclerotherapy with injection of domestic sodium morrhuate was carried out in all patients. The obstructed condition of the great saphenous vein was observed during the following three months. Results: The technical success was achieved in all 39 patients. The mean dose of foam sclerosant used for each diseased limb was 5.9 ml (3.4-8.2 ml). Disappearance of blood flow reflux in lower extremity vein immediately after the treatment was seen in 35 patients (90%). Three months after the therapy, vascular sonography showed that the great saphenous vein was obstructed, and no serious complications occurred. Conclusion: For the treatment of lower extremity varices, fluoroscopically-guided foam sclerotherapy with injection of domestic sodium morrhuate is safe and effective with satisfactory results. This technique is a newly-developed micro-invasive therapy for lower extremity varices. (authors)

  5. Scale-space for empty catheter segmentation in PCI fluoroscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchuwar, Ketan; Cousty, Jean; Vaillant, Régis; Najman, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we present a method for empty guiding catheter segmentation in fluoroscopic X-ray images. The guiding catheter, being a commonly visible landmark, its segmentation is an important and a difficult brick for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) procedure modeling. In number of clinical situations, the catheter is empty and appears as a low contrasted structure with two parallel and partially disconnected edges. To segment it, we work on the level-set scale-space of image, the min tree, to extract curve blobs. We then propose a novel structural scale-space, a hierarchy built on these curve blobs. The deep connected component, i.e. the cluster of curve blobs on this hierarchy, that maximizes the likelihood to be an empty catheter is retained as final segmentation. We evaluate the performance of the algorithm on a database of 1250 fluoroscopic images from 6 patients. As a result, we obtain very good qualitative and quantitative segmentation performance, with mean precision and recall of 80.48 and 63.04% respectively. We develop a novel structural scale-space to segment a structured object, the empty catheter, in challenging situations where the information content is very sparse in the images. Fully-automatic empty catheter segmentation in X-ray fluoroscopic images is an important and preliminary step in PCI procedure modeling, as it aids in tagging the arrival and removal location of other interventional tools.

  6. Correction of malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Ryong; Baek, Kyong Hee; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk; Rim, Hark [Kosin Medical College, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-11-01

    To determine the efficacy of correction of a malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance. Between November 1994 and March 1997, we performed 15 manipulations in 12 patients in whom a dual-cuff, straight Tenckhoff peritoneal dialysis catheter had been implanted due to chronic renal failure. The causes of catheter malfunctioning were inadequate drainage of the dialysate(n=14) and painful dialysis(n=1). Under fluoroscopic guidance, adhesiolysis and repositioning of the malfunctioning catheter were performed with an Amplatz Super Stiff guidewire and the stiffener from a biliary drainage catheter. The results of procedures were categorized as either immediate or durable success, this latter being defined as adequate catheter function for at least one month after the procedure. Immediate success was achieved in 14 of 15 procedures (93%), and durable success in 7 of 15(47%). The mean duration of catheter function was 157 (range, 30 to 578) days. After manipulation, abdominal pain developed in eight patients and peritonitis in two, but with conservative treatment, these symptoms improved. The correction of a malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance is an effective means of restoring catheter function and may be an effective alternative to surgical reimplantation of the catheter, or hemodialysis.

  7. Fluoroscopic guidance for placing a double lumen endotracheal tube in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calenda, Emile; Baste, Jean Marc; Hajjej, Ridha; Rezig, Najiba; Moriceau, Jerome; Diallo, Yaya; Sghaeir, Slim; Danielou, Eric; Peillon, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the right placement of the double lumen endotracheal tube with fluoroscopic guidance, which is used in first intention prior to the fiberscope in our institution. This was a prospective observational study. The study was conducted in vascular and thoracic operating rooms. We enrolled 205 patients scheduled for thoracic surgery, with ASA physical statuses of I (n = 37), II (n = 84), III (n = 80), and IV (n = 4). Thoracic procedures were biopsy (n = 20), wedge (n = 34), culminectomy (n = 6), lobectomy (n = 82), pneumonectomy (n = 4), sympathectomy (n = 9), symphysis (n = 47), and thymectomy (n = 3). The intubation with a double lumen tube was performed with the help of a laryngoscope. Tracheal and bronchial balloons were inflated and auscultation was performed after right and left exclusions. One shot was performed to locate the position of the bronchial tube and the hook. Fluoroscopic guidance was used to relocate the tube in case of a wrong position. When the fluoroscopic guidance failed to position the tube, a fiberscope was used. Perioperative collapse of the lung was assessed by the surgeon during the surgery. Correct fluoroscopic image was obtained after the first attempt in 58.5% of patients therefore a misplaced position was encountered in 41.5%. The fluoroscopic guidance allowed an exact repositioning in 99.5% of cases, and the mean duration of the procedure was 8 minutes. A fiberscope was required to move the hook for one patient. We did not notice a moving of the double lumen endotracheal tube during the surgery. The surgeon satisfaction was 100%. The fluoroscopy evidenced the right position of the double lumen tube and allowed a right repositioning in 99.5% of patients with a very simple implementation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. SU-D-209-02: Percent Depth Dose Curves for Fluoroscopic X-Ray Beam Qualities Incorporating Copper Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderle, K [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Godley, A; Shen, Z; Dong, F [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rakowski, J [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to quantify percent depth dose (PDD) curves for fluoroscopic x-ray beam qualities incorporating added copper filtration. Methods: A PTW (Freiburg, Germany) MP3 water tank was used with a Standard Imaging (Middleton, WI) Exradin Model 11 Spokas Chamber to measure PDD curves for 60, 80, 100 and 120 kVp x-ray beams with copper filtration ranging from 0.0–0.9 mm at 22cm and 42cm fields of view from 0 to 150 mm of water. A free-in-air monitor chamber was used to normalize the water tank data to fluctuations in output from the fluoroscope. The measurements were acquired on a Siemens (Erlangen, Germany) Artis ZeeGo fluoroscope. The fluoroscope was inverted from the typical orientation providing an x-ray beam originating from above the water tank. The water tank was positioned so that the water level was located at 60cm from the focal spot; which also represents the focal spot to interventional reference plane distance for that fluoroscope. Results: PDDs for 60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp with 0 mm of copper filtration compared well to previously published data by Fetterly et al. [Med Phys, 28, 205 (2001)] for those beam qualities given differences in fluoroscopes, geometric orientation, type of ionization chamber, and the water tank used for data collection. PDDs for 60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp with copper filtration were obtained and are presented, which have not been previously investigated and published. Conclusion: The equipment and processes used to acquire the reported data were sound and compared well with previously published data for PDDs without copper filtration. PDD data for the fluoroscopic x-ray beams incorporating copper filtration can be used as reference data for estimating organ or soft tissue dose at depth involving similar beam qualities or for comparison with mathematical models.

  9. A moving fluoroscope to capture tibiofemoral kinematics during complete cycles of free level and downhill walking as well as stair descent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate List

    Full Text Available Videofluoroscopy has been shown to provide essential information in the evaluation of the functionality of total knee arthroplasties. However, due to the limitation in the field of view, most systems can only assess knee kinematics during highly restricted movements. To avoid the limitations of a static image intensifier, a moving fluoroscope has been presented as a standalone system that allows tracking of the knee during multiple complete cycles of level- and downhill-walking, as well as stair descent, in combination with the synchronous assessment of ground reaction forces and whole body skin marker measurements. Here, we assess the ability of the system to keep the knee in the field of view of the image intensifier. By measuring ten total knee arthroplasty subjects, we demonstrate that it is possible to maintain the knee to within 1.8 ± 1.4 cm vertically and 4.0 ± 2.6 cm horizontally of the centre of the intensifier throughout full cycles of activities of daily living. Since control of the system is based on real-time feedback of a wire sensor, the system is not dependent on repeatable gait patterns, but is rather able to capture pathological motion patterns with low inter-trial repeatability.

  10. A moving fluoroscope to capture tibiofemoral kinematics during complete cycles of free level and downhill walking as well as stair descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postolka, Barbara; Schütz, Pascal; Hitz, Marco; Schwilch, Peter; Gerber, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Videofluoroscopy has been shown to provide essential information in the evaluation of the functionality of total knee arthroplasties. However, due to the limitation in the field of view, most systems can only assess knee kinematics during highly restricted movements. To avoid the limitations of a static image intensifier, a moving fluoroscope has been presented as a standalone system that allows tracking of the knee during multiple complete cycles of level- and downhill-walking, as well as stair descent, in combination with the synchronous assessment of ground reaction forces and whole body skin marker measurements. Here, we assess the ability of the system to keep the knee in the field of view of the image intensifier. By measuring ten total knee arthroplasty subjects, we demonstrate that it is possible to maintain the knee to within 1.8 ± 1.4 cm vertically and 4.0 ± 2.6 cm horizontally of the centre of the intensifier throughout full cycles of activities of daily living. Since control of the system is based on real-time feedback of a wire sensor, the system is not dependent on repeatable gait patterns, but is rather able to capture pathological motion patterns with low inter-trial repeatability. PMID:29016647

  11. A moving fluoroscope to capture tibiofemoral kinematics during complete cycles of free level and downhill walking as well as stair descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Renate; Postolka, Barbara; Schütz, Pascal; Hitz, Marco; Schwilch, Peter; Gerber, Hans; Ferguson, Stephen J; Taylor, William R

    2017-01-01

    Videofluoroscopy has been shown to provide essential information in the evaluation of the functionality of total knee arthroplasties. However, due to the limitation in the field of view, most systems can only assess knee kinematics during highly restricted movements. To avoid the limitations of a static image intensifier, a moving fluoroscope has been presented as a standalone system that allows tracking of the knee during multiple complete cycles of level- and downhill-walking, as well as stair descent, in combination with the synchronous assessment of ground reaction forces and whole body skin marker measurements. Here, we assess the ability of the system to keep the knee in the field of view of the image intensifier. By measuring ten total knee arthroplasty subjects, we demonstrate that it is possible to maintain the knee to within 1.8 ± 1.4 cm vertically and 4.0 ± 2.6 cm horizontally of the centre of the intensifier throughout full cycles of activities of daily living. Since control of the system is based on real-time feedback of a wire sensor, the system is not dependent on repeatable gait patterns, but is rather able to capture pathological motion patterns with low inter-trial repeatability.

  12. Fluoroscopic radiation exposure: are we protecting ourselves adequately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffler, C Edward; Ilyas, Asif M

    2015-05-06

    While traditional intraoperative fluoroscopy protection relies on thyroid shields and aprons, recent data suggest that the surgeon's eyes and hands receive more exposure than previously appreciated. Using a distal radial fracture surgery model, we examined (1) radiation exposure to the eyes, thyroid, chest, groin, and hands of a surgeon mannequin; (2) the degree to which shielding equipment can decrease exposure; and (3) how exposure varies with fluoroscopy unit size. An anthropomorphic model was fit with radiation-attenuating glasses, a thyroid shield, an apron, and gloves. "Exposed" thermoluminescent dosimeters overlaid the protective equipment at the eyes, thyroid, chest, groin, and index finger while "shielded" dosimeters were placed beneath the protective equipment. Fluoroscopy position and settings were standardized. The mini-c-arm milliampere-seconds were fixed based on the selection of the kilovolt peak (kVp). Three mini and three standard c-arms scanned a model of the patient's wrist continuously for fifteen minutes each. Ten dosimeter exposures were recorded for each c-arm. Hand exposure averaged 31 μSv/min (range, 22 to 48 μSv/min), which was 13.0 times higher than the other recorded exposures. Eye exposure averaged 4 μSv/min, 2.2 times higher than the mean thyroid, chest, and groin exposure. Gloves reduced hand exposure by 69.4%. Glasses decreased eye exposure by 65.6%. There was no significant difference in exposure between mini and standard fluoroscopy. Surgeons' hands receive the most radiation exposure during distal radial plate fixation under fluoroscopy. There was a small but insignificant difference in mean exposure between standard fluoroscopy and mini-fluoroscopy, but some standard units resulted in lower exposure than some mini-units. On the basis of these findings, we recommend routine protective equipment to mitigate exposure to surgeons' hands and eyes, in addition to the thyroid, chest, and groin, during fluoroscopy procedures

  13. Exposition of the operator's eye lens and efficacy of radiation shielding in fluoroscopically guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galster, M.; Adamus, R.; Guhl, C.; Uder, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Efficacy of radiation protection tools for the eye lens dose of the radiologist in fluoroscopic interventions. Materials and Methods: A patient phantom was exposed using a fluoroscopic system. Dose measurements were made at the eye location of the radiologist using an ionization chamber. The setting followed typical fluoroscopic interventions. The reduction of scattered radiation by the equipment-mounted shielding (undercouch drapes and overcouch top) was evaluated. The ceiling-suspended lead acrylic glass screen was tested in scattered radiation generated by a slab phantom. The protective properties of different lead glass goggles and lead acrylic visors were evaluated by thermoluminescence measurements on a head phantom in the primary beam. Results: The exposition of the lens of about 110 to 550 μSv during radiologic interventions is only slightly reduced by the undercouch drapes. Applying the top in addition to the drapes reduces the lens dose by a factor of 2 for PA projections. In 25 LAO the dose is reduced by a factor between 1.2 and 5. The highest doses were measured for AP angulations furthermore the efficacy of the equipment-mounted shielding is minimal. The ceiling-suspended lead screen reduced scatter by a factor of about 30. The lead glass goggles and visors reduced the lens dose up to a factor of 8 to 10. Depending on the specific design, the tested models are less effective especially for radiation from lateral with cranial angulation of the beam. Occasionally the visors even caused an increase of dose. Conclusion: The exposition of the eye lens can be kept below the new occupational limit recommended by the ICRP if the radiation shielding equipment is used consistently. (orig.)

  14. [Exposition of the operator's eye lens and efficacy of radiation shielding in fluoroscopically guided interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galster, M; Guhl, C; Uder, M; Adamus, R

    2013-05-01

    Efficacy of radiation protection tools for the eye lens dose of the radiologist in fluoroscopic interventions. A patient phantom was exposed using a fluoroscopic system. Dose measurements were made at the eye location of the radiologist using an ionization chamber. The setting followed typical fluoroscopic interventions. The reduction of scattered radiation by the equipment-mounted shielding (undercouch drapes and overcouch top) was evaluated. The ceiling-suspended lead acrylic glass screen was tested in scattered radiation generated by a slab phantom. The protective properties of different lead glass goggles and lead acrylic visors were evaluated by thermoluminescence measurements on a head phantom in the primary beam. The exposition of the lens of about 110 to 550 μSv during radiologic interventions is only slightly reduced by the undercouch drapes. Applying the top in addition to the drapes reduces the lens dose by a factor of 2 for PA projections. In 25°LAO the dose is reduced by a factor between 1.2 and 5. The highest doses were measured for AP angulations furthermore the efficacy of the equipment-mounted shielding is minimal. The ceiling-suspended lead screen reduced scatter by a factor of about 30. The lead glass goggles and visors reduced the lens dose up to a factor of 8 to 10. Depending on the specific design, the tested models are less effective especially for radiation from lateral with cranial angulation of the beam. Occasionally the visors even caused an increase of dose. The exposition of the eye lens can be kept below the new occupational limit recommended by the ICRP if the radiation shielding equipment is used consistently. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Transrectal Drainage of Deep Pelvic Abscesses Using a Combined Transrectal Sonographic and Fluoroscopic Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Soon; Lee, Eun Jung; Ko, Ji Ho; Joh, Young Duk; Jung, Gyoo Sik

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and clinical efficacy of transrectal drainage of a deep pelvic abscess using combined transrectal sonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. From March 1995 and August 2004, 17 patients (9 men; 8 women; mean age, 39 years) suffering from pelvic pain, fever and leukocytosis were enrolled in this retrospective study. Ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT), which was obtained prior to the procedure, showed pelvic fluid collections that were deemed unapproachable by the percutaneous trans abdominal routes. Transrectal drainage of the pelvic abscess was performed under combined transrectal sonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. The causes of the deep pelvic abscess were postoperative complications (n=7), complications associated with radiation (n=3) and chemotherapy (n=1) as well as unknown causes (n=6). A 7.5-MHz end-firing transrectal US probe with a needle biopsy guide attachment was advanced into the rectum. Once the abscess was identified, a needle was advanced via the biopsy guide and the abscess was punctured. Under US guidance, either a 0.018'or 0.035' guide wire was passed through the needle in the abscess. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the tract was dilated to the appropriate diameter with sequential fascial dilators, and a catheter was placed over the guide wire within the abscess. Clinical success of drainage was determined by a combination closure of the cavity on the follow up images and diminished leukocytosis. The technical and clinical success rate, complications, and patient's discomfort were analyzed. Drainage was technically successful in all patients and there were no serious complications. Surgery was eventually performed in two cases due to fistular formation with the rectum and leakage of the anastomosis site. The procedure was well tolerated in all but one patient who complained of discomfort while the catheter was inserted . The catheter did not interfere with defecation and there was no incidence of catheter

  16. C-arm cone beam computed tomography needle path overlay for fluoroscopic guided vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Alda L; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Chinndurai, Ponraj; Rohm, Esther; Hall, Andrew F; Wallace, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Retrospective review. To report our early clinical experience using C-arm cone beam computed tomography (C-arm CBCT) with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance during vertebroplasty. C-arm CBCT is advanced three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat panel based angiography systems. The imaging information provided by C-arm CBCT allows for the acquisition and reconstruction of "CT-like" images in flat panel based angiography/interventional suites. As part of the evolution of this technology, enhancements allowing the overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real time fluoroscopy. We report our early clinical experience with C-arm CBCT with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance during vertebroplasty. This is a retrospective review of 10 consecutive oncology patients who underwent vertebroplasty of 13 vertebral levels using C-arm CBCT with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance from November 2007 to December 2008. Procedural data including vertebral level, approach (transpedicular vs. extrapedicular), access (bilateral vs. unilateral) and complications were recorded. Technical success with the overlay technology was assessed based on accuracy which consisted of 4 measured parameters: distance from target to needle tip, distance from planned path to needle tip, distance from midline to needle tip, and distance from the anterior 1/3 of the vertebral body to needle tip. Success within each parameter required that the distance between the needle tip and parameter being evaluated be no more than 5 mm on multiplanar CBCT or fluoroscopy. Imaging data for 12 vertebral levels was available for review. All vertebral levels were treated using unilateral access and 9 levels were treated with an extrapedicular approach. Technical success rates were 92% for both distance from planned path and distance from midline to final needle tip, 100% when distance from needle tip to the anterior 1

  17. Percutaneous interventional forceps removal of radiopaque foreign bodies in soft-tissue under fluoroscopic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiujun; Xing Guangfu; Shi Changwen; Li Wei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value and limitations of percutaneous interventional forceps retrieval technique under fluoroscopic guidance in removing radiopaque foreign bodies in soft-tissue. Methods: A total of 4 105 consecutive soft-tissue injury patients with radiopaque foreign bodies, encountered in authors' hospital during the period from June 2005 to June 2010, were involved in this study. The diagnosis was confirmed by plain X-ray films in all patients. Additional CT scanning was performed in 1 591 patients, in some of them 3D reconstruction was adopted. With local anesthesia percutaneous interventional forceps retrieval of radiopaque foreign bodies (PIRFB) was carried out under C-arm video-fluoroscopic guidance. Results: Of all patients in this study, 61.34% (2 518/4 105) was treated by PIRFB (study group), and 38.66% (1 587/4 105) was not treated with PIRFB (control group). In study group,the complete and partial curative rate was 95.07% (2 394/2 518) and 4.81% (121/2 518) respectively, and the failure rate was 0.12% (3/2 518). Of 1 587 patients in control group, 25.02% (n=397) left hospital by patient's own reasons and 74.98% (n=1190) was discharged from hospital due to medical or technical reasons. In control group,the foreign objects were close to big vessels in 65.22% (1 035/1 587), large local hematoma was accompanied in 2.90% (46/1 587), associated traumatic pseudoaneurysm was seen in 1.32% (21/1 587) and the foreign objects were glass pieces and the like were found in 5.55% (88/1 587). No serious postoperative complications that required specific therapy, such as bleeding, infection and nerve damage, etc. occurred. CT, especially enhanced CT three-dimensional images, could precisely display the vasculatures nearby the foreign body, which helped make the correct judgment of the removal ability and the operation risk for foreign bodies with interventional procedure. Conclusion: Percutaneous interventional forceps retrieval technique under

  18. The effect of barium temperature on esophageal and castric motility in dogs: a fluoroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eville, P.; Ackerman, N.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of barium temperature on canine esophageal transit time and gastric motility were studied fluoroscopically. Micropulverized barium sulfate (30% wt/vol) at 35°F, 70°F, and 100°F was given orally to each of five dogs with a minimum of two hours between each temperature. Esophageal transit times ranged from 4 to 9.67 seconds, and gastric contractions average four per minute. Barium temperature had no significant effect on either esophageal transit time or gastric motility

  19. Repeated DNA sequences in fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, S K

    1974-11-01

    Several fungal species, representatives of all broad groups like basidiomycetes, ascomycetes and phycomycetes, were examined for the nature of repeated DNA sequences by DNA:DNA reassociation studies using hydroxyapatite chromatography. All of the fungal species tested contained 10 to 20 percent repeated DNA sequences. There are approximately 100 to 110 copies of repeated DNA sequences of approximately 4 x 10/sup 7/ daltons piece size of each. Repeated DNA sequence homoduplexes showed on average 5/sup 0/C difference of T/sub e/50 (temperature at which 50 percent duplexes dissociate) values from the corresponding homoduplexes of unfractionated whole DNA. It is suggested that a part of repetitive sequences in fungi constitutes mitochondrial DNA and a part of it constitutes nuclear DNA. (auth)

  20. A radiographic examination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, A.P.; Cable, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    A system for performing radiographic examination, particularly of large items such as international container units is disclosed. The system is formed as an installation comprising housings for respective linear accelerators transmitting a beam of radiation across the path of a conveyor along which the units can be displaced continuously or incrementally. On either end of the installation are container handling areas including roller conveyors with drag chains and transverse manipulators, and the whole installation is secured within automatically operated doors which seal the high energy region when a container on the conveyor is being subjected to examination. The radiation transmitted through a container is detected in a detector system incorporating a fluoroscopic screen light output from which is detected in a camera system such as a television camera, and transmitted as coded pulsed signals by a coding transfer unit to display screens where an image of the transmitted information can be displayed and/or recorded for further use. (author)

  1. Short-term outcome of fluoroscopic-guided steroid injection therapy of lumber facet cyst-induced radicular pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Mi Ri; Kwon, Jong Won; Lee, Jong Seo; Kim, Eu Sang [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    To determine the short-term effect of fluoroscopic-guided steroid injection therapy of lumbar facet cyst-induced radicular pain. Seventeen patients with radiculopathy due to lumbar synovial cysts, who were treated with fluoroscopically guided injection, were retrospectively evaluated. All plain radiographic images and MR images before the therapy were reviewed. Five patients underwent only the facet joint injection, whereas twelve patients underwent the facet joint injection with perineural injection therapy. The clinical course of pain was evaluated on the first follow-up after therapy. Effective pain relief was achieved in 11 (64.7%) of the 17 patients. Among 12 patients who underwent facet joint injection with perineural injection, 9 patients (75%) had an effective pain relief. Of 5 patients, 2 (40%) patients only took the facet joint injection and had an effective pain relief. Fluoroscopic-guided steroid injection therapy shows a good short-term effect in patients with symptomatic lumbar facet joint synovial cysts.

  2. Patient Dose Optimization in Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Procedures. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, many surgical procedures have increasingly been replaced by interventional procedures that guide catheters into the arteries under X ray fluoroscopic guidance to perform a variety of operations such as ballooning, embolization, implantation of stents etc. The radiation exposure to patients and staff in such procedures is much higher than in simple radiographic examinations like X ray of chest or abdomen such that radiation induced skin injuries to patients and eye lens opacities among workers have been reported in the 1990's and after. Interventional procedures have grown both in frequency and importance during the last decade. This Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and TECDOC were developed within the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) framework of statutory responsibility to provide for the worldwide application of the standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRP took place between 2003 and 2005 in six countries, with a view of optimizing the radiation protection of patients undergoing interventional procedures. The Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation (BSS) issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Health Organization (WHO), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), among others, require the radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and through optimization. In keeping with its responsibility on the application of standards, the IAEA programme on Radiological Protection of Patients encourages the reduction of patient doses. To facilitate this, it has issued specific advice on the application of the BSS in the field of radiology in Safety Reports Series No. 39 and the three volumes on Radiation

  3. Four-dimensional treatment planning and fluoroscopic real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy for moving tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shinichi; Kitamura, Kei; Nishioka, Takeshi; Kagei, Kenji; Hashimoto, Seiko; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Kunieda, Tatsuya; Shinohara, Nobuo; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve precise three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy for mobile tumors, a new radiotherapy system and its treatment planning system were developed and used for clinical practice. Methods and Materials: We developed a linear accelerator synchronized with a fluoroscopic real-time tumor tracking system by which 3D coordinates of a 2.0-mm gold marker in the tumor can be determined every 0.03 second. The 3D relationships between the marker and the tumor at different respiratory phases are evaluated using CT image at each respiratory phase, whereby the optimum phase can be selected to synchronize with irradiation (4D treatment planning). The linac is triggered to irradiate the tumor only when the marker is located within the region of the planned coordinates relative to the isocenter. Results: The coordinates of the marker were detected with an accuracy of ± 1 mm during radiotherapy in the phantom experiment. The time delay between recognition of the marker position and the start or stop of megavoltage X-ray irradiation was 0.03 second. Fourteen patients with various tumors were treated by conformal radiotherapy with a 'tight' planning target volume (PTV) margin. They were surviving without relapse or complications with a median follow-up of 6 months. Conclusion: Fluoroscopic real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy following 4D treatment planning was developed and shown to be feasible to improve the accuracy of the radiotherapy for mobile tumors

  4. Discrepancy between fluoroscopic arthrography and magnetic resonance arthrography in patients with arthroscopically confirmed supraspinatus tendon tears: The additional benefit of cine fluoroscopic arthrography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Seok; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck

    2016-01-01

    To determine the additional diagnostic benefits of fluoroscopic arthrography (FA) in patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tears by comparing FA images with magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) images. This study included FA and MRA images of 53 patients who were confirmed to have full-thickness SST tears by arthroscopy. In the FA analysis, the presence of contrast leakage into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was recorded. In the MRA analysis, contrast leakage, retraction of a torn tendon, width and length of the tear, and supraspinatus atrophy were evaluated. Patients were divided into the concordant group or the discordant group based on the presence of contrast leakage to compare the characteristics of SST tears. We used Fisher's exact test and two-sample t-test for the comparison. Of the 53 patients, 34 were included in the concordant group and 19 were included in the discordant group. In the concordant group, the grades of retraction were higher than those in the discordant group; the width and length of the tears were larger. Muscle atrophy was more severe in the concordant group. A full-thickness SST tear did not always exhibit contrast leakage on FA, particularly small SST tears or tears with low-grade retraction. FA can provide diagnostic information regarding the severity of full-thickness SST tears by itself

  5. Discrepancy between fluoroscopic arthrography and magnetic resonance arthrography in patients with arthroscopically confirmed supraspinatus tendon tears: The additional benefit of cine fluoroscopic arthrography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Seok; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck [Dept. Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Medical Convergence Research Institute, and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To determine the additional diagnostic benefits of fluoroscopic arthrography (FA) in patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tears by comparing FA images with magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) images. This study included FA and MRA images of 53 patients who were confirmed to have full-thickness SST tears by arthroscopy. In the FA analysis, the presence of contrast leakage into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was recorded. In the MRA analysis, contrast leakage, retraction of a torn tendon, width and length of the tear, and supraspinatus atrophy were evaluated. Patients were divided into the concordant group or the discordant group based on the presence of contrast leakage to compare the characteristics of SST tears. We used Fisher's exact test and two-sample t-test for the comparison. Of the 53 patients, 34 were included in the concordant group and 19 were included in the discordant group. In the concordant group, the grades of retraction were higher than those in the discordant group; the width and length of the tears were larger. Muscle atrophy was more severe in the concordant group. A full-thickness SST tear did not always exhibit contrast leakage on FA, particularly small SST tears or tears with low-grade retraction. FA can provide diagnostic information regarding the severity of full-thickness SST tears by itself.

  6. A study of the x-ray image quality improvement in the examination of the respiratory system based on the new image processing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yuichi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Torii, Jun; Iwase, Takumi; Aso, Tomohiko; Ihara, Kanyu; Fujikawa, Mari; Takeuchi, Yumiko; Suzuki, Katsumi; Ishiguro, Takashi; Hara, Akio

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the double contrast technique in a gastrointestinal examination and the transbronchial lung biopsy in an examination for the respiratory system [1-3] have made a remarkable progress. Especially in the transbronchial lung biopsy, better quality of x-ray fluoroscopic images is requested because this examination is performed under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images. On the other hand, various image processing methods [4] for x-ray fluoroscopic images have been developed as an x-ray system with a flat panel detector [5-7] is widely used. A recursive filtering is an effective method to reduce a random noise in x-ray fluoroscopic images. However it has a limitation for its effectiveness of a noise reduction in case of a moving object exists in x-ray fluoroscopic images because the recursive filtering is a noise reduction method by adding last few images. After recursive filtering a residual signal was produced if a moving object existed in x-ray images, and this residual signal disturbed a smooth procedure of the examinations. To improve this situation, new noise reduction method has been developed. The Adaptive Noise Reduction [ANR] is the brand-new noise reduction technique which can be reduced only a noise regardless of the moving object in x-ray fluoroscopic images. Therefore the ANR is a very suitable noise reduction method for the transbronchial lung biopsy under a guidance of x-ray fluoroscopic images because the residual signal caused of the moving object in x-ray fluoroscopic images is never produced after the ANR. In this paper, we will explain an advantage of the ANR by comparing of a performance between the ANR images and the conventional recursive filtering images.

  7. Fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers for lung cancer radiotherapy based on support vector machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Ying; Dy, Jennifer G; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B

    2008-01-01

    Various problems with the current state-of-the-art techniques for gated radiotherapy have prevented this new treatment modality from being widely implemented in clinical routine. These problems are caused mainly by applying various external respiratory surrogates. There might be large uncertainties in deriving the tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using template matching methods (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007b Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this note, our main contribution is to provide a totally different new view of the gating problem by recasting it as a classification problem. Then, we solve this classification problem by a well-studied powerful classification method called a support vector machine (SVM). Note that the goal of an automated gating tool is to decide when to turn the beam ON or OFF. We treat ON and OFF as the two classes in our classification problem. We create our labeled training data during the patient setup session by utilizing the reference gating signal, manually determined by a radiation oncologist. We then pre-process these labeled training images and build our SVM prediction model. During treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired, pre-processed and sent as an input to the SVM. Finally, our SVM model will output the predicted labels as gating signals. We test the proposed technique on five sequences of fluoroscopic images from five lung cancer patients against the reference gating signal as ground truth. We compare the performance of the SVM to our previous template matching method (Cui et al 2007b Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). We find that the SVM is slightly more accurate on average (1-3%) than

  8. Fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction and post-operative gastroenterostomy anastomotic stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Young; Lee, Soo Teik; Yang, Doo Hyun

    2001-07-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placements in providing palliative care for patients with inoperable malignant gastric outlet obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Under fluoroscopic guidance, placement of self-expandable, covered stents was attempted in 20 patients with inoperable or recurrent gastric cancer (age range 36-79 years). All patients had inoperable gastric outlet obstruction, 13 with native anatomy and seven with post-operative anatomy (gastrointestinal anastomotic sites). All patients had intolerance to oral alimentation and/or vomiting after ingestion. Success was defined both technically and clinically. RESULTS: The placement of the stent was technically successful in 18 patients and failed in two patients (technical success: 90%). The cause of the technical failures was an inability to negotiate the guide wire through the obstruction sites in spite of the use of both fluoroscopic and endoscopic guidance. After stent placement, 15 patients were able to ingest at least liquids and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting (clinical success: 75%). During the mean follow-up of 6 weeks, there have been no stent reocclusion and no life-threatening complications except migration of two stents in one patient. CONCLUSION: Fluoroscopically guided covered metallic stent placement appears to be valuable for the palliative treatment of malignant obstruction of gastric outlet and post-operative gastrointestinal anastomoses. Lee, J.M. et al. (2001)

  9. Percutaneous ethanol injection under interventional radiographic computed tomography-fluoroscopic guidance for the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuse, Junji; Satake, Mitsuo; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Sekiguchi, Ryuzo; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Yoshino, Masahiro [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East

    1998-04-01

    Some small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions show as tumor stains by dynamic CT, but cannot be detected by ultrasonography. Percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) is effective for treating small HCC lesions, but lack of adequate visualization of some lesions can limit its use. In this study, interventional radiographic, CT-fluoroscopically-guided PEI was performed as a new method for treating small HCC lesions that were difficult to detect by ultrasonography. Interventional radiographic, CT-fluoroscopically-guided PEI was performed on 11 patients (12 lesions) with HCC lesions measuring 2 cm or less in diameter. A thin needle was introduced into each tumor under CT-fluoroscopic guidance, with injection of contrast medium into the dominant hepatic artery. While lesions were observed using CT-fluoroscopy with the arteriogram, absolute ethanol was injected into the tumors. The ethanol injection rate and volume were monitored by observation of loss of tumor staining during real-time CT angiography. Needle introduction was successful in all 12 lesions, and disappearance of tumor staining was immediately observed on CT images after ethanol injection. Complications noted after treatment were local abdominal pain in all 11 patients, a slight fever in 9 patients, pneumothorax, right pleural effusion, and ascites, each in 1 patient. No other serious complications were observed. Interventional radiographic, CT-fluoroscopically-guided PEI is effective in the treatment of small HCC lesions, which are difficult to show by ultrasonography and treat by conventional PEI. (author)

  10. Radiation brain dose to vascular surgeons during fluoroscopically guided interventions is not effectively reduced by wearing lead equivalent surgical caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Melissa L; Arbique, Gary M; Guild, Jeffrey B; Zeng, Katie; Xi, Yin; Rectenwald, John; Anderson, Jon A; Timaran, Carlos

    2018-03-12

    Radiation to the interventionalist's brain during fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGIs) may increase the incidence of cerebral neoplasms. Lead equivalent surgical caps claim to reduce radiation brain doses by 50% to 95%. We sought to determine the efficacy of the RADPAD (Worldwide Innovations & Technologies, Lenexa, Kan) No Brainer surgical cap (0.06 mm lead equivalent at 90 kVp) in reducing radiation dose to the surgeon's and trainee's head during FGIs and to a phantom to determine relative brain dose reductions. Optically stimulated, luminescent nanoDot detectors (Landauer, Glenwood, Ill) inside and outside of the cap at the left temporal position were used to measure cap attenuation during FGIs. To check relative brain doses, nanoDot detectors were placed in 15 positions within an anthropomorphic head phantom (ATOM model 701; CIRS, Norfolk, Va). The phantom was positioned to represent a primary operator performing femoral access. Fluorography was performed on a plastic scatter phantom at 80 kVp for an exposure of 5 Gy reference air kerma with or without the hat. For each brain location, the percentage dose reduction with the hat was calculated. Means and standard errors were calculated using a pooled linear mixed model with repeated measurements. Anatomically similar locations were combined into five groups: upper brain, upper skull, midbrain, eyes, and left temporal position. This was a prospective, single-center study that included 29 endovascular aortic aneurysm procedures. The average procedure reference air kerma was 2.6 Gy. The hat attenuation at the temporal position for the attending physician and fellow was 60% ± 20% and 33% ± 36%, respectively. The equivalent phantom measurements demonstrated an attenuation of 71% ± 2.0% (P < .0001). In the interior phantom locations, attenuation was statistically significant for the skull (6% ± 1.4%) and upper brain (7.2% ± 1.0%; P < .0001) but not for the middle brain (1.4% ± 1.0%; P = .15

  11. Registration of angiographic image on real-time fluoroscopic image for image-guided percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongkue; Park, Sangsoo; Jeong, Myung Ho; Ryu, Jeha

    2018-02-01

    In percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), cardiologists must study two different X-ray image sources: a fluoroscopic image and an angiogram. Manipulating a guidewire while alternately monitoring the two separate images on separate screens requires a deep understanding of the anatomy of coronary vessels and substantial training. We propose 2D/2D spatiotemporal image registration of the two images in a single image in order to provide cardiologists with enhanced visual guidance in PCI. The proposed 2D/2D spatiotemporal registration method uses a cross-correlation of two ECG series in each image to temporally synchronize two separate images and register an angiographic image onto the fluoroscopic image. A guidewire centerline is then extracted from the fluoroscopic image in real time, and the alignment of the centerline with vessel outlines of the chosen angiographic image is optimized using the iterative closest point algorithm for spatial registration. A proof-of-concept evaluation with a phantom coronary vessel model with engineering students showed an error reduction rate greater than 74% on wrong insertion to nontarget branches compared to the non-registration method and more than 47% reduction in the task completion time in performing guidewire manipulation for very difficult tasks. Evaluation with a small number of experienced doctors shows a potentially significant reduction in both task completion time and error rate for difficult tasks. The total registration time with real procedure X-ray (angiographic and fluoroscopic) images takes [Formula: see text] 60 ms, which is within the fluoroscopic image acquisition rate of 15 Hz. By providing cardiologists with better visual guidance in PCI, the proposed spatiotemporal image registration method is shown to be useful in advancing the guidewire to the coronary vessel branches, especially those difficult to insert into.

  12. Fluoroscopic removal of metallic foreign bodies in the stomach with a magnetic orogastric tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, E.K.; Jaffe, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-six cases of metallic foreign bodies in the stomach were referred for fluoroscopically guided removal by means of a 5-mm diameter magnet coupled to an orogastric tube. The foreign bodies included 29 disk batteries, two nails, two screws, a nut and bolt, an unopened jack knife, and a metallic whistle. The average patient age was 4 years (range, 11 months to 13 years). Removal was successful in 33 of the 36 cases (92%). The three failures were the result of inadvertent passage of the foreign body into the duodenum (two cases) and lack of magnetic attraction (one case). There were no complications. No patient required general anesthesia, hospital admission, or endoscopic surgical intervention

  13. An assessment of methods for monitoring entrance surface dose in fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, J.C.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2001-01-01

    In the light of a growing awareness of the risks of inducing skin injuries as a consequence of fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures (FGIPs), this paper compares three methods of monitoring entrance surface dose (ESD). It also reports measurements of ESDs made during the period August 1998 to June 1999 on 137 patients undergoing cardiac, neurological and general FGIPs. Although the sample is small, the results reinforce the need for routine assessments to be made of ESDs in FGIPs. At present, the most reliable and accurate form of ESD measurement would seem to be arrays of TLDs. However, transducer based methods, although likely to be less accurate, have considerable advantages in relation to a continuous monitoring programme. It is also suggested that there may be the potential locally for threshold dose area product (DAP) values to be set for specific procedures. These could be used to provide early warning of the potential for skin injuries. (author)

  14. A digital fluoroscopic imaging system for verification during external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Michikatsu

    1990-01-01

    A digital fluoroscopic (DF) imaging system has been constructed to obtain portal images for verification during external beam radiotherapy. The imaging device consists of a fluorescent screen viewed by a highly sensitive video camera through a mirror. The video signal is digitized and processed by an image processor which is linked on-line with a host microcomputer. The image quality of the DF system was compared with that of film for portal images of the Burger phantom and the Alderson anthropomorphic phantom using 10 MV X-rays. Contrast resolution of the DF image integrated for 8.5 sec. was superior to the film resolution, while spatial resolution was slightly inferior. The DF image of the Alderson phantom processed by the adaptive histogram equalization was better in showing anatomical landmarks than the film portal image. The DF image integrated for 1 sec. which is used for movie mode can show patient movement during treatment. (author)

  15. Clinical comparison between 100 mm photofluorography and digital (1024/sup 2/) fluoroscopic image acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynes, D.M.; Edmonds, E.W.; Rowlands, J.A.; Porter, A.J.; Toth, B.D.

    1986-01-01

    The authors describe current work in progress in which a clinical image can be recorded on both 100-mm film and a 1,024/sup 2/ image store with the same exposure. The 100-mm film is exposed in the usual manner. However, the same radiation exposure is utilized by the optics of the beam splitter to transfer the output image of the intensifier into a 1,024/sup 2/ image store and thence to hard copy by multiformat camera or laser printer. Comparative phantom and clinical images will be presented, along with observations on dose rates needed for diagnostic digital imaging. Use of this system may allow fluoroscopic dose rates to be reduced

  16. Fluoroscopically guided tunneled trans-caudal epidural catheter technique for opioid-free neonatal epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Andrew D; Hughes, Elisabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Epidural analgesia confers significant perioperative advantages to neonates undergoing surgical procedures but may be very technically challenging to place using a standard interlaminar loss-of-resistance to saline technique given the shallow depth of the epidural space. Thoracic epidural catheters placed via the caudal route may reduce the risk of direct neural injury from needle placement, but often pose higher risks of infection and/or improper positioning if placed without radiographic guidance. We present a detailed method of placing a fluoroscopically guided, tunneled transcaudal epidural catheter, which may reduce both of these risks. The accuracy and precision of this technique often provides adequate analgesia to allow for opioid-free epidural infusions as well as significant reductions in systemic opioids through the perioperative period. Opioid-free analgesia using a regional anesthetic technique allows for earlier extubation and reduced perioperative sedation, which may have a less deleterious neurocognitive effect on the developing brain of the neonate.

  17. Problems of dentistrical prophylactic medical examination of persons dealing with ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinin, V.I.; Ramzaeva, L.V.; Zamanova, L.V.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative study of data of individual dosimetric control of radiological personnel and additional radiation contribution of annual fluoroscopy of chest into radiation load was carried out. It is stated that chest fluoroscopy adds 13 % of collective dose to the occupational irradiation. Efficiency of preventive chest fluoroscopic examination was simultaneously analyzed in 1388 persons engaged in occupational radiology. Investigation results permit to state a question on advisability of transition to differential chest fluoroscopic examination in persons of A category, being guided by clinical indications and potential risk of carcinogenesis and tuberculosis. 5 refs

  18. Characterization of a high-elbow, fluoroscopic electronic portal imaging device for portal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, J.C.J. de; Visser, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The application of a newly developed fluoroscopic (CCD-camera based) electronic portal imaging device (EPID) in portal dosimetry is investigated. A description of the EPID response to dose is presented in terms of stability, linearity and optical cross-talk inside the mechanical structure. The EPID has a relatively large distance (41 cm on-axis) between the fluorescent screen and the mirror (high-elbow), which results in cross-talk with properties quite different from that of the low-elbow fluoroscopic EPIDs that have been studied in the literature. In contrast with low-elbow systems, the maximum cross-talk is observed for points of the fluorescent screen that have the largest distance to the mirror, which is explained from the geometry of the system. An algorithm to convert the images of the EPID into portal dose images (PDIs) is presented. The correction applied for cross-talk is a position-dependent additive operation on the EPID image pixel values, with a magnitude that depends on a calculated effective field width. Deconvolution with a point spread function, as applied for low-elbow systems, is not required. For a 25 MV beam, EPID PDIs and ionization chamber measurements in the EPID detector plane were obtained behind an anthropomorphic phantom and a homogeneous absorber for various field shapes. The difference in absolute dose between the EPID and ionization chamber measurements, averaged over the four test fields presented in this paper, was 0.1±0.5% (1 SD) over the entire irradiation field, with no deviation larger than 2%. (author)

  19. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  20. The ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) concept in pediatric interventional and fluoroscopic imaging: striving to keep radiation doses as low as possible during fluoroscopy of pediatric patients - a white paper executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Keith J.; Kaste, Sue C.

    2006-01-01

    ALARA represents a practice mandate adhering to the principle of keeping radiation doses to patients and personnel As Low As Reasonably Achievable. This concept is strongly endorsed by the Society for Pediatric Radiology, particularly in the use of procedures and modalities involving higher radiation doses such as CT and fluoroscopic examinations of pediatric patients. There is no doubt that medical imaging, which has undergone tremendous technological advances in recent decades, is integral to patient care. However, these technological advances generally precede the knowledge of end-users concerning the optimal use and correct operation of the resulting imaging equipment, and such knowledge is essential to minimizing potential risks to the patients. Current imaging methods must be optimized for radiation dose reduction in pediatric patients who might be as much as ten times more radiosensitive than adults. Unlike straightforward radiographic examinations, radiation dose to the patient during fluoroscopy is dependent on the operator's training, experience with the fluoroscope, and efficiency in completing a diagnostic study. The range of pediatric radiation doses from fluoroscopy is wide because this examination is performed not only by pediatric radiologists but also by general radiologists who occasionally care for children, interventional cardiologists, gastroenterologists, urologists and others. Thus, a venue where multidisciplinary interaction by this variety of operators can occur serves to improve pediatric patient care

  1. Repeated causal decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmayer, York; Meder, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Many of our decisions refer to actions that have a causal impact on the external environment. Such actions may not only allow for the mere learning of expected values or utilities but also for acquiring knowledge about the causal structure of our world. We used a repeated decision-making paradigm to examine what kind of knowledge people acquire in such situations and how they use their knowledge to adapt to changes in the decision context. Our studies show that decision makers' behavior is strongly contingent on their causal beliefs and that people exploit their causal knowledge to assess the consequences of changes in the decision problem. A high consistency between hypotheses about causal structure, causally expected values, and actual choices was observed. The experiments show that (a) existing causal hypotheses guide the interpretation of decision feedback, (b) consequences of decisions are used to revise existing causal beliefs, and (c) decision makers use the experienced feedback to induce a causal model of the choice situation even when they have no initial causal hypotheses, which (d) enables them to adapt their choices to changes of the decision problem. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Comparison of conventional full spine radiographs and fluoroscopic scanning method in young patients with idiopathic scoliosis; Vergleich von konventioneller Wirbelsaeulenganzaufnahme und fluoroskopischer Scan-Methode bei jungen Patienten mit idiopathischer Skoliose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, J.; Kottke, R.; Claussen, C. [Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany); Kluba, T.; Niemeyer, T.; Hahnfeldt, T. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany); Vonthein, R. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Biometrie, Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany); Kamm, K.F. [Philips Medizin Systeme GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: evaluation of low-dose full spine radiographs using fluoroscopic images for the assessment of the Cobb angle measurement in patients with scoliosis. Material and methods: twenty-one consecutive patients (aged 10-27 years, mean age 14 years) with a conventional full spine examination (film speed class 800) underwent a follow-up exam using digital pulsed fluoroscopy (Multi Diagnost 4, Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, The Netherlands). The mean follow-up was 9 months. During a synchronized scan with a C-arm speed of 4 cm/sec fluoroscopic images were stored with a pulsed frequency of 3 images per second. The single images were merged and reconstructed to one image with the software easy spine (Philips medical Systems, Eindhoven, The Netherlands). The corresponding dose-area product values (DAP) of both methods were compared. Three independent observers assessed Cobb angles and image quality for each technique. Results: the mean DAP values for conventional imaging was 94.9 cGy x cm{sup 2} and for fluoroscopy 7.8 cGy x cm{sup 2}, respectively. A significant dose reduction of 91.8% (CI 91% to 95%) was calculated. The average absolute angle difference between the observers was found to be 2.7 for conventional imaging and 2.4 for the fluoroscopic method. Interobserver standard deviation of 2.9 was lower than the 5.3 for conventional images. Image quality was better in the conventional images. Conclusion: using the scanning method, we could achieve a mean reduction of the radiation dose of 92%, while the accuracy of the Cobb angle measurements was comparable for both techniques despite of reduced image quality of digital fluoroscopy. (orig.)

  3. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  4. Quantum repeated games revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frąckiewicz, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2 × 2 games based on Marinatto and Weber’s approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study the twice repeated Prisoner’s Dilemma game. We show that results not available in the classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games proposed by Iqbal and Toor. We point out the drawbacks that make their results unacceptable. (paper)

  5. Under digital fluoroscopic guidance multiple-point injection with absolute alcohol and pinyangmycin for the treatment of superficial venous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ming; Xiao Gang; Peng Youlin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of multiple-point injection with absolute alcohol and pinyangmycin under digital fluoroscopic guidance for superficial venous malformations. Methods: By using a disposal venous transfusion needle the superficial venous malformation was punctured and then contrast media lohexol was injected in to visualize the tumor body, which was followed by the injection of ethanol and pinyangmycin when the needle was confirmed in the correct position. The procedure was successfully performed in 31 patients. The clinical results were observed and analyzed. Results: After one treatment complete cure was achieved in 21 cases and marked effect was obtained in 8 cases, with a total effectiveness of 93.5%. Conclusion: Multiple-point injection with ethanol and pinyangmycin under digital fluoroscopic guidance is an effective and safe technique for the treatment of superficial venous malformations, especially for the lesions that are deeply located and ill-defined. (authors)

  6. Estimation of lung shunt fraction from simultaneous fluoroscopic and nuclear images

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Sandra; Bastiaannet, Remco; Braat, Arthur J. A. T.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Viergever, Max A.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2017-11-01

    Radioembolisation with yttrium-90 (90Y) is increasingly used as a treatment of unresectable liver malignancies. For safety, a scout dose of technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA) is used prior to the delivery of the therapeutic activity to mimic the deposition of 90Y. One-day procedures are currently limited by the lack of nuclear images in the intervention room. To cope with this limitation, an interventional simultaneous fluoroscopic and nuclear imaging device is currently being developed. The purpose of this simulation study was to evaluate the accuracy of estimating the lung shunt fraction (LSF) of the scout dose in the intervention room with this device and compare it against current clinical methods. Methods: A male and female XCAT phantom, both with two respiratory profiles, were used to simulate various LSFs resulting from a scout dose of 150 MBq 99mTc-MAA. Hybrid images were Monte Carlo simulated for breath-hold (5 s) and dynamic breathing (10 frames of 0.5 s) acquisitions. Nuclear images were corrected for attenuation with the fluoroscopic image and for organ overlap effects using a pre-treatment CT-scan. For comparison purposes, planar scintigraphy and mobile gamma camera images (both 300 s acquisition time) were simulated. Estimated LSFs were evaluated for all methods and compared to the phantom ground truth. Results: In the clinically relevant range of 10-20% LSF, hybrid imaging overestimated LSF with approximately 2 percentage points (pp) and 3 pp for the normal and irregular breathing phantoms, respectively. After organ overlap correction, LSF was estimated with a more constant error. Errors in planar scintigraphy and mobile gamma camera imaging were more dependent on LSF, body shape and breathing profile. Conclusion: LSF can be estimated with a constant minor error with a hybrid imaging device. Estimated LSF is highly dependent on true LSF, body shape and breathing pattern when estimated with current clinical methods. The hybrid

  7. Characterization of MOSFET Dosimeter Angular Response Using a Spherical Phantom for Fluoroscopic Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu; Hill, Kevin; Yoshizumi, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Metal-Oxide Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters, placed in anthropomorphic phantoms, are a standard method for organ dosimetry in medical x-ray imaging applications. However, many x-ray applications, particularly fluoroscopy procedures, use variable projection angles. During dosimetry, the MOSFET detector active area may not always be perpendicular to the x-ray beam. The goal of this study was to characterize the dosimeter's angular response in the fluoroscopic irradiation involved in pediatric cardiac catheterization procedures, during which a considerable amount of fluoroscopic x-ray irradiation is often applied from various projection angles. A biological x-ray irradiator was used to simulate the beam quality of a biplane fluoroscopy imaging system. A custom-designed acrylic spherical scatter phantom was fabricated to measure dosimeter response (in mV) in two rotational axes, axial (ψ) and normal-to-axial (θ), in 30° increments, as well as four common oblique angles used in cardiac catheterization: a) 90° Left Anterior Oblique (LAO); b) 70° LAO/ 20° Cranial; c) 20° LAO/ 15° Cranial; and d) 30° Right Anterior Oblique (RAO). All results were normalized to the angle where the dosimeter epoxy is perpendicular to the beam or the Posterior-Anterior projection angle in the clinical setup. The relative response in the axial rotation was isotropic (within ± 10% deviation); that in the normal-to-axial rotation was isotropic in all angles except the ψ = 270° angle, where the relative response was 83 ± 9%. No significant deviation in detector response was observed in the four common oblique angles, with their relative responses being: a) 102 ± 3%; b) 90 ± 3%; c) 92 ± 3%; and d) 95 ± 3%, respectively. These angular correction factors will be used in future dosimetry studies for fluoroscopy. The spherical phantom may be useful for other applications, as it allows the measurement of dosimeter response in virtually all angles in the 3

  8. Fluoroscopically Guided Extraforaminal Cervical Nerve Root Blocks: Analysis of Epidural Flow of the Injectate with Respect to Needle Tip Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Kyle; Riew, K. Daniel; Gilula, Louis A.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective evaluation of consecutively performed fluoroscopically guided cervical nerve root blocks. Objective To describe the incidence of injectate central epidural flow with respect to needle tip position during fluoroscopically guided extraforaminal cervical nerve root blocks (ECNRBs). Methods Between February 19, 2003 and June 11, 2003, 132 consecutive fluoroscopically guided ECNRBs performed with contrast media in the final injected material (injectate) were reviewed on 95 patients with average of 1.3 injections per patient. Fluoroscopic spot images documenting the procedure were obtained as part of standard quality assurance. An independent observer not directly involved in the procedures retrospectively reviewed the images, and the data were placed into a database. Image review was performed to determine optimal needle tip positioning for injectate epidural flow. Results Central epidural injectate flow was obtained in only 28.9% of injections with the needle tip lateral to midline of the lateral mass (zone 2). 83.8% of injectate went into epidural space when the needle tip was medial to midline of the lateral mass (zone 3). 100% of injectate flowed epidurally when the needle tip was medial to or at the medial cortex of the lateral mass (zone 4). There was no statistically significant difference with regards to central epidural flow and the needle tip position on lateral view. Conclusion To ensure central epidural flow with ECNRBs one must be prepared to pass the needle tip medial to midplane of the lateral mass or to medial cortex of the lateral mass. Approximately 16% of ECNRBs with needle tip medial to midline of the lateral mass did not flow into epidural space. One cannot claim a nerve block is an epidural block unless epidural flow of injectate is observed. PMID:24494176

  9. Closed reduction and fluoroscopic assisted percutaneous pinning of 42 physeal fractures in 37 dogs and 4 cats

    OpenAIRE

    Boekhout-Ta, Christina L; Kim, Stanley E; Corss, Alan R; Pozzi, Antonio; Evans, Richard

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report complications and clinical outcome of dogs and cats that underwent fluoroscopic-assisted percutaneous pinning (FAPP) of physeal fractures. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study. ANIMALS: Client-owned dogs (n = 37) and cats (n = 4). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Records (August 2007-August 2014) of physeal fractures treated with FAPP in 3 hospitals were evaluated. Data collected included signalment, fracture characteristics (etiology, location, duration, Salter-Harris classi...

  10. Evaluation of methods to produce an image library for automatic patient model localization for dose mapping during fluoroscopically guided procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian-Meneghin, Josh; Xiong, Z.; Rudin, S.; Oines, A.; Bednarek, D. R.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate methods for producing a library of 2D-radiographic images to be correlated to clinical images obtained during a fluoroscopically-guided procedure for automated patient-model localization. The localization algorithm will be used to improve the accuracy of the skin-dose map superimposed on the 3D patient- model of the real-time Dose-Tracking-System (DTS). For the library, 2D images were generated from CT datasets of the SK-150 anthropomorphic phantom using two methods: Schmid's 3D-visualization tool and Plastimatch's digitally-reconstructed-radiograph (DRR) code. Those images, as well as a standard 2D-radiographic image, were correlated to a 2D-fluoroscopic image of a phantom, which represented the clinical-fluoroscopic image, using the Corr2 function in Matlab. The Corr2 function takes two images and outputs the relative correlation between them, which is fed into the localization algorithm. Higher correlation means better alignment of the 3D patient-model with the patient image. In this instance, it was determined that the localization algorithm will succeed when Corr2 returns a correlation of at least 50%. The 3D-visualization tool images returned 55-80% correlation relative to the fluoroscopic-image, which was comparable to the correlation for the radiograph. The DRR images returned 61-90% correlation, again comparable to the radiograph. Both methods prove to be sufficient for the localization algorithm and can be produced quickly; however, the DRR method produces more accurate grey-levels. Using the DRR code, a library at varying angles can be produced for the localization algorithm.

  11. Repeat migration and disappointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, E K; Vanderkamp, J

    1986-01-01

    This article investigates the determinants of repeat migration among the 44 regions of Canada, using information from a large micro-database which spans the period 1968 to 1971. The explanation of repeat migration probabilities is a difficult task, and this attempt is only partly successful. May of the explanatory variables are not significant, and the overall explanatory power of the equations is not high. In the area of personal characteristics, the variables related to age, sex, and marital status are generally significant and with expected signs. The distance variable has a strongly positive effect on onward move probabilities. Variables related to prior migration experience have an important impact that differs between return and onward probabilities. In particular, the occurrence of prior moves has a striking effect on the probability of onward migration. The variable representing disappointment, or relative success of the initial move, plays a significant role in explaining repeat migration probabilities. The disappointment variable represents the ratio of actural versus expected wage income in the year after the initial move, and its effect on both repeat migration probabilities is always negative and almost always highly significant. The repeat probabilities diminish after a year's stay in the destination region, but disappointment in the most recent year still has a bearing on the delayed repeat probabilities. While the quantitative impact of the disappointment variable is not large, it is difficult to draw comparisons since similar estimates are not available elsewhere.

  12. Effectiveness of Fluoroscopic and US - Guided Percutaneous Catheter Drainage for Iliopsoas Abscess through the Anterolateral Transabdominal Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ho Cheol; Shin, Tae Beom; Park, Mee Jung; Kim, Ji Eun; Choi, Hye Young; Bae, Kyung Soo; Choi, Dae Seob; Na, Jae Boem; Jeong, Seong Hoon [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, College of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness of performing fluoroscopic and ultrasonography guided percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) through the anterolateral transabdominal approach for treating iliopsoas abscess. From January 2008 to December 2009, fluoroscopic and US-guided PCD through the anterolateral transabdominal approach was performed on sixteen iliopsoas abscesses of fourteen patients (7 males and 7 females; mean age: 63 years; age range: 30-87 years). Six abscesses were on the right side and ten abscesses were on the left side. The location of the abscesses were the psoas muscle (n=7), the iliacus muscle (n=7) and the iliopsoas muscle (n=2). All the procedures were performed under fluoroscopy and US guidance in the angiography room. The clinical findings before and after the procedure, the duration of catheter insertion and the procedure-related complications were evaluated. 15 out of the 16 iliopsoas abscesses were effectively treated. The duration of catheter insertion was 5- 27 days (mean: 14.6) days. No patient had significant complications during or after drainage. One patient died of uncontrolled diabetes complications and shock on the 9th day after percutaneous catheter drainage. One recurrence was noted 5 months after removal of the catheter. This patient underwent aspiration and antibiotic treatment for this lesion and the patient improved. Fluoroscopic and US-guided PCD for iliopsoas abscess through the anterolateral transabdominal approach is an effective and safe procedure

  13. Image quality evaluation and patient dose assessment of medical fluoroscopic X-ray systems: A national study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economides, S.; Hourdakis, C. J.; Kalivas, N.; Kalathaki, M.; Simantirakis, G.; Tritakis, P.; Manousaridis, G.; Vogiatzi, S.; Kipouros, P.; Boziari, A.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the results from a survey conducted by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), during the period 1998-2003, in 530 public and private owned fluoroscopic X-ray systems in Greece. Certain operational parameters for conventional and remote control systems were assessed, according to a quality control protocol developed by GAEC on the basis of the current literature. Public (91.5%) and private (81.5%) owned fluoroscopic units exhibit high-contrast resolution values over 1 lp mm -1 . Moreover, 88.5 and 87.1% of the fluoroscopic units installed in the public and private sector, respectively, present Maximum Patient Entrance Kerma Rate values lower than 100 mGy min -1 . Additionally, 68.3% of the units assessed were found to perform within the acceptance limits. Finally, the third quartile of the Entrance Surface Dose Rate distribution was estimated according to the Dose Reference Level definition and found equal to 35 mGy min -1 . (authors)

  14. Fluoroscopically-Guided Posterior Approach for Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Arthrography: Comparison with Conventional Anterior Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Koun J.; Ha, Doo Hoe; Lee, Sang Min

    2011-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of the fluoroscopically-guided posterior approach compared with the anterior approach for shoulder magnetic resonance(MR) arthrography. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Among 60 shoulder MR arthrographies performed on 59 patients with symptomatic shoulders, an intra-articular injection was performed (30 cases using the anterior approach and 30 using the posterior approach). Procedure-related pain was assessed by using a 5 score visual analogue scale (VAS). Depth of the puncture and standardized depth of puncture by body mass index (BMI) were recorded. The contrast leakage along the course of the puncture was evaluated by reviewing the MR. The statistical analyses included the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis test. There was no significant difference in VAS scores between the anterior and posterior groups (1.77 ± 1.10 vs. 1.80 ± 0.96). Depth of puncture and standardized depth of puncture by BMI were significantly shorter in the posterior group than those in the anterior group (4.4 ± 0.8 cm and 1.8 ± 0.3 cm vs. 6.6 ± 0.9 cm and 2.8 ± 0.4 cm, p < 0.001), respectively. The incidence of contrast leakage was more frequent in the posterior group (p = 0.003). The posterior approach will be useful in shoulder MR arthrography with a suspected anterior pathology, a postoperative follow-up study or obese patient.

  15. Pediatric patient and staff dose measurements in barium meal fluoroscopic procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipov, D.; Schelin, H. R.; Denyak, V.; Paschuk, S. A.; Porto, L. E.; Ledesma, J. A.; Nascimento, E. X.; Legnani, A.; Andrade, M. E. A.; Khoury, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates patient and staff dose measurements in pediatric barium meal series fluoroscopic procedures. It aims to analyze radiographic techniques, measure the air kerma-area product (PKA), and estimate the staff's eye lens, thyroid and hands equivalent doses. The procedures of 41 patients were studied, and PKA values were calculated using LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) positioned at the center of the patient's upper chest. Furthermore, LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs were used to estimate the equivalent doses. The results showed a discrepancy in the radiographic techniques when compared to the European Commission recommendations. Half of the results of the analyzed literature presented lower PKA and dose reference level values than the present study. The staff's equivalent doses strongly depends on the distance from the beam. A 55-cm distance can be considered satisfactory. However, a distance decrease of ~20% leads to, at least, two times higher equivalent doses. For eye lenses this dose is significantly greater than the annual limit set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. In addition, the occupational doses were found to be much higher than in the literature. Changing the used radiographic techniques to the ones recommended by the European Communities, it is expected to achieve lower PKA values ​​and occupational doses.

  16. Fluoroscopically guided automated gun biopsy of chest lesions: diagnostic accuracy and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Hee Sul; Han, Young Min; Choi, Ki Chul and others

    1998-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy and frequency of complications of fluoroscopyguided transthoracic needle biopsy, using an automated gun biopsy system. We retrospectively reviewed 86 patients who underwent automated gun biopsy between October 1995 and October 1996. An 18-gauge cutting needle was used in all cases. All biopsies were performed under fluoroscopic guidance by one interventional radiologist. Tissue sufficient for histologic diagnosis was obtained in 73 of 86 biopsies(84.9%). Fifty-six lesions were malignent and 30 were benign. Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy for malignant lesions were 87.5% and 87.5%, respectively while cell type specificity in malignant diagnosis was 91.7%(11/12). Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy for benign lesions were 80.0% and 73.3%, respectively. Postbioptic pneumothorax occurred in three of 86 biopsies(3.5%), one of which required placement of a chest tube. Automated gun biopsy is a simple, safe method for the diagnosis of focal chest lesions. An automated biopsy device offers high diagnostic accuracy in casis involving malignant and benign lesions of the chest, and is particularly useful for determining malignant cell type and specific diagnosis of benign lesions.=20

  17. Occupational exposures during abdominal fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures for different patient sizes - A Monte Carlo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, William S; Belinato, Walmir; Perini, Ana P; Caldas, Linda V E; Galeano, Diego C; Santos, Carla J; Neves, Lucio P

    2018-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the occupational exposures during an abdominal fluoroscopically guided interventional radiology procedure. We investigated the relation between the Body Mass Index (BMI), of the patient, and the conversion coefficient values (CC) for a set of dosimetric quantities, used to assess the exposure risks of medical radiation workers. The study was performed using a set of male and female virtual anthropomorphic phantoms, of different body weights and sizes. In addition to these phantoms, a female and a male phantom, named FASH3 and MASH3 (reference virtual anthropomorphic phantoms), were also used to represent the medical radiation workers. The CC values, obtained as a function of the dose area product, were calculated for 87 exposure scenarios. In each exposure scenario, three phantoms, implemented in the MCNPX 2.7.0 code, were simultaneously used. These phantoms were utilized to represent a patient and medical radiation workers. The results showed that increasing the BMI of the patient, adjusted for each patient protocol, the CC values for medical radiation workers decrease. It is important to note that these results were obtained with fixed exposure parameters. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transbronchial lung biopsy without fluoroscopic guide in Tehran Imam Khomeini’s Hospital (1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Firoozbakhsh S

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB is an attractive alternative to open lung biopsy as an initial diagnostic procedure for patients with diffuse parenchymal disease or localized densities beyond direct endoscopic vision. TBLB can be carried out safely without fluoroscopy in patients with diffuse lung disease. Since in our bronchoscopic department fluoroscopy is not available, we planned to evaluate the blind (without fluoroscopic guide TBLB being performed in our department to determine the success rate in obtaining lung tissue, the sensitivity of the procedure and the risk of complications. Materials and Methods: Sixty-Four TBLB were done in our department during a 6 month period (March-September 1999. Results: Lung tissue wasn’t detected in two (3.1 percent samples. Pathological results were helpful in 46 (71.9 percent cases. No evidence of hemoptysis was found after the procedure. Three (4.68 percent cases of pneumothorax was detected. Only one of them required chest tube (1.51 percent. Conclusion: We concluded that blind TBLB was successful in our department with rates of complications comparable to other approved centers.

  19. Is lead shielding of patients necessary during fluoroscopic procedures? A study based on kyphoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Joshua R.; Marsh, Rebecca M.; Silosky, Michael S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2018-01-15

    To determine the benefits, risks, and limitations associated with wrapping a patient with lead shielding during fluoroscopy-guided kyphoplasty procedures as a way to reduce operator radiation exposure. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to mimic a patient undergoing a kyphoplasty procedure under fluoroscopic guidance. Radiation measurements of the air kerma rate (AKR) were made at several locations and under various experimental conditions. First, AKR was measured at various angles along the horizontal plane of the phantom and at varying distances from the phantom, both with and without a lead apron wrapped around the lower portion of the phantom (referred to here as phantom shielding). Second, the effect of an operator's apron was simulated by suspending a lead apron between the phantom and the measurement device. AKR was measured for the four shielding conditions - phantom shielding only, operator apron only, both phantom shielding and operator apron, and no shielding. Third, AKR measurements were made at various heights and with varying C-arm angle. At all locations, the phantom shielding provided no substantial protection beyond that provided by an operator's own lead apron. Phantom shielding did not reduce AKR at a height comparable to that of an operator's head. Previous reports of using patient shielding to reduce operator exposure fail to consider the role of an operator's own lead apron in radiation protection. For an operator wearing appropriate personal lead apparel, patient shielding provides no substantial reduction in operator dose. (orig.)

  20. The Usefulness of Virtual Fluoroscopic Preprocedural Planning During Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: kinoshita.3216@tokushima-u.ac.jp [Tokushima University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Diagnostic Radiology) (Japan); Shirono, Ryozo; Takechi, Katsuya [Tokushima Red Cross Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Yonekura, Hironobu [Tokushima Red Cross Hospital, Department of Radiological Technology (Japan); Iwamoto, Seiji [Tokushima University Graduate School, Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences (Japan); Shinya, Takayoshi [Tokushima University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Diagnostic Radiology) (Japan); Takao, Shoichiro [Tokushima University Graduate School of Health Science, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Harada, Masafumi [Tokushima University Graduate School, Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate the usefulness of virtual fluoroscopic preprocedural planning (VFPP) in the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) procedure.Materials and MethodsTwenty-two patients who were treated by PTBD were included in this study. Twelve patients were treated using PTBD intraoperative referencing coronal computed tomography (CT) images (i.e., coronal CT group), and ten patients were treated using PTBD intraoperative referencing VFPP images (i.e., VFPP group). To analyze the effect of the intraoperative referencing VFPP image, the VFPP group was retrospectively compared with the coronal CT group.ResultsThe characteristics of both patient groups were not statistically significantly different. There were no significant differences in the targeted bile duct, diameter and depth of the target bile, breath-holding ability, number of targeted bile duct puncture attempts, change in the targeted bile duct, and exchange of the drainage catheter. However, the X-ray fluoroscopy time and the procedure time were significantly shorter in the VFPP group than in the coronal CT group (196 vs. 334 s, P < 0.05; and 16.0 vs. 27.2 min, P < 0.05).ConclusionIntraoperative referencing using the VFPP imaging in PTBD intuitively can be a useful tool for better localization of the guidewire in the bile duct and thereby shorten the X-ray fluoroscopy time and procedure time while minimizing radiation exposure and complications.

  1. Is lead shielding of patients necessary during fluoroscopic procedures? A study based on kyphoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Joshua R.; Marsh, Rebecca M.; Silosky, Michael S.

    2018-01-01

    To determine the benefits, risks, and limitations associated with wrapping a patient with lead shielding during fluoroscopy-guided kyphoplasty procedures as a way to reduce operator radiation exposure. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to mimic a patient undergoing a kyphoplasty procedure under fluoroscopic guidance. Radiation measurements of the air kerma rate (AKR) were made at several locations and under various experimental conditions. First, AKR was measured at various angles along the horizontal plane of the phantom and at varying distances from the phantom, both with and without a lead apron wrapped around the lower portion of the phantom (referred to here as phantom shielding). Second, the effect of an operator's apron was simulated by suspending a lead apron between the phantom and the measurement device. AKR was measured for the four shielding conditions - phantom shielding only, operator apron only, both phantom shielding and operator apron, and no shielding. Third, AKR measurements were made at various heights and with varying C-arm angle. At all locations, the phantom shielding provided no substantial protection beyond that provided by an operator's own lead apron. Phantom shielding did not reduce AKR at a height comparable to that of an operator's head. Previous reports of using patient shielding to reduce operator exposure fail to consider the role of an operator's own lead apron in radiation protection. For an operator wearing appropriate personal lead apparel, patient shielding provides no substantial reduction in operator dose. (orig.)

  2. Radiation injury of the skin following diagnostic and interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, T.R.; Wagner, L.K.; Mettler, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    Many radiation injuries to the skin, resulting from diagnostic and interventional fluoroscopic procedures, have been reported in recent years. In some cases skin damage was severe and debilitating. We analyzed 72 reports of skin injuries for progression and location of injury, type and number of procedures, and contributing patient and operator factors. Most cases (46) were related to coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). A smaller number was documented after cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation (12), transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement (7), neuroradiological interventions (3) and other procedures (4). Important factors leading to skin injuries were long exposure times over the same skin area, use of high dose rates, irradiation through thick tissue masses, hypersensitivity to radiation, and positioning of arms or breasts into the radiation entrance beam. Physicians were frequently unaware of the high radiation doses involved and did not recognize the injuries as radiation induced. Based on these findings, recommendations to reduce dose and improve patient care are provided. (author)

  3. Fluoroscopically Guided Transcervical Fallopian Tube Recanalization of Post-Sterilization Reversal Mid-Tubal Obstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J. Graeme; Anderson, David; Mills, John; Harrold, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical success and early outcome of fluoroscopically guided transcervical fallopian tube recanalization (FTR) in mid-tubal occlusion following sterilization reversal surgery.Methods: From July 1995 to January 1998, patients with greater than 12 months secondary infertility underwent hysterosalpingography (HSG). FTR was performed in proximal or mid-tubal occlusion. Cases of FTR in mid-tubal occlusion were included in this study. Technical success (defined as complete tubal patency) using a standard guidewire and hydrophilic glidewire, the number of patients with at least one patent tube, and the intrauterine and ectopic pregnancy rates were determined.Results: Twenty-six infertile patients with previous sterilization reversal underwent HSG. Eight of 26 (31%) patients (mean age 32 years, range 23-37 years), had attempted FTR for mid-tubal occlusion at the site of surgical anastomosis. Fourteen tubes were attempted as there were two previous salpingectomies. Technical success was achieved in eight of 14 (57%) tubes attempted, resulting in five of eight (62%) patients having at least one patent tube. At follow-up (mean 18 months, range 12-28 months) in these five patients there was one intrauterine pregnancy. There were no ectopic pregnancies.Conclusions: FTR in mid-tubal obstruction in infertile patients following sterilization reversal surgery is technically feasible and may result in intrauterine pregnancy. In this small group there was a lower technical success rate and lower pregnancy rate than in unselected proximal tubal occlusion

  4. Radiologic Analysis and Clinical Study of the Upper One-third Joint Technique for Fluoroscopically Guided Sacroiliac Joint Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junghyun; Park, Hue Jung; Moon, Dong Eon; Sa, Gye Jeol; Kim, Young Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Sacroiliac intraarticular injection by the traditional technique can be challenging to perform when the joint is covered with osteophytes or is extremely narrow. To examine whether there is enough space for the needle to be advanced from the L5-S1 interspinous space to the upper one-third sacroiliac joint (SIJ) by magnetic resonance image (MRI) analysis as an alternative to fluoroscopically guided SIJ injection with the lower one-third joint technique, and to determine the feasibility of this novel technique in clinical practice. MRI analysis and observational study. An interventional pain management practice at a university hospital. We analyzed 200 axial T2-weighted MRIs between the L5 and S1 vertebrae of 100 consecutive patients. The following measurements were obtained on both sides: 1) the thickness of fat in the midline; 2) the distance between the midline (Point C) and the junction (Point A) of the skin and the imaginary line that connects the SIJ and the most medial cortex of the ilium; 3) the distance between the midline (Point C) and the junction (Point B) of the skin and the imaginary line that connects the SIJ and the L5 spinous process; 4) the distance between the SIJ and midline (Point C) on the skin, or between the SIJ and the midpoint (Point C') of the line from Point A to Point B; and 5) the angle between the sagittal line and the imaginary line that connects the SIJ and the midline on the skin. The upper one-third joint technique was performed to establish the feasibility of the alternative technique in 20 patients who had unsuccessful sacroiliac intraarticular injections using the lower one-third joint technique. The mean distances from the midline to Point A and to Point B were 21.9 ± 13.7 mm and 27.8 ± 13.6 mm, respectively. The mean distance between the SIJ and Point C (or Point C') was 81.0 ± 13.3 mm. The angle between the sagittal line and the imaginary line that connects the SIJ and the midline on the skin was 42.8 ± 5.1°. The success

  5. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Fajardo, J. Eduardo; Fiser, Andras; Roderick, Steven L.; Takiff, Howard E.; Blanchard, John S.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S,T,A,V][D,N][L,F]-[S,T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Myc...

  6. simple sequence repeat (SSR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, 78 mapped simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers representing 11 linkage groups of adzuki bean were evaluated for transferability to mungbean and related Vigna spp. 41 markers amplified characteristic bands in at least one Vigna species. The transferability percentage across the genotypes ranged ...

  7. Patient and staff doses and relationships between them in fluoroscopically guided procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramova-Cholakova, S.; Christova-Popova, Y.; Sagorska, A.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Medical exposure has the main contribution to man-made sources of exposures to the population in developed countries. Fluoroscopically guided procedures in interventional cardiology, gastroenterology, urology, orthopaedics and others may be related to high doses to both patients and staff. The main risk for both groups is the radiation carcinogenesis and it is increasing with dose. However deterministic effects are also possible: severe patient skin injuries occur sometimes. There are such cases in Bulgarian radiological practice. For the medical staff, involved in the procedures, radiation induced cataract is observed occasionally. Learning objective: In many cases there is direct correlation between patient and staff doses. Several simple rules must be observed in order to decrease exposure. Rules related to patient: Patient dose (dose-area product (DAP), fluoroscopy time, number of series,number of images) should be recorded for every patient; The patient should be positioned as far away as possible from the x-ray tube and as closer as possible to the image intensifier/digital image receptor; Fluoroscopy time should be minimized; Pulsed fluoroscopy with the lowest dose rate and the lowest frame rate providing acceptable image quality should be used; Different skin areas should be exposed in different projections; Oblique projections increase the dose - they should be avoided; Magnification also increases the dose several times and should be avoided; The acquisition mode should be avoided; it delivers dozens of times higher doses. Minimal number of frames and cine runs should be used. Use of “last image hold” is encouraged; The x-ray beam should be collimated to the area of interest. Rules related to staff: The staff receives scattered radiation from patient’s body. Every measure to decrease patient’s dose decreases staff dose as well; Every available protective device should be used (lead apron, thyroid collar, lead glasses, screens). They

  8. Upper ankle joint space detection on low contrast intraoperative fluoroscopic C-arm projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sarina; Schnetzke, Marc; Brehler, Michael; Swartman, Benedict; Vetter, Sven; Franke, Jochen; Grützner, Paul A.; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Nolden, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Intraoperative mobile C-arm fluoroscopy is widely used for interventional verification in trauma surgery, high flexibility combined with low cost being the main advantages of the method. However, the lack of global device-to- patient orientation is challenging, when comparing the acquired data to other intrapatient datasets. In upper ankle joint fracture reduction accompanied with an unstable syndesmosis, a comparison to the unfractured contralateral site is helpful for verification of the reduction result. To reduce dose and operation time, our approach aims at the comparison of single projections of the unfractured ankle with volumetric images of the reduced fracture. For precise assessment, a pre-alignment of both datasets is a crucial step. We propose a contour extraction pipeline to estimate the joint space location for a prealignment of fluoroscopic C-arm projections containing the upper ankle joint. A quadtree-based hierarchical variance comparison extracts potential feature points and a Hough transform is applied to identify bone shaft lines together with the tibiotalar joint space. By using this information we can define the coarse orientation of the projections independent from the ankle pose during acquisition in order to align those images to the volume of the fractured ankle. The proposed method was evaluated on thirteen cadaveric datasets consisting of 100 projections each with manually adjusted image planes by three trauma surgeons. The results show that the method can be used to detect the joint space orientation. The correlation between angle deviation and anatomical projection direction gives valuable input on the acquisition direction for future clinical experiments.

  9. Patient and staff doses in fluoroscopically guided invasive diagnostic and interventional urology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, D.; Hristova-Popova, J.; Avramova-Cholakova, S.; Deyanova, Ts.; Dobrikov, R.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is to evaluate patient and staff doses in fluoroscopically guided invasive diagnostic and interventional urology procedures. All the data were collected in the Emergency Hospital 'N. I. Pirogov'. While recording data for the patients, a real time dosimetry measurement of the medical staff was made. Air kerma-area product (KAP) was recorded for intravenous pyelogram (IVP), percutaneous nephrostomy (PN) and ureteral 'double-J' stenting. Patient data sex, age and weight were also taken. Staff doses were estimated with the system RaySafe i2. It contains four dosimeters, with a wireless connection to a real time display. The dosimeters were worn on the unprotected upper part of the body and measured the personal dose equivalent Hp(10). The mean KAP values for the procedures are: 3.21 Gy.cm 2 for IVP, 10.37 Gy.cm 2 for PN and 4.15 Gy.cm 2 for 'double-J' respectively. The highest staff dose for PN and 'double-J' is received by the urologist (160 μSv and 47.3 μSv, respectively), while for the IVP the radiographer has the highest exposure (20 μSv). Each member of the medical staff was on a different position in respect to the X-ray tube and the patient, which is the main reason for the differences in the staff doses. The variations in the mean patient and staff doses are mostly due to the interventions themselves, their complexity and the individual treatment of every patient. RaySafe i2 is very useful as guideline for making a choice of a better position and in the decreasing of radiation exposure to the staff

  10. Palliation of malignant gastric obstruction : fluoroscopic guided covered metallic stent placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Yong; Choi, Ki Chul; Lee, Soo Tak; Han, Hyun Young

    2000-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and clinical efficacy of self-expanding, covered metallic stent placement for the palliative treatment of malignant gastric obstruction. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the placement of self-expanding, covered stents was attempted in 23 patients (age range, 31-78 years) with inoperable or recurrent gastric malignancies. All 23 suffered dysphagia and/or vomiting after the ingestion of soft foods, or swallowing difficulty. Three different types of self-expanding, covered metallic stents were used and in all patients, these were placed perorally using over the guide wire technique. Success was defined both technically and clinically. Stent placement was technically successful in 19 patients (82.6%) but because the guidewire failed to successfully negotiate the sites at which there was obstruction, was unsuccessful in four (17.4%). Stent placement was well tolerated in all patients except one, in whom an acutely angled efferent loop from remnant stomach was present. In this case, stent placement required a strong metallic guidewire. After placement, 17 of the 19 patients (89.5%) were able to ingest solid and/or soft foods without dysphagia and showed a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting. Two others showed some improvement in the frequency of vomiting but were able to ingest only a liquid diet. In one patient, the stent migrated two days after the procedure. During the follow-up period of 2-7 months (mean, 74 days), there were no clinically significant complications. For the short-term palliative treatment of patients with gastric inlet or outlet obstruction, the placement of self-expanding metallic stents has proven relatively easy and safe, as well as reasonably effective. (author)

  11. Upper cervical spine movement during intubation: fluoroscopic comparison of the AirWay Scope, McCoy laryngoscope, and Macintosh laryngoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, K; Yamada, T; Kawakami, R; Kamata, T; Yokochi, M; Hara, K

    2008-01-01

    The AirWay Scope (AWS) is a new fibreoptic intubation device, which allows visualization of the glottic structures without alignment of the oral, pharyngeal, and tracheal axes, and thus may be useful in patients with limited cervical spine (C-spine) movement. We fluoroscopically evaluated upper C-spine movement during intubation with the AWS or Macintosh or McCoy laryngoscope. Forty-five patients, with normal C-spine, scheduled for elective surgery were randomly assigned to one of the three intubation devices. Movement of the upper C-spine was examined by measuring angles formed by adjacent vertebrae during intubation. Time to intubation was also recorded. Median cumulative upper C-spine movement was 22.3 degrees, 32.3 degrees, and 36.5 degrees with the AWS, Macintosh laryngoscope, and McCoy laryngoscope, respectively (Pmovement of the C-spine at C1/C2 in comparison with the Macintosh or McCoy laryngoscope (P=0.012), and at C3/C4 in comparison with the McCoy laryngoscope (P=0.019). Intubation time was significantly longer in the AWS group than in the Macintosh group (P=0.03). Compared with the Macintosh or McCoy laryngoscope, the AWS produced less movement of upper C-spine for intubation in patients with a normal C-spine.

  12. A comparison of six software packages for evaluation of solid lung nodules using semi-automated volumetry: What is the minimum increase in size to detect growth in repeated CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoop, Bartjan de; Gietema, Hester; Prokop, Mathias; Ginneken, Bram van; Zanen, Pieter; Groenewegen, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    We compared interexamination variability of CT lung nodule volumetry with six currently available semi-automated software packages to determine the minimum change needed to detect the growth of solid lung nodules. We had ethics committee approval. To simulate a follow-up examination with zero growth, we performed two low-dose unenhanced CT scans in 20 patients referred for pulmonary metastases. Between examinations, patients got off and on the table. Volumes of all pulmonary nodules were determined on both examinations using six nodule evaluation software packages. Variability (upper limit of the 95% confidence interval of the Bland-Altman plot) was calculated for nodules for which segmentation was visually rated as adequate. We evaluated 214 nodules (mean diameter 10.9 mm, range 3.3 mm-30.0 mm). Software packages provided adequate segmentation in 71% to 86% of nodules (p < 0.001). In case of adequate segmentation, variability in volumetry between scans ranged from 16.4% to 22.3% for the various software packages. Variability with five to six software packages was significantly less for nodules ≥8 mm in diameter (range 12.9%-17.1%) than for nodules <8 mm (range 18.5%-25.6%). Segmented volumes of each package were compared to each of the other packages. Systematic volume differences were detected in 11/15 comparisons. This hampers comparison of nodule volumes between software packages. (orig.)

  13. Real-Time Verification of a High-Dose-Rate Iridium 192 Source Position Using a Modified C-Arm Fluoroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Takayuki, E-mail: nose-takayuki@nms.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nippon Medical School Tamanagayama Hospital, Tama (Japan); Chatani, Masashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Rosai Hospital, Sakai (Japan); Otani, Yuki [Department of Radiology, Kaizuka City Hospital, Kaizuka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Kumita, Shinichirou [Department of Radiology, Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy misdeliveries can occur at any institution, and they can cause disastrous results. Even a patient's death has been reported. Misdeliveries could be avoided with real-time verification methods. In 1996, we developed a modified C-arm fluoroscopic verification of an HDR Iridium 192 source position prevent these misdeliveries. This method provided excellent image quality sufficient to detect errors, and it has been in clinical use at our institutions for 20 years. The purpose of the current study is to introduce the mechanisms and validity of our straightforward C-arm fluoroscopic verification method. Methods and Materials: Conventional X-ray fluoroscopic images are degraded by spurious signals and quantum noise from Iridium 192 photons, which make source verification impractical. To improve image quality, we quadrupled the C-arm fluoroscopic X-ray dose per pulse. The pulse rate was reduced by a factor of 4 to keep the average exposure compliant with Japanese medical regulations. The images were then displayed with quarter-frame rates. Results: Sufficient quality was obtained to enable observation of the source position relative to both the applicators and the anatomy. With this method, 2 errors were detected among 2031 treatment sessions for 370 patients within a 6-year period. Conclusions: With the use of a modified C-arm fluoroscopic verification method, treatment errors that were otherwise overlooked were detected in real time. This method should be given consideration for widespread use.

  14. Assessment of patient exposure for barium enema examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednarek, D.R.; Rudin, S.; Wong, R.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are described for the assessment of patient exposure during clinical fluoroscopic procedures. Values of the roentgen-area-product (RAP) and their distribution throughout the examination are presented for both single-contrast and double-contrast barium enema studies. The double-contrast procedure was measured to give 50% more radiation to the patient than the single-contrast procedure when the same size optical aperture is used between the intensifier and TV pick-up tube. However, it was possible to decrease the fluoroscopic RAP value by over a factor of two for the double-contrast procedure without an adverse clinical effect by increasing the area of the aperture diaphragm

  15. Fluoroscopic Analysis of Tibial Translation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injured Knees With and Without Bracing During Forward Lunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Maryam; Farahmand, Farzam; Mousavi, Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim; Golestanha, Seyed Ali; Rezaeian, Tahmineh; Shirvani Broujeni, Shahram; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Esfandiarpour, Fateme

    2015-07-01

    Despite several studies with different methods, the effect of functional knee braces on knee joint kinematics is not clear. Direct visualization of joint components through medical imaging modalities may provide the clinicians with more useful information. In this study, for the first time in the literature, video fluoroscopy was used to investigate the effect of knee bracing on the sagittal plane kinematics of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured patients. For twelve male unilateral ACL deficient subjects, the anterior tibial translation was measured during lunge exercise in non-braced and braced conditions. Fluoroscopic images were acquired from the subjects using a digital fluoroscopy system with a rate of 10 fps. The image of each frame was scaled using a calibration coin and analyzed in AutoCAD environment. The angle between the two lines, tangent to the posterior cortexes of the femoral and tibial shafts was measured as the flexion angle. For the fluoroscopic images associated with 0°, 15°, 30°, 45° and 60° knee flexion angles, the relative anterior-posterior configuration of the tibiofemoral joint was assessed by measuring the position of landmarks on the tibia and femur. Results indicated that the overall anterior translations of the tibia during the eccentric (down) and concentric (up) phases of lunge exercise were 10.4 ± 1.7 mm and 9.0 ± 2.2 mm for non-braced, and 10.1 ± 3.4 mm and 7.4 ± 2.5 mm, for braced conditions, respectively. The difference of the tibial anterior-posterior translation behaviors of the braced and non-braced knees was not statistically significant. Fluoroscopic imaging provides an effective tool to measure the dynamic behavior of the knee joint in the sagittal plane and within the limitations of this study, the pure mechanical stabilizing effect of functional knee bracing is not sufficient to control the anterior tibial translation of the ACL deficient patients during lunge exercise.

  16. SU-D-209-01: Can Fluoroscopic Air-Kerma Rates Be Reliably Measured with Solid-State Meters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, C; Thai, L; Wagner, L; Ozus, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Ionization chambers remain the standard for calibration of air-kerma rate measuring devices. Despite their strong energy-dependent response, solid state radiation detectors are increasingly used, primarily due to their efficiency in making standardized measurements. To test the reliability of these devices in measuring air-kerma rates, we compared ion chambers measurements with solid-state measurements for various mobile fluoroscopes operated at different beam qualities and air-kerma rates. Methods: Six mobile fluoroscopes (GE OEC models 9800 and 9900) were used to generate test beams. Using various field sizes and dose rate controls, copper attenuators and a lead attenuator were placed at the image receptor in varying combinations to generate a range of air-kerma rates. Air-kerma rates at 30 centimeters from the image receptors were measured using two 6-cm"3 ion chambers with electrometers (Radcal, models 1015 and 9015) and two with solid state detectors (Unfors Xi and Raysafe X2). No error messages occurred during measurements. However, about two months later, one solid-state device stopped working and was replaced by the manufacturer. Two out of six mobile fluoroscopic units were retested with the replacement unit. Results: Generally, solid state and ionization chambers agreed favorably well, with two exceptions. Before replacement of the detector, the Xi meter when set in the “RF High” mode deviated from ion chamber readings by factors of 2 and 10 with no message indicating error in measurement. When set in the “RF Low” mode, readings were within −4% to +3%. The replacement Xi detector displayed messages alerting the user when settings were not compatible with air-kerma rates. Conclusion: Air-kerma rates can be measured favorably well using solid-state devices, but users must be aware of the possibility that readings can be grossly in error with no discernible indication for the deviation.

  17. SU-D-209-01: Can Fluoroscopic Air-Kerma Rates Be Reliably Measured with Solid-State Meters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, C; Thai, L; Wagner, L [The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Ozus, B [CHI St Luke’s Health, Baylor St Luke’s Medical Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Ionization chambers remain the standard for calibration of air-kerma rate measuring devices. Despite their strong energy-dependent response, solid state radiation detectors are increasingly used, primarily due to their efficiency in making standardized measurements. To test the reliability of these devices in measuring air-kerma rates, we compared ion chambers measurements with solid-state measurements for various mobile fluoroscopes operated at different beam qualities and air-kerma rates. Methods: Six mobile fluoroscopes (GE OEC models 9800 and 9900) were used to generate test beams. Using various field sizes and dose rate controls, copper attenuators and a lead attenuator were placed at the image receptor in varying combinations to generate a range of air-kerma rates. Air-kerma rates at 30 centimeters from the image receptors were measured using two 6-cm{sup 3} ion chambers with electrometers (Radcal, models 1015 and 9015) and two with solid state detectors (Unfors Xi and Raysafe X2). No error messages occurred during measurements. However, about two months later, one solid-state device stopped working and was replaced by the manufacturer. Two out of six mobile fluoroscopic units were retested with the replacement unit. Results: Generally, solid state and ionization chambers agreed favorably well, with two exceptions. Before replacement of the detector, the Xi meter when set in the “RF High” mode deviated from ion chamber readings by factors of 2 and 10 with no message indicating error in measurement. When set in the “RF Low” mode, readings were within −4% to +3%. The replacement Xi detector displayed messages alerting the user when settings were not compatible with air-kerma rates. Conclusion: Air-kerma rates can be measured favorably well using solid-state devices, but users must be aware of the possibility that readings can be grossly in error with no discernible indication for the deviation.

  18. Fluoroscopically guided closed reduction and internal fixation of fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle: prospective clinical study of the technique and results in ten dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Tomlinson, J L; Reed, A L

    1999-01-01

    To report a technique for fluoroscopically guided closed reduction with internal fixation of fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle (FLHC) and determine the long-term results in 10 clinical cases. Prospective clinical case study. Ten dogs with 11 fractures. Fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle were stabilized with transcondylar screws and Kirschner wires. Closed reduction and implant placement were achieved using intraoperative fluoroscopic guidance. After fracture repair, postoperative radiographs were evaluated for articular alignment and implant placement. Dogs were evaluated after surgery by means of lameness scores, elbow range of motion (ROM), radiographic assessment, and owner evaluation of function. Postoperative reduction was considered anatomic in 6 fractures with all other fractures having ROM values between affected and unaffected elbows. All of the dogs in this study regained 90-100% of full function, based on owner assessment. Fluoroscopic guidance for closed reduction and internal fixation of FLHC in dogs is an effective technique.

  19. Investigation of first ray mobility during gait by kinematic fluoroscopic imaging-a novel method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Heiner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is often suggested that sagittal instability at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level is a primary factor for hallux valgus and that sagittal instability increases with the progression of the deformity. The assessment of the degree of vertical instability is usually made by clinical evaluation while any measurements mostly refer to a static assessment of medial ray mobility (i.e. the plantar/dorsal flexion in the sagittal plane. Testing methods currently available cannot attribute the degree of mobility to the corresponding anatomical joints making up the medial column of the foot. The aim of this study was to develop a technique which allows for a quantification of the in-vivo sagittal mobility of the joints of the medial foot column during the roll-over process under full weight bearing. Methods Mobility of first ray bones was investigated by dynamic distortion-free fluoroscopy (25 frames/s of 14 healthy volunteers and 8 patients with manifested clinical instability of the first ray. A CAD-based evaluation method allowed the determination of mobility and relative displacements and rotations of the first ray bones within the sagittal plane during the stance phase of gait. Results Total flexion of the first ray was found to be 13.63 (SD 6.14 mm with the healthy volunteers and 13.06 (SD 8.01 mm with the patients (resolution: 0.245 mm/pixel. The dorsiflexion angle was 5.27 (SD 2.34 degrees in the healthy volunteers and increased to 5.56 (SD 3.37 degrees in the patients. Maximum rotations were found at the naviculo-cuneiform joints and least at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level in both groups. Conclusions Dynamic fluoroscopic assessment has been shown to be a valuable tool for characterisation of the kinematics of the joints of the medial foot column during gait. A significant difference in first ray flexion and angular rotation between the patients and healthy volunteers however could not be found.

  20. Percutaneous Transhepatic Drainage of Inaccessible Abdominal Abscesses Following Abdominal Surgery Under Real-Time CT-Fluoroscopic Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Takeda, Kan

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses retrospectively under real-time computed tomographic (CT) guidance. For abdominal abscesses, 12 consecutive patients received percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Abscesses were considered inaccessible using the usual access route because they were surrounded by the liver and other organs. The maximum diameters of abscesses were 4.6-9.5 cm (mean, 6.7 ± 1.4 cm). An 8-Fr catheter was advanced into the abscess cavity through the liver parenchyma using real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance. Safety, feasibility, procedure time, and clinical utility were evaluated. Drainage catheters were placed with no complications in abscess cavities through the liver parenchyma in all patients. The mean procedure time was 18.8 ± 9.2 min (range, 12-41 min). All abscesses were drained. They shrank immediately after catheter placement. In conclusions, this transhepatic approach under real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance is a safe, feasible, and useful technique for use of drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses.

  1. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation (MLI) has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five Glenn Research Center (GRC) provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4% whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0%. A second group of 10 coupons has been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, the repeatability between coupons has been shown to be +/- 15-25%. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  2. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  3. 78 FR 65594 - Vehicular Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... coordinators estimate the effect on coordination fees? Does the supposed benefit that mobile repeater stations... allow the licensing and operation of vehicular repeater systems and other mobile repeaters by public... email: [email protected] or phone: 202-418- 0530 or TTY: 202-418-0432. For detailed instructions for...

  4. Fluoroscopic Analysis of Tibial Translation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injured Knees With and Without Bracing During Forward Lunge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Maryam; Farahmand, Farzam; Mousavi, Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim; Golestanha, Seyed Ali; Rezaeian, Tahmineh; Shirvani Broujeni, Shahram; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Esfandiarpour, Fateme

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite several studies with different methods, the effect of functional knee braces on knee joint kinematics is not clear. Direct visualization of joint components through medical imaging modalities may provide the clinicians with more useful information. Objectives: In this study, for the first time in the literature, video fluoroscopy was used to investigate the effect of knee bracing on the sagittal plane kinematics of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured patients. Patients and Methods: For twelve male unilateral ACL deficient subjects, the anterior tibial translation was measured during lunge exercise in non-braced and braced conditions. Fluoroscopic images were acquired from the subjects using a digital fluoroscopy system with a rate of 10 fps. The image of each frame was scaled using a calibration coin and analyzed in AutoCAD environment. The angle between the two lines, tangent to the posterior cortexes of the femoral and tibial shafts was measured as the flexion angle. For the fluoroscopic images associated with 0°, 15°, 30°, 45° and 60° knee flexion angles, the relative anterior-posterior configuration of the tibiofemoral joint was assessed by measuring the position of landmarks on the tibia and femur. Results: Results indicated that the overall anterior translations of the tibia during the eccentric (down) and concentric (up) phases of lunge exercise were 10.4 ± 1.7 mm and 9.0 ± 2.2 mm for non-braced, and 10.1 ± 3.4 mm and 7.4 ± 2.5 mm, for braced conditions, respectively. The difference of the tibial anterior-posterior translation behaviors of the braced and non-braced knees was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Fluoroscopic imaging provides an effective tool to measure the dynamic behavior of the knee joint in the sagittal plane and within the limitations of this study, the pure mechanical stabilizing effect of functional knee bracing is not sufficient to control the anterior tibial translation of the ACL deficient

  5. SU-E-J-01: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Estimation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Lewis, J; Mishra, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: 3D motion modeling derived from 4DCT images, taken days or weeks before treatment, cannot reliably represent patient anatomy on the day of treatment. We develop a method to generate motion models based on 4DCBCT acquired at the time of treatment, and apply the model to estimate 3D time-varying images (referred to as 3D fluoroscopic images). Methods: Motion models are derived through deformable registration between each 4DCBCT phase, and principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated based on cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging. PCA coefficients are optimized iteratively through comparison of these cone-beam projections and projections estimated based on the motion model. Digital phantoms reproducing ten patient motion trajectories, and a physical phantom with regular and irregular motion derived from measured patient trajectories, are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization, and the global voxel intensity difference compared to ground truth. Results: Experiments included: 1) assuming no anatomic or positioning changes between 4DCT and treatment time; and 2) simulating positioning and tumor baseline shifts at the time of treatment compared to 4DCT acquisition. 4DCBCT were reconstructed from the anatomy as seen at treatment time. In case 1) the tumor localization error and the intensity differences in ten patient were smaller using 4DCT-based motion model, possible due to superior image quality. In case 2) the tumor localization error and intensity differences were 2.85 and 0.15 respectively, using 4DCT-based motion models, and 1.17 and 0.10 using 4DCBCT-based models. 4DCBCT performed better due to its ability to reproduce daily anatomical changes. Conclusion: The study showed an advantage of 4DCBCT-based motion models in the context of 3D fluoroscopic images estimation. Positioning and tumor baseline shift uncertainties were mitigated by the 4DCBCT

  6. Fluoroscopically-guided transnasal insertion of ileus tube intestinal decompression in patients with inoperable malignant bowel obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Shiming; Li Haili; Lin Qing; Mao Aiwu; Wu Shaoqiu; Jiang Haosheng; Cao Yan; Wang Zhenlei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the technical feasibility and effectiveness of fluoroscopically-guided transnasal insertion of ileus tube for intestinal decompression in the treatment of inoperable malignant bowel obstruction. Methods: A total of 211 patients with inoperable malignant bowel obstruction were enrolled in this study. The median KPS scale was 40 (ranged from 20 to 60). Under fluoroscopic guidance, transnasal insertion of ileus tube by using conventional technique or guidewire-catheter exchange technique was performed in all patients. The technical success rate, the clinical effective rate, the curative rate and adverse reactions as well as complications were documented. The correlation among the obstructive sites, obstruction causes and therapeutic effectiveness was analyzed. The ileus tube used in this study was a four-cavity and double-balloon catheter with a diameter of 16 F/18 f, which is produced by Cliny Company. Results: Transnasal drainage tube was successfully inserted into the proximal jejunum in all 211 patients with malignant bowel obstruction, and the total technical success rate was 100%. The initial technical success rate of the traditional technique and the catheter-guidewire exchange method was 85.5% (65/76) and 100% (135/135) respectively, the difference between the two was significant (P<0.05). After 24 hours, the clinical remission rate in the patients with high-level intestinal obstruction, lower-level intestinal obstruction and colorectal obstruction was 95.8% (46/48), 92.9% (117/126) and 83.8% (31/37), respectively. A follow-up of 4-245 days (mean 138 days) was conducted, and the total clinical cure rate was 27.5% (58/211). The clinical cure rate in small intestine obstruction and colorectal obstruction caused by primary tumor or recurrence was 12.7% (20/157) and 59.5% (22/37), respectively (P<0.05). The adverse reactions and complications included uncomfortable pharynx feeling or pain (99.1%, 199/221), the tube obstruction (23.2%, 49

  7. Repeating and non-repeating fast radio bursts from binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shotaro; Totani, Tomonori; Kiuchi, Kenta

    2018-04-01

    Most fast radio bursts (FRB) do not show evidence of repetition, and such non-repeating FRBs may be produced at the time of a merger of binary neutron stars (BNS), provided that the BNS merger rate is close to the high end of the currently possible range. However, the merger environment is polluted by dynamical ejecta, which may prohibit the radio signal from propagating. We examine this by using a general-relativistic simulation of a BNS merger, and show that the ejecta appears about 1 ms after the rotation speed of the merged star becomes the maximum. Therefore there is a time window in which an FRB signal can reach outside, and the short duration of non-repeating FRBs can be explained by screening after ejecta formation. A fraction of BNS mergers may leave a rapidly rotating and stable neutron star, and such objects may be the origin of repeating FRBs like FRB 121102. We show that a merger remnant would appear as a repeating FRB on a time scale of ˜1-10 yr, and expected properties are consistent with the observations of FRB 121102. We construct an FRB rate evolution model that includes these two populations of repeating and non-repeating FRBs from BNS mergers, and show that the detection rate of repeating FRBs relative to non-repeating ones rapidly increases with improving search sensitivity. This may explain why only the repeating FRB 121102 was discovered by the most sensitive FRB search with Arecibo. Several predictions are made, including the appearance of a repeating FRB 1-10 yr after a BNS merger that is localized by gravitational waves and subsequent electromagnetic radiation.

  8. Fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural steroid injections at a quaternary-care teaching institution: effect of trainee involvement and patient body mass index on fluoroscopy time and patient dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs-Heiden, C.A.; Murthy, N.S.; Geske, J.R.; Diehn, F.E.; Schueler, B.A.; Wald, J.T.; Kaufmann, T.J.; Lehman, V.T.; Carr, C.M.; Amrami, K.K.; Morris, J.M.; Thielen, K.R.; Maus, T.P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether there are differences in fluoroscopy time and patient dose for fluoroscopically guided lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) performed by staff radiologists versus with trainees and to evaluate the effect of patient body mass index (BMI) on fluoroscopy time and patient dose, including their interactions with other variables. Materials and methods: Single-level lumbar TFESIs (n=1844) between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013 were reviewed. Fluoroscopy time, reference point air kerma (K_a_,_r), and kerma area product (KAP) were recorded. BMI and trainee involvement were examined as predictors of fluoroscopy time, K_a_,_r, and KAP in models adjusted for age and gender in multivariable linear models. Stratified models of BMI groups by trainee presence were performed. Results: Increased age was the only significant predictor of increased fluoroscopy time (p<0.0001). K_a_,_r and KAP were significantly higher in patients with a higher BMI (p<0.0001 and p=0.0009). When stratified by BMI, longer fluoroscopy time predicted increased K_a_,_r and KAP in all groups (p<0.0001). Trainee involvement was not a statistically significant predictor of fluoroscopy time or K_a_,_r in any BMI category. KAP was lower with trainees in the overweight group (p=0.0009) and higher in male patients for all BMI categories (p<0.02). Conclusion: Trainee involvement did not result in increased fluoroscopy time or patient dose. BMI did not affect fluoroscopy time; however, overweight and obese patients received significantly higher K_a_,_r and KAP. Male patients received a higher KAP in all BMI categories. Limiting fluoroscopy time and good collimation practices should be reinforced in these patients. - Highlights: • Trainee involvement did not contribute to increased fluoroscopy time or dose. • BMI did not affect fluoroscopy time. • Overweight and obese patients received significantly higher Ka,r and KAP.

  9. SU-G-JeP1-11: Feasibility Study of Markerless Tracking Using Dual Energy Fluoroscopic Images for Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiinoki, T; Shibuya, K [Yamaguchi University, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Sawada, A [Kyoto college of medical science, Nantan, Kyoto (Japan); Uehara, T; Yuasa, Y; Koike, M; Kawamura, S [Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy (RTRT) system was installed in our institution. This system consists of two x-ray tubes and color image intensifiers (I.I.s). The fiducial marker which was implanted near the tumor was tracked using color fluoroscopic images. However, the implantation of the fiducial marker is very invasive. Color fluoroscopic images enable to increase the recognition of the tumor. However, these images were not suitable to track the tumor without fiducial marker. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of markerless tracking using dual energy colored fluoroscopic images for real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. Methods: The colored fluoroscopic images of static and moving phantom that had the simulated tumor (30 mm diameter sphere) were experimentally acquired using the RTRT system. The programmable respiratory motion phantom was driven using the sinusoidal pattern in cranio-caudal direction (Amplitude: 20 mm, Time: 4 s). The x-ray condition was set to 55 kV, 50 mA and 105 kV, 50 mA for low energy and high energy, respectively. Dual energy images were calculated based on the weighted logarithmic subtraction of high and low energy images of RGB images. The usefulness of dual energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template image matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Our proposed dual energy subtraction improve the contrast between tumor and background to suppress the bone structure. For static phantom, our results showed that high tracking accuracy using dual energy subtraction images. For moving phantom, our results showed that good tracking accuracy using dual energy subtraction images. However, tracking accuracy was dependent on tumor position, tumor size and x-ray conditions. Conclusion: We indicated that feasibility of markerless tracking using dual energy fluoroscopic images for real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. Furthermore, it is needed to investigate the

  10. Reduction of radiation exposure while maintaining high-quality fluoroscopic images during interventional cardiology using novel x-ray tube technology with extra beam filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boer, A; de Feyter, P J; Hummel, W A; Keane, D; Roelandt, J R

    1994-06-01

    Radiographic technology plays an integral role in interventional cardiology. The number of interventions continues to increase, and the associated radiation exposure to patients and personnel is of major concern. This study was undertaken to determine whether a newly developed x-ray tube deploying grid-switched pulsed fluoroscopy and extra beam filtering can achieve a reduction in radiation exposure while maintaining fluoroscopic images of high quality. Three fluoroscopic techniques were compared: continuous fluoroscopy, pulsed fluoroscopy, and a newly developed high-output pulsed fluoroscopy with extra filtering. To ascertain differences in the quality of images and to determine differences in patient entrance and investigator radiation exposure, the radiated volume curve was measured to determine the required high voltage levels (kVpeak) for different object sizes for each fluoroscopic mode. The fluoroscopic data of 124 patient procedures were combined. The data were analyzed for radiographic projections, image intensifier field size, and x-ray tube kilovoltage levels (kVpeak). On the basis of this analysis, a reference procedure was constructed. The reference procedure was tested on a phantom or dummy patient by all three fluoroscopic modes. The phantom was so designed that the kilovoltage requirements for each projection were comparable to those needed for the average patient. Radiation exposure of the operator and patient was measured during each mode. The patient entrance dose was measured in air, and the operator dose was measured by 18 dosimeters on a dummy operator. Pulsed compared with continuous fluoroscopy could be performed with improved image quality at lower kilovoltages. The patient entrance dose was reduced by 21% and the operator dose by 54%. High-output pulsed fluoroscopy with extra beam filtering compared with continuous fluoroscopy improved the image quality, lowered the kilovoltage requirements, and reduced the patient entrance dose by 55% and

  11. Concomitant Intracranial and Lumbar Chronic Subdural Hematoma Treated by Fluoroscopic Guided Lumbar Puncture: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICHINOSE, Daisuke; TOCHIGI, Satoru; TANAKA, Toshihide; SUZUKI, Tomoya; TAKEI, Jun; HATANO, Keisuke; KAJIWARA, Ikki; MARUYAMA, Fumiaki; SAKAMOTO, Hiroki; HASEGAWA, Yuzuru; TANI, Satoshi; MURAYAMA, Yuichi

    2018-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with a severe headache, lower back pain, and lower abdominal pain 1 month after a head injury caused by falling. Computed tomography (CT) of the head demonstrated bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with a significant amount in the left frontoparietal region. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine also revealed CSDH from L2 to S1 level. A simple drainage for the intracranial CSDH on the left side was performed. Postoperatively, the headache was improved; however, the lower back and abdominal pain persisted. Aspiration of the liquefied spinal subdural hematoma was performed by a lumbar puncture under fluoroscopic guidance. The clinical symptoms were dramatically improved postoperatively. Concomitant intracranial and spinal CSDH is considerably rare so only 23 cases including the present case have been reported in the literature so far. The etiology and therapeutic strategy were discussed with a review of the literature. Therapeutic strategy is not established for these two concomitant lesions. Conservative follow-up was chosen for 14 cases, resulting in a favorable clinical outcome. Although surgical evacuation of lumbosacral CSDH was performed in seven cases, an alteration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure following spinal surgery should be reminded because of the intracranial lesion. Since CSDH is well liquefied in both intracranial and spinal lesion, a less invasive approach is recommended not only for an intracranial lesion but also for spinal lesion. Fluoroscopic-guided lumbar puncture for lumbosacral CSDH following burr hole surgery for intracranial CSDH could be a recommended strategy. PMID:29479039

  12. TU-D-209-03: Alignment of the Patient Graphic Model Using Fluoroscopic Images for Skin Dose Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oines, A; Oines, A; Kilian-Meneghin, J; Karthikeyan, B; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D [University at Buffalo (SUNY) School of Med., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Dose Tracking System (DTS) was developed to provide realtime feedback of skin dose and dose rate during interventional fluoroscopic procedures. A color map on a 3D graphic of the patient represents the cumulative dose distribution on the skin. Automated image correlation algorithms are described which use the fluoroscopic procedure images to align and scale the patient graphic for more accurate dose mapping. Methods: Currently, the DTS employs manual patient graphic selection and alignment. To improve the accuracy of dose mapping and automate the software, various methods are explored to extract information about the beam location and patient morphology from the procedure images. To match patient anatomy with a reference projection image, preprocessing is first used, including edge enhancement, edge detection, and contour detection. Template matching algorithms from OpenCV are then employed to find the location of the beam. Once a match is found, the reference graphic is scaled and rotated to fit the patient, using image registration correlation functions in Matlab. The algorithm runs correlation functions for all points and maps all correlation confidences to a surface map. The highest point of correlation is used for alignment and scaling. The transformation data is saved for later model scaling. Results: Anatomic recognition is used to find matching features between model and image and image registration correlation provides for alignment and scaling at any rotation angle with less than onesecond runtime, and at noise levels in excess of 150% of those found in normal procedures. Conclusion: The algorithm provides the necessary scaling and alignment tools to improve the accuracy of dose distribution mapping on the patient graphic with the DTS. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.

  13. TU-D-209-03: Alignment of the Patient Graphic Model Using Fluoroscopic Images for Skin Dose Mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oines, A; Oines, A; Kilian-Meneghin, J; Karthikeyan, B; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Dose Tracking System (DTS) was developed to provide realtime feedback of skin dose and dose rate during interventional fluoroscopic procedures. A color map on a 3D graphic of the patient represents the cumulative dose distribution on the skin. Automated image correlation algorithms are described which use the fluoroscopic procedure images to align and scale the patient graphic for more accurate dose mapping. Methods: Currently, the DTS employs manual patient graphic selection and alignment. To improve the accuracy of dose mapping and automate the software, various methods are explored to extract information about the beam location and patient morphology from the procedure images. To match patient anatomy with a reference projection image, preprocessing is first used, including edge enhancement, edge detection, and contour detection. Template matching algorithms from OpenCV are then employed to find the location of the beam. Once a match is found, the reference graphic is scaled and rotated to fit the patient, using image registration correlation functions in Matlab. The algorithm runs correlation functions for all points and maps all correlation confidences to a surface map. The highest point of correlation is used for alignment and scaling. The transformation data is saved for later model scaling. Results: Anatomic recognition is used to find matching features between model and image and image registration correlation provides for alignment and scaling at any rotation angle with less than onesecond runtime, and at noise levels in excess of 150% of those found in normal procedures. Conclusion: The algorithm provides the necessary scaling and alignment tools to improve the accuracy of dose distribution mapping on the patient graphic with the DTS. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.

  14. Proposed Optimal Fluoroscopic Targets for Cooled Radiofrequency Neurotomy of the Sacral Lateral Branches to Improve Clinical Outcomes: An Anatomical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Alison; Dreyfuss, Paul; Swain, Nathan; Roberts, Shannon; Loh, Eldon; Agur, Anne

    2017-11-23

    Current sacroiliac joint (SIJ) cooled radiofrequency (RF) is based on fluoroscopic anatomy of lateral branches (LBs) in three specimens. Recent studies confirm significant variation in LB positions. To determine if common fluoroscopic needle placements for cooled SIJ RF are adequate to lesion all S1-3 LBs. If not, would different targets improve lesion accuracy? The LBs of 20 cadavers were dissected bilaterally (40 SIJs), and 26 G radiopaque wires were sutured to the LBs. With a 10-mm radius ruler centered at each foramen, standard targets were assessed, as judged by a clockface on the right, for S1 and S2 at 2:30, 4:00, and 5:30 positions and at S3 at 2:30 and 4:00. Mirror image targets were assessed on the left. Assuming an 8-mm lesion diameter, the percentage of LBs that would not be ablated for each level was determined. Imaging through the superior end plate of S1 was compared against segment specific (SS) imaging. Nine point four percent of LBs would not be ablated at S1 vs 0.99% at S2 vs 35% at S3, and 60% of the 40 SIJs would be completely denervated using current targets. SS imaging did not improve results. Alternate target locations could improve the miss rate to 2.8% at S1 and 0% at S3 and would ablate all LBs in 95% of SIJs. Using a conservative 8-mm lesion measurement, contemporary cooled RF needle targets are inadequate to lesion all target LBs. Modifications to current targets are recommended to increase the effectiveness of the procedure. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Design considerations for a new, high resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope based on a CMOS sensor (MAF-CMOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Singh, Vivek; Ionita, Ciprian N; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Titus, Albert; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-06

    The detectors that are used for endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI), particularly for neurovascular interventions, do not provide clinicians with adequate visualization to ensure the best possible treatment outcomes. Developing an improved x-ray imaging detector requires the determination of estimated clinical x-ray entrance exposures to the detector. The range of exposures to the detector in clinical studies was found for the three modes of operation: fluoroscopic mode, high frame-rate digital angiographic mode (HD fluoroscopic mode), and DSA mode. Using these estimated detector exposure ranges and available CMOS detector technical specifications, design requirements were developed to pursue a quantum limited, high resolution, dynamic x-ray detector based on a CMOS sensor with 50 μm pixel size. For the proposed MAF-CMOS, the estimated charge collected within the full exposure range was found to be within the estimated full well capacity of the pixels. Expected instrumentation noise for the proposed detector was estimated to be 50-1,300 electrons. Adding a gain stage such as a light image intensifier would minimize the effect of the estimated instrumentation noise on total image noise but may not be necessary to ensure quantum limited detector operation at low exposure levels. A recursive temporal filter may decrease the effective total noise by 2 to 3 times, allowing for the improved signal to noise ratios at the lowest estimated exposures despite consequent loss in temporal resolution. This work can serve as a guide for further development of dynamic x-ray imaging prototypes or improvements for existing dynamic x-ray imaging systems.

  16. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  17. The Effects of Repeated Experience on Children's Suggestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Martine B.; Roberts, Kim P.; Ceci, Stephen J.; Hembrooke, Helene

    1999-01-01

    Examined effect of suggestive questions on 3- to 5-year-olds' and 6- to 8-year-olds' recall of the final occurrence of repeated event. Found that relative to reports of children experiencing single occurrence, reports about fixed items of repeated events were less contaminated by false suggestions. Children's age and delay of interview were…

  18. Impact of Inclusion or Exclusion of Repeaters on Test Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhan, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of including or excluding repeaters on the equating process and results. New forms of two tests were equated to their respective old forms using either all examinees or only the first timer examinees in the new form sample. Results showed that for both tests used in this study, including or excluding repeaters in the…

  19. Film repeats in radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwan, A. Z.; Al-Shakharah, A. I

    1997-01-01

    During a one year period, 4910 radiographs of 55780 films were repeated. The objective of our study was to analyse and to classify the causes in order to minimize the repeats, cut the expenses and to provide optimal radiographs for accurate diagnosis. Analysis of the different factors revealed that, 43.6% of film repeats in our service were due to faults in exposure factors, centering comprises 15.9% of the repeats, while too much collimation was responsible for 7.6% of these repeats. All of which can be decreased by awareness and programmed training of technicians. Film blurring caused by patient motion was also responsible for 4.9% for radiographs reexamination, which can be minimized by detailed explanation to the patient and providing the necessary privacy. Fogging of X-Ray films by improper storage or inadequate handling or processing faults were responsible for 14.5% in repeats in our study. Methods and criteria for proper storage and handling of films were discussed. Recommendation for using modern day-light and laser processor has been high lighted. Artefacts are noticeably high in our cases, due to spinal dresses and frequent usage of precious metals for c osmotic purposes in this part of the world. The repeated films comprise 8.8% of all films We conclude that, the main factor responsible for repeats of up to 81.6% of cases was the technologists, thus emphasizing the importance of adequate training of the technologists. (authors). 15 refs., 9 figs., 1 table

  20. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  1. Repeated Prescribed Burning in Aspen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Perala

    1974-01-01

    Infrequent burning weather, low flammability of the aspen-hardwood association, and prolific sprouting and seeding of shrubs and hardwoods made repeated dormant season burning a poor tool to convert good site aspen to conifers. Repeat fall burns for wildlife habitat maintenance is workable if species composition changes are not important.

  2. SU-F-I-75: Half-Value Layer Thicknesses and Homogeneity Coefficients for Fluoroscopic X-Ray Beam Spectra Incorporating Spectral Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderle, K [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Godley, A; Shen, Z; Dong, F [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rakowski, J [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to quantify various first half-value-layers (HVLs), second HVLs and homogeneity coefficients (HCs) for a state-of-the-art fluoroscope utilizing spectral (copper) filtration. Methods: A Radcal (Monrovia, Ca) AccuPro dosimeter with a 10×6-6 calibrated ionization chamber was used to measure air kerma for radiographic x-ray exposures made on a Siemens (Erlangen, Germany) Artis ZeeGo fluoroscope operated in the service mode. The ionization chamber was centered in the x-ray beam at 72 cm from the focal spot with a source-to-image-distance of 120 cm. The collimators were introduced to limit the x-ray field to approximately 5 cm × 5 cm at the ionization chamber plane. Type-1100 aluminum filters, in 0.5 mm increments, were used to determine the HVL. Two HVL calculation methods were used, log-linear interpolation and Lambert-W interpolation as described by Mathieu [Med Phys, 38(8), 4546 (2011)]. Multiple measurements were made at 60, 80, 100, 120 kVp at spectral filtration thicknesses of 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 mm. Results: First HVL, second HVL, and HCs are presented for the fluoroscopic x-ray beam spectra indicated above, with nearly identical results from the two interpolation methods. Accuracy of the set kVp was also determined and deviated less than 2%. First HVLs for fluoroscopic x-ray beam spectra without spectral filtration determined in our study were 7%–16% greater than previously published data by Fetterly et al. [Med Phys, 28, 205 (2001)]. However, the FDA minimum HVL requirements changed since that publication, requiring larger HVLs as of 2006. Additionally, x-ray tube and generator architecture have substantially changed over the last 15 years providing different beam spectra. Conclusion: X-ray beam quality characteristics for state-of-the-art fluoroscopes with spectral filtration have not been published. This study provides reference data which will be useful for defining beam qualities encountered on

  3. Tevatron serial data repeater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducar, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    A ten megabit per second serial data repeater system has been developed for the 6.28km Tevatron accelerator. The repeaters are positioned at each of the thirty service buildings and accommodate control and abort system communications as well as distribution of the Tevatron time and energy clocks. The repeaters are transparent to the particular protocol of the transmissions. Serial data are encoded locally as unipolar two volt signals employing the self-clocking Manchester Bi-Phase code. The repeaters modulate the local signals to low-power bursts of 50 MHz rf carrier for the 260m transmission between service buildings. The repeaters also demodulate the transmission and restructure the data for local utilization. The employment of frequency discrimination techniques yields high immunity to the characteristic noise spectrum

  4. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  5. Repeatability of visual acuity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasch, T W; Bailey, I L; Bullimore, M A

    1998-05-01

    This study investigates features of visual acuity chart design and acuity testing scoring methods which affect the validity and repeatability of visual acuity measurements. Visual acuity was measured using the Sloan and British Standard letter series, and Landolt rings. Identifiability of the different letters as a function of size was estimated, and expressed in the form of frequency-of-seeing curves. These functions were then used to simulate acuity measurements with a variety of chart designs and scoring criteria. Systematic relationships exist between chart design parameters and acuity score, and acuity score repeatability. In particular, an important feature of a chart, that largely determines the repeatability of visual acuity measurement, is the amount of size change attributed to each letter. The methods used to score visual acuity performance also affect repeatability. It is possible to evaluate acuity score validity and repeatability using the statistical principles discussed here.

  6. Fluoroscopically-guided transforaminal epidural steroid injection for the treatment of sciatica due to herniated nucleus pulposus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiao; Wang Jianhui; Duan Zhaohui; Xu Zhitao; Shu Xiaomin; Qiu Ronghua

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the therapeutic benefit of fluoroscopically-guided lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESI) in treating patients with sciatica due to a herniated nucleus pulposus. Methods: From October 2004 to November 2007, fluoroscopically-guided lumbar TFESI as performed in 79 patients (41 males and 38 females with a mean age of 45.75 years,ranged from 20 to 70 years) with sciatica due to a herniated nucleus pulposus. Patients had a symptomatic course of disease from 8 weeks to 22 years and showed no response to conservative treatment. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. TFESI was performed at patient's request. Additional injections, up to 3 times, were given with an interval of 7 or 10 days. The injection medicine consisted of 25 mg of prednisolone acetate and (9-14) ml of 0.5% lidocaine. Patients were evaluated by an independent observer and received questionnaires before the initial injection and at 6,12 months after TFESI. Questionnaires included an eleven points visual analog scale (VAS) and a five points patient satisfaction scale. A successful outcome required a patient satisfaction scale score of 3 (very good) or 4(excellent) and a reduction on the VAS score of 2 or more points after TFESI. Pain relief was classified as 'excellent' when the pain was completely resolved or diminished by 5 points or more, as 'good' when a diminution of pain was 2 points or more, as 'fair' and 'poor' when a diminution of pain was 1 point or less, or even an increase in pain. Results: Twenty-nine patients received single injection, 22 patients received two, 15 patients received three and 13 patients received four times of injection, with a mean of 1.96 times per patient. The mean VAS scores were 6.5(ranged 3.5-9.5) before and 3.8(ranged 0-9.5) 6 months after the procedure. Pain relief was graded as excellent in 35 patients (44.3%), good in 26 patients(32.9%), fair in 10 patients(12.7%), and poor in 8

  7. Stent placement under fluoroscopic monitoring and endoscopic direct vision for the treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstruction: a report of 47 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baoyang; Li Weiping; Jiang Haosheng; Liu Shiyi; Hu Yi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the operational technique and clinical effect of metallic stent placement in treating malignant gastroduodenal obstruction. Methods: Metallic stent placement under fluoroscopic monitoring and endoscopic direct vision was performed in 47 patients with malignant gastroduodenal obstruction. A total of 54 metallic stents was used. Results: The procedure was successfully completed in all 47 patients. During the follow-up period, all the patients could take liquid or ordinary diet and were markedly relived of vomiting. The living quality was much improved and no serious complications occurred. Conclusion: Under fluoroscopic monitoring and endoscopic direct vision, stent placement is a safe, effective, technically-simple and time-saving procedure for the treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstruction with less sufferings to the patient. Therefore, it is definitely worth popularizing this technique in clinical practice. (authors)

  8. Effects of intra-operative fluoroscopic 3D-imaging on peri-operative imaging strategy in calcaneal fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerekamp, M S H; Backes, M; Schep, N W L; Ubbink, D T; Luitse, J S; Schepers, T; Goslings, J C

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that intra-operative fluoroscopic 3D-imaging (3D-imaging) in calcaneal fracture surgery is promising to prevent revision surgery and save costs. However, these studies limited their focus to corrections performed after 3D-imaging, thereby neglecting corrections after intra-operative fluoroscopic 2D-imaging (2D-imaging). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of additional 3D-imaging on intra-operative corrections, peri-operative imaging used, and patient-relevant outcomes compared to 2D-imaging alone. In this before-after study, data of adult patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of a calcaneal fracture between 2000 and 2014 in our level-I Trauma center were collected. 3D-imaging (BV Pulsera with 3D-RX, Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) was available as of 2007 at the surgeons' discretion. Patient and fracture characteristics, peri-operative imaging, intra-operative corrections and patient-relevant outcomes were collected from the hospital databases. Patients in whom additional 3D-imaging was applied were compared to those undergoing 2D-imaging alone. A total of 231 patients were included of whom 107 (46%) were operated with the use of 3D-imaging. No significant differences were found in baseline characteristics. The median duration of surgery was significantly longer when using 3D-imaging (2:08 vs. 1:54 h; p = 0.002). Corrections after additional 3D-imaging were performed in 53% of the patients. However, significantly fewer corrections were made after 2D-imaging when 3D-imaging was available (Risk difference (RD) -15%; 95% Confidence interval (CI) -29 to -2). Peri-operative imaging, besides intra-operative 3D-imaging, and patient-relevant outcomes were similar between groups. Intra-operative 3D-imaging provides additional information resulting in additional corrections. Moreover, 3D-imaging probably changed the surgeons' attitude to rely more on 3D-imaging, hence a 15%-decrease of

  9. Feasibility of differential quantification of 3D temporomandibular kinematics during various oral activities using a cone-beam computed tomography-based 3D fluoroscopic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Chen

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: A new CBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic method was proposed and shown to be capable of quantitatively differentiating TMJ movement patterns among complicated functional activities. It also enabled a complete description of the rigid-body mandibular motion and descriptions of as many reference points as needed for future clinical applications. It will be helpful for dental practice and for a better understanding of the functions of the TMJ.

  10. Leaded eyeglasses substantially reduce radiation exposure of the surgeon's eyes during acquisition of typical fluoroscopic views of the hip and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Sean; Thornton, Raymond; Dauer, Lawrence T; Quinn, Brian; Miodownik, Daniel; Hak, David J

    2013-07-17

    Despite recommendations to do so, few orthopaedists wear leaded glasses when performing operative fluoroscopy. Radiation exposure to the ocular lens causes cataracts, and regulatory limits for maximum annual occupational exposure to the eye continue to be revised downward. Using anthropomorphic patient and surgeon phantoms, radiation dose at the surgeon phantom's lens was measured with and without leaded glasses during fluoroscopic acquisition of sixteen common pelvic and hip views. The magnitude of lens dose reduction from leaded glasses was calculated by dividing the unprotected dose by the dose measured behind leaded glasses. On average, the use of leaded glasses reduced radiation to the surgeon phantom's eye by tenfold, a 90% reduction in dose. However, there was widespread variation in the amount of radiation that reached the phantom surgeon's eye among the various radiographic projections we studied. Without leaded glasses, the dose measured at the surgeon's lens varied more than 250-fold among these sixteen different views. In addition to protecting the surgeon's eye from the deleterious effects of radiation, the use of leaded glasses could permit an orthopaedist to perform fluoroscopic views on up to ten times more patients before reaching the annual dose limit of 20 mSv of radiation to the eye recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Personal safety and adherence to limits of occupational radiation exposure should compel orthopaedists to wear leaded glasses for fluoroscopic procedures if other protective barriers are not in use. Leaded glasses are a powerful tool for reducing the orthopaedic surgeon's lens exposure to radiation during acquisition of common intraoperative fluoroscopic views.

  11. Comparison of MR and fluoroscopic mucous fistulography in the pre-operative evaluation of infants with anorectal malformation: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Jose C.G.; Lotz, Jan W.; Pitcher, Richard D. [Stellenbosch University, Division of Radiodiagnosis, Department of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Sidler, Daniel [Stellenbosch University, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2013-08-15

    Anorectal malformations are often associated with rectal pouch fistulas. Surgical correction requires accurate evaluation of the presence and position of such fistulas. Fluoroscopy is currently the chosen modality for the detection of fistulas. The role of MRI is unexplored. To compare the diagnostic accuracy of MR versus fluoroscopic fistulography in the pre-operative evaluation of infants with anorectal malformation. We conducted a pilot study of infants requiring defunctioning colostomy for initial management of anorectal malformation. Dynamic sagittal steady-state free-precession MRI of the pelvis was acquired during introduction of saline into the mucous fistulas. Findings were compared among MR fistulography, fluoroscopic fistulography and intraoperative inspection. Eight children were included. Median age at fistulography was 15 weeks, inter-quartile range 13-20 weeks; all were boys. There was full agreement among MR fistulography, fluoroscopic fistulography and surgical findings. The pilot data suggest that MR fistulography is promising in the pre-operative evaluation of children with anorectal malformation. (orig.)

  12. Initial Experience with Computed Tomography and Fluoroscopically Guided Placement of Push-Type Gastrostomy Tubes Using a Rupture-Free Balloon Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Takeshi; Tanabe, Masahiro; Yamatogi, Shigenari; Shimizu, Kensaku; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement of push-type gastrostomy tubes using a rupture-free balloon (RFB) catheter under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance. A total of 35 patients (23 men and 12 women; age range 57–93 years [mean 71.7]) underwent percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement of a push-type gastrostomy tube using an RFB catheter between April 2005 and July 2008. Technical success, procedure duration, and complications were analyzed. Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement was considered technically successful in all patients. The median procedure time was 39 ± 13 (SD) min (range 24–78). The average follow-up time interval was 103 days (range 7–812). No major complications related to the procedure were encountered. No tubes failed because of blockage, and neither tube dislodgement nor intraperitoneal leakage occurred during the follow-up period. The investigators conclude that percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement with push-type tubes using an RFB catheter is a safe and effective means of gastric feeding when performed by radiologists.

  13. Analysis of repeated measures data

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M Ataharul

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad range of statistical techniques to address emerging needs in the field of repeated measures. It also provides a comprehensive overview of extensions of generalized linear models for the bivariate exponential family of distributions, which represent a new development in analysing repeated measures data. The demand for statistical models for correlated outcomes has grown rapidly recently, mainly due to presence of two types of underlying associations: associations between outcomes, and associations between explanatory variables and outcomes. The book systematically addresses key problems arising in the modelling of repeated measures data, bearing in mind those factors that play a major role in estimating the underlying relationships between covariates and outcome variables for correlated outcome data. In addition, it presents new approaches to addressing current challenges in the field of repeated measures and models based on conditional and joint probabilities. Markov models of first...

  14. Fostering repeat donations in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Ofori, S; Asenso-Mensah, K; Boateng, P; Sarkodie, F; Allain, J-P

    2010-01-01

    Most African countries are challenged in recruiting and retaining voluntary blood donors by cost and other complexities and in establishing and implementing national blood policies. The availability of replacement donors who are a cheaper source of blood has not enhanced repeat voluntary donor initiatives. An overview of activities for recruiting and retaining voluntary blood donors was carried out. Donor records from mobile sessions were reviewed from 2002 to 2008. A total of 71,701 blood donations; 45,515 (63.5%) being voluntary donations with 11,680 (25%) repeat donations were collected during the study period. Donations from schools and colleges contributed a steady 60% of total voluntary whilst radio station blood drives increased contribution from 10 to 27%. Though Muslim population is less than 20%, blood collection was above the 30-donation cost-effectiveness threshold with a repeat donation trend reaching 60%. In contrast Christian worshippers provided donations. Repeat donation trends amongst school donors and radio blood drives were 20% and 70% respectively. Repeat donations rates have been variable amongst different blood donor groups in Kumasi, Ghana. The impact of community leaders in propagating altruism cannot be overemphasized. Programs aiming at motivating replacement donors to be repeat donors should be developed and assessed. Copyright 2009 The International Association for Biologicals. All rights reserved.

  15. Transverse morphology of the sacroiliac joint: effect of angulation and implications for fluoroscopically guided sacroiliac joint injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, B.C.; Lee, J.W.; Man, H.S.J.; Grace, M.G.A.; Lambert, R.G.W.; Jhangri, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    Effects of angulation of computed tomography (CT) reconstruction plane on sacroiliac (SI) joint morphology were studied, and factors influencing the approach to fluoroscopically guided SI joint injection were assessed. CT scans of pelvises were reformatted on 41 subjects, aged 51.7 (±15.1) years. Transverse images were reconstructed at the caudal 3 cm of the SI joint tilting plane of reconstruction from -30 to +30 at 15 increments. Anteroposterior diameter of joint (depth), angle from sagittal plane (orientation angle), and distance from skin were measured. Joint contour was classified, and presence of bone blocking access to the joint was recorded. Comparison between angles were analysed by t-test. Relationships between variables were assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Depth was shorter with angulation in the inferior direction (P<0.01). Orientation angle increased with superior angulation (P<0.01). Distance from skin increased (P<0.01) with angulation in either direction. Joint contour was significantly different from baseline at each angle (P<0.001) but highly variable. Inferior angulation resulted in interposition of ilium between skin and SI joint, and superior angulation caused bone block due to the lower sacrum. None of these features was identified without tilting of the reconstruction plane, and effects were more pronounced with steeper angulation

  16. Transverse morphology of the sacroiliac joint: effect of angulation and implications for fluoroscopically guided sacroiliac joint injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, B.C.; Lee, J.W.; Man, H.S.J.; Grace, M.G.A.; Lambert, R.G.W. [Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton (Canada); Jhangri, G.S. [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton (Canada)

    2006-11-15

    Effects of angulation of computed tomography (CT) reconstruction plane on sacroiliac (SI) joint morphology were studied, and factors influencing the approach to fluoroscopically guided SI joint injection were assessed. CT scans of pelvises were reformatted on 41 subjects, aged 51.7 ({+-}15.1) years. Transverse images were reconstructed at the caudal 3 cm of the SI joint tilting plane of reconstruction from -30 to +30 at 15 increments. Anteroposterior diameter of joint (depth), angle from sagittal plane (orientation angle), and distance from skin were measured. Joint contour was classified, and presence of bone blocking access to the joint was recorded. Comparison between angles were analysed by t-test. Relationships between variables were assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Depth was shorter with angulation in the inferior direction (P<0.01). Orientation angle increased with superior angulation (P<0.01). Distance from skin increased (P<0.01) with angulation in either direction. Joint contour was significantly different from baseline at each angle (P<0.001) but highly variable. Inferior angulation resulted in interposition of ilium between skin and SI joint, and superior angulation caused bone block due to the lower sacrum. None of these features was identified without tilting of the reconstruction plane, and effects were more pronounced with steeper angulation.

  17. Closed reduction and fluoroscopic-assisted percutaneous pinning of 42 physeal fractures in 37 dogs and 4 cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekhout-Ta, Christina L; Kim, Stanley E; Cross, Alan R; Evans, Richard; Pozzi, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    To report complications and clinical outcome of dogs and cats that underwent fluoroscopic-assisted percutaneous pinning (FAPP) of physeal fractures. Retrospective study. Client-owned dogs (n = 37) and cats (n = 4). Records (August 2007-August 2014) of physeal fractures treated with FAPP in 3 hospitals were evaluated. Data collected included signalment, fracture characteristics (etiology, location, duration, Salter-Harris classification, preoperative and postoperative displacement), surgical information (implant size, surgical duration), and outcome assessment information (functional outcome, radiographic outcome, and complications). The majority of animals (92%) were classified as full functional outcome. No significant predictors of functional outcome were identified. The overall complication rate was 15% (n = 6). Elective pin removal rate was 41% (n = 17). Goniometry and limb circumference measurements of the affected and contralateral limbs were not significantly different in dogs for which measurements were obtained. Seventeen of 18 animals (16 dogs, 2 cats) measured had bone length changes on follow-up radiographs. FAPP is associated with an excellent functional outcome in a narrow selection of fracture configurations, specifically those with minimal displacement and for which anatomical alignment can be achieved with closed reduction. © 2016 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  18. Patient dose assessment from fluoroscopic procedures at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyekye, P. K.

    2008-06-01

    Organ and effective dose to ninety (90) patients undergoing myelogram, urethrogram, barium swallow, barium meal and barium enema examinations at the KorIe-Bu Teaching Hospital was estimated using the Monte Carlo Code (PCXMC). Free in air measurements were made with a calibrated ionisation chamber to estimate the entrance surface air kerma for each examination. Evaluation of fluoroscopy beam on time and number of radiographs taken per patient was done for all the examinations considered and studies were done on how they affect patient dose. Dose area product (DAP) was calculated from the entrance surface air kerma and the area of the beam on the surface of the patient and compared with internationally accepted reference levels. Excess relative risk of site specific solid cancer and all solid cancers excluding thyroid and Non-melanoma skin cancers incidences were estimated for the various examinations using Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation VII Committee risk model from the knowledge of the mean effective doses for each examination. The mean effective dose was found to be 0.29 :±: 0.07 mSv for urethrogram, 0.84:±: 0.13 mSv for barium swallow, 3.15 :±: 0.44 mSv for barium meal, 6.24 :±: 0.7 mSv for barium enema and 0.38 :I: 0.05 mSv for myelogram examinations. The estimated mean dose area product (DAP) was found to be 3.55 :±: 0.95 Gycm2 for urethrogram, 16.44:1: 2.60 Gycm2 for barium swallow, 50.81 :±: 7.04 Gycm2 for barium meal, 99.69 :±: 10.85 Gycm2 for barium enema and 9.32 :±: 0.99 Gycm2 for myelogram examinations. The estimated excess relative risk for the occurrence of all solid cancer was found to be 9.5700E-S and 1.6530E-4 for males and females respectively undergoing urethrogram examination, 2.7720E-4 and 4.7880E-4 for males and females respectively undergoing barium swallow examination, 1.0395E-3 and 1.7955E-3 for males and females respectively undergoing barium meal examination, 2.0592E-3 and 3.5568E-3 for males and females respectively

  19. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information.

  20. Learning With Repeated-Game Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Ioannou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2x2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we fi□nd that the strategy with the most occurrences is the Grim-Trigger. In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the Win-Stay, Lose-Shift and Grim-Trigger strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes.

  1. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the carotid artery using 3D time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics. Comparison with real-time fluoroscopic triggered 3D-elliptical centric view ordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Koshikawa, Tokiko; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yasuo; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Ishigaki, Takeo; Ichinose, Nobuyasu

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate contrast-enhanced MR angiography using the 3D time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics technique (3D-TRICKS) by direct comparison with the fluoroscopic triggered 3D-elliptical centric view ordering (3D-ELLIP) technique. 3D-TRICKS and 3D-ELLIP were directly compared on a 1.5-Tesla MR unit using the same spatial resolution and matrix. In 3D-TRICKS, the central part of the k-space is updated more frequently than the peripheral part of the k-space, which is divided in the slice-encoding direction. The carotid arteries were imaged using 3D-TRICKS and 3D-ELLIP sequentially in 14 patients. Temporal resolution was 12 sec for 3D-ELLIP and 6 sec for 3D-TRICKS. The signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the common carotid artery was measured, and the quality of MIP images was then scored in terms of venous overlap and blurring of vessel contours. No significant difference in mean S/N was seen between the two methods. Significant venous overlap was not seen in any of the patients examined. Moderate blurring of vessel contours was noted on 3D-TRICKS in five patients and on 3D-ELLIP in four patients. Blurring in the slice-encoding direction was slightly more pronounced in 3D-TRICKS. However, qualitative analysis scores showed no significant differences. When the spatial resolution of the two methods was identical, the performance of 3D-TRICKS was found to be comparable in static visualization of the carotid arteries with 3D-ELLIP, although blurring in the slice-encoding direction was slightly more pronounced in 3D-TRICKS. 3D-TRICKS is a more robust technique than 3D-ELLIP, because 3D-ELLIP requires operator-dependent fluoroscopic triggering. Furthermore, 3D-TRICKS can achieve higher temporal resolution. For the spatial resolution employed in this study, 3D-TRICKS may be the method of choice. (author)

  2. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Virgil; Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H.; ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2014-02-01

    The Gd5Ge2Si2 alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni50Mn35In15 Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd5Ge2Si2 and Ni50Mn35In15 alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  3. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provenzano, Virgil; Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H.; ElBidweihy, Hatem

    2014-01-01

    The Gd 5 Ge 2 Si 2 alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni 50 Mn 35 In 15 Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd 5 Ge 2 Si 2 and Ni 50 Mn 35 In 15 alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis

  4. Repeatability study of replicate crash tests: A signal analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppi, Jeremy; Toczyski, Jacek; Crandall, Jeff R; Kerrigan, Jason

    2017-10-03

    To provide an objective basis on which to evaluate the repeatability of vehicle crash test methods, a recently developed signal analysis method was used to evaluate correlation of sensor time history data between replicate vehicle crash tests. The goal of this study was to evaluate the repeatability of rollover crash tests performed with the Dynamic Rollover Test System (DRoTS) relative to other vehicle crash test methods. Test data from DRoTS tests, deceleration rollover sled (DRS) tests, frontal crash tests, frontal offset crash tests, small overlap crash tests, small overlap impact (SOI) crash tests, and oblique crash tests were obtained from the literature and publicly available databases (the NHTSA vehicle database and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety TechData) to examine crash test repeatability. Signal analysis of the DRoTS tests showed that force and deformation time histories had good to excellent repeatability, whereas vehicle kinematics showed only fair repeatability due to the vehicle mounting method for one pair of tests and slightly dissimilar mass properties (2.2%) in a second pair of tests. Relative to the DRS, the DRoTS tests showed very similar or higher levels of repeatability in nearly all vehicle kinematic data signals with the exception of global X' (road direction of travel) velocity and displacement due to the functionality of the DRoTS fixture. Based on the average overall scoring metric of the dominant acceleration, DRoTS was found to be as repeatable as all other crash tests analyzed. Vertical force measures showed good repeatability and were on par with frontal crash barrier forces. Dynamic deformation measures showed good to excellent repeatability as opposed to poor repeatability seen in SOI and oblique deformation measures. Using the signal analysis method as outlined in this article, the DRoTS was shown to have the same or better repeatability of crash test methods used in government regulatory and consumer evaluation test

  5. Real-time fluoroscopic needle guidance in the interventional radiology suite using navigational software for percutaneous bone biopsies in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shellikeri, Sphoorti; Srinivasan, Abhay; Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Vatsky, Seth; Zhu, Xiaowei; Keller, Marc S.; Cahill, Anne Marie [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Setser, Randolph M. [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Hoffman Estates, IL (United States); Hwang, Tiffany J. [University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Girard, Erin [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Navigational software provides real-time fluoroscopic needle guidance for percutaneous procedures in the Interventional Radiology (IR) suite. We describe our experience with navigational software for pediatric percutaneous bone biopsies in the IR suite and compare technical success, diagnostic accuracy, radiation dose and procedure time with that of CT-guided biopsies. Pediatric bone biopsies performed using navigational software (Syngo iGuide, Siemens Healthcare) from 2011 to 2016 were prospectively included and anatomically matched CT-guided bone biopsies from 2008 to 2016 were retrospectively reviewed with institutional review board approval. C-arm CT protocols used for navigational software-assisted cases included institution-developed low-dose (0.1/0.17 μGy/projection), regular-dose (0.36 μGy/projection), or a combination of low-dose/regular-dose protocols. Estimated effective radiation dose and procedure times were compared between software-assisted and CT-guided biopsies. Twenty-six patients (15 male; mean age: 10 years) underwent software-assisted biopsies (15 pelvic, 7 lumbar and 4 lower extremity) and 33 patients (13 male; mean age: 9 years) underwent CT-guided biopsies (22 pelvic, 7 lumbar and 4 lower extremity). Both modality biopsies resulted in a 100% technical success rate. Twenty-five of 26 (96%) software-assisted and 29/33 (88%) CT-guided biopsies were diagnostic. Overall, the effective radiation dose was significantly lower in software-assisted than CT-guided cases (3.0±3.4 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.02). The effective dose difference was most dramatic in software-assisted cases using low-dose C-arm CT (1.2±1.8 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.001) or combined low-dose/regular-dose C-arm CT (1.9±2.4 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.04), whereas effective dose was comparable in software-assisted cases using regular-dose C-arm CT (6.0±3.5 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.7). Mean procedure time was significantly lower for software-assisted cases (91±54 vs. 141±68 min, P=0

  6. TH-E-209-01: Fluoroscopic Dose Monitoring and Patient Follow-Up Program at Massachusetts General Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation dose monitoring solutions have opened up new opportunities for medical physicists to be more involved in modern clinical radiology practices. In particular, with the help of comprehensive radiation dose data, data-driven protocol management and informed case follow up are now feasible. Significant challenges remain however and the problems faced by medical physicists are highly heterogeneous. Imaging systems from multiple vendors and a wide range of vintages co-exist in the same department and employ data communication protocols that are not fully standardized or implemented making harmonization complex. Many different solutions for radiation dose monitoring have been implemented by imaging facilities over the past few years. Such systems are based on commercial software, home-grown IT solutions, manual PACS data dumping, etc., and diverse pathways can be used to bring the data to impact clinical practice. The speakers will share their experiences with creating or tailoring radiation dose monitoring/management systems and procedures over the past few years, which vary significantly in design and scope. Topics to cover: (1) fluoroscopic dose monitoring and high radiation event handling from a large academic hospital; (2) dose monitoring and protocol optimization in pediatric radiology; and (3) development of a home-grown IT solution and dose data analysis framework. Learning Objectives: Describe the scope and range of radiation dose monitoring and protocol management in a modern radiology practice Review examples of data available from a variety of systems and how it managed and conveyed. Reflect on the role of the physicist in radiation dose awareness.

  7. Training Distal Locking Screw Insertion Skills to Novice Trainees: A Comparison Between Fluoroscopic- and Electromagnetic-Guided Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Timothy; Khoshbin, Amir; Nousiainen, Markku T

    2015-10-01

    To compare the effect fluoroscopy or electromagnetic (EM) guidance has on the learning of locking screw insertion in tibial nails in surgical novices. A randomized, prospective, controlled trial was conducted involving 18 surgical trainees with no prior experience inserting locking screws in intramedullary nails. After a training session using fluoroscopy, participants underwent a pretest using fluoroscopic guidance. Participants were then randomized into either the fluoroscopy or EM group and were further trained using their respective technique. Post, retention, and transfer tests were conducted. Outcomes included task completion, drill attempts, screw changes, and radiation time. Intragroup comparisons revealed that the EM group used significantly less drill attempts during the post and retention tests compared with the pretest (P = 0.016 and P = 0.016, respectively). Intergroup comparisons revealed that the EM group was (1) more likely to complete the task during the retention test (P = 0.043) and (2) had significantly less radiation time during the post and retention tests (P = 0.002 and P = 0.003, respectively). Radiation time in the EM group during the transfer test increased to a level equal to what the fluoroscopy group used during the post and retention tests (P = 0.71 and P = 0.92, respectively). No other significant between-group differences occurred. EM guidance may be safely used to assist in the training of surgical novices in the skill of distal locking screw insertion. Not only does this technology significantly improve the ability to complete the task and decrease radiation use but also it does so without compromising skill acquisition. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  8. Shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography needle placement using fluoroscopic guidance: practice patterns of musculoskeletal radiologists in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortt, Conor P.; Morrison, William B.; Deely, Diane M.; Gopez, Angela G.; Zoga, Adam C.; Roberts, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the range of techniques used by radiologists performing shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography using fluoroscopic guidance. Questionnaires on shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography were distributed to radiologists at a national radiology meeting. We enquired regarding years of experience, preferred approaches, needle gauge, gadolinium dilution, and volume injected. For each approach, the radiologist was asked their starting and end needle position based on a numbered and lettered grid superimposed on a radiograph. Sixty-eight questionnaires were returned. Sixty-eight radiologists performed shoulder and hip arthrography, and 65 performed knee arthrograms. Mean experience was 13.5 and 12.8 years, respectively. For magnetic resonance arthrography, a gadolinium dilution of 1/200 was used by 69-71%. For shoulder arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 65/68 (96%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and posterior approaches, was immediately lateral to the humeral cortex. A 22-gauge needle was used by 46/66 (70%). Mean injected volume was 12.7 ml (5-30). For hip arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 51/68 (75%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and lateral approaches, was along the lateral femoral head/neck junction. A 22-gauge needle was used by 53/68 (78%). Mean injected volume was 11.5 ml (5-20). For knee arthrography, a lateral approach was preferred by 41/64 (64%). The most common site of needle end position, for lateral and medial approaches, was mid-patellofemoral joint level. A 22-gauge needle was used by 36/65 (56%). Mean injected volume was 28.2 ml (5-60). Arthrographic approaches for the shoulder, hip, and knee vary among radiologists over a wide range of experience levels. (orig.)

  9. Shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography needle placement using fluoroscopic guidance: practice patterns of musculoskeletal radiologists in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shortt, Conor P. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Morrison, William B.; Deely, Diane M.; Gopez, Angela G.; Zoga, Adam C. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Roberts, Catherine C. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2009-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the range of techniques used by radiologists performing shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography using fluoroscopic guidance. Questionnaires on shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography were distributed to radiologists at a national radiology meeting. We enquired regarding years of experience, preferred approaches, needle gauge, gadolinium dilution, and volume injected. For each approach, the radiologist was asked their starting and end needle position based on a numbered and lettered grid superimposed on a radiograph. Sixty-eight questionnaires were returned. Sixty-eight radiologists performed shoulder and hip arthrography, and 65 performed knee arthrograms. Mean experience was 13.5 and 12.8 years, respectively. For magnetic resonance arthrography, a gadolinium dilution of 1/200 was used by 69-71%. For shoulder arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 65/68 (96%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and posterior approaches, was immediately lateral to the humeral cortex. A 22-gauge needle was used by 46/66 (70%). Mean injected volume was 12.7 ml (5-30). For hip arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 51/68 (75%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and lateral approaches, was along the lateral femoral head/neck junction. A 22-gauge needle was used by 53/68 (78%). Mean injected volume was 11.5 ml (5-20). For knee arthrography, a lateral approach was preferred by 41/64 (64%). The most common site of needle end position, for lateral and medial approaches, was mid-patellofemoral joint level. A 22-gauge needle was used by 36/65 (56%). Mean injected volume was 28.2 ml (5-60). Arthrographic approaches for the shoulder, hip, and knee vary among radiologists over a wide range of experience levels. (orig.)

  10. Detection of organ movement in cervix cancer patients using a fluoroscopic electronic portal imaging device and radiopaque markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaatee, Robert S.J.P.; Olofsen, Manouk J.J.; Verstraate, Marjolein B.J.; Quint, Sandra; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a fluoroscopic electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and radiopaque markers to detect internal cervix movement. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients with radiopaque markers clamped to the cervix, electronic portal images were made during external beam irradiation. Bony structures and markers in the portal images were registered with the same structures in the corresponding digitally reconstructed radiographs of the planning computed tomogram. Results: The visibility of the markers in the portal images was good, but their fixation should be improved. Generally, the correlation between bony structure displacements and marker movement was poor, the latter being substantially larger. The standard deviations describing the systematic and random bony anatomy displacements were 1.2 and 2.6 mm, 1.7 and 2.9 mm, and 1.6 and 2.7 mm in the lateral, cranial-caudal, and dorsal-ventral directions, respectively. For the marker movement those values were 3.4 and 3.4 mm, 4.3 and 5.2 mm, 3.2 and 5.2 mm, respectively. Estimated clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-PTV) planning margins (∼11 mm) based on the observed overall marker displacements (bony anatomy + internal cervix movement) are only marginally larger than the margins required to account for internal marker movement alone. Conclusions: With our current patient setup techniques and methods of setup verification and correction, the required CTV-PTV margins are almost fully determined by internal organ motion. Setup verification and correction using radiopaque markers might allow decreasing those margins, but technical improvements are needed

  11. TH-E-209-01: Fluoroscopic Dose Monitoring and Patient Follow-Up Program at Massachusetts General Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B. [Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Radiation dose monitoring solutions have opened up new opportunities for medical physicists to be more involved in modern clinical radiology practices. In particular, with the help of comprehensive radiation dose data, data-driven protocol management and informed case follow up are now feasible. Significant challenges remain however and the problems faced by medical physicists are highly heterogeneous. Imaging systems from multiple vendors and a wide range of vintages co-exist in the same department and employ data communication protocols that are not fully standardized or implemented making harmonization complex. Many different solutions for radiation dose monitoring have been implemented by imaging facilities over the past few years. Such systems are based on commercial software, home-grown IT solutions, manual PACS data dumping, etc., and diverse pathways can be used to bring the data to impact clinical practice. The speakers will share their experiences with creating or tailoring radiation dose monitoring/management systems and procedures over the past few years, which vary significantly in design and scope. Topics to cover: (1) fluoroscopic dose monitoring and high radiation event handling from a large academic hospital; (2) dose monitoring and protocol optimization in pediatric radiology; and (3) development of a home-grown IT solution and dose data analysis framework. Learning Objectives: Describe the scope and range of radiation dose monitoring and protocol management in a modern radiology practice Review examples of data available from a variety of systems and how it managed and conveyed. Reflect on the role of the physicist in radiation dose awareness.

  12. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-01: A System for Automatically Calculating Organ and Effective Dose for Fluoroscopically-Guided Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Z; Vijayan, S; Rana, V; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A system was developed that automatically calculates the organ and effective dose for individual fluoroscopically-guided procedures using a log of the clinical exposure parameters. Methods: We have previously developed a dose tracking system (DTS) to provide a real-time color-coded 3D- mapping of skin dose. This software produces a log file of all geometry and exposure parameters for every x-ray pulse during a procedure. The data in the log files is input into PCXMC, a Monte Carlo program that calculates organ and effective dose for projections and exposure parameters set by the user. We developed a MATLAB program to read data from the log files produced by the DTS and to automatically generate the definition files in the format used by PCXMC. The processing is done at the end of a procedure after all exposures are completed. Since there are thousands of exposure pulses with various parameters for fluoroscopy, DA and DSA and at various projections, the data for exposures with similar parameters is grouped prior to entry into PCXMC to reduce the number of Monte Carlo calculations that need to be performed. Results: The software developed automatically transfers data from the DTS log file to PCXMC and runs the program for each grouping of exposure pulses. When the dose from all exposure events are calculated, the doses for each organ and all effective doses are summed to obtain procedure totals. For a complicated interventional procedure, the calculations can be completed on a PC without manual intervention in less than 30 minutes depending on the level of data grouping. Conclusion: This system allows organ dose to be calculated for individual procedures for every patient without tedious calculations or data entry so that estimates of stochastic risk can be obtained in addition to the deterministic risk estimate provided by the DTS. Partial support from NIH grant R01EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.

  13. Coordination in continuously repeated games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeren, A.J.T.M.; Schumacher, J.M.; Engwerda, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we propose a model to describe the effectiveness of coordination in a continuously repeated two-player game. We study how the choice of a decision rule by a coordinator affects the strategic behavior of the players, resulting in more or less cooperation. Our model requires the analysis

  14. Repeated checking causes memory distrust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hout, M.; Kindt, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper attempts to explain why in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) checkers distrust in memory persists despite extensive checking. It is argued that: (1) repeated checking increases familiarity with the issues checked; (2) increased familiarity promotes conceptual processing which inhibits

  15. Endoscopy dose examinations at the Sao Paulo University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldred, M.A.; Siqueira P, W.; Fonseca F, A.M. da; Nucci, J.R.; Yoshimura, E. M.; Okuno, E.

    1996-01-01

    During some specific endoscopic examinations, radiographic and fluoroscopic images of patients are taken with the medical staff near to them. To evaluate the equivalent and effective doses in these occupational exposures, simulated examinations have been performed, using an anthropomorphic phantom in place of one of the members of the staff. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were attached in various positions of the phantom in order to determine some organ doses. From the comparison between the experimentally determined doses the International and the Brazilian recommended occupational dose limits, the maximum number of examinations that any member of the staff can perform, was calculated. If a protective apron is used, this number is limited by the high equivalent dose to the eye lens (average of 1.67 mSv/examination) of the staff's member. (authors). 3 refs., 4 tabs

  16. Contemporary Australian dose area product levels in the fluoroscopic investigation of paediatric congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.; Brennan, P.C.; Mello-Thoms, C.; Ryan, E.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines radiation dose levels delivered to children from birth to 15 y of age in the investigation of congenital heart disease (CHD) at a major Sydney children's hospital. The aims are to compare values with those derived from similar studies, to provide a template for more consistent dose reporting, to establish local and national diagnostic reference levels and to contribute to the worldwide paediatric dosimetry database. A retrospective review of 1007 paediatric procedural records was undertaken. The cohort consisted of 795 patients over a period from January 2007 to December 2012 who have undergone cardiac catheterisation for the investigation of CHD. The age range included was from the day of birth to 15 y. Archived dose area product (DAP) and fluoroscopy time (FT) readings were retrieved and analysed. The mean, median, 25. and 75. percentile DAP levels were calculated for six specific age groupings. The 75. percentile DAP values for the specific age categories were as follows: 0-30 d-1.9 Gy cm 2 , 1-12 months-2.9 Gy cm 2 , 1-3 y-5.3 Gy cm 2 , 3-5 y-6.2 Gy cm 2 , 5-10 y-7.5 Gy cm 2 and 10-15 y-17.3 Gy cm 2 . These levels were found to be lower than the values reported in comparable overseas studies. Individual year-specific levels were determined, and it is proposed that these are more useful than the common grouping method. The age-specific 75. percentile DAP levels outlined in this study can be used as baseline local diagnostic reference levels. The needs for the standardisation of DAP reporting and for a greater range of age-specific diagnostic reference levels have been highlighted. For the first time, Australian dose values for paediatric cardiac catheterisation are presented. (authors)

  17. Influence of Flat-Panel Fluoroscopic Equipment Variables on Cardiac Radiation Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickoloff, Edward L.; Lu Zhengfeng; Dutta, Ajoy; So, James; Balter, Stephen; Moses, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the influence of physician-selectable equipment variables on the potential radiation dose reductions during cardiac catheterization examinations using modern imaging equipment. Materials. A modern bi-plane angiography unit with flat-panel image receptors was used. Patients were simulated with 15-30 cm of acrylic plastic. The variables studied were: patient thickness, fluoroscopy pulse rates, record mode frame rates, image receptor field-of-view (FoV), automatic dose control (ADC) mode, SID/SSD geometry setting, automatic collimation, automatic positioning, and others. Results. Patient radiation doses double for every additional 3.5-4.5 cm of soft tissue. The dose is directly related to the imaging frame rate; a decrease from 30 pps to 15 pps reduces the dose by about 50%. The dose is related to [(FoV) -N ] where 2.0 < N < 3.0. Suboptimal positioning of the patient can nearly double the dose. The ADC system provides three selections that can vary the radiation level by 50%. For pediatric studies (2-5 years old), the selection of equipment variables can result in entrance radiation doses that range between 6 and 60 cGy for diagnostic cases and between 15 and 140 cGy for interventional cases. For adult studies, the equipment variables can produce entrance radiation doses that range between 13 and 130 cGy for diagnostic cases and between 30 and 400 cGy for interventional cases. Conclusions. Overall dose reductions of 70-90% can be achieved with pediatric patients and about 90% with adult patients solely through optimal selection of equipment variables

  18. The effectiveness of eye-closure in repeated interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredeveldt, A.; Baddeley, A.D.; Hitch, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Closing the eyes during recall can help witnesses remember more about a witnessed event. This study examined the effectiveness of eye-closure in a repeated recall paradigm with immediate free recall followed 1 week later by both free and cued recall. We examined whether eye-closure was more

  19. Implementation of a competency check-off in diagnostic fluoroscopy for radiology trainees: impact on reducing radiation for three common fluoroscopic exams in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Sweta [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Desouches, Stephane L. [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Lowe, Lisa H.; Kasraie, Nima; Reading, Brenton [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2014-07-24

    Fluoroscopy is an important tool for diagnosis in the pediatric population, but it carries the risk of radiation exposure. Because radiology resident education and experience in the use of fluoroscopy equipment in children vary, we implemented an intervention to standardize fluoroscopy training. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of implementing a fluoroscopy competency check-off for radiology resident trainees aimed at decreasing radiation exposure in three common pediatric fluoroscopic studies. A fluoroscopy competency check-off form was developed for radiology resident trainees performing pediatric procedures. Techniques used to limit radiation exposure for common pediatric radiologic studies were reviewed as part of the check-off process. Pediatric radiologists supervised each trainee until they demonstrated competence to independently perform three specified procedures. Radiation dose was recorded for the three procedures, upper GI (UGI), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and oropharyngeal (OPM) exams, over 6 months preceding and 6 months following implementation of the competency check-off. The mean cumulative dose for each procedure was compared before and after implementation of competency check-off using a Kruskal-Wallis test. During the 12-month study period doses from 909 fluoroscopic procedures were recorded. In the 6 months preceding competency check-off implementation, procedures were performed by 24 radiology resident trainees including 171 UGI, 176 VCUG and 171 OPM exams. In the 6 months following competency check-off, 23 trainees performed 114 UGI, 145 VCUG and 132 OPM exams. After competency check-off implementation, a statistically significant reduction in average radiation dose was found for all three studies (P < 0.001). Median cumulative doses (mGy) were decreased by 33%, 36% and 13% for UGIs, VCUGs and OPMs, respectively. Implementation of a competency check-off for radiology resident trainees can reduce average radiation

  20. Implementation of a competency check-off in diagnostic fluoroscopy for radiology trainees: impact on reducing radiation for three common fluoroscopic exams in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Sweta; Desouches, Stephane L.; Lowe, Lisa H.; Kasraie, Nima; Reading, Brenton

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroscopy is an important tool for diagnosis in the pediatric population, but it carries the risk of radiation exposure. Because radiology resident education and experience in the use of fluoroscopy equipment in children vary, we implemented an intervention to standardize fluoroscopy training. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of implementing a fluoroscopy competency check-off for radiology resident trainees aimed at decreasing radiation exposure in three common pediatric fluoroscopic studies. A fluoroscopy competency check-off form was developed for radiology resident trainees performing pediatric procedures. Techniques used to limit radiation exposure for common pediatric radiologic studies were reviewed as part of the check-off process. Pediatric radiologists supervised each trainee until they demonstrated competence to independently perform three specified procedures. Radiation dose was recorded for the three procedures, upper GI (UGI), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and oropharyngeal (OPM) exams, over 6 months preceding and 6 months following implementation of the competency check-off. The mean cumulative dose for each procedure was compared before and after implementation of competency check-off using a Kruskal-Wallis test. During the 12-month study period doses from 909 fluoroscopic procedures were recorded. In the 6 months preceding competency check-off implementation, procedures were performed by 24 radiology resident trainees including 171 UGI, 176 VCUG and 171 OPM exams. In the 6 months following competency check-off, 23 trainees performed 114 UGI, 145 VCUG and 132 OPM exams. After competency check-off implementation, a statistically significant reduction in average radiation dose was found for all three studies (P < 0.001). Median cumulative doses (mGy) were decreased by 33%, 36% and 13% for UGIs, VCUGs and OPMs, respectively. Implementation of a competency check-off for radiology resident trainees can reduce average radiation

  1. Fluoroscopically guided placement of self-expandable metallic stents and stent-grafts in the treatment of acute malignant colorectal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Honsoul; Kim, Seung Hyoung; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Kwang-Hun; Won, Jong Yoon; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Jong Tae

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical effectiveness of fluoroscopically guided placement of self-expandable metallic stents and stent-grafts for acute malignant colorectal obstruction. Radiologic images and clinical reports of 42 patients (22 men, 20 women; age range, 28-93 years; median age, 65.5 years) who underwent fluoroscopically guided colorectal stent insertion without endoscopic assistance for acute malignant obstruction were reviewed retrospectively. Eighteen patients received bare stents as a bridge to surgery. Twenty-four patients received 27 insertions of either a bare stent (n = 15) or a stent-graft (n = 12) for palliation. The obstruction was located in the rectum (n = 8), sigmoid (n = 17), descending colon (n = 8), splenic flexure (n = 3), and transverse colon (n = 6). Clinical success, defined as more than 50% dilatation of the stent with subsequent symptomatic improvement, was achieved in 41 of the 42 patients (98%). No major procedure-related complications occurred. Minor complications occurred in eight of the 45 procedures (18%). No perioperative mortalities occurred within 1 month after surgery. In the palliative group, the median stent patency was 62 days (range, 0-1,014 days). There was no statistically significant difference in stent patency between the bare stents (range, 0-855 days; median, 68 days) and stent-grafts (range, 1-1,014 days; median, 81 days). Fluoroscopically guided placement of self-expandable metallic stents and stent-grafts for the relief of acute malignant colorectal obstruction was technically feasible without endoscopic assistance-even in lesions proximal to the splenic flexure and transverse colon-and clinically effective in both bridge to surgery and palliative management.

  2. SU-E-I-42: Normalized Embryo/fetus Doses for Fluoroscopically Guided Pacemaker Implantation Procedures Calculated Using a Monte Carlo Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damilakis, J; Stratakis, J; Solomou, G [University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well known that pacemaker implantation is sometimes needed in pregnant patients with symptomatic bradycardia. To our knowledge, there is no reported experience regarding radiation doses to the unborn child resulting from fluoroscopy during pacemaker implantation. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for estimating embryo/fetus dose from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all trimesters of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study. Three mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing the average pregnant patient at the first, second and third trimesters of gestation were generated using Bodybuilder software (White Rock science, White Rock, NM). The normalized embryo/fetus dose from the posteroanterior (PA), the 30° left-anterior oblique (LAO) and the 30° right-anterior oblique (RAO) projections were calculated for a wide range of kVp (50–120 kVp) and total filtration values (2.5–9.0 mm Al). Results: The results consist of radiation doses normalized to a) entrance skin dose (ESD) and b) dose area product (DAP) so that the dose to the unborn child from any fluoroscopic technique and x-ray device used can be calculated. ESD normalized doses ranged from 0.008 (PA, first trimester) to 2.519 μGy/mGy (RAO, third trimester). DAP normalized doses ranged from 0.051 (PA, first trimester) to 12.852 μGy/Gycm2 (RAO, third trimester). Conclusion: Embryo/fetus doses from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be estimated using the method developed in this study. This study was supported by the Greek Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, General Secretariat for Research and Technology, Operational Program ‘Education and Lifelong Learning’, ARISTIA (Research project: CONCERT)

  3. SU-E-I-42: Normalized Embryo/fetus Doses for Fluoroscopically Guided Pacemaker Implantation Procedures Calculated Using a Monte Carlo Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damilakis, J; Stratakis, J; Solomou, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is well known that pacemaker implantation is sometimes needed in pregnant patients with symptomatic bradycardia. To our knowledge, there is no reported experience regarding radiation doses to the unborn child resulting from fluoroscopy during pacemaker implantation. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for estimating embryo/fetus dose from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all trimesters of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study. Three mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing the average pregnant patient at the first, second and third trimesters of gestation were generated using Bodybuilder software (White Rock science, White Rock, NM). The normalized embryo/fetus dose from the posteroanterior (PA), the 30° left-anterior oblique (LAO) and the 30° right-anterior oblique (RAO) projections were calculated for a wide range of kVp (50–120 kVp) and total filtration values (2.5–9.0 mm Al). Results: The results consist of radiation doses normalized to a) entrance skin dose (ESD) and b) dose area product (DAP) so that the dose to the unborn child from any fluoroscopic technique and x-ray device used can be calculated. ESD normalized doses ranged from 0.008 (PA, first trimester) to 2.519 μGy/mGy (RAO, third trimester). DAP normalized doses ranged from 0.051 (PA, first trimester) to 12.852 μGy/Gycm2 (RAO, third trimester). Conclusion: Embryo/fetus doses from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be estimated using the method developed in this study. This study was supported by the Greek Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, General Secretariat for Research and Technology, Operational Program ‘Education and Lifelong Learning’, ARISTIA (Research project: CONCERT)

  4. Quantification of the gravity-dependent change in the C-arm image center for image compensation in fluoroscopic spinal neuronavigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, S; Abbasi, H R; Chin, S; Steinberg, G; Shahidi, R

    2001-01-01

    In the quest to develop a viable, frameless spinal navigation system, many researchers are utilizing the C-arm fluoroscope. However, there is a significant problem with the C-arm that must be quantified: the gravity-dependent sag effect resulting from the geometry of the C-arm and aggravated by the inequity of weight at each end of the C-arm. This study quantified the C-arm sag effect, giving researchers the protocol and data needed to develop a program that accounts for this distortion. The development of spinal navigation algorithms that account for the C-arm sag effect should produce a more accurate spinal navigation system.

  5. ESTIMATION OF THE CONVERSION COEFFICIENTS FROM DOSE-AREA PRODUCT TO EFFECTIVE DOSE FOR BARIUM MEAL EXAMINATIONS FOR ADULT PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vodovatov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroscopic examinations of the upper gastro-intestinal tract and, especially, barium meal examinations, are commonly performed in a majority of hospitals. These examinations are associated both with substantial individual patient doses and contribution to the collective dose from medical exposure. Effective dose estimation for this type of examinations is complicated due to: 1 the necessity to simulate the moving X-ray irradiation field; 2 differences in study structure for the individual patients; 3 subjectivity of the operators; and 4 differences in the X-ray equipment. The aim of the current study was to estimate conversion coefficients from dose-area product to effective dose for barium meal examinations for the over couch and under couch exposure conditions. The study was based on data collected in the X-ray unit of the surgical department of the St-Petersburg Mariinsky hospital. A model of patient exposure during barium meal examination was developed based on the collected data on fluoroscopy protocols and adult patient irradiation geometry. Conversion coefficients were calculated using PCXMC 2.0 software. Complete examinations were converted into a set of typical fluoroscopy phases and X-ray images, specified by the examined anatomical region and the projection of patient exposure. Conversion coefficients from dose-area product to effective dose were calculated for each phase of the examination and for the complete examination. The resulting values of the conversion coefficients are comparable with published data. Variations in the absolute values of the conversion coefficients can be explained by differences in clinical protocols, models for the estimation of the effective dose and parameters of barium meal examinations. The proposed approach for estimation of effective dose considers such important features of fluoroscopic examinations as: 1 non-uniform structure of examination, 2 significant movement of the X-ray tube within a single

  6. Online learning in repeated auctions

    OpenAIRE

    Weed, Jonathan; Perchet, Vianney; Rigollet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by online advertising auctions, we consider repeated Vickrey auctions where goods of unknown value are sold sequentially and bidders only learn (potentially noisy) information about a good's value once it is purchased. We adopt an online learning approach with bandit feedback to model this problem and derive bidding strategies for two models: stochastic and adversarial. In the stochastic model, the observed values of the goods are random variables centered around the true value of t...

  7. A repeating fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  8. Risk of whole body radiation exposure and protective measures in fluoroscopically guided interventional techniques: a prospective evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Jose

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoroscopic guidance is frequently utilized in interventional pain management. The major purpose of fluoroscopy is correct needle placement to ensure target specificity and accurate delivery of the injectate. Radiation exposure may be associated with risks to physician, patient and personnel. While there have been many studies evaluating the risk of radiation exposure and techniques to reduce this risk in the upper part of the body, the literature is scant in evaluating the risk of radiation exposure in the lower part of the body. Methods Radiation exposure risk to the physician was evaluated in 1156 patients undergoing interventional procedures under fluoroscopy by 3 physicians. Monitoring of scattered radiation exposure in the upper and lower body, inside and outside the lead apron was carried out. Results The average exposure per procedure was 12.0 ± 9.8 seconds, 9.0 ± 0.37 seconds, and 7.5 ± 1.27 seconds in Groups I, II, and III respectively. Scatter radiation exposure ranged from a low of 3.7 ± 0.29 seconds for caudal/interlaminar epidurals to 61.0 ± 9.0 seconds for discography. Inside the apron, over the thyroid collar on the neck, the scatter radiation exposure was 68 mREM in Group I consisting of 201 patients who had a total of 330 procedures with an average of 0.2060 mREM per procedure and 25 mREM in Group II consisting of 446 patients who had a total of 662 procedures with average of 0.0378 mREM per procedure. The scatter radiation exposure was 0 mREM in Group III consisting of 509 patients who had a total 827 procedures. Increased levels of exposures were observed in Groups I and II compared to Group III, and Group I compared to Group II. Groin exposure showed 0 mREM exposure in Groups I and II and 15 mREM in Group III. Scatter radiation exposure for groin outside the apron in Group I was 1260 mREM and per procedure was 3.8182 mREM. In Group II the scatter radiation exposure was 400 mREM and with 0.6042 m

  9. Two cases of radiodermatitis following repeated PTCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayami, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is the most important procedure for the treatment of ischemic cardiac diseases. Under fluoroscopic imaging, the equipment is guided into coronary arteries via femoral artery. Excessive dosis of X-rays, in rare cases, may be irradiated to the patients during this complicated procedure. Recently I have observed 2 patients who developed radiodermatitis following multiple PTCAs on the location of the tube. Sixty-four and 63-year-old patients, both males, have been suffered from severe ulcerative radiodermatitis after being exposed to PTCAs 5 and 8 times, respectively. Two published literatures of the radiodermatitis caused by PTCA were previously reported from Israel and France. However, to the best of my knowledge, no report on the above injury has ever been seen in our country. (author)

  10. Fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injection for management of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: short-term and long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Myung, Jae Sung; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-do (Korea); Park, Kun Woo; Yeom, Jin S. [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-do (Korea); Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-do (Korea)

    2010-07-15

    To evaluate the short-term and long-term effects of fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injection (ESI) for the management of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) and to analyze outcome predictors. All patients who underwent caudal ESI in 2006 for DLSS were included in the study. Response was based on chart documentation (aggravated, no change, slightly improved, much improved, no pain). In June 2009 telephone interviews were conducted, using formatted questions including the North American Spine Society (NASS) patient satisfaction scale. For short-term and long-term effects, age difference was evaluated by the Mann-Whitney U test, and gender, duration of symptoms, level of DLSS, spondylolisthesis, and previous operations were evaluated by Fisher's exact test. Two hundred and sixteen patients (male: female = 75:141; mean age 69.2 years; range 48{proportional_to}91 years) were included in the study. Improvements (slightly improved, much improved, no pain) were seen in 185 patients (85.6%) after an initial caudal ESI and in 189 patients (87.5%) after a series of caudal ESIs. Half of the patients (89/179, 49.8%) replied positively to the NASS patient satisfaction scale (1 or 2). There were no significant outcome predictors for either the short-term or the long-term responses. Fluoroscopically guided caudal ESI was effective for the management of DLSS (especially central canal stenosis) with excellent short-term and good long-term results, without significant outcome predictors. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of occupational radiation dose rate during fluoroscopically guided procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandblom, V; Almén, A; Cederblad, A.; Båth, M; Lundh, C; Mai, T; Rystedt, H

    2013-01-01

    Optimisation of radiological protection for operators working with fluoroscopically guided procedures has to be performed during the procedure, under varying and difficult conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate on optimisation of occupational radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided procedures. Individual radiation dose measurements, using a system for real-time visualisation, were performed in a cardiology laboratory for three cardiologists and ten assisting nurses. Radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were not displayed to the staff were compared to radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were displayed. When the radiation dose rates were displayed to the staff, one cardiologist and the assisting nurses (as a group) significantly reduced their personal radiation doses. The median radiation dose (H p (10)) per procedure decreased from 68 to 28 μSv (p = 0.003) for this cardiologist and from 4.3 to 2.5 μSv (p = 0.001) for the assisting nurses. The results of the present study indicate that a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate may have a positive impact on optimisation of occupational radiological protection. In particular, this may affect the behaviour of staff members practising inadequate personal radiological protection. (paper)

  12. Supplementation of bone marrow aspirate-derived platelet-rich plasma for treating radiation-induced ulcer after cardiac fluoroscopic procedures: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Nishimoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The frequency of encountering radiodermatitis caused by X-ray fluoroscopic procedures for ischaemic heart disease is increasing. In severe cases, devastating ulcers with pain, for which conservative therapy is ineffective, emerge. Radiation-induced ulcers are notorious for being difficult to treat. Simple skin grafting often fails because of the poor state of the wound bed. A vascularized flap is a very good option. However, the non-adherence of the well-vascularized flap with the irradiated wound bed is frequently experienced. Aim: To ameliorate the irradiated wound bed, bone marrow-derived platelet-rich plasma (bm-PRP was delivered during the surgery. Materials and Methods: Four patients with severe cutaneous radiation injury accompanied by unbearable pain after multiple fluoroscopic procedures for ischaemic heart disease were treated. Wide excision of the lesion and coverage with a skin flap supplemented with bm-PRP injection was performed. Results: All patients obtained wound closure and were relieved from pain. No complication concerning the bone marrow aspiration and delivery of bm-PRP was observed. Conclusions: Supplementation of bm-PRP can be an option without major complications, time, and cost to improve the surgical outcome for irradiated wounds.

  13. Fluoroscopic removal of retrievable self-expandable metal stents in patients with malignant oesophageal strictures: Experience with a non-endoscopic removal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Song, Ho-Young; Park, Jung-Hoon; Zhou, Wei-Zhong; Na, Han Kyu; Cho, Young Chul; Jun, Eun Jung; Kim, Jun Ki; Kim, Guk Bae

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes of fluoroscopic removal of retrievable self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) for malignant oesophageal strictures, to compare clinical outcomes of three different removal techniques, and to identify predictive factors of successful removal by the standard technique (primary technical success). A total of 137 stents were removed from 128 patients with malignant oesophageal strictures. Primary overall technical success and removal-related complications were evaluated. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify predictive factors of primary technical success. Primary technical success rate was 78.8 % (108/137). Complications occurred in six (4.4 %) cases. Stent location in the upper oesophagus (P=0.004), stricture length over 8 cm (P=0.030), and proximal granulation tissue (Pstent location in the upper oesophagus, and stricture length over 8 cm were negative predictive factors for primary technical success by standard extraction and may require a modified removal technique. • Fluoroscopic retrievable SEMS removal is safe and effective. • Standard removal technique by traction is effective in the majority of patients. • Three negative predictive factors of primary technical success were identified. • Caution should be exercised during the removal in those situations. • Eversion technique is effective in cases of proximal granulation tissue.

  14. The effect of repeated testing vs repeated practice on skills learning in undergraduate dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennhenn-Kirchner, S; Goerlich, Y; Kirchner, B; Notbohm, M; Schiekirka, S; Simmenroth, A; Raupach, T

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies in undergraduate medical education have demonstrated the advantage of repeated testing over repeated practice with regard to knowledge and skills retention. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this "testing effect" also applies to skills retention in undergraduate dental education. In this prospective, randomised controlled trial, fourth-year dental students at Göttingen University Medical Centre participated in a training session on surgical suturing in winter term 2014/2015. Following this, they were either assigned to two sessions of additional skills training (group A) or two sessions of skills assessment with feedback (group B). These sessions were spaced over a period of 4 weeks. Skills retention was assessed in a summative objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) at the end of term, that is 6 months after the initial teaching session. A total of 32 students completed the study. With regard to suturing, OSCE performance was significantly better in group B than group A (81.9±13.1% vs 63.0±15.4%; P=0.001; Cohen's d=1.33). There was no significant OSCE performance difference in the two groups with regard to other learning objectives that were addressed in the end-of-term examination. Thus, the group difference was specific to suturing skills. This is the first study to demonstrate that in dental education, repeated testing produces more favourable skills retention than repeated practice. Test-enhanced learning might be a viable concept for skills retention in undergraduate dentistry education. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Semi-automatic fluoroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarpley, M.W.

    1976-10-01

    Extruded aluminum-clad uranium-aluminum alloy fuel tubes must pass many quality control tests before irradiation in Savannah River Plant nuclear reactors. Nondestructive test equipment has been built to automatically detect high and low density areas in the fuel tubes using x-ray absorption techniques with a video analysis system. The equipment detects areas as small as 0.060-in. dia with 2 percent penetrameter sensitivity. These areas are graded as to size and density by an operator using electronic gages. Video image enhancement techniques permit inspection of ribbed cylindrical tubes and make possible the testing of areas under the ribs. Operation of the testing machine, the special low light level television camera, and analysis and enhancement techniques are discussed

  16. Stochastic risk estimation from medical x-ray diagnostic examinations, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Tadashi; Maruyama, Takashi; Noda, Yutaka; Iwai, Kazuo; Tateno, Y.; Nishizawa, Kanae.

    1981-01-01

    The risks of genetic, leukemia and malignant diseases from medical X-ray diagnostic examinations were estimated using the frequency of radiographic and fluoroscopic exposures per diagnostic examination, child expectancy, leukemia and malignancy significant factors, and using a weighting factor determined on the basis of data concerning the cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki and of a recommendation of International Commission of Radiological Protection. The organ or tissue doses with respect to the stochastic risks were determined with ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the positions of the organs or tissues in a RANDO woman phantom which was exposed to diagnostic X-rays according to technical factors of typical radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations obtained from a nationwide survey. The resultant risks by age-group and type of radiographic and fluoroscopic examination are tabulated in terms of risk level of 10 -6 . In general, the total risk defined as the sum of genetic, leukemia and malignant risks was a high value for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs involving barium meal and barium enema. For example, the total risk for young age-group was 100 to 200 x 10 -6 for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk from the chest radiography was lower value as compared with the risk from the X-ray diagnosis of other organs or tissues. On the contrary, the risk from the chest tomography was comparable to the risk from the diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk decreased with increasing of age for every X-ray diagnostic examination. (author)

  17. Improving repeatability by improving quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ackers, Mark; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla; Brink, Mundy

    1998-12-31

    Time lapse (4-D) seismic is a promising tool for reservoir characterization and monitoring. The method is apparently simple: to acquire data repeatedly over the same reservoir, process and interpret the data sets, then changes between the data sets indicate changes in the reservoir. A problem with time lapse seismic data is that reservoirs are a relatively small part of the earth and important reservoir changes may cause very small differences to the time lapse data. The challenge is to acquire and process economical time lapse data such that reservoir changes can be detected above the noise of varying acquisition and environment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Telomerase Repeated Amplification Protocol (TRAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-11-20

    Telomeres are found at the end of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, and proteins that bind to telomeres protect DNA from being recognized as double-strand breaks thus preventing end-to-end fusions (Griffith et al. , 1999). However, due to the end replication problem and other factors such as oxidative damage, the limited life span of cultured cells (Hayflick limit) results in progressive shortening of these protective structures (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex telomerase-consisting of a protein catalytic component hTERT and a functional RNA component hTR or hTERC - counteracts telomere shortening by adding telomeric repeats to the end of chromosomes in ~90% of primary human tumors and in some transiently proliferating stem-like cells (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). This results in continuous proliferation of cells which is a hallmark of cancer. Therefore, telomere biology has a central role in aging, cancer progression/metastasis as well as targeted cancer therapies. There are commonly used methods in telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) (Mender and Shay, 2015b), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this detailed protocol we describe Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP). The TRAP assay is a popular method to determine telomerase activity in mammalian cells and tissue samples (Kim et al. , 1994). The TRAP assay includes three steps: extension, amplification, and detection of telomerase products. In the extension step, telomeric repeats are added to the telomerase substrate (which is actually a non telomeric oligonucleotide, TS) by telomerase. In the amplification step, the extension products are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers (TS upstream primer and ACX downstream primer) and in the detection step, the presence or absence of telomerase is

  19. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  20. Nonparametric additive regression for repeatedly measured data

    KAUST Repository

    Carroll, R. J.; Maity, A.; Mammen, E.; Yu, K.

    2009-01-01

    We develop an easily computed smooth backfitting algorithm for additive model fitting in repeated measures problems. Our methodology easily copes with various settings, such as when some covariates are the same over repeated response measurements

  1. Aging and repeated thought suppression success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E Lambert

    Full Text Available Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differences in reactions to thought suppression attempts across four thought suppression sequences in 40 older and 42 younger adults. As expected, age differences were more prevalent during suppression than during free monitoring periods, with younger adults indicating longer, more frequent thought recurrences and greater suppression difficulty. Further, younger adults' thought suppression outcomes changed over time, while trajectories for older adults' were relatively stable. Results are discussed in terms of older adults' reduced thought recurrence, which was potentially afforded by age-related changes in reactive control and distractibility.

  2. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of [ 3 H]Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in [14C]iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress [an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures], although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results

  3. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  4. Nondestructive examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mletzko, U.

    1980-01-01

    Visual examination is treated as a method for the control of size and shape of components, surface quality and weld performance. Dye penetrant, magnetic particle and eddy current examinations are treated as methods for the evaluation of surface defects and material properties. The limitations to certain materials, defect sizes and types are shown. (orig./RW)

  5. Topological characteristics of helical repeat proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Barford, D

    The recent elucidation of protein structures based upon repeating amino acid motifs, including the armadillo motif, the HEAT motif and tetratricopeptide repeats, reveals that they belong to the class of helical repeat proteins. These proteins share the common property of being assembled from tandem

  6. Digital storage of repeated signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prozorov, S.P.

    1984-01-01

    An independent digital storage system designed for repeated signal discrimination from background noises is described. The signal averaging is performed off-line in the real time mode by means of multiple selection of the investigated signal and integration in each point. Digital values are added in a simple summator and the result is recorded the storage device with the volume of 1024X20 bit from where it can be output on an oscillograph, a plotter or transmitted to a compUter for subsequent processing. The described storage is reliable and simple device on one base of which the systems for the nuclear magnetic resonapce signal acquisition in different experiments are developed

  7. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Kovács

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried out in the morning and afternoon in order to decrease the effect of the distant temporal correction. To further increase the accuracy, on-site dIdD variometer has also been installed near the Aggtelek station, in the Baradla cave, during the survey of the easternmost sites. The paper presents the technical details and the results of our last campaign. The improvement of the accuracy of the temporal reduction by the use of the local variometer is also reported.

  8. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility

  9. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  10. Hybrid FRC under repeated loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komlos, K.; Babal, B.; Nuernbergerova, T.

    1993-01-01

    Fibre reinforced concretes (FRC) containing several volume fractions in different ratios of two types of fibres - polypropylene and steel, were tested under repeated loading. Mechanical properties of specimens - cubes 150/150/150 mm (for compressive strength), prisms 100/100/400 (for flexural strength), short cylinders 150/60 mm (for impact strength) have been experimentally investigated before and after cyclic loading at the age of 28 days curing time. Mix proportions were designed after DIN 1045 with max. aggregate size 8 mm and grading curve B 8. Portland Cement PC 400 in the amount of 450 kg. m -3 was applied and W/C ratio 0.55. Workability of mixes was measured by Vebe method and regulated by plasticizing admixture Ligoplast Na. Maximum hybrid fibre volume fraction (polypropylene + steel) was 1.0%. Dynamic forces generated in Schenck testing machine with frequency 16 Hz had sinusoidal wave form varying between 0.7 and 0.1 of static mechanical characteristics. The number of cycles in all tests was 10 5 . The residual MOR at static four point bending test and working diagram force-deflection was carried out as well. The impact properties after repeated loading in compression were tested by means of falling weight test. Relationships between composition of fibre composites with different combination of polypropylene (0.2, 0.3, 0.5% by volume) and steel (0.5, 0.7, and 0.8% by volume) fibre content were obtained and technological properties of mixes as well. (author)

  11. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  12. Do repeated rumble strip hits improve driver alertness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watling, C.N.; Akerstedt, T.; Kecklund, L.G.; Anund, A.

    2016-01-01

    Driving while sleepy is associated with increased crash risk. Rumble strips are designed to alert a sleepy or inattentive driver when they deviate outside their driving lane. The current study sought to examine the effects of repeated rumble strip hits on levels of physiological and subjective

  13. Repeated Recall and PKM? Maintain Fear Memories in Juvenile Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Chicora F.; Kabitzke, Patricia; Serrano, Peter; Egan, Laura J.; Barr, Gordon A.; Shair, Harry N.; Wiedenmayer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We examined the neural substrates of fear memory formation and maintenance when repeated recall was used to prevent forgetting in young animals. In contrast to adult rats, juveniles failed to show contextual fear responses at 4 d post-fear conditioning. Reconsolidation sessions 3 and 6 d after conditioning restored contextual fear responses in…

  14. Repeated oral administration of capsaicin increases anxiety-like ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study was conducted to examine the psycho-emotional effects of repeated oral exposure to capsaicin, the principal active component of chili peppers. Each rat received 1 mL of 0.02% capsaicin into its oral cavity daily, and was subjected to behavioural tests following 10 daily administrations of capsaicin. Stereotypy ...

  15. Evaluation of the UF/NCI hybrid computational phantoms for use in organ dosimetry of pediatric patients undergoing fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Emily L.; Borrego, David; Tran, Trung; Fudge, James C.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2018-03-01

    Epidemiologic data demonstrate that pediatric patients face a higher relative risk of radiation induced cancers than their adult counterparts at equivalent exposures. Infants and children with congenital heart defects are a critical patient population exposed to ionizing radiation during life-saving procedures. These patients will likely incur numerous procedures throughout their lifespan, each time increasing their cumulative radiation absorbed dose. As continued improvements in long-term prognosis of congenital heart defect patients is achieved, a better understanding of organ radiation dose following treatment becomes increasingly vital. Dosimetry of these patients can be accomplished using Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations, coupled with modern anatomical patient models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the University of Florida/National Cancer Institute (UF/NCI) pediatric hybrid computational phantom library for organ dose assessment of patients that have undergone fluoroscopically guided cardiac catheterizations. In this study, two types of simulations were modeled. A dose assessment was performed on 29 patient-specific voxel phantoms (taken as representing the patient’s true anatomy), height/weight-matched hybrid library phantoms, and age-matched reference phantoms. Two exposure studies were conducted for each phantom type. First, a parametric study was constructed by the attending pediatric interventional cardiologist at the University of Florida to model the range of parameters seen clinically. Second, four clinical cardiac procedures were simulated based upon internal logfiles captured by a Toshiba Infinix-i Cardiac Bi-Plane fluoroscopic unit. Performance of the phantom library was quantified by computing both the percent difference in individual organ doses, as well as the organ dose root mean square values for overall phantom assessment between the matched phantoms (UF/NCI library or reference) and the patient

  16. Studies on Section XI ultrasonic repeatability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamison, T.D.; McDearman, W.R.

    1981-05-01

    A block representative of a nuclear component has been welded containing intentional defects. Acoustic emission data taken during the welding correlate well with ultrasonic data. Repetitive ultrasonic examinations have been performed by skilled operators using a procedure based on that desribed in ASME Section XI. These examinations were performed by different examination teams using different ultrasonic equipment in such a manner that the effects on the repeatability of the ultrasonic test method caused by the operator and by the use of different equipment could be estimated. It was tentatively concluded that when considering a large number of inspections: (1) there is no significant difference in indication sizing between operators, and (2) there is a significant difference in amplitude and defect sizing when instruments having different, Code acceptable operating characteristics are used. It was determined that the Section XI sizing parameters follow a bivariate normal distribution. Data derived from ultrasonically and physically sizing indications in nuclear components during farication show that the Section XI technique tends to overestimate the size of the reflectors

  17. Reject/repeat analysis and the effect prior film viewing has on a department's reject/repeat rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, P.A.; Hogg, P.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Achieving cost-effectiveness within the NHS is an old initiative but one that has again been highlighted by recent government policies (The New NHS-Modern and Dependable, Stationary Office, London, 1997). It has been reiterated that it is the responsibility of individual Trusts to devise means to provide such a service. Reject/repeat analyses have long been the primary tool used to assess the cost-effectiveness of radiography departments (Quality Assurance in Diagnostic Radiology, WHO, Geneva, 1982). This research paper examines an in-house initiative (viewing patients' previous films) commonly employed in other Health Trusts in order to reduce departmental repeat/reject rates. Method: Three hundred orthopaedic patients with hip, knee and ankle prostheses were included in a reject/repeat analysis. The aim was to investigate whether or not viewing patient's previous relevant radiographs would be advantageous to the practicing radiographer. This was done through an audit cycle consisting of two audit periods each lasting for 3 months. The primary audit period recorded the baseline repeat/reject rate, with the secondary audit period recording the repeat/reject rate under an experimental condition of viewing the relevant radiographs. Results: The baseline audit revealed repeat rates of 33% in orthopaedic patients with hip, knee and ankle prostheses. The availability of prior film viewing to the radiographer reduced this repeat rate to 10.6%. Conclusion: Prior film viewing dramatically reduced the department's repeat/reject rate by 22.4%. This provides scope for significant patient dose reductions as well as reducing departmental film expenses. This is an underestimated initiative and should be used appropriately in routine clinical practice

  18. The leucine-rich repeat structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, J; Hindle, K L; McEwan, P A; Lovell, S C

    2008-08-01

    The leucine-rich repeat is a widespread structural motif of 20-30 amino acids with a characteristic repetitive sequence pattern rich in leucines. Leucine-rich repeat domains are built from tandems of two or more repeats and form curved solenoid structures that are particularly suitable for protein-protein interactions. Thousands of protein sequences containing leucine-rich repeats have been identified by automatic annotation methods. Three-dimensional structures of leucine-rich repeat domains determined to date reveal a degree of structural variability that translates into the considerable functional versatility of this protein superfamily. As the essential structural principles become well established, the leucine-rich repeat architecture is emerging as an attractive framework for structural prediction and protein engineering. This review presents an update of the current understanding of leucine-rich repeat structure at the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary levels and discusses specific examples from recently determined three-dimensional structures.

  19. Accuracy and repeatability of quantitative fluoroscopy for the measurement of sagittal plane translation and finite centre of rotation in the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Alexander; Breen, Alan

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) was developed to measure intervertebral mechanics in vivo and has been found to have high repeatability and accuracy for the measurement of intervertebral rotations. However, sagittal plane translation and finite centre of rotation (FCR) are potential measures of stability but have not yet been fully validated for current QF. This study investigated the repeatability and accuracy of QF for measuring these variables. Repeatability was assessed from L2-S1 in 20 human volunteers. Accuracy was investigated using 10 consecutive measurements from each of two pairs of linked and instrumented dry human vertebrae as reference; one which tilted without translation and one which translated without tilt. The results found intra- and inter-observer repeatability for translation to be 1.1mm or less (SEM) with fair to substantial reliability (ICC 0.533-0.998). Intra-observer repeatability of FCR location for inter-vertebral rotations of 5° and above ranged from 1.5mm to 1.8mm (SEM) with moderate to substantial reliability (ICC 0.626-0.988). Inter-observer repeatability for FCR ranged from 1.2mm to 5.7mm, also with moderate to substantial reliability (ICC 0.621-0.878). Reliability was substantial (ICC>0.81) for 10/16 measures for translation and 5/8 for FCR location. Accuracy for translation was 0.1mm (fixed centre) and 2.2mm (moveable centre), with an FCR error of 0.3mm(x) and 0.4mm(y) (fixed centre). This technology was found to have a high level of accuracy and with a few exceptions, moderate to substantial repeatability for the measurement of translation and FCR from fluoroscopic motion sequences. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An exploration of fluoroscopically guided spinal steroid injections in patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Neve

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Leon Neve1, John Orchard2, Nathan Gibbs3, Willem van Mechelen4, Evert Verhagen4, Ken Sesel5, Ian Burgess6, Brett Hines61VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 2School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3South Sydney Sports Medicine, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4EMGO, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 5Sydney X-ray Centre, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 6Mater Imaging, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Fluoroscopically guided lumbar cortisone injections have been proven useful in cases of lower-limb pain caused by lumbar disc prolapse (with evidence levels ll-1/ll-2. These injections are also sometimes used clinically in sports medicine for patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain, where no prolapse or other obvious cause of nerve-impingement is diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or computed tomography (CT, even though this treatment scenario has not been adequately studied for this last diagnosis.Objectives: To explore whether fluoroscopically guided transforaminal lumbar cortisone injections may be a valid treatment method for non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain.Study design: Retrospective case series.Methods: Patients were selected from databases at two sports clinics and divided into two groups: Group D, with back-related lower-limb pain and disc prolapse proven on CT or MR; and Group N, with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. Patients were sent a questionnaire regarding: symptoms, improvement, effect of injections, satisfaction, side effects and other used treatments. Outcomes were compared between Group D and N.Results: 153 patients were eligible for the study (Group D: 93/Group N: 60. Eventually 110 patients responded (Group D: 67/Group N: 43. Twelve percent of Group D and 14% of Group N indicated that the injections had fully cured their symptoms. Altogether, 27% of Group D and 24% of Group N were certain the injections had improved their symptoms in the

  1. Peripheral Insertion of a Central Venous Access Device Under Fluoroscopic Guidance Using a Peripherally Accessed System (PAS) Port in the Forearm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Yasuhiro; Morita, Sojiro; Morita, Yoshitaka; Awatani, Toshihide; Takasaki, Motohiro; Horimi, Tadashi; Ozawa, Zen

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the technique, efficacy, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a peripherally accessed system (PAS) port via the forearm. Methods: Beginning in July 1994, 105 central venous access devices were implanted in 104 patients for the long-term infusion of antibiotics or antineoplasmic agents, blood products, or parenteral nutrition. The devices was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance with real-time venography from a peripheral route. Results: All ports were successfully implanted. There were no procedure-related complications. No thrombosis or local infection was observed; however, in six patients catheter-related phlebitis occurred. Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a PAS port via the forearm is safe and efficacious, and injection of contrast medium through a peripheral IV catheter before introduction of the catheter helps to avoid catheter-related phlebitis

  2. Layered Architectures for Quantum Computers and Quantum Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nathan C.

    This chapter examines how to organize quantum computers and repeaters using a systematic framework known as layered architecture, where machine control is organized in layers associated with specialized tasks. The framework is flexible and could be used for analysis and comparison of quantum information systems. To demonstrate the design principles in practice, we develop architectures for quantum computers and quantum repeaters based on optically controlled quantum dots, showing how a myriad of technologies must operate synchronously to achieve fault-tolerance. Optical control makes information processing in this system very fast, scalable to large problem sizes, and extendable to quantum communication.

  3. Radionuclide examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on radionuclide examinations of the pancreas. The pancreas, situated retroperitonally high in the epigastrium, was a particularly difficult organ to image noninvasively before ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) became available. Indeed the organ still remains difficult to examine in some patients, a fact reflected in the variety of methods available to evaluate pancreatic morphology. It is something of a paradox that the pancreas is metabolically active and physiologically important but that its examination by radionuclide methods has virtually ceased to have any role in day-to-day clinical practice. To some extent this is caused by the tendency of the pancreas's commonest gross diseases emdash carcinoma and pancreatitis, for example emdash to result in nonfunction of the entire organ. Disorders of pancreatic endocrine function have generally not required imaging methods for diagnosis, although an understanding of diabetes mellitus and its nosology has been advanced by radioimmunoassay of plasma insulin concentrations

  4. Contrast fluoroscopic evaluation of gastrointestinal transit times with and without the use of falconry hoods in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Grayson A; Williams, Jackie M; Mans, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate gastrointestinal transit times in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) by use of contrast fluoroscopic imaging and investigate the effect of falconry hooding in these hawks on gastrointestinal transit time. DESIGN Prospective, randomized, blinded, complete crossover study. ANIMALS 9 healthy red-tailed hawks. PROCEDURES Hawks were gavage-fed a 30% weight-by-volume barium suspension (25 mL/kg [11.3 mL/lb]) into the crop. Fluoroscopic images were obtained at multiple time points after barium administration. Time to filling and emptying of various gastrointestinal tract organs and overall transit time were measured. The effect of hooding (hooded vs nonhooded) on these variables was assessed in a randomized complete crossover design. RESULTS In nonhooded birds, overall gastrointestinal transit time ranged from 30 to 180 minutes (mean ± SD, 100 ± 52 min). Time to complete crop emptying ranged from 30 to 180 minutes (83 ± 49 min). Contrast medium was present in the ventriculus in all birds within 5 minutes of administration and in the small intestines within 5 to 15 minutes (median, 5 min). Hooding of red-tailed hawks resulted in a significant delay of complete crop emptying (no hood, 83 ± 49 minutes; hood, 133 ± 48 minutes), but no significant effects of hooding were found on other measured variables. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE These results indicated that overall gastrointestinal transit times are faster in red-tailed hawks than has been reported for psittacines and that the use of a falconry hood in red-tailed hawks may result in delayed crop emptying. Hooding did not exert significant effects on overall gastrointestinal transit time in this raptorial species.

  5. Fluoroscopic position of the second-generation cryoballoon during ablation in the right superior pulmonary vein as a predictor of phrenic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Yukio; Ströker, Erwin; Irfan, Ghazala; Mugnai, Giacomo; Ciconte, Giuseppe; Hünük, Burak; Velagić, Vedran; Overeinder, Ingrid; Tanaka, Kaoru; Brugada, Pedro; de Asmundis, Carlo; Chierchia, Gian-Battista

    2016-08-01

    Phrenic nerve injury (PNI) is the most frequently observed complication during pulmonary vein isolation procedure using the second-generation cryoballoon (CB). Our objective was to analyse the correlation between the fluoroscopic position of the 28 mm CB during ablation in the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV) and the occurrence of PNI. A total of 165 patients having undergone the large 28 mm CB ablation were retrospectively reviewed. Positioning of the CB relative to the cardiac silhouette was classified under fluoroscopic guidance in antero-posterior projection during RSPV ablation. Regarding the lower half of the balloon, CB positioning was defined as follows: (A) completely inside the cardiac shadow; (B1) Phrenic nerve injury occurred in 9.7% (16/165) during ablation in the RSPV. The occurrence of PNI was 0.9, 10.6, and 90.1% in positions A, B1, and B2, respectively (A vs. B1, P = 0.01; B1 vs. B2, P < 0.0001). Among other pre-procedural and procedural variables, the B2 position was the strongest independent determinant for predicting PNI at RSPV (P = 0.001, odds ratio: 119.9; 95% confidence interval: 11.6-1234.7) after multivariable analysis. The incidence of PNI at the RSPV significantly increased in case of more distal positioning of the CB relative to the cardiac shadow. This simple and straightforward intra-procedural indicator might prone the operators to attempt occluding the RPSV more proximally in order to avoid PNI. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Radiologic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoeni, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The radiographic examination of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract has been changed drastically by the introduction of endoscopic procedures that are now widely available. However, the diagnostic approach to the small bowel remains largely unchanged. Ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are occasionally employed but are not primary imaging modalities for small bowel disease. Even though small bowel endoscopes are available, they are infrequently used, and no scientific paper on their employment has been published. Barium studies are still the mainstay for evaluating patients with suspected small bowel abnormalities. This paper discusses the anatomy and physiology of the small bowel and lists the various types of barium and pharmacologic aids used for examining it. The different radiographic methods for examining the small bowel with barium, including SBFT, dedicated SBFT, enteroclysis, peroral pneumocolon (PPC), and retrograde small bowel examination, are described and put into perspective. To some degree such an undertaking must be a personal opinion, but certain conclusions can be made based on the available literature and practical experience. This analysis is based on the assumption that all the various barium techniques are performed with equal expertise by the individual radiologist, thus excluding bias from unfamiliarity with certain aspects of a procedure, such as intubation or skilled compression during fluoroscopy. Also, the use of water-soluble contrast material, CT, and MRI for evaluating suspected small bowel abnormalities is outlined

  7. RNA FISH for detecting expanded repeats in human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Martyna O; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2016-04-01

    RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a widely used technique for detecting transcripts in fixed cells and tissues. Many variants of RNA FISH have been proposed to increase signal strength, resolution and target specificity. The current variants of this technique facilitate the detection of the subcellular localization of transcripts at a single molecule level. Among the applications of RNA FISH are studies on nuclear RNA foci in diseases resulting from the expansion of tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats present in different single genes. The partial or complete retention of mutant transcripts forming RNA aggregates within the nucleoplasm has been shown in multiple cellular disease models and in the tissues of patients affected with these atypical mutations. Relevant diseases include, among others, myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) with CUG repeats, Huntington's disease (HD) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) with CAG repeats, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) with CGG repeats, myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) with CCUG repeats, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD) with GGGGCC repeats and spinocerebellar ataxia type 32 (SCA32) with GGCCUG. In this article, we summarize the results obtained with FISH to examine RNA nuclear inclusions. We provide a detailed protocol for detecting RNAs containing expanded CAG and CUG repeats in different cellular models, including fibroblasts, lymphoblasts, induced pluripotent stem cells and murine and human neuronal progenitors. We also present the results of the first single-molecule FISH application in a cellular model of polyglutamine disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An Examination of Disciplinary Procedures with Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forehand, Rex; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Experiment 1 examined the effect of negative attention and repeated demands on the noncompliant behavior of children. Experiment 2 studied the relative effectiveness of negative attention, isolation, ignoring, and a combination of procedures in reducing noncompliance in children. (GO)

  9. Perfectionism and negative affect after repeated failure: Anxiety, depression, and anger

    OpenAIRE

    Stoeber, Joachim; Schneider, Natalia; Hussain, Rimi; Matthews, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Perfectionists have shown increased negative affect after failure compared to nonperfectionists. However, little is known about how perfectionists react to repeated failure. This study investigated the effects of two forms of perfectionism--self-oriented perfectionism and socially prescribed perfectionism--on 100 university students’ reactions to repeated failure (versus repeated success) examining three negative emotions: anxiety, depression, and anger. Results showed that socially prescribe...

  10. Stochastic risk estimation from medical x-ray diagnostic examinations, 2. Risk estimates of individuals from x-ray diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, T; Maruyama, T; Noda, Y; Iwai, K; Tateno, Y [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Nishizawa, K

    1981-01-01

    The risks of genetic, leukemia and malignant diseases from medical X-ray diagnostic examinations were estimated using the frequency of radiographic and fluoroscopic exposures per diagnostic examination, child expectancy, leukemia and malignancy significant factors, and using a weighting factor determined on the basis of data concerning the cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki and of a recommendation of International Commission of Radiological Protection. The organ or tissue doses with respect to the stochastic risks were determined with ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the positions of the organs or tissues in a RANDO woman phantom which was exposed to diagnostic X-rays according to technical factors of typical radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations obtained from a nationwide survey. The resultant risks by age-group and type of radiographic and fluoroscopic examination are tabulated in terms of risk level of 10/sup -6/. In general, the total risk defined as the sum of genetic, leukemia and malignant risks was a high value for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs involving barium meal and barium enema. For example, the total risk for young age-group was 100 to 200 x 10/sup -6/ for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk from the chest radiography was lower value as compared with the risk from the X-ray diagnosis of other organs or tissues. On the contrary, the risk from the chest tomography was comparable to the risk from the diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk decreased with increasing of age for every X-ray diagnostic examination.

  11. The repeatability of an intraoral dental colorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Francis F; Goldstein, Gary R; Jang, Sungkoo; Hittelman, Eugene

    2002-12-01

    Characterizing and reproducing color remain one of the most challenging aspects of dentistry. A relatively new intraoral colorimeter measures the color of natural teeth and metal-ceramic restorations and prints out a color recipe for the Vintage Halo Porcelain System. The reliability of the colorimeter is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of a contact dental colorimeter and to correlate the shade registered by the colorimeter with the shade selected by experienced clinicians. In part I of the study, 2 examiners (A and B) took 2 colorimeter measurements from the maxillary right central incisors of 11 subjects. The examiners were blinded to their own data and those of other investigators. The readings were repeated 3 weeks later with the same protocol. The Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient was used to analyze the collected data. In part II of the study, 2 experienced clinicians (examiners D and E) selected a shade from the classic Vita Lumin Vacuum shade guide for the maxillary right central incisors of the same 11 subjects. The clinicians were blinded to each other's selections and the colorimeter readings. It should be noted that the manufacturer of the colorimeter uses the terms shade, value, and hue to represent chroma, value, and hue, respectively, as defined in the Glossary of Prosthodontic Terms (J Prosthet Dent 1999;81:39-110). The reliability analysis results for each of the combined trials for shade, value, and hue were all >.94. The interexaminer reliability alpha values were >.9 for shade and value and.64 to.74 for hue. The interexaminer alpha represented the value range of each of 4 measurements. The intraexaminer reliability alpha values for shade, value, and hue were.99,.95, and.96 for examiner A and.99,.93, and.97 for examiner B, respectively. In part II of the study, the colorimeter agreed with itself 82% of the time, whereas clinicians agreed with each other on the selected shade 73% of the time. Selections made

  12. Repeated passive stretching : Acute effect on the passive muscle moment and extensibility of short hamstrings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halbertsma, JPK; Mulder, [No Value; Goeken, LNH; Eisma, WH; Mulder, I.; Göeken, L.N.

    Objective: To examine the response of short hamstring muscles to repeated passive stretching. Design: A repeated measures design. Setting: A university laboratory for human movement analysis in a department of rehabilitation. Subjects: Students (7 men, 10 women) from the Department of Human Movement

  13. Children's Conceptions of Bullying and Repeated Conventional Transgressions: Moral, Conventional, Structuring and Personal-Choice Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert; Thornberg, Ulrika Birberg; Alamaa, Rebecca; Daud, Noor

    2016-01-01

    This study examined 307 elementary school children's judgements and reasoning about bullying and other repeated transgressions when school rules regulating these transgressions have been removed in hypothetical school situations. As expected, children judged bullying (repeated moral transgressions) as wrong independently of rules and as more wrong…

  14. Repeatability & Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2009

    KAUST Repository

    Manegold, Stefan

    2010-12-15

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters\\' programs against their data to verify the repeatability of the experiments published [1]. Given the positive feedback concerning the SIGMOD 2008 repeatability initiative, SIGMOD 2009 modified and expanded the initiative with a workability assessment.

  15. simple sequence repeats (EST-SSR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... 212 primer pairs selected, based on repeat patterns of n≥8 for di-, tri-, tetra- and penta-nucleotide repeat ... Cluster analysis revealed a high genetic similarity among the sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) breeding lines which could reduce the genetic gain in ..... The multiple allele characteristic of SSR com-.

  16. Repeatability & Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2009

    KAUST Repository

    Manegold, Stefan; Manolescu, Ioana; Afanasiev, Loredana; Feng, Jieling; Gou, G.; Hadjieleftheriou, Marios; Harizopoulos, Stavros; Kalnis, Panos; Karanasos, Konstantinos; Laurent, Dominique; Lupu, M.; Onose, N.; Ré , C.; Sans, Virginie; Senellart, Pierre; Wu, T.; Shasha, Dennis E.

    2010-01-01

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters' programs against their data to verify the repeatability of the experiments published [1]. Given the positive feedback concerning the SIGMOD 2008 repeatability initiative, SIGMOD 2009 modified and expanded the initiative with a workability assessment.

  17. UK 2009-2010 repeat station report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J.G. Shanahan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The British Geological Survey is responsible for conducting the UK geomagnetic repeat station programme. Measurements made at the UK repeat station sites are used in conjunction with the three UK magnetic observatories: Hartland, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick, to produce a regional model of the local field each year. The UK network of repeat stations comprises 41 stations which are occupied at approximately 3-4 year intervals. Practices for conducting repeat station measurements continue to evolve as advances are made in survey instrumentation and as the usage of the data continues to change. Here, a summary of the 2009 and 2010 UK repeat station surveys is presented, highlighting the measurement process and techniques, density of network, reduction process and recent results.

  18. Chaotic examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildirici, Melike; Sonustun, Fulya Ozaksoy; Sonustun, Bahri

    2018-01-01

    In the regards of chaos theory, new concepts such as complexity, determinism, quantum mechanics, relativity, multiple equilibrium, complexity, (continuously) instability, nonlinearity, heterogeneous agents, irregularity were widely questioned in economics. It is noticed that linear models are insufficient for analyzing unpredictable, irregular and noncyclical oscillations of economies, and for predicting bubbles, financial crisis, business cycles in financial markets. Therefore, economists gave great consequence to use appropriate tools for modelling non-linear dynamical structures and chaotic behaviors of the economies especially in macro and the financial economy. In this paper, we aim to model the chaotic structure of exchange rates (USD-TL and EUR-TL). To determine non-linear patterns of the selected time series, daily returns of the exchange rates were tested by BDS during the period from January 01, 2002 to May 11, 2017 which covers after the era of the 2001 financial crisis. After specifying the non-linear structure of the selected time series, it was aimed to examine the chaotic characteristic for the selected time period by Lyapunov Exponents. The findings verify the existence of the chaotic structure of the exchange rate returns in the analyzed time period.

  19. Radiation dose and intra-articular access: comparison of the lateral mortise and anterior midline approaches to fluoroscopically guided tibiotalar joint injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ambrose J.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A.; Chang, Connie Y.; Simeone, Frank J.; Palmer, William E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Balza, Rene [Centro Medico de Occidente, Department of Radiology, Maracaibo (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To compare the lateral mortise and anterior midline approaches to fluoroscopically guided tibiotalar joint injections with respect to successful intra-articular needle placement, fluoroscopy time, radiation dose, and dose area product (DAP). This retrospective study was IRB-approved and HIPAA-compliant. 498 fluoroscopically guided tibiotalar joint injections were performed or supervised by one of nine staff radiologists from 11/1/2010-12/31/2013. The injection approach was determined by operator preference. Images were reviewed on a PACS workstation to determine the injection approach (lateral mortise versus anterior midline) and to confirm intra-articular needle placement. Fluoroscopy time (minutes), radiation dose (mGy), and DAP (μGy-m{sup 2}) were recorded and compared using the student's t-test (fluoroscopy time) or the Wilcoxon rank sum test (radiation dose and DAP). There were 246 lateral mortise injections and 252 anterior midline injections. Two lateral mortise injections were excluded from further analysis because no contrast was administered. Intra-articular location of the needle tip was documented in 242/244 lateral mortise injections and 252/252 anterior midline injections. Mean fluoroscopy time was shorter for the lateral mortise group than the anterior midline group (0.7 ± 0.5 min versus 1.2 ± 0.8 min, P < 0.0001). Mean radiation dose and DAP were less for the lateral mortise group than the anterior midline group (2.1 ± 3.7 mGy versus 2.5 ± 3.5 mGy, P = 0.04; 11.5 ± 15.3 μGy-m{sup 2} versus 13.5 ± 17.3 μGy-m{sup 2}, P = 0.006). Both injection approaches resulted in nearly 100 % rates of intra-articular needle placement, but the lateral mortise approach used approximately 40 % less fluoroscopy time and delivered 15 % lower radiation dose and DAP to the patient. (orig.)

  20. Development of analog watch with minute repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okigami, Tomio; Aoyama, Shigeru; Osa, Takashi; Igarashi, Kiyotaka; Ikegami, Tomomi

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor with large scale integration was developed for an electronic minute repeater. It is equipped with the synthetic struck sound circuit to generate natural struck sound necessary for the minute repeater. This circuit consists of an envelope curve drawing circuit, frequency mixer, polyphonic mixer, and booster circuit made by using analog circuit technology. This large scale integration is a single chip microcomputer with motor drivers and input ports in addition to the synthetic struck sound circuit, and it is possible to make an electronic system of minute repeater at a very low cost in comparison with the conventional type.

  1. Periodicity and repeatability in data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwood, D.

    Using magnetic data from the first two years in Saturn orbit, the basic periodicity of apparent is examined with the aim of elucidating the `cam' shaft model of Espinosa et al. (2003) identifying the nature of the `cam' and giving a definitive period for its rotation. An initial hypothesis, supported by the spectral analysis of analysis of the first 8 months in orbit Gianpieri et al. (2006), is made that the source of the period is linked to something inside the planet and therefore that the source inertia means that the period effectively does not change over the 2 years. Moreover one expects that the source phase is fixed. Using this approach, not only can the period identified by spectral analysis (647.1 + 0.6 min.) be verified but also by phase analysis between successive passes over the 2 years the period can be refined to 647.6 + 0.1 min. The signal itself is remarkably reproducible from pass to pass. It appears in all three components of the field and its polarisation is unambiguously not attributable to direct detection of an internal field. Not only does the signal not decay rapidly with distance from the planet, but although it has the m=1 symmetry of a tilted dipole, the field lines diverge from the planet indicating an exterior source. This feature led to the `cam' model. The polarisation and comparisons of passes with different latitude profiles show a surprising north-south symmetry in the azimuthal field. The absence of asymmetry with respect to the magnetic equator rules out a direct magnetospheric-ionospheric interaction source. Accordingly, it is proposed that the basic `cam' effect is generated by a single hemisphere anomaly which creates hemisphere to hemisphere field aligned currents. The existence of Saturn phase related anomaly appears to produce a basic asymmetry in the inner magnetosphere that sets the phase of both an inflowing and outflowing sector in a rotating circulation system.

  2. Effectiveness of combined use of imprint cytological and histological examination in CT-guided tissue-core biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Kajiwara, Kenji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Awai, Kazuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu [Tokai University Hachioji Hospital, Tokai University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hachioji, Tokyo (Japan); Kakizawa, Hideaki [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic-bomb Survivors Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Naka-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Toyoda, Naoyuki [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima (Japan); National Hospital Organisation Kure Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the combination of imprint cytology and histology in tissue-core percutaneous biopsy under real-time computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance. Between October 2009 and June 2013, 156 percutaneous needle biopsies were performed in our institution. Those obtained by tissue-core biopsy underwent both imprint cytological and histological examinations routinely after touch imprint cytology was performed on site to evaluate the samples' sufficiency for cytological and pathological examination. Final diagnosis was confirmed by independent surgical pathology, independent culture results or clinical follow-up. Rates of adequate specimens and precise diagnosis, by combined cytological and histological examination were 100 % (156/156) and 96.2 % (150/156), by cytology 94.4 % (152/156) and 83.3 % (130/156) and by histology 99.3 % (155/156) and 92.3 % (144/156). Precise diagnosis was achieved by combined examinations in 94.7 % (89/94) of thoracic lesions, 97.6 % (40/41) of musculoskeletal lesions, and 100 % (21/21) of abdominal, pelvic and retroperitoneal lesions. In all 104 lesions diagnosed as malignant by CT-guided biopsy and in 30 of 52 diagnosed as benign, specific cell types could be proved by combined examinations. Combined imprint cytology and histology performed after on-site touch imprint cytological evaluation improved the diagnostic ability of CT fluoroscopically guided biopsy. (orig.)

  3. Effectiveness of combined use of imprint cytological and histological examination in CT-guided tissue-core biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Kajiwara, Kenji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Awai, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Toyoda, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the combination of imprint cytology and histology in tissue-core percutaneous biopsy under real-time computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance. Between October 2009 and June 2013, 156 percutaneous needle biopsies were performed in our institution. Those obtained by tissue-core biopsy underwent both imprint cytological and histological examinations routinely after touch imprint cytology was performed on site to evaluate the samples' sufficiency for cytological and pathological examination. Final diagnosis was confirmed by independent surgical pathology, independent culture results or clinical follow-up. Rates of adequate specimens and precise diagnosis, by combined cytological and histological examination were 100 % (156/156) and 96.2 % (150/156), by cytology 94.4 % (152/156) and 83.3 % (130/156) and by histology 99.3 % (155/156) and 92.3 % (144/156). Precise diagnosis was achieved by combined examinations in 94.7 % (89/94) of thoracic lesions, 97.6 % (40/41) of musculoskeletal lesions, and 100 % (21/21) of abdominal, pelvic and retroperitoneal lesions. In all 104 lesions diagnosed as malignant by CT-guided biopsy and in 30 of 52 diagnosed as benign, specific cell types could be proved by combined examinations. Combined imprint cytology and histology performed after on-site touch imprint cytological evaluation improved the diagnostic ability of CT fluoroscopically guided biopsy. (orig.)

  4. Temporal Alcohol Availability Predicts First-Time Drunk Driving, but Not Repeat Offending

    OpenAIRE

    Schofield, Timothy P.; Denson, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol availability has been linked to drunk driving, but research has not examined whether this relationship is the same for first-time and repeat offenses. We examined the relationship between the business hours of alcohol outlets licensed to serve alcohol for on-premises consumption and misdemeanor-level (first offense) and felony-level drunk driving (repeat offense) charges in New York State in 2009. Longer outlet business hours were associated with more misdemeanor drunk driving charges...

  5. The effectiveness of eye-closure in repeated interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Vredeveldt, A.; Baddeley, A.D.; Hitch, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Closing the eyes during recall can help witnesses remember more about a witnessed event. This study examined the effectiveness of eye-closure in a repeated recall paradigm with immediate free recall followed 1 week later by both free and cued recall. We examined whether eye-closure was more or less effective during the second free-recall attempt compared with the first, whether eye-closure during the first recall attempt had an impact on subsequent free- and cued-recall performance, a...

  6. Fluoroscopically Guided Sacroiliac Joint Injections: Comparison of the Effects of Intraarticular and Periarticular Injections on Immediate and Short-Term Pain Relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacey, Nicholas C; Patrie, James T; Fox, Michael G

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether intraarticular sacroiliac joint injections provide greater immediate and short-term pain relief than periarticular sacroiliac joint injections do. The records of all fluoroscopically guided sacroiliac joint injections performed over a 4-year period were identified. Patients who received an injection of 0.5 mL of bupivacaine and 0.5 mL (20 mg) of triamcinolone and who had preinjection, immediate, and 1-week postinjection pain scores (0-10 numeric scale) were included. Images from the procedures were retrospectively reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists to determine intraarticular or periarticular administration of the injection with discrepancies resolved by consensus. One hundred thirteen injections in 99 patients (65 women, 34 men; mean age, 59.4 years) met the inclusion criteria. There were 55 intraarticular and 58 periarticular injections. The mean preinjection, immediate, and 1-week postinjection pain scores for the intraarticular injections were 6.0, 1.6, and 4.1 and for the periarticular injections were 6.1, 2.0, and 4.2. The mean immediate and 1-week postinjection pain reduction were statistically significant in both groups (p sacroiliac joint injections provide statistically significant immediate and 1-week postinjection pain relief, no significant difference in the degree of pain relief achieved with intraarticular and periarticular injections was noted.

  7. Fluoroscopic-guided radiofrequency ablation of the basivertebral nerve: application and analysis with multiple imaging modalities in an ovine model (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Jeffrey A.; Eskey, Cliff J.; Attawia, Mohammed; Patel, Samit J.; Ryan, Thomas P.; Pellegrino, Richard; Sutton, Jeffrey; Crombie, John; Paul, B. T.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2005-04-01

    Pathologic involvement of the basivertebral nerve, an intraosseous vertebral nerve found in humans and most mammalian species, may play a role in some forms of back pain. This study was designed to assess the feasibility and effects of the percutaneous delivery of radiofrequency (RF) energy to thermally ablate the basivertebral nerve in the lumbar vertebrae of mature sheep. Using fluoroscopic guidance, a RF bipolar device was placed and a thermal dose delivered to lumbar vertebral bodies in sheep. Post-treatment assessment included multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and computed tomography (CT). These data were analyzed and correlated to histopathology and morphometry findings to describe the cellular and boney structural changes resulting from the treatment. Imaging modalities MRI and CT can be implemented to non-invasively describe treatment region and volume, marrow cellular effects, and bone density alterations immediately following RF treatment and during convalescence. Such imaging can be utilized to assess treatment effects and refine the thermal dose to vertebral body volume ratio used in treatment planning. This information will be used to improve the therapeutic ratio and develop a treatment protocol for human applications.

  8. Rationale and design of the NO-PARTY trial: near-zero fluoroscopic exposure during catheter ablation of supraventricular arrhythmias in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Michela; Dello Russo, Antonio; Pelargonio, Gemma; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Del Greco, Maurizio; Piacenti, Marcello; Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Santangeli, Pasquale; Bartoletti, Stefano; Moltrasio, Massimo; Fassini, Gaetano; Marini, Massimiliano; Di Cori, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi; Fiorentini, Cesare; Zecchi, Paolo; Natale, Andrea; Picano, Eugenio; Tondo, Claudio

    2012-10-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation is the mainstay of therapy for supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. Conventional radiofrequency catheter ablation requires the use of fluoroscopy, thus exposing patients to ionising radiation. The feasibility and safety of non-fluoroscopic radiofrequency catheter ablation has been recently reported in a wide range of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias using the EnSite NavX™ mapping system. The NO-PARTY is a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial designed to test the hypothesis that catheter ablation of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias guided by the EnSite NavX™ mapping system results in a clinically significant reduction in exposure to ionising radiation compared with conventional catheter ablation. The study will randomise 210 patients undergoing catheter ablation of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias to either a conventional ablation technique or one guided by the EnSite NavX™ mapping system. The primary end-point is the reduction of the radiation dose to the patient. Secondary end-points include procedural success, reduction of the radiation dose to the operator, and a cost-effectiveness analysis. In a subgroup of patients, we will also evaluate the radiobiological effectiveness of dose reduction by assessing acute chromosomal DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes. NO-PARTY will determine whether radiofrequency catheter ablation of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias guided by the EnSite NavX™ mapping system is a suitable and cost-effective approach to achieve a clinically significant reduction in ionising radiation exposure for both patient and operator.

  9. Accuracy of CT chest without oral contrast for ruling out esophageal perforation using fluoroscopic esophagography as reference standard: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Muhammad; Qamar, Saqib; Rehman, Abdul; Baloch, Noor Ul-Ain; Shafqat, Gulnaz

    2018-02-26

    Esophageal perforation has a high mortality rate. Fluoroscopic esophagography (FE) is the procedure of choice for diagnosing esophageal perforation. However, FE can be difficult to perform in seriously ill patients. We retrospectively reviewed charts and scans of all patients who had undergone thoracic CT (TCT) without oral contrast and FE for suspicion of esophageal perforation at our hospital between October, 2010 and December, 2015. Scans were interpreted by a single consultant radiologist having > 5 years of relevant experience. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 20. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of TCT were computed using FE as reference standard. Of 122 subjects, 106 (83%) were male and their median age was 42 [inter-quartile range (IQR) 29-53] years. Esophageal perforation was evident on FE in 15 (8%) cases. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of TCT for detecting esophageal perforation were 100, 54.6, 23.4 and 100%, respectively. When TCT was negative (n = 107), an alternative diagnosis was evident in 65 cases. Thoracic computed tomography (TCT) had 100% sensitivity and negative predictive value for excluding esophageal perforation. FE may be omitted in patients who have no evidence of mediastinal collection, pneumomediastinum or esophageal wall defect on TCT. However, in the presence of any of these features, FE is still necessary to confirm or exclude the presence of an esophageal perforation.

  10. Preventing Repeat Teen Births PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the April 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses repeat teen births and ways teens, parents and guardians, health care providers, and communities can help prevent them.

  11. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors.

  12. WE-G-207-06: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Generation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models Derived From Physical Phantom and Clinical Patient Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhou, S; Cai, W; Hurwitz, M; Rottmann, J; Myronakis, M; Cifter, F; Berbeco, R; Lewis, J; Williams, C; Mishra, P; Ionascu, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images acquired immediately prior to treatment have the potential to represent patient motion patterns and anatomy during treatment, including both intra- and inter-fractional changes. We develop a method to generate patient-specific motion models based on 4DCBCT images acquired with existing clinical equipment and used to generate time varying volumetric images (3D fluoroscopic images) representing motion during treatment delivery. Methods: Motion models are derived by deformably registering each 4DCBCT phase to a reference phase, and performing principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated by optimizing the resulting PCA coefficients iteratively through comparison of the cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging and digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from the motion model. Patient and physical phantom datasets are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization error compared to manually defined ground truth positions. Results: 4DCBCT-based motion models were derived and used to generate 3D fluoroscopic images at treatment time. For the patient datasets, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.57 and 3.13 respectively in subsets of four patient datasets. For the physical phantom datasets, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.14 and 2.78 respectively in two datasets. 4DCBCT motion models are shown to perform well in the context of generating 3D fluoroscopic images due to their ability to reproduce anatomical changes at treatment time. Conclusion: This study showed the feasibility of deriving 4DCBCT-based motion models and using them to generate 3D fluoroscopic images at treatment time in real clinical settings. 4DCBCT-based motion models were found to account for the 3D non-rigid motion of the patient anatomy during treatment and have the potential

  13. A study on radiographic repeat rate data of several hospitals in Jeddah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Malki, M.A.; Abulfaraj, W.H.; Bhuiyan, S.I.; Kinsara, A.A

    2003-07-01

    Radiographic repeat rate data in diagnostic radiology in King Fahad Hospital (KFH), King Abdulaziz Hospital (KAH), and Maternity and Children Hospital (MCH) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, have been studied. The study provided valuable information to suggest preventive measures to reduce repeats. The variables included in the study are exposure techniques, examination types, total number of films used, number of films repeated, the film sizes, gender, the age groups of the patients, and reason for repetition. The total number of examinations in all three hospitals is 6001 using 8887 films on 5412 patients. The average repeat rate was 7.93%, where the individual hospital repeat rates were 9.57% in the MCH, 7.84% in KAH and 7.44% in KFH. The repeat rate for children and infants was found to be undesirable. The quality assurance (QA) programme can effectively reduce the unnecessary exposure and can identify the cause of the exposure. The overexposure, underexposure and position fault were the foremost contributors for repeats and constitute 32.91%, 28.94% and 22.98% of the total respectively. The QA study identified that human error and equipment malfunction are the major contributors to these causes of repeats. The highest repetition rate was for pelvis, 13.64%, followed by skull, 11.59%, and abdomen, 10.41%. It is estimated that the total area of wasted film in all three hospitals is 74.3 m{sup 2}. As per the average repeat rate, the cost of repeat films in the entire kingdom per year has been projected to be about US$1.82 million (SR 6.83 million) in the government hospitals only. Based on the findings of this study a set of recommendations have been prescribed for the radiology department to reduce the repeat rate and to improve the safety culture. (author)

  14. A study on radiographic repeat rate data of several hospitals in Jeddah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Malki, M.A.; Abulfaraj, W.H.; Bhuiyan, S.I.; Kinsara, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiographic repeat rate data in diagnostic radiology in King Fahad Hospital (KFH), King Abdulaziz Hospital (KAH), and Maternity and Children Hospital (MCH) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, have been studied. The study provided valuable information to suggest preventive measures to reduce repeats. The variables included in the study are exposure techniques, examination types, total number of films used, number of films repeated, the film sizes, gender, the age groups of the patients, and reason for repetition. The total number of examinations in all three hospitals is 6001 using 8887 films on 5412 patients. The average repeat rate was 7.93%, where the individual hospital repeat rates were 9.57% in the MCH, 7.84% in KAH and 7.44% in KFH. The repeat rate for children and infants was found to be undesirable. The quality assurance (QA) programme can effectively reduce the unnecessary exposure and can identify the cause of the exposure. The overexposure, underexposure and position fault were the foremost contributors for repeats and constitute 32.91%, 28.94% and 22.98% of the total respectively. The QA study identified that human error and equipment malfunction are the major contributors to these causes of repeats. The highest repetition rate was for pelvis, 13.64%, followed by skull, 11.59%, and abdomen, 10.41%. It is estimated that the total area of wasted film in all three hospitals is 74.3 m 2 . As per the average repeat rate, the cost of repeat films in the entire kingdom per year has been projected to be about US$1.82 million (SR 6.83 million) in the government hospitals only. Based on the findings of this study a set of recommendations have been prescribed for the radiology department to reduce the repeat rate and to improve the safety culture. (author)

  15. Variations of Patient Doses in Interventional Examinations at Different Angiographic Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor, Dogan; Toklu, Tuerkay; Olgar, Turan; Sancak, Tanzer; Cekirge, Saruhan; Onal, Baran; Bilgic, Sadik

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. We analyzed doses for various angiographic procedures using different X-ray systems in order to assess dose variations. Methods. Dose-area product (DAP), skin doses from thermoluminescent dosimeters and air kerma measurements of 308 patients (239 diagnostic and 69 interventional) were assessed for five different angiographic units. All fluoroscopic and radiographic exposure parameters were recorded online for single and multiprojection studies. Radiation outputs of each X-ray system were also measured for all the modes of exposure using standard protocols for such measurements. Results. In general, the complexity of the angiographic procedure was found to be the most important reason for high radiation doses. Skill of the radiologist, management of the exposure parameters and calibration of the system are the other factors to be considered. Lateral cerebral interventional studies carry the highest risk for deterministic effects on the lens of the eye. Effective doses were calculated from DAP measurements and maximum fatal cancer risk factors were found for carotid studies. Conclusions. Interventional radiologists should measure patient doses for their examinations. If there is a lack of necessary instrumentation for this purpose, then published dose reports should be used in order to predict the dose levels from some of the exposure parameters. Patient dose information should include not only the measured quantity but also the measured radiation output of the X-ray unit and exposure parameters used during radiographic and fluoroscopic exposures

  16. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  17. Psychological and physiological responses following repeated peer death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Pizarro Andersen

    Full Text Available Undergraduates at a university in the United States were exposed - directly and indirectly - to 14 peer deaths during one academic year. We examined how individual and social factors were associated with psychological (e.g., anxiety, depression, somatization and physiological (i.e., cortisol distress responses following this unexpected and repeated experience with loss.Two to three months after the final peer death, respondents (N = 122, 61% female, 18-23 years, M = 20.13, SD = 1.14 reported prior adverse experiences, degree of closeness with the deceased, acute responses to the peer deaths, ongoing distress responses, social support, support seeking, and media viewing. A subset (n = 24 returned hair samples for evaluation of cortisol responses during the previous 3 months.Ongoing psychological distress was associated with a prior interpersonal trauma, b fewer social supports, and c media exposure to news of the deaths (p's25 p/mg compared to individuals with one or two prior bereavement experiences (who were, on average, within the normal range, 10 to 25 p/mg (p<.05. Only 8% of the sample utilized available university psychological or physical health resources and support groups.Limited research has examined the psychological and physiological impact of exposure to chronic, repeated peer loss, despite the fact that there are groups of individuals (e.g., police, military soldiers that routinely face such exposures. Prior adversity appears to play a role in shaping psychological and physiological responses to repeated loss. This topic warrants further research given the health implications of repeated loss for individuals in high-risk occupations and university settings.

  18. Value of radiographic examination of the knee joint for the orthopedic surgeon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, M.; Hofmann, S.

    2006-01-01

    Extended radiographic examinations offer excellent options for diagnosis and strategy for treatment of the knee joint. The whole-leg radiograph is indispensable in measuring alignment for osteotomy or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fluoroscopically assisted varus-valgus stress radiographs provide the possibility for verifying mechanical function of the implanted knee prosthesis. Ultrasound examinations have been widely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is the golden standard to examine intra-articular structures of the knee (meniscus, ligaments, cartilage) and surrounding soft tissue. For evaluating femoral and tibial torsion and determining axial rotation of TKA, computed tomography (CT) is best qualified. Imaging of the patellofemoral joint (patella instability) is difficult; CT scans in combination with true lateral radiographs seem to be helpful. (orig.) [de

  19. Assessment of radiation dose due to fluoroscopic procedures in patients at some selected facilities in the Greater Accra Region, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyasi, E.

    2013-07-01

    Radiation doses to 182 adults patients who underwent barium enema, barium meal, barium swallow, myelogram, hysterosalpingography and urethrogram examination collectively at facilities A and B were investigated. Radiation dose was measured using kerma-area-product (KAP) meter. From the KAP readings, patient's data and other relevant information from the control console, effective dose and selective organ doses were estimated using Monte Carlo program software (PCXMC version 1.5). Quality control tests performed on the two fluoroscopy machines were found to be within the acceptance criteria. Mean effective doses were found to be 8.45 ± 0.38mSv, 7.628 ± 0.42 mSv, 1.46 ± 0.13 mSv, 2.02 ± 0.16 mSv, 0.32 ± 0.03 mSv for barium enema, barium meal, barium swallow, myelogram and urethrogram examinations respectively at Facility A. At Facility B the mean effective dose were found to be 4.12 ± 0.15 mSv, 1.83 ± 0.10 mSv, 0.81 ± 0.04 mSv, 0.53 ± 0.036 mSv and 0.27 ± 0.01 mSv for barium enema, barium meal, barium swallow, myelogram, hysterosalpingography and urethrogram examination respectively. Thymus received the highest organ dose of 29.19± 2.07mGy during barium meal studies at Facility A of all the procedures in the two hospitals. Magnitude of organ doses was observed to to be in relation with the closeness to or in the direction of the primary beam of radiation. Organ and effective doses from Facility A were relatively higher than those from Facility B in comparison by a factor of a about 2 with the exception of the barium meal examination at Facility A which was by a factor of about 4. The measured KAP readings fro the two facilities were below the international accepted reference levels with the exception of barium meal examination at Facility A which recorded a higher value of 25.96 ± 1.83 Gy.cm 2 as compared to ICRP (2001) reference value of 25 Gy.cm 2 . Longer radiation beam on time, high number of radiographs taken per patient, wide exposure beam area on

  20. Role of memory errors in quantum repeaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, L.; Kraus, B.; Briegel, H.-J.; Duer, W.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the influence of memory errors in the quantum repeater scheme for long-range quantum communication. We show that the communication distance is limited in standard operation mode due to memory errors resulting from unavoidable waiting times for classical signals. We show how to overcome these limitations by (i) improving local memory and (ii) introducing two operational modes of the quantum repeater. In both operational modes, the repeater is run blindly, i.e., without waiting for classical signals to arrive. In the first scheme, entanglement purification protocols based on one-way classical communication are used allowing to communicate over arbitrary distances. However, the error thresholds for noise in local control operations are very stringent. The second scheme makes use of entanglement purification protocols with two-way classical communication and inherits the favorable error thresholds of the repeater run in standard mode. One can increase the possible communication distance by an order of magnitude with reasonable overhead in physical resources. We outline the architecture of a quantum repeater that can possibly ensure intercontinental quantum communication

  1. Value of Examination Under Fluoroscopy for the Assessment of Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskander, Jonathan P; Ripoll, Juan G; Calixto, Frank; Beakley, Burton D; Baker, Jeffrey T; Healy, Patrick J; Gunduz, O H; Shi, Lizheng; Clodfelter, Jamie A; Liu, Jinan; Kaye, Alan D; Sharma, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Pain emanating from the sacroiliac (SI) joint can have variable radiation patterns. Single physical examination tests for SI joint pain are inconsistent with multiple tests increasing both sensitivity and specificity. To evaluate the use of fluoroscopy in the diagnosis of SI joint pain. Prospective double blind comparison study. Pain clinic and radiology setting in urban Veterans Administration (VA) in New Orleans, Louisiana. Twenty-two adult men, patients at a southeastern United States VA interventional pain clinic, presented with unilateral low back pain of more than 2 months' duration. Patients with previous back surgery were excluded from the study. Each patient was given a Gapping test, Patrick (FABERE) test, and Gaenslen test. A second blinded physician placed each patient prone under fluoroscopic guidance, asking each patient to point to the most painful area. Pain was provoked by applying pressure with the heel of the palm in that area to determine the point of maximum tenderness. The area was marked with a radio-opaque object and was placed on the mark with a fluoroscopic imgage. A site within 1 cm of the SI joint was considered as a positive test. This was followed by a diagnostic injection under fluoroscopy with 1 mL 2% lidocaine. A positive result was considered as more than 2 hours of greater than 75% reduction in pain. Then, in 2-3 days this was followed by a therapeutic injection under fluoroscopy with 1 mL 0.5% bupivacaine and 40 mg methylprednisolone. Each patient was reassessed after 6 weeks. The sensitivity and specificity in addition to the positive and negative predictive values were determined for both the conventional examinations, as well as the examination under fluoroscopy. Finally, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed to evaluate test performance. The sensitivity and specificity of the fluoroscopic examination were 0.82 and 0.80 respectively; Positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 0.93 and

  2. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D.; Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L.; Sze, Daniel Y.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver’s cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51–71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction

  3. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80–90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60–90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  4. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Sze, Daniel Y., E-mail: dansze@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51-71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction.

  5. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubuchon, Adam C., E-mail: acaubuchon@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Balamucki, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  6. The accuracy and safety of fluoroscopically guided percutaneous pedicle screws in the lumbosacral junction and the lumbar spine: a review of 880 screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, C K; Kwan, M K; Chan, C Y W; Schaefer, C; Hansen-Algenstaedt, N

    2015-08-01

    We undertook a retrospective study investigating the accuracy and safety of percutaneous pedicle screws placed under fluoroscopic guidance in the lumbosacral junction and lumbar spine. The CT scans of patients were chosen from two centres: European patients from University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, and Asian patients from the University of Malaya, Malaysia. Screw perforations were classified into grades 0, 1, 2 and 3. A total of 880 percutaneous pedicle screws from 203 patients were analysed: 614 screws from 144 European patients and 266 screws from 59 Asian patients. The mean age of the patients was 58.8 years (16 to 91) and there were 103 men and 100 women. The total rate of perforation was 9.9% (87 screws) with 7.4% grade 1, 2.0% grade 2 and 0.5% grade 3 perforations. The rate of perforation in Europeans was 10.4% and in Asians was 8.6%, with no significant difference between the two (p = 0.42). The rate of perforation was the highest in S1 (19.4%) followed by L5 (14.9%). The accuracy and safety of percutaneous pedicle screw placement are comparable to those cited in the literature for the open method of pedicle screw placement. Greater caution must be taken during the insertion of L5 and S1 percutaneous pedicle screws owing to their more angulated pedicles, the anatomical variations in their vertebral bodies and the morphology of the spinal canal at this location. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  7. Quantitative comparison using Generalized Relative Object Detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution Microangiographic Fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, M; Shankar, A; Jain, A; Setlur Nagesh, S V; Ionita, C N; Scott, C; Karim, K S; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2016-02-27

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25 μ m pixel pitch, and 1000 μ m thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/ μ m bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-prewhitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal-spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide breakthrough abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  8. Intra-operative fiducial-based CT/fluoroscope image registration framework for image-guided robot-assisted joint fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino, Giulio; Georgilas, Ioannis; Morad, Samir; Gibbons, Peter; Tarassoli, Payam; Atkins, Roger; Dogramadzi, Sanja

    2017-08-01

    Joint fractures must be accurately reduced minimising soft tissue damages to avoid negative surgical outcomes. To this regard, we have developed the RAFS surgical system, which allows the percutaneous reduction of intra-articular fractures and provides intra-operative real-time 3D image guidance to the surgeon. Earlier experiments showed the effectiveness of the RAFS system on phantoms, but also key issues which precluded its use in a clinical application. This work proposes a redesign of the RAFS's navigation system overcoming the earlier version's issues, aiming to move the RAFS system into a surgical environment. The navigation system is improved through an image registration framework allowing the intra-operative registration between pre-operative CT images and intra-operative fluoroscopic images of a fractured bone using a custom-made fiducial marker. The objective of the registration is to estimate the relative pose between a bone fragment and an orthopaedic manipulation pin inserted into it intra-operatively. The actual pose of the bone fragment can be updated in real time using an optical tracker, enabling the image guidance. Experiments on phantom and cadavers demonstrated the accuracy and reliability of the registration framework, showing a reduction accuracy (sTRE) of about [Formula: see text] (phantom) and [Formula: see text] (cadavers). Four distal femur fractures were successfully reduced in cadaveric specimens using the improved navigation system and the RAFS system following the new clinical workflow (reduction error [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]. Experiments showed the feasibility of the image registration framework. It was successfully integrated into the navigation system, allowing the use of the RAFS system in a realistic surgical application.

  9. LabVIEW Graphical User Interface for a New High Sensitivity, High Resolution Micro-Angio-Fluoroscopic and ROI-CBCT System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleshis, C; Ionita, Cn; Yadava, G; Patel, V; Bednarek, Dr; Hoffmann, Kr; Verevkin, A; Rudin, S

    2008-01-01

    A graphical user interface based on LabVIEW software was developed to enable clinical evaluation of a new High-Sensitivity Micro-Angio-Fluoroscopic (HSMAF) system for real-time acquisition, display and rapid frame transfer of high-resolution region-of-interest images. The HSMAF detector consists of a CsI(Tl) phosphor, a light image intensifier (LII), and a fiber-optic taper coupled to a progressive scan, frame-transfer, charged-coupled device (CCD) camera which provides real-time 12 bit, 1k × 1k images capable of greater than 10 lp/mm resolution. Images can be captured in continuous or triggered mode, and the camera can be programmed by a computer using Camera Link serial communication. A graphical user interface was developed to control the camera modes such as gain and pixel binning as well as to acquire, store, display, and process the images. The program, written in LabVIEW, has the following capabilities: camera initialization, synchronized image acquisition with the x-ray pulses, roadmap and digital subtraction angiography acquisition (DSA), flat field correction, brightness and contrast control, last frame hold in fluoroscopy, looped playback of the acquired images in angiography, recursive temporal filtering and LII gain control. Frame rates can be up to 30 fps in full-resolution mode. The user friendly implementation of the interface along with the high framerate acquisition and display for this unique high-resolution detector should provide angiographers and interventionalists with a new capability for visualizing details of small vessels and endovascular devices such as stents and hence enable more accurate diagnoses and image guided interventions. (Support: NIH Grants R01NS43924, R01EB002873).

  10. Intraoperative three-dimensional fluoroscopy after transpedicular positioning of Kirschner-wire versus conventional intraoperative biplanar fluoroscopic control: A retrospective study of 345 patients and 1880 pedicle screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: Retrospective study. Objective: The aim was to find out whether intraoperative three-dimensional imaging after transpedicular positioning of Kirschner wire (K-wire in lumbar and thoracic posterior instrumentation procedures is of benefit to the patients and if this technique is accurately enough to make a postoperative screw position control through computer tomography (CT dispensable. Patients and Methods: Lumbar and thoracic posterior instrumentation procedures conducted at our department between 2002 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups: group A, including patients who underwent intraoperative three-dimensional scan after transpedicular positioning of the K-wire and group B, including patients who underwent only intraoperative biplanar fluoroscopy. An early postoperative CT of the instrumented section was done in all cases to assess the screw position. The rate of immediate intraoperative correction of the K-wires in cases of mal-positioning, as well as the rate of postoperative screw revisions, was measured. Results: In general, 345 patients (1880 screws were reviewed and divided into two groups; group A with 225 patients (1218 screws and group B with 120 patients (662 screws. One patient (0.44% (one screw [0.082%] of group A underwent postoperative screw correction while screw revisions were necessary in 14 patients (11.7% (28 screws [4.2%] of group B. Twenty-three patients (10.2% (28 K-wires [2.3%] of group A underwent intraoperative correction due to primary intraoperative detected K-wire mal-position. None of the corrected K-wires resulted in a corresponding neurological deficit. Conclusion: Three-dimensional imaging after transpedicular K-wire positioning leads to solid intraoperative identification of misplaced K-wires prior to screw placement and reduces screw revision rates compared with conventional fluoroscopic control. When no clinical deterioration emerges, a

  11. Investigation on effect of image lag in fluoroscopic images obtained with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) on accuracy of target tracking in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Sanada, Sigeru; Mori, Shinichiro; Dobashi, Suguru; Kumagai, Motoki; Minohara, Shinichi; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Real-time tumor tracking in external radiotherapy can be achieved by diagnostic (kV) X-ray imaging with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). The purpose of this study was to address image lag in target tracking and its influence on the accuracy of tumor tracking. Fluoroscopic images were obtained using a direct type of dynamic FPD. Image lag properties were measured without test devices according to IEC 62220-1. Modulation transfer function (MTF) and profile curves were measured on the edges of a moving tungsten plate at movement rate of 10 and 20 mm/s, covering lung tumor movement of normal breathing. A lung tumor and metal sphere with blurred edge due to image lag was simulated using the results and then superimposed on breathing chest radiographs of a patient. The moving target with and without image lag was traced using a template-matching technique. In the results, the image lag for the first frame after X-ray cutoff was 2.0% and decreased to less than 0.1% in the fifth frame. In the measurement of profile curves on the edges of static and moving tungsten material plates, the effect of image lag was seen as blurred edges of the plate. The blurred edges of a moving target were indicated as reduction of MTF. However, the target could be traced within an error of ±5 mm. The results indicated that there was no effect of image lag on target tracking in usual breathing speed in a radiotherapy situation. (author)

  12. Repeating pneumatic pellet injector in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Suzuki, Sadaaki; Miura, Yukitoshi; Oda, Yasushi; Onozuka, Masanori; Tsujimura, Seiichi.

    1992-09-01

    A repeating pneumatic pellet injector has been developed and constructed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This injector can provide repetitive pellet injection to fuel tokamak plasmas for an extended period of time, aiming at the improvement of plasma performance. The pellets with nearly identical speed and mass can be repeatedly injected with a repetition rate of 2-3.3 Hz and a speed of up to 1.7 km/s by controlling the temperature of the cryogenic system, the piston speed and the pressure of the propellant gas. (author)

  13. Repeating pneumatic pellet injector in JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Suzuki, Sadaaki; Miura, Yukitoshi (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment); Oda, Yasushi; Onozuka, Masanori; Tsujimura, Seiichi.

    1992-09-01

    A repeating pneumatic pellet injector has been developed and constructed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This injector can provide repetitive pellet injection to fuel tokamak plasmas for an extended period of time, aiming at the improvement of plasma performance. The pellets with nearly identical speed and mass can be repeatedly injected with a repetition rate of 2-3.3 Hz and a speed of up to 1.7 km/s by controlling the temperature of the cryogenic system, the piston speed and the pressure of the propellant gas. (author).

  14. The relationship of social support concept and repeat mammography among Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadifar, Fariba; Taymoori, Parvaneh; Bahrami, Mitra; Zarea, Shamsy

    2015-10-24

    Breast cancer ranks as the first most common cancer among the Iranian women. The regular repeat of mammography with 1-2 year intervals leads to the increased efficiency of early detection of breast cancer. The present study examined the predictors of repeat mammography. It was hypothesized that higher social support is connected with mammography repeat. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 400 women 50 years and older in Sanandaj, Iran. Data was collected by the questionnaire including information on socio demographical variables and measuring social support level. Data was analyzed by SPSS16 software. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the predictive power of demographic variables and dimensions of social support for repeat mammography. Women aged 50-55 years had three times odds of repeat mammography compared to women aged 56-60 years) OR, 3.02). Married women had greater odds of repeat mammography compared to single women (P women with higher social support was 0.93 times greater than the women with lower social support (OR, 0.93; 95 % CI, 0.91-0.95; P women are less likely repeat mammography than other Asian women. Identifying the associations between perceived social support and repeat mammography may offer detailed information to allow for future study and guide the development of interventions not only for Iranian women but also for similar cultural that received pay too little attention to date in the breast cancer literature.

  15. Genetic Contributors to Intergenerational CAG Repeat Instability in Huntington's Disease Knock-In Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, João Luís; Lee, Jong-Min; Afridi, Ali; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Dempsey, Stephani; Lager, Brenda; Alonso, Isabel; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro

    2017-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Longer repeat sizes are associated with increased disease penetrance and earlier ages of onset. Intergenerationally unstable transmissions are common in HD families, partly underlying the genetic anticipation seen in this disorder. HD CAG knock-in mouse models also exhibit a propensity for intergenerational repeat size changes. In this work, we examine intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat in over 20,000 transmissions in the largest HD knock-in mouse model breeding datasets reported to date. We confirmed previous observations that parental sex drives the relative ratio of expansions and contractions. The large datasets further allowed us to distinguish effects of paternal CAG repeat length on the magnitude and frequency of expansions and contractions, as well as the identification of large repeat size jumps in the knock-in models. Distinct degrees of intergenerational instability were observed between knock-in mice of six background strains, indicating the occurrence of trans-acting genetic modifiers. We also found that lines harboring a neomycin resistance cassette upstream of Htt showed reduced expansion frequency, indicative of a contributing role for sequences in cis, with the expanded repeat as modifiers of intergenerational instability. These results provide a basis for further understanding of the mechanisms underlying intergenerational repeat instability. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Modeling intraindividual variability with repeated measures data methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hershberger, Scott L

    2013-01-01

    This book examines how individuals behave across time and to what degree that behavior changes, fluctuates, or remains stable.It features the most current methods on modeling repeated measures data as reported by a distinguished group of experts in the field. The goal is to make the latest techniques used to assess intraindividual variability accessible to a wide range of researchers. Each chapter is written in a ""user-friendly"" style such that even the ""novice"" data analyst can easily apply the techniques.Each chapter features:a minimum discussion of mathematical detail;an empirical examp

  17. Ecological Panel Inference from Repeated Cross Sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelzer, Ben; Eisinga, Rob; Franses, Philip Hans

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents a Markov chain model for the estimation of individual-level binary transitions from a time series of independent repeated cross-sectional (RCS) samples. Although RCS samples lack direct information on individual turnover, it is demonstrated here that it is possible with these

  18. Preventing Repeat Teen Births PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-02

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the April 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses repeat teen births and ways teens, parents and guardians, health care providers, and communities can help prevent them.  Created: 4/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/2/2013.

  19. Costly renegotiation in repeated Bertand games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ola; Wengström, Erik Roland

    2010-01-01

    This paper extends the concept of weak renegotiation-proof equilibrium (WRP) to allow for costly renegotiation and shows that even small renegotiation costs can have dramatic effects on the set of equilibria. More specifically, the paper analyzes the infinitely repeated Bertrand game. It is shown...

  20. On Solving Intransitivities in Repeated Pairwise Choices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Maas (Arne); Th.G.G. Bezembinder (Thom); P.P. Wakker (Peter)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractAn operational method is presented for deriving a linear ranking of alternatives from repeated paired comparisons of the alternatives. Intransitivities in the observed preferences are cleared away by the introduction of decision errors of varying importance. An observed preference

  1. Repeated checking induces uncertainty about future threat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giele, C.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/318754460; Engelhard, I.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239681533; van den Hout, M.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070445354; Dek, E.C.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313959552; Damstra, Marianne; Douma, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that obsessive-compulsive (OC) -like repeated checking paradoxically increases memory uncertainty. This study tested if checking also induces uncertainty about future threat by impairing the distinction between danger and safety cues. Participants (n = 54) engaged in a simulated

  2. FRB 121102: A Starquake-induced Repeater?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiyang; Luo, Rui; Yue, Han; Chen, Xuelei; Lee, Kejia; Xu, Renxin

    2018-01-01

    Since its initial discovery, the fast radio burst (FRB) FRB 121102 has been found to be repeating with millisecond-duration pulses. Very recently, 14 new bursts were detected by the Green Bank Telescope during its continuous monitoring observations. In this paper, we show that the burst energy distribution has a power-law form which is very similar to the Gutenberg–Richter law of earthquakes. In addition, the distribution of burst waiting time can be described as a Poissonian or Gaussian distribution, which is consistent with earthquakes, while the aftershock sequence exhibits some local correlations. These findings suggest that the repeating FRB pulses may originate from the starquakes of a pulsar. Noting that the soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) also exhibit such distributions, the FRB could be powered by some starquake mechanisms associated with the SGRs, including the crustal activity of a magnetar or solidification-induced stress of a newborn strangeon star. These conjectures could be tested with more repeating samples.

  3. On balanced minimal repeated measurements designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeel Ahmad Mir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated Measurements designs are concerned with scientific experiments in which each experimental unit is assigned more than once to a treatment either different or identical. This class of designs has the property that the unbiased estimators for elementary contrasts among direct and residual effects are obtainable. Afsarinejad (1983 provided a method of constructing balanced Minimal Repeated Measurements designs p < t , when t is an odd or prime power, one or more than one treatment may occur more than once in some sequences and  designs so constructed no longer remain uniform in periods. In this paper an attempt has been made to provide a new method to overcome this drawback. Specifically, two cases have been considered                RM[t,n=t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=1 for balanced minimal repeated measurements designs and  RM[t,n=2t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=2 for balanced  repeated measurements designs. In addition , a method has been provided for constructing              extra-balanced minimal designs for special case RM[t,n=t2/(p-1,p], λ2=1.

  4. Repeater For A Digital-Communication Bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Guzman, Esteban; Olson, Stephen; Heaps, Tim

    1993-01-01

    Digital repeater circuit designed to extend range of communication on MIL-STD-1553 bus beyond original maximum allowable length of 300 ft. Circuit provides two-way communication, one way at time, and conforms to specifications of MIL-STD-1553. Crosstalk and instability eliminated.

  5. Repeated wildfires alter forest recovery of mixed-conifer ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens-Rumann, Camille; Morgan, Penelope

    2016-09-01

    Most models project warmer and drier climates that will contribute to larger and more frequent wildfires. However, it remains unknown how repeated wildfires alter post-fire successional patterns and forest structure. Here, we test the hypothesis that the number of wildfires, as well as the order and severity of wildfire events interact to alter forest structure and vegetation recovery and implications for vegetation management. In 2014, we examined forest structure, composition, and tree regeneration in stands that burned 1-18 yr before a subsequent 2007 wildfire. Three important findings emerged: (1) Repeatedly burned forests had 15% less woody surface fuels and 31% lower tree seedling densities compared with forests that only experienced one recent wildfire. These repeatedly burned areas are recovering differently than sites burned once, which may lead to alternative ecosystem structure. (2) Order of burn severity (high followed by low severity compared with low followed by high severity) did influence forest characteristics. When low burn severity followed high, forests had 60% lower canopy closure and total basal area with 92% fewer tree seedlings than when high burn severity followed low. (3) Time between fires had no effect on most variables measured following the second fire except large woody fuels, canopy closure and tree seedling density. We conclude that repeatedly burned areas meet many vegetation management objectives of reduced fuel loads and moderate tree seedling densities. These differences in forest structure, composition, and tree regeneration have implications not only for the trajectories of these forests, but may reduce fire intensity and burn severity of subsequent wildfires and may be used in conjunction with future fire suppression tactics. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  6. Exposition of the operator's eye lens and efficacy of radiation shielding in fluoroscopically guided interventions; Exposition der Augenlinse des Untersuchers und Effizienz der Strahlenschutzmittel bei fluoroskopischen Interventionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galster, M.; Adamus, R. [Klinikum Nuernberg-Nord, Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Guhl, C. [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik; Uder, M. [Erlangen Univ. (Germany). Radiologisches Inst.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Efficacy of radiation protection tools for the eye lens dose of the radiologist in fluoroscopic interventions. Materials and Methods: A patient phantom was exposed using a fluoroscopic system. Dose measurements were made at the eye location of the radiologist using an ionization chamber. The setting followed typical fluoroscopic interventions. The reduction of scattered radiation by the equipment-mounted shielding (undercouch drapes and overcouch top) was evaluated. The ceiling-suspended lead acrylic glass screen was tested in scattered radiation generated by a slab phantom. The protective properties of different lead glass goggles and lead acrylic visors were evaluated by thermoluminescence measurements on a head phantom in the primary beam. Results: The exposition of the lens of about 110 to 550 {mu}Sv during radiologic interventions is only slightly reduced by the undercouch drapes. Applying the top in addition to the drapes reduces the lens dose by a factor of 2 for PA projections. In 25 LAO the dose is reduced by a factor between 1.2 and 5. The highest doses were measured for AP angulations furthermore the efficacy of the equipment-mounted shielding is minimal. The ceiling-suspended lead screen reduced scatter by a factor of about 30. The lead glass goggles and visors reduced the lens dose up to a factor of 8 to 10. Depending on the specific design, the tested models are less effective especially for radiation from lateral with cranial angulation of the beam. Occasionally the visors even caused an increase of dose. Conclusion: The exposition of the eye lens can be kept below the new occupational limit recommended by the ICRP if the radiation shielding equipment is used consistently. (orig.)

  7. Self-Expandable Metallic Stent for the Palliative Treatment of Obstructing Left-Sided Colorectal Cancer under Fluoroscopic Guidance: A Comparison of the Clinical Results according to Stent Diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Pyeong Guk; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Min Hee; Park, Hae Won; Chung, Eun Chul [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of self-expandable metallic stent for the palliative treatment of obstructing left-sided colorectal cancer under fluoroscopic guidance, and to compare results according to the stent diameter. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 31 self-expandable metallic stents were placed into 25 patients for palliative purposes. The rates of technical success, clinical success, complications associated with stent insertion, patient survival, and primary stent patency were evaluated. The results were also compared between two groups: 13 patients using stents with a diameter of 22 mm and 12 patients using stents with a diameter of 26 mm. The technical and clinical success rates were 93.5 and 90.3%, respectively. The complications included severe abdominal pain (6.5%), minor rectal bleeding (9.7%), stent migration (9.7%), and tumor ingrowth or overgrowth (9.7%). No statistical differences in technical were detected between the two groups for the clinical success rate and complication rates. The mean survival time was 5.5 +- 1.4 months. The primary stent patency rates were 91.3% at 5 months, 85.2% at 10 months, and 77.4% at 15 months. The mean period of stent patency was 12.4 +- 2.6 months. The mean period of primary stent patency was 16.4 +- 2.6 months in the 26 mm stent group, and significantly higher than 5.4 +- 1.4 months in the 22 mm stent group (p=0.031). A self-expandable metallic stent under fluoroscopic guidance, for the palliative treatment of obstructing left-sided colorectal cancer, was feasible and effective, and yielded good clinical results. The period of primary stent patency of the 26 mm stent group was longer than the 22 mm stent group, and the complication rate was not significantly different between the two stent groups

  8. Self-Expandable Metallic Stent for the Palliative Treatment of Obstructing Left-Sided Colorectal Cancer under Fluoroscopic Guidance: A Comparison of the Clinical Results according to Stent Diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Pyeong Guk; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Min Hee; Park, Hae Won; Chung, Eun Chul; Kim, Sam Soo

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of self-expandable metallic stent for the palliative treatment of obstructing left-sided colorectal cancer under fluoroscopic guidance, and to compare results according to the stent diameter. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 31 self-expandable metallic stents were placed into 25 patients for palliative purposes. The rates of technical success, clinical success, complications associated with stent insertion, patient survival, and primary stent patency were evaluated. The results were also compared between two groups: 13 patients using stents with a diameter of 22 mm and 12 patients using stents with a diameter of 26 mm. The technical and clinical success rates were 93.5 and 90.3%, respectively. The complications included severe abdominal pain (6.5%), minor rectal bleeding (9.7%), stent migration (9.7%), and tumor ingrowth or overgrowth (9.7%). No statistical differences in technical were detected between the two groups for the clinical success rate and complication rates. The mean survival time was 5.5 ± 1.4 months. The primary stent patency rates were 91.3% at 5 months, 85.2% at 10 months, and 77.4% at 15 months. The mean period of stent patency was 12.4 ± 2.6 months. The mean period of primary stent patency was 16.4 ± 2.6 months in the 26 mm stent group, and significantly higher than 5.4 ± 1.4 months in the 22 mm stent group (p=0.031). A self-expandable metallic stent under fluoroscopic guidance, for the palliative treatment of obstructing left-sided colorectal cancer, was feasible and effective, and yielded good clinical results. The period of primary stent patency of the 26 mm stent group was longer than the 22 mm stent group, and the complication rate was not significantly different between the two stent groups

  9. Fluoroscopic-guided primary single-step percutaneous gastrostomy. Initial results using the Freka {sup registered} GastroTube; Primaere einzeitige durchleuchtungsgesteuerte perkutane Gastrostomie (PG). Erste Ergebnisse mit dem Freka {sup registered} GastroTube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahne, J.D.; Schoennagel, B.P.; Arndt, C.; Bannas, P.; Koops, A.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.R. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Zentrum fuer Radiologie; Herrmann, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Zentrum fuer Radiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Abt. Paediatrische Radiologie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the practicability and outcome of fluoroscopic-guided primary one-step treatment of percutaneous gastrostomy (PG) with the system Freka {sup registered} Gastro Tube (Fresenius Kabi, Germany). Materials and Methods: In 39 patients (mean age 62.7 {+-} 12.0 years), primary PG was performed based on clinical indication from August 2009 to April 2010. The intervention was performed by an experienced radiologist under aseptic conditions by direct puncture with Freka {sup registered} Gastro Tube under fluoroscopic guidance. The clinical data and outcome as well as any complications originated from the electronic archive of the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf. Results: The intervention was technically successful in all 39 patients. Within the mean follow-up time of 155.3 {+-} 73.6 days, 29 patients (74.4 %) did not experience complications. 10 patients (25.6 %) had to be revised. Complications manifested after a mean of 135.6 {+-} 61.2 days and mainly corresponded to accidental dislocation (50 %). One patient had to be surgically revised under suspicion of a malpositioned tube and suspected intestinal perforation. Clinically relevant wound infections were not detected. The total costs per patient were 553.17 Euro for our single-step treatment (OPS 5 - 431.x) vs. 963.69 Euro (OPS 5 - 431.x and OPS 8 - 123.0) for the recommended two-step treatment. Conclusion: Fluoroscopic-guided primary single-step treatment with Freka {sup registered} Gastro Tube system is feasible and not associated with an increased complication rate when compared to published literature applying a two-step treatment approach. Material costs as well as human and time resources could be significantly reduced using the single-step treatment. (orig.)

  10. Characterization of the repeat expansion size in C9orf72 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dols-Icardo, Oriol; García-Redondo, Alberto; Rojas-García, Ricard; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Noguera, Aina; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Pastor, Pau; Hernández, Isabel; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; Suárez-Calvet, Marc; Antón-Aguirre, Sofía; Amer, Guillermo; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Blesa, Rafael; Fortea, Juan; Alcolea, Daniel; Capdevila, Aura; Antonell, Anna; Lladó, Albert; Muñoz-Blanco, José Luís; Mora, Jesús S; Galán-Dávila, Lucía; Rodríguez De Rivera, Francisco Javier; Lleó, Alberto; Clarimón, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions within the C9orf72 gene are the most important genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The difficulty of developing a precise method to determine the expansion size has hampered the study of possible correlations between the hexanucleotide repeat number and clinical phenotype. Here we characterize, through a new non-radioactive Southern blot protocol, the expansion size range in a series of 38 ALS and 22 FTD heterozygous carriers of >30 copies of the repeat. Maximum, median and modal hexanucleotide repeat number were higher in ALS patients than in FTD patients (P< 0.05 in all comparisons). A higher median number of repeats correlated with a bigger range of repeat sizes (Spearman's ρ = 0.743, P = 1.05 × 10(-11)). We did not find any correlation between age of onset or disease duration with the repeat size in neither ALS nor FTD mutation carriers. Clinical presentation (bulbar or spinal) in ALS patients did not correlate either with the repeat length. We finally analyzed two families with affected and unaffected repeat expansion carriers, compared the size of the repeat expansion between two monozygotic (MZ) twins (one affected of ALS and the other unaffected), and examined the expansion size in two different tissues (cerebellum and peripheral blood) belonging to the same FTD patient. The results suggested that the length of the C9orf72 repeat varies between family members, including MZ twins, and among different tissues from the same individual.

  11. Myotonin protein-kinase [AGC]n trinucleotide repeat in seven nonhuman primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelli, G.; Sineo, L.; Pontieri, E. [Catholic Univ. of Rome (Italy)]|[Univ. of Milan (Italy)]|[Univ. Florence (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is due to a genomic instability of a trinucleotide [AGC]n motif, located at the 3{prime} UTR region of a protein-kinase gene (myotonin protein kinase, MT-PK). The [AGC] repeat is meiotically and mitotically unstable, and it is directly related to the manifestations of the disorder. Although a gene dosage effect of the MT-PK has been demonstrated n DM muscle, the mechanism(s) by which the intragenic repeat expansion leads to disease is largely unknown. This non-standard mutational event could reflect an evolutionary mechanism widespread among animal genomes. We have isolated and sequenced the complete 3{prime}UTR region of the MT-PK gene in seven primates (macaque, orangutan, gorilla, chimpanzee, gibbon, owl monkey, saimiri), and examined by comparative sequence nucleotide analysis the [AGC]n intragenic repeat and the surrounding nucleotides. The genomic organization, including the [AGC]n repeat structure, was conserved in all examined species, excluding the gibbon (Hylobates agilis), in which the [AGC]n upstream sequence (GGAA) is replaced by a GA dinucleotide. The number of [AGC]n in the examined species ranged between 7 (gorilla) and 13 repeats (owl monkeys), with a polymorphism informative content (PIC) similar to that observed in humans. These results indicate that the 3{prime}UTR [AGC] repeat within the MT-PK gene is evolutionarily conserved, supporting that this region has important regulatory functions.

  12. The repeatability of three diagnostic methods (visual using ICDAS II, laser fluorescence, and radiographic) for early caries detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukmasari, S.; Lestari, W.; Ko, B. B.; Noh, Z.; Asmail, N.; Yaacob, N.

    2017-08-01

    Newly introduced ICDAS II as a visual method, laser fluorescence as another technique that have ability to quantify early mineral loss of tooth structure and intra oral radiograph, are methods can be used in the clinic. To provide standardization for comprehensive caries management at an early stage, all methods supposed to be tested between users. The objective of this research is to evaluate the repeatability of each system. It is a comparative cross sectional study using 100 extracted permanent teeth without obvious cavitation (premolar & molar) that were collected and stored in thymol solution. The teeth were embedded on the wax block and labeled with numbers. All 5 surfaces were examined by 5 examiners using visual (ICDAS II), laser fluorescence (LF) and radiographic examination. The data were then analyzed to measure intra and inter examiner repeatability using Cronbach’s alpha and inter-item correlation matrix. Intra-examiner repeatability for all examiners was >0.7. Chronbach’s a value for inter-examiner repeatability for ICDAS II was >0.8 on 3 surfaces except on buccal and lingual. LF exhibit repeatability of >0.8 on all surfaces. Radiograph shows a low value of inter examiner repeatability (students for inter-item correlation while the 2nd and 3rd reading of LF displays the best agreement. ICDAS II score favors more non-invasive treatment compared to LF. ICDAS II showed good repeatability except on buccal and lingual surfaces. In line with some of the previous study, ICDAS II is applicable for caries detection in daily clinical basis. Laser fluorescence exhibits the highest repeatability while the radiograph showed weak inter-examiner repeatability. Treatment decisions of ICDAS II propose more preventive treatment for early caries lesions compared to laser fluorescence.

  13. Repeated examination of natural sapovirus infections in pig litters raised under experimental conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøl; Hansen, Mette Sif; Johnsen, Christina K

    2015-01-01

    Porcine sapovirus, belonging to the family Caliciviridae, is an enteric virus that is widespread in the swine industry worldwide. A total of 14 sapovirus genogroups have been suggested and the most commonly found genogroup in swine is genogroup III (GIII). The goal of the present experiment was t...

  14. DNA Replication Dynamics of the GGGGCC Repeat of the C9orf72 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, Ryan Griffin; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-11-27

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures in addition to the normal B-form DNA, including hairpins and quadruplexes. These structures are implicated in a number of neurological diseases and cancer. Expansion of a GGGGCC repeat located at C9orf72 is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This repeat expands from two to 24 copies in normal individuals to several hundreds or thousands of repeats in individuals with the disease. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that as little as four repeats have the ability to form a stable DNA secondary structure known as a G-quadruplex. Quadruplex structures have the ability to disrupt normal DNA processes such as DNA replication and transcription. Here we examine the role of GGGGCC repeat length and orientation on DNA replication using an SV40 replication system in human cells. Replication through GGGGCC repeats leads to a decrease in overall replication efficiency and an increase in instability in a length-dependent manner. Both repeat expansions and contractions are observed, and replication orientation is found to influence the propensity for expansions or contractions. The presence of replication stress, such as low-dose aphidicolin, diminishes replication efficiency but has no effect on instability. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrates a replication stall with as few as 20 GGGGCC repeats. These results suggest that replication of the GGGGCC repeat at C9orf72 is perturbed by the presence of expanded repeats, which has the potential to result in further expansion, leading to disease. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Somatic mosaicism of androgen receptor CAG repeats in colorectal carcinoma epithelial cells from men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Francesco; Alvarado, Carlos; Gologan, Adrian; Youssef, Emad; Voda, Linda; Mitmaker, Elliot; Beitel, Lenore K; Gordon, Philip H; Trifiro, Mark

    2009-06-01

    The X-linked human androgen receptor gene (AR) contains an exonic polymorphic trinucleotide CAG. The length of this encoded CAG tract inversely affects AR transcriptional activity. Colorectal carcinoma is known to express the androgen receptor, but data on somatic CAG repeat lengths variations in malignant and normal epithelial cells are still sporadic. Using laser capture microdissection (LCM), epithelial cells from colorectal carcinoma and normal-appearing mucosa were collected from the fresh tissue of eight consecutive male patients undergoing surgery (mean age, 70 y; range, 54-82). DNA isolated from each LCM sample underwent subsequent PCR and DNA sequencing to precisely determine AR CAG repeat lengths and the presence of microsatellite instability (MSI). Different AR CAG repeat lengths were observed in colorectal carcinoma (ranging from 0 to 36 CAG repeats), mainly in the form of multiple shorter repeat lengths. This genetic heterogeneity (somatic mosaicism) was also found in normal-appearing colorectal mucosa. Half of the carcinoma cases examined tended to have a higher number of AR CAG repeat lengths with a wider range of repeat size variation compared to normal mucosa. MSI carcinomas tended to have longer median AR CAG repeat lengths (n = 17) compared to microsatellite stable carcinomas (n = 14), although the difference was not significant (P = 0.31, Mann-Whitney test). Multiple unique somatic mutations of the AR CAG repeats occur in colorectal mucosa and in carcinoma, predominantly resulting in shorter alleles. Colorectal epithelial cells carrying AR alleles with shorter CAG repeat lengths may be more androgen-sensitive and therefore have a growth advantage.

  16. Deception and Retribution in Repeated Ultimatum Bargaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles; Croson; Murnighan

    2000-11-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics of deception and retribution in repeated ultimatum bargaining. Anonymous dyads exchanged messages and offers in a series of four ultimatum bargaining games that had prospects for relatively large monetary outcomes. Variations in each party's knowledge of the other's resources and alternatives created opportunities for deception. Revelation of prior unknowns exposed deceptions and created opportunities for retribution in subsequent interactions. Results showed that although proposers and responders chose deceptive strategies almost equally, proposers told more outright lies. Both were more deceptive when their private information was never revealed, and proposers were most deceptive when their potential profits were largest. Revelation of proposers' lies had little effect on their subsequent behavior even though responders rejected their offers more than similar offers from truthful proposers or proposers whose prior deceit was never revealed. The discussion and conclusions address the dynamics of deception and retribution in repeated bargaining interactions. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. Governing conditions of repeatable Barkhausen noise response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupakov, O.; Pal'a, J.; Takagi, T.; Uchimoto, T.

    2009-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the establishment of experimental conditions, which ensure the repeatability of magnetic Barkhausen noise testing in practice. For this task, the measurements were performed on open flat samples using different experimental configurations, including: different magnetization frequencies, sampling rates, and filter cut-off frequencies; using a sample-wrapped coil and using attached pick-up coils of various dimensions, with different lift-offs of a single yoke magnet and of the attached coil. The sample magnetization was controlled by a vertical array of three Hall sensors; their readings were extrapolated to the sample surface to precisely define its field. After analysis of the results, a scheme for an optimized sensor with a controlled field waveform was suggested to improve the measurement repeatability. The important issues of signal processing and parameter applicability were also discussed in detail.

  18. Nonparametric additive regression for repeatedly measured data

    KAUST Repository

    Carroll, R. J.

    2009-05-20

    We develop an easily computed smooth backfitting algorithm for additive model fitting in repeated measures problems. Our methodology easily copes with various settings, such as when some covariates are the same over repeated response measurements. We allow for a working covariance matrix for the regression errors, showing that our method is most efficient when the correct covariance matrix is used. The component functions achieve the known asymptotic variance lower bound for the scalar argument case. Smooth backfitting also leads directly to design-independent biases in the local linear case. Simulations show our estimator has smaller variance than the usual kernel estimator. This is also illustrated by an example from nutritional epidemiology. © 2009 Biometrika Trust.

  19. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneau, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.bruneau@u-cergy.fr [Laboratoire AGM, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Site Saint-Martin, BP 222, 95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Joye, Alain, E-mail: Alain.Joye@ujf-grenoble.fr [Institut Fourier, UMR 5582, CNRS-Université Grenoble I, BP 74, 38402 Saint-Martin d’Hères (France); Merkli, Marco, E-mail: merkli@mun.ca [Department of Mathematics and Statistics Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL Canada A1C 5S7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  20. Toxicological characteristics of petroleum products repeated exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Rubin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The ability of petroleum products to initiate cumulative effects was assessed in experimental intragastric admission to male albino rats for one month. The analysis of skin-resorptive effects was performed using "test-tube" method on the skin of rats’ tails. It has been established that petroleum products can penetrate the intact skin and, with repeated admission, cause a general toxic effect. There were reductions bodyweights, the negative effect on the function of the kidneys and liver, changes of hematological parameters, as well as activation of the antioksidatnoy system. Repeated intragastric administration does not lead to the death of the animals testifying to the lack of accumulation capacity for petroleum products at the level of functional mortal effects, the cumulation coefficient being > 5.1. Negative impact on urinary function and hepatobiliary system, changes in hematological parameters and activation of the «lipid peroxidation – antioksidant defense» were observed.

  1. Childhood experiences and repeated suicidal behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Gertrud; Nielsen, Bent; Rask, P

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of various events in childhood on suicidal behavior in adult age. For this purpose, 99 patients admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of Odense University Hospital after making a suicide attempt were followed for 5 years, to register repeated...... that the psychological climate of the home may be more important than the rupture of early home life. It is noteworthy that the group of repeaters, as against the first-evers, could be characterized by personality disorders and abuse, especially of alcohol: disorders known to be precipitated by a discordant childhood....... It is commonly agreed that the experience in childhood of suicidal behavior among family members or other persons in the close environment is of importance in future suicidal risk. The results of this study indicate that the predictive value of this factor mainly applies to attempts with no fatal outcome...

  2. Firefighting and mental health: Experiences of repeated exposure to trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Sara A; Poston, Walker S Carlos; Haddock, Christopher K; Murphy, Beth

    2016-02-15

    Firefighters must be ready to respond to a broad range of emergencies every duty day. In the course of many of these emergencies, firefighters witness events which have the potential to induce emotional trauma, such as badly injured people, deceased children, and individuals who are highly distraught. Previous research suggests that repeated exposure to these traumas (RET) may have negative impacts on the emotional and mental health of fire service personnel. Research on the mental health of firefighters has been limited to small surveys reporting the prevalence of specific mental health problems such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder among firefighters. Despite the likelihood that RET leads to negative outcomes in firefighters, data is lacking on how exposure impacts fire service personnel. The current study examines the experiences of firefighters related to RET. Using formative research methods, we examined the beliefs and experiences of firefighters and administrators from across the United States regarding the impact of RET on firefighter health. Study findings highlight the cumulative psychological toll of repeated exposure to traumatic events including desensitization, flashbacks, and irritability. Results of the current study suggest that RET is a significant concern for emergency responders that warrants additional research and attention. It is likely that the long term consequences of RET are closely intertwined with other mental health outcomes and general well-being of this important occupational group.

  3. Repeated radiation injuries by fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilenko, I.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to repeated radiation injuries during internal irradiation of theoretical and practical interest, particularly in case of the intake into organism of young products of nuclear fission (PNF). The results of experiments with dogs with repeated radioactive iodine injury the isotopes of which (131-135sub(I)) constitute a considerable part of PNF activity are discussed. The blood reaction and protein metabolism state have been studied. Observations for dogs have been continued for about 4 years. The doses for thyroid, gastrointestinal tract and liver subjected to the most intensive irradiation consituted in the first series of experiments after the first intake about 3;0.3;0.05 Gy, after the second - 5;0.5;0.08 Gy and in the second series of experiments - 3;0.3;0.05 Gy and 0.6;0.06;0.01 Gy, respectively. Hematologic factors,thyroid function, changes in exchange and immunologic reactivity have been studied. The dogs have been under observation for 5 years. It is shown in case of repeated intake of Isup(131) PNF into animals organism in quantity which does not cause during the acute period a clinically outlined sickness, substantial differences in the organism reaction as compared with the first intake of radionuclides have not been found. The presence of residual radiation injuries did not cause charging action during the acute period during PNF and repeated intake which in the author's opinion testifies to perfection of compensator mechanisms in case of intake of such quantities of radioactive products. At the remote periods blastomogenic action manifested which is estimated as a result of general biological action of radionuclides administered to the organism. The necessity in subsequent investigations for obtaining the data on organism reactivity, clinic and pathogenesis with the aim of prophylaxis and treatment of such injuries is indicated

  4. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible...... to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range....

  5. Electrochemical detection of DNA triplet repeat expansion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojta, Miroslav; Havran, Luděk; Vojtíšková, Marie; Paleček, Emil

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 21 (2004), s. 6532-6533 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4004402; GA AV ČR IBS5004355; GA AV ČR KJB4004302; GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : DNA triplet repeat expansion * PCR amplification * neurodegenerative diseases Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.903, year: 2004

  6. Repeatability and Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    SIGMOD has offered, since 2008, to verify the experiments published in the papers accepted at the conference. This year, we have been in charge of reproducing the experiments provided by the authors (repeatability), and exploring changes to experiment parameters (workability). In this paper, we a...... find that most experiments are distributed as Linux packages accompanied by instructions on how to setup and run the experiments. We are still far from the vision of executable papers...

  7. SU-G-IeP3-05: Effects of Image Receptor Technology and Dose Reduction Software On Radiation Dose Estimates for Fluoroscopically-Guided Interventional (FGI) Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merritt, Z; Dave, J; Eschelman, D; Gonsalves, C [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of image receptor technology and dose reduction software on radiation dose estimates for most frequently performed fluoroscopically-guided interventional (FGI) procedures at a tertiary health care center. Methods: IRB approval was obtained for retrospective analysis of FGI procedures performed in the interventional radiology suites between January-2011 and December-2015. This included procedures performed using image-intensifier (II) based systems which were subsequently replaced, flat-panel-detector (FPD) based systems which were later upgraded with ClarityIQ dose reduction software (Philips Healthcare) and relatively new FPD system already equipped with ClarityIQ. Post procedure, technologists entered system-reported cumulative air kerma (CAK) and kerma-area product (KAP; only KAP for II based systems) in RIS; these values were analyzed. Data pre-processing included correcting typographical errors and cross-verifying CAK and KAP. The most frequent high and low dose FGI procedures were identified and corresponding CAK and KAP values were compared. Results: Out of 27,251 procedures within this time period, most frequent high and low dose procedures were chemo/immuno-embolization (n=1967) and abscess drainage (n=1821). Mean KAP for embolization and abscess drainage procedures were 260,657, 310,304 and 94,908 mGycm{sup 2}, and 14,497, 15,040 and 6307 mGycm{sup 2} using II-, FPD- and FPD with ClarityIQ- based systems, respectively. Statistically significant differences were observed in KAP values for embolization procedures with respect to different systems but for abscess drainage procedures significant differences were only noted between systems with FPD and FPD with ClarityIQ (p<0.05). Mean CAK reduced significantly from 823 to 308 mGy and from 43 to 21 mGy for embolization and abscess drainage procedures, respectively, in transitioning to FPD systems with ClarityIQ (p<0.05). Conclusion: While transitioning from II- to FPD- based

  8. A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, D. R.; Ionita, Ciprian; Rudin, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The increasing need for better image quality and high spatial resolution for successful endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) and the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art detectors provide motivation to develop a detector system tailored to the specific, demanding requirements of neurointerventional applications.Method: A microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high-resolution, region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower-resolution full field-of-view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images (30 frames per second) with high-resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a Gen 2 dual-stage microchannel plate light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. A 300 μm thick CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. The LII is the key component of the MAF and the large variable gain provided by it enables the MAF to operate as a quantum-noise-limited detector for both fluoroscopy and angiography. Results: The linear cascade model was used to predict the theoretical performance of the MAF, and the theoretical prediction showed close agreement with experimental findings. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQE were used to gauge the detector performance up to 10 cycles/mm. The measured zero frequency DQE(0) was 0.55 for an RQA5 spectrum. A total of 21 stages were identified for the whole imaging chain and each stage was characterized individually. Conclusions: The linear cascade model analysis provides insight into the imaging chain and may be useful for further development of the MAF detector. The preclinical testing of the prototype detector in animal procedures is showing encouraging results and points to the potential for significant impact on EIGIs when used in conjunction with a state

  9. Prosthesis alignment affects axial rotation motion after total knee replacement: a prospective in vivo study combining computed tomography and fluoroscopic evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harman Melinda K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical consequences of alignment errors in total knee replacement (TKR have led to the rigorous evaluation of surgical alignment techniques. Rotational alignment in the transverse plane has proven particularly problematic, with errors due to component malalignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and an overall mismatch between the femoral and tibial components’ relative positions. Ranges of nominal rotational alignment are not well defined, especially for the tibial component and for relative rotational mismatch, and some studies advocate the use of mobile-bearing TKR to accommodate the resulting small rotation errors. However, the relationships between prosthesis rotational alignment and mobile-bearing polyethylene insert motion are poorly understood. This prospective, in vivo study evaluates whether component malalignment and mismatch affect axial rotation motions during passive knee flexion after TKR. Methods Eighty patients were implanted with mobile-bearing TKR. Rotational alignment of the femoral and tibial components was measured from postoperative CT scans. All TKR were categorized into nominal or outlier groups based on defined norms for surgical rotational alignment relative to bone anatomic landmarks and relative rotational mismatch between the femoral and tibial components. Axial rotation motion of the femoral, tibial and polyethylene bearing components was measured from fluoroscopic images acquired during passive knee flexion. Results Axial rotation motion was generally accomplished in two phases, dominated by polyethylene bearing rotation on the tibial component in early to mid-flexion and then femoral component rotation on the polyethylene articular surface in later flexion. Opposite rotations of the femur-bearing and bearing-baseplate articulations were evident at flexion greater than 80°. Knees with outlier alignment had lower magnitudes of axial rotation and distinct transitions from external to

  10. SU-C-210-04: Considerable Pancreatic Tumor Motion During Breath-Hold Measured Using Intratumoral Fiducials On Fluoroscopic Movies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lens, E; Horst, A van der; Versteijne, E; Tienhoven, G van; Bel, A [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using a breath hold (BH) technique during radiotherapy of pancreatic tumors is expected to reduce intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor motion during BH. Methods: In this pilot study, we included 8 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients. All had 2– 4 intratumoral gold fiducials. Patients were asked to perform 3 consecutive 30-second end-inhale BHs on day 5, 10 and 15 of their three-week treatment. During BH, airflow through a mouthpiece was measured using a spirometer. Any inadvertent flow of air during BH was monitored for all patients. We measured tumor motion on lateral fluoroscopic movies (57 in total) made during BH. In each movie the fiducials as a group were tracked over time in superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction using 2-D image correlation between consecutive frames. We determined for each patient the range of intra-BH motion over all movies; we also determined the absolute means and standard deviations (SDs) for the entire patient group. Additionally, we investigated the relation between inadvertent airflow during BH and the intra-BH motion. Results: We found intra-BH tumor motion of up to 12.5 mm (range, 1.0–12.5 mm) in SI direction and up to 8.0 mm (range, 1.0–8.0 mm) in AP direction. The absolute mean motion over the patient population was 4.7 (SD: 3.0) mm and 2.8 (SD: 1.2) mm in the SI and AP direction, respectively. Patients were able to perform stable consecutive BHs; during only 20% of the movies we found very small airflows (≤ 65 ml). These were mostly stepwise in nature and could not explain the continuous tumor motions we observed. Conclusion: We found substantial (up to 12.5 mm) pancreatic tumor motion during BHs. We found minimal inadvertent airflow, seen only during a minority of BHs, and this did not explain the obtained results. This work was supported by the foundation Bergh in het Zadel through the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF Kankerbestrijding) project No. UVA 2011-5271.

  11. Effect of repeated burning on plant and soil carbon and nitrogen in cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dominated ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel Jones; Jeanne C. Chambers; Dale W. Johnson; Robert R. Blank; David I. Board

    2015-01-01

    Fire has profound effects on ecosystem properties, but few studies have addressed the effect of repeated burns on soil nutrients, and none have been conducted in cold desert ecosystems where invasion by exotic annual grasses is resulting in greater fire frequency. In a 5 year study, we examined effects of repeated burning, litter removal, and post-fire seeding on...

  12. Repeated Strains, Social Control, Social Learning, and Delinquency: Testing an Integrated Model of General Strain Theory in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wan-Ning; Haas, Ain; Chen, Xiaojin; Pi, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    In Agnew's general strain theory, repeated strains can generate crime and delinquency by reducing social control and fostering social learning of crime. Using a sample of 615 middle-and high-school students in China, this study examines how social control and social learning variables mediate the effect of repeated strains in school and at home on…

  13. Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Flannery, Thomas J.; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas, we assessed tumor control, clinical outcomes, and the risk of adverse radiation effects in patients whose tumors progressed after initial management. Methods and Materials: During a 21-year experience at our center, 1,352 patients underwent SRS as management for their acoustic neuromas. We retrospectively identified 6 patients who underwent SRS twice for the same tumor. The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-71 years). All patients had imaging evidence of tumor progression despite initial SRS. One patient also had incomplete surgical resection after initial SRS. All patients were deaf at the time of the second SRS. The median radiosurgery target volume at the time of the initial SRS was 0.5 cc and was 2.1 cc at the time of the second SRS. The median margin dose at the time of the initial SRS was 13 Gy and was 11 Gy at the time of the second SRS. The median interval between initial SRS and repeat SRS was 63 months (range, 25-169 months). Results: At a median follow-up of 29 months after the second SRS (range, 13-71 months), tumor control or regression was achieved in all 6 patients. No patient developed symptomatic adverse radiation effects or new neurological symptoms after the second SRS. Conclusions: With this limited experience, we found that repeat SRS for a persistently enlarging acoustic neuroma can be performed safely and effectively.

  14. A Unified Model for Repeating and Non-repeating Fast Radio Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagchi, Manjari

    2017-01-01

    The model that fast radio bursts (FRBs) are caused by plunges of asteroids onto neutron stars can explain both repeating and non-repeating bursts. If a neutron star passes through an asteroid belt around another star, there would be a series of bursts caused by a series of asteroid impacts. Moreover, the neutron star would cross the same belt repetitively if it were in a binary with the star hosting the asteroid belt, leading to a repeated series of bursts. I explore the properties of neutron star binaries that could lead to the only known repeating FRB so far (FRB121102). In this model, the next two epochs of bursts are expected around 2017 February 27 and 2017 December 18. On the other hand, if the asteroid belt is located around the neutron star itself, then a chance fall of an asteroid from that belt onto the neutron star would lead to a non-repeating burst. Even a neutron star grazing an asteroid belt can lead to a non-repeating burst caused by just one asteroid plunge during the grazing. This is possible even when the neutron star is in a binary with the asteroid-hosting star, if the belt and the neutron star orbit are non-coplanar.

  15. A Unified Model for Repeating and Non-repeating Fast Radio Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagchi, Manjari, E-mail: manjari@imsc.res.in [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences (IMSc-HBNI), 4th Cross Road, CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2017-04-01

    The model that fast radio bursts (FRBs) are caused by plunges of asteroids onto neutron stars can explain both repeating and non-repeating bursts. If a neutron star passes through an asteroid belt around another star, there would be a series of bursts caused by a series of asteroid impacts. Moreover, the neutron star would cross the same belt repetitively if it were in a binary with the star hosting the asteroid belt, leading to a repeated series of bursts. I explore the properties of neutron star binaries that could lead to the only known repeating FRB so far (FRB121102). In this model, the next two epochs of bursts are expected around 2017 February 27 and 2017 December 18. On the other hand, if the asteroid belt is located around the neutron star itself, then a chance fall of an asteroid from that belt onto the neutron star would lead to a non-repeating burst. Even a neutron star grazing an asteroid belt can lead to a non-repeating burst caused by just one asteroid plunge during the grazing. This is possible even when the neutron star is in a binary with the asteroid-hosting star, if the belt and the neutron star orbit are non-coplanar.

  16. Fixed-flexion knee radiography using a new positioning device produced highly repeatable measurements of joint space width: ELSA-Brasil Musculoskeletal Study (ELSA-Brasil MSK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Rosa Weiss; Costa-Silva, Luciana; Machado, Luciana A C; Reis, Rodrigo Citton Padilha Dos; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    To describe the performance of a non-fluoroscopic fixed-flexion PA radiographic protocol with a new positioning device, developed for the assessment of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health Musculoskeletal Study (ELSA-Brasil MSK). A test-retest design including 19 adults (38 knee images) was conducted. Feasibility of the radiographic protocol was assessed by image quality parameters and presence of radioanatomic alignment according to intermargin distance (IMD) values. Repeatability was assessed for IMD and joint space width (JSW) measured at three different locations. Approximately 90% of knee images presented excellent quality. Frequencies of nearly perfect radioanatomic alignment (IMD ≤1mm) ranged from 29% to 50%, and satisfactory alignment was found in up to 71% and 76% of the images (IMD ≤1.5mm and ≤1.7mm, respectively). Repeatability analyses yielded the following results: IMD [SD of mean difference=1.08; coefficient of variation (%CV)=54.68%; intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (95%CI)=0.59 (0.34-0.77)]; JSW [SD of mean difference=0.34-0.61; %CV=4.48%-9.80%; ICC (95%CI)=0.74 (0.55-0.85)-0.94 (0.87-0.97)]. Adequately reproducible measurements of IMD and JSW were found in 68% and 87% of the images, respectively. Despite the difficulty in achieving consistent radioanatomic alignment between subsequent radiographs in terms of IMD, the protocol produced highly repeatable JSW measurements when these were taken at midpoint and 10mm from the medial extremity of the medial tibial plateau. Therefore, measurements of JSW at these locations can be considered adequate for the assessment of knee OA in ELSA-Brasil MSK. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  17. Fixed-flexion knee radiography using a new positioning device produced highly repeatable measurements of joint space width: ELSA-Brasil Musculoskeletal Study (ELSA-Brasil MSK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Weiss Telles

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe the performance of a non-fluoroscopic fixed-flexion PA radiographic protocol with a new positioning device, developed for the assessment of knee osteoarthritis (OA in Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health Musculoskeletal Study (ELSA-Brasil MSK. Material and methods: A test–retest design including 19 adults (38 knee images was conducted. Feasibility of the radiographic protocol was assessed by image quality parameters and presence of radioanatomic alignment according to intermargin distance (IMD values. Repeatability was assessed for IMD and joint space width (JSW measured at three different locations. Results: Approximately 90% of knee images presented excellent quality. Frequencies of nearly perfect radioanatomic alignment (IMD ≤1 mm ranged from 29% to 50%, and satisfactory alignment was found in up to 71% and 76% of the images (IMD ≤1.5 mm and ≤1.7 mm, respectively. Repeatability analyses yielded the following results: IMD [SD of mean difference = 1.08; coefficient of variation (%CV = 54.68%; intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC (95%CI = 0.59 (0.34–0.77]; JSW [SD of mean difference = 0.34–0.61; %CV = 4.48%–9.80%; ICC (95%CI = 0.74 (0.55–0.85–0.94 (0.87–0.97]. Adequately reproducible measurements of IMD and JSW were found in 68% and 87% of the images, respectively. Conclusions: Despite the difficulty in achieving consistent radioanatomic alignment between subsequent radiographs in terms of IMD, the protocol produced highly repeatable JSW measurements when these were taken at midpoint and 10 mm from the medial extremity of the medial tibial plateau. Therefore, measurements of JSW at these locations can be considered adequate for the assessment of knee OA in ELSA-Brasil MSK.

  18. Potentials and limitations of histone repeat sequences for phylogenetic reconstruction of Sophophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, A M; Les, D H; Strausbaugh, L D

    1999-11-01

    Simplified DNA sequence acquisition has provided many new data sets that are useful for phylogenetic reconstruction, including single- and multiple-copy nuclear and organellar genes. Although transcribed regions receive much attention, nontranscribed regions have recently been added to the repertoire of sequences suitable for phylogenetic studies, especially for closely related taxa. We evaluated the efficacy of a small portion of the histone repeat for phylogenetic reconstruction among Drosophila species. Histone repeats in invertebrates offer distinct advantages similar to those of widely used ribosomal repeats. First, the units are tandemly repeated and undergo concerted evolution. Second, histone repeats include both highly conserved coding and variable intergenic regions. This composition facilitates application of "universal" primers spanning potentially informative sites. We examined a small region of the histone repeat, including the intergenic spacer segments of coding regions from the divergently transcribed H2A and H2B histone genes. The spacer (about 230 bp) exists as a mosaic with highly conserved functional motifs interspersed with rapidly diverging regions; the former aid in alignment of the spacer. There are no ambiguities in alignment of coding regions. Coding and noncoding regions were analyzed together and separately for phylogenetic information. Parsimony, distance, and maximum-likelihood methods successfully retrieve the corroborated phylogeny for the taxa examined. This study demonstrates the resolving power of a small histone region which may now be added to the growing collection of phylogenetically useful DNA sequences.

  19. Frequency of X-ray diagnostic examinations in Japan, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Nishizawa, Kanae; Noda, Yutaka; Iwai, Kazuo; Mase, Naomichi.

    1993-01-01

    This is the results of actural survey done during a period October 17-24, 1986. Questionnaire was sent to randomely selected 1596 hospitals throughout the country. Nine hundred and fifty-seven hospitals responded it, consisting of 30 with 1000 beds or more, 58 with 300-999 beds, 216 with 20-299 beds, 623 with 20 beds or less, and 30 other special hospitals. The annual number of diagnostic X-ray examinations was 497 millions and 100 thousands (261 millions and 300 thousands for men and 235 millions and 800 thousands for women), which was increased by approximately 50%, as compared with the figure in 1979. The number of X-rays per patient averaged 3.5, being almost equal to that in 1979. The total number of X-ray examinations per diagnosis was 141 millions and 500 thousands (75 millions for men and 66 millions and 500 thousands for women). This figure was also increased by approximately 50% as compared with 1979. The number of X-ray examinations per person of the population increased with advancing age; the average of X-ray examinations was approximately 4 once a year at the age of 40, approximately 8 twice a year at the age of 60, and approximately 10 three times a year at the age of 70. The annual number of fluoroscopic examinations was 25 millions and 290 thousands (14 millions and 510 thousands for men and 10 millions and 780 thousands for women). The number of X-ray examinations for pregnant women was 660 thousands. (N.K.)

  20. Measurement of patient skin absorbed dose in ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, and examination of treatment protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shohji, Tomokazu; Hiramatsu, Masaki; Hasome, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    The ablation for atrial fibrillation minute movement done in our hospital is 250 minutes or less, within an average time of 150 minutes during a fluoroscopic time of about 7 hours, with very large average inspection times numerical values. However, the skin-absorbed dose could be understood only from the numerical value of the area dosimeter. It was considered that the total dose that reached the threshold was sufficient, although radiation injury would not be reported from the ablation currently done at our hospital. Therefore, we aimed to examine the inspection protocol in this hospital, and to request the patient be given an inspection dose that was the average skin-absorbed dose by using the acryl board. The amount of a total dose for an inspection of 150 minutes of fluoroscopic time was about 2.7 Gy. Moreover, a value of 1.5 Gy was indicated in the hot spot as a result of repetition in some exposure fields. However, it was thought that the possibility of exceeding the threshold of 2 Gy depending on the inspection situation in the future and other factors was tolerable because these measurements were done so as not to overvalue it more than the necessary. (author)

  1. Repeated mild closed head injury impairs short-term visuospatial memory and complex learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylin, Michael J; Orsi, Sara A; Rozas, Natalia S; Hill, Julia L; Zhao, Jing; Redell, John B; Moore, Anthony N; Dash, Pramod K

    2013-05-01

    Concussive force can cause neurocognitive and neurobehavioral dysfunction by inducing functional, electrophysiological, and/or ultrastructural changes within the brain. Although concussion-triggered symptoms typically subside within days to weeks in most people, in 15%-20% of the cases, symptomology can continue beyond this time point. Problems with memory, attention, processing speed, and cognitive flexibility (e.g., problem solving, conflict resolution) are some of the prominent post-concussive cognitive symptoms. Repeated concussions (with loss or altered consciousness), which are common to many contact sports, can exacerbate these symptoms. The pathophysiology of repeated concussions is not well understood, nor is an effective treatment available. In order to facilitate drug discovery to treat post-concussive symptoms (PCSs), there is a need to determine if animal models of repeated mild closed head injury (mCHI) can mimic the neurocognitive and histopathological consequences of repeated concussions. To this end, we employed a controlled cortical impact (CCI) device to deliver a mCHI directly to the skull of mice daily for 4 days, and examined the ensuing neurological and neurocognitive functions using beam balance, foot-fault, an abbreviated Morris water maze test, context discrimination, and active place avoidance tasks. Repeated mCHI exacerbated vestibulomotor, motor, short-term memory and conflict learning impairments as compared to a single mCHI. Learning and memory impairments were still observed in repeated mCHI mice when tested 3 months post-injury. Repeated mCHI also reduced cerebral perfusion, prolonged the inflammatory response, and in some animals, caused hippocampal neuronal loss. Our results show that repeated mCHI can reproduce some of the deficits seen after repeated concussions in humans and may be suitable for drug discovery studies and translational research.

  2. Characteristics of intergenerational contractions of the CTG repeat in myotonic dystropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashizawa, T.; Anvret, M.; Grandell, U.; Baiget, M.; Cobo, A.M.; Barcelo, J.M.; Korneluk, R.G.; Dallapiccola, B.; Novelli, G.; Fenwick, R.G. Jr. (and others)

    1994-03-01

    In myotonic dystropy (DM), the size of a CTG repeat in the DM kinase gene generally increases in successive generations with clinical evidence of anticipation. However, there have also been cases with an intergenerational contraction of the repeat. The authors have examined 1,489 DM parent-offspring pairs, of which 95 (6.4%) showed such contractions in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). In 56 of th 95 pairs, clinical data allowed an analysis of their anticipation status. It is surprising that anticipation occurred in 27 (48%) of these 56 pairs, while none clearly showed a later onset of DM in the asymptomatic offspring. The contraction occurred in 76 (10%) of 753 paternal transmission and in 19 (3%) of 736 maternal transmissions. Anticipation was observed more frequently in maternal (85%) than in paternal (37%) transmissions (P<.001). The parental repeat size correlated with the size of intergenerational contraction (r[sup 2] = .50, P [much lt].001), and the slope of linear regression was steeper in paternal ([minus].62) than in maternal ([minus].30) transmissions (P [much lt].001). Sixteen DM parents had multiple DM offspring with the CTG repeat contractions. This frequency was higher than the frequency expected from the probability of the repeat contractions (6.4%) and the size of DM sib population (1.54 DM offspring per DM parent, in 968 DM parents). The authors conclude that (1) intergenerational contraction of the CTG repeat in leukocyte DNA frequently accompanies apparent anticipation, especially when DM is maternally transmitted, and (2) the paternal origin of the repeat and the presence of the repeat contraction in a sibling increase the probability of the CTG repeat contraction. 43 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  3. Identifying uniformly mutated segments within repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinalp, S Cenk; Eichler, Evan; Goldberg, Paul; Berenbrink, Petra; Friedetzky, Tom; Ergun, Funda

    2004-12-01

    Given a long string of characters from a constant size alphabet we present an algorithm to determine whether its characters have been generated by a single i.i.d. random source. More specifically, consider all possible n-coin models for generating a binary string S, where each bit of S is generated via an independent toss of one of the n coins in the model. The choice of which coin to toss is decided by a random walk on the set of coins where the probability of a coin change is much lower than the probability of using the same coin repeatedly. We present a procedure to evaluate the likelihood of a n-coin model for given S, subject a uniform prior distribution over the parameters of the model (that represent mutation rates and probabilities of copying events). In the absence of detailed prior knowledge of these parameters, the algorithm can be used to determine whether the a posteriori probability for n=1 is higher than for any other n>1. Our algorithm runs in time O(l4logl), where l is the length of S, through a dynamic programming approach which exploits the assumed convexity of the a posteriori probability for n. Our test can be used in the analysis of long alignments between pairs of genomic sequences in a number of ways. For example, functional regions in genome sequences exhibit much lower mutation rates than non-functional regions. Because our test provides means for determining variations in the mutation rate, it may be used to distinguish functional regions from non-functional ones. Another application is in determining whether two highly similar, thus evolutionarily related, genome segments are the result of a single copy event or of a complex series of copy events. This is particularly an issue in evolutionary studies of genome regions rich with repeat segments (especially tandemly repeated segments).

  4. Multivariate linear models and repeated measurements revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Methods for generalized analysis of variance based on multivariate normal theory have been known for many years. In a repeated measurements context, it is most often of interest to consider transformed responses, typically within-subject contrasts or averages. Efficiency considerations leads...... to sphericity assumptions, use of F tests and the Greenhouse-Geisser and Huynh-Feldt adjustments to compensate for deviations from sphericity. During a recent implementation of such methods in the R language, the general structure of such transformations was reconsidered, leading to a flexible specification...

  5. Repeat Sequence Proteins as Matrices for Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummy, L.; Koerner, H; Phillips, D; McAuliffe, J; Kumar, M; Farmer, B; Vaia, R; Naik, R

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant protein-inorganic nanocomposites comprised of exfoliated Na+ montmorillonite (MMT) in a recombinant protein matrix based on silk-like and elastin-like amino acid motifs (silk elastin-like protein (SELP)) were formed via a solution blending process. Charged residues along the protein backbone are shown to dominate long-range interactions, whereas the SELP repeat sequence leads to local protein/MMT compatibility. Up to a 50% increase in room temperature modulus and a comparable decrease in high temperature coefficient of thermal expansion occur for cast films containing 2-10 wt.% MMT.

  6. Mechanical processes with repeated attenuated impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaev, R F

    1999-01-01

    This book is devoted to considering in the general case - using typical concrete examples - the motion of machines and mechanisms of impact and vibro-impact action accompanied by a peculiar phenomenon called "impact collapse". This phenomenon is that after the initial collision, a sequence of repeated gradually quickening collisions of decreasing-to-zero intensity occurs, with the final establishment of protracted contact between the interacting bodies. The initiation conditions of the impact collapse are determined and calculation techniques for the quantitative characteristics of the corresp

  7. Development of repeating pneumatic pellet injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Y.; Onozuka, M.; Shimomura, T. (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Kobe (Japan)) (and others)

    1990-01-01

    A repeating pneumatic pellet injector has been constructed to experiment with the technique of continuous injection for fueling fusion reactors. This device is composed of a cryogenic extruder and a gun assembly in (among others) a high-vacuum vessel, diagnostic vessels, LHe, fuel-gas and propellant-gas supply systems, control and data acquisition systems, etc. The performance tests, using hydrogen, have proved that the device provides the function of extruding frozen hydrogen ribbons at the speed of 6 mm s{sup -1}, chambering pellet at the rate of 5 Hz, and injecting pellet at the speed of 900 m s{sup -1}, as planned. (author).

  8. Development of repeating pneumatic pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Y.; Onozuka, M.; Shimomura, T.

    1990-01-01

    A repeating pneumatic pellet injector has been constructed to experiment with the technique of continuous injection for fueling fusion reactors. This device is composed of a cryogenic extruder and a gun assembly in (among others) a high-vacuum vessel, diagnostic vessels, LHe, fuel-gas and propellant-gas supply systems, control and data acquisition systems, etc. The performance tests, using hydrogen, have proved that the device provides the function of extruding frozen hydrogen ribbons at the speed of 6 mm s -1 , chambering pellet at the rate of 5 Hz, and injecting pellet at the speed of 900 m s -1 , as planned. (author)

  9. The Student Volunteer Army: a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Sally; Mills, Colleen E

    2017-10-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to understanding of the factors associated with an effective emergent emergency response organisation and to provide new insights into this understudied area. It examines, through an analysis of a range of textual resources, the emergence and re-emergence of the Student Volunteer Army (SVA) during the devastating earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand, in 2010-11. This evaluation is conducted in relation to the four key features of an effective emergency response organisation: adaptability; direction; leadership; and communication. In addition, the paper aims to further understanding of 'emergency entrepreneurship' and thus of the values and strategies that underpin social entrepreneur organisations in times of normalcy. The paper concludes that the unique position of the SVA as a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation enabled it to innovate continually and to improve repeatedly its systems, relationships, and image, such that it exhibited features common to emergent and established emergency response organisations. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  10. Neonates' responses to repeated exposure to a still face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Emese; Pilling, Karen; Watt, Rachel; Pal, Attila; Orvos, Hajnalka

    2017-01-01

    The main aims of the study were to examine whether human neonates' responses to communication disturbance modelled by the still-face paradigm were stable and whether their responses were affected by their previous experience with the still-face paradigm. The still face procedure, as a laboratory model of interpersonal stress, was administered repeatedly, twice, to 84 neonates (0 to 4 day olds), with a delay of an average of 1.25 day. Frame-by-frame analysis of the frequency and duration of gaze, distressed face, crying, sleeping and sucking behaviours showed that the procedure was stressful to them both times, that is, the still face effect was stable after repeated administration and newborns consistently responded to such nonverbal violation of communication. They averted their gaze, showed distress and cried more during the still-face phase in both the first and the second administration. They also showed a carry-over effect in that they continued to avert their gaze and displayed increased distress and crying in the first reunion period, but their gaze behaviour changed with experience, in the second administration. While in the first administration the babies continued averting their gaze even after the stressful still-face phase was over, this carry-over effect disappeared in the second administration, and the babies significantly increased their gaze following the still-face phase. After excluding explanations of fatigue, habituation and random effects, a self-other regulatory model is discussed as a possible explanation for this pattern.

  11. Extending Teach and Repeat to Pivoting Wheelchairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Del Castillo

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper extends the teach-and-repeat paradigm that has been successful for the control of holonomic robots to nonholonomic wheelchairs which may undergo pivoting action over the course of their taught movement. Due to the nonholonomic nature of the vehicle kinematics, estimation is required -- in the example given herein, based upon video detection of wall-mounted cues -- both in the teaching and the tracking events. In order to accommodate motion that approaches pivoting action as well as motion that approaches straight-line action, the estimation equations of the Extended Kalman Filter and the control equations are formulated using two different definitions of a nontemporal independent variable. The paper motivates the need for pivoting action in real-life settings by reporting extensively on the abilities and limitations of estimation-based teach-and-repeat action where pivoting and near-pivoting action is disallowed. Following formulation of the equations in the near-pivot mode, the paper reports upon experiments where taught trajectories which entail a seamless mix of near-straight and near-pivot action are tracked.

  12. Repeated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tokuuye, Koichi; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Igaki, Hiroshi; Hata, Masaharu; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the safety and effectiveness of repeated proton beam therapy for newly developed or recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From June 1989 through July 2000, 225 patients with HCC underwent their first course of proton beam therapy at University of Tsukuba. Of them, 27 with 68 lesions who had undergone two or more courses were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Median interval between the first and second course was 24.5 months (range 3.3-79.8 months). Median total dose of 72 Gy in 16 fractions and 66 Gy in 16 fractions were given for the first course and the rest of the courses, respectively. Results: The 5-year survival rate and median survival period from the beginning of the first course for the 27 patients were 55.6% and 62.2 months, respectively. Five-year local control rate for the 68 lesions was 87.8%. Of the patients, 1 with Child-Pugh class B and another with class C before the last course suffered from acute hepatic failure. Conclusions: Repeated proton beam therapy for HCC is safe when the patient has a target in the peripheral region of the liver and liver function is Child-Pugh class A

  13. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  14. Aggregating quantum repeaters for the quantum internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Kato, Go

    2017-09-01

    The quantum internet holds promise for accomplishing quantum teleportation and unconditionally secure communication freely between arbitrary clients all over the globe, as well as the simulation of quantum many-body systems. For such a quantum internet protocol, a general fundamental upper bound on the obtainable entanglement or secret key has been derived [K. Azuma, A. Mizutani, and H.-K. Lo, Nat. Commun. 7, 13523 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms13523]. Here we consider its converse problem. In particular, we present a universal protocol constructible from any given quantum network, which is based on running quantum repeater schemes in parallel over the network. For arbitrary lossy optical channel networks, our protocol has no scaling gap with the upper bound, even based on existing quantum repeater schemes. In an asymptotic limit, our protocol works as an optimal entanglement or secret-key distribution over any quantum network composed of practical channels such as erasure channels, dephasing channels, bosonic quantum amplifier channels, and lossy optical channels.

  15. Repeat cesarean delivery: what indications are recorded in the medical chart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydon-Rochelle, Mona T; Gardella, Carolyn; Cárdenas, Vicky; Easterling, Thomas R

    2006-03-01

    National surveillance estimates reported a troubling 63 percent decline in the rate of vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC) from 1996 (28.3%) to 2003 (10.6%), with subsequent rising rates of repeat cesarean delivery. The study objective was to examine patterns of documented indications for repeat cesarean delivery in women with and without labor. We conducted a population-based validation study of 19 nonfederal short-stay hospitals in Washington state. Of the 4,541 women who had live births in 2000, 11 percent (n = 493) had repeat cesarean without labor and 3 percent (n = 138) had repeat cesarean with labor. Incidence of medical conditions and pregnancy complications, patterns of documented indications for repeat cesarean delivery, and perioperative complications in relation to repeat cesarean delivery with and without labor were calculated. Of the 493 women who underwent a repeat cesarean delivery without labor, "elective"(36%) and "maternal request"(18%) were the most common indications. Indications for maternal medical conditions (3.0%) were uncommon. Among the 138 women with repeat cesarean delivery with labor, 60.1 percent had failure to progress, 24.6 percent a non-reassuring fetal heart rate, 8.0 percent cephalopelvic disproportion, and 7.2 percent maternal request during labor. Fetal indications were less common (5.8%). Breech, failed vacuum, abruptio placentae, maternal complications, and failed forceps were all indicated less than 5.0 percent. Women's perioperative complications did not vary significantly between women without and with labor. Regardless of a woman's labor status, nearly 10 percent of women with repeat cesarean delivery had no documented indication as to why a cesarean delivery was performed. "Elective" and "maternal request" were common indications among women undergoing repeat cesarean delivery without labor, and nearly 10 percent of women had undocumented indications for repeat cesarean delivery in their medical record

  16. Intra-rater repeatability of the Oxford foot model in healthy children in different stages of the foot roll over process during gait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, D J; Bencke, J; Stebbins, J A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The repeatability of the Oxford foot model has been reported, but possible variations in the repeatability during the foot roll over process have not been examined. The aim of this study was to determine the relative and absolute repeatability of the model for each stage of the foot...... roll over process during gait and to compare foot kinematic data from this study with that from another centre as a preliminary examination of the model's inter-centre repeatability and validity. METHOD: Eight healthy children were tested twice at the gait laboratory. Foot kinematics from this study...... were plotted against those from an earlier repeatability study and repeatability statistics calculated for the three rockers of stance phase and swing phase. RESULTS: Foot kinematics from this study and an earlier repeatability study produced similar kinematic patterns and joint angle ranges...

  17. Behavioral sensitization after repeated formaldehyde exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, B A; Hochstatter, T

    1999-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a phenomenon whereby individuals report increased sensitivity to chemicals in the environment, and attribute their sensitivities to prior exposure to the same or often structurally unrelated chemicals. A leading hypothesis suggests that MCS is akin to behavioral sensitization observed in rodents after repeated exposure to drugs of abuse or environmental stressors. Sensitization occurring within limbic circuitry of the central nervous system (CNS) may explain the multisymptom complaints in individuals with MCS. The present studies represent the continuing development of an animal model for MCS, the basis of which is the CNS sensitization hypothesis. Three behaviors were assessed in rats repeatedly exposed to formaldehyde (Form) inhalation. In the first series of experiments, rats were given high-dose Form exposure (11 parts per million [ppm]; 1 h/day x 7 days) or low-dose Form exposure (1 ppm; either 1 h/day x 7 days or 1 h/day x 5 days/week x 4 weeks). Within a few days after discontinuing daily Form, cocaine-induced locomotor activity was elevated after high-dose Form or 20 days of low-dose Form inhalation. Approximately 1 month later, cocaine-induced locomotor activity remained significantly elevated in the 20-day Form-exposed rats. The second experiment assessed whether prior exposure to Form (20 days, as above) would alter the ability to condition to an odor (orange oil) paired with footshock. The results suggested a tendency to increase the conditioned fear response to the odor but not the context of the footshock box, and a decreased tendency to extinguish the conditioned fear response to odor. The third experiment examined whether CNS sensitization to daily cocaine or stress would alter subsequent avoidance responding to odor (Form). Daily cocaine significantly elevated approach responses to Form, while daily stress pretreatment produced a trend in the opposite direction, producing greater avoidance of Form. Preliminary

  18. Mechanical Alterations Associated with Repeated Treadmill Sprinting under Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Girard

    Full Text Available Examine the mechanical alterations associated with repeated treadmill sprinting performed in HOT (38°C and CON (25°C conditions.Eleven recreationally active males performed a 30-min warm-up followed by three sets of five 5-s sprints with 25-s recovery and 3-min between sets in each environment. Constant-velocity running for 1-min at 10 and 20 km.h-1 was also performed prior to and following sprinting.Mean skin (37.2±0.7 vs. 32.7±0.8°C; P<0.001 and core (38.9±0.2 vs. 38.8±0.3°C; P<0.05 temperatures, together with thermal comfort (P<0.001 were higher following repeated sprinting in HOT vs. CON. Step frequency and vertical stiffness were lower (-2.6±1.6% and -5.5±5.5%; both P<0.001 and contact time (+3.2±2.4%; P<0.01 higher in HOT for the mean of sets 1-3 compared to CON. Running distance per sprint decreased from set 1 to 3 (-7.0±6.4%; P<0.001, with a tendency for shorter distance covered in HOT vs. CON (-2.7±3.4%; P = 0.06. Mean vertical (-2.6±5.5%; P<0.01, horizontal (-9.1±4.4%; P<0.001 and resultant ground reaction forces (-3.0±2.8%; P<0.01 along with vertical stiffness (-12.9±2.3%; P<0.001 and leg stiffness (-8.4±2.7%; P<0.01 decreased from set 1 to 3, independently of conditions. Propulsive power decreased from set 1 to 3 (-16.9±2.4%; P<0.001, with lower propulsive power values in set 2 (-6.6%; P<0.05 in HOT vs. CON. No changes in constant-velocity running patterns occurred between conditions, or from pre-to-post repeated-sprint exercise.Thermal strain alters step frequency and vertical stiffness during repeated sprinting; however without exacerbating mechanical alterations. The absence of changes in constant-velocity running patterns suggests a strong link between fatigue-induced velocity decrements during sprinting and mechanical alterations.

  19. Mechanical Alterations Associated with Repeated Treadmill Sprinting under Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocherie, Franck; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Racinais, Sébastien; Millet, Grégoire P.; Périard, Julien D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Examine the mechanical alterations associated with repeated treadmill sprinting performed in HOT (38°C) and CON (25°C) conditions. Methods Eleven recreationally active males performed a 30-min warm-up followed by three sets of five 5-s sprints with 25-s recovery and 3-min between sets in each environment. Constant-velocity running for 1-min at 10 and 20 km.h-1 was also performed prior to and following sprinting. Results Mean skin (37.2±0.7 vs. 32.7±0.8°C; P<0.001) and core (38.9±0.2 vs. 38.8±0.3°C; P<0.05) temperatures, together with thermal comfort (P<0.001) were higher following repeated sprinting in HOT vs. CON. Step frequency and vertical stiffness were lower (-2.6±1.6% and -5.5±5.5%; both P<0.001) and contact time (+3.2±2.4%; P<0.01) higher in HOT for the mean of sets 1–3 compared to CON. Running distance per sprint decreased from set 1 to 3 (-7.0±6.4%; P<0.001), with a tendency for shorter distance covered in HOT vs. CON (-2.7±3.4%; P = 0.06). Mean vertical (-2.6±5.5%; P<0.01), horizontal (-9.1±4.4%; P<0.001) and resultant ground reaction forces (-3.0±2.8%; P<0.01) along with vertical stiffness (-12.9±2.3%; P<0.001) and leg stiffness (-8.4±2.7%; P<0.01) decreased from set 1 to 3, independently of conditions. Propulsive power decreased from set 1 to 3 (-16.9±2.4%; P<0.001), with lower propulsive power values in set 2 (-6.6%; P<0.05) in HOT vs. CON. No changes in constant-velocity running patterns occurred between conditions, or from pre-to-post repeated-sprint exercise. Conclusions Thermal strain alters step frequency and vertical stiffness during repeated sprinting; however without exacerbating mechanical alterations. The absence of changes in constant-velocity running patterns suggests a strong link between fatigue-induced velocity decrements during sprinting and mechanical alterations. PMID:28146582

  20. Preservice science teachers' experiences with repeated, guided inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Amy B.

    The purpose of this study was to examine preservice science teachers' experiences with repeated scientific inquiry (SI) activities. The National Science Education Standards (National Research Council, 1996) stress students should understand and possess the abilities to do SI. For students to meet these standards, science teachers must understand and be able to perform SI; however, previous research demonstrated that many teachers have naive understandings in this area. Teacher preparation programs provide an opportunity to facilitate the development of inquiry understandings and abilities. In this study, preservice science teachers had experiences with two inquiry activities that were repeated three times each. The research questions for this study were (a) How do preservice science teachers' describe their experiences with repeated, guided inquiry activities? (b) What are preservice science teachers' understandings and abilities of SI? This study was conducted at a large, urban university in the southeastern United States. The 5 participants had bachelor's degrees in science and were enrolled in a graduate science education methods course. The researcher was one of the course instructors but did not lead the activities. Case study methodology was used. Data was collected from a demographic survey, an open-ended questionnaire with follow-up interviews, the researcher's observations, participants' lab notes, personal interviews, and participants' journals. Data were coded and analyzed through chronological data matrices to identify patterns in participants' experiences. The five domains identified in this study were understandings of SI, abilities to conduct SI, personal feelings about the experience, science content knowledge, and classroom implications. Through analysis of themes identified within each domain, the four conclusions made about these preservice teachers' experiences with SI were that the experience increased their abilities to conduct inquiry

  1. Performance Comparisons of Improved Regular Repeat Accumulate (RA and Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA Turbo Decoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdulkadhim Hamad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, different techniques are used to improve the turbo decoding of regular repeat accumulate (RA and irregular repeat accumulate (IRA codes. The adaptive scaling of a-posteriori information produced by Soft-output Viterbi decoder (SOVA is proposed. The encoded pilots are another scheme that applied for short length RA codes. This work also suggests a simple and a fast method to generate a random interleaver having a free 4 cycle Tanner graph. Progressive edge growth algorithm (PEG is also studied and simulated to create the Tanner graphs which have a great girth.

  2. Exploring antecedents of consumer satisfaction and repeated search behavior on e-health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Jung; Park, Jungkun; Widdows, Richard

    2009-03-01

    E-health information has become an important resource for people seeking health information. Even though many studies have been conducted to examine the quality of e-health information, only a few studies have explored the effects of the information seekers' motivations on the perceived quality of e-health information. There is even less information about repeated searches for e-health information after the users' initial experience of e-health information use. Using an online survey of information seekers, 252 e-health information users' responses were collected. The research examines the relationship among motivation, perceived quality, satisfaction, and intention to repeat-search e-health information. The results identify motivations to search e-health information and confirm the relationship among motivation, perceived quality dimensions, and satisfaction and intention to repeat searches for e-health information.

  3. Temporal alcohol availability predicts first-time drunk driving, but not repeat offending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Timothy P; Denson, Thomas F

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol availability has been linked to drunk driving, but research has not examined whether this relationship is the same for first-time and repeat offenses. We examined the relationship between the business hours of alcohol outlets licensed to serve alcohol for on-premises consumption and misdemeanor-level (first offense) and felony-level drunk driving (repeat offense) charges in New York State in 2009. Longer outlet business hours were associated with more misdemeanor drunk driving charges, but were not associated with felony drunk driving charges. The per capita density of on-premises alcohol outlets did not affect misdemeanor or felony drunk driving charges. The results suggest that temporal alcohol availability may be an impelling factor for first-time drunk driving, but other factors likely influence repeat drunk driving behaviors.

  4. Temporal alcohol availability predicts first-time drunk driving, but not repeat offending.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P Schofield

    Full Text Available Alcohol availability has been linked to drunk driving, but research has not examined whether this relationship is the same for first-time and repeat offenses. We examined the relationship between the business hours of alcohol outlets licensed to serve alcohol for on-premises consumption and misdemeanor-level (first offense and felony-level drunk driving (repeat offense charges in New York State in 2009. Longer outlet business hours were associated with more misdemeanor drunk driving charges, but were not associated with felony drunk driving charges. The per capita density of on-premises alcohol outlets did not affect misdemeanor or felony drunk driving charges. The results suggest that temporal alcohol availability may be an impelling factor for first-time drunk driving, but other factors likely influence repeat drunk driving behaviors.

  5. Contraceptive Use among Women Seeking Repeat Abortion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Compared with women seeking their first abortion, significantly more repeat abortion clients had ever used contraceptives ... findings, the level of repeat abortions in Europe, .... and contraceptive history, and post-abortion ..... working women.

  6. Methods for analysing cardiovascular studies with repeated measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleophas, T. J.; Zwinderman, A. H.; van Ouwerkerk, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Repeated measurements in a single subject are generally more similar than unrepeated measurements in different subjects. Unrepeated analyses of repeated data cause underestimation of the treatment effects. Objective. To review methods adequate for the analysis of cardiovascular studies

  7. Discrepancies in reporting the CAG repeat lengths for Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarrell, Oliver W; Handley, Olivia; O'Donovan, Kirsty

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease results from a CAG repeat expansion within the Huntingtin gene; this is measured routinely in diagnostic laboratories. The European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY project centrally measures CAG repeat lengths on fresh samples; these were compared with the original...

  8. The absolute number of repeat operations for complex intra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abdominal sepsis, questions about futility of treatment frequently arise. This study focuses specifically on patients who required two or more repeat laparotomies and describes the spectrum of disease necessitating multiple repeat laparotomies ...

  9. Reconditioning perovskite films in vapor environments through repeated cation doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonthum, Chirapa; Pinsuwan, Kusuma; Ponchai, Jitprabhat; Srikhirin, Toemsak; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn

    2018-06-01

    Perovskites have attracted considerable attention for application as high-efficiency photovoltaic devices owing to their low-cost and low-temperature fabrication. A good surface and high crystallinity are necessary for high-performance devices. We examine the negative effects of chemical ambiences on the perovskite crystal formation and morphology. The repeated cation doping (RCD) technique was developed to remedy these issues by gradually dropping methylammonium ions on top of about-to-form perovskite surfaces to cause recrystallization. RCD promotes pinhole-free, compact, and polygonal-like surfaces under various vapor conditions. Furthermore, it enhances the electronic properties and crystallization. The benefits of RCD extend beyond perovskites under vapor ambiences, as it can improve regular and wasted perovskites.

  10. Repeated thinking promotes cooperation in spatial prisoner's dilemma game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Cai Kaiquan; Du Wenbo; Cao Xianbin

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the realistic process of taking decisions in social life, we have proposed a repeated thinking mechanism in the evolutionary spatial prisoner's dilemma game where players are denoted by the vertices and play games with their direct neighbors. Under our mechanism, a player i will randomly select a neighbor j and then deliberate for M times before strategy updating. It will remain unchanged if not all M considerations suggest it to learn the strategy of j. We mainly focus on the evolution of cooperation in the systems. Interestingly, we find that the cooperation level f C is remarkably promoted and f C has a monotonic dependence on the caution parameter M, indicating that being cautious facilitates the emergence and persistence of cooperation. We give a simple but clear explanation for this cooperation promotion via detecting the cooperator-defector transition process. Moreover, the robustness of this mechanism is also examined on different noise levels and game models. (paper)

  11. THE EFFECTS OF SINGLE VERSUS REPEATED PLYOMETRICS ON LANDING BIOMECHANICS AND JUMPING PERFORMANCE IN MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Makaruk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the chronic effects of single and repeated jumps training on vertical landing force (VGRF and jump height in untrained men. The VGRF and jump height were compared after a six-week plyometric training programme containing single and repeated jumps, together with two additional parameters: landing time (LT and range of the knee flexion during landing (KF. Thirty-six untrained physical education students with a plyometric training background were randomly assigned to a single jump group (SJG, n =12, repeated jumps group (RJG, n =12, and control group (CON, n =12. The SJG performed only single jumps, the RJG executed repeated (consecutive jumps, whereas the CON did not perform any exercises at all. A countermovement jump (CMJ, repeated countermovement jumps (RCMJ, and a drop jump (DJ were tested before and after the training. Only the RJG showed a significantly reduced VGRF (p<0.05 in all tests. Both plyometric groups significantly improved (p<0.05 their jump height in all tests. The LT was significantly greater in the RJG, compared to the SJG, in all tests. The KF was also significantly (p<0.05 greater in the RJG than in the SJG for CMJ and RCMJ. The results suggest that repeated jumps are beneficial for simultaneous landing force reduction and jumping performance enhancement.

  12. Postural adaptations to repeated optic flow stimulation in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Kathryn W.; Loughlin, Patrick J.; Redfern, Mark S.; Sparto, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the processes of adaptation (changes in within-trial postural responses) and habituation (reductions in between-trial postural responses) to visual cues in older and young adults. Of particular interest were responses to sudden increases in optic flow magnitude. The postural sway of 25 healthy young adults and 24 healthy older adults was measured while subjects viewed anterior-posterior 0.4 Hz sinusoidal optic flow for 45 s. Three trials for each of three conditions were performed: 1) constant 12 cm optic flow amplitude (24 cm peak-to-peak), 2) constant 4 cm amplitude (8 cm p-t-p), and 3) a transition in amplitude from 4 to 12 cm. The average power of head sway velocity (Pvel) was calculated for consecutive 5 s intervals during the trial to examine the changes in sway within and between trials. A mixed factor repeated measures ANOVA was performed to examine the effects of subject Group, Trial, and Interval on the Pvel. Pvel was greater in older adults in all conditions (p Pvel of the older adults decreased significantly between all 3 trials, but decreased only between trial 1 and 2 in young adults. While the responses of the young adults to the transition in optic flow from 4 to 12 cm did not significantly change, older adults had an increase in Pvel following the transition, ranging from 6.5 dB for the first trial to 3.4 dB for the third trial. These results show that older adults can habituate to repeated visual perturbation exposures; however, this habituation requires a greater number of exposures than young adults. This suggests aging impacts the ability to quickly modify the relative weighting of the sensory feedback for postural stabilization. PMID:18329878

  13. Novel expressed sequence tag- simple sequence repeats (EST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using different bioinformatic criteria, the SUCEST database was used to mine for simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Among 42,189 clusters, 1,425 expressed sequence tag- simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) were identified in silico. Trinucleotide repeats were the most abundant SSRs detected. Of 212 primer pairs ...

  14. Erroneous Memories Arising from Repeated Attempts to Remember

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Linda A.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of repeated and prolonged attempts at remembering on false memory rates was assessed in three experiments. Participants saw and imagined pictures and then made repeated recall attempts before taking a source memory test. Although the number of items recalled increased with repeated tests, the net gains were associated with more source…

  15. Adaptation and complexity in repeated games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maenner, Eliot Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a learning model for two-player infinitely repeated games. In an inference step players construct minimally complex inferences of strategies based on observed play, and in an adaptation step players choose minimally complex best responses to an inference. When players randomly...... select an inference from a probability distribution with full support the set of steady states is a subset of the set of Nash equilibria in which only stage game Nash equilibria are played. When players make ‘cautious' inferences the set of steady states is the subset of self-confirming equilibria...... with Nash outcome paths. When players use different inference rules, the set of steady states can lie between the previous two cases...

  16. Who Repeats Algebra, and How Does Initial Performance Relate to Improvement When the Course Is Repeated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Anthony; Jaquet, Karina; Finkelstein, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The information provided in this report shows how students perform when they repeat algebra I and how the level of improvement varies depending on initial course performance and the academic measure (course grades or CST scores). This information can help inform decisions and policies regarding whether and under what circumstances students should…

  17. Repeat Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonneville, Sarah; Delbrouck, Carine; Renier, Cécile; Devriendt, Daniel; Massager, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gamma Knife (GK) surgery is a recognized treatment option for the management of small to medium-sized vestibular schwannoma (VS) associated with high-tumor control and low morbidity. When a radiosurgical treatment fails to stop tumor growth, repeat GK surgery can be proposed in selected cases. Methods: A series of 27 GK retreatments was performed in 25 patients with VS; 2 patients underwent three procedures. The median time interval between GK treatments was 45 months. The median margin dose used for the first, second, and third GK treatments was 12 Gy, 12 Gy, and 14 Gy, respectively. Six patients (4 patients for the second irradiation and 2 patients for the third irradiation) with partial tumor regrowth were treated only on the growing part of the tumor using a median margin dose of 13 Gy. The median tumor volume was 0.9, 2.3, and 0.7 cc for the first, second, and third treatments, respectively. Stereotactic positron emission tomography (PET) guidance was used for dose planning in 6 cases. Results: Mean follow-up duration was 46 months (range 24–110). At the last follow-up, 85% of schwannomas were controlled. The tumor volume decreased, remained unchanged, or increased after retreatment in 15, 8, and 4 cases, respectively. Four patients had PET during follow-up, and all showed a significant metabolic decrease of the tumor. Hearing was not preserved after retreatment in any patients. New facial or trigeminal palsy did not occur after retreatment. Conclusions: Our results support the long-term efficacy and low morbidity of repeat GK treatment for selected patients with tumor growth after initial treatment. PMID:26500799

  18. Repeatability and Reproducibility in Proteomic Identifications by Liquid Chromatography—Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabb, David L.; Vega-Montoto, Lorenzo; Rudnick, Paul A.; Variyath, Asokan Mulayath; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Bunk, David M.; Kilpatrick, Lisa E.; Billheimer, Dean D.; Blackman, Ronald K.; Cardasis, Helene L.; Carr, Steven A.; Clauser, Karl R.; Jaffe, Jacob D.; Kowalski, Kevin A.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Regnier, Fred E.; Schilling, Birgit; Tegeler, Tony J.; Wang, Mu; Wang, Pei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Fisher, Susan J.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Stein, Steven E.; Tempst, Paul; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Spiegelman, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of proteomic instrumentation for LC-MS/MS introduces many possible sources of variability. Data-dependent sampling of peptides constitutes a stochastic element at the heart of discovery proteomics. Although this variation impacts the identification of peptides, proteomic identifications are far from completely random. In this study, we analyzed interlaboratory data sets from the NCI Clinical Proteomic Technology Assessment for Cancer to examine repeatability and reproducibility in peptide and protein identifications. Included data spanned 144 LC-MS/MS experiments on four Thermo LTQ and four Orbitrap instruments. Samples included yeast lysate, the NCI-20 defined dynamic range protein mix, and the Sigma UPS 1 defined equimolar protein mix. Some of our findings reinforced conventional wisdom, such as repeatability and reproducibility being higher for proteins than for peptides. Most lessons from the data, however, were more subtle. Orbitraps proved capable of higher repeatability and reproducibility, but aberrant performance occasionally erased these gains. Even the simplest protein digestions yielded more peptide ions than LC-MS/MS could identify during a single experiment. We observed that peptide lists from pairs of technical replicates overlapped by 35–60%, giving a range for peptide-level repeatability in these experiments. Sample complexity did not appear to affect peptide identification repeatability, even as numbers of identified spectra changed by an order of magnitude. Statistical analysis of protein spectral counts revealed greater stability across technical replicates for Orbitraps, making them superior to LTQ instruments for biomarker candidate discovery. The most repeatable peptides were those corresponding to conventional tryptic cleavage sites, those that produced intense MS signals, and those that resulted from proteins generating many distinct peptides. Reproducibility among different instruments of the same type lagged behind

  19. The Enigma of Rapid Repeat Pregnancy: A Qualitative Study of Teen Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, K N; Engelhart, T G; Martins, Y; Huntington, N L; Snyder, A F; Coletti, K D; Cox, J E

    2016-06-01

    Rapid repeat pregnancy accounts for 18% of teen pregnancies and leads to adverse health, economic, and developmental outcomes for teen mothers and their children. Few interventions have been successful in reducing rapid repeat pregnancy. In this qualitative study we examined adolescent mothers' perceptions of their decision-making and behaviors that helped prevent or promote a rapid repeat pregnancy. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 31 adolescent mothers, aged 16-21 years; 15 of these subjects experienced a repeat pregnancy within a year of their first child's birth and 16 had not. Two researchers used a grounded, inductive technique to identify emergent themes; interviews were subsequently coded accordingly. Counts were tabulated of the number of times themes were endorsed among those with or without a repeat pregnancy. Four overarching themes emerged from the interviews: intentionality regarding pregnancy planning, patients' degree of independence in making contraceptive choices, sense of control over life experience, and barriers to follow-through on contraceptive planning. Teens who had not experienced a rapid repeat pregnancy more often endorsed themes of intentionality in preventing or promoting a pregnancy, independence in decision-making, and feelings of control over their experience. Ambivalence and lack of decision-making about seeking another pregnancy were frequently endorsed by mothers who had experienced a second pregnancy. Decision-making regarding seeking or preventing a rapid repeat pregnancy is complex for teen mothers; techniques to help support decision-making or to delay pregnancy until decision-repeat making is complete might be important in reducing rapid pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Apraxia of Speech: Perceptual Analysis of Trisyllabic Word Productions across Repeated Sampling Occasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauszycki, Shannon C.; Wambaugh, Julie L.; Cameron, Rosalea M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Early apraxia of speech (AOS) research has characterized errors as being variable, resulting in a number of different error types being produced on repeated productions of the same stimuli. Conversely, recent research has uncovered greater consistency in errors, but there are limited data examining sound errors over time (more than one…

  1. Visual attention to repeated print advertising : A test of scanpath theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, F.G.M.; Rosbergen, E.; Wedel, M.

    The authors examine consumers' visual attention during repeated exposures to print advertisements using eye-tracking methodology. The authors propose a statistical model comprising submodels for two key measures of visual attention to elements of the advertisement: attention duration and inter- and

  2. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in plants and green algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhixin Zhao; Cheng Guo; Sreeskandarajan Sutharzan; Pei Li; Craig Echt; Jie Zhang; Chun Liang

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) extensively exist in the genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Based on the sequenced genomes and gene annotations of 31 plant and algal species in Phytozome version 8.0 (http://www.phytozome.net/), we examined TRs in a genome-wide scale, characterized their distributions and motif features, and explored their putative biological functions. Among...

  3. Regret in repeat purchase versus switching decisions : The attenuating role of decision justifiability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inman, J.J.; Zeelenberg, M.

    2002-01-01

    The decision-making literature has consistently reported that decisions to maintain the status quo tend to be regretted less than decisions to change it. We examine the consequences of repeat purchasing (maintaining the status quo) versus switching in the context of information regarding the reason

  4. Use of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms 62 (CCAPS-62) as a Repeated Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arpita; Rieder Bennett, Sara; Martin, Juanita K.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this initial, exploratory study was to examine the utility of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62) as a repeated measure tool at one university counseling center. This study investigated whether clients engaged in individual counseling changed in symptomology while in treatment and when (e.g.,…

  5. Visual attention to repeated print advertising : A test of scanpath theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, F.G.M.; Rosbergen, E.; Wedel, M.

    1999-01-01

    The authors examine consumers' visual attention during repeated exposures to print advertisements using eye-tracking methodology. The authors propose a statistical model comprising submodels for two key measures of visual attention to elements of the advertisement: attention duration and inter- and

  6. Construction of Subgame-Perfect Mixed Strategy Equilibria in Repeated Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Kimmo; Schoenmakers, Gijsbertus

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines how to construct subgame-perfect mixed-strategy equilibria in discounted repeated games with perfect monitoring.We introduce a relatively simple class of strategy profiles that are easy to compute and may give rise to a large set of equilibrium payoffs. These sets are called

  7. Repeatability of the Oxford Foot Model for Kinematic Gait Analysis of the Foot and Ankle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeve, S.; Vos, J.; Weijers, P.; Verbruggen, J.; Willems, P.; Poeze, M.; Meijer, K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Kinematic gait analysis via the multi-segmental Oxford foot model (OFM) may be a valuable addition to the biomechanical examination of the foot and ankle. The aim of this study is to assess the repeatability of the OFM in healthy subjects. METHODS: Nine healthy subjects, without a

  8. Near-Peer Teaching in Paramedic Education: A Repeated Measures Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Nguyen, David

    2017-01-01

    The transition of the Australian paramedic discipline from vocation education and training to the higher education sector has seen a sharp rise in interest in near-peer teaching (NPT). The objective of this study was to examine satisfaction levels of NPT over one academic semester among undergraduate paramedic students. A repeated measured design…

  9. Repeatability of measures of inflammatory cell number in bronchial biopsies in atopic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sont, J. K.; Willems, L. N.; Evertse, C. E.; Hooijer, R.; Sterk, P. J.; van Krieken, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    Airway pathology is increasingly considered to be a major outcome in asthma research. The aim of this study was to examine the intra-observer, within-section and between-biopsy repeatability, together with the implications for statistical power of a computerized quantitative analysis of inflammatory

  10. Repeated E-Book Reading and Its Contribution to Learning New Words among Kindergartners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korat, Ofra; Kozlov-Peretz, Olla; Segal-Drori, Ora

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of repeated e-book reading with and without word explanation support and its effect on receptive and expressive word learning among preschoolers was examined. Seventy-eight kindergartners were randomly divided into an experimental and a control group. The experimental group received two individual reading sessions of an e-book…

  11. Heart failure re-admission: measuring the ever shortening gap between repeat heart failure hospitalizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Bakal

    Full Text Available Many quality-of-care and risk prediction metrics rely on time to first rehospitalization even though heart failure (HF patients may undergo several repeat hospitalizations. The aim of this study is to compare repeat hospitalization models. Using a population-based cohort of 40,667 patients, we examined both HF and all cause re-hospitalizations using up to five years of follow-up. Two models were examined: the gap-time model which estimates the adjusted time between hospitalizations and a multistate model which considered patients to be in one of four states; community-dwelling, in hospital for HF, in hospital for any reason, or dead. The transition probabilities and times were then modeled using patient characteristics and number of repeat hospitalizations. We found that during the five years of follow-up roughly half of the patients returned for a subsequent hospitalization for each repeat hospitalization. Additionally, we noted that the unadjusted time between hospitalizations was reduced ∼40% between each successive hospitalization. After adjustment each additional hospitalization was associated with a 28 day (95% CI: 22-35 reduction in time spent out of hospital. A similar pattern was seen when considering the four state model. A large proportion of patients had multiple repeat hospitalizations. Extending the gap between hospitalizations should be an important goal of treatment evaluation.

  12. Entrance surface dose measurements in pediatric radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, L.A.; Yoshimura, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    A survey of pediatric radiological examinations was carried out in a reference pediatric hospital of the city of Sao Paulo, in order to investigate the doses to children undergoing conventional X-ray examinations. The results showed that the majority of pediatric patients are below 4 years, and that about 80% of the examinations correspond to chest projections. Doses to typical radiological examinations were measured in vivo with thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Ti and LiF: Mg, Cu, P) attached to the skin of the children to determine entrance surface dose (ESD). Also homogeneous phantoms were used to obtain ESD to younger children, because the technique uses a so small kVp that the dosimeters would produce an artifact image in the patient radiograph. Four kinds of pediatric examinations were investigated: three conventional examinations (chest, skull and abdomen) and a fluoroscopic procedure (barium swallow). Relevant information about kVp and mAs values used in the examinations was collected, and we discuss how these parameters can affect the ESD. The ESD values measured in this work are compared to reference levels published by the European Commission for pediatric patients. The results obtained (third-quartile of the ESD distribution) for chest AP examinations in three age groups were: 0.056 mGy (2-4 years old); 0.068 mGy (5-9 years old); 0.069 mGy (10-15 years old). All of them are below the European reference level (0.100 mGy). ESD values measured to the older age group in skull and abdomen AP radiographs (mean values 3.44 and 1.20 mGy, respectively) are above the European reference levels (1.5 mGy to skull and 1.0 mGy to abdomen). ESD values measured in the barium swallow examination reached 10 mGy in skin regions corresponding to thyroid and esophagus. It was noticed during this survey that some technicians use, improperly, X-ray fluoroscopy in conventional examinations to help them in positioning the patient. The results presented here are a

  13. Lesser Neural Pattern Similarity across Repeated Tests Is Associated with Better Long-Term Memory Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson Wirebring, Linnea; Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Eriksson, Johan; Andersson, Micael; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2015-07-01

    Encoding and retrieval processes enhance long-term memory performance. The efficiency of encoding processes has recently been linked to representational consistency: the reactivation of a representation that gets more specific each time an item is further studied. Here we examined the complementary hypothesis of whether the efficiency of retrieval processes also is linked to representational consistency. Alternatively, recurrent retrieval might foster representational variability--the altering or adding of underlying memory representations. Human participants studied 60 Swahili-Swedish word pairs before being scanned with fMRI the same day and 1 week later. On Day 1, participants were tested three times on each word pair, and on Day 7 each pair was tested once. A BOLD signal change in right superior parietal cortex was associated with subsequent memory on Day 1 and with successful long-term retention on Day 7. A representational similarity analysis in this parietal region revealed that beneficial recurrent retrieval was associated with representational variability, such that the pattern similarity on Day 1 was lower for retrieved words subsequently remembered compared with those subsequently forgotten. This was mirrored by a monotonically decreased BOLD signal change in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on Day 1 as a function of repeated successful retrieval for words subsequently remembered, but not for words subsequently forgotten. This reduction in prefrontal response could reflect reduced demands on cognitive control. Collectively, the results offer novel insights into why memory retention benefits from repeated retrieval, and they suggest fundamental differences between repeated study and repeated testing. Repeated testing is known to produce superior long-term retention of the to-be-learned material compared with repeated encoding and other learning techniques, much because it fosters repeated memory retrieval. This study demonstrates that repeated memory

  14. In situ detection of tandem DNA repeat length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.; Smith, C.L. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    A simple method for scoring short tandem DNA repeats is presented. An oligonucleotide target, containing tandem repeats embedded in a unique sequence, was hybridized to a set of complementary probes, containing tandem repeats of known lengths. Single-stranded loop structures formed on duplexes containing a mismatched (different) number of tandem repeats. No loop structure formed on duplexes containing a matched (identical) number of tandem repeats. The matched and mismatched loop structures were enzymatically distinguished and differentially labeled by treatment with S1 nuclease and the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Respiratory-aspirated 35-mm hairpin successfully retrieved with a Teflon® snare system under fluoroscopic guidance via a split endotracheal tube: a useful technique in cases of failed extraction by bronchoscopy and avoiding the need for a thoracotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, S S; Pease, R A; Ashwin, C J; Gill, S S; Tait, N P

    2012-09-01

    Respiratory foreign body aspiration (FBA) is a common global health problem requiring prompt recognition and early treatment to prevent potentially fatal complications. The majority of FBAs are due to organic objects and treatment is usually via either endoscopic or surgical extraction. FBA of a straight hairpin has been described as a unique entity in the literature, occurring most commonly in females, particularly during adolescence. In the process of inserting hairpins, the pins will typically be between the teeth with the head tilted backwards, while tying their hair with both hands. This position increases the risk of aspiration, particularly if there is any sudden coughing or laughing. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a 35-mm straight metallic hairpin foreign body that has been successfully retrieved by a radiological snare system under fluoroscopic guidance. This was achieved with the use of a split endotracheal tube, and therefore avoided the need for a thoracotomy in an adolescent female patient.

  16. Functionality and operation of fluoroscopic automatic brightness control/automatic dose rate control logic in modern cardiovascular and interventional angiography systems: a report of Task Group 125 Radiography/Fluoroscopy Subcommittee, Imaging Physics Committee, Science Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Phillip; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Balter, Stephen; Fukuda, Atsushi; Goode, Allen; Hartwell, Gary; LaFrance, Terry; Nickoloff, Edward; Shepard, Jeff; Strauss, Keith

    2012-05-01

    Task Group 125 (TG 125) was charged with investigating the functionality of fluoroscopic automatic dose rate and image quality control logic in modern angiographic systems, paying specific attention to the spectral shaping filters and variations in the selected radiologic imaging parameters. The task group was also charged with describing the operational aspects of the imaging equipment for the purpose of assisting the clinical medical physicist with clinical set-up and performance evaluation. Although there are clear distinctions between the fluoroscopic operation of an angiographic system and its acquisition modes (digital cine, digital angiography, digital subtraction angiography, etc.), the scope of this work was limited to the fluoroscopic operation of the systems studied. The use of spectral shaping filters in cardiovascular and interventional angiography equipment has been shown to reduce patient dose. If the imaging control algorithm were programmed to work in conjunction with the selected spectral filter, and if the generator parameters were optimized for the selected filter, then image quality could also be improved. Although assessment of image quality was not included as part of this report, it was recognized that for fluoroscopic imaging the parameters that influence radiation output, differential absorption, and patient dose are also the same parameters that influence image quality. Therefore, this report will utilize the terminology "automatic dose rate and image quality" (ADRIQ) when describing the control logic in modern interventional angiographic systems and, where relevant, will describe the influence of controlled parameters on the subsequent image quality. A total of 22 angiography units were investigated by the task group and of these one each was chosen as representative of the equipment manufactured by GE Healthcare, Philips Medical Systems, Shimadzu Medical USA, and Siemens Medical Systems. All equipment, for which measurement data were

  17. Functionality and operation of fluoroscopic automatic brightness control/automatic dose rate control logic in modern cardiovascular and interventional angiography systems: A Report of Task Group 125 Radiography/Fluoroscopy Subcommittee, Imaging Physics Committee, Science Council

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Phillip; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Balter, Stephen; Fukuda, Atsushi; Goode, Allen; Hartwell, Gary; LaFrance, Terry; Nickoloff, Edward; Shepard, Jeff; Strauss, Keith [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Shiga Medical Center for Children, Moriyama City, Shiga-Ken, Japan 524-0022 (Japan); University of Virginia Health Science Center, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Baystate Health Systems, Inc., Springfield, Massachusetts 01199 (United States); Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032 (United States); University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Task Group 125 (TG 125) was charged with investigating the functionality of fluoroscopic automatic dose rate and image quality control logic in modern angiographic systems, paying specific attention to the spectral shaping filters and variations in the selected radiologic imaging parameters. The task group was also charged with describing the operational aspects of the imaging equipment for the purpose of assisting the clinical medical physicist with clinical set-up and performance evaluation. Although there are clear distinctions between the fluoroscopic operation of an angiographic system and its acquisition modes (digital cine, digital angiography, digital subtraction angiography, etc.), the scope of this work was limited to the fluoroscopic operation of the systems studied. The use of spectral shaping filters in cardiovascular and interventional angiography equipment has been shown to reduce patient dose. If the imaging control algorithm were programmed to work in conjunction with the selected spectral filter, and if the generator parameters were optimized for the selected filter, then image quality could also be improved. Although assessment of image quality was not included as part of this report, it was recognized that for fluoroscopic imaging the parameters that influence radiation output, differential absorption, and patient dose are also the same parameters that influence image quality. Therefore, this report will utilize the terminology ''automatic dose rate and image quality'' (ADRIQ) when describing the control logic in modern interventional angiographic systems and, where relevant, will describe the influence of controlled parameters on the subsequent image quality. A total of 22 angiography units were investigated by the task group and of these one each was chosen as representative of the equipment manufactured by GE Healthcare, Philips Medical Systems, Shimadzu Medical USA, and Siemens Medical Systems. All equipment, for which

  18. Functionality and operation of fluoroscopic automatic brightness control/automatic dose rate control logic in modern cardiovascular and interventional angiography systems: A Report of Task Group 125 Radiography/Fluoroscopy Subcommittee, Imaging Physics Committee, Science Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauch, Phillip; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Balter, Stephen; Fukuda, Atsushi; Goode, Allen; Hartwell, Gary; LaFrance, Terry; Nickoloff, Edward; Shepard, Jeff; Strauss, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Task Group 125 (TG 125) was charged with investigating the functionality of fluoroscopic automatic dose rate and image quality control logic in modern angiographic systems, paying specific attention to the spectral shaping filters and variations in the selected radiologic imaging parameters. The task group was also charged with describing the operational aspects of the imaging equipment for the purpose of assisting the clinical medical physicist with clinical set-up and performance evaluation. Although there are clear distinctions between the fluoroscopic operation of an angiographic system and its acquisition modes (digital cine, digital angiography, digital subtraction angiography, etc.), the scope of this work was limited to the fluoroscopic operation of the systems studied. The use of spectral shaping filters in cardiovascular and interventional angiography equipment has been shown to reduce patient dose. If the imaging control algorithm were programmed to work in conjunction with the selected spectral filter, and if the generator parameters were optimized for the selected filter, then image quality could also be improved. Although assessment of image quality was not included as part of this report, it was recognized that for fluoroscopic imaging the parameters that influence radiation output, differential absorption, and patient dose are also the same parameters that influence image quality. Therefore, this report will utilize the terminology ''automatic dose rate and image quality'' (ADRIQ) when describing the control logic in modern interventional angiographic systems and, where relevant, will describe the influence of controlled parameters on the subsequent image quality. A total of 22 angiography units were investigated by the task group and of these one each was chosen as representative of the equipment manufactured by GE Healthcare, Philips Medical Systems, Shimadzu Medical USA, and Siemens Medical Systems. All equipment, for which measurement data were

  19. Examination Management and Examination Malpractice: The Nexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunji, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Examination malpractice or cheating has become a global phenomenon. In different countries of the world today, developed and developing, academic dishonesty especially cheating in examinations has heightened and taken frightening dimension. In many countries of the world this phenomenon has become a serious matter of concern that has left many…

  20. Improvement of Repeated-Sprint Ability and Horizontal-Jumping Performance in Elite Young Basketball Players With Low-Volume Repeated-Maximal-Power Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Skok, Oliver; Tous-Fajardo, Julio; Arjol-Serrano, José Luis; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Casajús, José Antonio; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    To examine the effects of a low-volume repeated-power-ability (RPA) training program on repeated-sprint and change-of- direction (COD) ability and functional jumping performance. Twenty-two male elite young basketball players (age 16.2 ± 1.2 y, height 190.0 ± 10.0 cm, body mass 82.9 ± 10.1 kg) were randomly assigned either to an RPA-training group (n = 11) or a control group (n = 11). RPA training consisted of leg-press exercise, twice a week for 6 wk, of 1 or 2 blocks of 5 sets × 5 repetitions with 20 s of passive recovery between sets and 3 min between blocks with the load that maximized power output. Before and after training, performance was assessed by a repeated-sprint-ability (RSA) test, a repeated-COD-ability test, a hop for distance, and a drop jump followed by tests of a double unilateral hop with the right and left legs. Within-group and between-groups differences showed substantial improvements in slowest (RSAs) and mean time (RSAm) on RSA; best, slowest and mean time on repeated-COD ability; and unilateral right and left hop in the RPA group in comparison with control. While best time on RSA showed no improvement in any group, there was a large relationship (r = .68, 90% CI .43;.84) between the relative decrement in RSAm and RSAs, suggesting better sprint maintenance with RPA training. The relative improvements in best and mean repeated-COD ability were very largely correlated (r = .89, 90% CI .77;.94). Six weeks of lowvolume (4-14 min/wk) RPA training improved several physical-fitness tests in basketball players.

  1. Radiation exposure of the UK population from medical and dental x-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, D.; Wall, B.F.

    2002-03-01

    Knowledge of recent trends in the radiation doses from x-ray examinations and their distribution for the UK population provides useful guidance on where best to concentrate efforts on patient dose reduction in order to optimise the protection of the population in a cost-effective manner. In this report, the results of a recent survey of the frequency of medical and dental x-ray examinations in the UK and contemporary data on the radiation doses typically received by patients, are used to assess trends in the extent and the pattern of the population exposure. Individual patient doses, expressed in terms of the effective dose, range from a few microsieverts for simple radiographic examinations of the teeth, limbs or chest to tens of millisieverts for prolonged fluoroscopic procedures or some computed tomography (CT) examinations. A total of about 41.5 million medical and dental x-ray examinations are now conducted each year in the UK (0.70 examination per head of population) resulting in an annual per caput effective dose of 330 μSv. This is not significantly different from the previous rough estimate of 350 μSv for 1991. However, over the last ten years CT has more than doubled its contribution and is now responsible for 40% of the total dose to the population from medical x-rays. In contrast, the contribution from conventional radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations has nearly halved to about 44%. Interventional and angiographic procedures together contribute the remaining 16%. The annual per caput dose of 330 μSv is low in comparison with other countries having similarly developed systems of health care. This is due to both a lower frequency of x-ray examinations per head of population and generally lower doses in the UK than in other developed countries. However, the much increased contributions of CT, angiography and interventional procedures to the UK population dose indicate an urgent need to develop radiation protection and optimisation activities for

  2. Radiation dosages absorbed by the skin during videofluorographic examination of velopharyngeal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Hirotoshi; Ogata, Hisao; Nakajima, Tatsuo; Sone, Kiyoaki

    2008-01-01

    Radiographic assessment has become essential in examining the function of the soft palate and pharyngeal walls in patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency. However, in our search of the literature, there was no report on the exposure dose during videofluorographic examination of velopharyngeal function in Japan. Radiation dosages from videofluorography were measured by attaching a glass dosimeter to the submental skin in 17 patients undergoing examination of velopharyngeal function. Sixteen patients underwent a complete videofluorographic examination. For these 16 patients, the mean time of examination was 96.4 sec; the mean radiation dosage absorbed by the skin was 14.4 mGy, equivalent to approximately 7 standard skull x-rays and lower than that during other fluoroscopic procedures. This dose was also lower than the threshold dose at which the skin damage occurs. In light of increasing concern among the general public over radiation exposure, we consider that these data should provide useful information to patients being asked to give informed consent for this examination. (author)

  3. Short tandem repeat analysis in Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiyada, M

    2000-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs), known as microsatellites, are one of the most informative genetic markers for characterizing biological materials. Because of the relatively small size of STR alleles (generally 100-350 nucleotides), amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is relatively easy, affording a high sensitivity of detection. In addition, STR loci can be amplified simultaneously in a multiplex PCR. Thus, substantial information can be obtained in a single analysis with the benefits of using less template DNA, reducing labor, and reducing the contamination. We investigated 14 STR loci in a Japanese population living in Sendai by three multiplex PCR kits, GenePrint PowerPlex 1.1 and 2.2. Fluorescent STR System (Promega, Madison, WI, USA) and AmpF/STR Profiler (Perkin-Elmer, Norwalk, CT, USA). Genomic DNA was extracted using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) proteinase K or Chelex 100 treatment followed by the phenol/chloroform extraction. PCR was performed according to the manufacturer's protocols. Electrophoresis was carried out on an ABI 377 sequencer and the alleles were determined by GeneScan 2.0.2 software (Perkin-Elmer). In 14 STRs loci, statistical parameters indicated a relatively high rate, and no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was detected. We apply this STR system to paternity testing and forensic casework, e.g., personal identification in rape cases. This system is an effective tool in the forensic sciences to obtain information on individual identification.

  4. A Repeated Signal Difference for Recognising Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran Greer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new mechanism that might help with defining pattern sequences, by the fact that it can produce an upper bound on the ensemble value that can persistently oscillate with the actual values produced from each pattern. With every firing event, a node also receives an on/off feedback switch. If the node fires then it sends a feedback result depending on the input signal strength. If the input signal is positive or larger, it can store an ‘on’ switch feedback for the next iteration. If the signal is negative or smaller it can store an ‘off’ switch feedback for the next iteration. If the node does not fire, then it does not affect the current feedback situation and receives the switch command produced by the last active pattern event for the same neuron. The upper bound therefore also represents the largest or most enclosing pattern set and the lower value is for the actual set of firing patterns. If the pattern sequence repeats, it will oscillate between the two values, allowing them to be recognised and measured more easily, over time. Tests show that changing the sequence ordering produces different value sets, which can also be measured.

  5. Repeated intravenous doxapram induces phrenic motor facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, M S; Lee, K Z; Gonzalez-Rothi, E J; Fuller, D D

    2013-12-01

    Doxapram is a respiratory stimulant used to treat hypoventilation. Here we investigated whether doxapram could also trigger respiratory neuroplasticity. Specifically, we hypothesized that intermittent delivery of doxapram at low doses would lead to long-lasting increases (i.e., facilitation) of phrenic motor output in anesthetized, vagotomized, and mechanically-ventilated rats. Doxapram was delivered intravenously in a single bolus (2 or 6mg/kg) or as a series of 3 injections (2mg/kg) at 5min intervals. Control groups received pH-matched saline injections (vehicle) or no treatment (anesthesia time control). Doxapram evoked an immediate increase in phrenic output in all groups, but a persistent increase in burst amplitude only occurred after repeated dosing with 2mg/kg. At 60min following the last injection, phrenic burst amplitude was 168±24% of baseline (%BL) in the group receiving 3 injections (Pphrenic response to doxapram (2mg/kg) was reduced by 68% suggesting that at low doses the drug was acting primarily via the carotid chemoreceptors. We conclude that intermittent application of doxapram can trigger phrenic neuroplasticity, and this approach might be of use in the context of respiratory rehabilitation following neurologic injury. © 2013.

  6. Superfamily of ankyrin repeat proteins in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Shizhong; Qing, Xiaohe; Sun, Meihong; Liu, Shiyang; Su, Hongyan; Shu, Huairui; Li, Xinzheng

    2013-07-10

    The ankyrin repeat (ANK) protein family plays a crucial role in plant growth and development and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, no detailed information concerning this family is available for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) due to the limited information on whole genome sequences. In this study, we identified a total of 130 ANK genes in tomato genome (SlANK), and these genes were distributed across all 12 chromosomes at various densities. And chromosomal localizations of SlANK genes indicated 25 SlANK genes were involved in tandem duplications. Based on their domain composition, all of the SlANK proteins were grouped into 13 subgroups. A combined phylogenetic tree was constructed with the aligned SlANK protein sequences. This tree revealed that the SlANK proteins comprise five major groups. An analysis of the expression profiles of SlANK genes in tomato in different tissues and in response to stresses showed that the SlANK proteins play roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a genome-wide analysis of the tomato ANK gene family. This study provides valuable information regarding the classification and putative functions of SlANK genes in tomato. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Multineuronal Spike Sequences Repeat with Millisecond Precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki eMatsumoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical microcircuits are nonrandomly wired by neurons. As a natural consequence, spikes emitted by microcircuits are also nonrandomly patterned in time and space. One of the prominent spike organizations is a repetition of fixed patterns of spike series across multiple neurons. However, several questions remain unsolved, including how precisely spike sequences repeat, how the sequences are spatially organized, how many neurons participate in sequences, and how different sequences are functionally linked. To address these questions, we monitored spontaneous spikes of hippocampal CA3 neurons ex vivo using a high-speed functional multineuron calcium imaging technique that allowed us to monitor spikes with millisecond resolution and to record the location of spiking and nonspiking neurons. Multineuronal spike sequences were overrepresented in spontaneous activity compared to the statistical chance level. Approximately 75% of neurons participated in at least one sequence during our observation period. The participants were sparsely dispersed and did not show specific spatial organization. The number of sequences relative to the chance level decreased when larger time frames were used to detect sequences. Thus, sequences were precise at the millisecond level. Sequences often shared common spikes with other sequences; parts of sequences were subsequently relayed by following sequences, generating complex chains of multiple sequences.

  8. Neonates’ responses to repeated exposure to a still face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Karen; Watt, Rachel; Pal, Attila; Orvos, Hajnalka

    2017-01-01

    Aim The main aims of the study were to examine whether human neonates’ responses to communication disturbance modelled by the still-face paradigm were stable and whether their responses were affected by their previous experience with the still-face paradigm. Methods The still face procedure, as a laboratory model of interpersonal stress, was administered repeatedly, twice, to 84 neonates (0 to 4 day olds), with a delay of an average of 1.25 day. Results Frame-by-frame analysis of the frequency and duration of gaze, distressed face, crying, sleeping and sucking behaviours showed that the procedure was stressful to them both times, that is, the still face effect was stable after repeated administration and newborns consistently responded to such nonverbal violation of communication. They averted their gaze, showed distress and cried more during the still-face phase in both the first and the second administration. They also showed a carry-over effect in that they continued to avert their gaze and displayed increased distress and crying in the first reunion period, but their gaze behaviour changed with experience, in the second administration. While in the first administration the babies continued averting their gaze even after the stressful still-face phase was over, this carry-over effect disappeared in the second administration, and the babies significantly increased their gaze following the still-face phase. Conclusion After excluding explanations of fatigue, habituation and random effects, a self-other regulatory model is discussed as a possible explanation for this pattern. PMID:28771555

  9. ATXN2 trinucleotide repeat length correlates with risk of ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproviero, William; Shatunov, Aleksey; Stahl, Daniel; Shoai, Maryam; van Rheenen, Wouter; Jones, Ashley R; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Andersen, Peter M; Bonini, Nancy M; Conforti, Francesca L; Van Damme, Philip; Daoud, Hussein; Del Mar Amador, Maria; Fogh, Isabella; Forzan, Monica; Gaastra, Ben; Gellera, Cinzia; Gitler, Aaron D; Hardy, John; Fratta, Pietro; La Bella, Vincenzo; Le Ber, Isabelle; Van Langenhove, Tim; Lattante, Serena; Lee, Yi-Chung; Malaspina, Andrea; Meininger, Vincent; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Orrell, Richard; Rademakers, Rosa; Robberecht, Wim; Rouleau, Guy; Ross, Owen A; Salachas, Francois; Sidle, Katie; Smith, Bradley N; Soong, Bing-Wen; Sorarù, Gianni; Stevanin, Giovanni; Kabashi, Edor; Troakes, Claire; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Veldink, Jan H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Shaw, Christopher E; Powell, John F; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2017-03-01

    We investigated a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Two new case-control studies, a British dataset of 1474 ALS cases and 567 controls, and a Dutch dataset of 1328 ALS cases and 691 controls were analyzed. In addition, to increase power, we systematically searched PubMed for case-control studies published after 1 August 2010 that investigated the association between ATXN2 intermediate repeats and ALS. We conducted a meta-analysis of the new and existing studies for the relative risks of ATXN2 intermediate repeat alleles of between 24 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats and ALS. There was an overall increased risk of ALS for those carrying intermediate sized trinucleotide repeat alleles (odds ratio 3.06 [95% confidence interval 2.37-3.94]; p = 6 × 10 -18 ), with an exponential relationship between repeat length and ALS risk for alleles of 29-32 repeats (R 2  = 0.91, p = 0.0002). No relationship was seen for repeat length and age of onset or survival. In contrast to trinucleotide repeat diseases, intermediate ATXN2 trinucleotide repeat expansion in ALS does not predict age of onset but does predict disease risk. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes

  11. Repeat Syphilis Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in California, 2002–2006: Implications for Syphilis Elimination Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew Ng, Rilene A.; Katz, Kenneth A.; Bernstein, Kyle T.; Samuel, Michael C.; Kerndt, Peter R.; Bolan, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined rates of and risk factors for repeat syphilis infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) in California. Methods. We analyzed 2002 to 2006 California syphilis surveillance system data. Results. During the study period, a mean of 5.9% (range: 4.9%–7.1% per year) of MSM had a repeat primary or secondary (PS) syphilis infection within 2 years of an initial infection. There was no significant increase in the annual proportion of MSM with a repeat syphilis infection (P = .42). In a multivariable model, factors associated with repeat syphilis infection were HIV infection (odds ratio [OR] = 1.65; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14, 2.37), Black race (OR = 1.84; 95% CI = 1.12, 3.04), and 10 or more recent sex partners (OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.12, 3.50). Conclusions. Approximately 6% of MSM in California have a repeat PS syphilis infection within 2 years of an initial infection. HIV infection, Black race, and having multiple sex partners are associated with increased odds of repeat infection. Syphilis elimination efforts should include messages about the risk for repeat infection and the importance of follow-up testing. Public health attention to individuals repeatedly infected with syphilis may help reduce local disease burdens. PMID:22095364

  12. Repeat Colonoscopy within 6 Months after Initial Outpatient Colonoscopy in Ontario: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Paszat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The goal of this study is to examine utilization of early repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months after an index procedure. Methods. We identified persons having repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months following outpatient colonoscopy without prior colonoscopy ≤ 5 years or prior diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC. We modeled repeat colonoscopy using a generalized estimating equation with an exchangeable correlation structure to account for clustering of patients by endoscopist. Results. The population included 334,663 persons, 7,892 (2.36% of whom had an early repeat colonoscopy within 6 months. Overall, endoscopist prior year colonoscopy volume was inversely related to repeat ≤ 6 months. Repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months varied by the clinical setting of the index colonoscopy (adjusted OR = 1.41 (95% CI 1.29–1.55 at nonhospital facilities compared to teaching or community hospitals. Among those who had polypectomy or biopsy, the adjusted OR for early repeat ≤ 6 months was elevated among those whose index colonoscopy was at a nonhospital facility (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.30–1.60, compared to those at a teaching hospital or community hospital. Conclusions. Repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months after an index procedure is associated with the clinical setting of the index colonoscopy.

  13. Anterior prostate biopsy at initial and repeat evaluation: is it useful to detect significant prostate cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pepe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: Detection rate for anterior prostate cancer (PCa in men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy has been prospectively evaluated. Materials and Methods: From January 2013 to March 2014, 400 patients all of Caucasian origin (median age 63.5 years underwent initial (285 cases and repeat (115 cases prostate biopsy; all the men had negative digital rectal examination and the indications to biopsy were: PSA values > 10 ng/mL, PSA between 4.1-10 or 2.6-4 ng/mL with free/total PSA≤25% and ≤20%, respectively. A median of 22 (initial biopsy and 31 cores (repeat biopsy were transperineally performed including 4 cores of the anterior zone (AZ and 4 cores of the AZ plus 2 cores of the transition zone (TZ, respectively. Results: Median PSA was 7.9 ng/mL; overall, a PCa was found in 180 (45% patients: in 135 (47.4% and 45 (36% of the men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy, respectively. An exclusive PCa of the anterior zone was found in the 8.9 (initial biopsy vs 13.3% (repeat biopsy of the men: a single microfocus of cancer was found in the 61.2% of the cases; moreover, in 7 out 18 AZ PCa the biopsy histology was predictive of significant cancer in 2 (28.5% and 5 (71.5% men who underwent initial and repeat biopsy, respectively. Conclusions: However AZ biopsies increased detection rate for PCa (10% of the cases, the majority of AZ PCa with histological findings predictive of clinically significant cancer were found at repeat biopsy (about 70% of the cases.

  14. Health Examination by PET. (1) Cancer Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    Cancer examination by positron emission tomography (PET) started in Japan in 1994 and has been rapidly popularized. This paper describes author's experience of the examination in his hospital along the recent Japanese guideline for the PET cancer examination. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is intravenously injected at 3.7 (or 4.6, for diabetic patients) MBq/kg after 4-5 hr fasting and 40 min later, imaging is conducted with additional delayed scan at 2 hr to reduce the possible false positive. Image is taken by the equipment with PET-specific camera, of which quality assurance (QA) is maintained according to the guideline, and 3D image is constructed by the ordered subset expectation maximization method. Number of examinees during 4.5 years are 18,210 (M/F=9,735/8,475), and 236 (1.3%), together with use of other test measures like ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biochemical marker and occult blood as well, are found to have cancer of thyroid, large bowel, lung, breast and others. The false negative rate by PET alone is 78/236 (33%) for cancer. PET examination has problems of image reading and specificity of organs, and tasks of informed consent, test cost, increased exchange of information and radiation exposure. However, PET cancer examination will be established as a routine diagnostic tool when the accumulated evidence of early cancer detection is shown useful for improving the survival rate and for reducing the medicare cost. (T.I.)

  15. Repeated pulsed x-ray emission equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terauchi, Hikaru; Iida, Satoshi

    1982-01-01

    X-ray diffraction technique has been applied to determine the spatial positions of atoms which compose a material, and it is needless to say that the technique is a fundamental means regardless of the fields of research. However, the application of X-ray diffraction to the research on physical properties has been so far limited to know the spatial positions of atoms or molecules under thermal equilibrium condition. The addition of time element to the conventional technique, that is, the analysis of material structure including the time-varying processes under non-equilibrium conditions, is considered to approach the elucidation of the essence of materials. The authors call this dynamic structural analysis. The authors have planned to analyze X-ray diffraction intensity which has the resolution of about 10 -8 s in the real time which is conjugate with energy. However, present pulsed X-ray sources are not suitable for diffraction experiment because the pulse width is too long or X-ray wavelength is too short. Accordingly, the authors have made for trial a pulsed X-ray source for diffraction experiment. Its specifications are: diode voltage (X-ray tube voltage) from 200 to 300 kV, diode current from 2 to 5 kA, pulse width of about 30ns, maximum repetition frequency 10 pps, and X-ray focus size of 2 mm diameter. One of the features of this source is the repeated generation of pulsed X-ray. This is the first trial in the world, and is indispensable to the dynamic structural analysis described above. The quality of the emitted X-ray is also written. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Repeated speech errors: evidence for learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Karin R; Menzies, Heather; Lake, Johanna K

    2010-11-01

    Three experiments elicited phonological speech errors using the SLIP procedure to investigate whether there is a tendency for speech errors on specific words to reoccur, and whether this effect can be attributed to implicit learning of an incorrect mapping from lemma to phonology for that word. In Experiment 1, when speakers made a phonological speech error in the study phase of the experiment (e.g. saying "beg pet" in place of "peg bet") they were over four times as likely to make an error on that same item several minutes later at test. A pseudo-error condition demonstrated that the effect is not simply due to a propensity for speakers to repeat phonological forms, regardless of whether or not they have been made in error. That is, saying "beg pet" correctly at study did not induce speakers to say "beg pet" in error instead of "peg bet" at test. Instead, the effect appeared to be due to learning of the error pathway. Experiment 2 replicated this finding, but also showed that after 48 h, errors made at study were no longer more likely to reoccur. As well as providing constraints on the longevity of the effect, this provides strong evidence that the error reoccurrences observed are not due to item-specific difficulty that leads individual speakers to make habitual mistakes on certain items. Experiment 3 showed that the diminishment of the effect 48 h later is not due to specific extra practice at the task. We discuss how these results fit in with a larger view of language as a dynamic system that is constantly adapting in response to experience. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. No impact of repeated extinction exposures on operant responding maintained by different reinforcer rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, John Y H; Podlesnik, Christopher A

    2017-05-01

    Greater rates of intermittent reinforcement in the presence of discriminative stimuli generally produce greater resistance to extinction, consistent with predictions of behavioral momentum theory. Other studies reveal more rapid extinction with higher rates of reinforcers - the partial reinforcement extinction effect. Further, repeated extinction often produces more rapid decreases in operant responding due to learning a discrimination between training and extinction contingencies. The present study examined extinction repeatedly with training with different rates of intermittent reinforcement in a multiple schedule. We assessed whether repeated extinction would reverse the pattern of greater resistance to extinction with greater reinforcer rates. Counter to this prediction, resistance to extinction was consistently greater across twelve assessments of training followed by six successive sessions of extinction. Moreover, patterns of responding during extinction resembled those observed during satiation tests, which should not alter discrimination processes with repeated testing. These findings join others suggesting operant responding in extinction can be durable across repeated tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Poor methodological detail precludes experimental repeatability and hampers synthesis in ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddaway, Neal R; Verhoeven, Jos T A

    2015-10-01

    Despite the scientific method's central tenets of reproducibility (the ability to obtain similar results when repeated) and repeatability (the ability to replicate an experiment based on methods described), published ecological research continues to fail to provide sufficient methodological detail to allow either repeatability of verification. Recent systematic reviews highlight the problem, with one example demonstrating that an average of 13% of studies per year (±8.0 [SD]) failed to report sample sizes. The problem affects the ability to verify the accuracy of any analysis, to repeat methods used, and to assimilate the study findings into powerful and useful meta-analyses. The problem is common in a variety of ecological topics examined to date, and despite previous calls for improved reporting and metadata archiving, which could indirectly alleviate the problem, there is no indication of an improvement in reporting standards over time. Here, we call on authors, editors, and peer reviewers to consider repeatability as a top priority when evaluating research manuscripts, bearing in mind that legacy and integration into the evidence base can drastically improve the impact of individual research reports.

  19. Repeated episodes of chronic intermittent ethanol promote insensitivity to devaluation of the reinforcing effect of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M F; Becker, H C; Chandler, L J

    2014-11-01

    Studies in animal models have shown that repeated episodes of alcohol dependence and withdrawal promote escalation of drinking that is presumably associated with alterations in the addiction neurocircuitry. Using a lithium chloride-ethanol pairing procedure to devalue the reinforcing properties of ethanol, the present study determined whether multiple cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure by vapor inhalation also alters the sensitivity of drinking behavior to the devaluation of ethanol's reinforcing effects. The effect of devaluation on operant ethanol self-administration and extinction was examined in mice prior to initiation of CIE (short drinking history) and after repeated cycles of CIE or air control exposure (long drinking history). Devaluation significantly attenuated the recovery of baseline ethanol self-administration when tested either prior to CIE or in the air-exposed controls that had experienced repeated bouts of drinking but no CIE. In contrast, in mice that had undergone repeated cycles of CIE exposure that promoted escalation of ethanol drinking, self-administration was completely resistant to the effect of devaluation. Devaluation had no effect on the time course of extinction training in either pre-CIE or post-CIE mice. Taken together, these results are consistent with the suggestion that repeated cycles of ethanol dependence and withdrawal produce escalation of ethanol self-administration that is associated with a change in sensitivity to devaluation of the reinforcing properties of ethanol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Repeated superovulation increases the risk of osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases by accelerating ovarian aging in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinjin; Lai, Zhiwen; Shi, Liangyan; Tian, Yong; Luo, Aiyue; Xu, Zheyuan; Ma, Xiangyi; Wang, Shixuan

    2018-05-22

    Superovulation procedures and assisted reproductive technologies have been widely used to treat couples who have infertility problems. Although generally safe, the superovulation procedures are associated with a series of complications, such as ovarian hyper-stimulation syndrome, thromboembolism, and adnexal torsion. The role of long-term repeated superovulation in ovarian aging and especially in associated disorders such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases is still unclear. In this study, we sought to determine if repeated superovulation by ten cycles of treatment with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin/human chorionic gonadotropin could affect ovarian reserve, ovarian function, bone density and heart function. Ovarian reserve and function were reflected by the size of the primordial follicle pool, anti-Mullerian hormone expressions, hormone levels and fertility status. Furthermore, we examined bone density and heart function by microCT and cardiovascular ultrasonography, respectively. After repeated superovulation, the size of the primordial follicle pool and the expression of anti-mullerian hormone decreased, along with the concentrations of estrogen and progesterone. Mice exposed to repeated superovulation showed an obvious decrease in fertility and fecundity. Furthermore, both bone density and heart ejection fraction significantly decreased. These results suggest that repeated superovulation may increase the risk of osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases by accelerating ovarian aging.

  1. Repeatability and accuracy of reproductive tract scoring to determine pubertal status in beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrans, Kelly S; Hardin, David K

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the repeatability and accuracy of palpation per rectum to transrectal ultrasonography and serum progesterone concentrations for determining pubertal status in beef heifers. One hundred and seventy-four rectal examinations were performed on 29 predominantly Angus heifers by two veterinarians (A and B) and assigned individual reproductive tract scores (RTS) during monthly examinations over a 3-month period. Heifers were examined in the morning by both veterinarians, randomized, and re-examined in the afternoon. The size and location of ovarian structures of each heifer were determined by ultrasonography. Heifers with follicles >10mm in diameter or corpora lutea were classified as pubertal. Serum progesterone concentrations at the time of the examination and 10 days later were determined by radioimmunoassay and used to classify heifers as prepubertal (or=1 ng/ml). Kappa, which describes degree of agreement beyond chance, was used to determine repeatability of the RTS system. Multicategory Kappa for agreement was 0.64 within veterinarian, 0.46 between veterinarian, and 0.35 between palpation per rectum and transrectal ultrasonography. Sensitivity and specificity of palpation per rectum for diagnosis of pubertal status compared to serum progesterone levels were higher (82 and 69%, respectively) than sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography (79 and 59%, respectively). This study validates the RTS system as a repeatable and accurate screening test to evaluate pubertal status in groups of heifers prior to the onset of the breeding season.

  2. Isolation of human simple repeat loci by hybridization selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Neumann, R; Gobert, S; Jeffreys, A J

    1994-04-01

    We have isolated short tandem repeat arrays from the human genome, using a rapid method involving filter hybridization to enrich for tri- or tetranucleotide tandem repeats. About 30% of clones from the enriched library cross-hybridize with probes containing trimeric or tetrameric tandem arrays, facilitating the rapid isolation of large numbers of clones. In an initial analysis of 54 clones, 46 different tandem arrays were identified. Analysis of these tandem repeat loci by PCR showed that 24 were polymorphic in length; substantially higher levels of polymorphism were displayed by the tetrameric repeat loci isolated than by the trimeric repeats. Primary mapping of these loci by linkage analysis showed that they derive from 17 chromosomes, including the X chromosome. We anticipate the use of this strategy for the efficient isolation of tandem repeats from other sources of genomic DNA, including DNA from flow-sorted chromosomes, and from other species.

  3. Metallographic examination in irradiated materials examination facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Lee, Key Soon; Park, Dae Gyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Yoo, Byoung Ok

    1998-01-01

    It is very important to have equipment of metallographic examination in hot-cell to observe the micro-structure of nuclear fuels and materials irradiated at nuclear power and/or research reactor. Those equipment should be operated by master-slave manipulators, so they are designed, manufactured and modified to make exercise easy and no trouble. The metallographic examination equipment and techniques as well as its operation procedure are described, so an operator can practice the metallography in hot-cell. (author). 5 refs., 7 tabs., 21 figs.

  4. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes

  5. Assembly of Repeat Content Using Next Generation Sequencing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    labutti, Kurt; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Copeland, Alex

    2014-03-17

    Repetitive organisms pose a challenge for short read assembly, and typically only unique regions and repeat regions shorter than the read length, can be accurately assembled. Recently, we have been investigating the use of Pacific Biosciences reads for de novo fungal assembly. We will present an assessment of the quality and degree of repeat reconstruction possible in a fungal genome using long read technology. We will also compare differences in assembly of repeat content using short read and long read technology.

  6. RTEL1 Inhibits Trinucleotide Repeat Expansions and Fragility

    OpenAIRE

    Aisling Frizzell; Jennifer H.G. Nguyen; Mark I.R. Petalcorin; Katherine D. Turner; Simon J. Boulton; Catherine H. Freudenreich; Robert S. Lahue

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human RTEL1 is an essential, multifunctional helicase that maintains telomeres, regulates homologous recombination, and helps prevent bone marrow failure. Here, we show that RTEL1 also blocks trinucleotide repeat expansions, the causal mutation for 17 neurological diseases. Increased expansion frequencies of (CTG·CAG) repeats occurred in human cells following knockdown of RTEL1, but not the alternative helicase Fbh1, and purified RTEL1 efficiently unwound triplet repeat hairpins in vi...

  7. Misleading Children: Causal Attributions of Inconsistency under Repeated Questioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michael; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Four studies investigated whether inconsistency of children aged four to six on developmental tasks may reflect a misinterpretation of the experimenter's intent in communication under repeated questioning. (SKC)

  8. Coexistence of 3G repeaters with LTE base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Woon-Young; Lee, Sang-Min; Hwang, Gyung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Repeaters have been an attractive solution for mobile operators to upgrade their wireless networks at low cost and to extend network coverage effectively. Since the first LTE commercial deployment in 2009, many mobile operators have launched LTE networks by upgrading their 3G and legacy networks. Because all 3G frequency bands are shared with the frequency bands for LTE deployment and 3G mobile operators have an enormous number of repeaters, reusing 3G repeaters in LTE networks is definitely a practical and cost-efficient solution. However, 3G repeaters usually do not support spatial multiplexing with multiple antennas, and thus it is difficult to reuse them directly in LTE networks. In order to support spatial multiplexing of LTE, the role of 3G repeaters should be replaced with small LTE base stations or MIMO-capable repeaters. In this paper, a repeater network is proposed to reuse 3G repeaters in LTE deployment while still supporting multilayer transmission of LTE. Interestingly, the proposed network has a higher cluster throughput than an LTE network with MIMO-capable repeaters.

  9. R-loops: targets for nuclease cleavage and repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2018-01-11

    R-loops form when transcribed RNA remains bound to its DNA template to form a stable RNA:DNA hybrid. Stable R-loops form when the RNA is purine-rich, and are further stabilized by DNA secondary structures on the non-template strand. Interestingly, many expandable and disease-causing repeat sequences form stable R-loops, and R-loops can contribute to repeat instability. Repeat expansions are responsible for multiple neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease, myotonic dystrophy, and several types of ataxias. Recently, it was found that R-loops at an expanded CAG/CTG repeat tract cause DNA breaks as well as repeat instability (Su and Freudenreich, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114, E8392-E8401, 2017). Two factors were identified as causing R-loop-dependent breaks at CAG/CTG tracts: deamination of cytosines and the MutLγ (Mlh1-Mlh3) endonuclease, defining two new mechanisms for how R-loops can generate DNA breaks (Su and Freudenreich, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114, E8392-E8401, 2017). Following R-loop-dependent nicking, base excision repair resulted in repeat instability. These results have implications for human repeat expansion diseases and provide a paradigm for how RNA:DNA hybrids can cause genome instability at structure-forming DNA sequences. This perspective summarizes mechanisms of R-loop-induced fragility at G-rich repeats and new links between DNA breaks and repeat instability.

  10. Trial of Repeated Analgesia with Kangaroo Mother Care (TRAKC Trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) between mother and infant, commonly referred to as Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC), is recommended as an intervention for procedural pain. Evidence demonstrates its consistent efficacy in reducing pain for a single painful procedure. The purpose of this study is to examine the sustained efficacy of KMC, provided during all routine painful procedures for the duration of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) hospitalization, in diminishing behavioral pain response in preterm neonates. The efficacy of KMC alone will be compared to standard care of 24% oral sucrose, as well as the combination of KMC and 24% oral sucrose. Methods/design Infants admitted to the NICU who are less than 36 6/7 weeks gestational age (according to early ultrasound), that are stable enough to be held in KMC, will be considered eligible (N = 258). Using a single-blinded randomized parallel group design, participants will be assigned to one of three possible interventions: 1) KMC, 2) combined KMC and sucrose, and 3) sucrose alone, when they undergo any routine painful procedure (heel lance, venipuncture, intravenous, oro/nasogastric insertion). The primary outcome is infant’s pain intensity, which will be assessed using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). The secondary outcome will be maturity of neurobehavioral functioning, as measured by the Neurobehavioral Assessment of the Preterm Infant (NAPI). Gestational age, cumulative exposure to KMC provided during non-pain contexts, and maternal cortisol levels will be considered in the analysis. Clinical feasibility will be accounted for from nurse and maternal questionnaires. Discussion This will be the first study to examine the repeated use of KMC for managing procedural pain in preterm neonates. It is also the first to compare KMC to sucrose, or the interventions in combination, across time. Based on the theoretical framework of the brain opioid theory of attachment, it is expected that KMC will be a

  11. Cardiorespiratory Coordination in Repeated Maximal Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Garcia-Retortillo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Increases in cardiorespiratory coordination (CRC after training with no differences in performance and physiological variables have recently been reported using a principal component analysis approach. However, no research has yet evaluated the short-term effects of exercise on CRC. The aim of this study was to delineate the behavior of CRC under different physiological initial conditions produced by repeated maximal exercises. Fifteen participants performed 2 consecutive graded and maximal cycling tests. Test 1 was performed without any previous exercise, and Test 2 6 min after Test 1. Both tests started at 0 W and the workload was increased by 25 W/min in males and 20 W/min in females, until they were not able to maintain the prescribed cycling frequency of 70 rpm for more than 5 consecutive seconds. A principal component (PC analysis of selected cardiovascular and cardiorespiratory variables (expired fraction of O2, expired fraction of CO2, ventilation, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate was performed to evaluate the CRC defined by the number of PCs in both tests. In order to quantify the degree of coordination, the information entropy was calculated and the eigenvalues of the first PC (PC1 were compared between tests. Although no significant differences were found between the tests with respect to the performed maximal workload (Wmax, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max, or ventilatory threshold (VT, an increase in the number of PCs and/or a decrease of eigenvalues of PC1 (t = 2.95; p = 0.01; d = 1.08 was found in Test 2 compared to Test 1. Moreover, entropy was significantly higher (Z = 2.33; p = 0.02; d = 1.43 in the last test. In conclusion, despite the fact that no significant differences were observed in the conventionally explored maximal performance and physiological variables (Wmax, VO2 max, and VT between tests, a reduction of CRC was observed in Test 2. These results emphasize the interest of CRC

  12. Reinforcement Learning in Repeated Portfolio Decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Diao, Linan; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    How do people make investment decisions when they receive outcome feedback? We examined how well the standard mean-variance model and two reinforcement models predict people's portfolio decisions. The basic reinforcement model predicts a learning process that relies solely on the portfolio's overall return, whereas the proposed extended reinforcement model also takes the risk and covariance of the investments into account. The experimental results illustrate that people reacted sensitively to...

  13. Examine Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  14. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  15. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  16. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ...

  17. Wood's lamp examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003386.htm Wood lamp examination To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A Wood lamp examination is a test that uses ultraviolet ( ...

  18. Repeat photography as a tool for detecting and monitoring historical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repeat photography was used to illustrate long-term changes occurring in coastal habitats in the Western Cape, South Africa. Hi storic images were sourced from books and theses, the public and subject specialists, and repeat photographs were then taken from the same perspectives. Visible changes could be categorised ...

  19. Towards accurate de novo assembly for genomes with repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucur, Doina

    2017-01-01

    De novo genome assemblers designed for short k-mer length or using short raw reads are unlikely to recover complex features of the underlying genome, such as repeats hundreds of bases long. We implement a stochastic machine-learning method which obtains accurate assemblies with repeats and

  20. Analysis of CR1 Repeats in the Zebra Finch Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most bird species have smaller genomes and fewer repeats than mammals. Chicken Repeat 1 (CR1 repeat is one of the most abundant families of repeats, ranging from ~133,000 to ~187,000 copies accounting for ~50 to ~80% of the interspersed repeats in the zebra finch and chicken genomes, respectively. CR1 repeats are believed to have arisen from the retrotransposition of a small number of master elements, which gave rise to multiple CR1 subfamilies in the chicken. In this study, we performed a global assessment of the divergence distributions, phylogenies, and consensus sequences of CR1 repeats in the zebra finch genome. We identified and validated 34 CR1 subfamilies and further analyzed the correlation between these subfamilies. We also discovered 4 novel lineage-specific CR1 subfamilies in the zebra finch when compared to the chicken genome. We built various evolutionary trees of these subfamilies and concluded that CR1 repeats may play an important role in reshaping the structure of bird genomes.

  1. Characteristics of persons with repeat syphilis - Idaho, 2011-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Ahmed M; Bartschi, Jared; Carter, Kris K

    2018-03-14

    During 2011-2015 in Idaho, 14 (7%) of 193 persons with early syphilis had repeat syphilis. Persons with repeat infections were more likely to have had secondary or early latent syphilis (P = 0.037) and be infected with HIV (P < 0.001) compared with those having one infection.

  2. Trinucleotide repeat microsatellite markers for Black Poplar (Populus nigra L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, M.J.M.; Schoot, van der J.; Arens, P.; Vosman, B.

    2001-01-01

    Using an enrichment procedure, we have cloned microsatellite repeats from black poplar (Populus nigra L.) and developed primers for microsatellite marker analysis. Ten primer pairs, mostly for trinucleotide repeats, produced polymorphic fragments in P. nigra. Some of them also showed amplification

  3. Simple sequence repeat marker development and genetic mapping ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    polymorphic SSR (simple sequence repeats) markers from libraries enriched for GA, CAA and AAT repeats, as well as 6 ... ers for quinoa was the development of a genetic linkage map ...... Weber J. L. 1990 Informativeness of human (dC-dA)n.

  4. Ocular surface sensitivity repeatability with Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Cecilia; Stapleton, Fiona; Badarudin, Ezailina; Golebiowski, Blanka

    2015-02-01

    To determine the repeatability of ocular surface threshold measurements using the Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer on the same day and 3 months apart. Two separate studies were conducted to determine the repeatability of ocular surface threshold measurements made on the same day (n = 20 subjects) and 3 months apart (n = 29 subjects). The Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer was used to measure corneal and inferior conjunctival thresholds using the ascending method of limits. The pressure exerted by the Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer was determined using an analytical balance, for both the 0.08- and 0.12-mm-diameter filaments. This calibration was then used to convert filament length measurements to pressure. Repeatability was determined using a Bland and Altman analysis. The pressure exerted at each filament length differed between the two filament diameters. The measured pressure also differed from values provided by the manufacturer. Repeatability of threshold measurements at the central cornea was shown to be good, with better repeatability for same-day measurements (coefficient of repeatability [CoR] = ±0.23 g/mm²) than for those 3 months apart (CoR = ±0.52 g/mm²). Threshold measurements at the inferior conjunctiva, in contrast, were poorly repeatable (CoR = ±12.78 g/mm²). Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometry is repeatable when performed on the central cornea on the same day and 3 months apart, but this instrument is not recommended for conjunctival threshold measurements.

  5. Development of Repeated Sprint Ability in Talented Youth Basketball Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Wierike, Sanne C. M.; de Jong, Mark C.; Tromp, Eveline J. Y.; Vuijk, Pieter J.; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Malina, Robert M.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    te Wierike, SCM, de Jong, MC, Tromp, EJY, Vuijk, PJ, Lemmink, KAPM, Malina, RM, Elferink-Gemser, MT, and Visscher, C. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players. J Strength Cond Res 28(4): 928-934, 2014-Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated

  6. Large Polyglutamine Repeats Cause Muscle Degeneration in SCA17 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In polyglutamine (polyQ diseases, large polyQ repeats cause juvenile cases with different symptoms than those of adult-onset patients, who carry smaller expanded polyQ repeats. The mechanisms behind the differential pathology mediated by different polyQ repeat lengths remain unknown. By studying knockin mouse models of spinal cerebellar ataxia-17 (SCA17, we found that a large polyQ (105 glutamines in the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP preferentially causes muscle degeneration and reduces the expression of muscle-specific genes. Direct expression of TBP with different polyQ repeats in mouse muscle revealed that muscle degeneration is mediated only by the large polyQ repeats. Different polyQ repeats differentially alter TBP’s interaction with neuronal and muscle-specific transcription factors. As a result, the large polyQ repeat decreases the association of MyoD with TBP and DNA promoters. Our findings suggest that specific alterations in protein interactions by large polyQ repeats may account for the unique pathology in juvenile polyQ diseases.

  7. Large Polyglutamine Repeats Cause Muscle Degeneration in SCA17 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shanshan; Yang, Su; Guo, Jifeng; Yan, Sen; Gaertig, Marta A.; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, large polyQ repeats cause juvenile cases with different symptoms than adult-onset patients, who carry smaller expanded polyQ repeats. The mechanisms behind the differential pathology mediated by different polyQ repeat lengths remain unknown. By studying knock-in mouse models of spinal cerebellar ataxia-17 (SCA17), we found that a large polyQ (105 glutamines) in the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) preferentially causes muscle degeneration and reduces the expression of muscle-specific genes. Direct expression of TBP with different polyQ repeats in mouse muscle revealed that muscle degeneration is mediated only by the large polyQ repeats. Different polyQ repeats differentially alter TBP’s interaction with neuronal and muscle-specific transcription factors. As a result, the large polyQ repeat decreases the association of MyoD with TBP and DNA promoters. Our findings suggest that specific alterations in protein interactions by large polyQ repeats may account for the unique pathology in juvenile polyQ diseases. PMID:26387956

  8. Huntingtin gene repeat size variations affect risk of lifetime depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardiner, Sarah L.; van Belzen, Martine J.; Boogaard, Merel W.

    2017-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder caused by a cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeat expansion in the HTT gene. Although HD is frequently complicated by depression, it is still unknown to what extent common HTT CAG repeat size variations in the normal range could affect...

  9. The Outpatient Physical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artandi, Maja K; Stewart, Rosalyn W

    2018-05-01

    The physical examination in the outpatient setting is a valuable tool. Even in settings where there is lack of evidence, such as the annual physical examination of an asymptomatic adult, the physical examination is beneficial for the physician-patient relationship. When a patient has specific symptoms, the physical examination-in addition to a thorough history-can help narrow down, or in many cases establish, a diagnosis. In a time where imaging and laboratory tests are easily available, but are expensive and can be invasive, a skilled physical examination remains an important component of patient evaluation. Copyright © 2018 El