WorldWideScience

Sample records for repeat dwi offenders

  1. Assessment of Alcohol Use Disorders among Court-Mandated DWI Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiewicz, Paul R.; Nochajski, Thomas H.; Homish, D. Lynn

    2007-01-01

    Convicted DWI offenders (N = 549) were assessed for alcohol use disorders. Repeat offenders had twice the rate of both lifetime and current alcohol use disorders compared with 1st-time offenders. Guidelines for determining alcohol problems in DWI offenders are recommended.

  2. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  3. A Comparison of the Social Context for Alcohol Consumption of College Students and Convicted DWI Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kenneth H.; Summons, Terry G.

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed college students (N=272) and convicted DWI offenders (N=261). The results revealed that DWI offenders tend to drink in their own home, alone, and to relieve stress; whereas college students are more likely to drink at a party, for the enjoyment of taste, and to get drunk. (JAC)

  4. Assessing Driving while Intoxicated (DWI) Offender Characteristics and Drinking Problems Utilizing the Numerical Drinking Profile (NDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Adam E.; Misra, Ranjita; Dennis, Maurice

    2006-01-01

    Driving a vehicle under the influence of alcohol is a major public health concern. By distinguishing the type of individuals violating driving while intoxicated (DWI) sanctions, intervention programs will be better suited to reduce drinking and driving. The purpose of this study was to examine the personal characteristics of DWI offenders and…

  5. Effects of Mothers against Drunk Driving's (MADD's) Victim Impact Panels on First-Time DWI Offenders: Some Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nagesh; And Others

    A study assessed the effects of victim impact panels (VIP) on first-time DWI (Driving While Intoxicated) offenders in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The VIP is an emotional presentation by the victim or their parents about how they were injured or their child was killed by a drunk driver. Subjects, 350 first-time offenders participated in a Mothers…

  6. PTSD among a treatment sample of repeat DUI offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Allyson J; Najavits, Lisa M; Nelson, Sarah E; LaBrie, Richard A; Shaffer, Howard J

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most common psychiatric comorbidities among driving-under-the-influence (DUI) offenders in treatment. Investigation of DUI offenders' PTSD and clinical characteristics could have important implications for prevention and treatment. This prospective study examined the demographic and clinical characteristics of repeat DUI offenders with PTSD symptoms at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Seven hundred twenty-nine DUI offenders admitted to a 2-week inpatient program participated in the study. Participants with PTSD evidenced more severe psychiatric comorbidity and reported a higher DUI recidivism rate at 1-year than those without PTSD. This study suggests a need to address PTSD among DUI offenders, as well as to further develop methodologies for accurately reporting DUI recidivism.

  7. A Prospective Study of Psychiatric Comorbidity and Recidivism Among Repeat DUI Offenders

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Sarah E.; Belkin, Katerina; LaPlante, Debi A.; Bosworth, Leslie; Shaffer, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity has emerged as a key element distinguishing DUI offenders from others, and, in some cases, distinguishing repeat offenders from first-time offenders. This paper utilizes a prospective design to determine whether the comorbid disorders identified among repeat DUI offenders can predict recidivism. Seven hundred forty-three repeat DUI offenders were recruited from a two-week inpatient treatment program at which they received a standardized mental health assessment and fol...

  8. A Prospective Study of Psychiatric Comorbidity and Recidivism Among Repeat DUI Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sarah E; Belkin, Katerina; LaPlante, Debi A; Bosworth, Leslie; Shaffer, Howard J

    2015-04-13

    Psychiatric comorbidity has emerged as a key element distinguishing DUI offenders from others, and, in some cases, distinguishing repeat offenders from first-time offenders. This paper utilizes a prospective design to determine whether the comorbid disorders identified among repeat DUI offenders can predict recidivism. Seven hundred forty-three repeat DUI offenders were recruited from a two-week inpatient treatment program at which they received a standardized mental health assessment and followed across five years post-treatment to track DUI offense, motor vehicle-related offenses, and general criminal offenses. Psychiatric comorbidity, though it did not predict DUI recidivism specifically, predicted criminal re-offense more generally. In addition, there was a specific relationship between lifetime attention deficit disorder and repeated motor vehicle-related offenses. These findings suggest that for many repeat offenders, DUI is one outlet in a constellation of criminal behavior, and that psychiatric comorbidity increases vulnerability for criminal re-offense.

  9. Driving While Impaired (DWI) Intervention Service Provider Orientations: The Scales of the DWI Therapeutic Educator Inventory (DTEI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMuro, Scott; Wanberg, Kenneth; Anderson, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The therapeutic educator who provides services to driving while impaired (DWI) offenders is a unique professional hybrid, combining education and therapeutic service delivery. In an effort to understand and address this service provider, a 69-item DWI Therapeutic Educator Inventory (DTEI) was constructed. Using principal components and common…

  10. The chromatin remodeller ATRX: a repeat offender in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, David; Higgs, Douglas R; Gibbons, Richard J

    2013-09-01

    The regulation of chromatin structure is of paramount importance for a variety of fundamental nuclear processes, including gene expression, DNA repair, replication, and recombination. The ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling factor ATRX (α thalassaemia/mental retardation X-linked) has emerged as a key player in each of these processes. Exciting recent developments suggest that ATRX plays a variety of key roles at tandem repeat sequences within the genome, including the deposition of a histone variant, prevention of replication fork stalling, and the suppression of a homologous recombination-based pathway of telomere maintenance. Here, we provide a mechanistic overview of the role of ATRX in each of these processes, and propose how they may be connected to give rise to seemingly disparate human diseases.

  11. Criminality and continued DUI offense: criminal typologies and recidivism among repeat offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrie, Richard A; Kidman, Rachel C; Albanese, Mark; Peller, Allyson J; Shaffer, Howard J

    2007-01-01

    We examined over 20,000 arraignment records to define criminal typologies and post-treatment driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) convictions for a select cohort of 1,281 repeat DUI offenders who were offered and elected treatment as an alternative to incarceration; we compared this information with a similar data analysis collected 20 years previously. Analyses of 8,600 prior-to-treatment convictions defined four basic crime profiles: only DUI and other substance-related offenses (60%), plus crimes against property (18%), plus crimes against people (8%), plus crimes against both property and people (13%). During the six years after inpatient treatment, 15.5% of the cohort was convicted of another DUI. The reoffense rate was significantly different across criminal types and was not related to the time post treatment years at risk. The findings show there has been no significant improvement in treatment outcome over the last 20 years. New and innovative DUI offender policies and practices are needed to better engage the heterogeneous offender population, and reduce the incidence of repeat DUI.

  12. Do Deterrence and Social-Control Theories Predict Driving after Drinking 15 years after a DWI Conviction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Sandra C.; Todd, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study investigates the utility of deterrence and social-control theories for prospective prediction of driving-while-impaired (DWI) outcomes of first-time DWI offenders. Method The sample consisted of a subset of 544 convicted first-time DWI offenders (n = 337 females) who were interviewed 5 and 15 years after referral to a screening program in Bernalillo County, New Mexico. Variables collected at the 5-year (initial) interview were used in structural equation models to predict past 3-months, self-reported DWI at the 15-year follow-up (follow-up) interview. These variables represented domains defined by deterrence and social-control theories of DWI behavior, with one model corresponding to deterrence theory and one to social-control theory. Results Both models fit the data. DWI jail time was positively related to perceived enforcement, which was negatively but not significantly related to self-reported DWI. Neither jail time for DWI nor perceived likelihood of arrest was linearly related to self-reported DWI at follow-up. Interactions between jail time and prior DWI behavior indicated relatively weaker associations between initial and 15-year DWI for those reporting more jail time. Conclusion Our prospective study demonstrated that for this convicted DWI offender cohort, classic formulations of deterrence and social-control theories did not account for DWI. However, results suggest that punishment may decrease the likelihood of DWI recidivism. PMID:22269495

  13. Temporal alcohol availability predicts first-time drunk driving, but not repeat offending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Timothy P; Denson, Thomas F

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol availability has been linked to drunk driving, but research has not examined whether this relationship is the same for first-time and repeat offenses. We examined the relationship between the business hours of alcohol outlets licensed to serve alcohol for on-premises consumption and misdemeanor-level (first offense) and felony-level drunk driving (repeat offense) charges in New York State in 2009. Longer outlet business hours were associated with more misdemeanor drunk driving charges, but were not associated with felony drunk driving charges. The per capita density of on-premises alcohol outlets did not affect misdemeanor or felony drunk driving charges. The results suggest that temporal alcohol availability may be an impelling factor for first-time drunk driving, but other factors likely influence repeat drunk driving behaviors.

  14. Temporal alcohol availability predicts first-time drunk driving, but not repeat offending.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P Schofield

    Full Text Available Alcohol availability has been linked to drunk driving, but research has not examined whether this relationship is the same for first-time and repeat offenses. We examined the relationship between the business hours of alcohol outlets licensed to serve alcohol for on-premises consumption and misdemeanor-level (first offense and felony-level drunk driving (repeat offense charges in New York State in 2009. Longer outlet business hours were associated with more misdemeanor drunk driving charges, but were not associated with felony drunk driving charges. The per capita density of on-premises alcohol outlets did not affect misdemeanor or felony drunk driving charges. The results suggest that temporal alcohol availability may be an impelling factor for first-time drunk driving, but other factors likely influence repeat drunk driving behaviors.

  15. [Temporality and trauma: Towards an articulation between the judicial, educational and psychological times in repeat teenage offenders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermarrec, S; Mougli, K

    2015-09-01

    Within the past few years, the problem of repeat teenage offenders has raised troubling questions among the various institutions in charge of this population. The temporalities of these adolescents are marked by immediacy, urgency, and repetition that circumvent a linear view of time and the programs set up to handle them. Studies on repeat teenage aggressors (notably, sexual aggressors) have shown that these young people often have a history of an acknowledged or unacknowledged trauma. The fact of having been a victim of abuse during childhood is thought to be a factor leading to later acting out. Our objective is to inquire into these juvenile delinquents and their treatment using a temporal framework of their life pathway that will influence the ways in which they are treated by professionals. By tracing back through the lives of these young authors of violence, we can find out whether they were themselves victims. Repeated acts of violence by a youth could then be seen not as isolated acts but as expressions of ill-being, of having been a victim, whether recognized or not. The act thus represents a link between the present and the past that can be analyzed by looking at occurrences of acting out. It would be interesting, moreover, to reflect upon how continuity could be created there where disruption strikes the youth and often the institutions too. We provide a detailed description of the notion of trauma by recalling its definition and its possible immediate and deferred effects on these youths. In the immediate time frame, the subject may present a physical reaction to the trauma. The psychological reaction will determine a psychic time frame expressed in several ways, whether immediately or at a distance from the traumatic event. Posttraumatic reactions may hamper the development of the teenager's personality. Some traumatized adolescents will express their ill-being by aggressiveness, as they replay the traumatic scene by staging violent and dangerous

  16. SU-F-303-13: Initial Evaluation of Four Dimensional Diffusion- Weighted MRI (4D-DWI) and Its Effect On Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y [Duke University Medical Physics Program (United States); Yin, F; Czito, B; Bashir, M; Palta, M; Cai, J [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Zhong, X; Dale, B [Siemens Healthcare, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI) has been shown to have superior tumor-to-tissue contrast for cancer detection.This study aims at developing and evaluating a four dimensional DWI(4D-DWI) technique using retrospective sorting method for imaging respiratory motion for radiotherapy planning,and evaluate its effect on Apparent Diffusion Coefficient(ADC) measurement. Materials/Methods: Image acquisition was performed by repeatedly imaging a volume of interest using a multi-slice single-shot 2D-DWI sequence in the axial planes and cine MRI(served as reference) using FIESTA sequence.Each 2D-DWI image were acquired in xyz-diffusion-directions with a high b-value(b=500s/mm2).The respiratory motion was simultaneously recorded using bellows.Retrospective sorting was applied in each direction to reconstruct 4D-DWI.The technique was evaluated using a computer simulated 4D-digital human phantom(XCAT),a motion phantom and a healthy volunteer under an IRB-approved study.Motion trajectories of regions-of-interests(ROI) were extracted from 4D-DWI and compared with reference.The mean motion trajectory amplitude differences(D) between the two was calculated.To quantitatively analyze the motion artifacts,XCAT were controlled to simulate regular motion and the motions of 10 liver cancer patients.4D-DWI,free-breathing DWI(FB- DWI) were reconstructed.Tumor volume difference(VD) of each phase of 4D-DWI and FB-DWI from the input static tumor were calculated.Furthermore, ADC was measured for each phase of 4D-DWI and FB-DWI data,and mean tumor ADC values(M-ADC) were calculated.Mean M-ADC over all 4D-DWI phases was compared with M-ADC calculated from FB-DWI. Results: 4D-DWI of XCAT,the motion phantom and the healthy volunteer demonstrated the respiratory motion clearly.ROI D values were 1.9mm,1.7mm and 2.0mm,respectively.For motion artifacts analysis,XCAT 4D-DWI images show much less motion artifacts compare to FB-DWI.Mean VD for 4D-WDI and FB-DWI were 8.5±1.4% and 108±15

  17. Sex Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Susan

    1991-01-01

    This paper on the problem of sex offending among individuals with intellectual disabilities examines the incidence of this problem, characteristics of intellectually disabled sex offenders, determination of whether the behavior is a paraphilia or functional age-related behavior, and treatment options, with emphasis on the situation in New South…

  18. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in spinal cord ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, Vienna (Austria); Bammer, Roland [Stanford University, Lucas MRS/I Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Spinal cord infarction is a rare clinical diagnosis characterized by a sudden onset of paralysis, bowel and bladder dysfunction, and loss of pain and temperature perception, with preservation of proprioception and vibration sense. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) usually demonstrates intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted MR images with cord enlargement. However, in approximately 45% of patients, MR shows no abnormality. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) has been widely used for the evaluation of a variety of brain disorders, especially for acute stroke. Preliminary data suggest that DWI has the potential to be useful in the early detection of spinal infarction. We performed DWI, using navigated, interleaved, multishot echo planar imaging (IEPI), in a series of six patients with a clinical suspicion of acute spinal cord ischemia. In all patients, high signal was observed on isotropic DWI images with low ADC values (0.23 and 0.86 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/s), indicative of restricted diffusion. We analyzed the imaging findings from conventional MR sequences and diffusion-weighted MR sequences in six patients with spinal cord infarction, compared the findings with those in published series, and discuss the value of DWI in spinal cord ischemia based on current experience. Although the number of patients with described DWI findings totals only 23, the results of previously published studies and those of our study suggest that DWI has the potential to be a useful and feasible technique for the detection of spinal infarction. (orig.)

  19. Penokohan Film Sawung Kampret Karya Dwi Koendoro (Dwi Koen Dalam Perspektif Strukturalisme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Gayatri Puspitasari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tulisan ini berisi  kajian penokohan film Sawung Kampret yang diadaptasi dari komik Le- genda Sawung Kampret. Kajian ini menarik karena dua hal. Pertama, komik dan film adaptasi- nya diciptakan dan disutradarai oleh orang yang sama, yakni Dwi Koendoro. Kedua, kajian film yang diadaptasi dari komik Indonesia merupakan yang pertama. Melalui pendekatan struktural Ferdinand de Saussure, kajian berpusat pada relasi berbagai elemen penokohan yang membentuk keutuhan struktur narasi film. Didapat beberapa temuan menarik dimana unsur kelucuan pada penokohan film Sawung Kampret direlasikan dengan sejarah, hingga mampu membentuk narasi asosiatif yang mengusung nasionalisme berdasar nilai kemanusiaan, kebe- ragaman etnis dan budaya. Fakta tersebut menunjukkan bahwa melalui film Sawung Kampret, Dwi Koendoro mampu menciptakan perspektif struktur baru dengan melakukan kritik terha- dap struktur lama. Pasangan berlawanan (binary opposition dalam sistem lama coba diperta- nyakan. Sebagai hasil akhir maka dapat disimpulkan bahwa film Sawung Kampret merupakan film parodi sejarah yang sarat akan muatan pesan moral dan nasionalisme.       Kata kunci: film, adaptasi, penokohan, struktur, relasi

  20. Sexual Offender Subtyping: The Incest Offender Question

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    Lea H. Studer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Background: Current wisdom in the risk assessment of sexual offenders is that incest offenders have a small chance of re-offending. Previous research has shown that re-offense rates even for untreated offenders who choose victims from within the family, range from 4-10%. Flowing from this belief are further assumptions that they are less dangerous and do not require intensive treatment, if they require any at all.Material/Methods: The paper summarizes the findings of two prior reports which examined a sample of in-patient child molesters attending treatment at the Phoenix Program. Results: Findings reveal a great deal of overlap between categories with incestuous offenders having numerous non-incestuous victims, and non-incestuous offenders also having incestuous victims. There was also a great deal of overlap between these two groups in terms of their erotic preference testing responses. This was the finding even when biologically related fathers were examined separately, and when exclusively incestuous fathers were considered.Conclusions: If there were a “pure” form of incest offender who poses little risk to other children, it is virtually impossible to discriminate who fits this category at the outset of treatment. Neither index offense nor erotic preference testing are very helpful in distinguishing this group from extrafamilial offenders. Beliefs about treatment requirements for incest offenders and their potential risk to victims outside their own family need to be reconsidered.

  1. Offenders: Characteristics and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Judith V.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews what is known about child sex offenders and their treatment. The author discusses the role of paraphilia in child molestation and reviews what is known about juvenile and incest offenders and recidivism rates. What is known about recidivism of untreated offenders and treatment practices is also summarized. Recommendations conclude the…

  2. Evolution of DWI signal abnormalities after transient ischemic attack and minor ischaemic stroke

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Merwick, A

    2011-05-01

    Background: Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) signal abnormality after transient ischaemic attack (TIA) predicts early stroke, independently of other risk markers included in the ABCD3-I score. Early stroke recurrence detected on follow-up DWI after the acute-phase DWI may identify patients at high risk for subsequent clinicalstrokesstroke, cognitive impairment, and seizures. We aimed to determine the evolution of acute DWI lesions and rate of new ischaemic lesion (NIL) occurrence on follow-up DWI after TIA and minor stroke.\\r\

  3. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and violent re-offending in adult offenders in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danesh John

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High rates of repeat offending are common across nations that are socially and culturally different. Although psychiatric disorders are believed to be risk factors for violent reoffending, the available evidence is sparse and liable to bias. Method We conducted a historical cohort study in Sweden of a selected sample of 4828 offenders given community sentences who were assessed by a psychiatrist during 1988–2001, and followed up for an average of 5 years for first violent offence, death, or emigration, using information from national registers. Hazard ratios for violent offending were calculated by Cox regression models. Results Nearly a third of the sample (n = 1506 or 31.3% offended violently during follow-up (mean duration: 4.8 years. After adjustment for socio-demographic and criminal history variables, substance use disorders (hazard ratio 1.97, 95% CI, 1.40–2.77 and personality disorders (hazard ratio 1.71, 1.20–2.44 were significantly associated with an increased risk of violent offending. No other diagnoses were related to recidivism risk. Adding information on diagnoses of substance use and personality disorders to data recorded on age, sex, and criminal history improved only minimally the prediction of violent offending. Conclusion Diagnoses of substance use and personality disorders are associated with the risk of subsequent violent offending in community offenders about as strongly as are its better documented demographic and criminal history risk factors. Despite this, assessment of such disorders in addition to demographic and criminal history factors enhances only minimally the prediction of violent offending in the community.

  4. Juvenile Sex Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Eileen P; Otonichar, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Sexual offending by juveniles accounts for a sizable percentage of sexual offenses, especially against young children. In this article, recent research on female juvenile sex offenders (JSOs), risk factors for offending in juveniles, treatment, and the ways in which these youth may differ from general delinquents will be reviewed. Most JSOs do not go on to develop paraphilic disorders or to commit sex offenses during adulthood, and as a group, they are more similar to nonsexual offending juvenile delinquents than to adult sex offenders. Recent research has elucidated some differences between youth who commit sex offenses and general delinquents in the areas of atypical sexual interests, the use of pornography, and early sexual victimization during childhood.

  5. The differences between sex offenders who victimise older women and sex offenders who offend against children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, K D; Hines, Morag; Tully, Ruth J

    2016-07-01

    Within the literature on sex offending, much attention is paid to the distinction between those sex offenders who offend against adults and those who offend against children. In contrast, there is a paucity of research into sex offenders who offend specifically against elderly or older victims. A detailed interview and psychometric tests were conducted with a sample of 28 sex offenders who had been convicted of a sexually motivated offence against an older female. These data were compared to a sample of 23 child sex offenders. Results indicate that amongst other significant differences between these sub-groups, men who offend against older women are generally younger, are more violent, and are more likely to use a weapon and cause injury and death compared to child sex offenders. The men who offended against children were more likely to think about and plan their offending, spend more time with the victim pre and post offence, admit sexual arousal during the offence, and admit to a sexual motivation for the offence. This study suggests that men who sexually offend against older women and men who sexually offend against children are distinct groups. Treatment and risk management strategies should take this into account. Further exploration of this sub-group of offenders is recommended to help inform treatment and risk management strategies for sex offenders who offend against older people.

  6. Technical advancements and protocol optimization of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ping; Lin, Yuning; Zhong, Qun; Chen, Ziqian; Sandrasegaran, Kumar; Lin, Chen

    2016-01-01

    An area of rapid advancement in abdominal MRI is diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). By measuring diffusion properties of water molecules, DWI is capable of non-invasively probing tissue properties and physiology at cellular and macromolecular level. The integration of DWI as part of abdominal MRI exam allows better lesion characterization and therefore more accurate initial diagnosis and treatment monitoring. One of the most technical challenging, but also most useful abdominal DWI applications is in liver and therefore requires special attention and careful optimization. In this article, the latest technical developments of DWI and its liver applications are reviewed with the explanations of the technical principles, recommendations of the imaging parameters, and examples of clinical applications. More advanced DWI techniques, including Intra-Voxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) diffusion imaging, anomalous diffusion imaging, and Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) are discussed.

  7. Personality disorder & serious further offending

    OpenAIRE

    West, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Offender characteristics are considered important in the prediction of future risk of re-offending and response to treatment. The psychiatric classification of offenders can therefore be an important variable influencing decision making. Although the relationship between personality disorder and offending is established in the literature, the relationship is complex. Recidivism of any type, particularly serious further offending that is violent or sexual in nature, has far reaching impl...

  8. Towards discrimination of infarcts from artifacts in DWI scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Varsha; Prakash, K.N.B.; Nowinski, Wieslaw L. [Technology and Research, Biomedical Imaging Lab, Agency for Science, Singapore (Singapore)

    2008-04-15

    Accurate and rapid quantification of infarcts from DWI scans is critical in acute ischemic stroke. Acquisition artifacts lead to hyperintense regions in DWI MR scans resulting in false positives. Discriminating infarcts and artifacts helps in reducing infarct segmentation errors. An algorithm based on two-dimensional symmetry of artifacts about the midsagittal plane and three-dimensional spatial coherence of infarct regions is proposed to characterize and separate infarcts from artifacts. The two dimensional symmetry is quantified by propagating Poisson errors in the intensity space of each pixel, and distant and spatially incoherent regions in a volume are considered as artifacts. The combination of two criteria enhances the confidence in the decision whether a hyperintense region is an infarct or artifact. The validity of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using 51 cases. The improvement in results is demonstrated in three situations: (1) automatic infarct slice identification resulting in an average increase in (specificity, Dice Statistical Index (DSI)) by (15.2%, 6.9%) while the sensitivity decrease is by only 1.5% and (2) automatic infarct segmentation using two different algorithms: first resulting in an average DSI increase by 7.6% and second by 5.1%. On a matlab platform, the processing time is < 1 s. The proposed algorithm is useful as a fast post-processing tool to reduce artifacts in infarct processing applications. (orig.)

  9. Violent female offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Loinaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Female violent offending is an understudied topic in Spanish-speaking countries. This review explores themajor research findings accumulated internationally over the last decade (2003-2013 about women'sviolence and crimes. The focus of the review is the intimate partner violence (IPV and sexual violencecommitted by females, the psychopathy and violence risk assessment, and the treatment and recidivism ofthese female offenders. Although the female offender topic is too wide to review all crime typologies (childphysical abuse is not included, for example the review indicates that: there are legal and police biases inthe treatment of women offenders; women can commit the same IPV and share the motivations of maleoffenders; sexual violence has a low prevalence, but there are many limitations in this research topic;predicting the risk of non-specific violence is feasible with the available tools; psychopathy is less prevalentamong adult female offenders, although there are fewer differences with male offenders among adolescentsamples; research about treatments is very limited and there are not effectiveness evidences; and last,recidivism rates for violent crimes are very low (in cases where information is available. Main implicationsand research lines are discussed.

  10. DWI for Assessment of Rectal Cancer Nodes After Chemoradiotherapy: Is the Absence of Nodes at DWI Proof of a Negative Nodal Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heeswijk, Miriam M; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Palm, Walter M; Hendriks, Babs M F; Maas, Monique; Beets, Geerard L; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2017-03-01

    When considering organ preservation in patients with rectal cancer with good tumor response, assessment of a node-negative status after chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is important. DWI is a very sensitive technique to detect nodes. The study aim was to test the hypothesis that the absence of nodes at DWI after CRT is concordant with a ypN0 status. A retrospective study was performed of 90 patients with rectal cancer treated with CRT followed by restaging MRI at 1.5 T, including DWI (highest b value, 1000 s/mm(2)). Two independent readers counted the number of nodes visible in the mesorectal compartment on DW images obtained after CRT. The number of nodes on DWI (0 vs ≥ 1) was compared with the number of metastatic nodes at histopathology or long-term clinical follow-up (yN0 vs yN-positive status). Seventy-one patients had a yN0 status, and 19 had a yN-positive status. For 10 patients, no nodes were observed at DWI, which was concordant with a yN0 status in 100% of cases. In the other 61 patients with a yN0 status, the median number of nodes detected at DWI was three (range, 1-17 nodes). To differentiate between yN0 and yN-positive status, sensitivity was 100%, specificity was 14%, the positive predictive value was 24%, and the negative predictive value was 100%. Although the absence of nodes at DWI is not a frequent finding, it appears to be a reliable predictor of yN0 status after CRT in patients with rectal cancer. DWI may thus be a helpful adjunct in assessing response after CRT and may help select patients for organ-saving treatment.

  11. Offenders and Post-Release Jobs: Variables Influencing Success and Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Byron; Schehr, Robert Carl

    2004-01-01

    Nonviolent adult repeat offenders between the ages of 18 and 35 face nearly insurmountable obstacles to successful reintegration into dominant culture. Upon release from prison ex-offenders receive an average of $69 from their state department of corrections, or between $100-$500 from the Federal Bureau of Prisons to aid their transition back into…

  12. Collaboration between Correctional and Public School Systems for Juvenile Offenders: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellriegel, Kimberly L.; Yates, James R.

    The educational processes for youth who participated in a county-run correctional facility for juvenile offenders were studied. The county's Leadership Academy, a 48-bed correctional treatment center where juveniles are placed when ordered into direct care, is designed to divert repeat male offenders from the state-run correctional system. The…

  13. The juvenile sex offender: The effect of employment on offending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, C.; Bijleveld, C.; Hendriks, J.; Mooi-Reçi, I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In many countries, sex offenders are treated as a special group of offenders, requiring special criminal justice responses and treatment modalities, presuming they are at high risk of re-offending. These special measures limit them in entering adult roles, especially employment. At the same

  14. Hypnotic Psychotherapy with Sex Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Sullivan; Briggs, Wanda P.; Magnus, Virginia

    2005-01-01

    The authors review the literature on the prevalence of sex offenders; multiple treatment modalities; and implications of the use of hypnotic psychotherapy, coupled with cognitive behavioral treatment programs, for treating sex offenders. (Contains 2 tables.)

  15. Wide area continuous offender monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshen, J. [Lucent Technologies (United States); Drake, G. [New Mexico Dept. of Corrections, Santa Fe, NM (United States); Spencer, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The corrections system in the U.S. is supervising over five million offenders. This number is rising fast and so are the direct and indirect costs to society. To improve supervision and reduce the cost of parole and probation, first generation home arrest systems were introduced in 1987. While these systems proved to be helpful to the corrections system, their scope is rather limited because they only cover an offender at a single location and provide only a partial time coverage. To correct the limitations of first-generation systems, second-generation wide area continuous electronic offender monitoring systems, designed to monitor the offender at all times and locations, are now on the drawing board. These systems use radio frequency location technology to track the position of offenders. The challenge for this technology is the development of reliable personal locator devices that are small, lightweight, with long operational battery life, and indoors/outdoors accuracy of 100 meters or less. At the center of a second-generation system is a database that specifies the offender`s home, workplace, commute, and time the offender should be found in each. The database could also define areas from which the offender is excluded. To test compliance, the system would compare the observed coordinates of the offender with the stored location for a given time interval. Database logfiles will also enable law enforcement to determine if a monitored offender was present at a crime scene and thus include or exclude the offender as a potential suspect.

  16. Online solicitation offenders are different from child pornography offenders and lower risk contact sexual offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Michael C; Wood, J Michael; Babchishin, Kelly M; Flynn, Sheri

    2012-08-01

    The current study compared 38 lower risk (based on actuarial risk assessments) men convicted of contact sexual offenses against children, 38 child pornography offenders, and 70 solicitation offenders (also known as luring or traveler offenders). Solicitation and child pornography offenders were better educated than contact offenders but did not differ on other sociodemographic variables. In comparison to child pornography offenders, solicitation offenders had lower capacity for relationship stability and lower levels of sex drive/preoccupation and deviant sexual preference. Solicitation offenders were also more problematic than lower risk contact offenders on sex drive/preoccupation and capacity for relationship stability and had greater self-reported use of child pornography. Differences between groups on two actuarial risk measures, the Static-99 and the VASOR, were inconsistent. This study suggests that solicitation offenders differ in meaningful ways from lower risk contact offenders and child pornography offenders and, consequently, in risk, treatment, and supervision needs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. The utility of high b-value DWI in evaluation of ischemic stroke at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cihangiroglu, Mutlu, E-mail: mcihangiroglu@yeditepe.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Citci, Beyza, E-mail: bcitci@yeditepe.edu.tr [Department of Neurology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Kilickesmez, Ozgur, E-mail: okilickesmez@yeditepe.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Firat, Zeynep, E-mail: zfirat@yeditepe.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Karlikaya, Geysu, E-mail: gkarlikaya@yeditepe.edu.tr [Department of Neurology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Ulug, Aziz M., E-mail: ulug@ieee.org [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yeditepe University, Istanbul (Turkey); The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY (United States); Bingol, Canan A., E-mail: caykutbingol@yeditepe.edu.tr [Department of Neurology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Kovanlikaya, Ilhami, E-mail: ilk2002@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, NY (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The utility of DWI with high b-value in ischemic stroke is still unsettled. The purpose of this study is to compare high b-value (3000) and standard b-value (1000) diffusion-weighted images in patients with ischemic stroke at 3 T. Materials and methods: 27 patients with acute stroke who were admitted to the hospital during the first 24 h after symptom onset were included in this study. All patients had a brain MRI study with stroke protocol including standard (b = 1000) DWI and high b-value (b = 3000) DWI sequences at 3 T MR scanner. Number and localization of the lesions were assessed MR signal intensities (SI), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), contrast ratio (CR) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the lesions and normal parenchyma on DWI with b = 1000 and b = 3000 sequences were measured. Results: All patients with acute stroke revealed hyperintense lesions due to restricted diffusion on DWI with both b-values. However, lesions of restricted diffusion were more conspicuous in b = 3000 value DWI than b = 1000, and additional 4 ischemic lesions were detected on b = 3000 DWI. SNR, CNR, SI and also ADC values in both stroke area and normal parenchyma were lower at b = 3000 than the value at b = 1000. At b = 3000, CR was significantly greater than b = 1000 images. Conclusions: Although quantitative analysis shows higher SI, SNR and CNR values with standard b-value (b = 1000) diffusion-weighted imaging, using higher b-value may still be beneficial in detecting additional subtle lesions in patients whose clinical findings are not correlated with standard b-value DWI in stroke.

  18. Self-reported traumatic brain injury in male young offenders: a risk factor for re-offending, poor mental health and violence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W Huw; Cordan, Giray; Mewse, Avril J; Tonks, James; Burgess, Crispin N W

    2010-12-01

    Adolescence is a risk period for offending and for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and TBI is a risk factor for poor mental health and for offending. TBI has been largely neglected from guidance on managing the mental health needs of young offenders. We sought to determine the rate of self-reported TBI, of various severities, in a male, adolescent youth offending population. We also aimed to explore whether TBI was associated with number of convictions, violent offending, mental health problems and drug misuse. Young male offenders aged 11 to 19 years were recruited from a Young Offender Institute, a Youth Offending Team and a special needs school. A total of 197 participants were approached and 186 (94.4%) completed the study. They completed self-reports on TBI, crime history, mental health and drug use. TBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) was reported by 46% of the sample. LOC consistent with mild TBI was reported by 29.6%, and 16.6% reported LOC consistent with moderate to severe TBI. Possible TBI was reported by a further 19.1%. Repeat injury was common - with 32% reporting more than one LOC. Frequency of self-reported TBI was associated with more convictions. Three or more self-reported TBIs were associated with greater violence in offences. Those with self-reported TBI were also at risk of greater mental health problems and of misuse of cannabis. TBI may be associated with offending behaviour and worse mental health outcomes. Addressing TBI within adolescent offenders with neurorehabilitative input may be important for improving well-being and reducing re-offending.

  19. Treating offending children: what works?

    OpenAIRE

    Nee, Claire; Ellis, Tom

    2005-01-01

    There is little evidence on the effectiveness of interventions with offending children and juveniles, either in Europe or North America. We present the evaluation findings of an innovative intervention and relate these to the existing evidence-base for young offenders and to the more extensive literature on older offenders. Methods Using an established risk predictor (LSI-R), we measured the criminogenic risks and needs of the intervention group and a non-intervention group of child and juven...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and DWI Features of Orbital Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuetao Mu; Hong Wang; Yueyue Li; Yuwen Hao; Chunnan Wu; Lin Ma

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:.To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of orbital rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods:.Thirty-nine patients with histopathologically con-firmed orbital RMS were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent orbital conventional MRI, including axial,.sagittal, and coronal T1-weighted,.T2-weighted,.and postcontrast T1-weighted sequences. The location, shape, margin, and MRI signal of the 39 lesions were reviewed..DWI in 15 patients and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in 2 patients were also analyzed. Results:.Orbital MRI was available in 39 patients and re-vealed a soft tissue mass in the orbital region in all cases..Of the 39 patients,.the primary tumor sites were limited to the orbital proper in 31 cases, while 28 cases had extraocular muscle invasion and 8 cases had extraorbital invasion..All le-sions were unilateral..Thirty-three cases were well-defined soft tissue masses and 6 cases appeared as less well-defined soft-tissue masses..Thirty-four cases showed homogeneous isoin-tense or slightly hypointense signals on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and hyperintense signal on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) compared with extraocular muscles. Five cases had heterogeneous signals with focal areas of increased signal on T1WI or decreased signal on T2WI, including 1 case with hy-pointense signal on SWI..The mean apparent diffusion coeffi-cient (ADC) value of the viable part of tumors was (0.925 ± 0.09)×10-3 mm2/s. All cases showed moderate to marked en-hancement after contrast administration. Conclusion:Several MRI features-including homogeneous isointense or slightly hypointense signal on T1WI and slightly hyperintense signal on T2WI, relative low ADC values, and moderate to marked enhancement,.extraocular muscles inva-sion, and extraorbital extensionare helpful in the diagnosis of orbital RMS. (Eye Science 2014; 29:6-11).

  1. Juvenile female sex offenders: Offender and offence characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijkman, M.; Bijleveld, C.; Hendriks, J.

    2014-01-01

    Almost all research on juvenile sex offending pertains to adolescent males. This study comprises all female juveniles convicted for sexual offences in the Netherlands between 1993 and 2008 (N = 66). From analysis of their court files and their criminal records, these female offenders are described i

  2. Emotions and Young Offenders' Suitability for Victim-Offender Mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Tracey A.

    Although evidence indicates that Victim-Offender Mediation (VOM) provides an effective alternative to traditional sanctioning for young offenders, research investigating suitable candidates for VOM is lacking. Reintegrative shaming is theorized to be the mechanism underlying successful mediation; however, it is difficult to determine whether shame…

  3. Psychosocial profile of Swiss sexual offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, F; Niveau, G

    1998-07-01

    Background data on psychosocial characteristics of sexual offenders are sparse in Europe. From 67 experts' reports done between 1982 and 1995 in Geneva, Switzerland, demographic, criminological and psychiatric characteristics were collected for three groups of sexual offenders: offenders against adults, offenders against non-relative minors (offenders against minors with incest. The results showed that the offenders against adults were younger (p = 0.02), more frequently single (p = 0.0007) and with a lower educational level (p = 0.05) than the offenders against minors. Incest offenders had no prior conviction compared with 50% of the other offenders. Violence was more often used by offenders against adults (86%) than by offenders against minors (45%) (p = 0.005). About two-thirds of the sexual offenders had no psychiatric history, but a personality disorder (mainly borderline) was diagnosed in half of the offenders. A history of sexual abuse during childhood was reported by a third of the offenders against minors and by 5% of the offenders against adults (p = 0.04). It is concluded that a low socio-economic status and social isolation characterized offenders against adults, whereas offenders against minors had a relatively normal psychosocial profile.

  4. Use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in PET/MRI for head and neck cancer evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Marcelo A.; Schulthess, Gustav von [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Huellner, Martin [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kuhn, Felix; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Huber, Gerhardt; Meerwein, Christian [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kollias, Spyros [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) adds significant information to positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) on lesion detection and characterization in head and neck cancers. Seventy patients with different head and neck cancers were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent sequential contrast-enhanced (ce) PET/computed tomography (CT) and cePET/MRI using a tri-modality PET/CT-MR setup either for staging or re-staging. First, the DWI alone was evaluated, followed by the PET/MRI with conventional sequences, and in a third step, the PET/MRI with DWI was evaluated. McNemar's test was used to evaluate differences in the accuracy of PET/MRI with and without DWI compared to the standard of reference. One hundred eighty-eight (188) lesions were found, and of those, 118 (62.8 %) were malignant and 70 (37.2 %) were benign. PET/MRI without DWI had a higher accuracy in detecting malignant lesions than DWI alone (86.8 % vs. 60.6 %, p < 0.001). PET/MRI combined with DWI detected 120 concurrent lesions (89 malignant and 31 benign), PET/MRI alone identified 48 additional lesions (20 malignant and 28 benign), and DWI alone detected 20 different lesions (nine malignant and 11 benign). However, lesions detected on DWI did not change overall staging. SUV maximum and mean were significantly higher in malignant lesions than in benign lesions. DWI parameters between malignant and benign lesions were not statistically different. The use of DWI as part of PET/MRI to evaluate head and neck cancers does not provide remarkable information. Thus, the use of DWI might not be needed in clinical PET/MRI protocols for the staging or restaging of head and neck cancers. (orig.)

  5. General Characteristics of Child Sexual Offenders in Hatay, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, M. Mustafa; Demirkiran, D. Sumeyra; Akcan, Ramazan; Zeren, Cem; Kokacya, M. Hanifi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Child sexual offenders are a poorly studied and relatively neglected population in our country. This study aims to evaluate the relationship between criminal behavior and socio-demographic characteristics of a series of child sexual offenders. Materials and Methods: The records of social worker interviews with 48 child sexual offenders between 2009 and 2013 were used. The reports issued by social workers regarding child sexual offenders were retrospectively examined, since these reports were relatively the most thorough documents including offenders’ personal and familial characteristics, and criminal event information. Cases were investigated in terms of socio-demographic and psychosocial characteristics. Results: There were 48 children interviewed based on an alleged sexual crime, during four-year of study period. All of the cases were male and their ages ranged between 12 and 17 years. Of these, 50% were students at any grade of school. Five cases were living in social service facilities. Only two cases involved incest. Of all, three offenders were accused of repeated sexual crimes. Type of sexual assault was anal penetration in 20 (41.7%) cases. Of all cases, 19 were cigarette smoker, while 4 were drug abusers. The families of 12 (25%) cases suffered from low socio-economic status, while 23 (47.9%) offenders were members of broken families. According to social worker reports, 47 cases had criminal responsibility based on their psychosocial development. Out of all cases, 7 children were suspected of suffering from impulse control disorder and one was suspected to be mentally retarded. Twelve cases were reported to need consulting and social protective services. Conclusion: The rate of offenders with interrupted education was considerably high. Interestingly the number of male victims and the frequency of cases involving anal penetration were high. Obtained results suggest that male children of broken and scattered families, and particularly those

  6. Relationship between AQP4 expression and DWI of the cerebral ischemic edema in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁宏; 孙善全

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation between aquaporin-4(AQP4) expression and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the process of ischemic brain edema for the molecular biologic mechanism of DWI. Methods: A total of 34 Wistar rats were divided into 8 groups randomly: Non-operated group (n=4), sham-operated group (n=6), and operated group, receiving right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 15 and 30 min, and 1, 3, 6 and 24 h respectively (6 subgroups, n=4). All groups were imaged with DWI and T2WI. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), relevant density (rd) and relevant area (rs) of hyperintensity of the lesions on DWI and T2WI were measured. Relevant ADC (rADC), relevant area of immunohistochemical staining for AQP4 (rS), optical density of AQP4 hybridization (α) were calculated. After that the animals were sacrificed and perfused at different time intervals, correlations between DWI, ADC, and AQP4 expression (rS, α) in ischemic tissue was made. Results: There was a significant correlation between rS and α (r=0.949). The abnormal high intensity was found in DWI of the ipsilateral MAC territory at 15 min after MCAO. The ADC value decreased quickly within 1 h after MCAO, the rd and rs of DWI increased rapidly and the expression of AQP4 increased quickly, too. However, there was no change on the T2WI. In the period of time (15 min-1 h), the AQP4 expression(α) had a strong relation to the rd and rs( r=0.914, 0.895). With the progress of the time, the ADC value of MCAO decreased further to (2.1±0.6)×10-4 mm2/s at 3 h, and then followed an increased slowly till 24 h, but the rd and the rs as well as the expression of AQP4 continuously increased during the stage. The T2WI detected the lesion at the average time (1.4 h) after MCAO, and the rs of T2WI was less than that of DWI at the same time in the same layer (P<0.05). Conclusion: The results imply that high expression of AQP4 may play a key role in ischemic brain edema. It is, certainly, one of the

  7. Victim ranking among sex offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschman, J.; Wilcox, D.; Spreen, M.; Marshall, B.; Bogaerts, S.

    2008-01-01

    A previous exploratory study of the Child Molester Empathy Measure (CMEM) focused on the difference between offenders' normal level of general empathy and the way in which a sample of Dutch offenders viewed their own victims. The authors found that, regardless of their level of general victim empath

  8. Neuropsychological Assessment of Adult Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Roger; Meghani, Rehana; Reddon, John R.

    2008-01-01

    This report is primarily concerned with reporting on the normative results obtained on a large sample of serious adult offenders. An expanded Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery was administered to 584 adult offenders (OF), 132 normal controls (NC), and 494 acute psychiatric patients (PP). Subjects were between 18 and 44 years of age.…

  9. Tennessee Offender Management Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Tim

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the integration of a knowledge-based system with a large COBOL-DB2-based offender management system. The knowledge-based application, developed for the purpose of offender sentence calculation, is shown to provide several benefits, including a shortened development cycle, simplified maintenance, and improved accuracy over a previous COBOL-based application.

  10. Children as Sex Offenders, Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deranek, Traci; Gilman, David A.

    This study investigates juvenile sex offenders and the predetermining factors that are present in their lives, prior to their first offenses. This study will give an overview of theories, children's sexual behaviors ranging from normal to disturbed, and family dynamics of juvenile offenders. The treatment files of boys and young men, currently in…

  11. Neuropsychological Assessment of Adult Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Roger; Meghani, Rehana; Reddon, John R.

    2008-01-01

    This report is primarily concerned with reporting on the normative results obtained on a large sample of serious adult offenders. An expanded Halstead-Reitan Neuropsychological Test Battery was administered to 584 adult offenders (OF), 132 normal controls (NC), and 494 acute psychiatric patients (PP). Subjects were between 18 and 44 years of age.…

  12. Drug Dependence Treatment Awareness among Japanese Female Stimulant Drug Offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinzo Yatsugi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Few stimulant drug users receive adequate treatment. This cross-sectional study describes the characteristics of female drug offenders that use stimulants and clarifies the factors related to the awareness of treatment for drug dependencies. We included 80 females imprisoned due to stimulant control law violations from 2012 to 2015. The characteristics of the female prisoners were stratified according to various treatment awareness levels, and associations between each characteristic and treatment awareness were evaluated using logistic regression models. The average period of stimulant drug use was 17.7 years. Participants imprisoned for the second time were significantly more likely to consider treatment compared to those imprisoned only once: odds ratio (OR = 3.2 (95% confidence interval (CI: 1.0–10.7. This elevated OR was diluted in repeat offenders. Participants who had experienced multiple aftereffects (≥7 or serious depressive symptoms were also more likely to consider treatment: OR = 6.1 (95% CI: 1.8–20.8 and OR = 2.5 (95% CI: 1.0–6.2, respectively. Second-time stimulant offenders or offenders who had experienced health problems were more likely to consider it important to receive drug dependence treatment. To overcome relapses of stimulant use, it is recommended that stimulant use offenders are encouraged to accept adequate treatment.

  13. Community Maintenance Programs for Sexual Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Carollyne

    2013-01-01

    While optimism regarding the treatment of sexual offenders has increased over the past couple of decades, research into the factors that assist offenders in maintaining therapeutic changes remains in the dark. Maintenance programs for offenders, while theoretically appearing to have a solid place in offender rehabilitation, surprisingly have not…

  14. Community Maintenance Programs for Sexual Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Carollyne

    2013-01-01

    While optimism regarding the treatment of sexual offenders has increased over the past couple of decades, research into the factors that assist offenders in maintaining therapeutic changes remains in the dark. Maintenance programs for offenders, while theoretically appearing to have a solid place in offender rehabilitation, surprisingly have not…

  15. An Internet study of men sexually attracted to children: Correlates of sexual offending against children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J Michael; Bernhard, Paula A; Hsu, Kevin J

    2016-10-01

    We conducted an Internet survey of 1,102 men sexually attracted to children concerning their history of adjudicated offenses related to child pornography and sexual contact with children. Most of the men reported no offenses, but their rate of offenses was much higher than that expected for adult-attracted men. Correlates of offending are consistent with a strong role of the cumulative effects of temptation, especially age. Older men, men who had repeatedly worked in jobs with children, men who had repeatedly fallen in love with children, and men who had often struggled not to offend were especially likely to have offended. Attraction to male children, relative attraction to children versus adults, and childhood sexual abuse experiences were also strong predictors of offending. In contrast, permissive attitudes regarding child-adult sex and frequent indulgence in sexual fantasies about children were not significantly related to offending. Our findings represent the first large study of offending among men sexually attracted to children who were not recruited via contact with the legal system. Because of methodological limitations, our findings cannot be definitive. Reassuringly, however, results are generally consistent with those from the most pertinent existing studies, of recidivism among convicted sex offenders. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. DWI of Prostate Cancer: Optimal b-Value in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo Manenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the diagnostic performance of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI using b-values of 1000 s/mm2 and 2000 s/mm2 at 3 Tesla (T for the evaluation of clinically significant prostate cancer. Matherials and Methods. Seventy-eight prostate cancer patients underwent a 3T MRI scan followed by radical prostatectomy. DWI was performed using b-values of 0, 1000, and 2000 s/mm2 and qualitatively analysed by two radiologists. ADC maps were obtained at b-values of 1000 and 2000 s/mm2 and quantitatively analyzed in consensus. Results. For diagnosis of 78 prostate cancers the accuracy of DWI for the young reader was significantly greater at b = 2000 s/mm2 for the peripheral zone (PZ but not for the transitional zone (TZ. For the experienced reader, DWI did not show significant differences in accuracy between b-values of 1000 and 2000 s/mm2. The quantitative analysis in the PZ and TZ was substantially superimposable between the two b-values, albeit with a higher accuracy with a b-value of 2000 s/mm2. Conclusions. With a b-value of 2000 s/mm2 at 3T both readers differentiated clinical significant cancer from benign tissue; higher b-values can be helpful for the less experienced readers.

  17. [The actions of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in differentiating breast tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi; Yu, Jianqun; Chen, Dongdong; Xu, Zhongzi; Zeng, Hanjiang

    2013-12-01

    We studied the actions of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in differentiating breast tumors. From January 2010 to February 2012, we retrospectively analyzed data of 95 cases with breast tumor pathologically confirmed from DWI and DCE-MRI. We compared the ADC value, time-intensity curve (TIC) and DCE-MRI parameters between breast tumors, and calculated the sensitivity and specificity for differentiating breast tumors. The results were as follows: (1) On DWI, mean ADC value of malignant tumor was lower than that of benign tumor (P value of time to peak (Tpeak) and maximal enhancement ratio (SImax) were lower than that of benign tumor (all P < 0.05). As for TIC, type II and III were more frequently seen in malignant tumor than in benign tumor whereas type I was more common in benign tumor than in malignant tumor (all P < 0.05). For differentiating breast malignant tumors from benign neoplasm, DCE-MRI obtained a sensitivity of 89.7% and specificity of 70.3%. (3) For differentiating breast malignant tumors from benign neoplasm, ADC value together with TIC obtained a sensitivity of 79.3% and specificity of 78.4%. Malignant or benign breast tumors could have their own unique characteristics on DWI and DCE-MRI. These characteristics might be helpful for differentiating these tumors.

  18. Informal Education with Young Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David

    1994-01-01

    The example of an environmental conservation program for young offenders demonstrates the efficacy of group activities in enhancing self-esteem and coping skills and in enabling transition out of the custodial environment. (SK)

  19. Preventive detention of sex offenders: A comparative law perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Calkins Mercado, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, criminal justice and mental health legislation across the globe has sought to manage and prevent the problem of repeat sexual violence. Perhaps some of the most restrictive measures have been those aimed at the preventive detention of those sex offenders thought to pose an elevated risk of re-offense. This paper examines Sexually Violent Predator (SVP) legislation, deemed constitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court in Kansas v. Hendricks (1997), and compares this post-sentence...

  20. Clinical Breast MR Using MRS or DWI: Who Is the Winner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Carbonaro, Luca Alessandro; Montemezzi, Stefania; Cavedon, Carlo; Trimboli, Rubina Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast gained a role in clinical practice thanks to the optimal sensitivity of contrast-enhanced (CE) protocols. This approach, first proposed 30 years ago and further developed as bilateral highly spatially resolved dynamic study, is currently considered superior for cancer detection to any other technique. However, other directions than CE imaging have been explored. Apart from morphologic features on unenhanced T2-weighted images, two different non-contrast molecular approaches were mainly run in vivo: proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Both approaches have shown aspects of breast cancer (BC) hidden to CE-MRI: 1H-MRS allowed for evaluating the total choline peak (tCho) as a biomarker of malignancy; DWI showed that restricted diffusivity is correlated with high cellularity and tumor aggressiveness. Secondary evidence on the two approaches is now available from systematic reviews and meta-analyses, mainly considered in this article: pooled sensitivity ranged 71–74% for 1H-MRS and 84–91% for DWI; specificity 78–88% and 75–84%, respectively. Interesting research perspectives are opened for both techniques, including multivoxel MRS and statistical strategies for classification of MR spectra as well as diffusion tensor imaging and intravoxel incoherent motion for DWI. However, when looking at a clinical perspective, while MRS remained a research tool with important limitations, such as relatively long acquisition times, frequent low quality spectra, difficult standardization, and quantification of tCho tissue concentration, DWI has been integrated in the standard clinical protocols of breast MRI and several studies showed its potential value as a stand-alone approach for BC detection. PMID:27840809

  1. Clinical Breast MR using MRS or DWI: Who Is the Winner?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Sardanelli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the breast gained a role in clinical practice thanks to the optimal sensitivity of contrast-enhanced (CE protocols. This approach, firstly proposed thirty years ago and further developed as bilateral highly spatially resolved dynamic study, is currently considered superior for cancer detection to any other technique. However, other directions than CE imaging have been explored. Apart from morphologic features on unenhanced T2-weighted images, two different non-contrast molecular approaches were mainly run in-vivo: proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI. Both approaches have shown aspects of breast cancer hidden to CE-MRI: 1H-MRS allowed for evaluating the total choline peak (tCho as a biomarker of malignancy; DWI showed that restricted diffusivity is correlated with high cellularity and tumor aggressiveness. Secondary evidence on the two approaches is now available from systematic reviews and meta-analyses, mainly considered in this article: pooled sensitivity ranged 71%-74% for 1H-MRS and 84%-91% for DWI; specificity 78%-88% and 75%-84%, respectively. Interesting research perspectives are opened for both techniques, including multivoxel MRS and statistical strategies for classification of MR spectra as well as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM for DWI. However, when looking at a clinical perspective, while MRS remained a research tool with important limitations such as relatively long acquisition times, frequent low quality spectra, difficult standardization and quantification of tCho tissue concentration, DWI has been integrated in the standard clinical protocols of breast MRI and several studies showed its potential value as a stand-alone approach for breast cancer detection.

  2. MR Enterography Assessment of Bowel Inflammation Severity in Crohn Disease Using the MR Index of Activity Score: Modifying Roles of DWI and Effects of Contrast Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Sil; Jang, Hye Young; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Han, Kyunghwa; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Park, Sang Hyoung; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to appraise the use of the MR index of activity (MaRIA) score in evaluating Crohn disease (CD) on present-day MR enterography images, with an emphasis on determining the modifying roles of DWI and the effects of different contrast enhancement phases. Fifty patients prospectively underwent MR enterography, including DWI and enteric and portal phase scans, and ileocolonoscopy with segmental CD endoscopic index of severity (CDEIS) scoring within a week. Thirty-nine terminal ilea and 40 right-sided colons (mean [± SD] segmental CDEIS score, 14.3 ± 12.1) from 42 patients with CD (mean age, 27 ± 6.2 years) were finally analyzed by three independent readers. Original and modified (ulcer replaced with DWI grade) MaRIA scores were compared regarding their correlation with segmental CDEIS score, accuracy in diagnosing active (segmental CDEIS score ≥ 3) and severe (segmental CDEIS score ≥ 12) inflammation, and interobserver reproducibility. The primary analysis used portal phase data, and the agreement between portal and enteric phase scores was analyzed. MaRIA and modified MaRIA scores correlated similarly with CDEIS scores (r = 0.737 and 0.742; p = 0.387) and did not significantly differ in terms of AUC values for the diagnosis of active (0.909 and 0.903; p = 0.571) or severe (0.907 and 0.892; p = 0.443) inflammation. The intraclass correlation coefficient was significantly higher for modified MaRIA than for MaRIA (0.845 and 0.701; p < 0.001). The mean difference between portal and enteric phase scores (i.e., portal minus enteric) was 0.33-0.36 score points for individual readers, and the Bland-Altman repeatability coefficient was 0.9-1.42 score points. Interobserver reproducibility in evaluating the severity of bowel inflammation in CD using the MaRIA score can be improved by modification with DWI. MaRIA scoring provides steady results across enteric and portal phases.

  3. Criminal offending and distinguishing features of offenders among persons experiencing a first episode of psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2011-02-01

    Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) are at increased risk of criminal offending, particularly violent offending, as compared with the general population. Most offenders with SMI acquire convictions prior to contact with mental health services. This study examined offending among 301 individuals experiencing their first episode of psychosis.

  4. Serum Testosterone Levels in Sex Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnani, Prem D.; Dwyer, Margretta

    1986-01-01

    Reports that with the increase in diagnosis of offenders across the nation, physicians and psychiatric personnel need to be aware of low testosterone as a possible indicator of hypo-sexuality and possible concurrent offending behavior. (Author/ABB)

  5. The Use of 'Shame' with Sexual Offenders

    OpenAIRE

    McAlinden, Anne-Marie

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the use of shaming mechanisms with sexual offenders, particularly those who offend against children. Shaming, a central concept in the broader theory of restorative justice, may be of two varieties. The first, ‘disintegrative shaming’, characterises the traditional retributive framework of justice and is evident in recent state led and popular responses to the risk posed by released sexual offenders. Far from ensuring offender integration, the net result is often labelli...

  6. 77 FR 73558 - Sex Offender Registration Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... COLUMBIA 28 CFR Part 811 RIN 3225-AA10 Sex Offender Registration Amendments AGENCY: Court Services and... verification of registration information for sex offenders. The proposed rule, if finalized, would permit CSOSA to verify addresses of sex offenders by conducting home visits on its own accord and with its...

  7. Three Years of Teen Court Offender Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgays, Deborah Kirby

    2008-01-01

    Since 1983, Teen Courts have offered a judicial alternative for many adolescent offenders. In the first year of the Whatcom County Teen Court Program, a small sample of Teen Court offenders had more favorable outcomes than did Court Diversion offenders. In the current study, the results are based on a three-year sample of 84 Whatcom County…

  8. Youth Transitions: From Offending to Desistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Monica

    2010-01-01

    This article examines youth transitions and youth offending in tandem. It argues that the transition to adulthood is heavily implicated in the fact that most offending occurs in the youth phase. Drawing on a study of 20 male and 20 female persistent young offenders in Scotland, it explores young people's desire for integration with others in the…

  9. Offending prior to first psychiatric contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, H; Agerbo, E; Dean, K

    2012-01-01

    There is a well-established association between psychotic disorders and subsequent offending but the extent to which those who develop psychosis might have a prior history of offending is less clear. Little is known about whether the association between illness and offending exists in non-psychot...

  10. Group sexual offending by juvenile females

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijkman, M.; Weerman, F.; Bijleveld, C.; Hendriks, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined all group sexual offending cases in the Netherlands between 1995 and 2009 (n = 26) in which at least one juvenile female offender (n = 35) had been adjudicated. Information from court files showed that the majority of juvenile female group sexual offenders have (inter)personal pr

  11. TU-C-12A-05: Repeatability Study of Reduced Field-Of-View Diffusion-Weighted MRI On Human Thyroid Gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla-Dave, A; Lu, Y; Hatzoglou, V; Stambuk, H; Mazaheri, Y [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Banerjee, S; Shankaranarayanan, A [GE Healthcare, Menlo Park, California (United States); Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the repeatability of reduced field-of-view diffusion-weighted imaging (rFOV DWI) in quantifying apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) for human thyroid glands in a clinical setting. Methods: Nine healthy human volunteers were enrolled and underwent 3T MRI exams. For each volunteer, 3 longitudinal exams (2 weeks apart) with 2 repetitive sessions within each exam, including rFOV and conventional full field-of-view (fFOV) DWI scans, were performed. In the acquired DWI images, a fixed-size region of interest (ROI; diameter=8mm) was placed on thyroid glands to calculate ADC. ADC was calculated using a monoexponential function with a noise correction scheme. The repeatability of ADC was assessed by using coefficient variation (CV) across sessions or exams, which was defined to be: r = 1-CV, 0 < r < 1, where CV=STD/m, STD is the standard deviation of ADC, and m is the average of ADC across sessions or exams. An experienced radiologist assessed and scored rFOV and fFOV DW images based on image characteristics (1, nondiagnostic; 2, poor; 3, satisfactory; 4, good; and 5, excellent).Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare ADC values, CV of ADC, repeatability of ADC across sessions and exams, and radiologic scores between rFOV and fFOV DWI techniques. Results: There was no significant difference in ADC values across sessions and exams either in rFOV or fFOV DWI. The average CVs of both rFOV and fFOV DWI were less than 13%. The repeatability of ADC measurement between rFOV and fFOV DWI was not significantly different. The overall image quality was significantly higher with rFOV DWI than with fFOV DWI. Conclusion: This study suggested that ADCs from both rFOV and fFOV DWI were repeatable, but rFOV DWI had superior imaging quality for human thyroid glands in a clinical setting.

  12. Handedness, criminality, and sexual offending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, A F

    2001-01-01

    A very large database was used to investigate whether men with a history of criminality and/or sexual offending have a higher incidence of nonright-handedness (NRH) relative to a control sample of nonoffender men. The sample (N>8000) comprised interviews by investigators at the Kinsey Institute for Sex and Reproduction in Indiana. The general offender group and a subsample of sex offenders (e.g. pedophiles) had a significantly higher rate of NRH relative to the control (nonoffender) men. In addition, evidence was found that the general criminality/NRH relationship might result from increased educational difficulties that some nonright-handers experience. In contrast, education was unrelated to the handedness/pedophilia relationship, suggesting that there may be a different mechanism underlying the handedness/pedophile relationship than the handedness/(general) criminality relationship. Finally, as a cautionary note, it is stressed that the effects are small and that NRH should not be used as a marker of criminality.

  13. Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) in evaluation of breast lesions: Comparison with conventional DWI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chunling, E-mail: liuchunling79@163.com [Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital, GuangZhou, Guangdong Province (China); Southern Medical University, GuangZhou, Guangdong Province (China); Liang, Changhong, E-mail: cjr.lchh@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital, GuangZhou, Guangdong Province (China); Liu, Zaiyi, E-mail: zyliu@163.com [Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital, GuangZhou, Guangdong Province (China); Zhang, Shuixing, E-mail: shui7515@126.com [Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital, GuangZhou, Guangdong Province (China); Huang, Biao, E-mail: cjr.huangbiao@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences/Guangdong General Hospital, GuangZhou, Guangdong Province (China)

    2013-12-01

    Objectives: To obtain perfusion as well as diffusion information in normal breast tissues and breast lesions from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging with biexponential analysis of multiple b-value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and compare these parameters to apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) obtained with monoexponential analysis in their ability to discriminate benign lesions and malignant tumors. Materials and methods: In this prospective study, informed consent was acquired from all patients. Eighty-four patients with 40 malignant tumors, 41 benign lesions, 30 simple cysts and 39 normal breast tissues were imaged at 1.5 T utilizing contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DWI using 12 b values (range: 0–1000 s/mm{sup 2}). Tissue diffusivity (D), perfusion fraction (f) and pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*) were calculated using segmented biexponential analysis. ADC (b = 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) was calculated with monoexponential fitting of the DWI data. D, f, D* and ADC values were obtained for normal breast tissues, simple cysts, benign lesions and malignant tumors. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed for all DWI parameters. Results: There was good interobserver agreement on the measurements between the 2 observers. D values were significantly different among malignant tumors, benign lesions, simple cysts and normal breast tissues (P = 0.000) and it was the same result for f, D* and ADC values. Further comparisons of these 4 parameters between every single pair were as the following. D and ADC values of malignant tumors were significantly smaller than those of benign lesions, simple cysts and normal tissues (P = 0.000, respectively). The f value of malignant tumors was significantly higher than that of benign lesions, simple cysts and normal breast tissues (P = 0.001, P = 0.000, and P = 0.000). D and ADC values demonstrated higher sensitivity and specificity in differentiating benign lesions and malignant

  14. Wide-area continuous offender monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshen, Joseph; Drake, George; Spencer, Debra D.

    1997-02-01

    The corrections system in the U.S. is supervising over five million offenders. This number is rising fast and so are the direct and indirect costs to society. To improve supervision and reduce the cost of parole and probation, first generation home arrest systems were introduced in 1987. While these systems proved to be helpful to the corrections system, their scope is rather limited because they only cover an offender at a single location and provide only a partial time coverage. To correct the limitations of first- generation systems, second-generation wide area continuous electronic offender monitoring systems, designed to monitor the offender at all times and locations, are now on the drawing board. These systems use radio frequency location technology to track the position of offenders. The challenge for this technology is the development of reliable personal locator devices that are small, lightweight, with long operational battery life, and indoors/outdoors accuracy of 100 meters or less. At the center of a second-generation system is a database that specifies the offender's home, workplace, commute, and time the offender should be found in each. The database could also define areas from which the offender is excluded. To test compliance, the system would compare the observed coordinates of the offender with the stored location for a given time interval. Database logfiles will also enable law enforcement to determine if a monitored offender was present at a crime scene and thus include or exclude the offender as a potential suspect.

  15. Distinguishing among weapons offenders, drug offenders, and weapons and drug offenders based on childhood predictors and adolescent correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Skye; Day, David M

    2013-07-01

    Weapons and drug offences incur a large cost to society and tend to be strongly associated. Improved understanding of their antecedents could inform targeted early intervention and prevention programmes. This study aimed to examine differences in criminal careers, childhood predictors and adolescent correlates among weapons-only offenders, drugs-only offenders and a versatile group of weapons + drugs offenders. We conducted a longitudinal records study of 455 young Canadians charged with drug and/or weapons offences who started their offending in late childhood/early adolescence. Consistent with expectation, differences emerged in their criminal careers as the versatile group had a longer criminal career and desisted from offending at a later age than weapons-only offenders. Against prediction, weapons-only offenders experienced the greatest number of childhood predictors and adolescent correlates. The three offending groups could be differentiated on offending trajectories and developmental factors.In making links between past events and later behaviour, life-course criminology may inform development of effective early intervention and prevention strategies.As weapons-only offenders experience the greatest level of adversity in childhood and adolescence, they may benefit most (of these three groups) from early intervention and prevention programmes.A reduction in weapon carrying and use might be achieved by early identification of children risk factors (e.g. family adversity) and appropriate intervention. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Evaluating Awareness of Registered Sex Offenders in the Neighborhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craun, Sarah W.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of sex offender registration is to protect residents from recidivistic sexual offenders by providing public information about local offenders. This study determines what percentage of residents living near registered sex offenders are aware of the offenders and the predictors of awareness. The investigational group includes randomly…

  17. DWI/ADC in Differentiation of Benign from Malignant Focal Liver Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahic, Elma; Sofic, Amela; Selimovic, Azra Husic

    2016-01-01

    Material and methods: The study was of prospective-retrospective character. It was carried out at the AKH in Vienna (Austria), where 100 patients with focal liver lesions were included in the study. All patients underwent the routine MR sequences on appliances 1,5 and 3T (Siemens, Germany): T1, T2, HASTE, VIBE, and a DWI with three b values (b 50, b 300 b 600 s / mm2) and ADC map with ROI (regions of interest). The numerical value of ADC map was calculated, where n = 100 liver lesions, by two independent radiologists. Results: On the basis of matching the PH finding statistically we get DWI accuracy of 96.8% for the assessment of liver lesions. The average numerical value of ADC in benign hepatic lesions (FNH, Hemangiomas) in our study amounted to 1.88 (1.326 to 2.48) x103 mm2 /s, while the value of malignant liver lesions (HCC, CCC, CRCLM) were significantly lower and amounted to 1.15 (1.024 to 1.343) x10-3 mm2 /s (Figure 2). Differences between the mean ADC of benign and malignant lesions showed a statistically significant difference with p <0.0005. In our research, we get cut-off for the ADC value of 1,341x10-3 mm2 /s, which proved to be the optimal parameter for differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. Conclusion: Measuring ADC values with DWI as an additional MRI tool can help in oncological practice by distinguishing normal liver parenchyma from focal lesions, and in differentiating benign from malignant liver lesions, particularly in cases where administration of contrast is not possible. PMID:27708485

  18. Towards a neurobiological model of offending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ian J; Beech, Anthony R

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we consider how disturbances in the neurobiological/neurochemical processes at a young age lead to problematic attachment styles in later life, and which can potentiate probability of offending behavior. In particular, we will contrast attachment and offending patterns of the more generalist type of offender (i.e., those who have a varied criminal career, committing both violent and non-violent offenses, in extremis the psychopathic type of offender), with the more specialist sexual offender (prototypically, the fixated pedophile), in the light of a preliminary neurobiological model. Here, we will argue that these two extremes of offenders show, or are predicted to show, differential patterns of neurochemical/neurobiological functioning.

  19. A correlative study between AQP4 expression and the manifestation of DWI after the acute ischemic brain edema in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁宏; 孙善全

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the rule of the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) expression in acute ischemic brain edema, and to study the correlation between AQP4 expression and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI).Methods Thirty-six Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups randomly, control group (n=12) and operation group (n=24) in which right middle cerebral artery of each animal had been occluded unilaterally (MCAO) at interval times of: 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hours, 3 hours, 6 hours and 24 hours, respectively. The operation process of the control group was the same as the operation group except for the MCAO. All groups were examined using DWI. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), relative density (rd) and relative area (rs) of the biggest hyperintensity signal layer on DWI were measured. After that the animals were sacrificed and perfused with the mixture solution consisting of TTC. The biggest layers of the ischemic cerebral tissues in each rat corresponding to the DWI were stained with TTC and examined with immunochemistry (△S) , in situ hybridization (α) and histology.Results There was no significant change in the control group. In the operation group, a hyperintensity signal was found in the DWI of the right MAC territory at 15 minutes after MCAO. The ADC value decreased quickly within one hour after MCAO, while the AQP4 expression, rd-DWI and rs-DWI increased rapidly during this stage. As time progressed, the ADC value decreased further to (2.1±0.6)×10-4 mm2/s at 3 hours, and then began to increase slowly till 24 hours. But the AQP4 expression (△S and α) and rd as well as the rs continuously increased slowly between 1 hour and 6 hours after MCAO, followed a peak after 6 hours. The AQP4 expression (α) showed a positive relationship with the rs-DWI, they all presented two peaks and a plateau. The corresponding sequential pathologic changes were a gradual increase of intracellular edema (within one hour), then an emergence of vasogenic edema (1-6 hours), and final

  20. "The Effects of Mixing Offenders with Non-Offenders: Findings from a Danish Quasi Experiment"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær Minke, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of mixing offenders with nonoffenders at Skejby half-way house in Denmark. Skejby halfway house constitutes an outstanding social experiment, as offenders are deliberately mixed with non-offenders in order to reduce their risk of recidivism. The treatment group...

  1. Ethnic Identity and Offending Trajectories among Mexican American Juvenile Offenders: Gang Membership and Psychosocial Maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, George P.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Cho, Young Il; Chassin, Laurie; Williams, Joanna Lee; Cota-Robles, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    We examined the association of joint trajectories of ethnic identity and criminal offending to psychosocial maturity, gang membership, and Mexican American affiliation among 300 Mexican American male juvenile offenders from ages 14 to 22. There were two low-offending groups: one was the highest in ethnic identity and changing slightly with age and…

  2. A Comparison of Anger in Offenders and Non-Offenders Who Have Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Matthew; Beail, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy to treat anger in offenders with intellectual disabilities. The aim is to lower anger levels; the rationale is that this will reduce recidivism. However, the hypothesis that anger levels amongst offenders are higher than non-offenders has not been tested.…

  3. Mental health assessment of rape offenders

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Jaydip

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent need for development of methods of assessment and management of sex offenders (rapists, child sex offenders, other sexual offenders, and murderers) to mount a society-wide battle against the scourge of sexual offences in India. This paper provides an overview of theories, models, and assessment methods of rapists. It draws upon literature from psychiatry, psychology, criminology, probation, and ethics to provide a framework for understanding reasons behind rape, how mental ...

  4. Quantification of diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient maps (ADC) in the detection of acute stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipano, P. Karina; Millar, William S.; Imielinska, Celina; Liu, Xin; Rosiene, Joel; D'Ambrosio, Anthony L.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an imaging modality that is used in the management and diagnosis of acute stroke. Common MR imaging techniques such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient maps (ADC) are used routinely in the diagnosis of acute infarcts. However, advances in radiology information systems and imaging protocols have led to an overload of image information that can be difficult to manage and time consuming. Automated techniques to assist in the identification of acute ischemic stroke can prove beneficial to 1) the physician by providing a mechanism for early detection and 2) the patient by providing effective stroke therapy at an early stage. We have processed DW images and ADC maps using a novel automated Relative Difference Map (RDM) method that was tailored to the identification and delineation of the stroke region. Results indicate that the technique can delineate regions of acute infarctions on DW images and ADC maps. A formal evaluation of the RDM algorithm was performed by comparing accuracy measurements between 1) expert generated ground truths with the RDM delineated DWI infarcts and 2) RDM delineated DWI infarcts with RDM delineated ADC infarcts. The accuracy measurements indicate that the RDM delineated DWI infarcts are comparable to the expert generated ground truths. The true positive volume fraction value (TPVF), between RDM delineated DWI and ADC infarcts, is nonzero for all cases with an acute infarct while the value for non-acute cases remains zero.

  5. Establishing a compulsory drug treatment prison: Therapeutic policy, principles, and practices in addressing offender rights and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgden, Astrid; Grant, Luke

    2010-01-01

    A Compulsory Drug Treatment Correctional Center (CDTCC) was established in Australia in 2006 for repeat drug-related male offenders. Compulsory treatment law is inconsistent with a therapeutic jurisprudence approach. Despite the compulsory law, a normative offender rehabilitation framework has been established based on offender moral rights. Within moral rights, the offender rehabilitation framework addresses the core values of freedom (supporting autonomous decision-making) and well-being (supporting support physical, social, and psychological needs). Moral rights are underpinned by a theory or principle which, in this instance, is a humane approach to offender rehabilitation. While a law that permits offenders to choose drug treatment and rehabilitation is preferable, the article discusses the establishment of a prison based on therapeutic policy, principles, and practices that respond to participants as both rights-violators and rights-holders. The opportunity for accelerated community access and a therapeutic alliance with staff has resulted in offenders actively seeking to be ordered into compulsory drug treatment and rehabilitation.

  6. A comparison of sex offenders against female and male minors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, K; Watson, R; Rienzo, D

    1987-01-01

    Male sex offenders against minors were grouped according to age and sex of victims, and according to whether they had offended against one or more than one minor. Cases of incest or courtship disorder were not included in the study. Among offenders against female children, the number of one-case offenders was substantially larger than that of multicase offenders. The opposite was true of offenders against male children, and there was no significant difference between one-case and multicase offenders against female or male early adolescents. If these counts reflect corresponding prevalences within sex offenders against minors in a Western cultural setting, some inferences can be made from these comparisons.

  7. Marital relations in incest offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, R A; Langevin, R; van Santen, V; Billingsley, D; Wright, P

    1990-01-01

    The study compared 92 incest perpetrators to 40 (noncriminal) married males on two marital inventories, the Clarke Martial Relations Questionnaire (CMRQ), and the Sexual Behavior and Marital Satisfaction Questionnaire (SBMSQ). Results showed that marital disharmony, in the form of mistrustfullness, lack of mutual friends and time together, emotional instability (in both partners), but not sexual relations, were predominant factors in incest perpetrators' profiles. A discriminant function analysis correctly classified 91.3% of incest offenders, but only 30.0% of controls, into their a priori group. Incest perpetrators reported less mutual give-and-take in disagreements with their spouses, a trend to confide less in their wives, and being more lonely in their marriage. Incest offenders reported they knew their spouses less well prior to marriage, despite the lack of any between-group differences in length of marriage or number of prior marriages. No differences emerged with respect to the range of sexual behaviors experienced or the degree of satisfaction with them. There were no group differences in the frequency of coitus nor in sexual dysfunction. In general, the lack of a satisfying emotional relationship between the incest offenders and their wives appeared as the most prominent factor in their marital relationships. The prominent aspects of their marital disharmony and sexual relations identified in the study reflect, in part, the inherent treatment goals needed for the incest perpetrator.

  8. Aplikasi Perhitungan Pembiasan DC Pada Transistor Dwi Kutub NPN Dengan Visual Basic 6.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Hendra Saptadi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Transistor dwi kutub (Bipolar Junction Transistor adalah salah satu komponen semikonduktor yang sering digunakan dalam rangkaian penguat (amplifier. Untuk menjaga agar komponen ini dapat bekerja di dalam titik operasinya (operating point, maka diperlukan rangkaian pembiasan dengan pengaturan tertentu, yaitu Bias Basis, Bias Bagi Tegangan, Bias Kolektor dan Bias Emitter. Perancangan rangkaian tersebut lazimnya menggunakan perhitungan manual sesuai teori dengan bantuan alat hitung (kalkulator. Proses perancangan ini membutuhkan waktu yang relatif lama dan sangat rentan terjadi kesalahan prosedur perhitungan. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah merancang perangkat lunak perhitungan rangkaian pembiasan transistor dwi kutub dengan Visual Basic 6. Proses perancangan meliputi pembuatan form, pembuatan basis data (database, penulisan kode sumber (coding, desain laporan (report dan kompilasi. Dari hasil uji coba diketahui bahwa tingkat kesalahan (error untuk perhitungan seluruh parameter dari 4 jenis rangkaian pembiasan adalah 1,18%, sehingga disimpulkan layak digunakan. Hasil perhitungan juga dapat disajikan secara visual dalam rangkaian. Ditinjau dari sifat perangkat lunak ini sebagai aplikasi komputer, maka terdapat kelemahan dari sisi kepraktisan penggunaan, meski proses perhitungan dapat dilakukan relatif cepat. Selain itu, aplikasi ini masih memerlukan perbaikan dalam menu bantuan (help menu, penggunaan satuan dan faktor pengali.

  9. Merging squared-magnitude approaches to DWI denoising: An adaptive Wiener filter tuned to the anatomical contents of the image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristán-Vega, Antonio; Brion, Véronique; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Aja-Fernández, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for denoising of Diffusion Weighted Images (DWI) that shares several desirable features of state-of-the-art proposals: 1) it works with the squared-magnitude signal, allowing for a closed-form formulation as a Linear Minimum Mean Squared Error (LMMSE) estimator, a.k.a. Wiener filter; 2) it jointly accounts for the DWI channels altogether, being able to unveil anatomical structures that remain hidden in each separated channel; 3) it uses a Non-Local Means (NLM)-like scheme to discriminate voxels corresponding to different fiber bundles, being able to enhance the anatomical structures of the DWI. We report extensive experiments evidencing the new approach outperforms several related methods for all the range of input signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). An open-source C++ implementation of the algorithm is also provided for the sake of reproducibility.

  10. Sexual Offending in Adolescence: A Comparison of Sibling Offenders and Nonsibling Offenders across Domains of Risk and Treatment Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Natasha E.; Viljoen, Jodi L.; Scalora, Mario J.; Ullman, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Sibling sexual offending has received limited empirical attention, despite estimates that approximately half of all adolescent-perpetrated sexual offenses involve a sibling victim. The present study addresses this gap by examining male adolescent sibling (n = 100) and nonsibling offenders (n = 66) with regard to maltreatment histories and scores…

  11. Identifying Risk and Protective Factors in Recidivist Juvenile Offenders: A Decision Tree Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Campos, Elena; García-García, Juan; Gil-Fenoy, Maria José; Zaldívar-Basurto, Flor

    2016-01-01

    Research on juvenile justice aims to identify profiles of risk and protective factors in juvenile offenders. This paper presents a study of profiles of risk factors that influence young offenders toward committing sanctionable antisocial behavior (S-ASB). Decision tree analysis is used as a multivariate approach to the phenomenon of repeated sanctionable antisocial behavior in juvenile offenders in Spain. The study sample was made up of the set of juveniles who were charged in a court case in the Juvenile Court of Almeria (Spain). The period of study of recidivism was two years from the baseline. The object of study is presented, through the implementation of a decision tree. Two profiles of risk and protective factors are found. Risk factors associated with higher rates of recidivism are antisocial peers, age at baseline S-ASB, problems in school and criminality in family members. PMID:27611313

  12. The Impact of Interpersonal Style and Interpersonal Complementarity on the Therapeutic Alliance Between Therapists and Offenders in Sex Offender Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Rachael; Daffern, Michael; Thomas, Stuart

    2017-03-01

    Therapist and treatment process variables affect the effectiveness of offender rehabilitation programs. This study examined the influence of therapists' and offenders' interpersonal styles (IPSs) and interpersonal complementarity on therapeutic alliance (TA). Seventy-five sex offenders and their therapists evaluated each other's IPSs and the TA after 3 weeks of treatment. Offenders evaluated the TA more positively than therapists. Regarding the impact of IPS, therapist affiliation was positively correlated and therapist control was negatively correlated with offenders' ratings of the TA; in other words, offenders evaluated the TA more strongly when therapists were perceived as affiliative, and weaker when therapists were viewed as controlling. Offender affiliation was positively correlated with therapists' ratings of TA; in other words, therapists evaluated the TA more strongly when offenders were viewed as more affiliative; perceptions of offender control were unrelated to offenders' ratings of TA. Complementarity in IPS between offenders and therapists did not affect TA.

  13. Female Sex Offenders: Public Awareness and Attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Calli M; Anderson, Amy L

    2016-09-16

    Traditional gender roles, sex scripts, and the way female sex offenders are portrayed in the media may lead to misconceptions about who can commit sexual offenses. Sexual crimes by women may go unnoticed or unreported if there is a general lack of awareness that females commit these crimes. Data from the 2012 Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey were used to determine whether the public perceives women as capable sex offenders and the perceived causes of female sex offending. The traditional focus on male sex offenders by researchers, media, and politicians, in addition to gender stereotypes, introduces the possibility of group differences (e.g., between men and women) in perceptions of female sex offenders. Consequently, two secondary analyses were conducted that tested for group differences in both the public's perception of whether females can commit sex offenses and the explanations selected for why females sexually offend. The findings suggest that the public does perceive women as capable sex offenders, although there were group differences in the causal attributions for female sex offending.

  14. Types of Empathy and Adolescent Sexual Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varker, Tracey; Devilly, Grant J.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine general empathy, general victim empathy and own victim empathy in adolescent sexual offenders. Sixteen adolescent sexual offenders completed the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI), the Personal Reaction Inventory, a "general sexual abuse victim" form of the Victim Empathy Distortions Scale (VEDS) and an…

  15. Psychopathic and Non-Psychopathic Alcoholic Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the incidence of psychopathy among an alcoholic-offender population (N=128) and compares psychopathic and non-psychopathic alcoholics in relation to childhood history, demographics, alcohol dependence, violence, and suicide. Results indicate that 20% of offenders could be classified as psychopaths. These persons were more alcohol…

  16. Do Juveniles Bully More than Young Offenders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Jane L.

    2002-01-01

    Study compares bullying behavior among juvenile and young offenders. Ninety-five male juvenile and 196 male young offenders completed two questionnaires, measuring bullying directly and behaviors indicative of "being bullied" or of "bullying others". Juveniles perceived a higher extent of bullying and reported significantly…

  17. A Preliminary Typology of Young Sex Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langstrom, Niklas; Grann, Martin; Lindblad, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Uses data concerning all young sex offenders (N=56) to construct and validate an introductory young sex offender typology based solely on offense characteristics. A 5-cluster solution received optimal support from cluster analysis of 15 offense-related variables. Survival analysis revealed that the clusters differed with respect to sexual but not…

  18. Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

  19. Offending Behaviour in Adults with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David; Evans, Carys; Hider, Andrew; Hawkins, Sarah; Peckett, Helen; Morgan, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Considerable speculation is evident both within the scientific literature and popular media regarding possible links between Asperger syndrome and offending. A survey methodology that utilised quantitative data collection was employed to investigate the prevalence of offending behaviour amongst adults with Asperger Syndrome in a large geographical…

  20. Moral Development of Solo Juvenile Sex Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vugt, Eveline; Stams, Geert Jan; Dekovic, Maja; Brugman, Daan; Rutten, Esther; Hendriks, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the moral development of solo juvenile male sex offenders (n = 20) and juvenile male non-offenders (n = 76), aged 13-19 years, from lower socioeconomic and educational backgrounds. The Moral Orientation Measure (MOM) was used to assess punishment- and victim-based moral orientation in sexual and non-sexual situations. Moral…

  1. Shame and guilt in child sexual offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proeve, Michael; Howells, Kevin

    2002-12-01

    In this article, the authors build on previous discussions of the possible role of shame and guilt in sexual offending. They review the general psychological literature on shame and guilt and conclude that the distinction between internal and external shame is an important one in considering sexual offenders. The effects of shame and guilt on victim empathy and relapse are discussed, and it is proposed that the phenomena of shame and guilt have implications for treatment beyond those identified in previous studies. Shame is a salient feature in the initial presentation of many sexual offenders against children. Furthermore, aspects of the treatment of sexual offenders can be characterized as a shift from shame toward guilt. Implications of shame and guilt for treatment of sexual offenders are described.

  2. Defense styles of pedophilic offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapeau, Martin; Beretta, Véronique; de Roten, Yves; Koerner, Annett; Despland, Jean-Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    This pilot study investigated the defense styles of pedophile sexual offenders. Interviews with 20 pedophiles and 20 controls were scored using the Defense Mechanisms Rating Scales. Results showed that pedophiles had a significantly lower overall defensive functioning score than the controls. Pedophiles used significantly fewer obsessional-level defenses but more major image-distorting and action-level defenses. Results also suggested differences in the prevalence of individual defenses where pedophiles used more dissociation, displacement, denial, autistic fantasy, splitting of object, projective identification, acting out, and passive aggressive behavior but less intellectualization and rationalization.

  3. Empathy and theory of mind in offenders with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Tracey; Beail, Nigel

    2007-06-01

    Little research has been carried out on empathy and theory of mind in offenders with intellectual disability (ID) and these concepts are often poorly defined. Various models of empathy and theory of mind are discussed and scores on 2 empathy and 3 theory of mind tasks are compared for 25 offenders with ID and 25 non-offenders with ID (all male). Differences were found in empathy and theory of mind performance of offenders and non-offenders with ID. Offenders performed better than non-offenders on a second order theory of mind task and on emotion recognition. They required fewer prompts to mention emotions, and gave empathic/caring responses more often than non-offenders when observing happiness (but not sadness or anger). Results suggest that offenders with ID may have better, rather than poorer, empathy and theory of mind abilities than non-offenders, and that empathy training is therefore not indicated for this group.

  4. Detection of Lymph Nodes Metastasis in Biliary Carcinomas: Morphological Criteria by MDCT and the Clinical Impact of DWI-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morine, Yuji; Shimada, Mitsuo; Imura, Satoru; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Hanaoka, Jun; Kanamoto, Mami; Ishibashi, Hiroki; Utsunomiya, Tohru

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the usefulness of multi-slice CT (MDCT) and diffusion weighted MR images (DWI-MRI) for diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) in biliary carcinomas. Eighteen patients with biliary carcinomas (total 121 LNs) underwent surgical resection were included. In MDCT, the following criteria were measured: the maximum diameter, the enhanced value and the long and short axis (L/S) ratio. In DWI-MRI, the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured from ADC maps. In ROC analysis, the maximum diameter has the highest diagnostic power with area under curves of 0.903. And when the maximum diameter 8 mm and L/S ratio is less than 2, the accuracy was improved with a sensitivity of 81%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 45%. In DWI-MRI, ADCs values of metastatic LNs significantly lower than that of non-metastatic LNs (mean: 1.65 vs. 2.11 x10 3mm2/s). When the ADC value of 1.8 x10(-3) was used as a cut-off value, the best results were obtained with sensitivity of 75%, PPV of 82%. Using MDCT, diagnosis of LNs metastasis should be more than 8mm diameter and less than 2 of L/S ratio. In addition, DWI-MRI is more useful modality for diagnosis of LNs metastasis.

  5. Quantitative DWI implemented after DCE-MRI yields increased specificity for BI-RADS 3 and 4 breast lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Dorrius, Monique D; Wielema, Mirjam; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Sijens, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess if specificity can be increased when semiautomated breast lesion analysis of quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is implemented after dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the workup of BI-RADS 3 and 4 breast lesions larger than 1 cm. MATER

  6. MRI DWI/ADC signal predicts shrinkage of lumbar disc herniation after O2–O3 discolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Marco; Grattacaso, Giuseppe; Di Tunno, Valeria; Marsecano, Claudia; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Gallucci, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the discal morpho-structural changes as a predictive sign in the clinical outcome after ozone therapy in lumbar disc herniation using the T2–shine through effect in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Method One hundred and fifty-four patients suffering from lumbosciatica (89 men and 65 women; age range, 23–62 years) were included, previous MR study performed with FSE-T2 and T2-fat, SE-T1 and DWI sequences, and were randomly assigned to two groups. Seventy-seven patients (control group) underwent conservative treatment with intraforaminal injection of steroid and anaesthetic. The remaining 77 patients (study group) underwent the same treatment with the addition of oxygen–ozone (O2–O3). During the following six months, a MRI follow-up with the same sequences was performed. An intervertebral disc volumetric analysis (IDVA), DWI signal score and post treatment clinical outcome evaluation were performed for an assessment of hernia reduction. χ2 test, Student's t test and analysis of covariance were used for comparison of variables. Results In the study group, 58 of 77 patients had a successful outcome (responders). In the responders group, DWI T2–shine through effect was present during MRI follow-up and in particular in 53 of 77 patients in six months of follow-up (p < 0.05). Moreover, in the same group a statistically significant disc shrinkage was shown by IDVA in sixth months of follow-up (p < 0.05). Conclusions T2–shine through effect in DWI is present before morphological disc reduction and moreover could be considered as a predictive sign of response to oxygen–ozone treatment. PMID:25923680

  7. MRI DWI/ADC signal predicts shrinkage of lumbar disc herniation after O2-O3 discolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Marco; Grattacaso, Giuseppe; Di Tunno, Valeria; Marsecano, Claudia; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Evaluate the discal morpho-structural changes as a predictive sign in the clinical outcome after ozone therapy in lumbar disc herniation using the T2-shine through effect in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). One hundred and fifty-four patients suffering from lumbosciatica (89 men and 65 women; age range, 23-62 years) were included, previous MR study performed with FSE-T2 and T2-fat, SE-T1 and DWI sequences, and were randomly assigned to two groups. Seventy-seven patients (control group) underwent conservative treatment with intraforaminal injection of steroid and anaesthetic. The remaining 77 patients (study group) underwent the same treatment with the addition of oxygen-ozone (O2-O3). During the following six months, a MRI follow-up with the same sequences was performed. An intervertebral disc volumetric analysis (IDVA), DWI signal score and post treatment clinical outcome evaluation were performed for an assessment of hernia reduction. χ² test, Student's t test and analysis of covariance were used for comparison of variables. In the study group, 58 of 77 patients had a successful outcome (responders). In the responders group, DWI T2-shine through effect was present during MRI follow-up and in particular in 53 of 77 patients in six months of follow-up (p < 0.05). Moreover, in the same group a statistically significant disc shrinkage was shown by IDVA in sixth months of follow-up (p < 0.05). T2-shine through effect in DWI is present before morphological disc reduction and moreover could be considered as a predictive sign of response to oxygen-ozone treatment. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Is there a role for diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in the diagnosis of central cartilage tumors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douis, H. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); University Hospital Birmingham, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Jeys, L.; Grimer, R. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Vaiyapuri, S. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Musculoskeletal Pathology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Davies, A.M. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-07

    To assess if diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) can differentiate between central enchondromas and chondrosarcomas (CS) and if DWI can distinguish low-grade chondroid lesions from high-grade CS. Fifty-two patients with central cartilage tumors were included. Patients underwent conventional MRI and DWI with ADC mapping. The slice on MRI with the most aggressive imaging feature was identified. The corresponding mean and minimum ADC maps of the tumor at this position were measured. There were 24 enchondromas, five atypical cartilaginous lesions, 15 grade 1, three grade 2, two grade 3, and three dedifferentiated CS. Mean ADC values (x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s) for enchondromas, atypical cartilaginous tumors, grade 1 CS, grade 2, CS, grade 3 CS and dedifferentiated CS were 1,896, 2,048, 2,152, 2,170, 2,076, and 1,261, respectively. Minimum ADC values (x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s) for enchondromas, atypical cartilaginous tumors, grade 1 CS, grade 2, CS, grade 3 CS and dedifferentiated CS were 1,820, 1,752, 2,010, 1,829, 1,752, and 767, respectively. ANOVA test demonstrated a statistically significant difference in mean and minimum ADC values in all groups. Post hoc analysis revealed this was due to difference in mean and minimum ADC values in dedifferentiated CS. The mean ADC value in low-grade chondroid lesions was 2,001, while the ADC value for high-grade CS were 2,132. The minimum ADC value for low-grade chondroid lesions was 1,896, while the minimum ADC for high-grade CS was 1,837. The difference in minimum and mean ADC values was not statistically significant. DWI cannot differentiate between enchondromas and CS and DWI does not aid in the distinction of low-grade chondroid tumors from high-grade CS. (orig.)

  9. Mental health assessment of rape offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Jaydip

    2013-07-01

    There is an urgent need for development of methods of assessment and management of sex offenders (rapists, child sex offenders, other sexual offenders, and murderers) to mount a society-wide battle against the scourge of sexual offences in India. This paper provides an overview of theories, models, and assessment methods of rapists. It draws upon literature from psychiatry, psychology, criminology, probation, and ethics to provide a framework for understanding reasons behind rape, how mental health issues are implicated, what mental health professionals can do to contribute to crime management, and why this is ethically right and proper.

  10. Vocational Teachers' Role in Serving Juvenile Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meers, Gary D.

    1983-01-01

    Educators need to understand the juvenile justice system to understand what juvenile offenders go through while completing their sentences. This article reviews cases and juvenile charge classifications, and presents a model for alternative sentencing options for juveniles. (JOW)

  11. Socialization Processes and Clergy Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This article uses feminist theory to investigate how the socialization processes used to maintain the clergy community in the Roman Catholic Church contributes to a vulnerability in some clergy for sexually abusing children. This vulnerability is identified first in an examination of the literature on the impact of socialization processes on clergy offenders between the 1960s and 1980s. A comparison is then made with the implications of the apostolic exhortation, Pastores Dabo Vobis, which provides a theological basis to clergy formation. The article argues that the document works to ensure a continuity of socialization processes that not only have been shown to create a vulnerability for committing child sexual abuse but compound existing vulnerabilities. The article concludes that constraints produced by the preservation of a hegemonic masculinity and patriarchy retain a threat of violence against children and require recommended reforms.

  12. Sexual Abuse History among Adult Sex Offenders and Non-Sex Offenders: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Ashley F.; Lalumiere, Martin L.; Seto, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The sexually abused-sexual abuser hypothesis states there is a specific relationship between sexual abuse history and sexual offending, such that individuals who experience sexual abuse are significantly more likely to later engage in sexual offenses. Therefore, samples of adult sex offenders should contain a disproportionate number of…

  13. Childhood predictors of desistance and level of persistence in offending in early onset offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domburgh, van L.; Loeber, R.; Bezemer, P.D.; Stallings, R.; Stouthamer-Loeber, M.

    2009-01-01

    Childhood predictors of adolescent offending careers were studied in 310 boys from the longitudinal Pittsburgh Youth Study who started offending prior to age 12. Three main groups were distinguished: serious persisters (n = 95), moderately serious persisters (n = 117), desisters (n = 63), and an int

  14. Childhood Predictors of Desistance and Level of Persistence in Offending in Early Onset Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Domburgh, L.; Loeber, R.; Bezemer, D.; Stallings, R.; Stouthamer-Loeber, M.

    2009-01-01

    Childhood predictors of adolescent offending careers were studied in 310 boys from the longitudinal Pittsburgh Youth Study who started offending prior to age 12. Three main groups were distinguished: serious persisters (n = 95), moderately serious persisters (n = 117), desisters (n = 63), and an intermittent group (n = 35). Group membership was…

  15. Childhood Predictors of Desistance and Level of Persistence in Offending in Early Onset Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Domburgh, L.; Loeber, R.; Bezemer, D.; Stallings, R.; Stouthamer-Loeber, M.

    2009-01-01

    Childhood predictors of adolescent offending careers were studied in 310 boys from the longitudinal Pittsburgh Youth Study who started offending prior to age 12. Three main groups were distinguished: serious persisters (n = 95), moderately serious persisters (n = 117), desisters (n = 63), and an intermittent group (n = 35). Group membership was…

  16. Childhood predictors of desistance and level of persistence in offending in early onset offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domburgh, van L.; Loeber, R.; Bezemer, P.D.; Stallings, R.; Stouthamer-Loeber, M.

    2009-01-01

    Childhood predictors of adolescent offending careers were studied in 310 boys from the longitudinal Pittsburgh Youth Study who started offending prior to age 12. Three main groups were distinguished: serious persisters (n = 95), moderately serious persisters (n = 117), desisters (n = 63), and an int

  17. DCE-MRI and DWI Integration for Breast Lesions Assessment and Heterogeneity Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Andrés Méndez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to better predict and follow treatment responses in cancer patients, there is growing interest in noninvasively characterizing tumor heterogeneity based on MR images possessing different contrast and quantitative information. This requires mechanisms for integrating such data and reducing the data dimensionality to levels amenable to interpretation by human readers. Here we propose a two-step pipeline for integrating diffusion and perfusion MRI that we demonstrate in the quantification of breast lesion heterogeneity. First, the images acquired with the two modalities are aligned using an intermodal registration. Dissimilarity-based clustering is then performed exploiting the information coming from both modalities. To this end an ad hoc distance metric is developed and tested for tuning the weighting for the two modalities. The distributions of the diffusion parameter values in subregions identified by the algorithm are extracted and compared through nonparametric testing for posterior evaluation of the tissue heterogeneity. Results show that the joint exploitation of the information brought by DCE and DWI leads to consistent results accounting for both perfusion and microstructural information yielding a greater refinement of the segmentation than the separate processing of the two modalities, consistent with that drawn manually by a radiologist with access to the same data.

  18. Accelerated maturation of white matter in young children with autism: a high b value DWI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Bashat, Dafna; Kronfeld-Duenias, Vered; Zachor, Ditza A; Ekstein, Perla M; Hendler, Talma; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Even, Ariela; Levy, Yonata; Ben Sira, Liat

    2007-08-01

    The goal of this work was to study white matter maturation in young children with autism following previous reports of increased cerebral volume during early development, as well as arguments for abnormal neural growth patterns and regulation at this critical developmental period. We applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high b value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to young children diagnosed with autism and to a typically developing (TD) control group. Fractional anisotropy (FA), probability and displacement were measured in overall analysis as well as in regions of interest (ROI). Individual data points of children with autism were compared to the developmental curves obtained from typically developing children. Increased restriction, reflected in significantly increased FA and probability along with reduced displacement values, was detected in overall analysis as well as in several brain regions. Increased restriction, suggesting an early and accelerated abnormal maturation of white matter, was more dominant in the left hemisphere and was mainly detected in the frontal lobe. No changes were detected in the occipital lobes. These results support previous claims of abnormal brain overgrowth in young children with autism and are in contrast to the decreased restricted diffusion reported in previous studies in adolescent with autism.

  19. Sex Offending and Situational Motivation: Findings From a Qualitative Analysis of Desistance From Sexual Offending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Mark; McAlinden, Anne-Marie; Maruna, Shadd

    2016-09-25

    Sex offending is typically understood from a pathology perspective with the origin of the behavior thought to be within the offending individual. Such a perspective may not be beneficial for those seeking to desist from sexual offending and reintegrate into mainstream society. A thematic analysis of 32 self-narratives of men convicted of sexual offences against children suggests that such individuals typically explain their pasts utilizing a script consistent with routine activity theory, emphasizing the role of circumstantial changes in both the onset of and desistance from sexual offending. It is argued that the self-framing of serious offending in this way might be understood as a form of "shame management," a protective cognition that enables desistance by shielding individuals from internalizing stigma for past violence. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Reinforcement sensitivity of sex offenders and non-offenders: an experimental and psychometric study of reinforcement sensitivity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leue, Anja; Brocke, Burkhard; Hoyer, Jürgen

    2008-08-01

    This study tested predictions of Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) in subgroups of sex offenders and male non-offenders using an experimental choice task consisting of a reward and a non-reward phase. In addition, RST-related psychometric measures were used. Both experimental and psychometric data were of interest to determine whether sex offenders could be reliably differentiated from non-offenders. Paraphilic (N=50) and impulse control-disordered (N=48) sex offenders showed greater sensitivity to continuous reward than male non-offenders (N=51). Impulse control-disordered sex offenders showed less behavioural adaptation under non-reward than both paraphilic sex offenders and male non-offenders. In addition, reward sensitivity, rash-spontaneous impulsivity, and anxiety measures discriminated sex offenders from male non-offenders. The results suggest that reinforcement sensitivity is a promising personality trait for differentiating subgroups of sex offenders from non-offenders. The experimental and psychometric results illustrate that predictive accuracy in forensic settings could be improved by combining several types of data.

  1. Penitentiary Diagnosis of Crime Offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiola Friedrich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic standards of serving the punishment of imprisonment is its individualization, which means varying interactions consisting in adjusting them to the personality of the offender and the purposes of executing the sentence. A properly served psychological diagnosis, especially the penitentiary diagnosis, should describe the studied phenomenon well. The content of the penitentiary diagnosis should include a description of the clinical picture of an imprisoned person and basic social rehabilitation indications. The paper was written on the basis of literature on the subject, legislation and available research results. The aim of this paper is to characterize the diagnosis performed for the needs of justice, which is continuous and should be performed at every stage of imprisonment. The effect of a properly formed psychological and penitentiary decision should be the placement of a prisoner in a suitable type, kind of prison and appropriate system of serving imprisonment, followed by the correct selection of educational measures which may imply the efficiency and effectiveness of the punishment of imprisonment.

  2. THE OFFENDER PERSONALITY DISORDER PATHWAY: RISKING REHABILITATION?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Following over a decade of treatment refusal by 'risky' offenders preventively detained in Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder hospital and prison units, the coalition government now aims to improve treatment engagement in high secure prisons by clarifying pathways out of detention. This article asks whether the reconfiguration will end reliance upon preventive detention for public protection. Drawing on original empirical data collected by the author, it is argued that the government is unaware that offenders with 'severe personality disorder' appear to engage with treatment only if it increases their chances of achieving expedited parole. Hitherto, this incentive was provided by the Indeterminate Sentence for Public Protection; its replacement with determinate sentences under the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 will worsen treatment engagement, because they provide offenders with a prison release date. The troubling result may be increased reliance by the Secretary of State for Justice on his inherent jurisdiction under the Mental Health Act 1983 to transfer offenders due for prison release to secure psychiatric hospitals. To counter this limitation of risk-focused decision-making, it is proposed that judges be able to impose a new hybrid order combining a custodial term with a subsequent community mental health treatment requirement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The juvenile sex offender : Criminal careers and life events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, C.; Bijleveld, C.; Hendriks, J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we investigate whether the life events of marriage, parenthood, and employment were associated with general offending for a Dutch sample of 498 juvenile sex offenders (JSOs). In previous empirical studies, these life events were found to limit adult general offending in the populati

  4. The relation between empathy and offending: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.M. van Langen; I.B. Wissink; E.S. van Vugt; T. van der Stouwe; G.J.J.M. Stams

    2014-01-01

    A meta-analysis of k = 38 studies (60 independent effect sizes), including 6631 participants, was conducted to investigate whether differences in cognitive and affective empathy exist between offenders and non-offenders. Cognitive empathy was more strongly associated with offending (d = .43) than af

  5. Treatment for Juveniles Who Sexually Offend in a Southwestern State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikomi, Philip A.; Harris-Wyatt, Georgetta; Doucet, Geraldine; Rodney, H. Elaine

    2009-01-01

    A 25-item questionnaire was mailed to sex offender treatment providers from counties with 60 or more reported juvenile sex offenders in a Southwestern state to determine the most effective treatment for juvenile sex offenders. Results indicated that cognitive behavioral therapy was the most successful reported approach to treatment with an average…

  6. Education, Schooling and Young Offenders of Secondary School Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Carol

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines the evidence about education, schooling and young offenders of secondary school age. Education and experiences of schooling are shown to be potentially risk or protective factors in relation to offending behaviour by young people. The victimisation and vulnerability of more serious young offenders is highlighted in the case…

  7. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  8. Characteristics of DUI recidivists: a 12-year follow-up study of first time DUI offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaiola, Alan A; Strohmetz, David B; Abreo, Sandra D

    2007-04-01

    77 individuals convicted of a drinking and driving (DUI) offense were screened for recidivism approximately 12 years following their first offense. At the time of the initial DUI conviction, participants were administered the MAST and the MMPI-2. Participants' drinking history and driving history and arrest at the time of screening and at a 12-year follow-up were also reviewed. The results indicate that, among DUI recidivists, on average 6 years elapsed between their first and second DUI offenses. Driving history prior to the first DUI offense was predictive of later recidivism. The only significant finding from the MAST and MMPI results was that repeat offenders tended to have higher scores on the L and K validity scales of the MMPI. These results are discussed in the context of Jessor's Problem-Behavior Theory and as well their clinical implications for screening and treatment decisions involving first time DUI offenders.

  9. MR assessment of lumbar disk herniation treated with oxygen-ozone diskolysis: the role of DWI and related ADC versus intervertebral disk volumetric analysis for detecting treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splendiani, A; Perri, M; Conchiglia, A; Fasano, F; Di Egidio, G; Masciocchi, C; Gallucci, M

    2013-06-01

    We prospectively assessed the diagnostic criteria of morphologic MRI study (MMS) and the accuracy of DWI and related ADC values (DWI-ADC) versus intervertebral disk volumetric analysis (IDVA) for predicting shrinkage of lumbar disk herniation treated with oxygen-ozone (O2-O3) diskolysis. Sixty-eight patients (36 men and 32 women; mean age 39) with lumbosciatica underwent O2-O3 diskolysis. The six-month MRI follow-up was performed with FSE-T2 and T2-fat, SE-T1 and DWI-weighted images. IDVA was determined using OsiriX(®). Diagnostic criteria and accuracy were evaluated with regards to DWI and related ADC in detecting response to ozone therapy. Fifty-eight of 68 patients had successful outcomes (responders), whereas ten patients showed unsatisfactory outcomes (non-responders). MMS showed that a centrally located herniated disk and grade 1 nerve root compression were more common in the responder group (p < 0.05). DWI-ADC and IDVA showed statistically significant shrinkage in the sixth month of follow-up (p < 0.05) with a mean ADC value reduction of 2.10 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s +/- 0.19 SD in the second month of follow-up (p < 0.05). DWI-ADC had an accuracy of 0.81 in detecting response to therapy around the second month of follow-up. DWI-ADC appear to be useful adjuncts to MMS in the follow-up of patients undergoing O2-O3 diskolysis.

  10. Undetected and detected child sexual abuse and child pornography offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Janina; Grundmann, Dorit; Scherner, Gerold; Beier, Klaus Michael

    2012-01-01

    Current knowledge about risk factors for child sexual abuse and child pornography offenses is based on samples of convicted offenders, i.e., detected offenders. Only few studies focus on offenders not detected by the criminal justice system. In this study, a sample of 345 self-referred pedophiles and hebephiles was recruited from the community. All participants met DSM-IV-TR criteria for pedophilia or hebephilia (paraphilia not otherwise specified), were assured of confidentiality, and self-reported lifetime sexual offending against prepubescent and/or pubescent children. Two sets of group comparisons were conducted on self-report data of risk factors for sexual reoffending. Measures of risk factors address the following dimensions identified in samples of convicted offenders: sexual preferences (i.e. co-occurring paraphilias), sexual self-regulation problems, offense-supportive cognitions, diverse socio-affective deficits, and indicators of social functioning (e.g., education, employment). Men who admitted current or previous investigation or conviction by legal authorities (detected offenders) were compared with those who denied any detection for their sexual offenses against children (undetected offenders). Group comparisons (detected vs. undetected) were further conducted for each offense type separately (child pornography only offenders, child sexual abuse only offenders, mixed offenders). Although there were more similarities between undetected and detected offenders, selected measures of sexual-self regulation problems, socio-affective deficits, and social functioning data demonstrated group differences.

  11. Online child pornography offenders are different: a meta-analysis of the characteristics of online and offline sex offenders against children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babchishin, Kelly M; Hanson, R Karl; VanZuylen, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The current meta-analysis compared the characteristics of online child pornography-only offenders, typical (offline) sex offenders against children, and offenders with both child pornography and contact sex offences against children (mixed). Based on 30 unique samples (comparison ns ranging from 98 to 2,702), the meta-analysis found key differences between groups. Offenders who committed contact sex offences were more likely to have access to children than those with only child pornography offences. In contrast, offenders who used the internet to commit sexual offences had greater access to the internet than those with contact sex offenders. Differences between the groups, however, were not limited to differential opportunities. Sex offenders against children and mixed offenders were found to score higher on indicators of antisociality than online child pornography offenders (CPOs). CPOs were also more likely to have psychological barriers to sexual offending than sex offenders against children and mixed offenders (e.g., greater victim empathy). Mixed offenders were found to be the most pedophilic, even more than CPOs. The findings suggest that offenders who restricted their offending behavior to online child pornography offences were different from mixed offenders and offline sex offenders against children, and that mixed offenders were a particularly high risk group.

  12. fDWI Evaluation of Hypothalamic Appetite Regulation Pathways in Mice Genetically Deficient in Leptin or Neuropeptide Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarbe, Blanca; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2015-12-01

    We evaluate the contribution of leptin-dependent anorexigenic pathways and neuropeptide Y (NPY)-dependent orexigenic pathways to the changes in hypothalamic water diffusion parameters observed in vivo by functional diffusion weighted MRI (fDWI). Mice genetically deficient in leptin (B6.V-Lep (ob) /J) or NPY (129S-Npy (tm1Rpa) /J) and the corresponding wild-type controls, were subjected to sequential isocaloric feeding, fasting and recovery regimes. Non-invasive fDWI measurements were performed under these conditions, and complemented with parallel determinations of food and water consumption, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), locomotor activity and endocrine profiles. Control mice showed significant increases in hypothalamic water diffusion parameters upon fasting, returning to normal values in the recovery period. Leptin deficient mice depicted permanently increased water diffusion parameters under all feeding conditions as compared to wild type controls, without important changes upon fasting or recovery. These results paralleled sustained increases in food and water intake, significantly augmented body weight, and decreased RER values or locomotor activity, thus configuring an obese phenotype. NPY-deficient mice showed significantly reduced increases (or even slight decreases) in the water diffusion parameters upon fasting as compared to wild type controls, paralleled by decreased food and water intake during the recovery period. In conclusion, leptin deficiency results in sustained orexigenic stimulation, leading to increased water diffusion parameters, while NPY deficiency lead to reduced orexigenic stimulation and water diffusion parameters. Diffusion changes are proposed to reflect net astrocytic volume changes induced by the balance between the orexigenic and anorexigenic firings of AgRP/NPY and POMC/CART neurons, respectively. Together, our results suggest that fDWI provides an adequate tool to investigate hypothalamic appetite disorders.

  13. Individual, family and offence characteristics of high risk childhood offenders: comparing non-offending, one-time offending and re-offending Dutch-Moroccan migrant children in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens Gonneke WJM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood offenders are at an increased risk for developing mental health, social and educational problems later in life. An early onset of offending is a strong predictor for future persistent offending. Childhood offenders from ethnic minority groups are a vulnerable at-risk group. However, up until now, no studies have focused on them. Aims To investigate which risk factors are associated with (re-offending of childhood offenders from an ethnic minority. Method Dutch-Moroccan boys, who were registered by the police in the year 2006-2007, and their parents as well as a control group (n = 40 were interviewed regarding their individual and family characteristics. Two years later a follow-up analysis of police data was conducted to identify one-time offenders (n = 65 and re-offenders (n = 35. Results All groups, including the controls, showed substantial problems. Single parenthood (OR 6.0 and financial problems (OR 3.9 distinguished one-time offenders from controls. Reading problems (OR 3.8, having an older brother (OR 5.5 and a parent having Dutch friends (OR 4.3 distinguished re-offenders from one-time offenders. First offence characteristics were not predictive for re-offending. The control group reported high levels of emotional problems (33.3%. Parents reported not needing help for their children but half of the re-offender's families were known to the Child Welfare Agency, mostly in a juridical framework. Conclusion The Moroccan subgroup of childhood offenders has substantial problems that might hamper healthy development. Interventions should focus on reaching these families tailored to their needs and expectations using a multi-system approach.

  14. A multimodal examination of sexual interest in children: a comparison of sex offenders and nonsex offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babchishin, Kelly M; Nunes, Kevin L; Kessous, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Research and theoretical models have consistently identified sexual interest in children as a key factor involved in child sexual offending. However, there is only moderate agreement in the diagnosis of pedophilia and different assessment methods identify different offenders as pedophiles. The current study examined the discriminative and convergent validity of three different measures of sexual interest in children. Participants included sex offenders and nonsex offenders recruited from federal prisons (i.e., offenders serving sentences of more than 2 years) in Ontario, Canada. Child molesters' responses (n = 35) were not significantly different from nonsex offenders (n = 21) on an implicit measure of sexual interest in children (Sexual Attraction to Children Implicit Association Test [SAC-IAT] d = 0.44, 95% CI [-0.11, 0.99]), but differed on the self-report (Sexual Interest Profiling System; d = 0.83, 95% CI [0.27, 1.39]) and viewing time (d = 1.15, 95% CI [0.54, 1.75]) measures. Findings did not provide clear support for the superiority of a multimodal approach, possibly due to the relatively small sample. More often than not, convergence between the three measures was observed (n = 74). Findings from the present study are an important step toward understanding the relationship between different measures of sexual interest in children and establishing their validity. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Zoomed EPI-DWI of the pancreas using two-dimensional spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Riffel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Implementation of DWI in the abdomen is challenging due to artifacts, particularly those arising from differences in tissue susceptibility. Two-dimensional, spatially-selective radiofrequency (RF excitation pulses for single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI combined with a reduction in the FOV in the phase-encoding direction (i.e. zooming leads to a decreased number of k-space acquisition lines, significantly shortening the EPI echo train and potentially susceptibility artifacts. PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility and image quality of a zoomed diffusion-weighted EPI (z-EPI sequence in MR imaging of the pancreas. The approach is compared to conventional single-shot EPI (c-EPI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 23 patients who had undergone an MRI study of the abdomen were included in this retrospective study. Examinations were performed on a 3T whole-body MR system (Magnetom Skyra, Siemens equipped with a two-channel fully dynamic parallel transmit array (TimTX TrueShape, Siemens. The acquired sequences consisted of a conventional EPI DWI of the abdomen and a zoomed EPI DWI of the pancreas. For z-EPI, the standard sinc excitation was replaced with a two-dimensional spatially-selective RF pulse using an echo-planar transmit trajectory. Images were evaluated with regard to image blur, respiratory motion artifacts, diagnostic confidence, delineation of the pancreas, and overall scan preference. Additionally ADC values of the pancreatic head, body, and tail were calculated and compared between sequences. RESULTS: The pancreas was better delineated in every case (23/23 with z-EPI versus c-EPI. In every case (23/23, both readers preferred z-EPI overall to c-EPI. With z-EPI there was statistically significantly less image blur (p<0.0001 and respiratory motion artifact compared to c-EPI (p<0.0001. Diagnostic confidence was statistically significantly better with z-EPI (p<0.0001. No statistically significant differences in calculated ADC values were observed

  16. Using Reality Therapy with Adult Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ben-Zion; Sordo, Itzhak

    1984-01-01

    Presents a version of reality therapy with adult offenders. Focuses on the normative principles underlying the theory, and outlines five basic treatment techniques--involvement, current behavior, evaluation of behavior, planning, and commitment, illustrated with case vignettes. Concludes that reality therapy can promote more responsible behavior…

  17. Status Offender Legislation and the Courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Lori L.; Culbertson, Robert G.

    1988-01-01

    Examined records of 558 juveniles sheltered at short-term residential facility for five years to determine effect of Illinois' Minor Requiring Authoritative Intervention (MRAI) statute on status offenders. Results indicated that dispositions of clients MRAI legislation were not significantly different from earlier dispositions under old Minor in…

  18. Strategies of Intervention with Public Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaneles, Sol, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews intervention strategies with public offenders, including learning therapy, education, group assertive training, and the use of volunteers. The l0 articles deal with inmates' rights in terms of health care and psychotherapy, and evaluation of social programs, and a psychodrama program description/model. (JAC)

  19. Violent Offenders in a Deaf Prison Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katrina R.; Vernon, McCay; Capella, Michele E.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research suggested an unexplained difference in the patterns of offending behaviors among deaf people when compared to hearing people. This study, conducted in Texas, compares the incidence and types of violent offenses of a deaf prison population in comparison to the hearing prison population. Sixty-four percent of deaf prisoners were…

  20. How Incest Offenders Overcome Internal Inhibitions through the Use of Cognitions and Cognitive Distortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Carolyn Copps

    1998-01-01

    Explores cognitions incest offenders use to overcome their initial inhibitions against offending and to maintain their offending behavior once begun. Involves in-person interviews with caucasian male incest offenders in treatment. Discusses cognitions identified within the context of new theory on the role of cognitions in sexual offending. (MKA)

  1. The neural correlates of emotion processing in juvenile offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincham, Hannah L; Bryce, Donna; Pasco Fearon, R M

    2015-11-01

    Individuals with severe antisocial behaviour often demonstrate abnormalities or difficulties in emotion processing. Antisocial behaviour typically onsets before adulthood and is reflected in antisocial individuals at the biological level. We therefore conducted a brain-based study of emotion processing in juvenile offenders. Male adolescent offenders and age-matched non-offenders passively viewed emotional images whilst their brain activity was recorded using electroencephalography. The early posterior negativity (EPN) and the late positive potential (LPP) components were used as indices of emotion processing. For both juvenile offenders and non-offenders, the EPN differentiated unpleasant images from other image types, suggesting that early perceptual processing was not impaired in the offender group. In line with normal emotion processing, the LPP was significantly enhanced following unpleasant images for non-offenders. However, for juvenile offenders, the LPP did not differ across image categories, indicative of deficient emotional processing. The findings indicated that this brain-based hypo-reactivity occurred during a late stage of cognitive processing and was not a consequence of atypical early visual attention or perception. This study is the first to show attenuated emotion processing in juvenile offenders at the neural level. Overall, these results have the potential to inform interventions for juvenile offending. © 2014 The Authors. Developmental Science Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Psychopathic traits in young offenders vs. non-offenders in similar socioeconomic condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo B. Castellana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the differences in psychopathic traits between offender and non-offender youths with similar socioeconomic backgrounds. Method: The Psychopathy Checklist Revised (PCL-R scale was used to identify whether 39 young offenders with no history of mental disorders or criteria for psychopathy exhibited differences in its total score, and specifically for factor 1 or factor 2 of this scale, when compared with 32 other young people, living in similar socioeconomic conditions, who had not committed offenses. Results: We observed statistically significant between-group differences (p < 0.01 in mean PCL-R scores, with a mean score of 13.4 in the offender group vs. 2.1 in the non-offender group. We also detected significant between-group differences when we analyzed mean factor 1 (p < 0.01 and factor 2 (p < 0.01 scores separately. Although the groups exhibited statistically significant difference in educational attainment, between-group comparison of mean PCL-R scores controlling for educational attainment by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA showed that the difference in PCL-R scores remained statistically significant (p < 0.01. Conclusions: We conclude that, in this sample, the presence of both primary (interpersonal/affective characteristics and secondary (lifestyle/antisocial behavior psychopathic traits differed between offender and non-offender youths, even when excluding psychopathy and other mental disorders from the assessments. These results suggest a need for wide-ranging interventions, not restricted to socioeconomic aspects, for the management of juvenile delinquency.

  3. Oral language competence in incarcerated young offenders: links with offending severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Pamela C; Powell, Martine B

    2011-12-01

    Previous research in Australia and overseas has shown that young offenders serving community-based orders are at high-risk for undetected but clinically significant oral language difficulties. However, this phenomenon has received little attention in incarcerated samples, and links with offending severity, mental health, and other markers of early risk have not previously been systemically examined. A cross-sectional examination of 100 young offenders (mean age 19.03 years) completing custodial sentences in Victoria, Australia was conducted. A range of standardized oral language, IQ, mental health, and offending severity measures was employed. Forty-six per cent of participants were classified as language impaired (LI), and these were compared with the non-LI sub-group on background and offending variables. When the sub-group with high scores on a measure of offending severity was compared with those with (relatively) lower offending scores, significant differences on a range of language measures were identified. A range of early risk indicators (such as placement in Out of Home Care) was also examined with respect to language impairment in this high-risk group. Results are discussed with respect to policy and practice pertaining to early intervention for vulnerable children, and implications for service delivery within the justice system. In particular, emphasis is placed on the need to closely examine the oral language skills of children who struggle with the transition to literacy and then display behavioural difficulties in the classroom. Once a young person is engaged with youth justice services, a high index of suspicion should be maintained with respect to their oral language skills; for example, in relation to forensic interviewing and the ability to benefit from verbally mediated interventions.

  4. Is psychopathy elevated among criminal offenders who are under preventive detention pursuant to Section 66 of the German Penal Code?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermeyer, Elmar; Passow, Daniel; Vohs, Knut

    2010-01-01

    In Germany, preventive detention can be imposed if a repeat offender shows a proclivity to commit further significant criminal acts. The courts require expert opinion to provide information about personality traits relevant for this disposition. However, currently, consensus about this topic is lacking. On the basis of a standardized examination, the relevance of Hare's concept of "psychopathy" for expert opinion is discussed in the context of preventive detention.

  5. An Investigation into the Effect of Respondent Gender, Victim Age, and Perpetrator Treatment on Public Attitudes towards Sex Offenders, Sex Offender Treatment, and Sex Offender Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Paul; Hirst, Lindsay; Davies, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In this study the authors examine the effect respondent gender, victim age, and offender treatment programs have upon public attitudes towards sex offenders. A community sample of 235 participants were asked to read a hypothetical vignette involving the sexual assault of a 10-, 15-, or 20-year-old female by a 35-year-old male who subsequently…

  6. Prevalence of mental disorders among sexual offenders and non-sexual offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Faria Achá

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of mental disorders in convicted sex offenders admitted to the Psychiatric Custody and Treatment Hospital (Forensic Psychiatric Facility. METHOD: 89 patient records of males admitted from March 2005 to August 2006 were analyzed. The analysis included evaluation of two study groups: Group I comprised subjects who had committed sex offenses (sexual offenders while Group II contained subjects convicted for other crimes (non-sexual offenders. Variables studied were: age bracket, years of schooling, marital status, skin color, place of birth, previous psychiatric admissions and psychiatric diagnosis. RESULTS: Mental retardation and personality disorders were the mainly diagnoses in Group I (sexual offenders (61,76% and 29,41% respectively. In the other hand, schizophrenic subjects predominated in Group II (non-sexual offenders (82,93%. CONCLUSION: Different from international data, we have found low prevalence of personality disorders among Brazilian forensic population and we believe that it's due to a distinguishing characteristic of the Brazilian legal system, which does not consider personality disorder a mental disease, thus, not prompting these patients to civil commitment.

  7. Female sexual offenders in the educational system: a brief overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, O Lizette; Benedek, Elissa P

    2012-01-01

    Female sexual offenders comprise the minority of sexual offenders in the criminal justice system. However, empirical research reveals that sexual offenses against adolescents by females are a bigger problem than previously thought, particularly in the educational system. The authors review some of the data in the criminal justice system as well as in empirical research studies about female sexual offenders, with a specific focus on females who commit sexual crimes against students who are minors.

  8. The criminal careers of chronic offenders in Vancouver, British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, Christopher M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Typically, research on “chronic offenders” employs a cohort design with general population or higher risk samples. These designs tend to include a small number of high frequency offenders. This dissertation examines the conviction histories of 152 pre-identified high frequency offenders who are supervised by the Chronic Offenders Program (COP) at the Vancouver Police Department in Vancouver, British Columbia. The lifetime conviction histories and other background variables of the 152 offen...

  9. Childhood Abuse and Harmful Substance Use among Criminal Offenders

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Childhood abuse is a serious problem that has been linked to harmful alcohol and drug use in non-offender samples. In a sample of 219 criminal offenders, we examined the associations between childhood physical and sexual abuse and three indices of harmful substance use. Results indicate that physical abuse was associated with symptoms of alcohol use disorder and sexual abuse was associated with symptoms of drug use disorder among offenders. Both forms of childhood abuse were associated with s...

  10. Identifying and transferring offenders with mental health needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, James; Paler, Helen

    This article provides an overview of the challenges encountered by mental health staff involved in the transfer of offenders with mental health problems between prisons and secure hospital settings. The article presents a case study demonstrating the importance of identifying offenders with mental health needs to provide appropriate care and support, prevent further mental deterioration and reduce the risk of offenders harming themselves or others.

  11. Female Sex Offenders and Pariah Femininities: Rewriting the Sexual Scripts

    OpenAIRE

    Sharon Hayes; Bethney Baker

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to analyze the way in which the media reports of sex offences tend to reinforce traditional sexual scripts and gender identities. Compared to investigations into male sex offenders, female sex offending is relatively underresearched, undertheorized, and misunderstood (Hayes and Carpenter, 2013). We argue that the media’s reinforcement of traditional scripts has hindered the development of awareness of sex offending by women, depicting them as aberrations, that is, as “female p...

  12. [Convicted sexual offenders. The risk of recidivism?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünfeld, B; Noreik, K; Sivertsen, E A

    1998-01-10

    332 persons, who in 1987 received sanctions for sexual offences, were observed in freedom for five years, or until recidivism at an earlier stage. 82 (24.7%) committed new crimes during the observation period. Sexual offences comprised about 1/3 (8.4%) of the crimes committed. Rapists had the highest degree of recidivism. There was no significant difference between the various subgroups of sexual offenders (sexual offences against minors, rapists and other offenders) with regard to the frequency of recidivism into sexual offences. Registered sanctions for sexual offences before 1987, and sexual abuse and obscene conduct toward minors registered i 1987, were found to be significantly correlated to sexual recidivism after 1987. Problems regarding the evaluation of the effects of treatment to forestall recidivism into sexual crimes are discussed.

  13. The sexual preferences of incest offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, M C; Lalumière, M L; Kuban, M

    1999-05-01

    Inclusive fitness theory suggests that discriminative solicitude and inbreeding avoidance are important mechanisms regulating parent-children interactions. From an inclusive fitness perspective, sex with one's biological children is paradoxical. The authors hypothesized that incest can occur when these mechanisms are not activated (e.g., if a father is uninvolved in child rearing) or are overwhelmed by another factor, such as pedophilic interest. They predicted that biological fathers, who presumably have been the most involved in the rearing of their victims, would show greater phallometrically measured pedophilic interest than would other incest offenders against children (e.g., grandfathers, uncles, stepfathers). The prediction was not supported. A testable alternative hypothesis to explain biological father incest is presented and the importance of assessing pedophilic interest among incest offenders is discussed.

  14. Early maladaptive schemas in convicted sexual offenders: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Joana; Nobre, Pedro J

    2014-01-01

    Core cognitive schemas may play a role in the vulnerability for sexual offending. Identifying these schemas could help to conceptualize sexual crimes and rehabilitate convicted sexual offenders. The aim of this preliminary study was to explore the relationship between early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) and sexual offending, as well as how rapists and child sex molesters differ in terms of these schemas. Thirty-two men convicted for rape, 33 convicted for child sexual abuse, and 30 non-offenders were evaluated using the Young Schema Questionnaire (YSQ-S3) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Results showed that participants convicted for child sexual abuse presented significantly more schemas from the disconnection/rejection, impaired autonomy/performance, other directness, and over vigilance/inhibition domains than non-offenders, whereas rapists presented more schemas from the impaired autonomy/performance domain than non-offenders. Differences between sex offenders showed that child molesters presented more schemas of pessimism than rapists. Preliminary findings suggested that EMSs may impact sex offender's perceptions about themselves and about the world. Schema-focused therapy (Young, 1990, 1999) may thus be an acceptable approach to sex offender's psychological assessment and intervention.

  15. Implicit Theories and Offender Representativeness in Judgments About Sexual Crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Craig A; Bartels, Ross M

    2016-07-01

    Implicit theories structure the way people understand and respond to various human actions. Typically, people believe attributes are either fixed (entitists) or malleable (incrementalists). The present study aimed to examine (a) whether attitudes toward sexual offenders differ depending upon one's implicit theory about human nature and sexual offenders, and (b) whether implicit theories are associated with judgments made about different types of child abusers. A sample of 252 community participants was recruited. Their attitudes, implicit theories, and political orientation were assessed via self-report. One of three vignettes describing an incidence of child sexual abuse was then presented. The cases were identical except the perpetrator was either an adult male, an adult female, or a male juvenile. Participants then made judgments about the offender's deserved sentence and moral character. Entitists (across both domains) held more negative attitudes than incrementalists, although the magnitude of the difference was greatest when examining implicit theories about sexual offenders. Compared with those with an incremental theory of sexual offenders, entity theorists judged sexual offending to be more (a) indicative of the perpetrator's moral character and (b) deserving of punishment. However, scores were greater toward the adult male relative to the adult female and juvenile. The findings suggest that implicit theories about sexual offenders are domain specific. They also indicate that judgments made by those with an entity theory (about sexual offenders) are affected by whether a case is representative of a stereotypical sexual offender. Implications of the findings are discussed, along with limitations and future research.

  16. Early parenting styles and sexual offending behavior: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigre-Leirós, Vera; Carvalho, Joana; Nobre, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    Sexual offenders, in general, report problematic rearing practices from their parents, lacking however more empirical research on this topic regarding particular subtypes of offenders. The current study examined the relationship between early parenting styles and different types of sexual offending. A total of 113 sexual offenders (rapists, pedophilic and nonpedophilic child molesters), and 51 nonsexual offenders completed the EMBU (My Memories of Upbringing), the Brief Symptom Inventory, and the Socially Desirable Response Set Measure. Results showed that rapists were less likely to remember their fathers as being emotionally warm compared with nonsexual offenders and pedophilic child molesters. In addition, compared with rapists, pedophilic offenders perceived their mothers as having been less emotionally warm to them. Overall, results showed that certain developmental experiences with parents were able to distinguish between subtypes of offenders supporting an association between distal interpersonal factors and sexual offending. These findings may have important implications for early intervention and prevention of sexual crimes. Further research using larger samples of pedophilic child molesters is recommended.

  17. The Theory of the Offender's Forfeited Right

    OpenAIRE

    Rosebury, Brian John

    2015-01-01

    In justifying punishment we sometimes appeal to the idea that the punished offender has, by his criminal action against others, forfeited his moral right (and therefore his legal right) against hard treatment by the state. The imposition of suffering, or deprivation of liberty, loses its prima facie morally objectionable character, and becomes morally permissible.\\ud \\ud Philosophers interrogating the forfeited right theory generally focus on whether the forfeiting of the right constitutes a ...

  18. UNDERSTANDING CONATIVE REGULATION SYSTEMS – AN EXAMINATION OF THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN OFFENDERS AND NON-OFFENDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja DJURDJEVIC

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Numerous studies confirmed personality traits as being important predictors of criminal behavior. The aim of this research was to determine which constellation of basic personality traits incarcerated individuals and those serving alternative sanctions differ, and which traits make the difference between the criminal and the non-criminal populations. In this research, the model of personality used is a cybernetic model of conative functioning, which assumes that conative regulation systems almost completely describe the structure of personality. Methods: The study sample consisted of 391 male respondents (152 offenders serving prison sentence, 91 convicts sentenced to alternative penalties and 148 non-offenders. Examined variables were: the regulator of activity (Extroversion, the regulator of organic functions (Hysteria, the regulator of defense reactions (Anxiety, the regulator of attack reactions (Aggressiveness, the system for coordination of regulatory functions (Psychoticism and the system for integration of regulatory functions (Integration. Results: There were significant differences in all dimensions of personality between groups, except for the framework of Extraversion. The traits that contribute to the difference between individuals serving prison sentence and offenders sentenced to alternative penalties are Integration and Aggressiveness. The traits that contribute to the difference between non-offenders and offenders serving prison sentence are Psychoticism, Integration, Aggressiveness, and Anxiety. Among offenders sentenced to alternative penalties and the general population no difference in personality traits was found. Conclusion: Our findings may indicate the need for mandatory diagnostic psychological evaluation of persons who have committed minor offenses, to ensure the right decision is made when choosing between prison and an alternative method of punishment.

  19. Self-reported psychopathic traits in sexually offending juveniles compared with generally offending juveniles and general population youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonmann, Cyril; Jansen, Lucres M C; 't Hart-Kerkhoffs, Lisette A; Vahl, Pauline; Hillege, Sanne L; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Vermeiren, Robert R J M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to gain a better insight into the relationship between sexually aggressive behaviour and psychopathy in youths; juveniles who sexually offended (JSOs) were compared with generally offending youths and a general population group. Seventy-one JSOs, 416 detained general offenders, and 331 males from the general population were assessed by means of the Youth Psychopathic traits Inventory (YPI), a self-report instrument. Sexually and generally offending juveniles had significantly lower levels of self-reported psychopathic traits than youths from the general population. Juvenile sexual offenders and generally offending juveniles did not differ in self-reported psychopathic traits. Furthermore, no differences in self-reported psychopathic traits were found between subgroups of JSOs (i.e., child molesters, solo offenders, and group offenders). The finding that self-reported psychopathic traits are less prevalent in offending juveniles than in general population youths raises questions about the usefulness of the YPI when comparing psychopathic traits between clinical samples and general-population samples.

  20. Prediction of treatment response in head and neck carcinomas using IVIM-DWI: Evaluation of lymph node metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Hauser@klinikum-augsburg.de [Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Augsburg, Augsburg (Germany); Essig, Marco [Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada); Jensen, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Therapy, Ruprecht-Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany); Laun, Frederik B. [Quantitative imaging based disease characterization (E011), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiology (E020), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Münter, Marc [Department of Radiation Therapy, Ruprecht-Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Therapy, Katharinenhospital, Stuttgart (Germany); Maier-Hein, Klaus H. [Quantitative imaging based disease characterization (E011), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Division of Medical and Biological Informatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Stieltjes, Bram [Quantitative imaging based disease characterization (E011), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To obtain diffusion and microperfusion measures in lymph node metastases of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) using intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging. The obtained IVIM parameters were used to characterize lymph nodes in the staging phase and longitudinal follow-up was performed to evaluate the potential predictive value of these parameters considering therapy response. Methods: Fifteen patients with lymph node metastases of histologically confirmed locally advanced HNSCC were examined using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) before a nonsurgical organ preserving therapy. DWI imaging was performed at 3 T using eight different b-values ranging from 0 to 800 s/mm{sup 2}. Using the IVIM-approach, the perfusion fraction f and the diffusion coefficient D were extracted using a biexponential fit. A follow-up period of 13.5 months was available for all patients. One patient with a macroscopically necrotic lymph node was excluded from analyses. A region of interest (ROI)-analysis was performed in all patients. Results: Locoregional failure (LRF) was present in 3 of 15 patients within 13.5 months follow-up. The initial f-value was significantly higher (p = 0.01) in patients with LRF (14.5 ± 0.6% vs. 7.7 ± 2.6%) compared to patients with locoregional control (LRC). The initial diffusion coefficient D did not differ significantly (p = 0.30) between the two groups (0.97 ± 0.15 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 0.88 ± 0.13 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s). Conclusions: Our results indicate that a high initial perfusion fraction f in lymph nodes may predict poor treatment response in patients with HNSCC due to locoregional failure.

  1. [Studying dysfunctional personality trends among sex offenders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, M; Bénony, H; Chahraoui, K; Juif, C

    2014-10-01

    A review of the literature reveals a consensus on the high prevalence of personality disorders among sexual offenders. Studies show that there is no unique personality profile for sex offenders. In France, little research has been conducted on this population with standardized assessment tools. The objective of the present study is to identify the distribution of personality disorders among sexual offenders using a new French questionnaire, i.e. the TD12. In view of the literature, we postulate that this tool will identify the diversity of personality disorders observed by various authors, but with a higher proportion of cluster B disorders. This study was conducted among 56 men, including 28 sex offenders aged from 21 to 70 years old, and a control group of 28 men without psychiatric disorders. The sex offenders in this study are men convicted or charged with sex offenses of various kinds: exhibitionism, the recording, distribution and possession of pornography depicting minors, aggravated corruption of a minor, sexual assault of a minor, or rape of a minor. They were examined using an inventory of dysfunctional trends recently developed by Rolland and Pichot with the aim of assessing dysfunctional personality styles. The TD-12 questionnaire is composed of 140 items describing thoughts, feelings and behaviors. It is based on the diagnostic criteria of Axis II of DSM IV-TR and consists of twelve scales that match the personality disorders described in this diagnostic manual (ten officially recognized disorders and two additional disorders). From a categorical viewpoint, results indicate rigid dysfunctional trends with regard to avoidant personality disorder in sex offenders compared to the control group (Chi(2)=9.16; P=0.005). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the number of rigid dysfunctional trends. Potentially controllable dysfunctional personality trends are identified for the dependent personality (Chi(2

  2. Segmentation and quantification of ischemic lesions on DWI images with different b-value at high magnetic field (3.0T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Tian, Jie; Dai, Jianping

    2004-04-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is the gold standard for imaging of acute stroke. Today, high-field systems operating at 3T become increasingly available in clinical settings. But, with b-value increasing, lesion SNR of DWI image descends, and anisotropy increases significantly. Aim of the study is to develop an automatic volumetric measure method of ischemic lesions on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) images at high magnetic field, without the disturbance of anisotropy. Using a home-built interactive platform, we rated SNR and anisotropy. The extent of anisotropy was evaluated by the intensity ratio of white matter versus gray matter. Based on this knowledge, we developed an automatic segmentation method, involving firstly non-linear anisotropic diffusion filtering, secondly expert pieces of information applied to determine the scopes of parameters according to different b-value, and finally multi-scale adaptive statistical classification with intensity inhomogeneity correction. Results of the automatic segmentation are compared with lesion delineations by experts, showing the rapid identification of ischemic lesion with accuracy and reproducibility, even in the presence of radio frequency (RF) inhomogeneity. There has been considerable interest in using DWI at 3T to detect ischemic lesion in stroke patients. The proposed method is promising for rapid, accurate, and quantitatively diagnosis of ischemic stroke.

  3. Designing a Classification System for Internet Offenders: Doing Cognitive Distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundersmarck, Steven F.; Durkin, Keith F.; Delong, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    Televised features such as NBC's "To Catch a Predator" have highlighted the growing problem posed by Internet sexual predators. This paper reports on the authors' attempts in designing a classification system for Internet offenders. The classification system was designed based on existing theory, understanding the nature of Internet offenders and…

  4. Psychopathology and Deviant Sexual Arousal in Incarcerated Sexual Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serin, Ralph C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between psychopathology and deviant sexual arousal in sexual offenders (n=65), with approximately equal numbers of rapists and child molesters. Differentiating between rapists, extrafamilial pedophiles, and incest offenders revealed that the relationship between psychopathology and arousal was most apparent for…

  5. Some Essential Environmental Ingredients for Sex Offender Reintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Douglas P.

    2013-01-01

    Until the systematic work on the Good Lives Model (GLM) produced by Tony Ward, not a great deal of conceptual structure existed to provide sex offender treatment specialists with a theoretical underpinning for their work in helping offenders develop a better life as a way to prevent reoffending. However, the work of Ward and colleagues initially…

  6. Variables Affecting Successful Reintegration as Perceived by Offenders and Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffam, Joe; Shinkfield, Alison; Lavelle, Barbara; McPherson, Wenda

    2004-01-01

    Six broad domains were identified as influencing reintegration of ex-offenders including personal conditions, social network/environment, accommodation, criminal justice system, rehabilitation and counselling support, and employment and training support. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 offenders and 22 professionals from criminal…

  7. Adolescent Sex Offenders: Issues in Research and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otey, Emeline M., Ed.; Ryan, Gail D., Ed.

    This document contains an introduction by Richard D. Krugman and five papers from the Adolescent Sex Offender Work Group meeting, which provide an overview of the present status of treatment programs for adolescent sexual offenders, methodological and ethical issues in research on etiology and treatment, and perspectives on research from those…

  8. Organized Crime Offenders in Canada: Risk, Reform, and Recidivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stys, Yvonne; Ruddell, Rick

    2013-01-01

    This study extends our knowledge about the rehabilitation of criminal organization offenders by focusing on their community outcomes upon release, and identifying the risk factors related to reoffending for 332 organized crime offenders released from federal penitentiaries in Canada prior to March 31, 2009. Of that group, 12.7% were readmitted to…

  9. Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents: Profiles of Juvenile Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowder, Melissa H.; Cummings, Jack A.; McKinney, Robert

    2010-01-01

    An exploratory study of resiliency profiles of male and female juvenile offenders committed to a juvenile correctional facility was conducted. The goal of the present study was to examine juvenile offenders' positive characteristics (e.g., adaptability, optimism, self-efficacy, tolerance of differences). To assess positive characteristics and…

  10. Sibling Incest: Treatment of the Family and the Offender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiorgio-Miller, Janet

    1998-01-01

    Examines systemic underpinnings of sibling incest and its relationship to internal and external factors of offending behavior. Describes treatment in context of offenders' families, underscoring poor boundaries, impact on the victim, and necessity of hierarchical reconstruction; argues formulation of a safety plan to prevent future offenses is…

  11. Development of a Denial Scale for Male Incest Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, James T.; Canada, Richard M.; Lim, Mee-Gaik; Jennings, Glen H.

    1998-01-01

    A scale to measure denial among sexual offenders was developed for male incest offenders (N=265). Validity and reliability were tested. Four subscales correspond to the domains of denial: facts, awareness, impact, and responsibility. Development strategy and psychometric analysis are reported. Recommendations for further research are included.…

  12. A Commentary on the Michigan Sex Offender Registration Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lucinda A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the author's comments on the Michigan sex offender registration article "Family Experiences of Young Adult Sex Offender Registration" (Comartin, Kernsmith, & Miles, 2010). The article is an important piece of research that addresses a much neglected and almost invisible population in the annals of research: the families of…

  13. Young Offenders' Perspectives on Their Literacy and Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Thomas; Clegg, Judy; Stackhouse, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research has revealed that the youth offending population has low language ability when assessed on standardized language measures. However, little is known about the perceptions young offenders (YOs) have of their own literacy ability and their communicative interactions with others. Such knowledge might further our understanding of…

  14. Rehabilitation for Young Offenders in Hong Kong Correctional Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Kai Yung; Heng, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    The motto of the Hong Kong Correctional Services Department (CSD) is to "Support Rehabilitative Offenders for a More Inclusive Society." The Hong Kong CSD has developed a correctional system which has placed increasing emphasis on correction and rehabilitation of offenders over the years. This paper describes the efforts of the Hong Kong…

  15. Engaging Scottish Young Offenders in Education through Music and Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kirstin; Overy, Katie

    2010-01-01

    This study examined music and art classes as a way to engage young offenders in education, and to see if such engagement had an effect on their further participation in education, self-esteem, self-control, behaviour and literacy skills. The arts are often discussed as being an inviting and safe method of entry for young offenders who may have had…

  16. A Commentary on the Michigan Sex Offender Registration Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lucinda A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the author's comments on the Michigan sex offender registration article "Family Experiences of Young Adult Sex Offender Registration" (Comartin, Kernsmith, & Miles, 2010). The article is an important piece of research that addresses a much neglected and almost invisible population in the annals of research: the…

  17. Detention Center in Hong Kong: A Young Offender's Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Wing Hong

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a clinical inquiry at how one young male ex-offender described his time in custody, how his time had been constructively spent during detention, and the effect of a detention center order on his offending behavior one year after his discharge. In so doing, it allowed him to talk about his institutionalized experience and to…

  18. Family Experiences of Young Adult Sex Offender Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comartin, Erin B.; Kernsmith, Poco D.; Miles, Bart W.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1994, policies have been instituted throughout the United States that require sex offenders to register their personal information with law enforcement officials (Jacob Wetterling Crimes against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Program, 1994). With the passage of additional laws, this information is now available to the…

  19. Young Female Sex Offenders: Assessment and Treatment Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Jennifer; McRoy, Ruth; Matthews, Bobbie M.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the literature on female sex offenders and presents the results of a nationwide survey of mental health providers on approaches to diagnosing prior sexual abuse history and/or perpetration among juvenile females. Key findings include the lack of research, tools, and literature on young female sex offenders and perceived differences between…

  20. Profile of Incarcerated Juveniles: Comparison of Male and Female Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Don; Martin, Magy; Dell, Rex; Davis, Candice; Guerrieri, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Effective methods of identifying potential juvenile offenders are critical when developing prevention programs within both state and national juvenile justice systems. The characteristics of juvenile offenders in a large juvenile justice system are examined in this study. Participants live in a Midwestern city with a high rate of crime as…

  1. Tracking Offenders: The Child Victim. Bureau of Justice Statistics Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Donald A.; Sedgwick, Jeffrey L., Ed.

    This research focused on the criminal justice system's handling of offenders against children, comparing it with the processing of offenders against all victims. Data were obtained from California, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utah, and Virginia for offenses against children and against all victims in the areas of kidnapping, sexual assault,…

  2. 32 CFR 635.7 - Registration of sex offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Registration of sex offenders. 635.7 Section 635.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW... of sex offenders. Soldiers who are convicted by court-martial for certain sexual offenses must...

  3. Transference and Counter-Transference in Treating Incarcerated Sex Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Brad; Brekke, Karl E.

    1996-01-01

    Explores the processes involved in treating sex offenders. Focuses on how therapists can feel traumatized by this patient population, the dynamism of transference, and tactics used by sex offender patients, such as seduction, imitation, intimidation, and invalidation. Describes ways for therapists to maintain objectivity and use transference…

  4. Variables Affecting Successful Reintegration as Perceived by Offenders and Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffam, Joe; Shinkfield, Alison; Lavelle, Barbara; McPherson, Wenda

    2004-01-01

    Six broad domains were identified as influencing reintegration of ex-offenders including personal conditions, social network/environment, accommodation, criminal justice system, rehabilitation and counselling support, and employment and training support. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 offenders and 22 professionals from criminal…

  5. Young Offenders' Perspectives on Their Literacy and Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Thomas; Clegg, Judy; Stackhouse, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research has revealed that the youth offending population has low language ability when assessed on standardized language measures. However, little is known about the perceptions young offenders (YOs) have of their own literacy ability and their communicative interactions with others. Such knowledge might further our understanding of…

  6. 28 CFR 2.45 - Same; youth offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Same; youth offenders. 2.45 Section 2.45 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.45 Same; youth...

  7. Demographic and personality characteristics of Internet Child Pornography Offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnen, L.; Bulten, B.H.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2009-01-01

    This research study was conducted to map out the demographic and psychological aspects of Internet child pornography offenders. The backgrounds, characteristics, and MMPI profiles of 22 Internet child pornography offenders were statistically compared to those of 112 perpetrators of other offenses. I

  8. Effect of b value and pre-admission of contrast on diagnostic accuracy of 1.5-T breast DWI: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorrius, Monique D.; Dijkstra, Hildebrand [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging - North East Netherlands, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen / University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, EB44, Groningen (Netherlands); Oudkerk, Matthijs [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging - North East Netherlands, Groningen (Netherlands); Sijens, Paul E. [University of Groningen / University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, EB44, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate the effect of the choice of b values and prior use of contrast medium on apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of breast lesions derived from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and on the discrimination between benign and malignant lesions. A literature search of relevant DWI studies was performed. The accuracy of DWI to characterize lesions by using b value ≤600 s/mm{sup 2} and b value >600 s/mm{sup 2} was presented as pooled sensitivity and specificity, and the ADC was calculated for both groups. Lesions were pooled as pre- or post-contrast DWI. Of 198 articles, 26 met the inclusion criteria. Median ADCs were significantly higher (13.2-35.1 %, p < 0.001) for the group of b values ≤600 s/mm{sup 2} compared to >600 s/mm{sup 2}. The sensitivity in both groups was similar (91 % and 89 %, p = 0.495) as well as the specificity (75 % and 84 %, p = 0.237). Contrast medium had no significant effects on the ADCs (p ≥ 0.08). The differentiation between benign and malignant lesions was optimal (58.4 %) for the combination of b = 0 and 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}. The wide variety of b value combinations applied in different studies significantly affects the ADC of breast lesions and confounds quantitative DWI. If only a couple of b values are used, those of b = 0 and 1,000 s/mm{sup 2} are recommended for the best improvement of differentiating between benign and malignant lesions. (orig.)

  9. Differences in Offending Patterns between Adolescent Sex Offenders High or Low in Callous--Unemotional Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawing, Kathryn; Frick, Paul J.; Cruise, Keith R.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated whether callous and unemotional (CU) traits designated a distinct and important group of adolescent sex offender. A sample of 150 detained adolescents (mean age = 15.89, SD = 1.53) with a current sexual offense disposition was assessed with a self-report measure of CU traits and through extensive…

  10. Examining Antisocial Behavioral Antecedents of Juvenile Sexual Offenders and Juvenile Non-Sexual Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCuish, Evan C; Lussier, Patrick; Corrado, Raymond R

    2015-08-01

    In prospective longitudinal studies of juvenile offenders, the presence of multiple developmental pathways of antisocial behaviors has consistently been identified. An "antisocial" type of juvenile sex offender (JSO) has also been identified; however, whether antisocial JSOs follow different antisocial pathways has not been examined. In the current study, differences in antisocial pathways within JSOs and between JSOs and juvenile non-sex offenders (JNSOs) were examined. Data on Canadian male incarcerated adolescent offenders were used to identify whether behavioral antecedents differed within JSOs and between JSOs (n = 51) and JNSOs (n = 94). Using latent class analysis (LCA), three behavioral groups were identified. For both JSOs and JNSOs, there was a Low Antisocial, Overt, and Covert group. Overall, there were important within-group differences in the behavioral patterns of JSOs, but these differences resembled differences in the behavioral patterns of their JNSO counterpart. Risk factors including offense history, abuse history, and family history were more strongly associated with the Overt and Covert groups compared with the Low Antisocial group. Implications for JSO assessment practices were discussed.

  11. The impact of specialized sex offender legislation on community reentry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Cynthia Calkins; Alvarez, Shea; Levenson, Jill

    2008-06-01

    The authors sought to examine the impact of notification and residence restriction statutes on sex offender reintegration. Although previous research has primarily sampled sex offenders receiving treatment, the authors examined the impact of these policies on a broad sample of registered sex offenders subject to notification via the Internet. Findings from a survey of 138 community sex offenders revealed that a high percentage perceived residence restriction and community notification legislation to negatively affect employment, housing, and social relations. Consistent with prior research in this area, these findings suggest that such policies might hamper offenders' efforts toward community reintegration, which ultimately could serve to inflate rates of recidivism. Directions for future research and implications for practice and policy evaluation are discussed.

  12. Moral Disengagement among Serious Juvenile Offenders: A Longitudinal Study of the Relations between Morally Disengaged Attitudes and Offending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Elizabeth P.; Cauffman, Elizabeth; Piquero, Alex R.; Fagan, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the relation between moral disengagement--one's willingness to conditionally endorse transgressive behavior--and ongoing offending in a sample of adolescent male felony offenders (N = 1,169). In addition, the study attempts to rule out callous-unemotional traits as a third variable responsible for observed…

  13. Violent juvenile sex offenders compared with violent juvenile nonsex offenders: explorative findings from the Pittsburgh Youth Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van A.P.; Loeber, R.; Vermeiren, R; Pardini, D.; Bullens, R.A.R.; Doreleijers, T.A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Only a limited number of studies have compared the psychosocial characteristics of juvenile sex offenders and nonsex offenders. The results of these studies have often been contradictory. Furthermore, studies in normal population groups are rare and most of those studies have been conducted in speci

  14. Similarities and Differences between the Criminal Careers of Dutch Juvenile Sex Offenders and Non-Sex Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullens, Ruud; van Wijk, Anton; Mali, Bas

    2006-01-01

    Research was undertaken on the criminal careers of a large group of juvenile sexual and non-sexual offenders (of violence and property) in the Netherlands. Data from police records over a 6-year period from 1996 to 2002 were analysed. Results show that, with the exception of those in the exhibitionist subgroup, young sexual offenders start their…

  15. Empathy and recognition of facial expressions of emotion in sex offenders, non-sex offenders and normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gery, Isabelle; Miljkovitch, Raphaële; Berthoz, Sylvie; Soussignan, Robert

    2009-02-28

    Research conducted on empathy and emotional recognition in sex offenders is contradictory. The present study was aimed to clarify this issue by controlling for some affective and social variables (depression, anxiety, and social desirability) that are presumed to influence emotional and empathic measures, using a staged multicomponent model of empathy. Incarcerated sex offenders (child molesters), incarcerated non-sex offenders, and non-offender controls (matched for age, gender, and education level) performed a recognition task of facial expressions of basic emotions that varied in intensity, and completed various self-rating scales designed to assess distinct components of empathy (perspective taking, affective empathy, empathy concern, and personal distress), as well as depression, anxiety, and social desirability. Sex offenders were less accurate than the other participants in recognizing facial expressions of anger, disgust, surprise and fear, with problems in confusing fear with surprise, and disgust with anger. Affective empathy was the only component that discriminated sex offenders from non-sex offenders and was correlated with accuracy recognition of emotional expressions. Although our findings must be replicated with a larger number of participants, they support the view that sex offenders might have impairments in the decoding of some emotional cues conveyed by the conspecifics' face, which could have an impact on affective empathy.

  16. Is the Sexual Murderer a Unique Type of Offender? A Typology of Violent Sexual Offenders Using Crime Scene Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Jay; Beauregard, Eric; Beech, Anthony; Vettor, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    The empirical literature on sexual homicide has posited the sexual murderer as a unique type of offender who is qualitatively different from other types of offenders. However, recent research has suggested that sexual homicide is a dynamic crime and that sexual assaults can escalate to homicide when specific situational factors are present. This study simultaneously explored the utility of the sexual murderer as a unique type of offender hypothesis and sexual homicide as a differential outcome of sexual assaults hypothesis. This study is based on a sample of 342 males who were convicted of committing a violent sexual offense, which resulted in either physical injury or death of the victim. A series of latent class analyses were performed using crime scene indicators in an attempt to identify discrete groups of sexual offenders. In addition, the effects of modus operandi, situational factors, and offender characteristics on each group were investigated. Results suggest that both hypotheses are supported. A group of offenders was identified who almost exclusively killed their victims and demonstrated a lethal intent by the choice of their offending behavior. Moreover, three other groups of sex offenders were identified with a diverse lethality level, suggesting that these cases could end up as homicide when certain situational factors were present.

  17. Trends in Offender Vocational and Education Programs: A Literature Search with Program Development Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Sylvia D.

    The American penal system of placing criminal offenders in institutions has evolved from two major goals: (1) to punish offenders as an example to the rest of the community, and (2) to rehabilitate offenders into the community. Since the mid-1960's there has been a trend toward placing offenders in the community and away from isolating them in…

  18. Coping Style and Psychological Health among Adolescent Prisoners: A Study of Young and Juvenile Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, J.L.; Boustead, R.; Ireland, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    The current study explores the role of coping styles as a predictor of poor psychological health among adolescent offenders. It presents the first study to compare young and juvenile offenders. Two hundred and three male offenders took part: 108 young (18-21 years) and 95 juvenile (15-17 years) offenders. All completed the General Health…

  19. High-risk sexual offenders: an examination of sexual fantasy, sexual paraphilia, psychopathy, and offence characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Michael; Freimuth, Tabatha; Hutton, Erin L; Carpenter, Tara; Agar, Ava D; Logan, Matt

    2013-01-01

    High-risk sexual offenders are a complex and heterogeneous group of offenders about whom researchers, clinicians, and law enforcement agencies still know relatively little. In response to the paucity of information that is specifically applicable to high-risk offenders, the present study investigated the potential influence of sexual fantasy, sexual paraphilia, and psychopathy on the offending behaviour of 139 of the highest risk sexual offenders in one province of Canada. The sample included 41 child molesters, 42 rapists, 18 rapist/molesters, 30 mixed offenders, and 6 "other" sexual offenders. Two offenders could not be categorized by type due to insufficient file information. Data analyses revealed significant differences between offender types for a number of criminal history variables including past sexual and nonsexual convictions, number of victims, weapon use, and age of offending onset. Further, there were significant differences between offender types for sexual fantasy themes, paraphilia diagnoses, and levels of psychopathy. For example, results revealed that offenders' sexual fantasies were significantly more likely to correspond with the specific type of index sexual offence that they had committed. Further, offenders scoring high in psychopathy were significantly more likely to have a sadistic paraphilia than offenders with either low or moderate psychopathy scores. Results from the current study provide a refined and informed understanding of sexual offending behaviour with important implications for future research, assessment, and treatment, as well as law enforcement practices when working with high-risk sexual offenders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting Offender-Generated Exchange Rates: Implications for a Theory of Sentence Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, David C.; Wood, Peter B.; Mooney, Jennifer L.; Minor, Kevin I.

    2005-01-01

    We solicited offender-generated exchange rates between prison and several noncustodial sanctions from a sample of 588 offenders currently serving community-based punishments. We then regressed these exchange rates on demographic, attitudinal, and correctional experience indicators. Males, Blacks, older offenders, offenders with prison experience,…

  1. Brief Report: The Sexual and Physical Abuse Histories of Offenders with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, W.; Steptoe, L.; Haut, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Some studies have found higher rates of childhood sexual abuse in sex offenders while others have failed to find such relationships. Method: This study reviews the sexual and physical abuse histories of 156 male sex offenders with intellectual disability (ID), 126 non-sexual male offenders with ID and 27 female offenders with ID.…

  2. 28 CFR 2.4 - Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Same: Youth offenders and juvenile... RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.4 Same: Youth offenders and juvenile delinquents. Committed youth offenders and...

  3. Fantasy Management in sex offender treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kris Vanhoeck; Els Van Daele; Kim Gykiere

    2011-01-01

    Sexual fantasies of sex offenders are a difficult therapeutic issue. First, there is not much we know about sexual fantasies in general. In the second place, the question rises as to what role sexual fantasies play as a risk factor in sexual abuse. And third, there's the difficult task for therapists on how they may affect sexual fantasies of their client (if they choose at all to address the issue). In this article we reflect on how to manage fantasies, which possibly sustain a relapse arous...

  4. [Adolescents engaging in sexually offending behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Työläjärvi, Marja; Eronen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Sexually offending behavior by adolescents may be directed towards children, age-mates and adults. Neurocognitive and psychiatric disorders and the associated inability to age-related interpersonal relationships and inability to control the sexual desires activated during adolescence may lead a young person to seek inappropriate sexual satisfaction from children. Sometimes the offenses are part of antisocial development. Interventions should be focused on the distorted cognitions and attitudes maintaining the injurious sexual behavior, and on the risk of criminal behavior in general. Pharmacological therapy, mainly with SSRI drugs, has also been tested in adolescents.

  5. Is Coersive Treatment of Offenders Morally Acceptable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Is it morally acceptable to instigate criminal offenders to participate in rehabilitative treatment by offering treatment in return for early release from prison? Some theorists have supported such treatment schemes by pointing to the beneficial consequences that follow from the treatment. Others...... have suggested that the schemes are unacceptably coercive, which implies that consent becomes an illusion. This paper argues that the discussion—with clear parallels to debates of other healthcare treatment offers in medical ethics—has adopted a too narrow focus. By failing to consider the question...

  6. Accuracy of Whole-Body DWI for Metastases Screening in a Diverse Group of Malignancies: Comparison With Conventional Cross-Sectional Imaging and Nuclear Scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruthikunnan, Samir Mustaffa; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Karegowda, Lakshmikanth Halegubbi

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the role of whole-body (WB) DWI as a screening modality for the detection of metastases and to compare it to conventional cross-sectional imaging modalities or nuclear scintigraphy in a population with various histopathologic malignancies. WB DWI and conventional imaging (CT, MRI, or scintigraphy) were performed for patients with known malignancies for metastatic workup, and these patients were followed up for a period of 1 year. Two radiologists assessed WB DW images separately, and conventional images were assessed by the senior radiologist. The metastatic lesions were classified into four regions: liver, lung, skeletal system, and lymph nodes. The reference standard was considered on the basis of histopathologic confirmation or clinical follow-up of the metastatic lesions. WB DWI was slightly inferior to conventional imaging modalities for the detection of hepatic metastases (sensitivity, 86.6% vs 93.3%; specificity, 91.6% vs 95.8%; and accuracy, 89.7% vs 94.8%) and skeletal metastases (sensitivity, 81.8% vs 89.4%; specificity, 86.4% vs 94.3%; and accuracy, 85.2% vs 93.0%); however, the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.625 for hepatic metastases and p = 0.0953 for skeletal metastases, McNemar test). WB DWI was statistically significantly inferior to conventional imaging for the detection of lymph node metastases (sensitivity, 74.0% vs 81.5%; specificity, 87.9% vs 90.1%; accuracy, 81.4% vs 86.0%; p = 0.0389). WB DWI was statistically significantly inferior to conventional imaging for the detection of pulmonary metastases (sensitivity, 33.3% vs 100.0%; specificity, 90.9% vs 100.0%; accuracy, 60.8% vs 100.0%; p = 0.045). WB DWI can be used for screening hepatic and skeletal metastases, but its reliability as the sole imaging sequence for the detection of lymph nodal and pulmonary metastases is poor and, at present, it cannot replace conventional imaging modalities.

  7. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (IIDL): Conventional and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) findings in 42 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koelblinger, Claus; Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Kubin, Klaus [CT/MRI Institut Dr. Klaus Kubin, Salzburg (Austria); Wallner-Blazek, Mirja [Department of Neurology, Medical University Graz, Graz (Austria); Hauwe, Luc van den [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Macedo, Leonardo [Department of Radiology, CEDIMAGEM, Centro - Juiz de Fora (Brazil); Puchner, Stefan B. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Thurnher, Majda M., E-mail: majda.thurnher@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR imaging characteristics with conventional and advanced MR imaging techniques in patients with IIDL. Methods: MR images of the brain in 42 patients (20 male, 22 female) with suspected or known multiple sclerosis (MS) from four institutions were retrospectively analyzed. Lesions were classified into five different subtypes: (1) ring-like lesions; (2) Balo-like lesions; (3) diffuse infiltrating lesions; (4) megacystic lesions; and (5) unclassified lesions. The location, size, margins, and signal intensities on T1WI, T2WI, and diffusion-weighted images (DWI), and the ADC values/ratios for all lesions, as well as the contrast enhancement pattern, and the presence of edema, were recorded. Results: There were 30 ring-like, 10 Balo-like, 3 megacystic-like and 16 diffuse infiltrating-like lesions were detected. Three lesions were categorized as unclassified lesions. Of the 30 ring-like lesions, 23 were hypointense centrally with a hyperintense rim. The mean ADC, measured centrally, was 1.50 ± 0.41 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. The mean ADC in the non-enhancing layers of the Balo-like lesions was 2.29 ± 0.17 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, and the mean ADC in enhancing layers was 1.03 ± 0.30 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. Megacystic lesions had a mean ADC of 2.14 ± 0.26 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. Peripheral strong enhancement with high signal on DWI was present in all diffuse infiltrating lesions. Unclassified lesions showed a mean ADC of 1.43 ± 0.13 mm{sup 2}/s. Conclusion: Restriction of diffusion will be seen in the outer layers of active inflammation/demyelination in Balo-like lesions, in the enhancing part of ring-like lesions, and at the periphery of infiltrative-type lesions.

  8. Self-harm in young offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschmann, Rohan; Coffey, Carolyn; Moran, Paul; Hearps, Stephen; Degenhardt, Louisa; Kinner, Stuart A; Patton, George

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence and correlates of self-harm and suicidal behavior in 515 young offenders (mean age 17.3 years, SD = 1.7) serving community-based orders (CBOs; n = 242) or custodial sentences (n = 273) in Victoria, Australia, are described. Results from structured interviews showed that 83 (16.1%) participants reported self-harming in the previous 6 months, and this was more common among those serving custodial sentences than those serving CBOs (19.4% vs. 12.4%; OR 3.10, 95% CI: 1.74-5.55). Multiple incidents were more common in females and 24% (95% CI: 19-39) of participants who had self-harmed reported having done so with suicidal intent. Self-harm was associated with recent bullying victimization, expulsion from school, past year violent victimization, cannabis dependence, and risk-taking behavior in the preceding year. The epidemiological profile of self-harm in this population appears to be distinct from that seen in the general population. Young offenders who self-harm are a vulnerable group with high rates of psychiatric morbidity, substance misuse problems, and social risk factors. They may benefit from targeted psychological interventions designed specifically to address impulsivity, delivered both within-and during the transition from-the youth justice system.

  9. Offense related characteristics and psychosexual development of juvenile sex offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Wijk Anton PH

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: This article reports on offense related characteristics and the psychosexual development in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders as measured by the Global Assessment Instrument for Juvenile Sex Offenders (GAIJSO. The predictive validity of these characteristics for persistent (sexual offensive behavior in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders was investigated. Methods: One hundred seventy four sex offenders (mean age 14.9 SD 1.4 referred by the police to the Dutch Child Protection Board were examined. Offense related characteristics were assessed by means of the GAIJSO and the BARO (a global assessment tool for juvenile delinquents, and criminal careers of the subjects were ascertained from official judicial records. Results: Serious need for comprehensive diagnostics were found on the domains sexual offense and psychosexual development in juvenile sex offenders, especially in the group of child molesters. These youngsters displayed more internalizing and (psychosexual developmental problems and their sexual offense was more alarming as compared to the other juvenile sex offender subgroups. Although one third of the juveniles had already committed one or more sex offenses prior to the index offense, at follow up (mean follow up period: 36 months SD 18 months almost no sexual recidivism was found (0.6% of the entire sample. However, a substantial proportion of the entire sample of juvenile sex offenders showed non-sexual (55.6% and violent recidivism (32.1%. Several predictors for a history of multiple sex offending and non-sexual recidivism were identified. Conclusion: This study revealed numerous problems in juvenile sex offenders. Assessment using the GAIJSO is helpful in order to identify indicators for extensive diagnostic assessment. In order to investigate the predictive validity for sexual reoffending a longer follow up period is necessary.

  10. Offense related characteristics and psychosexual development of juvenile sex offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart-Kerkhoffs, Lisette 't A; Doreleijers, Theo AH; Jansen, Lucres MC; van Wijk, Anton PH; Bullens, Ruud AR

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This article reports on offense related characteristics and the psychosexual development in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders as measured by the Global Assessment Instrument for Juvenile Sex Offenders (GAIJSO). The predictive validity of these characteristics for persistent (sexual) offensive behavior in subgroups of juvenile sex offenders was investigated. Methods: One hundred seventy four sex offenders (mean age 14.9 SD 1.4) referred by the police to the Dutch Child Protection Board were examined. Offense related characteristics were assessed by means of the GAIJSO and the BARO (a global assessment tool for juvenile delinquents), and criminal careers of the subjects were ascertained from official judicial records. Results: Serious need for comprehensive diagnostics were found on the domains sexual offense and psychosexual development in juvenile sex offenders, especially in the group of child molesters. These youngsters displayed more internalizing and (psychosexual) developmental problems and their sexual offense was more alarming as compared to the other juvenile sex offender subgroups. Although one third of the juveniles had already committed one or more sex offenses prior to the index offense, at follow up (mean follow up period: 36 months SD 18 months) almost no sexual recidivism was found (0.6% of the entire sample). However, a substantial proportion of the entire sample of juvenile sex offenders showed non-sexual (55.6%) and violent recidivism (32.1%). Several predictors for a history of multiple sex offending and non-sexual recidivism were identified. Conclusion: This study revealed numerous problems in juvenile sex offenders. Assessment using the GAIJSO is helpful in order to identify indicators for extensive diagnostic assessment. In order to investigate the predictive validity for sexual reoffending a longer follow up period is necessary. PMID:19594889

  11. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  12. Features of trust in other people in juvenile offenders

    OpenAIRE

    Astanina N.B.

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the results of a comparative study of trust in other people in juvenile offender and law-abiding teens. The study involved 113 young offenders (from detention center for juvenile offenders, special closed schools, juvenile correctional facilities of Voronezh and Lipetsk regions) and 106 law-abiding teens, 13 to 18 years old. We identified the types of trust in other people in the two groups of adolescents. We analyzed the specifics of trust in other people in the group of ...

  13. From child pornography offending to child sexual abuse : A review of child pornography offender characteristics and risks for cross-over

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtepen, J.A.B.M.; Sijtsema, J.J.; Bogaerts, S.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, concrete directions are provided for individual risk assessment, treatment planning, and future research on child pornography offending. First, based on reviewing offender characteristics, including demographics, socio-affective difficulties, cognitive distortions and psychosexual is

  14. Evidence for superior neurobiological and behavioral inhibitory control abilities in non-offending as compared to offending pedophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärgel, Christian; Massau, Claudia; Weiß, Simone; Walter, Martin; Borchardt, Viola; Krueger, Tillmann H C; Tenbergen, Gilian; Kneer, Jonas; Wittfoth, Matthias; Pohl, Alexander; Gerwinn, Hannah; Ponseti, Jorge; Amelung, Till; Beier, Klaus M; Mohnke, Sebastian; Walter, Henrik; Schiffer, Boris

    2017-02-01

    Neurobehavioral models of pedophilia and child sexual offending suggest a pattern of temporal and in particular prefrontal disturbances leading to inappropriate behavioral control and subsequently an increased propensity to sexually offend against children. However, clear empirical evidence for such mechanisms is still missing. Using a go/nogo paradigm in combination with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we compared behavioral performance and neural response patterns among three groups of men matched for age and IQ: pedophiles with (N = 40) and without (N = 37) a history of hands-on sexual offences against children as well as healthy non-offending controls (N = 40). As compared to offending pedophiles, non-offending pedophiles exhibited superior inhibitory control as reflected by significantly lower rate of commission errors. Group-by-condition interaction analysis also revealed inhibition-related activation in the left posterior cingulate and the left superior frontal cortex that distinguished between offending and non-offending pedophiles, while no significant differences were found between pedophiles and healthy controls. Both areas showing distinct activation pattern among pedophiles play a critical role in linking neural networks that relate to effective cognitive functioning. Data therefore suggest that heightened inhibition-related recruitment of these areas as well as decreased amount of commission errors is related to better inhibitory control in pedophiles who successfully avoid committing hands-on sexual offences against children. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1092-1104, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Diagnostic performance of PWI/DWI MRI parameters in discriminating hyperacute versus acute ischaemic stroke: Finding the best thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldan-Valadez, E., E-mail: ernest.roldan@usa.net [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Medica Sur Hospital and Clinic Foundation, Mexico City (Mexico); Gonzalez-Gutierrez, O.; Martinez-Lopez, M. [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Medica Sur Hospital and Clinic Foundation, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2012-03-15

    Aim: To determine the accuracy of the perfusion/diffusion-weighted imaging (PWI/DWI) parameters [time to peak (TTP), mean time to peak (MTT), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) maps]; in the evaluation of acute versus hyperacute ischaemic stroke. Materials and methods: Fifty-five patients with symptomatic hyperacute (first 6 h) or acute (7-24 h) ischaemic stroke underwent diffusion and perfusion evaluation. Statistical analysis included Student's t-test, receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), TTP, MTT, CBV, and CBF; correlation, linear, and logistic regression analysis. Results: Area under receiver operating characteristics (AUROC) analysis identified the ADC cut-off value 385 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s, MTT at 109.5%, TTP at 3.05 s, CBV at 129%, and CBF at 98.5% (the record of the time of onset was considered the reference standard). The best performance corresponded to TTP, which showed a sensitivity of 0.94 and specificity of 0.88 (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Based on the present findings, hyperacute penumbra is reliably defined with a TTP >3 s with no visible changes in diffusion. ADC, rCBF, and rCBV are not useful for discriminating between acute and hyperacute ischaemic stroke.

  16. Agency, relatedness, inner peace and problem-solving in sexual offending: How sexual offenders prioritise and operationalise their Good Lives conceptions.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Georgia; Jane L Wood

    2008-01-01

    Untreated imprisoned sexual offenders (N = 42) completed interviews and questionnaires to establish the priority they assigned, at the time of their offending, to three "goods" from the good lives model and to gain insight into how they operationalized these goods at that time. The relationship between the priorities offenders assigned to the goods of ( a) agency, ( b) relatedness, and ( c) inner peace at the time of offending and their problem-solving ability was also explored. A measure of ...

  17. Prediction of Offending: SARPO—The Czech Tool for Assessment of Offenders' Criminogenic Risk and Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Jiricka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past three decades, developed prison and probation services have paid large attention to risk assessment tools predicting the probability of reoffending. This not only resulted in a more accurate classification of offenders, but also in a more informed choice of effective intervention helping to reduce relapse in offending behaviour. In terms of reducing the risk of reoffending intervention programmes considering the principle of criminogenic risks, needs, and responsivity proved successful, while imprisonment on its own, where intervention methods were not applied, showed only limited effectiveness. For historical reasons, the Czech Prison Service underwent a different development, although its objectives were similar. It was not until the beginning of a new millennium when the Czech prison system together with a newly created probation service decided to seek new methods of assessing offenders based on criminogenic risks. This paper presents development and results of the first Czech tool used for assessment of offenders’ risks and needs, called SARPO (from the Czech abbreviation of Complex Analysis of Offenders’ Risk and Needs.

  18. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI in Locoregional Therapy Outcome Prediction and Response Assessment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC: The New Era of Functional Imaging Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes M. Ludwig

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reliable response criteria are critical for the evaluation of therapeutic response in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Current response assessment is mainly based on: (1 changes in size, which is at times unreliable and lag behind the result of therapy; and (2 contrast enhancement, which can be difficult to quantify in the presence of benign post-procedural changes and in tumors presenting with a heterogeneous pattern of enhancement. Given these challenges, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI have been recently investigated, aiding specificity to locoregional therapy response assessment and outcome prediction. Briefly, DWI quantifies diffusion of water occurring naturally at a cellular level (Brownian movement, which is restricted in multiple neoplasms because of high cellularity. Disruption of cellular integrity secondary to therapy results in increased water diffusion across the injured membranes. This review will provide an overview of the current literature on DWI therapy response assessment and outcome prediction in HCC following treatment with locoregional therapies.

  19. Community reintegration of sex offenders of children in new zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Gemma; Seymour, Fred; Lambie, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Reintegration of offenders following incarceration is most successful if matched to the needs of offenders, victims, and the community. This study explored child sex offenders' expectations for and experiences of reintegration into the community. A longitudinal design was used in which semistructured interviews covered issues identified in the literature as being related to reintegration. Nine offenders were interviewed within 1 week prior to release, 3 months post release, and 6 months post release. Interviews were analysed using thematic analyses producing six key themes. The interviews revealed that most of the participants feared their release from prison into the community and once released struggled to live in society. Overall, reintegration planning was simplistic and aimed primarily to manage risk factors rather than promote reintegration. Those participants who reported most satisfaction with their adjustment following release had more comprehensive reintegration plans, which enabled them to visualise what life would be like after release.

  20. Minor offenders in Mexico Menores infractores en México

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martha E. Izquierdo

    2012-01-01

    One of the major issues currently being debated around young offenders is that if it is a social or legal problem, since this problem should be considered not from the legal point of view but from the...

  1. Psychological characteristics of juvenile offenders with personal immaturity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    E.G. Dozortseva; A.A. Fedonkina

    2013-01-01

    .... We describe the prevalence of personal immaturity among juvenile offenders. We analyze individual psychological characteristics specific to the minors with personal immaturity and characterize the phenomenon of personal immaturity itself...

  2. Pharmacologic treatment of sex offenders with paraphilic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Frederico Duarte; Delavenne, Heloise Garcia; Assumpção, Alessandra de Fátima Almeida; Thibaut, Florence

    2013-05-01

    Sexual offending is both a social and a public health issue. Evidence demonstrates that a combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches may reduce or even eliminate deviant sexual behavior in sex offenders with paraphilic disorders. In this article, we will review pharmacological treatment options for sex offenders with paraphilias. Both serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and antiandrogen treatments have been used with reported success in decreasing recidivism. SSRIs have been used in mild types of paraphilias and juvenile paraphilias. Antiandrogen treatments seem to be effective in severe sex offenders with paraphilic disorders in order to reduce victimization. Combined pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment is associated with better efficacy. Imaging studies may improve the knowledge of paraphilic disorders and the mechanisms of action of current treatments. In spite of existing evidence, there is a need for independent, large-scale and good quality studies assessing the long-term efficacy and tolerance of treatments.

  3. Group Work with Parents of Adolescent Sex Offenders: Intervention Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bennett

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Interest and attention to adolescent sex offenders has increased greatly over the past twenty years. Allegations of adolescent sexual improprieties are known to have profound and disruptive repercussions on the entire family, especially the parents of the offending adolescent. Adolescent criminal acts, in general, result in a myriad of disconcerting emotions experienced by the parent(s. Although a great deal of attention is currently being focused upon treatment of adolescent sex offenders, little is being written about intervention with parents of these adolescents. This paper reviews the clinical and research literature pertaining to the family dimensions of male adolescent sexual offending behavior and offers a set of guidelines for use in group practice with parents of these adolescent.

  4. Sadism in sexual offenders: evidence for dimensionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokros, Andreas; Schilling, Frank; Weiss, Karien; Nitschke, Joachim; Eher, Reinhard

    2014-03-01

    Recurrent and intense sexual fantasies and urges that circle around the infliction of pain or humiliation on another human being may predispose individuals toward acts of sexual aggression against nonconsenting victims. Consequently, sexual sadism is a paraphilia with particular relevance for forensic psychology and psychiatry. Using behavioral indicators derived from crime scene actions as well as clinical data, we sought in the present study to identify the latent structure of the disorder. We analyzed data from a national sample of male sexual offenders from Austria (N = 1,020). In addition to latent profile analysis, 3 conceptually different taxometric methods were applied. The results of the analyses were more in accordance with a dimensional interpretation than with a categorical distinction. That is, sadistic conduct in sexual offenses is likely an extreme form of coercion, but not a qualitatively different entity. The implications with respect to the current debate on the diagnostic criteria for sadism are discussed.

  5. Mentally Disordered Non-Psychotic Criminal Offenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Peter; Gabrielsen, Gorm; Kørner, Alex

    2013-01-01

    as sanctions in criminal cases, the court will request a psychiatric report. They may furthermore ask a medical expert consultation board, the Danish Medico-Legal Council, for an opinion on the mental status of the defendant. Aims: To describe a sample of offenders falling under §69 and the use of the section...... and the final verdicts on socio-demographic, health and criminal items, and the data were computerized. Results: The sample was characterized by severe criminality and mental disorder. Forty-six percent (138/298) were sentenced by the court to a psychiatric measure instead of punishment. Conclusions......: The results document that §69 of the Danish Penal Code is used as intended by the law....

  6. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Heidenhain variant: case report with MRI (DWI) findings; Doenca de Creutzfeldt-Jakob forma Heidenhain: relato de caso com achados de ressonancia magnetica e DWI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda, Walter Oleschko; Bordignon, Kelly C.; Milano, Jeronimo B.; Ramina, Ricardo [Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: warruda@speednet.com.br

    2004-06-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a pre senile dementia characterized by rapidly progressive mental deterioration, myoclonic jerking, and other less common neurological signs. Few accentuates cases have been described in Brazil. A 54-year-old white woman, was admitted in our service with a month history of progressive, bilateral cortical blindness. After admission, she developed right partial motor seizures (right facial, upper and lower limbs), she became progressively aphasic (mixed aphasia). Seizures were controlled with phenytoine, but she developed choreoathetotic movements on her right dimidium, with partial control after introduction of chlorpromazine 25 mg q/d. She could no longer stand up or walk due to severe ataxia. The first EEG (October, 2001) showed left hemisphere severe seizure activity (status epilepticus partial is). She was delivered home with enteral nutrition, phenytoine, chlorpromazine and mepacrine 100 mg q d. The following laboratory tests were negative or normal: blood series, platelets, ESR, kidney and liver function, copper, ceruloplasmin, Vedril, HIV, HTLV-1, lactate, and cerebral Dsa (performed in other service). A spinal tap with normal opening pressure was perform and CSFR examination was normal. CSFR 14-3-3 protein was positive, CSF specific neuronal enolase 7.5 ng/ml(normal). Genetic study of PRNP gene did not disclosed any known mutation. A MRI (October, 2001) showed areas of hyperintense signal (T 2 and FLAIR) without Gd-enhancement on T1, in the left temporal lobe and in both occipital lobes; basal ganglia have a normal appearance. DWI imaging showed bright areas at the same sites. An EEG (March, 2002) disclosed a periodical sharp triphasic waves pattern, suggestive of CJD. A second MRI (April, 2002) showed mild generalized atrophy, no ventricular dilatation, and the hyperintense sites disappeared. She remained clinically stable and under use of chlorpromazine and mepacrine until she died due to pulmonary complications on April

  7. Understanding the sexual fantasies of sex offenders and their correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Bartels, Ross M.; Gannon, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Sexual fantasy is proposed to be an important factor in sexual offending. However, the existing research on this topic suggests that its role is multifaceted and interrelated with various other important factors associated with sexual offending. In this paper, we begin by examining some of the conceptual and definitional issues regarding the term ‘deviant sexual fantasy’. We then discuss the literature relating to sexual fantasies and some of its chief correlates, including: (1) sexual arousa...

  8. Improving Negative Emotion Recognition in Young Offenders Reduces Subsequent Crime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Hubble

    Full Text Available Children with antisocial behaviour show deficits in the perception of emotional expressions in others that may contribute to the development and persistence of antisocial and aggressive behaviour. Current treatments for antisocial youngsters are limited in effectiveness. It has been argued that more attention should be devoted to interventions that target neuropsychological correlates of antisocial behaviour. This study examined the effect of emotion recognition training on criminal behaviour.Emotion recognition and crime levels were studied in 50 juvenile offenders. Whilst all young offenders received their statutory interventions as the study was conducted, a subgroup of twenty-four offenders also took part in a facial affect training aimed at improving emotion recognition. Offenders in the training and control groups were matched for age, SES, IQ and lifetime crime level. All offenders were tested twice for emotion recognition performance, and recent crime data were collected after the testing had been completed.Before the training there were no differences between the groups in emotion recognition, with both groups displaying poor fear, sadness and anger recognition. After the training fear, sadness and anger recognition improved significantly in juvenile offenders in the training group. Although crime rates dropped in all offenders in the 6 months following emotion testing, only the group of offenders who had received the emotion training showed a significant reduction in the severity of the crimes they committed.The study indicates that emotion recognition can be relatively easily improved in youths who engage in serious antisocial and criminal behavior. The results suggest that improved emotion recognition has the potential to reduce the severity of reoffending.

  9. Implicit Theories and Offender Representativeness in Judgments About Sexual Crime

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, CA; Bartels, RM

    2016-01-01

    Implicit theories structure the way people understand and respond to various human actions. Typically, people believe attributes are either fixed (entitists) or malleable (incrementalists). The present study aimed to examine: (a) whether attitudes towards sexual offenders differ depending upon one’s implicit theory about human nature and sexual offenders, and (b) whether implicit theories are associated with judgments made about different types of child abuser. A sample of 252 community parti...

  10. Alcohol Use and HIV Risk among Juvenile Drug Court Offenders

    OpenAIRE

    Tolou-Shams, Marina; Houck, Christopher D.; Nugent, Nicole; Conrad, Selby M.; REYES, AYANARIS; Brown, Larry K.

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile drug courts (JDC) largely focus on marijuana and other drug use interventions. Yet, JDC offenders engage in other high-risk behaviors, such as alcohol use and sexual risk behaviors, which can compromise their health, safety and drug court success. An examination of alcohol use and sexual risk behaviors among 52 male substance abusing young offenders found that over 50% were using alcohol, 37% reported current marijuana use and one-third of all sexual intercourse episodes were unprote...

  11. Implementing a health promotion model in a young offender institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sarah; Carter, Helen

    Young people in young offender institutions experience more physical and mental health problems than the general population. This article explores how the primary nursing service at HM Young Offenders Institution Huntercombe used national policy as a framework for managing change. In outlining the challenges and opportunities that influence practice development, we hope to demystify nursing in a prison setting, which is a hidden and often misunderstood aspect of healthcare.

  12. Prevalence of Mental Disorders and Recidivism in Young Offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Machado Dias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies report that incarcerated young offenders show a high rate of psychiatric disorders whereas associations between specific psychiatric disorders and recidivism remain unknown. The Brazilian legal system has created a unique opportunity for the study of this issue when consider young offenders not that guilty in spite of the severity of the crime, settling in three years the maximum period of incarceration. This study aims to determine the rate of psychiatric disorders in a cohort of incarcerated young offenders and evaluate the possible psychiatric connections of primary offenders and recidivism. A group of 898 incarcerated young offenders at Fundação Casa answered psychiatric interviews and was diagnosed according to the criteria of ICD-10. Statistic connections were analyzed using the tests of Pearson and Cramer. The cohort was comprised of 619 primaries and 267 recidivists. 'Psychoactive Substance Use' and 'Disorders of Adult Personality and Behavior' categories were related to recidivism, whereas 'Organic Mental Disorders', 'Mood Disorders', and 'Stress-related Disorders' were related to primary offenders. Discriminating disorders were the most likely to represent reactions to primary incarceration. In relation to associations that might represent predictors of crime, it became highly suggestive that substance abuse is the main cause of incarceration for the entire cohort.

  13. Juvenile Sex Offending Through a Developmental Life Course Criminology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussier, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    Current American policies and responses to juvenile sex offending have been criticized for being based on myths, misconceptions, and unsubstantiated claims. In spite of the criticism, no organizing framework has been proposed to guide policy development with respect to the prevention of juvenile sex offending. This article proposes a developmental life course (DLC) criminology perspective to investigate the origins, development, and termination of sex offending among youth. It also provides a review of the current state of knowledge regarding various parameters characterizing the development of sex offending (e.g., prevalence, age of onset, frequency, persistence, continuity in adulthood, and versatility). The review highlights some heterogeneity across these developmental parameters suggesting the presence of different sex offending patterns among youth. In fact, it is proposed that, based on the current knowledge, such heterogeneity can be accounted for by a dual taxonomy of adolescents involved in sexual offenses: (a) the adolescent-limited and (b) the high-rate/slow-desister. The DLC criminology approach and the dual taxonomy are proposed as organizing frameworks to conduct prospective longitudinal research to better understand the origins and development of sex offending and to guide policy development and responses to at-risk youth and those who have committed sexual offenses.

  14. The relationship between maltreatment victimisation and sexual and violent offending: differences between adolescent offenders with and without intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Put, C.E.; Asscher, J.J.; Wissink, I.B.; Stams, G.J.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Juveniles with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more often victims of maltreatment and more often perpetrators of abuse than juveniles without ID. Because previous research on the relationship between maltreatment victimisation and subsequent offending behaviour was primarily performed

  15. Forgive and Forget, or Forgive and Regret? Whether Forgiveness Leads to Less or More Offending Depends on Offender Agreeableness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, James K; Russell, V Michelle

    2016-05-01

    How does forgiveness predict the likelihood of reoffending? One survey study, one experiment, one 4-year longitudinal study, and one 2-week diary study examined the implications of forgiveness for reoffending in relationships. In all four studies, agreeableness interacted with partner forgiveness to predict subsequent offending; partner forgiveness was negatively associated with subsequent offending among more agreeable people but positively associated with subsequent offending among less agreeable people. Furthermore, Study 4 demonstrated a unique mechanism of each simple effect; relatively agreeable people engaged in fewer transgressions against more forgiving partners because they felt obligated to refrain from transgressing against such partners whereas relatively disagreeable people engaged in more transgressions against more forgiving partners because they perceived those partners were less easily angered. These studies indicate that completely understanding the intrapersonal and interpersonal consequences of forgiveness requires recognizing the dyadic nature of forgiveness and attending to qualities of the offender.

  16. Detained Male Adolescent Offender's Emotional, Physical and Sexual Maltreatment Profiles and Their Associations to Psychiatric Disorders and Criminal Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebi, Marcel; Linhart, Susanne; Thun-Hohenstein, Leonhard; Bessler, Cornelia; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Plattner, Belinda

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyse patterns of emotional, physical and sexual maltreatment in detained male juvenile offenders using latent class analysis (LCA). The association of maltreatment related LCA profiles with psychopathology and criminal behaviors was also studied. LCA based on the items of the Child Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) assessing childhood emotional, physical, and sexual abuse was performed in a sample of 260 male adolescent offenders (mean age = 16.5 years, SD = 1.29 years). Chi square tests and general linear models were performed to assess the associations of CTQ profiles with categorical interview-based psychiatric disorders, dimensional Youth Self-Report problem scales, and officially registered offenses. LCA suggested a three class solution: (1) a no/mild trauma (NM; 76 %) (2) emotional and physical trauma (EP; 18 %) and (3) emotional, physical, and sexual trauma (EPS; 8 %). The classes EP and EPS were related to a variety of psychiatric disorders and self-reported mental health problems. Furthermore, EPS showed higher presence of a subsequent re-incarceration compared to NM. A majority of sexually abused juveniles also experienced emotional and physical abuse reflecting gravely disturbed family systems. Multiple abuse in childhood was associated with a broad variety of disorders including externalizing disorders and repeated criminal offending. Such findings indicate that trauma assessment is also relevant in externalizing youth. A comprehensive treatment approach for detained boys with multiple abuse experiences is required targeting both mental health needs and the reduction of criminal behaviors.

  17. The evaluation of violent thinking in adult offenders and non-offenders using the Maudsley Violence Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Julian; Bowes, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    The Maudsley Violence Questionnaire (MVQ) was designed to measure explicit rules and beliefs associated with violence. Previous studies with young people and offenders with mental disorder found the MVQ to be a valid and reliable measure of violent thinking. This study explores the use of the MVQ with a 'normal' (non-offender) population and an offender population without mental illness in order to evaluate how the MVQ's subscales related to violence within these groups. The MVQ was given to 78 adult male participants along with a measure of self-reported violence; demographic information and criminal history were also recorded. Thirty-five of the participants were convicted adult male offenders resident of an adult male closed prison in South Wales; 43 were volunteers from the staff group in the same prison. The MVQ factors were compared with self-reported violence and with officially recorded violent convictions. Although both subscales of the MVQ related to self-reported violence, 'Machismo' showed a stronger relationship to both self-reported and officially recorded violence. Violent thinking, specifically beliefs measured by the Machismo subscale of the MVQ, was robustly associated with self-reported and officially recorded violence in this study with offender and non-offender adults. The MVQ is a valid and feasible measure for use with adult populations. Violent thinking (specifically Machismo thinking styles) should be included in the assessments of violent offenders. Work on violent thinking and reducing 'macho' thinking could be a useful adjunct to anger management work with violent offenders. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Assessment of brain core temperature using MR DWI-thermometry in Alzheimer disease patients compared to healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparacia, Gianvincenzo; Sakai, Koji; Yamada, Kei; Giordano, Giovanna; Coppola, Rosalia; Midiri, Massimo; Grimaldi, Luigi Maria

    2017-04-01

    To assess the brain core temperature of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients in comparison with healthy volunteers using diffusion-weighted thermometry. Fourteen AD patients (3 men, 11 women; age range 60-81 years, mean age 73.8 ± 6.1 years) and 14 healthy volunteers, age and sex-matched (mean age 70.1 ± 6.9 years; range 62-84 years; 5 men, 9 women) underwent MR examination between February 2014 and March 2016. MR imaging studies were performed with a 1.5-T MR scanner. Brain core temperature (T: °C) was calculated using the following equation from the diffusion coefficient (D) in the lateral ventricular (LV) cerebrospinal fluid: T = 2256.74/ln (4.39221/D) - 273.15 using a standard DWI single-shot echo-planar pulse sequence (b value 1000 s/mm(2)). Statistical analysis was performed using a nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test to compare the patient and control groups regarding LV temperatures. There was no significant difference (P = 0.1937) in LV temperature between patients (mean 37.9 ± 1.1 °C, range 35.8-39.2 °C) and control group (38.7 ± 1.4 °C, range 36.9-42.7 °C). Brain core temperature in AD patients showed no significant alterations compared to healthy volunteers.

  19. Juvenile and adult offenders arrested for sexual homicide: an analysis of victim-offender relationship and weapon used by race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Heng Choon Oliver; Heide, Kathleen M; Myers, Wade C

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available on racial offending patterns of sexual homicide offenders (SHOs). This study used a 30-year U.S. Supplementary Homicide Reports sample of SHOs arrested in single-victim situations (N = 3745). The analysis strength was used to determine whether the findings yielded meaningful patterns for offender profiling. Several important findings emerged for the juvenile offenders. Juvenile White SHOs were likely to target victims with whom they shared a mutual relationship. In contrast, Black juveniles were equally likely to murder strangers and those with whom they had prior and familial relationships. Notably, no juvenile Black SHOs were arrested for murdering intimate partners. Juvenile White SHOs were twice as likely to use edged weapons as their Black counterparts. Black juveniles, conversely, were more likely than White juveniles to use personal weapons. Beyond these findings, known victim-offender relationships and weapon used may not have significant utility for investigators in identifying the SHO race, even after controlling for offender age. Limitations and future directions are discussed. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Victimization and Violent Offending: An Assessment of the Victim-Offender Overlap Among Native American Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reingle, Jennifer M; Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the victim-offender overlap among a nationally representative sample of Native American adolescents and young adults. Data for this study were obtained from 338 Native American youth who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Waves I-IV. Group-based trajectory modeling was used to estimate trajectories of violence and victimization separately. Bivariate tests were used to assess the overlap between victimization and violent trajectory groups. Multinomial regression procedures were used to assess the predictors of victimization, offending, and the overlap category of both victimization and offending. Three trajectory groups were found for violence (nonviolent, escalators, and desistors) and victimization (nonvictim, decreasing victimization, and increasing victimization). We found substantial evidence of an overlap between victimization and offending among Native Americans, as 27.5% of the sample reported both victimization and offending. Those in the overlap group had greater number of risk factors present at baseline. These results suggest that the victim-offender overlap is present in Native American adolescents. Explanations and implications are discussed.

  1. Predicting recidivism among adult male child pornography offenders: Development of the Child Pornography Offender Risk Tool (CPORT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Michael C; Eke, Angela W

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we developed a structured risk checklist, the Child Pornography Offender Risk Tool (CPORT), to predict any sexual recidivism among adult male offenders with a conviction for child pornography offenses. We identified predictors of sexual recidivism using a 5-year fixed follow-up analysis from a police case file sample of 266 adult male child pornography offenders in the community after their index offense. In our 5-year follow-up, 29% committed a new offense, and 11% committed a new sexual offense, with 3% committing a new contact sexual offense against a child and 9% committing a new child pornography offense. The CPORT items comprised younger offender age, any prior criminal history, any contact sexual offending, any failure on conditional release, indication of sexual interest in child pornography material or prepubescent or pubescent children, more boy than girl content in child pornography, and more boy than girl content in other child depictions. The CPORT was significantly associated with any sexual recidivism, with moderate predictive accuracy, and thus has promise in the risk assessment of adult male child pornography offenders with further cross-validation. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Sex offender treatment outcome, actuarial risk, and the aging sex offender in Canadian corrections: a long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, Mark E; Nicholaichuk, Terry P; Gu, Deqiang; Wong, Stephen C P

    2013-08-01

    The present study is an examination of sex offender treatment outcome in a large national cohort of Canadian Federally incarcerated sex offenders followed up an average of 11.7 years postrelease. A brief actuarial risk scale (BARS), which predicted sexual and violent recidivism, was created for the purposes of the present study to control for risk-related differences between treated and untreated offenders. In total, 732 offenders were identified as having completed (n = 625) or not attended (n = 107) a sex offender treatment program and for whom sufficient information was available to complete the scale. Controlling for risk and individual differences in follow-up time using Cox regression survival analyses and an 8-year fixed follow-up period, treated sex offenders demonstrated significantly lower rates of violent, but not sexual, recidivism. When the treated and untreated groups were stratified by risk level, significant differences were observed only among moderate or high risk offenders. Some significant group differences also emerged on indicators of recidivism severity, with treated offenders demonstrating slower times to sexual reoffense and lower scores on a quantified metric of sexual and violent recidivism severity after controlling for risk. Differences in recidivism base rates between treated and untreated offenders were also larger in magnitude for younger offenders (i.e., under age 50 at release), than for older offenders; however, interactions between age and treatment were not found. The findings are consistent with the risk principle and have possible implications regarding the dynamic nature of sexual violence risk.

  3. A Restorative Justice Approach to Empathy Development in Sex Offenders: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, Christopher P.; Ritchie, Martin; Laux, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe an exploratory study in sex offender treatment using a restorative justice approach to examine the shame, guilt, and empathy development of convicted sexual offenders. Implications for clinical practice and future research are highlighted. (Contains 3 tables.)

  4. Unfair offers, unfair offenders? Fairness considerations in incarcerated individuals with and without psychopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radke, S.; Brazil, I.A.; Scheper, I.; Bulten, B.H.; Bruijn, E.R.A. de

    2013-01-01

    Offenders with psychopathy have often committed crimes violating social norms, which may suggest a biased moral reasoning in psychopathy. Yet, as findings on utilitarian decisions remain conflicting, the current study investigated different aspects of fairness considerations in offenders with psycho

  5. Unfair offers, unfair offenders? Fairness considerations in incarcerated individuals with and without psychopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radke, S.; Brazil, I.A.; Scheper, I.; Bulten, B.H.; Bruijn, E.R.A. de

    2013-01-01

    Offenders with psychopathy have often committed crimes violating social norms, which may suggest a biased moral reasoning in psychopathy. Yet, as findings on utilitarian decisions remain conflicting, the current study investigated different aspects of fairness considerations in offenders with psycho

  6. Doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob forma Heidenhain: relato de caso com achados de ressonância magnética e DWI Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Heidenhain variant: case report with MRI (DWI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD é uma forma de demência pré-senil de rápida evolução, geralmente fatal em um ano. Casos autóctones no Brasil têm sido raramente descritos assim como achados de ressonância magnética. Mulher, natural de Ponta Grossa PR, branca , 54 anos , foi admitida no serviço em outubro de 2001 com quadro de amaurose bilateral cortical progressiva desde há 1 mês do internamento. Nunca viajou ao exterior e foi somente submetida a uma cirurgia de redução do estômago, para obesidade. História familial sem relato de casos semelhantes. Logo após o internamento a paciente desenvolveu quadro de disfasia mista, hemiparesia flácida direita, com movimentos coreoatetóticos e crises parciais motoras. Paciente evoluiu com quadro demencial progressivo; atualmente, acamada, torporosa, dependente de alimentação enteral, recebendo mepacrina, fenitoína e clorpromazina , estabilizando o quadro até final de maio de 2002. Exames laboratoriais negativos ou normais. Pesquisa de proteína 14-3-3 no líquor foi positiva; enolase-neurônio-específica no líquor foi normal. Estudo genético do gen PRNP não revelou mutação descrita anteriormente. EEG (23/10/2001 revelou intensa atividade irritativa hemisfério cerebral esquerdo. Estudo de ressonância magnética revelou áreas de hipersinal em T2 e FLAIR em regiões temporal esquerda e bioccipital; gânglios da base normal. Imagens de DWI mostraram hipersinal nas mesmas áreas.Outro EEG (15/03/2002 revelou padrão periódico de ondas trifásicas sugestivos de CJD. A paciente fez uso de mepacrina associado a clorpromazina com aparente estabilização do quadro, até seu óbito por complicações infecciosas pulmonares em abril de 2003.Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a presenile dementia characterized by rapidly progressive mental deterioration, myoclonic jerking, and other less common neurological signs. Few autoctonous cases have been described in Brazil. A 54-year

  7. Does empathy always inhibit amorality and offending?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukosavljevic-Gvozden Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of previous studies have been inconsistent over the role of emotional and cognitive empathy in aggressive and antisocial behavior. The aim of this study is to clarify the specific nature of the empathic profiles associated with different types of amoral behavior (induced by impulsivity, frustration and brutality, measured through self-reports. The sample consists of male prisoners who have committed violent and non-violent types of offenses (robberies and thefts and the control group with no criminal history (N=200. Results demonstrate that general amorality which combines all three types of amoral attitudes is negatively associated both with emotional and cognitive empathy, but the association with the emotional empathy is much stronger one. On the other hand, amorality induced by frustration (characterized by resentment, dark picture of reality which justifies personal Machiavellianism is positively associated with cognitive empathy which might be used for manipulation. These results provide guidelines for empathy trainings for offenders, highlighting the significance of increasing emotional empathy [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179018

  8. [Characteristics of sexual offenders in our data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, B; Misić-Pavkov, G; Novović, Z

    1990-01-01

    By analyzing two groups of sexual delinquents: those which have committed rape, attempted rape or committed rape with murder (the first group) and the commiters of indecent acts (the second group), it was established that the named groups are substantially different in relation to some of the studied parameters. In the first group of delinquents, there is considerably less of those who are married (35.48%), in relation to the second group (73.68%). Indecent acts are most often committed in the apartment of the sexual offender (63.16%), while this is the case in 22.58% of the offences from the first group. The victims of indecent acts were only minors. In both groups the most frequent psychiatric diagnosis was psychopathy. Alcoholic state at the time of committing the offence was considerably greater in the first group (87.10%), in relation to the other one (47.37%). There were no important differences relating earlier criminal offences, as well as the psychiatric estimates of accountability between the groups.

  9. Can We Distinguish Juvenile Violent Sex Offenders, Violent Non-Sex Offenders, and Versatile Violent Sex Offenders Based on Childhood Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanklyn, Sonya G.; Ward, Ashley K.; Cormier, Nicole S.; Day, David M.; Newman, Jennifer E.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the developmental precursors of juvenile violent sex offending can contribute to the promotion of effective early intervention and prevention programs for high-risk children and youth. However, there is currently a lack of research on the early characteristics of adolescents who commit violent sex offenses. Drawing on the literature…

  10. PSYCHO-SOCIOLOGICAL PERSONALITY TRAITS OF SEXUAL OFFENDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SlobodankaTodoroska-Gjurchevska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Criminality is an extremely heterogeneous social phenomenon that includes various kinds of deviant behavior. It also includes sexual criminality (crimes against sexual freedom and moral, which has highly negative impact on society and endangers the most intimate parts of a person’s life. The aim of this survey is to outline a structure of psychological features of sexual offenders, to determine the degree of their development and the way in which they are connected, as well as to describe certain social and sociological phenomena that are typical of sexual offenders. The results that have been achieved during this survey will successfully be implemented into the practical work of penal institutions in the Republic of Macedonia in order to ensure successful resocialisation and reintegration of sexual offenders in the society. Our experience and knowledge are compatible with world-wide trends saying that sexual offenders are mentally healthy people and that they cannot be included in any diagnostic category. The main results of this survey can be summed up into several points: in general, sexual offenders are male, aged between 26 and 33, with minimal education and without profession or employment. Usually, they do not behave in pathological manner and they are mentally healthy people. It is believed that resocialisation as well as a complex treatment will be necessary for people convicted of sexual offenses: not only will it represent prevention from committing new crimes, it will also be a breeding ground for their active participation in life out of the penal institutions

  11. Measuring victim empathy among mentally disordered offenders: validating VERA-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S; Sedgwick, O; Perkins, D; Lister, H; Southgate, K; Das, M; Kumari, V; Bishopp, D; Gudjonsson, G H

    2015-01-01

    There are very few, if any, valid and victim-specific situation empathy measures available at present for use with mentally disordered offenders. The aim of this study was to validate a modified version (VERA-2) of the Victim Empathy Response Assessment (VERA) tool which was developed earlier (Young et al., 2008) to enable victim-specific situation empathy measurement in offenders. A total of 55 mentally disordered in-patients residing in a maximum security hospital were assessed on VERA-2 as well as on measures of antisocial personality traits, global affective empathy, violent cognitions, and reported remorse for the index offence. The VERA-2 cognitive and affective empathy scales were negatively correlated with antisocial personality traits and violent cognitions, and positively related to remorse for the index offence. Global affective empathy was positively related to VERA-2 affective empathy. Participants with a history of sexual offending had significantly higher cognitive empathy than other offenders. Acceptance of violence and remorse for the index offence were the best predictors of both cognitive and affective empathy. The findings suggest that the VERA-2 is a valid instrument for measuring victim empathy among mentally disordered offenders, and may prove useful in the context of future risk assessment and outcomes in this population.

  12. The kindest cut? Surgical castration, sex offenders and coercive offers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, John

    2014-09-01

    The European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) have conducted visits and written reports criticising the surgical castration of sex offenders in the Czech Republic and Germany. They claim that surgical castration is degrading treatment and have called for an immediate end to this practice. The Czech and German governments have published rebuttals of these criticisms. The rebuttals cite evidence about clinical effectiveness and point out this is an intervention that must be requested by the sex offender and cannot occur without informed consent. This article considers a number of relevant arguments that are not discussed in these reports but which are central to how we might assess this practice. First, the article discusses the possible ways in which sex offenders could be coerced into castration and whether this is a decisive moral problem. Then, it considers a number of issues relevant to determining whether sex offenders are harmed by physical castration. The article concludes by arguing that sex offenders should not be coerced into castration, be that via threats or offers, but that there is no reason to think that this is occurring in the Czech Republic or Germany. In some cases, castration might be useful for reconfiguring a life that has gone badly awry and where there is no coercion, the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment are mistaken about this being degrading treatment.

  13. Life satisfaction and status among adolescent law offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buunk, Abraham P; Peiró, José María; Rocabert, Esperanza; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    2016-04-01

    Life satisfaction among young offenders may be affected by the subjective experience of their social status and by the feeling of being a 'loser' compared with others, but it is not clear what variables affect such experiences in this group. To examine relationships of type of sentence (prison or probation) and of gender with subjective social status, sense of defeat and life satisfaction among young offenders. One hundred and five participants were randomly selected from a cohort of young offenders, stratifying for sentence type and for gender. They were interviewed by trained and experienced interviewers. Young people in a correctional facility experienced lower life satisfaction and greater sense of defeat than those on probation. Independently of judicial measure, low life satisfaction was correlated with sense of defeat among young men but not young women, whereas among young women, but not young men, low life satisfaction was associated with low subjective status. Our findings of a correlation between sentence type and life satisfaction needs new, longitudinal research to determine the direction of this relationship. Whether low life satisfaction is predictive of a custodial disposal for young offenders or such a sentence lowers life satisfaction, those trying to supervise or help these young people may need to take account of it. Further, our findings suggest that young male and young female offenders should perhaps be treated in different ways to improve their sense of satisfaction with life, which may, in turn, reduce their risk of reoffending. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Child pornography possessors: trends in offender and case characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolak, Janis; Finkelhor, David; Mitchell, Kimberly

    2011-03-01

    This article describes trends in child pornography (CP) possession cases that ended in arrest in 2000 and in 2006, using data from the National Juvenile Online Victimization Study, a two-wave longitudinal survey of a national sample of more than 2,500 U.S. law enforcement agencies. In 2006, there were an estimated 3,672 arrests for CP possession, compared with 1,713 arrests in 2000. Many characteristics of the offenders and the offense remained stable. In both 2006 and 2000, most offenders were White, non-Hispanic males and socioeconomically diverse. Few were known to have committed previous sex crimes. Most had CP that depicted preteen children and serious sexual abuse. In 2006, however, a higher proportion of offenders were aged 18 to 25 years, used peer-to-peer (p2p) networks, had images of children younger than 3 years, and had CP videos. P2p users had more extreme images (e.g., younger victims, sexual violence) and larger numbers of images than those who did not use p2p networks. Findings reflect heightened efforts in the criminal justice system to combat CP crimes. More cases originated with investigations of CP possession and involved proactive investigations aimed at detecting CP. The great majority of cases were successfully prosecuted, with more offenders sentenced to incarceration and serving longer sentences than in 2000. As in 2000, one in six cases that began with investigations of CP possession detected offenders who had molested children.

  15. Suppression of aggressive rorschach responses among violent offenders and nonoffenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjestorf, Sue TaVoularis; Viglione, Donald J; Lamb, Judy D; Giromini, Luciano

    2013-10-01

    This Rorschach study explored the suppression of aggression content when violent offenders and nonoffenders are asked to present themselves as not posing a threat of dangerousness in a court role-playing context. Aggressive content and complexity in this suppressive role-play context was compared to a neutral control condition. A total of 41 participants, approximately half violent offenders and half nonoffenders took the Rorschach under both conditions. Results indicate that both groups suppressed aggression content on the Rorschach without altering response complexity. This large effect size for testing condition may partly explain the inconsistencies across previous studies. It is possible that violent offenders have typically been tested in highly suppressive conditions whereas nonoffender or normative groups may have been tested in relatively low suppression conditions. If so, aggression score differences may be a reflection of the testing condition, not group differences. Both instructional sets produced similar levels of complexity, so that individuals do not simplify responses when they screen out aggressive attributions. Violent offenders did not differ from nonviolent offenders in terms of aggression content, but did produce more simplistic records. In addition, this study also undertook a semantic, textual analysis and found that individuals in the suppressive condition tended to eliminate many response elaborations, particularly those with negative of threatening connotations.

  16. Female Sex Offenders and Pariah Femininities: Rewriting the Sexual Scripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Hayes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze the way in which the media reports of sex offences tend to reinforce traditional sexual scripts and gender identities. Compared to investigations into male sex offenders, female sex offending is relatively underresearched, undertheorized, and misunderstood (Hayes and Carpenter, 2013. We argue that the media’s reinforcement of traditional scripts has hindered the development of awareness of sex offending by women, depicting them as aberrations, that is, as “female pariahs.” As Harris (2010 notes, female sex crimes cannot be explained by male theories of crime. To address this issue, we examined 487 media reports from Australia and the United Kingdom and found that, as key stakeholders in public debate, the media does indeed play a crucial role in shaping the public perceptions of female sex offenders as aberrations and pariahs. This distorted view influences approaches to understanding and acknowledging sex offending by women as well as hindering the safe and timely reporting of offences by victims.

  17. The perceived employability of ex-prisoners and offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffam, Joseph; Shinkfield, Alison J; Hardcastle, Lesley

    2008-12-01

    A large-scale study was conducted to examine the perceived employability of ex-prisoners and offenders. Four participant groups comprising 596 (50.4%) employers, 234 (19.8%) employment service workers, 176 (14.9%) corrections workers, and 175 (14.8%) prisoners and offenders completed a questionnaire assessing the likelihood of a hypothetical job seeker's both obtaining and maintaining employment; the importance of specific skills and characteristics to employability; and the likelihood that ex-prisoners, offenders, and the general workforce exhibit these skills and characteristics. Apart from people with an intellectual or psychiatric disability, those with a criminal background were rated as being less likely than other disadvantaged groups to obtain and maintain employment. In addition, ex-prisoners were rated as being less likely than offenders and the general workforce to exhibit the skills and characteristics relevant to employability. Implications for the preparation and support of ex-prisoners and offenders into employment are discussed, together with broader community-wide initiatives to promote reintegration.

  18. Inter-observer variation and diagnostic efficacy of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements obtained by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in small renal masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponhold, Lothar; Javor, Domagoj; Heinz-Peer, Gertraud; Sevcenco, Sabina; Hofstetter, Martin; Baltzer, Pascal Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is increasingly used to diagnose renal lesion subtypes. Especially in small renal masses, identification of less aggressive tumor types is of clinical interest, as active surveillance strategies can be applied. To evaluate the inter-observer variation and diagnostic efficacy of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements obtained by DWI in small renal masses ≤4 cm (SRM). This retrospective IRB-approved study included 39 patients (46 SRM: 12 benign, 34 malignant). All underwent a 3 T DWI of SRM prior to surgery. Two radiologists independently analyzed all imaging data by three measurements. Limits of agreement, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), group comparisons by t-tests, and ROC analysis were performed. Reliability of ADC measurements was very high with an ICC of >0.9 for both observers. Inter-rater reliability was high with an ICC of 0.82. Limits of agreement for average ADC values between both observers were -23.5% to 38.3% with a mean difference of 7.5% between both observers. No significant differences were found between benign and malignant lesions (P value Observer 1: 0.362, Observer 2: 0.622). Papillary carcinoma showed lower ADC values compared to non-papillary carcinoma (P value Observer 1: 0.008, Observer 2: 0.012). Consequently, ROC analysis revealed a significant (P < 0.001, respectively) area under the ROC curve of 0.853 (Observer 1) and 0.837 (Observer 2) without significant differences between both readers (P = 0.772). ADC measurements of SRM at 3 T show a high reproducibility and differentiate papillary from non-papillary carcinoma subtypes. However, measurement variability may limit the application of fixed ADC thresholds for lesion diagnosis. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  19. The diagnostic value of SE MRI and DWI of the spine in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smouldering myeloma and multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutoit, Julie C.; Vanderkerken, Matthias A.; Dochy, Frederick; Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Anthonissen, Joris [Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate DWI of the bone marrow in the differentiation of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smouldering myeloma (SMM) and multiple myeloma (MM). The retrospective study includes 64 patients with MGUS, 27 with SMM, 64 with new MM and 12 controls. Signal intensity (SI) of spinal SE-MRI and DWI (b0-1000) as well as apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were measured in the T10 and L3. Qualitative assessment of b-images was performed by one experienced radiologist. ADC600 and ADC1000 are the best ADC values in differentiating patient groups (p < 0.030). SIT2, SIb1000 and ADC1000 are higher and SIT1 lower in L3 compared to T10 (p < 0.050). All quantitative parameters of L3 can differentiate significantly between MGUS and MM (p < 0.050) and between patients with percentage plasma cells (PC%) between 0-10 % compared to >50 % (p = 0.001). Only SIT2 for L3 can differentiate MGUS from SMM (p = 0.044) and PC%0-10 from PC%10-25 (p = 0.033). Qualitative interpretation of b1000 images allows differentiating MM patients from those with MGUS or SMM (p < 0.001). Spinal SE-MRI can differentiate among MGUS, SMM, MM and control subjects. DWI based on the SI on b1000 images and ADC values is increased in MM compared to MGUS and SMM. Qualitative assessment of b-images can differentiate MM from MGUS or SMM. (orig.)

  20. Learning Handicapped and Nonlearning Handicapped Female Juvenile Offenders: Educational and Criminal Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejes-Mendoza, Kathy E.; Rutherford, Robert B., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Interviews with 30 female juvenile offenders were conducted to (1) describe their educational and criminal backgrounds and (2) describe a subgroup of learning handicapped juvenile female offenders. Nearly one third had received special education services prior to their incarceration with additional offenders diagnosed as handicapped upon entry…

  1. 76 FR 68509 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Reintegration of Ex-Offenders-Adult Reporting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... Request for Information Collection for Reintegration of Ex-Offenders-Adult Reporting System, Extension... support the Reintegration of Ex-Offenders-Adult (RExO-Adult) grants, which expires on March 31, 2012. A... Reintegration of Ex-Offender-Adult (formerly Prisoner Reentry Initiative) grants, faith-based and...

  2. The Relation of Facial Affect Recognition and Empathy to Delinquency in Youth Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Mary B.; Lutjemeier, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Associations among facial affect recognition, empathy, and self-reported delinquency were studied in a sample of 29 male youth offenders at a probation placement facility. Youth offenders were asked to recognize facial expressions of emotions from adult faces, child faces, and cartoon faces. Youth offenders also responded to a series of statements…

  3. Assessing Components of Empathy in Sex-Offenders with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralfs, Sonya; Beail, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Because of a lack of research investigating empathy in sex offenders with intellectual disabilities, this study explored empathy in sex offenders and non-offenders with intellectual disabilities. Specific aims were to explore differences between these groups on measures of the components of empathy. Methods: The scores of 21…

  4. Vocational Psychology and Ex-Offenders' Reintegration: A Call for Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Failure to find steady and rewarding employment and stabilizing economic resources are key contributors to recidivism among ex-offenders. Within 3 years of their release, almost two thirds of ex-offenders return to prison. Ex-offenders face formidable barriers to employment including legal limitations and those specific to their skills, education,…

  5. THE EVOLUTION OF ROMANIAN CRIMINAL AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURAL RULES APPLICABLE TO JUVENILE OFFENDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei-Lucian PUŞCAŞU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the evolution of societies, this trend to punish offenders has undergone substantial changes. Thus, ancient legislators began to gradually express concern for the adoption of a different criminal sanction regime for juvenile offenders. Through the given research we want to analyze the evolution of the criminal and criminal procedural rules applicable to Romanian juvenile offenders.

  6. 28 CFR Appendix A to Part 811 - Listing of Sex Offender Registration Offenses by Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; or (v) Any offense against a minor for which the offender agreed in a plea agreement to be subject to... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Listing of Sex Offender Registration Offenses by Class A Appendix A to Part 811 Judicial Administration COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION...

  7. The Remodeling Process: A Grounded Theory Study of Perceptions of Treatment among Adult Male Incest Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheela, Rochelle A.

    1992-01-01

    Conducted grounded theory study to explore incest offender perceptions of treatment to generate explanatory theory of sexual abuse treatment process. Findings from theoretical sampling of 20 adult male incest offenders revealed that offenders felt remodeling process occurred as they faced discovery of their abuse and went through treatment.…

  8. The Relation of Facial Affect Recognition and Empathy to Delinquency in Youth Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Mary B.; Lutjemeier, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Associations among facial affect recognition, empathy, and self-reported delinquency were studied in a sample of 29 male youth offenders at a probation placement facility. Youth offenders were asked to recognize facial expressions of emotions from adult faces, child faces, and cartoon faces. Youth offenders also responded to a series of statements…

  9. The Mental Health of Young Offenders Serving Orders in the Community: Implications for Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Dianna T.; Lennings, Christopher J.; Nelson, Paul K.

    2007-01-01

    Young offenders internationally have a higher incidence of mental health problems compared with adolescents in the general population. Mental health issues, particularly comorbid presentations, affect the response to and outcome of rehabilitation and hence recidivism of offending. Most information on the mental health of young offenders has…

  10. The Psychosocial Needs of Young Offenders and Adolescents from an Inner City Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, Kenneth; Maughan, Barbara; Davis, Hilton; Davenport, Franscesca; Goddard, Nick

    2004-01-01

    To date, assessments of the prevalence of mental health problems in young offenders have largely focused on incarcerated samples. This paper describes a quantitative study of a sample of 47 male young offenders under the supervision of an inner city Youth Offending Team. A semi-structured interview, modified from previous studies, was used to…

  11. Barriers to Positive Mental Health in a Young Offenders Institution: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, James

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the barriers to positive mental health in a group of young offenders. Design: A qualitative approach was used to provide insight into the ways in which mental health for young offenders is experienced and managed. Setting: A Young Offenders Institute (YOI) accommodating males aged between 18 and 21 years. Method: Participants…

  12. Adolescent Sex Offenders' Rankings of Therapeutic Factors Using the Yalom Card Sort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sribney, Christine L.; Reddon, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Following 11-98 weeks of inpatient residential treatment, 69 male adolescent sex offenders completed the 60-item, 12-factor Yalom Card Sort. The rank orders were compared to adult sex offenders and a psychiatric adult outpatient group. Relative to adult psychiatric outpatients, the adolescent sex offenders had rated Instillation of Hope three…

  13. 24 CFR 5.856 - When must I prohibit admission of sex offenders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... sex offenders? 5.856 Section 5.856 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department... Denying Admissions § 5.856 When must I prohibit admission of sex offenders? You must establish standards... lifetime registration requirement under a State sex offender registration program. In the screening...

  14. Local Life Circumstances and Offending Specialization/Versatility: Comparing Opportunity and Propensity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGloin, Jean Marie; Sullivan, Christopher J.; Piquero, Alex R.; Pratt, Travis C.

    2007-01-01

    Research has consistently indicated that most offenders demonstrate diversity over the life course. Even so, recent work suggests that offenders tend to illustrate specialization in the short-term, though this specialization diminishes as the "time window" for examining an offending career increases. To examine why this pattern emerges, the…

  15. Exploring Differences in Youth and Parent Reports of Antisociality among Adolescent Sexual and Nonsexual Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilling, Tracey A.; Doiron, James M.; Seto, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent of, and explored several possible explanations for, the discrepancies found between adolescent and parent reports of conduct problems in adolescent sexual and nonsexual offenders. We found that adolescent sexual offenders scored lower on measures of conduct problems than did nonsexual offenders, whether on the basis…

  16. Demographic and Personality Characteristics of Internet Child Pornography Downloaders in Comparison to Other Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnen, Lotte; Bulten, Erik; Nijman, Henk

    2009-01-01

    This research study was conducted to map out the demographic and psychological aspects of Internet child pornography offenders. The backgrounds, characteristics, and MMPI profiles of 22 Internet child pornography offenders were statistically compared to those of 112 perpetrators of other offenses. In comparison to the other sexual offenders, the…

  17. Transitions and Turning Points: Examining the Links between Child Maltreatment and Juvenile Offending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Anna; Livingston, Michael; Dennison, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The links between child maltreatment and juvenile offending are well established. However, the majority of maltreated children do not offend. The research presented in this paper examines the impact that timing and chronicity of child maltreatment have on juvenile offending. Methods: Administrative data were obtained on all children who…

  18. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  19. Court-ordered emergency visitations for DUI offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, B F

    1991-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) and morgue visits to view the results of accidents have recently been instituted as an alternative sentence for adolescents convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI). Although many DUI offenders are alcoholic, and educational programs intended to reduce recidivism in adults are generally not effective, scant data exist on adolescent offenders. Initial assessment of 59 of our program participants diagnosed 41% as alcoholic. This finding prompted further participant evaluation to define our population. Fifty-four participants evaluated by self-administered diagnostic questionnaire revealed an alcoholism rate of 54%. Additionally, recidivism rates for alcohol-related moving violations for 176 program participants and matched controls were 28% and 23%, respectively. The significance of these findings represents the serious alcohol problems faced by the study population and indicates that visitation programs are not effective for addressing the problems of alcoholic offenders or in reducing recidivism.

  20. Offenders' crime narratives as revealed by the Narrative Roles Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Donna; Canter, David V

    2013-03-01

    The study of narrative processes as part of the immediate factors that shape criminal action is limited by the lack of a methodology for differentiating the narrative themes that characterise specific crime events. The current study explores how the roles offenders see themselves as playing during an offence encapsulate their underlying crime narratives and thus provide the basis for a quantitative methodology. To test this possibility, a 33-item Narrative Roles Questionnaire (NRQ) was developed from intensive interviews with offenders about their experience of committing a recent offence. A multidimensional analysis of the NRQ completed by 71 convicted offenders revealed life narrative themes similar to those identified in fiction by Frye and with noncriminals by McAdams, labelled The Professional, Victim, Hero, and Revenger offence roles. The NRQ thus is a first step in opening up the possibility of empirical studies of the narrative aetiological perspective in criminology.

  1. Sexualization and lifestyle impulsivity: clinically valid discriminators in sexual offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eher, Reinhard; Neuwirth, Wolfgang; Fruehwald, Stefan; Frottier, Patrick

    2003-08-01

    Following clinical observations in this study a comparison was undertaken between nonsexualized rapists, sexualized rapists, and pedophilic child molesters in terms of psychometric measures, criminological data, and DSM-IV diagnoses following the authors' hypotheses that nonsexualized and sexualized rapists differ in respect of psychiatric comorbidity and criminal history and sexualized rapists and pedophilic child molesters are more similar as regards to psychiatric comorbidity (anxiety, depression, and aggression) and criminal history variables than nonsexualized and sexualized rapists are. Preliminary findings confirmed the hypotheses: the authors found significant differences between paraphilic and sexualized sex offenders on one hand--regardless whether they had offended against minors or adults--and a group of sex offenders exhibiting a history of high lifestyle impulsivity on the other hand. From a psychiatric clinical point of view, paraphilic or sexualized rapists could be shown to resemble more the pedophilic child molesters. Therapeutic approaches should take these findings into account.

  2. Psychological characteristics of juvenile offenders with personal immaturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Dozortseva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the psychological characteristics of juveniles with personal immaturity who committed socially dangerous actions. We present conceptual psychological approaches to the concepts of “maturity” and “immaturity”, manifestations of maturity and immaturity in adolescents. We describe the prevalence of personal immaturity among juvenile offenders. We analyze individual psychological characteristics specific to the minors with personal immaturity and characterize the phenomenon of personal immaturity itself. We compare the parameters studied in samples of juvenile offenders with personal immaturity and offenders with no personality immaturity, undergoing a comprehensive forensic psychological and psychiatric examination. We describe the main clusters of indices that together represent a psychological symptom of personal immaturity

  3. Sex offender treatment: consumer satisfaction and engagement in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Jill S; Prescott, David S; D'Amora, David A

    2010-06-01

    Convicted sex offenders attending an outpatient treatment program in Connecticut were surveyed about their experiences in therapy, their perceived importance of treatment content, their satisfaction with the help they receive, and their engagement in therapeutic services. There were strong correlations between perceived importance of content items and satisfaction with services. A robust correlation was also found between engagement and satisfaction. Clients rated accountability and victim empathy as the most important components of treatment. Other popular content areas were thinking errors, relapse prevention concepts, uncovering motivations to offend, and controlling deviant arousal. Most sex offenders valued the peer support and confrontation offered by group therapy. Though reduced recidivism is clearly the crucial measure of treatment success, clients who are engaged in the treatment process and develop healthy interpersonal skills by participating in therapy may be less likely to engage in abusive behavior. Implications for practitioners are discussed.

  4. Should violent offenders be forced to undergo neurotechnological treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Thomas Søbirk; Kragh, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    ’s right to freedom of thought. We argue that this objection can be challenged. First, we present some specifications of what a right to freedom of thought might mean. We focus on the recently published views of Jared Craig, and Jan Cristopher Bublitz and Reinhard Merkel. Secondly, we argue that forcing...... violent offenders to undergo certain kinds of NT may not violate the offender’s right to freedom of thought as that right is specified by Craig, and Bublitz and Merkel. Thirdly, even if non-consensual NT is used in a way that does violate freedom of thought, such use can be difficult to abandon without...... inconsistency. For if one is not an abolitionist, and therefore accepts traditional state punishments for violent offenders like imprisonment – which, the evidence shows, often violate the offender’s right to freedom of thought – then, it is argued, one will have reason to accept that violent offenders can...

  5. Psychological characteristics of juvenile offenders with constant integration problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Démuthová Slávka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the typical psychological, demographic, socio-economical, educational, health, and criminological characteristics of juvenile delinquents who tend to continue in their criminal career to adulthood and therefore obstruct the possibility of successful, non-offending integration to society. Subjects of research were young male prisoners jailed in the Juvenile imprisonment house that completed the test battery. By ex-post analysis after a period of five years, the differences between offenders and non-offenders were identified. Results show significant differences in the age of prisoners, length of imprisonment, presence of violent offence (esp. robbery in the criminal history, number of previous offences recorded, differences in factors i, h, and q1 from the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire, responses within the Hand test characteristic (affection, dependence, and communication, and in several signs of the drawings in a Draw-A-Person test. The importance and influence of listed factors is discussed.

  6. Oral Language Competence, Social Skills and High-Risk Boys: What Are Juvenile Offenders Trying to Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Pamela C.; Powell, Martine B.

    2008-01-01

    A cross-sectional study examining the oral language abilities and social skills of male juvenile offenders is described. Fifty juvenile offenders and 50 non-offending controls completed measures of language processing and production, and measures of social skill and IQ. Information about type of offending, substance use histories and…

  7. Predicting Reoffence in Sexual Offender Subtypes: A Prospective Validation Study of the German Version of the Sexual Offender Risk Appraisal Guide (SORAG)

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Rettenberger; Reinhard Eher

    2007-01-01

    This study is part of a prospective, longitudinal research project to evaluate the reliability and validity of different recidivism risk assessment methods for sexual offenders under community supervision for scientific and practical use in the German-speaking part of Europe. In this paper we present the German adaptation of the Sexual Offender Risk Appraisal Guide (SORAG), a specific risk assessment tool for sexual offenders that was developed and published in 1998 in Canada. We examined int...

  8. Sensitivity and specificity of unenhanced MR mammography (DWI combined with T2-weighted TSE imaging, ueMRM) for the differentiation of mass lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltzer, Pascal A.T.; Benndorf, Matthias; Dietzel, Matthias; Kaiser, Werner A. [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena (Germany); Gajda, Mieczyslaw [Institute of Pathology, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena (Germany); Camara, Oumar [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Clinic of Gynecology, Jena (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    This study was performed to assess the sensitivity and specificity for malignant and benign mass lesions of a diagnostic approach combining DWI with T2-weighted images (unenhanced MR mammography, ueMRM) and compare the results with contrast-enhanced MR mammography (ceMRM). Consecutive patients undergoing histopathological verification of mass lesions after MR mammography without prior breast interventions (contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, T2-weighted and DWI sequences) were eligible for this retrospective investigation. Two blinded observers first rated ueMRM and then ceMRM according to the BIRADS scale. Lesion size, ADC values and T2-weighted TSE descriptors were assessed. This study examined 81 lesions (27 benign, 54 malignant). Sensitivity of ueMRM was 93% (observer 1) and 86% (observer 2), respectively. Sensitivity of ceMRM was 96.5% (observer 1) and 98.3% (observer 2). Specificity was 85.2% (ueMRM) and 92.6% (ceMRM) for both observers. The differences between both methods and observers were not significant (P {>=} 0.09). Lesion size measurements did not differ significantly among all sequences analyzed. Tumor visibility was worse using ueMRM for both benign (P < 0.001) and malignant lesions (P = 0.004). Sensitivity and specificity of ueMRM in mass lesions equal that of ceMRM. However, a reduced lesion visibility in ueMRM may lead to more false-negative findings. (orig.)

  9. Offending, Adjudication, and Outcome Patterns of Solo Male, Solo Female, and Partnered Mass Murderers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurian, Elizabeth A

    2017-06-01

    Research on mass murder is limited due to differences in definitions (particularly with respect to victim count), as well as categorizations based on motive. These limitations restrict our understanding of the offending, adjudication, and outcome patterns of these offenders and can obscure potential underlying similarities to comparable types of offenders (e.g., lone actors or terrorists). To address some of these limitations, this research study, which includes an international sample of 434 cases (455 total offenders), uses descriptive and empirical analyses of solo male, solo female, and partnered mass murderers (teams of two or more) to explore offending, adjudication, and outcome patterns among these different types offenders. While the results from this research study support much previous mass murder research, the findings also emphasize the importance of large international sample sizes, objective categorizations, and the use of empirically based analyses to further advance our understanding of these offenders.

  10. Role Differentiation in an Adolescent Victim-Offender Typology: Results From Medellin, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Holli; Dizgun, John; Keeling, David

    2016-11-01

    The present study evaluates adolescent victimization and offending using cross-sectional survey data from 1,475 adolescents living in a disadvantaged Comuna in Medellin, Colombia, while paying particular attention to the ways in which both victimization and violent offending are operationalized. We find that 37% of respondents experienced no lifetime victimization, while 60% experienced vicarious, and 4% personal victimization. When restricting violent offending to behavior involving a weapon, the majority of offenders (81%) also experienced victimization while only 33% of victims were also weapons offenders. Our final analysis seeks to identify theoretical conditions which differentiate roles in a victim-offender typology, a result we determine varies significantly depending on how "violent offending" is measured. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. King's theory of goal attainment applied in group therapy for inpatient juvenile sexual offenders, maximum security state offenders, and community parolees, using visual aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laben, J K; Dodd, D; Sneed, L

    1991-01-01

    Group psychotherapy has been considered the treatment of choice by many therapists working with offenders within the criminal justice system. However, there has been little written by nurses regarding this special population. This article's purpose is to illustrate how King's theory of goal attainment may be used in conducting group psychotherapy with offender populations. The application of King's model is demonstrated in three milieus: an inpatient setting for juvenile sexual offenders, a state maximum security prison, and a halfway house for offenders involved in a work-release program. The methodology and use of visual aids in actualizing King's theory of mutual goal setting and goal attainment are discussed.

  12. Constructing Hope: a Multi-Agency Programme model for Young Sex Offenders living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas P. Boer; Dario Dosio

    2007-01-01

    Many young sex offenders in South Africa have HIV/AIDS. This fact both complicates and underlines the importance of delivering effective multi-agency sex offender programmes to these individuals. Reducing reoffending rates is of obvious importance, as stopping these young offenders from offending also means limiting the spread of HIV to new victims. We are proposing an integrative programme that incorporates proven models of sex offender treatment in combination with medical, educational and ...

  13. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  14. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  15. Childhood Psychopathology Predicts Adolescence-Onset Offending: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Nicole; Verhulst, Frank; van Marle, Hjalmar; van der Ende, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Moffitt, Caspi, Harrington, and Milne (2002) found in a follow-up study that many of the supposedly adolescence-limited offenders had committed offenses past adolescence. This finding raises the question of whether adulthood starts later or whether there are two distinct delinquency types, adolescence limited and adolescence onset, each with its…

  16. An Evaluation of Intimate Partner Violence Intervention with Incarcerated Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Angela D.; Mills, Jeremy F.; Gray, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The following study is an evaluation of the Moderate Intensity Family Violence Prevention Program (MIFVPP). The sample consisted of 298 male federal offenders who participated in the MIFVPP while incarcerated or on release within the community. Participants were assessed pre-, mid-, and postprogram using an assessment battery consisting of…

  17. Childhood Psychopathology Predicts Adolescence-Onset Offending: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Nicole; Verhulst, Frank; van Marle, Hjalmar; van der Ende, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Moffitt, Caspi, Harrington, and Milne (2002) found in a follow-up study that many of the supposedly adolescence-limited offenders had committed offenses past adolescence. This finding raises the question of whether adulthood starts later or whether there are two distinct delinquency types, adolescence limited and adolescence onset, each with its…

  18. Appropriate Benefits for Outdoor Programs Targeting Juvenile Male Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyere, Brett L.

    2002-01-01

    A benefits-based management approach will enable outdoor adventure therapy programs for male adolescent offenders to be built around desired outcomes such as building connections to community, enhancing self-esteem, and establishing intergenerational relationships. Outdoor programs must maintain informal environments, involve participants in…

  19. Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Research, Best Practices, and Emerging Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of sexual offenders has evolved substantially over the years; various theoretical and practice models of treatment been developed, modified, refined, and proposed over time. The predominant current recommended approach, supported by research, adheres to specific principles of effective correctional intervention, follows a…

  20. Acculturation and Enculturation Trajectories among Mexican-American Adolescent Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, George P.; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino; Losoya, Sandra H.; Cota-Robles, Sonia; Chassin, Laurie; Lee, Joanna M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines changes over time in ethnic affirmation/belonging and ethnic identity achievement, Spanish language use, English language use, Mexican/Mexican-American affiliation/identification and Anglo affiliation/identification in a sample of Mexican-American adolescents participating in a longitudinal study of juvenile offenders. The…

  1. Young Offending: Towards a Radical/Critical Social Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Young offending is perceived as a serious social problem and always remains near the top of the political agenda. Over the post-war years, policy and practice moved from welfare/treatment towards punishment as the key for addressing the problem, culminating in New Labour's Crime and Disorder Act 1998. Thereafter there was increasing concern about…

  2. The Incidence of Dyslexia among Young Offenders in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeheri, Gad; Everatt, John; Malki, Mohammad Al

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the incidence of dyslexia among young offenders in Kuwait. A total of 91 children/young adults from 8 juvenile delinquent welfare centres across Kuwait were interviewed and tested. A measure of non-verbal reasoning ability was used to exclude those with low general ability. The remaining 53 participants were tested on their…

  3. Education in Young Offender Institutions and Secure Youth Care Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to gain a better insight into efforts made to provide optimum education to juveniles in young offender institutions and in secure youth care institutions, and into barriers with which educators are confronted in this process. Results show that for a substantial number of juveniles insufficient information is…

  4. The effectiveness of aftercare for juvenile and young adult offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, C.; Asscher, J.J.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; van der Laan, P.H.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the New Perspectives Aftercare Program (NPAP) for serious juvenile and young adult offenders in The Netherlands. Participants (n = 127) were randomly assigned to NPAP (n = 66) or existing aftercare services ("treatment as usual" [TAU], n = 61). The aim was to determine whether NP

  5. "Making Amends": An Interventionist Theatre Programme with Young Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jane

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a project established at the New Vic Borderlines by Sue Moffat in 1999 titled "Making Amends." It is an example of interventionist theatre undertaken with young offenders. The article draws on theories of restorative justice as well as ideas of learning development found in social constructivism in order to…

  6. Identifying the Psychosocial and Mental Health Needs of Young Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, David M.; Pleydon, Anne

    This study examined the psychosocial, mental health, and intellectual characteristics of young offenders serving a sentence at Syl Apps Youth Centre, a secure custody facility. The sample comprised 50 youths, 37 males and 13 females. The index offenses were varied, but the majority were sentenced for a violent offense. The results showed that…

  7. Community Hostels: An Alternative to Rehabilitating Young Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozner, Yochanan; Arad-Davidson, Bilha

    1994-01-01

    Describes community hostel for rehabilitating young offenders outside family environment. Describes way of life at community hostel, emphasizing its socio-behavioral intervention strategies. Notes close relationship between hostel, local community, and families of residents. Presents follow-up data concerning various aspects of 43 graduates'…

  8. Restitution Programs for Juvenile Offenders. Technical Assistance Bulletin 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National School Resource Network, Washington, DC.

    Restitution programs have been organized in many areas of the country to make juvenile offenders more accountable for their criminal behavior, more aware of the consequences to themselves, their victims, and the community, and thus, less likely to continue committing crimes. The programs also provide direct compensation for victims of crime.…

  9. Juvenile Offender Recidivism: An Examination of Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calley, Nancy G.

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and seventy three male juvenile offenders were followed two years postrelease from a residential treatment facility to assess recidivism and factors related to recidivism. The overall recidivism rate was 23.9%. Logistic regression with stepwise and backward variable selection methods was used to examine the relationship between…

  10. Gender Differences and Offender Reentry: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldnes, Solveig; Goodkind, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Historically, men have been incarcerated at rates far greater than women. As a result, reentry and reintegration programs have focused mainly on men's needs. The Second Chance Act of 2007 authorized funding for offender reentry programs and research on special populations--including about women and parents acknowledging the importance of…

  11. Protective factors and recidivism in accused juveniles who sexually offended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Verena; Rettenberger, Martin; Yoon, Dahlnym; Köhler, Nora; Briken, Peer

    2015-02-01

    To date, research on juvenile sexual offender recidivism has tended to focus on risk factors rather than protective factors. Therefore, very little is known about protective factors in the population of juveniles who sexually offended. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of protective factors on non-recidivism in a sample of accused juveniles who sexually offended (N = 71) in a mean follow-up period of 47.84 months. Protective factors were measured with the Protective Factor Scale of the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth (SAVRY), and the Structured Assessment of PROtective Factors for violence risk (SAPROF). Criminal charges served as recidivism data. The internal scale of the SAPROF, in particular, yielded moderate predictive accuracy for the absence of violent and general recidivism, though not for the absence of sexual recidivism. No protective factor of the SAVRY did reveal predictive accuracy regarding various types of the absence of recidivism. Furthermore, protective factors failed to achieve any significant incremental predictive accuracy beyond that captured by the SAVRY risk factors alone. The potential therapeutic benefit of protective factors in juvenile sexual offender treatment is discussed.

  12. Missouri Curriculum Guide for Alcohol-Related Traffic Offenders' Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Don; McClain, Robert

    This document contains the second edition of the Alcohol or Drug Related Traffic Offenders' Program (ARTOP) curriculum guide developed by the Missouri Department of Mental Health to reduce alcohol-related traffic offenses by presenting factual information about the physical effects of alcohol on the body and on driving skills. The materials…

  13. The Impact of Training on Attitudes towards Sex Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Leam A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure attitudes towards sex offenders held by professionals and paraprofessionals and to evaluate an introductory training workshop aimed at increasing knowledge and improving attitudes to this client group. Eighty-five residential hostel workers and probation officers attended an intensive two-day…

  14. Analysis of Youth Offending Team Inspection Reports. LGA Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Shona; Jeffes, Jennifer; White, Richard; Bramley, George

    2010-01-01

    How well do youth offending teams (YOT) work? In which areas of their work is their performance excellent and where is improvement needed? This research examined annual performance assessments of services for children and young people undertaken by Ofsted in 57 local authorities from January 2006 to April 2009, together with relevant data relating…

  15. The Role of Education in the Treatment of Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanic, Goran

    2011-01-01

    This article considers an aspect of inclusive education that has received relatively limited exposure: the challenges involved in meeting the educational needs of offenders in prisons. It does this by taking the example of Serbia, where recent changes in legislation have ensured the educational rights of inmates. It then looks at possible ways in…

  16. Neighborhood Characteristics and the Social Control of Registered Sex Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socia, Kelly M.; Stamatel, Janet P.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses geospatial and regression analyses to examine the relationships among social disorganization, collective efficacy, social control, residence restrictions, spatial autocorrelation, and the neighborhood distribution of registered sex offenders (RSOs) in Chicago. RSOs were concentrated in neighborhoods that had higher levels of social…

  17. Factors Affecting Sentence Severity for Young Adult Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Peter W.; And Others

    This document analyzes the sentencing of young adult defendants in comparison with older adult and younger juvenile offenders, and disputes prior research which held that young adults received more lenient sentencing, perhaps because of the restrictions on disclosing juvenile delinquency histories. The document presents data from samples of young…

  18. The Role Distance Learning Has to Play in Offender Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Caroline; Rate, Leanne

    2014-01-01

    This article looks into the uses of digital and online tools in distance learning to improve literacy and numeracy of offenders in New Zealand prisons. Looking at the benefits and restrictions of digital education within the prison environment, this article discusses the solutions that Open Polytechnic, in partnership with the the New Zealand…

  19. Sexual Abuse Victimization and Psychological Distress among Adolescent Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Debra L.; Kingree, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    This study focused on sexual abuse victimization and psychological distress among 272 adolescent offenders. Female respondents reported more sexual abuse victimization and psychological distress than did their male counterparts. Furthermore, church attendance moderated the association between sexual abuse victimization and psychological distress…

  20. Witness recall across repeated interviews in a case of repeated abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubacher, Sonja P; La Rooy, David

    2014-02-01

    In this illustrative case study we examine the three forensic interviews of a girl who experienced repeated sexual abuse from ages 7 to 11. She disclosed the abuse after watching a serialized television show that contained a storyline similar to her own experience. This triggered an investigation that ended in successful prosecution of the offender. Because this case involved abuse that was repeated on a weekly basis for 4 years we thus investigated the degree to which the child's narrative reflected specific episodes or generic accounts, and both the interviewer's and child's attempts to elicit and provide, respectively, specific details across the 3 interviews collected in a 1 month period. Across the 3 interviews, the child's account was largely generic, yet on a number of occasions she provided details specific to individual incidents (episodic leads) that could have been probed further. As predicted: earlier interviews were characterized more by episodic than generic prompts and the reverse was true for the third interview; the child often responded using the same style of language (episodic or generic) as the interviewer; and open questions yielded narrative information. We discuss the importance of adopting children's words to specify occurrences, and the potential benefits of permitting generic recall in investigative interviews on children's ability to provide episodic leads. Despite the fact that the testimony was characterized by generic information about what usually happened, rather than specific episodic details about individual occurrences, this case resulted in successful prosecution.

  1. MR diffusion-weighted imaging-based subcutaneous tumour volumetry in a xenografted nude mouse model using 3D Slicer: an accurate and repeatable method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zelan; Chen, Xin; Huang, Yanqi; He, Lan; Liang, Cuishan; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and repeatable measurement of the gross tumour volume(GTV) of subcutaneous xenografts is crucial in the evaluation of anti-tumour therapy. Formula and image-based manual segmentation methods are commonly used for GTV measurement but are hindered by low accuracy and reproducibility. 3D Slicer is open-source software that provides semiautomatic segmentation for GTV measurements. In our study, subcutaneous GTVs from nude mouse xenografts were measured by semiautomatic segmentation with 3D Slicer based on morphological magnetic resonance imaging(mMRI) or diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI)(b = 0,20,800 s/mm2) . These GTVs were then compared with those obtained via the formula and image-based manual segmentation methods with ITK software using the true tumour volume as the standard reference. The effects of tumour size and shape on GTVs measurements were also investigated. Our results showed that, when compared with the true tumour volume, segmentation for DWI(P = 0.060–0.671) resulted in better accuracy than that mMRI(P < 0.001) and the formula method(P < 0.001). Furthermore, semiautomatic segmentation for DWI(intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.9999) resulted in higher reliability than manual segmentation(ICC = 0.9996–0.9998). Tumour size and shape had no effects on GTV measurement across all methods. Therefore, DWI-based semiautomatic segmentation, which is accurate and reproducible and also provides biological information, is the optimal GTV measurement method in the assessment of anti-tumour treatments. PMID:26489359

  2. DWI联合MRS对前列腺癌诊断的价值%The value of diagnosis for prostate cancer by combining DWI with MRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆洋; 葛尚; 朱艳; 王亚婷; 柏根基

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨联合磁共振扩散加权成像(DWI)及磁共振波谱分析(MRS)对前列腺癌(PCa)的诊断价值。材料与方法对经过病理证实的24例PCa和30例前列腺增生(BPH)患者进行DWI和MRS检查。测量PCa区和BPH患者外周带、中央腺体的ADC值,观察枸橼酸盐(Cit)、胆碱(Cho)、肌酸(Cr)的化学位移并测量(Cho+Cr)/Cit比值。分别将PCa区ADC值95%可信区间上界、(Cho+Cr)/Cit值95%可信区间上界作为鉴别PCa与BPH的阈值。分析DWI、MRS及DWI联合MRS三种检查方法对PCa诊断的敏感度、特异度、准确度。结果 PCa区、BPH患者外周带、中央腺体的平均ADC值分别为(0.83±0.12)×10–3 mm 2/s、(1.82±0.26)×10–3 mm2/s、(1.46±0.16)×10–3 mm2/s (F=31.1,P<0.05),两两间比较差异均有统计学意义(P值均<0.05)。PCa区、BPH患者外周带、中央腺体的平均(Cho+Cr)/Cit值分别为1.55±0.11、0.53±0.16、0.64±0.13(F=18.2,P<0.05)。PCa区与BPH患者外周带及中央腺体(Cho+Cr)/Cit差异有统计学意义(P<0.05), BPH患者外周带与中央腺体(Cho+Cr)/Cit差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。DWI诊断PCa的敏感度、特异度、准确度分比为79.17%、80%、79.63%。MRS诊断PCa的敏感度、特异度、准确度分比为87.5%、86.67%、87.03%。DWI联合MRS诊断PCa的敏感度、特异度、准确度分别为91.67%、93.33%、92.59%。结论 DWI联合MRS对PCa诊断优于单独运用DWI及MRS。%Objective: To investigate the value of diagnosis for prostate cancer (PCa) by combining diffusion weighted imaging (DWl) with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Materials and Methods: Twenty-four cases of PCa and 30 cases of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) proved by pathology were examined by DWI and MRS. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of cancerous regions and peripheral zone and central glands in BPH were measured. The chemical shift of citrate (Cit), choline (Cho), creatine (Cr) spectra, and the ratio of

  3. Rape against Brazilian Women: Characteristics of Victims and Sex Offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Q. SOUTO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Violence against women is a serious social problem and affects mainly young women. This study aimed to evaluate sexual violence against women in Campina Grande, Brazil. Methods: A retrospective study with analysis of 886 forensic medical reports of sexual violence from the Institute of Legal Medicine of Campina Grande, Brazil, was conducted between January 2005 and December 2009. Sociodemographic variables related to victims, offenders and aggressions were analyzed. Significance level of 5% was adopted.Results: Two hundred and ninety-one cases of rape (32.8% were confirmed, the majority of victims aged between 0 and 19 years (89.9%, were single (98.8% and had low educational level (86.9%, with association with marital status (P = 0.02. The sex offender was known to the victim in 84.2% of cases and in 93.8% of cases, he acted alone. There was an association between rape and the relationship with the offenders (P = 0.01 and the age of the offenders (P = 0.03. The rape occurred in most cases at the home of victims (49.3%, with the use of violence in 72.3% of cases, but only 5.7% of the victims exhibited physical injuries. There was an association between rape and variables date of occurrence (P = 0.001, previous virginity (P = 0.001 and violence during practice (P = 0.001.Conclusion: Over one third of women were victims of rape, predominantly adolescents, unmarried and with low educational level. The offenders were known to the victims, and acted alone in most situations, making use of physical violence. Keywords: Sex offenses, Rape, Domestic violence, Brazil

  4. The Cycle of Abuse: When Victims Become Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Malory; Cossins, Annie

    2016-07-19

    Various psychological theories exist in the literature to explain the behavior of men who commit child sex offences, including the belief that child sexual abuse (CSA) is a predisposing factor for the transition from victim to offender. These theories are, however, unable to explain the fact that while most victims of CSA are female, most perpetrators of CSA are male. The sex specificity of CSA in terms of victims and offenders suggests that the experience of CSA and its psychosocial effects may be different for boys, compared to girls. We hypothesize that CSA experiences may involve risk factors that affect the development of sexually abusive behavior for boys, rather than girls. Our aim was to determine whether the literature provides evidence of a cycle of abuse from victim to offender, and, if so, to document its characteristics. We undertook a comprehensive literature review of studies on both victims and offenders, including studies which revealed the following: age of onset of CSA, duration of abuse, gender of the abuser, the relationship between victim and abuser, grooming behaviors, the types and severity of abuse, and disclosure of abuse. While we found no evidence for the existence of a cycle of abuse for female CSA victims, we discovered evidence to support the existence of a cycle of abuse for male CSA victims who had experienced particular abuse characteristics. As an original contribution to the literature, we identified four factors that may be associated with a boy's transition from victim to offender as well as the methodological issues to be addressed in future research. Based on criminological theories, we argue that these four factors share a common theme, that is, that they represent experiences of power (for the abuser) and powerlessness (for the victim).

  5. Offenders in emerging adulthood: School maladjustment, childhood adversities, and prediction of aggressive antisocial behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallinius, Märta; Delfin, Carl; Billstedt, Eva; Nilsson, Thomas; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Hofvander, Björn

    2016-10-01

    Early psychosocial adversities and maladjustment, such as childhood maltreatment and school adjustment problems, have been linked to an increased risk of aggressive antisocial behaviors. Yet, clinical studies of subjects at the highest risk of persistence in such behaviors are rare, especially during the life-changing transition years of emerging adulthood. This study describes early predictors of aggressive antisocial behaviors in a large, nationally representative cohort of Swedish, male violent offenders in emerging adulthood (age range = 18-25 years; N = 270). First, data on psychosocial background characteristics and aggressive antisocial behaviors (including age at onset) are provided. Second, early predictors of aggressive antisocial behaviors are tested in bivariate and multivariate interactive models. The offenders demonstrated a diversity of early onset adversities and disruptive behaviors, in line with established risk factors for subsequent criminality and adverse outcomes in a variety of life domains. Severe school adjustment problems, especially bullying others and early onset truancy, were important and interrelated predictors of aggressive antisocial behaviors over the lifetime, whereas childhood adversities such as parental substance or alcohol abuse and repeated exposure to violence at home during childhood were interrelated predictors of aggressive antisocial behaviors, albeit with less statistical importance. The findings stress the importance of early identification of individuals in the risk zone of developing severe and persistent aggressive antisocial behaviors and of early preventive interventions directed toward families with high-risk profiles. The findings also provide initial guidelines on which psychosocial background risk factors that need to be considered first-hand in early interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  7. Helping sex offenders to desist offending: The gains and drains for CoSA volunteers. A review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoïng, M.; Bogaerts, S.; Vogelvang, B.

    2016-01-01

    In Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA), a group of trained volunteers support sex offenders in their desistance process by engaging in a long-lasting empathic relationship. Is it safe to employ volunteers in this way? This literature review provides an overview of both theoretical

  8. Assessing the Risk of Re-Offending for Juvenile Offenders Using the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Kristin; Lowenkamp, Christopher T.; Latessa, Edward

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Youth Level of Service Case Management Inventory (YLS/CMI) is to assess, classify, and assist agencies with developing treatment and service plans according to the offender's criminogenic risk factors. Given the limited research in the predictive validity for this instrument, the current study attempts to examine this issue on a…

  9. Personality and deviant sexual fantasies: an examination of the MMPIs of sex offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curnoe, Suzanne; Langevin, Ron

    2002-07-01

    A sample of 228 sex offenders and nonsex offender controls were divided into two groups, based on the presence or absence of deviant sexual fantasies, as determined by their replies to the Clarke Sex History Questionnaire Fantasy Scales. The sex offenders were divided into six groups based on sexual preferences and criminal history. There were 14 heterosexual pedophiles, 23 homosexual pedophiles, 51 exhibitionists, 17 incest offenders, 24 sexual aggressives, and 57 multiple/miscellaneous offenders as well as 42 nonviolent nonsex offender controls. A 2 (fantasy group) x 7 (sex offender group) multivariate analysis with age and education as covariates was used to compare the MMPI validity scales (L, F, and K) and the 10 clinical scales as dependent variables. Deviant fantasizers had more clinically significantly scores on the F, Psychopathic Deviate, Masculinity-Femininity, Paranoia, and Schizophrenia Scales compared to nondeviant fantasizers, regardless of group membership. Results suggest that deviant fantasizers may be more socially alienated and less emotionally stable than nondeviant fantasizers, although few were diagnosed as psychotic. The sex offender and control groups showed considerable overlap on mean MMPI Scales. The groups tended to differ in level of depression and extent of persecutory ideas, but the multivariate sex offender group effect was not statistically significant when problems of inhomogeneity of variance were corrected. There was no interaction of fantasy groups and sex offender groups, indicating that the two factors can be considered independently.

  10. Potential and Dunkelfeld offenders: two neglected target groups for prevention of child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Gerard A; Mundt, Ingrid A; Feelgood, Steven; Hupp, Elena; Neutze, Janina; Ahlers, Christoph J; Goecker, David; Beier, Klaus M

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about men who have not yet committed child sexual abuse but may be at risk of doing so (potential offenders) and the factors that distinguish these men from undetected child sexual abuse offenders with a sexual interest in children (Dunkelfeld offenders). The present study describes and compares potential and Dunkelfeld offenders, which can be viewed as ideal target groups for (primary) prevention efforts with respect to child sexual abuse. Also, this study seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of using a telephone screening procedure to conduct research with these groups. Using a computer assisted telephone interview (CATI), data on demographics, mental health, sexuality, criminal history, and victim characteristics were collected from respondents in a nation-wide media campaign, which informed potential (re-)offenders of child sexual abuse of a research and treatment project. Many participants reported recurrent sexual fantasies involving minors, as well as related distress, suggesting a high prevalence of pedophilia and hebephilia. More than half feared they would sexually abuse a minor, and Dunkelfeld offenders reported 3.2 victims on average. Group comparisons revealed that Dunkelfeld offenders were, for example, more likely to perceive themselves being at risk of offending, compared to potential offenders. The results suggest that targeting potential and Dunkelfeld offenders could prove a worthwhile approach in the prevention of child sexual abuse.

  11. Aggression and attitudes to time and risk in weapon-using violent offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Iain R; Moore, Simon C; Shepherd, Jonathan P

    2010-08-15

    The use of weapons in violence increases both the severity of harm to victims and the severity of legal consequences for offenders, but little is known of the characteristics of violent offenders who choose to use weapons. Levels of anger, attitude to risk, time discounting, and antisocial history among a sample of weapon-using violent offenders (n=15) were compared to violent offenders who had not used a weapon (n=10) and nonviolent offenders (n=15). Results showed that weapon-using violent offenders displayed greater trait aggression and were more risk seeking than other offender types. In addition, weapon-using violent offenders were first convicted at an earlier age and truanted from school more frequently compared to other offender types. The results indicate that weapon users are more aggressive and more risk taking, but no more present focused than other violent and nonviolent offenders. Further research into the cognitive and social factors that influence weapon use is required if this dangerous behavior is to be reduced. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Interaction of Perceived Maternal and Paternal Parenting Styles and Their Relation with the Psychological Distress and Offending Characteristics of Incarcerated Young Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Julie; Power, Kevin; Loucks, Nancy; Swanson, Vivien

    2001-01-01

    The Parental Bonding Instrument was used to examine the relationship between parenting styles and the psychological distress and offending patterns of a group of young male offenders in Scotland. High levels of psychological distress were linked with low parental care, but there was no association between psychological distress and parental…

  13. Comparisons of Sex Offenders with Non-Offenders on Attitudes Toward Masturbation and Female Fantasy as Related to Participation in Human Sexuality Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten-Hustan, Annie L.

    1983-01-01

    Examined the effects of sexuality classes on 23 sex offenders and 28 college students. Results showed that compared to controls, participants had more positive attitudes toward masturbation and a disgust of perverse fantasies about women, suggesting human sexuality education may be useful in preventing sex offenses and rehabilitating offenders.…

  14. The Interaction of Perceived Maternal and Paternal Parenting Styles and Their Relation with the Psychological Distress and Offending Characteristics of Incarcerated Young Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Julie; Power, Kevin; Loucks, Nancy; Swanson, Vivien

    2001-01-01

    The Parental Bonding Instrument was used to examine the relationship between parenting styles and the psychological distress and offending patterns of a group of young male offenders in Scotland. High levels of psychological distress were linked with low parental care, but there was no association between psychological distress and parental…

  15. Solo and Multi-Offenders Who Commit Stranger Kidnapping: An Assessment of Factors That Correlate With Violent Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shannon N; Vandiver, Donna M

    2016-03-06

    Research has demonstrated that co-offending dyads and groups often use more violence than individual offenders. Despite the attention given to co-offending by the research community, kidnapping remains understudied. Stranger kidnappings are more likely than non-stranger kidnappings to involve the use of a weapon. Public fear of stranger kidnapping warrants further examination of this specific crime, including differences between those committed by solo and multi-offender groups. The current study uses National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data to assess differences in use of violence among 4,912 stranger kidnappings by solo offenders and multi-offender groups using cross-tabulations, ordinal regression, and logistic regression. The results indicate that violent factors are significantly more common in multi-offender incidents, and that multi-offender groups have fewer arrests than solo offenders. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. Assessing liver function in patients with HBV-related HCC: a comparison of T{sub 1} mapping on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging with DWI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Ying; Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Chen, Caizhong; Li, Renchen; Zeng, Meng-Su [Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, 180 Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai (China)

    2015-05-01

    To compare the potential of T{sub 1} mapping on gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for assessing liver function in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). One hundred consecutive patients with known HBV-related HCCs were included. T{sub 1} relaxation time and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the liver were measured, and the reduction rate of T{sub 1} relaxation time (∇%) was calculated. T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements were compared with ADC values according to the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. Hepatobiliary phase (HBP) and ∇% of T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements showed significant correlations with MELD score (rho = 0.571, p < 0.0001; rho = -0.573, p < 0.0001, respectively). HBP and ∇% of T{sub 1} relaxation time were significantly different between good (MELD ≤8) and poor liver function (MELD ≥9) (p < 0.0001 for both). Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of T{sub 1} relaxation time for HBP (AUC 0.84) and ∇% (AUC 0.82) were significantly better than for ADC (AUC 0.53; p < 0.0001). T{sub 1} mapping on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI showed promise for evaluating liver function in patients with HBV-related HCC, while DWI was not reliable. HBP T{sub 1} relaxation time measurement was equally accurate as ∇% measurement. (orig.)

  17. Imaging anti-angiogenic treatment response with DCE-VCT, DCE-MRI and DWI in an animal model of breast cancer bone metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeuerle, Tobias [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: t.baeuerle@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Bartling, Soenke [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: s.bartling@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Berger, Martin [Unit of Chemotherapy and Toxicology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: m.berger@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette [Institute of Pathology, University of Freiburg, Postfach 214, 79002 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: annette.schmitt-graeff@uniklinik-freiburg.de; Hilbig, Heidegard [Institute of Anatomy, University of Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 13, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)], E-mail: Heidegard.Hilbig@medizin.uni-leipzig.de; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Radiologische Klinik, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: hans-ulrich.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Delorme, Stefan [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: s.delorme@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Kiessling, Fabian [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: fkiessling@ukaachen.de

    2010-02-15

    As current classification systems for the assessment of treatment response in bone metastasis do not meet the needs of oncologists, new imaging biomarkers are desirable. Therefore, the diagnostic impact of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-volumetric computed tomography (VCT) (descriptive analysis), DCE-MRI (two-compartment model) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) for monitoring anti-angiogenic therapy effects of the VEGF antibody bevacizumab in breast cancer bone metastases in rats was studied. Nude rats (n = 8 animals treated with bevacizumab and n = 9 untreated control rats) with site-specific osteolytic bone metastasis of the hind leg were imaged with a 1.5 T clinical MRI-scanner in an animal coil as well as in a volumetric CT-scanner at days 30, 40, 50 and 60 after inoculation of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. From these data, osteolytic lesion size (OLS), peak enhancement (PE), area under the curve (AUC), amplitude (A), exchange rate constant (k{sub ep}) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were determined in bone metastases. Prior to changes in OLS (p {<=} 0.05 at days 50 and 60) there was already a significant decrease in PE, AUC and A (p {<=} 0.05 at days 40-60) in treated animals compared to controls. However, for k{sub ep} and ADC there were no significant differences between the groups at any time point (p > 0.05 at days 40-60). In conclusion, anti-angiogenic treatment response in osteolytic breast cancer bone metastases can be assessed early with surrogate markers of vascularization, while DWI appears to be insensitive.

  18. An application of the rational choice approach to the offending process of sex offenders: a closer look at the decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, Eric; Leclerc, Benoît

    2007-06-01

    Although the study of both offense processes and implicit theories provides in-depth knowledge about the decision-making of sex offenders, these studies focus solely on the internal psychological processes of the offender leading to the commission of a sexual assault. These studies neglect to look specifically at the offender's decision-making during the offense in interaction with the immediate situations encountered at the offense scene, such as the choices of behavior while interacting with the victim in a specific context. Based on a rational choice approach, this study investigates the decision-making involved in the offending process of 69 serial sexual offenders who have committed their crimes against stranger victims. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with offenders in order to identify the rationale behind their actions during the pre-crime phase (premeditation of the crime, estimation of risk of apprehension by the offender, and forensic awareness of the offender), crime phase (use of a weapon, use of restraints, use of a vehicle, and level of force used), and the post-crime phase (event leading to the end of crime and victim release site location choice). Results show that sex offenders, even if traditionally described as "irrational" and impulsive individuals, are capable, up to a certain point, of an analysis of the costs/benefits related to their actions. Moreover, results emphasize the important role of situational factors, such as victim resistance, on the decision-making process of sex offenders. Implications of the results are briefly discussed in regard of clinical practice and crime prevention.

  19. Initial experience with identifying high-grade prostate cancer using diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in patients with a Gleason score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somford, D.M.; Hambrock, T.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Futterer, J.J.; Oort, I.M. van; Basten, J.P. van; Karthaus, H.F.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (DWI) might be able to fulfill the need to accurately identify high-grade prostate carcinoma, in patients initially selected for active surveillance in the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) screening era based on transrectal ultrasound-g

  20. Criminal profiles of violent juvenile sex and violent juvenile non sex offenders: an explorative longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Anton Ph; Mali, Bas R F; Bullens, Ruud A R; Vermeiren, Robert R

    2007-10-01

    Few studies have longitudinally investigated the criminal profiles of violent juvenile sex and violent juvenile non-sex offenders. To make up for this lack, this study used police records of juveniles to determine the nature of the criminal profiles of violent sex offenders (n = 226) and violent non-sex offenders (n = 4,130). All offenders committed their first offense in 1996 and were followed for 7 years. Results showed that violent sex offenders and violent non-sex offenders cannot be considered a homogeneous group because of different background characteristics and criminal profiles. Sex and violent offenses often constitute a small part of a broader criminal pattern. Further research is necessary to reveal in more detail the developmental and criminological patterns of violent and sexual delinquency. Treatment and intervention programs may benefit from this.

  1. Does Watching a Play about the Teenage Brain Affect Attitudes toward Young Offenders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Blakey

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscience is increasingly used to infer the cognitive capacities of offenders from the activity and volume of different brain regions, with the resultant findings receiving great interest in the public eye. This field experiment tested the effects of public engagement in neuroscience on attitudes toward offenders. Brainstorm is a play about teenage brain development. Either before or after watching this play, 728 participants responded to four questions about the age of criminal responsibility, and the moral responsibility and dangerousness of a hypothetical young or adult offender. After watching the play, participants perceived the young offender as less likely to reoffend than the adult offender and the young, but not adult, offender as less morally responsible for his actions, especially on the first offense. Therefore, public engagement in the newest arrival to the criminological scene – neuroscience – may shift support for different youth justice responses.

  2. Does Watching a Play about the Teenage Brain Affect Attitudes toward Young Offenders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakey, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscience is increasingly used to infer the cognitive capacities of offenders from the activity and volume of different brain regions, with the resultant findings receiving great interest in the public eye. This field experiment tested the effects of public engagement in neuroscience on attitudes toward offenders. Brainstorm is a play about teenage brain development. Either before or after watching this play, 728 participants responded to four questions about the age of criminal responsibility, and the moral responsibility and dangerousness of a hypothetical young or adult offender. After watching the play, participants perceived the young offender as less likely to reoffend than the adult offender and the young, but not adult, offender as less morally responsible for his actions, especially on the first offense. Therefore, public engagement in the newest arrival to the criminological scene - neuroscience - may shift support for different youth justice responses.

  3. Diminished responsibility as a mitigating circumstance in juvenile offenders' legal judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, M

    1984-09-01

    The legal judgments of 20 juvenile offenders and 20 non-offenders were examined for three types of crimes: assault, arson and treason. Mitigating circumstances cast in the form of an inability to control events consisted of brain damage, passion and economic need, in contrast to a situation in which no mitigating circumstances were offered. The results indicated that despite the often-made legal argument, neither group regarded passion and economic need as circumstances warranting the reduction of sentencing. Compared to the non-offender group, offenders rated brain damage as less mitigating. While non-offenders rated passion and economic need more severely than brain damage, offenders' ratings of the three circumstances did not differ significantly. The findings are discussed in terms of perceptions of control and structural-developmental approaches to socialization.

  4. Relationship between parenting and cognitive schemas in a group of male adult offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica ePellerone

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the correlation of retrospective ratings on parental binding with cognitive patterns in the inmates for property crimes. The participant group comprehended 248 adults men, including 130 marked out as offenders (the experimental group, aged between 19 and 70, currently serving sentences in the Cavadonna prison in Siracusa, and 118 marked out as non-offenders (the control group, aged between 20 and 70, living in Siracusa (Sicily.The instruments used were the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, and the Young Schema Questionnaire-3 (YSQ. The preliminary analysis showed an high percentage of offenders who experienced an affectionate constraint parenting. Offenders scored significantly higher than the non-offenders on the level of paternal control and the YSQ subscales. The study underlines the influence of maternal care on most of the cognitive schemas, and the role of father’s control on the tendency to social isolation and defectiveness in the offenders.

  5. Sexual Offenders' Perceptions of the Client-Therapist Relationship: The Role of Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasko, Brandy L; Jeglic, Elizabeth L

    2016-06-01

    The therapeutic alliance has been shown to be integral to treatment outcomes even in forensic settings. There is still a relative dearth of research examining factors related to the formation of the therapeutic alliance in sex offender treatment specifically. Using a sample of 202 incarcerated male sexual offenders participating in sex offender treatment, this study examined whether perceptions of the client-therapist relationship from the perspective of male sexual offenders varied by risk for sexual and general recidivism. Overall, we found a significant negative relationship between risk for sexual recidivism and bond formation. However, when therapist subscale scores on the Working Alliance Inventory were considered by therapist gender, higher risk sexual offenders perceived poorer bonds with their female therapists, relative to their male therapists. Findings are discussed as they pertain to therapeutic relationships and responsivity issues in sex offender treatment.

  6. [Psychological processes of stress management and neuroendocrine regulation in incarcerated adolescent offenders: A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillod, L; Habersaat, S; Suter, M; Jeanneret, T; Bertoni, C; Stéphan, P; Urben, S

    2016-10-10

    Adolescence is a stressful period where important biological, psychological and social changes occur. Adolescents are particularly vulnerable during this developmental period and can use various strategies to deal with daily stress, such as substance use or externalizing behaviors. In previous studies, stress in adolescents with externalizing behaviors was often linked to ineffective cognitive coping strategies (i.e., constructive thinking) and overlooking the biological aspects involved in stress management such as neuroendocrine regulation. Indeed, repeated activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in chronic stress situations may have long-term effects on subsequent cortisol regulation and lead to psychological difficulties. It was also shown that basal cortisol levels are lower in adolescents with externalizing behaviors. This study aims to assess the links between constructive thinking and neuroendocrine regulation in adolescent offenders and their association with externalizing symptoms (e.g., aggression, delinquency, psychopathic traits, substance use). Identifying particular biopsychological patterns can help to better understand stress management in youth with externalizing behaviors and to improve clinical treatments. Sixteen adolescent males aged from 12 to 18 years were recruited in an institution for juvenile offenders. Exclusion criteria were insufficient reasoning abilities assessed using the Raven Matrices Test. Regarding psychological dimensions, constructive thinking was assessed through the Constructive thinking inventory (CTI), psychopathic traits through the Youth psychopathic traits inventory (YPI), externalizing behaviors through 30 items (out of 113) and 2 subscales (aggressive behavior and delinquency problems) from the Child behavior checklist-youth self-report (CBCL), and substance use through the Dep-ado. Regarding biological dimensions, cortisol daily secretion and regulation were assessed through saliva samples

  7. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  8. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  9. Sex Offenders Seeking Treatment for Sexual Dysfunction--Ethics, Medicine, and the Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Elizabeth A; Rajender, Archana; Douglas, Thomas; Brandon, Ashley F; Munarriz, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of sexual dysfunction in patients with prior sexual offenses poses ethical and legal dilemmas. Sex offenders are not obligated by law to disclose this history to medical professionals. Over 20% of sex offenders experience sexual dysfunction; however, the number of sex offenders seeking evaluation for sexual dysfunction is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence and characteristics of sex offenders seeking treatment in our clinic; and to review data regarding sex offender recidivism and ethics pertaining to the issue as it relates to treating physicians. Sex offenders were identified via three methods: new patient screening in a dedicated sexual medicine clinic, chart review of those on intracavernosal injection (ICI) therapy for erectile dysfunction (ED), and review of patient's status-post placement of penile prosthesis. Charts were cross-referenced with the U.S. Department of Justice National Sex Offender Public Website. Patient characteristics and details of offenses were collected. The main outcome measures used were a self-reported sexual offense and national registry data. Eighteen male sex offenders were identified: 13 via new patient screening; 3 by review of ICI patients; 1 by review of penile prosthesis data; and 1 prior to penile prosthesis placement. All were primarily referred for ED. Of those with known offenses, 64% were level 3 offenders (most likely to re-offend). The same number had committed crimes against children. All those with complete data had multiple counts of misconduct (average 3.6). Ninety-four percent (17/18) had publicly funded health care. Twelve (67%) were previously treated for sexual dysfunction. Registered sex offenders are seeking and receiving treatment for sexual dysfunction. It is unknown whether treatment of sexual dysfunction increases the risk of recidivism of sexual offenses. Physicians currently face a difficult choice in deciding whether to treat sexual dysfunction in sex

  10. Risk, Resource, Redemption? The Parenting and Custodial Experiences of Young Offender Fathers

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on an ESRC funded qualitative longitudinal study of young fatherhood, this article explores the experiences of young offender fathers, the complex intersection of offender and fatherhood pathways for young men and the impact of professional support and tailored intervention programmes on these processes. The article challenges the axiom of young offender fathers as inherently ‘risky’, and suggests the utility of a dynamic, life course approach to criminal policy and practice that reco...

  11. Evaluation of DoD Correctional Facility Compliance with Military Sex Offender Notification Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-26

    Sex Offender Notifications Appendix E - DoD and Service Policy on Notifications Concerning Changes in Inmate Status Appendix F - Victim and Witness...requesting victim and witness, at the earliest possible date, of (a) the date on which the offender will be eligible for parole and any scheduled...victim or witness, at the earliest possible date, (a) of the date on which the offender will be eligible for parole and any scheduled release hearing

  12. PERSONALITY AND CLINICAL TESTS IN SPANISH FOR ASSESSING JUVENILE OFFENDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Wenger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The psychological assessment of offenders throughout the different stages in the juvenile justice system is essential. It ensures the adequacy of the legal and educational measures to be applied in the process. This paper reviews the main tests of psychological assessment available in Spanish, suitable for use by psychology professionals who work with young offenders in the juvenile justice services in Spanish-speaking countries. We classify these tools into three groups: a personological, i.e. generic tools, suitable for any professional context in psychology, b clinical, i.e. tools whose initial use has been limited to working with adolescents with mental health needs, and c forensic, tools that have been specially developed for use in the juvenile justice population. This last group is described in the second part of this article (which appears in this same issue. The most important instruments of proven utility are presented and reviewed for each group.

  13. What works for serious juvenile offenders? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Genovés, Vicente; Anyela Morales, Luz; Sánchez-Meca, Julio

    2006-08-01

    This study examines the outcomes of best available empirical research regarding the effectiveness of treatment programs implemented in secure corrections to prevent the recidivism of serious (violent and chronic) juvenile offenders (from 12 to 21 years old). In this review 30 experimental and quasi-experimental studies are analyzed, comparing 2831 juveniles in the treatment groups and 3002 youths for the control groups. The global effect size of these 30 studies in terms of standardized mean difference was d = 0.14 in favour of the treatment groups. This size effect, in terms of "r" coefficient reached the value of 0.07, of low magnitude. The cognitive-behavioral methods of treatment were the most effective in decreasing recidivism. These results report that the rehabilitation programs for serious offenders achieve to reduce the general recidivism in comparison with the control juveniles in approximately seven percent.

  14. Identifying Gender Differences in an Australian Youth Offender Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane M. Shepherd

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study examined gender differences in risk factors for violence in a sample of 213 male and female youths held in Youth Justice Centres in Victoria, Australia. Although violence risk factors are considered to be commensurate across gender, a growing body of international literature is categorizing gender-specific criminal trajectories. The study aimed to investigate this concept in an Australian juvenile context. Through the use of a widely validated youth violence risk assessment inventory, the prevalence of salient risk items was compared across gender. Young female offenders were found to present with higher levels of family dysfunction, peer rejection and self-injurious behavior reflecting international female offending pathways literature.

  15. Treatment outcomes of chemical castration on Korean sex offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kyo Chul; Shim, Geum Sook; Park, Hyoun Hee; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Chung, Byung Ha; Hong, Sung Joon; Lee, Jae Woo

    2013-08-01

    After the recent enactment of the chemical castration legislation for sex offenders in Korea, we sought to report primary treatment outcomes for 38 patients at the National Forensic Hospital since 2011. After chemical castration, these patients experienced reductions in frequency and intensity of sexual drive, frequency of masturbation and sexual fantasies. The incidence of adverse effects was similar to that of previous reports. Serial hormonal evaluations showed an association between testosterone level and degree of paraphilic and non-paraphilic sexual thoughts. A notable finding was an unexpected upsurge of testosterone levels with intense sexual drive and fantasy observed during the first 2 months after cessation of treatment. This suggested the need for a temporary anti-androgen therapy or close surveillance during this period. When proper precautions are taken, chemical castration may be an effective treatment strategy for paraphilic and non-paraphilic sex offenders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  16. Spirituality and desistance from substance use among reentering offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Nicholas W; DeCamp, Whitney; Visher, Christy A

    2014-11-01

    Prior research has indicated an inverse relationship between religion and criminal behavior; however, few studies have specifically examined the effect of spirituality on the desistance process among a contemporary and diverse sample of reentering drug-involved offenders. A comprehensive understanding of how spirituality is related to desistance from substance use can lead to more effective and evidence-based preventive and rehabilitative interventions. Using data from a longitudinal study of 920 diverse offenders returning to the community after a period of incarceration, the current study examines three distinct forms of substance use (alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine) to gauge the effect that spirituality plays in the desistance process. The findings suggest a relatively high importance of spirituality in terms of preventing substance use during reentry, particularly concerning the use of both alcohol and cocaine.

  17. Sexual Offender Laws and Prevention of Sexual Violence or Recidivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Sexual violence is a significant public health problem in the United States. In an effort to decrease the incidence of sexual assault, legislators have passed regulatory laws aimed at reducing recidivism among convicted sexual offenders. As a result, sex offenders living in the United States are bound by multiple policies, including registration, community notification, monitoring via a global positioning system, civil commitment, and residency, loitering, and Internet restrictions. These policies have led to multiple collateral consequences, creating an ominous environment that inhibits successful reintegration and may contribute to an increasing risk for recidivism. In fact, evidence on the effectiveness of these laws suggests that they may not prevent recidivism or sexual violence and result in more harm than good. PMID:20075329

  18. The ability of juvenile offenders with personality immaturity to conscious leadership by their actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedonkina A.A.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the characteristics of the phenomenon of personality immaturity, stand out its main features, described differences in their quantitative representation of juvenile offenders, clinical features the diagnosis of mental disorders in juvenile offenders with personality immaturity. Special attention is given to how identified characteristics of personality immaturity affects to the ability of juvenile offenders to conscious regulation of their activities, including the potential ability and current ability of minors accused to realize the significance of their actions and control them when they commit socially dangerous acts. The studied parameters are compared in samples of juvenile offenders with personality immaturity and without it.

  19. Patterns of offending behaviour:a new approach (Full report)

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    This study focuses on developing a typology of criminal activity. It aims to identify a fixed number of types of criminal behaviour separately for males and females. Age profiles for each type of criminal activity are also constructed. Finally, the study probes the notion of criminal pathways. What proportion of offenders are specialists within one sphere of activity? How many tend to migrate from one sphere to another as they become older? The distinguishing feature of the analysis is that i...

  20. Understanding the Offender/Environment Dynamic for Computer Crimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willison, Robert Andrew

    2005-01-01

    practices by possiblyhighlighting new areas for safeguard implementation. To help facilitate a greaterunderstanding of the offender/environment dynamic, this paper assesses the feasibilityof applying criminological theory to the IS security context. More specifically, threetheories are advanced, which focus......There is currently a paucity of literature focusing on the relationship between theactions of staff members, who perpetrate some form of computer abuse, and theorganisational environment in which such actions take place. A greater understandingof such a relationship may complement existing security...

  1. HIV-Risk Reduction with Juvenile Offenders on Probation

    OpenAIRE

    Donenberg, Geri R.; Emerson, Erin; Mackesy-Amiti, Mary Ellen; Udell, Wadiya

    2014-01-01

    Youth involved in the juvenile justice system are at elevated risk for HIV as a result of high rates of sexual risk taking, substance use, mental health problems and sexually transmitted infections. Yet few HIV prevention programs exist for young offenders. This pilot study examined change in juvenile offenders’ sexual activity, drug/alcohol use, HIV testing and counseling, and theoretical mediators of risk taking following participation in PHAT Life, an HIV-prevention progr...

  2. Desistance from Sexual Offending: Do the Mainstream Theories Apply?

    OpenAIRE

    McAlinden, Anne-Marie; Farmer, Mark; Maruna, Shadd

    2016-01-01

    The literature on desistance from crime has become well established in recent years with strong bodies of evidence supporting the role of factors such as employment, relationships and identity change in this process. However, the relevance of this literature to individuals convicted of sexual crimes is not known as such individuals are almost always excluded from this research. This article presents the results from one of the first empirical studies on desistance from sexual offending based ...

  3. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  4. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  5. Patterns of federal Internet offenders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ann W; Carretta, Carrie M; Burgess, Allen G

    2012-09-01

    Internet-facilitated sexual offending is receiving increased forensic and clinical attention. Two issues confront this field. First, studies are equivocal as to whether (or not) the possession of Internet pornography can escalate to contact sexual offenses against a child, and second, federal judges have been questioning the length of sentences for users only of child pornography. The findings of this pilot study of 101 federal Internet offenders revealed over half of the men at the time of arrest were employed, educated, were in (or had been in) a relationship, had children, and did not have a prior criminal offense, suggesting a changing profile of a convicted sex offender. Forensic and psychiatric nurses who evaluate users of child pornography contraband need to be knowledgeable of Internet file transfer technology and the various types of contraband viewed specifically for the age of the preferred child, extreme acts to the child (e.g., bondage, S&M), and whether the user prefers images of adults with children or images of children only.

  6. The content of sexual fantasies for sexual offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Dion G; Devilly, Grant J; Ward, Tony

    2004-10-01

    Although the phenomenon of sexual fantasy has been extensively researched, little contemporary inquiry has investigated the content of sexual fantasy within the context of sexual offending. In this study, a qualitative analysis was used to develop a descriptive model of the phenomena of sexual fantasy during the offence process. Twenty-four adult males convicted of sexual offences provided detailed retrospective descriptions of their thoughts, emotions, and behaviors before, during, and after their offences. Using Grounded Theory, a model was developed to elucidate the content and themes of sexual fantasy for sexual offenders, as well as the way fantasy content was used in the process of sexual offending. The Sexual Fantasy Content Model (SFCM) comprises of three higher-order (level 1) and five second-order (level 2) categories that describe the content of sexual fantasy across the offence process. The level 1 categories are general sexual fantasy, nonspecific offence fantasy, and offence-specific fantasy, whereas the level 2 categories included demographic, behavioral, relational, situational, and self-perceptual considerations. The strengths of the SFCM are discussed and its clinical implications are reviewed.

  7. Music Exposure and Criminal Behavior: Perceptions of Juvenile Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardstrom

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine young offenders' perceptions of the relationship between exposure to music and their criminal behavior. Using a tool designed for the study, male felony offenders ages 12 to 17 were questioned about their music listening patterns and the perceived influence of listening on their offending fantasies and behavior. Rap music was the predominant choice across all participant profiles. While 72% of respondents believed that music influenced the way they feel at least some of the time, only 4% perceived a connection between music listening and their deviant behavior. Narrative comments provided by the youths were largely consistent with objective data. Most respondents believed in the reflection-rejection theory, in which music is perceived as a mirror of the adolescents' lives rather than a causative factor in their behavior. Two additional theoretical perspectives were espoused: drive reduction theory, which states that music serves as an expressive vehicle (thus reducing the likelihood of emotional and physical outburst); and excitation-transfer theory, wherein residual physiological arousal affects subsequent behavior. In the latter, music was perceived as harmful only when applied to preexisting states of negative arousal.

  8. The incidence of dyslexia among young offenders in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeheri, Gad; Everatt, John; Al Malki, Mohammad

    2009-05-01

    This paper investigates the incidence of dyslexia among young offenders in Kuwait. A total of 91 children/young adults from 8 juvenile delinquent welfare centres across Kuwait were interviewed and tested. A measure of non-verbal reasoning ability was used to exclude those with low general ability. The remaining 53 participants were tested on their ability to identify alliteration and rhyme, retain and manipulate sequences of digit and letter names, decode novel letter strings and identify words within letter chains. Participants' reading accuracy, rate of reading, reading comprehension and ability to spell correctly dictated text were also assessed. These measures were used to determine those with indicators of dyslexia. The results indicated that the percentage of individuals presenting evidence of dyslexia was much larger (greater than 20%) in this population of young offenders than would be expected based on the national average (around 6%) of dyslexics in Kuwait derived from a nationwide study (A survey study of dyslexia in Kuwait, Kuwait Dyslexia Association: Kuwait City; 2002). These findings replicate previous evidence for an increased frequency of dyslexia among young offenders. The implications of such findings are discussed in terms of dyslexia awareness, socio-cultural factors, education and intervention, particularly in Kuwait juvenile delinquent welfare centres.

  9. Parent--child relations and offending during young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wendi L; Giordano, Peggy C; Manning, Wendy D; Longmore, Monica A

    2011-07-01

    There is a long tradition of studying parent-child relationships and adolescent delinquency. However, the association between parent-child relationships and criminal offending during young adulthood is less well understood. Although the developmental tasks of young adulthood tend to focus on intimate relationships, employment, and family formation, the parent-child bond persists over the life course and likely continues to inform and shape behavior beyond adolescence. Using data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (TARS), the influence of parental involvement on patterns of offending among respondents interviewed first as adolescents (mean age of 15 years), and later as young adults (mean age of 20 years), is examined. The TARS sample used for our study (N = 1,007) is demographically diverse (49.5% female; 25.3% Black; 7.2% Hispanic) and includes youth beyond those enrolled in college. The influences of both early and later parenting factors such as support, monitoring and conflict on young adults' criminal behavior are examined. Results show that early monitoring and ongoing parental support are associated with lower offending in young adulthood. These effects persist net of peer influence and adolescent delinquency. This suggests the importance of examining multiple ways in which parental resources and support influence early adult behavior and well-being.

  10. Desistance From Sexual Offending: Behavioral Change Without Cognitive Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Danielle Arlanda

    2015-08-05

    The treatment and management of sexual offenders has long been focused on risk and recidivism. As a consequence, the phenomenon of desistance from sexual offending has only recently gained research attention. Unsurprisingly, the area of theory building to account for this empirical reality has been slow. Although a number of psychological theories of behavioral change and criminological theories of desistance exist, a comprehensive theoretical understanding of desistance from sexual offending is lacking. A theme common across a number of theories of internal desistance is cognitive transformation and specifically, one's readiness for and willingness to change. This study tested the relevance of that particular theme for a sample of 45 men convicted of sexual offenses who are living offense-free lives in the community. In contrast to this theme, long-term desistance was observed in most cases in the absence of any initial desire for intervention. The impact of current approaches such as mandatory treatment is discussed and implications for future research and practice are presented. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Comparison of intellectually disabled offenders with a combined history of sexual offenses and other offenses versus intellectually disabled offenders without a history of sexual offenses on dynamic client and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogaard, K J H M; Embregts, P J C M; Hendriks, A H C; Heestermans, M

    2013-10-01

    Sexually offensive behavior is prevalent among individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) and many sex offenders also commit other offenses such as vandalism or assault. We examined the differences between sex offenders with ID and a history of combined sex and other types of offenses (mixed sex offenders) versus offenders with no history of sexual offenses (non-sex offenders). Dynamic client and environmental factors were measured using the Adult Behaviour Checklist (ABCL) and the Risk Inventarization Scale on Sexually Offensive Behavior of Clients with intellectual disabilities (RISC-V). Item, subscale, and total scores were then compared for the two groups. Most of the comparisons did not reveal significant differences between the two groups. The findings call for a general theory of offending behavior to explain the absence of differences between the mixed sex offenders and non-sex offenders with ID.

  12. Why do People Stop offending? Recent Theories on Desistance and Their Value in Practical Approaches to offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Mihelj Plesničar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Desistance theories, researching the ways how and reasons why people stop offending have developed only recently. The article briefly describe their development in general and then examines four of the more recent influential ones in more detail: Laub and Sampson’s Age-graded theory of social control, the Cognitive transformation theory developed by Giordano et al., Maruna’s Theory of narrative self-change and Wikström’s Situational action theory. These theories are analysed with regard to their applicability to general or specific offending populations. Finally, the sociotherapeutic approach common to the Slovenian system in the past is analysed through the lenses of these theories and conclusions as to the value of general and specific theories and approaches are made.

  13. Sexual offending runs in families: A 37-year nationwide study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Långström, Niklas; Babchishin, Kelly M; Fazel, Seena; Lichtenstein, Paul; Frisell, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexual crime is an important public health concern. The possible causes of sexual aggression, however, remain uncertain. Methods: We examined familial aggregation and the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to sexual crime by linking longitudinal, nationwide Swedish crime and multigenerational family registers. We included all men convicted of any sexual offence (N = 21 566), specifically rape of an adult (N = 6131) and child molestation (N = 4465), from 1973 to 2009. Sexual crime rates among fathers and brothers of sexual offenders were compared with corresponding rates in fathers and brothers of age-matched population control men without sexual crime convictions. We also modelled the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors to the liability of sexual offending. Results: We found strong familial aggregation of sexual crime [odds ratio (OR) = 5.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.5–5.9] among full brothers of convicted sexual offenders. Familial aggregation was lower in father-son dyads (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 3.2–4.4) among paternal half-brothers (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.5–2.9) and maternal half-brothers (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2–2.4). Statistical modelling of the strength and patterns of familial aggregation suggested that genetic factors (40%) and non-shared environmental factors (58%) explained the liability to offend sexually more than shared environmental influences (2%). Further, genetic effects tended to be weaker for rape of an adult (19%) than for child molestation (46%). Conclusions: We report strong evidence of familial clustering of sexual offending, primarily accounted for by genes rather than shared environmental influences. Future research should possibly test the effectiveness of selective prevention efforts for male first-degree relatives of sexually aggressive individuals, and consider familial risk in sexual violence risk assessment. PMID:25855722

  14. Parenting Styles, Prosocial, and Aggressive Behavior: The Role of Emotions in Offender and Non-offender Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Llorca

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to analyse the parenting styles effects (acceptance, negative control and negligence on prosociality and aggressive behavior in adolescents through the mediator variables empathy and emotional instability, and also, if this model fits to the same extent when we study adolescents institutionalized due to problems with the law and adolescents from the general population, and at the same time, if the values of the different analyzed variables are similar in both groups of adolescents. We carried out a cross-sectional study. 220 participants from schools in the metropolitan area of Valencia took part in the study. Also, 220 young offenders took part recruited from four Youth Detention Centres of Valencia, in which they were carrying out court sentences. The age of the subjects range from 15-18 years. The results indicate that the emotional variables act as mediators in general, in the non-offender adolescents, but it has been observed, in the offender adolescents, a direct effect of support on aggressive behavior in a negative way and on prosociality in a positive way; and of negligence on aggressive behavior and of permissiveness on prosociality in a negative way.

  15. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  16. K-space and image-space combination for motion-induced phase-error correction in self-navigated multicoil multishot DWI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Anh T; Karampinos, Dimitrios C; Georgiadis, John G; Sutton, Bradley P

    2009-11-01

    Motion during diffusion encodings leads to different phase errors in different shots of multishot diffusion-weighted acquisitions. Phase error incoherence among shots results in undesired signal cancellation when data from all shots are combined. Motion-induced phase error correction for multishot diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been studied extensively and there exist multiple phase error correction algorithms. A commonly used correction method is the direct phase subtraction (DPS). DPS, however, can suffer from incomplete phase error correction due to the aliasing of the phase errors in the high spatial resolution phases. Furthermore, improper sampling density compensation is also a possible issue of DPS. Recently, motion-induced phase error correction was incorporated in the conjugate gradient (CG) image reconstruction procedure to get a nonlinear phase correction method that is also applicable to parallel DWI. Although the CG method overcomes the issues of DPS, its computational requirement is high. Further, CG restricts to sensitivity encoding (SENSE) for parallel reconstruction. In this paper, a new time-efficient and flexible k-space and image-space combination (KICT) algorithm for rigid body motion-induced phase error correction is introduced. KICT estimates the motion-induced phase errors in image space using the self-navigated capability of the variable density spiral trajectory. The correction is then performed in k -space. The algorithm is shown to overcome the problem of aliased phase errors. Further, the algorithm preserves the phase of the imaging object and receiver coils in the corrected k -space data, which is important for parallel imaging applications. After phase error correction, any parallel reconstruction method can be used. The KICT algorithm is tested with both simulated and in vivo data with both multishot single-coil and multishot multicoil acquisitions. We show that KICT correction results in diffusion-weighted images with higher

  17. Criminal Profiles of Violent Juvenile Sex and Violent Juvenile Non-Sex Offenders: An Explorative Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Anton Ph.; Mali, Bas R. F.; Bullens, Ruud A. R.; Vermeiren, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    Few studies have longitudinally investigated the criminal profiles of violent juvenile sex and violent juvenile non-sex offenders. To make up for this lack, this study used police records of juveniles to determine the nature of the criminal profiles of violent sex offenders (n = 226) and violent non-sex offenders (n = 4,130). All offenders…

  18. What Is so Special about Male Adolescent Sexual Offending? A Review and Test of Explanations through Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Michael C.; Lalumiere, Martin L.

    2010-01-01

    We tested special and general explanations of male adolescent sexual offending by conducting a meta-analysis of 59 independent studies comparing male adolescent sex offenders (n = 3,855) with male adolescent non-sex offenders (n = 13,393) on theoretically derived variables reflecting general delinquency risk factors (antisocial tendencies),…

  19. Substance Use, Offending, and Participation in Alcohol and Drug Treatment Programmes: A Comparison of Prisoners with and without Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, Jane A.; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J.; Newton, Danielle C.; Richardson, Ben A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many offenders with intellectual disabilities have substance use issues. Offending behaviour may be associated with substance use. Materials and Methods: Prisoners with and without intellectual disabilities were compared in terms of their substance use prior to imprisonment, the influence of substance use on offending, and their…

  20. Motivations behind "Bullies Then Offenders" versus "Pure Bullies": Further Suggestions for Anti-Bully Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Pattie; Tankersley, Merrie; Joenson, Trevor; Hupp, Mikey; Buckley, Jennifer; Redmond-McGowan, Margaret; Zanzinger, Allison; Poirier, Alex; Walsh, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    Cyber-bullying has become increasingly problematic in academic settings including universities and colleges. The bullying literature has been expanding investigation of the bully behaviors and has identified four bully types to include pure offender, pure victim, offender and victim, neither-offender-nor-victim. The majority of research has…

  1. Motivations behind "Bullies Then Offenders" versus "Pure Bullies": Further Suggestions for Anti-Bully Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Pattie; Tankersley, Merrie; Joenson, Trevor; Hupp, Mikey; Buckley, Jennifer; Redmond-McGowan, Margaret; Zanzinger, Allison; Poirier, Alex; Walsh, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    Cyber-bullying has become increasingly problematic in academic settings including universities and colleges. The bullying literature has been expanding investigation of the bully behaviors and has identified four bully types to include pure offender, pure victim, offender and victim, neither-offender-nor-victim. The majority of research has…

  2. Substance Use, Offending, and Participation in Alcohol and Drug Treatment Programmes: A Comparison of Prisoners with and without Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, Jane A.; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J.; Newton, Danielle C.; Richardson, Ben A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many offenders with intellectual disabilities have substance use issues. Offending behaviour may be associated with substance use. Materials and Methods: Prisoners with and without intellectual disabilities were compared in terms of their substance use prior to imprisonment, the influence of substance use on offending, and their…

  3. On the relationships between commercial sexual exploitation/prostitution, substance dependency, and delinquency in youthful offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Joan A; Piquero, Alex R

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have consistently linked commercial sexual exploitation (CSE) of youth and involvement in prostitution with substance dependency and delinquency. Yet, important questions remain regarding the directionality and mechanisms driving this association. Utilizing a sample of 114 CSE/prostituted youth participating in the Pathways to Desistance study-a longitudinal investigation of the transition from adolescence to adulthood among serious adolescent offenders-the current study examined key criminal career parameters of CSE/prostitution including age of onset and rate of recurrence. Additionally, structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore concurrent associations and causal links between CSE/prostitution and drug involvement. Findings show a general sequential pattern of the ages of onset with substance use and selling drugs occurring prior to CSE/prostitution, evidence that a small group with chronic CSE/prostitution account for the majority of CSE/prostitution occurrences, and high rates of repeated CSE/prostitution. SEM results suggest CSE/prostituted youth persist in drug involvement from year to year but infrequently experience perpetuation of CSE/prostitution from year to year. Concurrent associations between CSE/prostitution and drug involvement were found across the length of the study. Additionally, drug involvement at one year was linked to CSE/prostitution during the subsequent year during early years of the study.

  4. What Makes Offenders with an Intellectual Disability Ready to Engage with Psychological Therapy? A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckon, Susan E.; Smith, Ian C.; Daiches, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Although there are established links between measures of readiness for psychological therapy in offenders and subsequent reduction in recidivism rates there has been a lack of theoretical research considering this process within the intellectual disability (ID) offender population. Grounded theory methodology was used to explore the process by…

  5. Executive functioning deficits and childhood trauma in juvenile violent offenders in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhili; Meng, Huaqing; Ma, Zhongrui; Deng, Wei; Du, Lian; Wang, Hui; Chen, Pinhong; Hu, Hua

    2013-05-30

    A large body of evidence indicates that violent offenders have executive functioning deficits. However, previous studies have not considered childhood trauma, which is likely to influence the executive functioning of violent offenders. The aim of the present study was to compare the difference of executive functioning among juvenile violent offenders, with non-violent offenders and normal controls, and then to analyse whether executive functioning was affected independently of childhood trauma. In addition to using a battery of tests assessing executive functioning including the Intra/Extradimensional Shift Test(IED), the Stockings of Cambridge Test (SOC), and the Spatial Working Memory Test (SWM) from the Cambridge Automated Neuropsychological Testing Battery (CANTAB), the short form of the Chinese Revision of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-RC) and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-28 item Short Form (CTQ) were also used among 107 violent offenders, 107 non-violent offenders and 107 normal controls. Our results showed that both offender groups obtained significantly lower estimated Intelligence Quotient (IQ) scores and experienced more childhood trauma than did normal controls. Violent offenders showed impaired executive functioning on tasks of attention set-shifting, working memory and planning. Finally, spatial working memory (SWM) deficits, particularly SWM strategy scores, may be associated with childhood trauma.

  6. Embedding Psychodrama in a Wilderness Group Program for Adolescent Sex Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambie, Ian; Robson, Marlyn; Simmonds, Les

    1997-01-01

    Describes the technique of psychodrama to facilitate victim empathy with adolescent sexual offenders. Discusses other psychodramatic methods of role training, sociodrama, mirroring, and modeling, and their applications to working with adolescent sexual offenders. Outlines the history of the psychodrama technique's implementation in a…

  7. Childhood Abuse and Adolescent Sexual Re-Offending: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallie, Adana L.; Viljoen, Jodi L.; Mordell, Sarah; Spice, Andrew; Roesch, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Recent research indicates that adolescents who have sexually offended are more likely than other adolescents to have a history of sexual and physical abuse. However, it is unclear whether abuse predicts re-offending among these adolescents. To examine this relationship, a meta-analysis was conducted which included 29 effect sizes drawn from 11…

  8. Second-to-fourth digit ratio and impulsivity: a comparison between offenders and nonoffenders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Hanoch

    Full Text Available Personality characteristics, particularly impulsive tendencies, have long been conceived as the primary culprit in delinquent behavior. One crucial question to emerge from this line of work is whether impulsivity has a biological basis. To test this possibility, 44 male offenders and 46 nonoffenders completed the Eysenck Impulsivity Questionnaire, and had their 2D∶4D ratio measured. Offenders exhibited smaller right hand digit ratio measurements compared to non-offenders, but higher impulsivity scores. Both impulsivity and 2D∶4D ratio measurements significantly predicted criminality (offenders vs. nonoffenders. Controlling for education level, the 2D∶4D ratio measurements had remained a significant predictor of criminality, while impulsivity scores no longer predicted criminality significantly. Our data, thus, indicates that impulsivity but not 2D∶4D ratio measurements relate to educational attainment. As offenders varied in their number of previous convictions and the nature of their individual crimes, we also tested for differences in 2D∶4D ratio and impulsivity among offenders. Number of previous convictions did not correlate significantly with the 2D∶4D ratio measurements or impulsivity scores. Our study established a link between a biological marker and impulsivity among offenders (and lack thereof among non-offenders, which emphasise the importance of studying the relationship between biological markers, impulsivity and criminal behavior.

  9. Sexualized Minds: Child Sex Offenders Offense-supportive Cognitions and Interpretations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.S. Hempel (Inge)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Child sex offenders (CSOs) tend to justify their sexually abusive behaviour. To clarify the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the offending process of CSOs, this thesis aimed to extend the knowledge about CSOs’ problematic attitudes and beliefs about sex with chi

  10. Interpreting child sexual abuse: Empathy and offense-supportive cognitions among child sex offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempel, I.S.; Buck, N.M.L.; van Vugt, E.S.; van Marle, H.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that child sex offenders hold distorted views on social interactions with children. Misinterpreting children’s behavior and intentions could lead to sexually abusive behavior toward children. It is further suggested that the interpretation process is influenced by offender

  11. Differences between Male and Female Juvenile Offenders as Measured by the BASC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Georgia B.

    2001-01-01

    This study is an initial examination of behavioral and emotional differences between male and female juvenile offenders using an omnibus self-report personality inventory. Differences between male and female juvenile offenders were found on 6 of 14 comparisons. Findings provide support for differential treatment planning in addressing the needs of…

  12. Cost and Service Impacts of Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders in Ten States: "Responses to Angry Youth."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Washington, DC.

    Status offenders are minors brought to the attention of courts because they are runaways, truants, or are considered ungovernable or incorrigible. This report assesses the costs and service impacts of deinstitutionalization of status offenders. The findings are based on case studies in 10 states. Included in this report are sections on the state…

  13. The treatment of incest offenders--a hypnotic approach: a brief communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, C G; Van Patten, I T

    1995-07-01

    Incest has become more prominent in public awareness over the past 15 years. The major focus of this interest has been on the incest survivor. The incest offender has received less attention. A hypnotic approach to treating incest offenders is outlined that involves a seven-stage approach. A case example is presented and future research directions suggested.

  14. A Personality Test for Spanish-Literate Offenders: The Psicologico Texto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the development of the Psicologico Texto (PT), a personality survey specifically designed for the Spanish-literate offender. Describes problems in accurate, relevant assessment of those individuals who generally have poor literary skills. Tested PT with offenders (n=130) of Puerto Rican, Mexican, and Cuban heritages. (Author/ABL)

  15. Validation of the Offending-Related Attitudes Questionnaire of CRIME-PICS II Scale (Chinese)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Wing Hong; Wu, Joseph; Kwok, Yan Yuen; Liu, Liu

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the first part of the Chinese version of the CRIME-PICS II Scale, a self-administrated instrument assessing offending-related attitudes. Data were collected from three samples: male Hong Kong young offenders, female Mainland Chinese prisoners, and Hong Kong college students.…

  16. The Mental Health of Young People Attending a Youth Offending Team: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, Paul; Thomason, Jane; Churchyard, Sally

    2003-01-01

    Documents the health needs of young offenders aged 10-17 attending a community Youth Offending Team. Health information was collected via semi-structured interviews and standardized questionnaires. Potential mental health problems that required further specialist assessment were identified in 56% of those assessed. Discusses the process of meeting…

  17. How effective are severe disciplinary policies? School policies and offending from adolescence into young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matjasko, Jennifer L

    2011-10-01

    Based on the stage environment and the person environment fit perspectives, the current study examined the relation between school disciplinary policies and offending from adolescence into young adulthood. Using Waves I and III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (a.k.a., Add Health), hierarchical multinomial logistic regression models were utilized to test whether school disciplinary policies were related to offending patterns during adolescence and young adulthood. Descriptive results suggest that, overall, severe school policies were not associated with the course of offending. However, relations between individual characteristics (i.e., inattention and impulsivity) and offending patterns did appear to differ depending on the severity of disciplinary policies. Within schools with more severe policies, adolescents scoring higher on inattention were more likely to be in the adolescent-limited offender group over the persistent offender group. On the other hand, adolescents with high levels of impulsivity were more likely to be in the persistent group over the non-offender group within schools with more severe policies. The results suggest that severe policies may not be effective for all students and the policies, alone, may not be promising avenues for the prevention of offending during adolescence and young adulthood.

  18. Parenting Interventions for Male Young Offenders: A Review of the Evidence on What Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buston, K.; Parkes, A.; Thomson, H.; Wight, D.; Fenton, C.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately one in four incarcerated male young offenders in the UK is an actual or expectant father. This paper reviews evidence on the effectiveness of parenting interventions for male young offenders. We conducted systematic searches across 20 databases and consulted experts. Twelve relevant evaluations were identified: 10 from the UK, of…

  19. Moral Judgment of Young Sex Offenders with and without Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, Eveline; Asscher, Jessica; Stams, Geert Jan; Hendriks, Jan; Bijleveld, Catrien; van der Laan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differences in moral judgment between juvenile sex offenders with and without intellectual disabilities. The Sociomoral Reflection Measure-Short Form (SRM-SF) was used to assess moral judgment, and was extended with questions referring to general sexual situations and to the offenders' abuse victim(s). Juvenile sex offenders…

  20. Second-to-fourth digit ratio and impulsivity: a comparison between offenders and nonoffenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanoch, Yaniv; Gummerum, Michaela; Rolison, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Personality characteristics, particularly impulsive tendencies, have long been conceived as the primary culprit in delinquent behavior. One crucial question to emerge from this line of work is whether impulsivity has a biological basis. To test this possibility, 44 male offenders and 46 nonoffenders completed the Eysenck Impulsivity Questionnaire, and had their 2D∶4D ratio measured. Offenders exhibited smaller right hand digit ratio measurements compared to non-offenders, but higher impulsivity scores. Both impulsivity and 2D∶4D ratio measurements significantly predicted criminality (offenders vs. nonoffenders). Controlling for education level, the 2D∶4D ratio measurements had remained a significant predictor of criminality, while impulsivity scores no longer predicted criminality significantly. Our data, thus, indicates that impulsivity but not 2D∶4D ratio measurements relate to educational attainment. As offenders varied in their number of previous convictions and the nature of their individual crimes, we also tested for differences in 2D∶4D ratio and impulsivity among offenders. Number of previous convictions did not correlate significantly with the 2D∶4D ratio measurements or impulsivity scores. Our study established a link between a biological marker and impulsivity among offenders (and lack thereof among non-offenders), which emphasise the importance of studying the relationship between biological markers, impulsivity and criminal behavior.

  1. Formulating a Serious-Games Design Project for Adult Offenders with the Probation Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Matthew Ian; Brown, David; Cranton, Wayne; Lewis, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper documents an investigation evaluating if adult offenders can benefit from a facilitated serious-games design project as part of their probation program. Research has observed a participatory design group of adult offenders working with their probation managers and a PhD researcher to create a new serious-game for use by the probation…

  2. Bullying in Childhood, Externalizing Behaviors, and Adult Offending: Evidence from a 30-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergusson, David M.; Boden, Joseph M.; Horwood, L. John

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the developmental processes linking childhood bullying to criminal offending in adulthood, using data from a 30-year longitudinal study. The linkages between bullying in childhood and three criminal offending outcomes in adulthood were estimated both before and after control for a range of confounding factors. A series of…

  3. Formulating a Serious-Games Design Project for Adult Offenders with the Probation Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Matthew Ian; Brown, David; Cranton, Wayne; Lewis, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper documents an investigation evaluating if adult offenders can benefit from a facilitated serious-games design project as part of their probation program. Research has observed a participatory design group of adult offenders working with their probation managers and a PhD researcher to create a new serious-game for use by the probation…

  4. Substance misuse and substance use disorders in sex offenders: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.L. Kraanen; P.M.G. Emmelkamp

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse has often been associated with committing sex offenses. In this article, the following will be reviewed: 1) studies that assessed substance abuse in sex offenders; 2) differences in substance abuse among different types of sex offenders; 3) differences in substance abuse between sex

  5. Substance use disorders in forensic psychiatry: differences among different types of offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraanen, F.L.; Scholing, A.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study that compared different types of offenders in forensic outpatient treatment (i.e., offenders of general violence [GV], intimate partner violence [IPV], sex crimes, and "other offenses" such as drug smuggling and property crimes) regarding the prevalence of substance use

  6. Exploring Emotion Regulation in Juveniles Who Have Sexually Offended: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sara; Joyal, Christian C; Cisler, Josh M; Bai, Shasha

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study compared juveniles who sexually offend to nonoffending juveniles in their capacities to behaviorally and neurologically regulate, or reappraise, negative emotions. Participants were 39 juvenile males, including 10 healthy, nonoffending control subjects and 29 juveniles who sexually offend, comprising 12 juveniles who sexually offend with history of child sexual abuse. Participants completed a clinical assessment and a reappraisal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Difficulties in Emotional Regulation Scale results showed significantly less difficulties in emotion regulation among controls compared to juveniles who sexually offend, but when self-rating reappraisal abilities during the functional magnetic resonance imaging, all groups obtained comparable results. The imaging results showed no significant differences in fronto-temporal regions between controls and juveniles who sexually offend. Differences were found in other regions indicated in cognitive control, working memory, and emotional processing between controls and juveniles who sexually offend as well as between juveniles who sexually offend and those without history of child sexual abuse. Findings suggest that juveniles who sexually offend are capable of emotion regulation.

  7. Offenders, Judges, and Officers Rate the Relative Severity of Alternative Sanctions Compared to Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nathan T.; May, David C.; Wood, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Recent work suggests that offenders rate several alternatives as more severe than imprisonment. We build on this literature by comparing punishment exchange rates generated by criminal court judges with rates generated by offenders and their supervising officers. Findings reveal that none of the three groups rates prison as the most severe…

  8. The Lesser of Two Evils? A Qualitative Study of Offenders' Preferences for Prison Compared to Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alisha; May, David C.; Wood, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that many offenders will choose to serve prison rather than any amount of a community-based sanction. This primarily quantitative research has found that offender-generated exchange rates are influenced by a wide variety of experiences and characteristics. Missing from this literature is a qualitative evaluation of…

  9. Embedding Psychodrama in a Wilderness Group Program for Adolescent Sex Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambie, Ian; Robson, Marlyn; Simmonds, Les

    1997-01-01

    Describes the technique of psychodrama to facilitate victim empathy with adolescent sexual offenders. Discusses other psychodramatic methods of role training, sociodrama, mirroring, and modeling, and their applications to working with adolescent sexual offenders. Outlines the history of the psychodrama technique's implementation in a…

  10. The Utility of Male Domestic Violence Offender Typologies: New Directions for Research, Policy, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Mary M.; Gelles, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The development of empirically based behavioral and psychological typologies provides clear evidence that offenders vary across types. A review and synthesis of the literature reveals three types of batterers common across current typology research - a low, moderate, and high-risk offender. Examination of these types demonstrates that most male…

  11. Dispelling the Myths: Can Psychoeducation Change Public Attitudes towards Sex Offenders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleban, Holly; Jeglic, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The public desires more punitive sentencing for sex offenders; however, treatment has been shown to be most effective in increasing public safety. It has been suggested that public education about the benefits of sex offender treatment could influence public policy. The purpose of this study was to determine if a brief psychoeducational…

  12. Predicting trajectories of offending over the life course : findings from a Dutch conviction cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bersani, B.; Nieuwbeerta, P.; Laub, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Distinguishing trajectories of criminal offending over the life course, especially the prediction of high-rate offenders, has received considerable attention over the past two decades. Motivated by a recent study by Sampson and Laub (2003), this study uses longitudinal data on conviction histories f

  13. Substance use disorders in forensic psychiatry: differences among different types of offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.L. Kraanen; A. Scholing; P.M.G. Emmelkamp

    2011-01-01

    This is the first study that compared different types of offenders in forensic outpatient treatment (i.e., offenders of general violence [GV], intimate partner violence [IPV], sex crimes, and "other offenses" such as drug smuggling and property crimes) regarding the prevalence of substance use disor

  14. 32 CFR 755.7 - Action where offenders are members of different commands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Action where offenders are members of different commands. (a) Action by common superior. The investigative report shall be forwarded to the common superior exercising general court-martial jurisdiction... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Action where offenders are members of...

  15. The Role of Family Affect in Juvenile Drug Court Offenders' Substance Use and HIV Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolou-Shams, Marina; Hadley, Wendy; Conrad, Selby M.; Brown, Larry K.

    2012-01-01

    Family-based interventions targeting parenting factors, such as parental monitoring and parent-child communication, have been successful in reducing adolescent offenders' substance use and delinquency. This pilot, exploratory study focuses on family and parenting factors that may be relevant in reducing juvenile offenders' substance use and sexual…

  16. Selectively Incapacitating Frequent Offenders : Costs and Benefits of Various Penal Scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokland, Arjan A. J.; Nieuwbeerta, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A small number of offenders are responsible for a disproportionate share of total crime. Policy makers have been seeking to reduce crime more efficiently by targeting corrections at these frequent offenders. Thus far, both macro- and micro-level research have yielded mixed results regarding the effe

  17. Extending Deterrence Theory: Do Delinquent Peers Condition the Relationship between Perceptions of Getting Caught and Offending?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Shelley Keith; Agnew, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Studies suggest that the perceived certainty of punishment has little or no effect on subsequent offending. Some researchers, however, argue that perceived certainty deters offending among some types of people but not among others. This article contributes to this line of argument by examining whether the effect of perceived certainty on offending…

  18. Risk Assessment and Risk Management in Offenders with Intellectual Disabilities: Are We There Yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouls, Claudia; Jeandarme, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Research on risk assessment and risk management in offenders with intellectual disabilities (OIDs), although far behind compared to the mainstream offender literature, is now expanding. The current review provides an overview of the predictive value of risk assessment and treatment outcome monitoring tools developed for both mainstream forensic…

  19. Predictors of offending among prisoners: the role of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S; Wells, J; Gudjonsson, G H

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate predictors of offending among prisoners from official records after controlling for age at first conviction and antisocial personality disorder. The participants were 198 Scottish prisoners, who had completed Diagnostic Statistical Manual IV screens for child and adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III for Axis I and Axis II disorders. The ADHD symptomatic group had significantly higher rates of total, acquisitive and violent offending than other prisoners, as well as greater regular heroin use. Hierarchical multiple regressions, using child and adult symptoms as dimensions, showed that frequent use of heroin in the year prior to imprisonment was the single most powerful predictor of the extent of total offending, with ADHD symptoms also adding independently to the variance in offending. In contrast, for violent offending, ADHD symptoms were the strongest predictor followed by alcohol dependence. The findings demonstrate the importance of heroin use and ADHD symptoms in the persistence of offending. There is an urgent need to treat drug addiction and ADHD symptoms in order to reduce offending among the most persistent offenders. Recently, treatment programmes have been developed for adults with ADHD, heroin and crack cocaine addiction which can be applied to this population.

  20. Sexualized Minds: Child Sex Offenders Offense-supportive Cognitions and Interpretations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.S. Hempel (Inge)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Child sex offenders (CSOs) tend to justify their sexually abusive behaviour. To clarify the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the offending process of CSOs, this thesis aimed to extend the knowledge about CSOs’ problematic attitudes and beliefs about sex with

  1. Interpreting child sexual abuse: Empathy and offense-supportive cognitions among child sex offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempel, I.S.; Buck, N.M.L.; van Vugt, E.S.; van Marle, H.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that child sex offenders hold distorted views on social interactions with children. Misinterpreting children’s behavior and intentions could lead to sexually abusive behavior toward children. It is further suggested that the interpretation process is influenced by offender

  2. Therapeutic Responses of Psychopathic Sexual Offenders: Treatment Attrition, Therapeutic Change, and Long-Term Recidivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, Mark E.; Wong, Stephen C. P.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the therapeutic responses of psychopathic sex offenders (greater than or equal to 25 Psychopathy Checklist-Revised; PCL-R) in terms of treatment dropout and therapeutic change, as well as sexual and violent recidivism over a 10-year follow-up among 156 federally incarcerated sex offenders treated in a high-intensity inpatient…

  3. House-Tree-Person Drawings and Sex Offenders: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jennifer R.; Carolan, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Investigates whether or not specific indicators appear more frequently in the House-Tree-Person drawings of sex offenders when compared to drawings of a control group. The goal of the research is to explore the use of an art-based assessment as a tool for the early identification of sex offenders. (BF)

  4. The Relationship between Childhood Abuse, Psychological Symptoms and Subsequent Sex Offending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Childhood sexual and physical abuse has been related to subsequent offending behaviour in non-disabled individuals as well as people with intellectual disabilities, but there is a dearth of research examining the link between these two characteristics and psychological, behavioural and psychiatric symptoms amongst sex offenders with…

  5. Helping Sex Offenders to Desist Offending: The Gains and Drains for CoSA Volunteers-A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höing, Mechtild; Bogaerts, Stefan; Vogelvang, Bas

    2016-08-01

    In Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA), a group of trained volunteers support sex offenders in their desistance process by engaging in a long-lasting empathic relationship. Is it safe to employ volunteers in this way? This literature review provides an overview of both theoretical explanations and empirical evidence of the possible impact of this type of volunteerism on the volunteers themselves. Fifty original research articles and reviews met the selection criteria of a systematic search. Results on effects of volunteering in general, effects of volunteer work with offenders, and effects of working with sex offenders on professionals are summarized and integrated. Generally, volunteering supports and improves physical health and mental well-being, personal growth, and citizenship. However, working with sex offenders in an empathic relationship generates both positive and negative effects on psychological and social function. Personal characteristics, task characteristics, and organizational characteristics moderate and mediate the impact. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Theory of mind in men who have sexually offended against children: a U.K. comparison study between child sex offenders and nonoffender controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsegood, Kelly J; Duff, Simon C

    2010-03-01

    Child sex offenders are typically characterized by empathy problems, cognitive distortions, and social skills deficits. It has been proposed that these characteristics may be attributable to an underlying impairment in the ability to attribute mental states to others (i.e., theory of mind).This study compared a group of nonincarcerated child sex offenders (n = 46) with a group of community controls ( n = 46) matched for age, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and status as a parent. Both groups completed two measures of theory of mind: one that measures the ability to infer the mental states of adults and another that measures the ability to infer the mental states of children. Offenders were significantly worse than controls at inferring the mental states of adults. In contrast, there were no differences between offenders and controls in their ability to infer the mental states of children. The results are discussed with regard to psychological theory, clinical work, and future research.

  7. Psychological strengths and posttraumatic growth in the successful reintegration of South African ex-offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guse, Tharina; Hudson, Daphne

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to explore the possible presence of psychological strengths and posttraumatic growth in the life stories of ex-offenders who desisted returning to crime. Recidivism rates in South African offenders released from prison remain as high as 97%. Little is known about positive psychological factors that may facilitate successful reentry of ex-offenders in the South African context. In an exploratory qualitative study, three adult male ex-offenders who had successfully reintegrated into society were interviewed, using a semi-structured interview schedule focusing on their life stories. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Several psychological strengths, including hope, gratitude, and spirituality, were evident in the responses of the participants. Furthermore, they seemed to experience a sense of posttraumatic growth. Identifying psychological strengths, including character strengths, may add to understanding and facilitating successful reintegration of ex-offenders. From these preliminary findings, implications for practice and research are proposed.

  8. The proportions of heterosexual and homosexual pedophiles among sex offenders against children: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, K; Watson, R J

    1992-01-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that the ratio of sex offenders against female children vs. offenders against male children is approximately 2:1, while the ratio of gynephiles to androphiles among the general population is approximately 20:1. The present study investigated whether the etiology of preferred partner sex among pedophiles is related to the etiology of preferred partner sex among males preferring adult partners. Using phallometric test sensitivities to calculate the proportion of true pedophiles among various groups of sex offenders against children, and taking into consideration previously reported mean numbers of victims per offender group, the ratio of heterosexual to homosexual pedophiles was calculated to be approximately 11:1. This suggests that the resulting proportion of true pedophiles among persons with a homosexual erotic development is greater than that in persons who develop heterosexually. This, of course, would not indicate that androphilic males have a greater propensity to offend against children.

  9. The Neuropsychological Function of Older First-Time Child Exploitation Material Offenders: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Marcelo; Ellis, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Despite the growing incidence of child exploitation offences, there is little knowledge of the neuropsychological function of older child exploitation material offenders (CEMOs). Given that studies have reported that sex offenders demonstrate deficits attributed to frontal and temporal lobe function, the aim of this pilot study was to investigate the frontotemporal function of older first-time child exploitation material offenders (FTCEMOs). The neuropsychological performance of 11 older FTCEMOs was compared with 34 older historical sex offenders (HSOs) and 32 older nonsex offender (NSO) controls. Forty-five percent of FTCEMOs admitted to a pedophilic interest, which was significantly lower than those reported by HSOs. FTCEMOs provided significantly higher intellectual function scores than HSOs. Results revealed no evidence of mild or major neurocognitive disorder in FTCEMOs. Although the groups were not significantly different, compared with normative data, FTCEMOs reported a high incidence of impairment on a measure of decision making and on a measure of facial emotional recognition.

  10. Megan's Law and its impact on community re-entry for sex offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Jill S; D'Amora, David A; Hern, Andrea L

    2007-01-01

    Community notification, known as "Megan's Law," provides the public with information about known sex offenders in an effort to assist parents and potential victims to protect themselves from dangerous predators. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of community notification on the lives of registered sex offenders. Two hundred and thirty-nine sex offenders in Connecticut and Indiana were surveyed. The negative consequences that occurred with the greatest frequency included job loss, threats and harassment, property damage, and suffering of household members. A minority of sex offenders reported housing disruption or physical violence following community notification. The majority experienced psychosocial distress such as depression, shame, and hopelessness. Recommendations are made for community notification policies that rely on empirically derived risk assessment classification systems in order to better inform the public about sex offenders' danger while minimizing the obstacles that interfere with successful community reintegration. 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  11. Female domestic violence offenders: their attachment security, trauma symptoms, and personality organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenson, Julie; Geffner, Robert; Foster, Sharon L; Clipson, Clark R

    2007-01-01

    Unlike male domestic violence offenders, female domestic violence offenders have traditionally been overlooked in research and theory, despite the fact that females also have high rates of domestic violence perpetration. Towards the aim of extending extant research on male and female pepetrators of domestic violence, we examined attachment style, trauma symptoms, and personality organization in 33 female offenders receiving mandated treatment for domestic violence. These offenders were compared to 32 nonoffending women receiving psychological treatment. The Experiences in Close Relationships Revised (ECR-Revised) was used to examine adult attachment, the Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) was used to examine trauma symptomology, and finally, the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III (MCMI-III) was used to examine cluster B personality traits. Analyses indicated that female domestic violence offenders reported less attachment security, more trauma-related symptoms, and more personality psychopathology (Antisocial, Borderline, and Dependent Subscales) than did nonoffender clinical comparison women.

  12. Beyond the Gates: Identifying and Managing Offenders with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Community Probation Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Susan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Research has indicated that, compared with the general population, the prevalence of offenders with ADHD in prison is high. The situation for offenders managed in the community by the Probation Service is unknown. This study aimed to bridge the gap in our knowledge by (1 surveying the awareness of probation staff about ADHD and (2 screening the rate of offenders with ADHD managed within the service. In the first study, a brief survey was circulated to offender managers working in 7 Probation Trusts in England and Wales asking them to estimate the prevalence of offenders with ADHD on their caseload, the presenting problems of these offenders and challenges to their management, and the training received on the treatment and management of offenders with ADHD. The survey had a return rate of 11%. Probation staff perceived that 7.6% of their caseload had ADHD and identified this group to have difficulties associated with neuropsychological dysfunction, lifestyle problems and compliance problems. They perceived that these problems hindered meaningful engagement with the service and rehabilitation. Challenges to their management were perceived to be due to both internal processes (motivation and engagement and external processes (inadequate or inappropriate interventions. Few respondents had received training in the management of offenders with ADHD and most wanted more support. In the second study, a sub-sample of 88 offenders in one Probation Trust completed questionnaires to screen for DSM-IV ADHD in childhood and current symptoms. The screen found an estimated prevalence of 45.45% and 20.51% for childhood and adulthood ADHD respectively and these were strongly associated with functional impairment. Thus probation staff considerably underestimated the likely rate, suggesting there are high rates of under-detection and/or misdiagnosis among offenders with ADHD in their service. The results indicate that screening provisions are needed in probation

  13. Comparing attitudinal and situational measures of self-control among felony offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Jeff; Craig, Jessica M; Piquero, Alex R

    2015-04-01

    Hirschi recently revised the measurement of self-control to include the number and salience of costs an individual considers in an offending situation. Evidence is mixed on its predictive utility relative to other self-control measures but suffers from different studies operationalising the measure in different ways and mostly examining it with non-offenders. This study aimed to investigate Hirschi's reconceptualisation of self-control. Our research question was whether the number and salience of Hirschi's 'costs' are independently related to offending. Data on self-perceptions of likelihood of driving while drunk and various self-control and social control measures were collected by researchers during an orientation class for convicted offenders newly received into correctional facilities--one for men and one for women--during January to May 2011. Eight hundred and nineteen men and 194 women completed the ratings. Both attitudinal and situational self-control measures were independently associated with self-rated likelihood of driving while drunk. These findings were confined to the male offenders. Findings revealed mixed support for Hirschi's conceptualisation of self-control and its relevance. Situational and attitudinal measures of self-control share some common ground but relate differently to offending according to gender. Further research is needed to find out if these results are generalisable to other crime types and whether race/ethnicity could modify the findings. Even among convicted offenders whose crimes are serious and/or frequent enough to result in imprisonment, high self-control may inhibit offending. This has implications for intervention programmes. This is the first study to compare attitudinal and self-control measures in relation to offending among a sample of incarcerated offenders and across gender. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  15. Treatment of adolescent sexual offenders: theory-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermabeikian, P; Martinez, D

    1994-11-01

    The treatment of adolescent sexual offenders (ASO) has its theoretical underpinnings in social learning theory. Although social learning theory has been frequently cited in literature, a comprehensive application of this theory, as applied to practice, has not been mapped out. The social learning and social cognitive theories of Bandura appear to be particularly relevant to the group treatment of this population. The application of these theories to practice, as demonstrated in a program model, is discussed as a means of demonstrating how theory-driven practice methods can be developed.

  16. Serial murder in America: case studies of seven offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, James O

    2004-01-01

    This article summarizes and compares information on seven interviewed serial killers in an ongoing project designed to study similarities and differences among these individuals. The aim of this article is to increase our collective knowledge of the dynamics of serial murder by examining the perpetrators' backgrounds, as well as the unique ways in which they view themselves and the world around them. Although qualitative interview research alone is not sufficient to fully understand such behavior, it is useful in many ways. Some of the information discussed based on the seven offenders interviewed is compared with broader epidemiological studies, and the strengths and limitations of each type of research are discussed.

  17. Value of DWI combined with routine MR sequence for the diagnosis of anal fistula%DWI联合常规MR扫描对肛瘘的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李美芹; 张现坡; 孙新海; 李娴; 盛华强; 胡喜斌; 徐洁

    2011-01-01

    目的:评价DWI联合常规MR扫描对肛瘘的诊断价值.方法:选取20例临床怀疑肛瘘或有肛瘘手术史患者行常规MR扫描及DWI检查,比较肛瘘内、外瘘口,瘘管分支及脓肿的显示率.结果:常规MR扫描序列共显示瘘管22个、内口14个、外口22个、脓肿14个;DWI检查共显示瘘管25个、内口16个、外口23个、脓肿17个.结论:DWI联合常规MR扫描可提供肛瘘合并肛周脓肿的检出率,为外科手术提供可靠的影像学依据.%Objective : To explore the value of DWI combined with routine MR sequence for the diagnosis of anal fistulaMethods: 20 patients with suspected anal fistula were examined with routine MR sequence and DWI,and the display rates of anal inner and outer fistula,fistula branch and abscesses were compared. Results : Routine MR sequence displayed fistula 22 , inside mouth 14 , outside mouth 22 , abscesses 14 : DWI displayed fistula 25 ,inside mouth 16 ,outside mouth 23 , abscesses 17. Conclusion: DWI combined with routine MRI is a sensitive diagnostic method for anal fistula examination,it can provide important informations about anal fistula. Especially it can improve the detection rate of fistula combined with perianal abscess.

  18. The Analysis of Correlation between DCE-MRI Perfusion Index and MR DWI ADC in Prostate Cancer Patients%DCE-MRI灌注指标与 MR DWI ADC 值在前列腺癌患者中的关系分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔凌; 庄伟雄; 文海忠

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI ( DCE-MRI) and MR DWI ADC of prostate cancer .Methods 53 prostate cancer patients confirmed with pathology underwent DCE-MRI using 3.0 T MR liver acquisition with volume acceleration ( LAVA) and DWI.Signal intensity-time( SI-T) of cancerous and non-cancerous regions in peripheral prostate zone were acquired ,and the time to minimum(Tmax),the whole enhancement degree (Simax) and the max-imum slope(Rmax) were calculated.ADC in DWI was assessed,and the correlation with perfusion indexes in DCE-MRI was ana-lyzed statistically .Results The value of Tmax ,Simax and Rmax in cancerous and non-cancerous regions were statistical signifi-cantly (P<0.05).The ADC value in cancerous and non-cancerous regions were (1.59 ±0.11) ×10 -3 mm2/s and (0.88 ± 0.16) ×10 -3mm2/s,it was statistical significantly (P<0.05).There was positive correlation between Tmax and ADC ,and nega-tive correlation between Rmax and Simax in cancerous regions of prostate cancer .Conclusion Perfusion indexes of DCE-MRI are correlated with ADC in prostate cancer .DCE-MRI combined with DWI might improve the accuracy of detection ,localization and staging of prostate cancer .%目的:探讨DCE-MRI灌注指标与MR DWI ADC值在前列腺癌患者中的相关性。方法选取前列腺癌患者53例,且均经病理组织切片活检确诊,进行DWI检查以及肝脏快速容积采集序列( LAVA)动态增强扫描,从而得到前列腺两侧外周带非癌区和癌区信号强度-时间( SI-T)曲线,并计算得到最快强化率( Rmax )、达峰时间( Tmax )和最大强化程度(SImax)。最终分析得到DCE-MRI灌注指标与MRD WI ADC值之间的相关性。结果在DCE-MRI中,癌灶在早期即有快速和明显的强化,在Tmax、SImax和Rmax等指标上同非癌区相比,差异显著,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。前列腺非癌区和癌区ADC值分别为(1.59±0.11)×10

  19. The care of Filipino juvenile offenders in residential facilities evaluated using the risk-need-responsivity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruit, Anouk; Wissink, Inge B; Stams, Geert Jan J M

    2016-01-01

    According to the risk-need-responsivity model of offender, assessment and rehabilitation treatment should target specific factors that are related to re-offending. This study evaluates the residential care of Filipino juvenile offenders using the risk-need-responsivity model. Risk analyses and criminogenic needs assessments (parenting style, aggression, relationships with peers, empathy, and moral reasoning) have been conducted using data of 55 juvenile offenders in four residential facilities. The psychological care has been assessed using a checklist. Statistical analyses showed that juvenile offenders had a high risk of re-offending, high aggression, difficulties in making pro-social friends, and a delayed socio-moral development. The psychological programs in the residential facilities were evaluated to be poor. The availability of the psychological care in the facilities fitted poorly with the characteristics of the juvenile offenders and did not comply with the risk-need-responsivity model. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  20. [Social perception of the Spanish law for young offenders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ma Dolores; Martín, Eduardo; Torbay, Ángela; Rodríguez, Carmen

    2010-11-01

    The implementation of the law 5/2000 for the regulation of Criminal Responsibility for Minors has led to a change in interventions in cases of juvenile offenders. This law promotes the educational and rehabilitative aims of the measures imposed. However, the focus of the media on the most serious cases has generated considerable alarm in society in general. The aim of this study is to determine the social perception of Law 5/2000. For this purpose, a sample of 936 people from the Autonomous Region of the Canary Islands was surveyed. The main results indicate that there is a significant lack of knowledge about the law and that people tend to think that the measures taken are not as effective as studies carried out in connection with this subject have shown. Nevertheless, the people surveyed are more in favour of educational measures than of measures that penalize. These results are discussed in connection with the importance that community factors have in dealing with juvenile delinquency, and in particular, in the power of social pressure to modify legislation, and of the community to assume responsibility for the reinsertion of juvenile offenders.

  1. Age Diversity Among Victims of Hebephilic Sexual Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Skye; Seto, Michael C; Goodwill, Alasdair M; Cantor, James M

    2016-08-25

    Hebephilia refers to sexual interest in pubescent children who are beginning to show early signs of sexual development but are sexually immature. The present study examined the relationship between hebephilia and victim age choice in a sample of 2,238 adult male sexual offenders. On average, offenders were 39 years old at the time of their assessments, and approximately half (48%) were referred by probation or parole offices. Assessment data included self-report, sexual arousal measured by volumetric phallometry, and victims' ages. Results suggested that, similar to pedophilia, hebephilia had a medium sized association with a greater number of victims under age 11 and a small sized association with a greater number of victims ages 11 to 14. Unlike pedophilia, a small positive association was consistently found between hebephilia and a greater number of victims ages 15 or 16. Furthermore, a small positive association was observed between victim age polymorphism and hebephilia and pedophilia. The present results suggested that hebephilia was associated with a greater number of victims age 14 or younger and had similar victim age correlates to pedophiles.

  2. Acculturation and Enculturation Trajectories Among Mexican-American Adolescent Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, George P; Vargas-Chanes, Delfino; Losoya, Sandra H; Cota-Robles, Sonia; Chassin, Laurie; Lee, Joanna M

    2009-12-01

    This study examines changes over time in ethnic affirmation/belonging and ethnic identity achievement, Spanish language use, English language use, Mexican/Mexican-American affiliation/identification and Anglo affiliation/identification in a sample of Mexican-American adolescents participating in a longitudinal study of juvenile offenders. The Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure and the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans-II were completed by the Mexican-American adolescents 7 times over a 3-year period. The findings from longitudinal growth modeling analyses and growth mixture modeling analyses indicate that there is heterogeneity in the initial scores and changes over time on these variables that are related to markers for the cultural qualities of the home environment (i.e., generational status and mother's most frequent language use). In contrast to expectations, marginalized or assimilated acculturation trajectories/types were not overrepresented in this sample of adolescent offenders. Implications for our understanding of the nature of acculturation and enculturation processes and the way these processes are studied are discussed.

  3. Intelligence and psychopathy: a correlational study on insane female offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spironelli, C; Segrè, D; Stegagno, L; Angrilli, A

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of a significant relationship between psychopathic traits and intelligence is still open to debate. Most of the relevant information has been obtained from crystallized IQ tests or on psychopathic male offenders. In this study we hypothesized a negative correlation between psychopathic traits and fluid intelligence on a sample of criminal female in-patients. We carried out a correlational study on a selected sample of 56 criminal female offenders. Variables that were measured include the Hare Psychopathy Checklist Revised (PCL-R) total score (and, separately, the scores from its four subscales: Interpersonal, Affective, Lifestyle and Antisocial) and fluid IQ measured by Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM). Pearson's correlation between RPM IQ and total PCL-R score was negative (r(54) = -0.55, p correlations were also found between IQ and the four PCL-R subscales, Interpersonal, Affective, Lifestyle and Antisocial (r(54) = -0.35, p < 0.01, r(54) = -0.52, p < 0.001, r(54) = -0.53, p < 0.001, and r(54) = -0.49, p < 0.001 respectively). The results indicate a general negative relationship between PCL-R and IQ, equally distributed across the four subcomponents of the psychopathic trait, and support the view that unsuccessful psychopathic women have poor planning and are unable to foresee and represent future consequences of their actions.

  4. Prefrontal brain asymmetry and aggression in imprisoned violent offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keune, Philipp M; van der Heiden, Linda; Várkuti, Bálint; Konicar, Lilian; Veit, Ralf; Birbaumer, Niels

    2012-05-02

    Anterior brain asymmetry, assessed through the alpha and beta band in resting-state electroencephalogram (EEG) is associated with approach-related behavioral dispositions, particularly with aggression in the general population. To date, the association between frontal asymmetry and aggression has not been examined in highly aggressive groups. We examined the topographic characteristics of alpha and beta activity, the relation of both asymmetry metrics to trait aggression, and whether alpha asymmetry was extreme in anterior regions according to clinical standards in a group of imprisoned violent offenders. As expected, these individuals were characterized by stronger right than left-hemispheric alpha activity, which was putatively extreme in anterior regions in one third of the cases. We also report that in line with observations made in the general population, aggression was associated with stronger right-frontal alpha activity in these violent individuals. This suggests that frontal alpha asymmetry, as a correlate of trait aggression, might be utilizable as an outcome measure in studies which assess the effects of anti-aggressiveness training in violent offenders.

  5. A Review of HIV Prevention Interventions for Juvenile Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Angela; Fasciano, John; Brown, Larry K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To conduct a critical review of all HIV prevention intervention studies conducted with adolescents in juvenile justice settings to inform future intervention development. Method PubMed and PsycInfo database searches were conducted for peer-reviewed, published HIV prevention intervention studies with juvenile offenders. Results Sixteen studies were identified (N = 3,700 adolescents). Half of the projects utilized rigorous methodologies to determine intervention effect on behavior change, such as conducting a randomized controlled trial (n = 8). Nine studies reported behaviors at least 3 months post-intervention and five out of nine showed decreases in sexual risk behavior. Conclusions Several HIV prevention programs with juvenile offenders have led to sexual risk reduction, although effect sizes are modest. Most existing programs have neglected to address the impact of family, mental health, and substance use on HIV risk. More work is needed to develop evidence-based interventions that include HIV prevention strategies relevant and appropriate for the juvenile justice setting. PMID:19741021

  6. Analysis of MR image quality of echo planar diffusion -weighted imaging. Investigations at 1.5 Tesla with higher gradient field strength; Analyse der Bildqualitaet einer diffusionsgewichteten (EPI DWI) Sequenz. Untersuchungen an einem 1,5 T MRT mit hoeherer Gradientenfeldstaerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorenbeck, U. [Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany). Radiologische Klinik, FE Neuroradiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany). Inst. fuer diagnostische Radiologie; Zorger, N.; Feuerbach, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany). Inst. fuer diagnostische Radiologie

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: Single - shot echo planar Diffusion - weighted - Imaging (EPI DWI) requires extended gradient facilities with strong, fast switching gradients. Up to now the image quality of EPI DWI is enormously influenced by some kinds of artifacts. Therefore we evaluated the image quality of EPI DWI in demonstrating anatomical structures using a 1.5 T MR scanner with a higher gradient field strength of 40 mt/m, a risetime of 200 {mu}s and a slewrate of 200T/m/s. Materials and methods: Using an evaluation scale with four categories two independent readers evaluated 12 different infra - and supratentorial anatomic regions of the brain in 50 DWI images and compared them with the corresponding T2 turbospin echo image. Results: No region was judged to be undistinguishable. On axial DWI images the assessment of the brain stem was poor. In the level of the putamen and thalamus the image quality of DWI was judged to be from adequate to excellent. The central sulcus and the boundary of the white and grey matter was assessed to be adequately visible. The interobserver variability showed a good agreement between the two readers. Conclusion: The image quality of EPI DWI improves from a higher gradient field strength. The shortening rise time of 200 {mu}s and the slewrate of 200T/m/s will lead to a faster gradient switching. Single shot EPI DWI is less influenced by image artefacts and the presentation of different anatomical structures profits when a MR scanner with higher gradient field strength is used. (orig.)

  7. Offenders with antisocial personality disorder show attentional bias for violence-related stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domes, Gregor; Mense, Julia; Vohs, Knut; Habermeyer, Elmar

    2013-08-30

    Offenders with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) may be characterized by a lack in emotional functioning that manifests in irritability and a lack of remorse. The proposed link between ASPD and negative emotionality led to the question of emotional processing anomalies in ASPD. Furthermore, the effect of childhood maltreatment/abuse on emotional processing was tested in the present study. Violent and sexual offenders with ASPD (n=35), without ASPD (n=34), and healthy non-criminal controls (n=24) were compared in an Emotional Stroop Task (EST) using neutral, negative, and violence-related words. Secondary analyses focused on the effect of psychopathic traits and childhood maltreatment. Offenders with ASPD showed a stronger attentional bias to violence-related and negative words as compared to controls. Comparable results were obtained when grouping offenders to high, medium, and low psychopathic subgroups. Offenders with childhood maltreatment specifically showed stronger violence-related attentional bias than non-maltreated offenders. The data suggest that enhanced attention to violence-related stimuli in adult criminal offenders is associated with adverse developmental experiences and delinquency but to a lesser extent with antisocial or psychopathic traits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Social Networks and Treatment Adherence Among Latino Offenders With Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eno Louden, Jennifer; Manchak, Sarah M

    2017-07-06

    Mental health treatment adherence is often required for offenders with mental illness supervised on probation and parole. However, research on offenders with mental illness has largely overlooked cultural and ethnic responsivity factors that may affect adherence to treatment. Latinos are a quickly growing subgroup of offenders whose social networks differ in meaningful ways from European Americans' (e.g., size, composition, centrality of family). Social networks are known to relate to both clinical and criminal justice outcomes for offenders with mental illness, and there are features of nonoffender Latinos' social networks that suggest that findings distilled from work with non-Latino offenders may not apply to them. The present study examined the social networks of 86 Latino probationers with serious mental illness to (a) describe the size and composition of these networks and (b) to determine which factors of social networks are related to treatment adherence. The authors found that Latino offenders' social networks are small (∼6 individuals), consisting primarily of family and professionals such as treatment providers and probation officers. Supportive relationships with nonprofessionals and treatment providers was related to lower likelihood of missing treatment appointments, whereas social control and pressure from family and friends to attend treatment was not related to treatment adherence. Findings are discussed within the context of improved practices for community corrections and mental health agencies in working with Latino offenders with mental illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Persistent Offenders in the North West of England, 1880-1940: Some Critical Research Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Cox, Steve Farrall and Barry Godfrey

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the concept of the persistent offender as a group within society, and the presumed impact of that discrete group upon society via a case study of offending in Crewe between 1880 and 1940. The findings of persistent offending in Crewe challenge the assumptions and prejudices of the period, about the links between unemployment and crime and the extent to which crime was an enduring ‘career’. There were no ‘hardened’ persistent offenders in the sample of the type envisaged by contemporary comment, though the role of drink in offending was sustained; and there was no clear ‘type’ of offender either. Examination of the life histories of a selection of offenders is shown to raise a number of interdisciplinary questions, challenging the assumptions of criminologists and legal scholars in relation to the role of legislation in the management of criminality, including the concept (of interest also to historians that reformation of the criminal was more achievable in the past than it is in the over-regulated present.

  10. Childhood attachment, childhood sexual abuse, and onset of masturbation among adult sexual offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallbone, Stephen W; McCabe, Billee-Anne

    2003-01-01

    Written autobiographies of 48 incarcerated adult male sexual offenders (22 rapists, 13 intrafamilial child molesters, and 13 extrafamilial child molesters) were used to generate retrospective self-report measures of their childhood maternal and paternal attachment, childhood sexual abuse experiences, and onset of masturbation. Contrary to expectation, the offenders as a combined group more often reported secure than they did insecure childhood maternal and paternal attachment. There were no differences between the three offender subgroups with respect to maternal attachment; however the rapists and the intrafamilial child molesters were more likely to report insecure paternal attachment than were the extrafamilial child molesters. There were no differences between these offender subgroups in the frequency with which childhood sexual abuse was reported. However, offenders with insecure paternal attachment were more likely to report having been sexually abused than were those with secure paternal attachment. Sexually abused offenders in turn reported earlier onset of masturbation than did those who were not sexually abused. These results are consistent with contemporary attachment models linking insecure childhood attachment to childhood sexual abuse, and with traditional conditioning models linking childhood sexual abuse, early masturbation, and sexual offending.

  11. Sex offender punishment and the persistence of penal harm in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Chrysanthi S

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. has dramatically revised its approach to punishment in the last several decades. In particular, people convicted of sex crimes have experienced a remarkable expansion in social control through a wide-range of post-conviction interventions. While this expansion may be largely explained by general punishment trends, there appear to be unique factors that have prevented other penal reforms from similarly modulating sex offender punishment. In part, this continuation of a "penal harm" approach to sex offenders relates to the past under-valuing of sexual victimization. In the "bad old days," the law and its agents sent mixed messages about sexual violence and sexual offending. Some sexual offending was mere nuisance, some was treatable, and a fraction "deserved" punishment equivalent to other serious criminal offending. In contrast, today's sex offender punishment schemes rarely distinguish formally among gradations of harm or dangerousness. After examining incarceration trends, this article explores the historical context of the current broad brush approach and reviews the unintended consequences. Altogether, this article reinforces the need to return to differentiation among sex offenders, but differentiation based on science and on the experience-based, guided discretion of experts in law enforcement, corrections, and treatment.

  12. Offending by people with intellectual disabilities in community settings: a preliminary examination of contextual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Jessica R; Clare, Isabel C H; Holland, Anthony J

    2013-09-01

    While several validated measures of the life circumstances of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) have been developed, this stream of research has not yet been well integrated with environmentally oriented criminological theory to explain offending among people with ID. In this study, we attempt to provide a preliminary integration through an investigation of the relationship between contemporary life experiences, well-being, choice and offending among people with ID, exploring the relevance of two classic criminological theories (theories of strain and social control). Questionnaire measures were used to compare a range of 'ordinary' life experiences [the 'Life Experiences Checklist' (LEC)], subjective well-being (the 'Personal Well-being Index - ID') and the extent of choice (the 'Choice Questionnaire'), between offenders (N = 27) and non-offenders (N = 19) with ID recruited through integrated (NHS and Local Authority) multi-disciplinary teams (community teams for adults with learning disabilities). Using regression analyses to explore the strength of associations with offending, it was found that an indicator of impoverished personal relationships, from the LEC provided the best predictor of offending. This finding appears to favour criminological explanations based on social control. Existing measures of life circumstances can be used to explore environmentally oriented criminological theories, bringing benefits to our understanding and treatment of offenders with ID living in community settings. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Interventions for alcohol-related offending by women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurran, Mary; Riemsma, Rob; Manning, Nathan; Misso, Kate; Kleijnen, Jos

    2011-08-01

    Treatment programmes specifically for women offenders are under-developed. A systematic review of studies that could inform interventions for alcohol-related offending by women is reported. Three questions were addressed: 1) What is the most up to date knowledge of 'what works' with females who commit alcohol-related offences? 2) What are the identifiable risk-needs factors for non-alcohol dependent women who commit offences involving alcohol misuse? 3) Are there differences between male and female alcohol-related offending? Four studies addressed the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions; three addressed identifiable risk-needs; and 19 addressed differences between male and female offenders' alcohol-related offending. Heterogeneity of these studies precluded meta-analyses, and so a narrative synthesis method was used. There is insufficient evidence to answer the question of what treatment works with women who commit alcohol-related offences. Drunk-driving is most widely studied, and women offenders appear to have more psychosocial problems than men. Alcohol increases the likelihood of violence for both men and women, and, while the mechanisms whereby alcohol increases the likelihood of violence are likely the same in men and women, the effect may be moderated by gender-associated issues. Again, women offenders appear to have more psychosocial problems than men. Implications for developing interventions are discussed.

  14. Analysis of the value of DWI in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer after radiotherapy%DWI在宫颈癌诊断和放疗后疗效评价中的价值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊焕煜

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyse the value of DWI in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer after radiotherapy.Methods:97 patients with cervical cancer,76 patients with cervical cancer after radiotherapy,98 health patients were selected,DWI imaging of the magnetic resonance imaging is carried out,and the results are compared and analyzed.Results:The normal control group showed a high-low-slightly higher signal on DWI,the difference of ADC values between the cervical glands and the fibers was significant(P<0.05),DWI showed high signal in cervical cancer,and the ADC value was significantly lower than that of normal cervix(P<0.05),the cervical cancer ADC value was significantly higher in cervical cancer than in newly diagnosed cervical cancer(P<0.05).Conclusion:Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical cancer patients with magnetic resonance imaging can be performed for accurate diagnosis and differential diagnosis,and it has important value for the prognosis of DWI.%目的:分析DWI在宫颈癌诊断和放疗后疗效评价中的价值.方法:收治宫颈癌患者97例、宫颈癌放疗后患者76例以及宫颈健康手术者98例,对其展开磁共振DWI成像,而后对检查结果进行对比分析.结果:正常对照组宫颈DWI上表现为高-低-稍高信号,宫颈腺体、纤维间质ADC值差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);宫颈癌的DWI表现高信号,ADC值较正常宫颈明显降低(P<0.05);放疗后宫颈癌ADC值较初诊宫颈癌发生明显升高(P<0.05).结论:宫颈癌患者经磁共振DWI成像可以进行准确的诊断和鉴别,对放疗后的预后监测具有重要价值.

  15. Combined Application of Gadoxetic Acid Disodium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI in the Diagnosis of Chronic Liver Disease-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    Full Text Available Gadoxetic acid disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent to target the liver cells with normal function. In clinical practice, the Gd-EOB-DTPA produces high quality hepatocyte specific image 20 minutes after intravenous injection, so DWI sequence is often performed after the conventional dynamic scanning. However, there are still some disputes about whether DWI sequence will provide more effective diagnostic information in clinical practice. This study aimed to explore the diagnostic value of combining Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and DWI in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in patients with chronic liver disease.A systematic literature search was performed in the PubMed and Cochrane library database up to March 2015. The quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS was used to evaluate the quality of studies. Heterogeneous test on the included literature was performed by using the software Review Manager 5.3. The MetaDiSc 1.4 software was used to calculate the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio; meanwhile the summary receiver operating characteristics (SROC curve was drawn to compare the diagnostic performance.A total of 13 literatures were included in this study. In 8 literatures regarding HCC diagnosis based on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI, the pooled sensitivity: 0.90 (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.88-0.93; specificity: 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.92; positive likelihood ratio: 8.60 (95% CI: 6.20-11.92; negative likelihood ratio: 0.10 (95% CI: 0.08-0.14 were obtained. The area under curve (AUC and Q values were 0.96 and 0.90, respectively. In 5 literatures relating to HCC diagnosis by combination of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and DWI sequence, the pooled sensitivity: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.85-0.91, specificity: 0.96 (0.94-0.97, positive likelihood ratio: 19.63 (12.77-30.16, negative likelihood ratio: 0.10 (0.07-0.14 were obtained. The AUC value was 0

  16. Single-victim and serial sexual homicide offenders: differences in crime, paraphilias and personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Heng Choon Oliver; Beauregard, Eric; Myers, Wade C

    2015-02-01

    Information on psychopathological characteristics of sexual homicide offenders is scarce. To investigate criminal, paraphilic and personality trait differences between serial and single-victim sexual homicide offenders. All 73 single-victim and 13 serial sexual homicide offenders presenting within a cohort of 671 men sentenced for sexual crimes between 1994 and 2005 and serving their sentence in one high-security Canadian prison and who consented to interview were assessed and compared on their offending patterns, personality pathology and paraphilic behaviours. Serial sexual homicide offenders were more likely than the single offenders to report deviant sexual fantasies, having selected victims with distinctive characteristics, to have targeted strangers, structured premeditation and/or verbal humiliation of their victims during the offences. Personality pathology, defined by at least two Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV criteria for personality disorder, was common in both groups, but the serial offenders were more likely to have narcissistic, schizoid and/or obsessive-compulsive traits; they were also more likely to engage in sexual masochism, partialism, homosexual paedophilia, exhibitionism and/or voyeurism. Samples of serial sexual homicide offenders will, fortunately, always be small, and it may be that more could be learned to assist in preventing such crimes if data from several studies or centres were pooled. Our findings suggest that an investigation of sexual homicide offenders should include strategies for evaluating premeditation as well as personality and paraphilic characteristics. Crime scene features that should alert investigators should include similar characteristics between victims and particular aspects of body exposure or organisation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Treatment Progress and Behavior Following 2 Years of Inpatient Sex Offender Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Jill D; Becker, Judith V; McVay, Lee Ann

    2017-02-01

    Emerging research highlights the role of self-regulation in the treatment of sexual offenders. Safe Offender Strategies (SOS) is a manualized sex offender treatment program that emphasizes the role of self-regulation and self-regulatory skills development in sex offender treatment, particularly for offenders with serious mental illness and intellectual/developmental disabilities. The current study involves 156 adult male sexual offenders in an inpatient psychiatric setting who received SOS treatment for a period ranging from 6 months to 1 year. Participants' baseline and treatment data were obtained from archival medical records describing 1 year pre-treatment and up to 2 years of treatment participation. Dependent variables included monthly count rates of verbal and physical aggression and contact and noncontact sexual offending, as well as sexual deviancy attitudes, self-regulatory ability, and cooperation with treatment and supervision, as measured by the Sex Offender Treatment Intervention and Progress Scale (SOTIPS). Data were examined via paired-samples t tests, regression, and multilevel modeling, examining the impact of overall percentage of SOS groups attended over time, comparing participants' baseline measures to data from 2 years of treatment. The impact of predicted risk was also evaluated. Significant treatment dose effects were identified for improvements in aggression, sexual offending, and indicators of treatment compliance and change. These findings suggest that the skills-based, self-regulation approach utilized in SOS may be effective in improving clients' aggressive and sexual behaviors, attitudes toward their offenses and treatment, and self-regulatory ability over time. Implications for further research and treatment generalizability are discussed.

  18. Response Bias on Self-Report Measures of Sexual Fantasies Among Sexual Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Kindra; Boulas, Jenna; Huss, Matthew T; Scalora, Mario J

    2017-02-01

    The impact of sexual fantasies in future risk and treatment response among sexual offenders has long been known. However, as we develop objective self-report measures of sexual fantasies, response bias is becoming an increasing concern. In examining a sample of institutionalized sex offenders, the present study suggests that offenders' responses on these measures are prone to response bias, the bias does not negate their associations with other self-report measures of sexual deviance, and relationship of their sexual fantasies does not appear to relate to actual behavioral indications. Clinical and research implications for these findings are discussed.

  19. Criminogenic needs of women offenders as a challenge for institutional resocialization

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Chojecka

    2013-01-01

    The crisis of institutional rehabilitation was faced by What works Movement, which for years has been focused on finding the answer to the question „what works and for whom work.” Thanks to Risk-Need-Responsivity Model we have the possibility to define the criminogenic needs of offenders, their cognitive abilities and we can assess the risk of re-offending. In this article, attention has been focused on the results of the research conducted in three prisons for female offenders in Poland. The...

  20. Consideration of three arenas of social control for the treatment and management of sexual offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, S D

    1998-12-01

    This paper sets out to explore the influences of social control upon the discourse relating to treatment and management of sexual offenders. This discussion takes as its foci three environmental arenas (social, penal/judicial and health care), and examines their influences and culpability within this context. It is not the intention of this article to present, nor does it arrive at, any answers to the perpetual concerns of treatment and management of this offender group, preferring to leave it to the individual reader to draw their own conclusions. It is accepted that there is no gender demarcation amongst sexual offenders, though in this paper, the masculine tense is used.

  1. Risk, Resource, Redemption? The Parenting and Custodial Experiences of Young Offender Fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladlow, Linzi; Neale, Bren

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on an ESRC funded qualitative longitudinal study of young fatherhood, this article explores the experiences of young offender fathers, the complex intersection of offender and fatherhood pathways for young men and the impact of professional support and tailored intervention programmes on these processes. The article challenges the axiom of young offender fathers as inherently 'risky', and suggests the utility of a dynamic, life course approach to criminal policy and practice that recognises the fluidity of their life journeys, and brings ideas of redemption more centrally into the picture.

  2. Relations of Distinct Psychopathic Personality Traits with Anxiety and Fear: Findings from Offenders and Non-Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Steven M; Mitchell, Ian J; Satherley, Rose-Marie; Beech, Anthony R; Rotshtein, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Early descriptions of psychopathy emphasise fearlessness and a lack of nervousness or anxiety as key characteristics of the disorder. However, conflicting evidence suggests that anxiety may be positively correlated with some aspects of the psychopathy construct. This position may seem somewhat paradoxical when considered alongside impaired processing of fear related stimuli in psychopathic personality. The aim of the current paper was to examine the distinct relations of callous, egocentric, and antisocial psychopathic traits with measures of anxiety and social anxiety in samples of non-offenders (Study 1) and violent offenders (Study 2). In Study 2 we also used an emotion recognition task to examine fearful face recognition. In Studies 1 and 2 we showed distinct and opposite significant relationships of egocentric and antisocial psychopathic traits with trait anxiety. Thus, while trait anxiety was negatively predicted by egocentric traits, it was predicted in a positive direction by antisocial traits in both samples. In Study 2 we found that callous traits were predictive of greater impairments in fearful face recognition. These findings suggest that anxiety and fear are distinguishable constructs in relation to psychopathic personality traits, and are discussed in terms of potentially separable mechanisms for these two constructs.

  3. Cultural Differences in Personality and Aggressive Behavior in Intimate Partner Violence Offenders: A Comparison of English and Spanish Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalá-Miñana, Alba; Walker, Kate; Bowen, Erica; Lila, Marisol

    2014-09-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a ubiquitous and serious problem, the prevalence of which varies greatly around the world. Previous research shows that cultural factors interact with personality and that this interaction influences cognitions, attitudes, and behaviors that are related to personal and individual styles of resolving conflicts. In relation to this, the present study has three aims: comparing the self-reported IPV (physical, psychological and sexual) of English and Spanish offenders, comparing the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III (MCMI-III) scores of the two groups, and examining the association between country of origin, psychopathology, and IPV. The sample consists of 147 IPV offenders (80 English and 67 Spanish). The measures used were the MCMI-III and the Conflict Tactics Scale 2. The Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the English and Spanish sample, and independent logistic regressions were used to examine the relationship between personality patterns, psychopathology and culture, and IPV. Higher frequencies of physical and psychological aggression were found in the English group compared with the Spanish group as well as several differences in personality patterns and psychopathology between the groups. Some MCMI-III subscales also interact with nationality and predict physical and psychological aggression. The relevance of these results for intervention is discussed.

  4. The use of DWI to assess spleen and liver quantitative ADC changes in the detection of liver fibrosis stages in chronic viral hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cece, Hasan, E-mail: hasan_cece@yahoo.com [Harran University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sanliurfa (Turkey); Ercan, Abdulbasit, E-mail: abdulbasitercan@hotmail.com [Harran University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sanliurfa (Turkey); Yıldız, Sema, E-mail: drsemayildiz@yahoo.com [Harran University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sanliurfa (Turkey); Karakas, Ekrem, E-mail: karakasekrem@yahoo.com [Harran University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sanliurfa (Turkey); Karakas, Omer, E-mail: dromerkarakas@hotmail.com [Harran University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sanliurfa (Turkey); Boyacı, Fatıma Nurefsan, E-mail: drnurefsan@yahoo.com [Harran University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sanliurfa (Turkey); Aydogan, Timucin, E-mail: drtaydogan@yahoo.com.tr [Harran University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterology, Sanliurfa (Turkey); Karakas, Emel Yigit, E-mail: e.ygtkarakas@yahoo.com.tr [Sanliurfa Training and Research Hospital, Department of İnternal Medicine, Sanliurfa (Turkey); Cullu, Nesat, E-mail: nesatcullu77@gmail.com [Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mugla (Turkey); Ulas, Turgay, E-mail: turgayulas@yahoo.com [Harran University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of İnternal Medicine, Sanliurfa (Turkey)

    2013-08-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the changes in spleen and liver diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in chronic viral hepatitis patients. The study comprised 47 patients and 30 healthy volunteers. DWIs were obtained. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) measurements were made by transferring the images to the workstation. The measurements of value b 1000 were made from a total of five points of the liver and three points of the spleen. Liver biopsy was performed on the 47 patients. The fibrosis stages of the patients were defined according to the METAVIR scoring system. Student's t-test was used in the comparison of mean ages, liver and spleen ADC values between the patient and the control group. Kruskal–Wallis followed by Mann–Whitney U Test with Bonferroni adjustment was performed in the comparison of mean ADC values of the patients at different stages and the control group. A statistically significant difference was determined between the patient and control group in respect of liver and spleen mean ADC values (P < 0.05). F3 group showed a significant difference compared to control and F1 and F4 group showed a significant difference compared to control, F1, F2 and F3 group in terms of the mean liver ADC value (P < 0.01). F3 and F4 group showed a significant difference compared to control and F1 group in terms of the mean spleen ADC value (P < 0.01). As a result we believe that the measurement of liver and spleen ADC values may be an indicator in the determination of the level of fibrosis.

  5. DWI在宫颈癌诊断及预后检测的价值%The Value of DWI in the Diagnosis and Prognosis of Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁真娇; 梁梅芬; 钟菀杞; 董延江; 周雁玲; 余艳萍; 王永莉

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnosis and prognosis value of DWI in detecting cervical cancer.Methods 100 patients with cervical cancer were selected from January 2011 to January 2014. 100 cases of cervical cancer radiotherapy troubles and 100 cases of healthy patients were also closed.The apparent diffusion coefficient were analyzed. Results Compared with normal cervical glands, the apparent diffusion coefficient values of cervical fibrous was 1.70±0.45×10-3mm2/s, after comparative analysis, the difference was statistically significant (t=6.834,P<0.05). 100 cases of cervical lesions in DWI showed high signal state. According to the depth of patient invasion, the low signal of cervical fiber disappeared. Compared with normal cervix, the apparent diffusion coefficient value of cervical cancer patients was 1.02±0.32×10-3mm2/s, after comparative analysis, the difference was statistically significant (t=12.412,P<0.05). Compared with patients with cervical cancer, the prognosis of patients with normal apparent diffusion coefficient value was 1.45±0.41×10-3mm2/s, after comparative analysis, the difference was statistically significant (t=7.395,P<0.05). Compared with newly diagnosed with cervical cancer, cervical cancer recurrence in patients with apparent diffusion coefficient value was 0.82± 0.20×10-3mm2/s, after comparative analysis, the difference was statistically significant (t= 8.295, P<0.05).Conclusion DWI approach can significantly distinguish normal cervix and cervical disease and it also being able to significantly observe human cervical tissue changes after radiotherapy.%目的 探讨DWI在宫颈癌诊断及预后检测的价值.方法 选择我院2011年1月至2014年1月收治的100例宫颈癌患者.同期选择100例宫颈癌放疗后患者及100例健康体检者,对表观扩散系数值进行分析.结果 与正常宫颈管腺体相比,宫颈纤维间质的表观扩散系数值为1.70±0.45×10-3mm2/s,对比分析后,差异有统计学意义(t=6

  6. Characteristics of mentally ill offenders from 100 psychiatric court reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an increasing probability that the psychiatrist will, willingly or not, come into contact with mentally ill offenders in the course of their practice. There are increasing rates of violence, substance abuse and other psychiatric disorders that are of legal importance. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the rates of different mental disorders in 100 court reports and to investigate the characteristics of mentally ill offenders. Methods All cases referred from different departments of the legal system to the forensic committee for assessment of legal accountability over 13-months duration were included. A specially designed form was prepared for data collection. Cases were classified into five groups: murder, robbery, financial offences, violent and simple offences and a group for other offences. Data were subjected to statistical analysis and comparisons between different groups of subjects were performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results Men constituted 93% of cases. In all, 73% of offenders were younger than 40 years old. Schizophrenia cases made up 13% of the total, substance related cases constituted 56% and amphetamine cases alone made up 21%; 10% of cases were antisocial personality disorders, and 51% of cases were classified as having a low education level. Unemployment was found in 34% of cases. The final decision of the forensic committee was full responsibility in 46% of cases and partial responsibility in 11% of cases, with 33% considered non-responsible. A total of 58% of cases had had contact with psychiatric healthcare prior to the offence and in 9% of cases contact had been in the previous 12 weeks. A history of similar offences was found in 32% of cases. In all, 14% of the offences were murders, 8% were sexual crimes, and 31% were violent/simple crimes. Conclusions The ability of the legal system to detect cases was good, while the ability of the healthcare system to predict crimes and offences was weak, as

  7. Characteristics of mentally ill offenders from 100 psychiatric court reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Zahrani Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing probability that the psychiatrist will, willingly or not, come into contact with mentally ill offenders in the course of their practice. There are increasing rates of violence, substance abuse and other psychiatric disorders that are of legal importance. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the rates of different mental disorders in 100 court reports and to investigate the characteristics of mentally ill offenders. Methods All cases referred from different departments of the legal system to the forensic committee for assessment of legal accountability over 13-months duration were included. A specially designed form was prepared for data collection. Cases were classified into five groups: murder, robbery, financial offences, violent and simple offences and a group for other offences. Data were subjected to statistical analysis and comparisons between different groups of subjects were performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results Men constituted 93% of cases. In all, 73% of offenders were younger than 40 years old. Schizophrenia cases made up 13% of the total, substance related cases constituted 56% and amphetamine cases alone made up 21%; 10% of cases were antisocial personality disorders, and 51% of cases were classified as having a low education level. Unemployment was found in 34% of cases. The final decision of the forensic committee was full responsibility in 46% of cases and partial responsibility in 11% of cases, with 33% considered non-responsible. A total of 58% of cases had had contact with psychiatric healthcare prior to the offence and in 9% of cases contact had been in the previous 12 weeks. A history of similar offences was found in 32% of cases. In all, 14% of the offences were murders, 8% were sexual crimes, and 31% were violent/simple crimes. Conclusions The ability of the legal system to detect cases was good, while the ability of the healthcare system to predict

  8. The puzzle of intrafamilial child sexual abuse: a meta-analysis comparing intrafamilial and extrafamilial offenders with child victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Michael C; Babchishin, Kelly M; Pullman, Lesleigh E; McPhail, Ian V

    2015-07-01

    Intrafamilial child sexual abuse is a serious social and health problem, yet explanations of sexual offending against children that emphasize antisocial tendencies and atypical sexual interests do not adequately explain intrafamilial offending. In this meta-analysis, we tested other explanations of intrafamilial child sexual abuse by examining 78 independent samples that compared a total of 6605 intrafamilial offenders to a total of 10,573 extrafamilial offenders, in studies disseminated between 1978 and 2013 (Mdn=2000). Intrafamilial offenders were significantly lower on variables reflecting antisocial tendencies (e.g., criminal history, juvenile delinquency, impulsivity, substance use, and psychopathy) and atypical sexual interests (e.g., pedophilia, other paraphilias, and excessive sexual preoccupation). Contrary to other explanations that have been proposed, intrafamilial offenders scored lower on offense-supportive attitudes and beliefs, emotional congruence with children, and interpersonal deficits; intrafamilial offenders also did not differ from extrafamilial offenders on most indicators of psychopathology. Intrafamilial offenders were, however, more likely to have experienced sexual abuse, family abuse or neglect, and poor parent-child attachments. There were too few studies to examine family dynamics - spousal relationship quality, parent-child victim relationship, and family functioning more generally - even though these factors have been frequently mentioned in the clinical and theoretical literatures. Implications for theories of intrafamilial sexual offending, treatment, and future directions for research are discussed.

  9. Child Pornography Possessors and Child Contact Sex Offenders: A Multilevel Comparison of Demographic Characteristics and Rates of Recidivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Erik; Bickart, William; Renaud, Cheryl; Camp, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Considerable debate surrounds the topic of whether possessing or distributing online images of child pornography (CP) represents a new type of crime perpetrated by conventional sex offenders (e.g., child contact [CC] sex offenders), or whether individuals who commit these crimes differ from contact sex offenders in meaningful ways. The current study compares groups of Internet (CP) and CC sexual offenders, with each group's sexual offending history exclusively confined to its offense category. T tests were used to conduct bivariate comparisons of group demographics and criminal histories. Rates of recidivism were examined using survival curves and Cox proportional hazard regression models. Results showed significant differences on demographic and criminal history variables, with CP offenders demonstrating a lower frequency of prior criminal offending and substance abuse, and higher rates of pre-incarceration employment and level of education. Rates of recidivism were significantly different between the two groups, with CP offenders showing lower rates of re-offense for most measures of recidivism. When controlling for background characteristics and the timing of the event, CC offenders were at much greater risk for having an arrest for a new crime or a non-sexual violent crime than CP offenders. Treatment and policy implications are discussed, along with suggestions for future research. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Cool and hot executive function impairments in violent offenders with antisocial personality disorder with and without psychopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane A De Brito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impairments in executive function characterize offenders with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD and offenders with psychopathy. However, the extent to which those impairments are associated with ASPD, psychopathy, or both is unknown. METHODS: The present study examined 17 violent offenders with ASPD and psychopathy (ASPD+P, 28 violent offenders with ASPD without psychopathy (ASPD-P, and 21 healthy non-offenders on tasks assessing cool (verbal working memory and alteration of motor responses to spatial locations and hot (reversal learning, decision-making under risk, and stimulus-reinforcement-based decision-making executive function. RESULTS: In comparison to healthy non-offenders, violent offenders with ASPD+P and those with ASPD-P showed similar impairments in verbal working memory and adaptive decision-making. They failed to learn from punishment cues, to change their behaviour in the face of changing contingencies, and made poorer quality decisions despite longer periods of deliberation. Intriguingly, the two groups of offenders did not differ significantly from the non-offenders in terms of their alteration of motor responses to spatial locations and their levels of risk-taking, indicated by betting, and impulsivity, measured as delay aversion. The performance of the two groups of offenders on the measures of cool and hot executive function did not differ, indicating shared deficits. CONCLUSIONS: These documented impairments may help to explain the persistence of antisocial behaviours despite the known risks of the negative consequences of such behaviours.

  11. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  12. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  13. Juvenile sex-only and sex-plus offenders: an exploratory study on criminal profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, A Ph; Mali, S R F; Bullens, R A R

    2007-08-01

    In this study, research was done on the criminal profiles of a large group of juvenile sex-only and sex-plus (sex and other offenses) delinquents (N = 4,430) in the Netherlands. Use was made of information from police records. Results show that sex-plus offenders start their careers earlier, that more of these offenders are of non-Dutch origin, that they commit more crimes, and will partly continue their criminal career after their adolescence. Juvenile sex-only offenders rarely go on committing crimes. In sex-plus offenders, sexual crimes play only a minor role in their total crime repertory. As time goes by, their criminal career will develop into the direction of property crimes. Finally, the implications and limitations of this study will be discussed.

  14. The impact of prison-based treatment on sex offender recidivism: evidence from Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwe, Grant; Goldman, Robin A

    2009-09-01

    Using a retrospective quasi-experimental design, this study evaluates the effectiveness of prison-based treatment by examining recidivism outcomes among 2,040 sex offenders released from Minnesota prisons between 1990 and 2003 (average follow-up period of 9.3 years). To reduce observed selection bias, the authors used propensity score matching to create a comparison group of 1,020 untreated sex offenders who were not significantly different from the 1,020 treated offenders. In addition, intent-to-treat analyses and the Rosenbaum bounds method were used to test the sensitivity of the findings to treatment refuser and unobserved selection bias. Results from the Cox regression analyses revealed that participating in treatment significantly reduced the hazard ratio for rearrest by 27% for sexual recidivism, 18% for violent recidivism, and 12% for general recidivism. These findings are consistent with the growing body of research supporting the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral treatment for sex offenders.

  15. Perceived danger and offending: exploring the links between violent victimization and street crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Tyler J; McCarthy, Bill; Hagan, John

    2013-01-01

    Perceptions of the danger of crime are typically discussed in the context of people's fear that they will be harmed by offenders. We shift the focus and examine the association between perceived danger and offending and the contribution of these perceptions to the well-established relationship between violent victimization and crime. We hypothesize that violence may embolden some victims and contribute to their perception that offending is not dangerous. We examine the mediating effects of these perceptions alongside two other potential links between violent victimization and crime: deviant definitions and risk seeking. Our analyses of data from a sample of homeless youth find that violent victimization is strongly associated with four types of offending--theft, drug use, drug selling, and prostitution--and that perceived danger significantly mediates several of these relationships. Our results suggest that perceived danger may be an important mechanism connecting victimization and crime.

  16. Treatment impact of an integrated sex offender program as measured by J-SOAP-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfuss, Mark C; Underwood, Lee A; Enright, Morgan; Hill, Savannah; Marshall, Rod; Tipton, Paula; West, Laura; Warren, Kellie

    2013-04-01

    Despite the increase in juvenile sex offending in society and the significant growth in the number of treatment programs, relatively few studies have examined the effectiveness of these programs. This study examined the effectiveness of an integrated sex offender program on a sample of 309 adjudicated male sex offenders in a juvenile correctional facility using the dynamic scale score of the Juvenile Sex Offender Assessment Protocol II (J-SOAP-II). The youth participated in one of the three treatment groups characterized by length of treatment and risk of recidivism: low risk (0 to 9 months), moderate risk (9 to 23 months), and high risk (23 to 56 months). A significant decrease in the dynamic scale scores of the J-SOAP-II was found only for the moderate treatment group (9 to 23 months).

  17. The Predictive Validity of the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth for Young Spanish Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Campos, Elena; García-García, Juan; Zaldívar-Basurto, Flor

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the predictive validity of the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth (SAVRY) in a group of young Spanish offenders. The sample is made up of 594 minors from the Juvenile Court, between the ages of 14 and 18 at the time they committed the delinquent act. The SAVRY was able to differentiate between low and high-risk younger offenders. Mean scores on risk factor are greater in the group of recidivist offenders, the group of non-recidivist shows higher mean scores in Protective domain. The accuracy of the instrument is high (AUCRiskTotalScore = 0.737 and AUCSummaryRiskRating = 0.748). An approximation of the predictive validity study of the SAVRY in Spanish younger offenders is presented. The results obtained support the SAVRY good functioning with not English samples.

  18. Children sexual abuse in Poland--study of 257 sexual offenders against minors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heitzman, Janusz; Lew-Starowicz, Michał; Pacholski, Marek; Lew-Starowicz, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining objective data on sexual offenders against minors is difficult. In order to enhance the possibilities to prevent such crimes it is essential to determine factors that condition this kind of sexual behavior...

  19. Offender risk assessment in delinquent minors and probation service in the USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chirkina R.V; Degtyaryov A.V; Galushkin A.A

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the review of American researchers concerning the application of the method of offender risk assessment in delinquent minors and techniques, which can be qualified as Structured Decision Making – SDM...

  20. Low Self-Control and the Victim-Offender Overlap: A Gendered Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexon, Jamie L; Meldrum, Ryan C; Piquero, Alex R

    2016-07-01

    The overlap between victimization and offending is well documented. Yet, there have been fewer investigations of the reasons underlying this relationship. One possible, but understudied, explanation lies with Gottfredson and Hirschi's arguments regarding self-control. The current study adds to this line of inquiry by assessing whether low self-control accounts for the victim-offender overlap in a sample of young adults and whether self-control accounts for the observed overlap similarly across gender. Results from a series of bivariate probit regression models indicate that low self-control is positively related to both victimization and offending. However, only among males does low self-control account for a substantive portion of the victim-offender overlap. Limitations of the study and implications and directions for future research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. At a crossroads: reentry challenges and healthcare needs among homeless female ex-offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Benissa E; Nyamathi, Adeline; Idemundia, Faith; Slaughter, Regina; Ames, Masha

    2013-01-01

    The exponential increase in the number of women parolees and probationers in the last decade has made women the most rapidly growing group of offenders in the United States. The purpose of this descriptive, qualitative study is to understand the unique gendered experiences of homeless female ex-offenders, in the context of healthcare needs, types of health services sought, and gaps in order to help them achieve a smooth transition post prison release. Focus group qualitative methodology was utilized to engage 14 female ex-offenders enrolled in a residential drug treatment program in Southern California. The findings suggested that for homeless female ex-offenders, there are a myriad of healthcare challenges, knowledge deficits, and barriers to moving forward in life, which necessitates strategies to prevent relapse. These findings support the development of gender-sensitive programs for preventing or reducing drug and alcohol use, recidivism, and sexually transmitted infections among this hard-to-reach population.

  2. Theta phase coherence in affective picture processing reveals dysfunctional sensory integration in psychopathic offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillem, Scott; Ryan, Jonathan; Wu, Jia; Crowley, Michael J; Mayes, Linda C; Baskin-Sommers, Arielle

    2016-09-01

    Psychopathic offenders are described as emotionally cold, displaying deficits in affective responding. However, research demonstrates that many of the psychopathy-related deficits are moderated by attention, such that under conditions of high attentional and perceptual load psychopathic offenders display deficits in affective responses, but do not in conditions of low load. To date, most studies use measures of defensive reflex (i.e., startle) and conditioning manipulations to examine the impact of load on psychopathy-related processing, but have not examined more direct measures of attention processing. In a sample of adult male offenders, the present study examined time-frequency EEG phase coherence in response to a picture-viewing paradigm that manipulated picture familiarity to assess neural changes in processing based on perceptual demands. Results indicated psychopathy-related differences in the theta response, an index of readiness to perceive and integrate sensory information. These data provide further evidence that psychopathic offenders have disrupted integration of sensory information.

  3. Sexual abuse in childhood and the mentally disordered female offender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    This study examines the role that a history of child sexual abuse played in the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders in a sample of 321 female offenders incarcerated in a maximum-security prison for women. The results show that a history of child sexual abuse increases the likelihood that an inmate would receive mental health treatment. Psychotropic medication is frequently prescribed in response to adjustment problems associated with childhood sexual abuse. White women who exhibit adjustment problems associated with a history of child sexual abuse are especially likely to be diagnosed as mentally disordered at admission and to be sent to the mental health unit for treatment. In the absence of a diagnosed mental disorder at admission, women who receive psychotropic medication to help them adjust to prison life are likely to be diagnosed with a mental disorder later on.

  4. Gang Reengagement Intentions among Incarcerated Serious Juvenile Offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Boduszek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research examining the factors that precipitate gang membership has contributed substantially to our understanding of gangs and gang-related activity, yet we know little about the factors influencing intentions to rejoin a gang after having being incarcerated. This study examines the relationship between gang characteristics, number of incarcerated friends, and family characteristics and gang reengagement intentions, while controlling for ethnicity. Participants were 206 male serious juvenile offenders interviewed as part of the Pathways to Desistance Study. The model explained between 35% and 47% of variance in gang reengagement intentions. However, only three variables made a unique statistically significant contribution to the model (punishment if gang rules are broken, importance of gang membership, and moral disengagement, with the strongest predictor being importance of gang membership. The results suggest that challenging young offenders’ perceptions about the importance of gang membership might be particularly effective in reducing gang reengagement intentions after incarceration.

  5. Reentry Programming for High-Risk Offenders: Insights From Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kimberly A; Cobbina, Jennifer E; McGarrell, Edmund F

    2016-10-01

    The mass increase in imprisonment of the last two decades has led to an increasing number of adults released from prison. Scholarly accounts of prisoner reentry have demonstrated that incarcerated individuals face barriers on release from prison and that intervention programs are necessary to assist their transition to the community. Here, we build from the insights of previous research by examining how high-risk offenders perceive a reentry program. Using a qualitative approach, our findings suggest that procedural and substantive justice affect their satisfaction and involvement with the program. This study highlights the importance of providing employment opportunities, social support, and fair and respectful delivery of services to assist incarcerated individuals transitioning to the community.

  6. Implications of Trauma among Male and Female Offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora I. Matheson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Criminal behaviour is believed to arise from a multiplicity of factors, including unemployment and poverty [1,2], low self-control [3], psychological issues [4,5], early conduct problems [6], childhood physical and sexual abuse disorder [5], and social bonding in child- and adulthood [7]. Social-structural influences like family conflict/disruption, financial resources, child-parent and school/peer attachment and abuse and neglect in childhood have lasting impressions, leading to multiple problems including delinquency and later criminal activity, substance use/abuse, mental illness and poor self-rated health [8-12]. The consequences of such behaviour include financial losses, injury, and death that together have significant personal and societal costs. Society also bears the burden of incarcerating and rehabilitating offenders; a burden that is not trivial. Direct costs of imprisonment in Canada approach $3.5 billion annually; in the US the cost is substantially higher, approaching $74 billion [13]. [...

  7. Socio-psychological characteristics of juvenile offenders modern educational colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Timofeevna Shchelina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the features of adolescent and youth crime, shows the influence of the nature of socialization in previous years of age development in the family and other institutions of socialization on its prevalence in modern Russia. We also give a characterization of the basic socio-psychological characteristics of juvenile offenders serving sentences. The authors describe the data characterizing the ratio of pupils to work and family, children themselves, as well as alcohol and drug use. Besides, we presented the experience of professional use of socio-psychological characteristics in the process of developing and implementing FKOU «Evening shift school № 1» GUFSIN Russia Nizhny Novgorod Region preventive project involving different on the status and objectives of the impact of re-socialization subjects pupils colony.

  8. Interrogations, confessions, and adolescent offenders' perceptions of the legal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndorfer, Andrea; Malloy, Lindsay C; Cauffman, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    The potential consequences of interrogations and false confessions have been discussed primarily in terms of the risk for wrongful conviction, especially among adolescents and other vulnerable populations. However, it is possible that such experiences influence adolescents' perceptions of the legal system more generally. In the present study, we examined whether incarcerated male juvenile offenders' (n = 193) perceptions of police and the courts were related to their confession and interrogation experiences. High-pressure interrogation experiences and self-reported false confessions to police were associated with more negative perceptions of police. However, self-reported true confessions were not significantly associated with youths' perceptions of the police. Neither interrogation nor confession experiences (true or false) were related to youths' perceptions of the courts. Results provide additional support for policy reform of interrogation practices with young suspects. A more developmentally appropriate approach to criminal interrogations with youth may simultaneously improve police-youth relations and protect vulnerable suspects in the interrogation room.

  9. Resistance among domestic violence offenders: measurement development and initial validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Deborah A; Velicer, Wayne F; Castle, Patricia H; Greene, R Neil

    2008-02-01

    Batterers' resistance to traditional intervention programs has been well documented. Within a Transtheoretical Model of Change (stage of change) framework, a measure of processes of resistance was developed and administered to 346 adult male domestic violence offenders in treatment. The study yielded a 38-item measure that assesses eight dimensions of resistance: (a) System Blaming, (b) Problems with Partner, (c) Problems with Alliance, (d) Social Justification, (e) Hopelessness, (f) Isolation, (g) Psychological Reactance, and (h) Passive Reactance. The relationship between resistance and stage of change, time in treatment, and partner aggression are reported. Results suggest that we look beyond the most common forms of resistance (e.g., denial and victim-blaming) to identify and address other forms of resistance that may be more internally based and difficult to detect. The processes of resistance measure provides a tool for measuring those types of resistance.

  10. FORENSIC TESTS IN SPANISH FOR ASSESSING JUVENILE OFFENDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Wenger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectively and rigorously understanding the individual psychological characteristics of adolescent offenders, such as intelligence, personality traits and others of a clinical and criminological nature, is essential when developing appropriate processes for intervention in educational and judicial measures in the context of juvenile justice. However, the clinical and personological tools described in the previous article (Wenger & Andrés-Pueyo, 2016 are not enough to address the criminogenic needs of the adolescents and other, more specific, tools are needed. In this article, a number of complementary instruments developed specifically for the forensic area are reviewed. These tools enable us to carry out very specific assessments in this context, such as the evaluation of the risk of violence or the assessment of psychopathy. A review is also presented of the forensic psychological tests available in Spanish for professionals in the field of juvenile justice.

  11. 应用DWI结合常规MRI动态评价晚期早产儿脑白质损伤%To evaluate cerebral white matter damage in the late preterm infants by DWI combined with conventional MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯子鉴; 陈丹; 张静; 王晓明; 李娟; 毛健

    2014-01-01

    Objective According to the conventional magnetic resonance imaging (T1WI, T2WI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), we can make sure the best time to do MRI and evaluate the prognosis for the late preterm infants. Method A total of 649 late preterm infants were enrolled and received the MRI scans with the sequences of conventional MRI and DWI. 271 cases were diagnosed CWMD. To investigate the early MRI signal characteristics of different types CWMD. And the 76 cases were followed up, to study the dynamic change rule. Result In the 271 late preterm infants with CWMD, 170 cases showed focal CWMD, 77 cases showed wide spread CWMD and 24 cases diffuse CWMD. The first time that they received magnetic resonance imaging was (8.3±6.4)(1.7-14.7)d, and the second time was (19.9±5.2)(14.7-25.1) d. There were 36 cases of lesions range reduced, and 23 cases disappeared. But 17 cases (6.3%) showed different degrees of leukomalacia. There were statistically significant differences between the different types of CWMD (P<0.05). (2) Within the first two weeks of white matter damage, DWI had high sensitivity. There were 98% characterized by high signal. T1WI also showed normal or slightly high signals, with or without low signals on T2WI. High signal on DWI of focal CWMD can last for more than 3 weeks, but diffuse CWMD had short duration (within 2 weeks). (3) Focal CWMD often only involved one site of damage (65.3%), mainly concentrated in the lateral ventricle hind feet (53.5%). Widespread CWMD often involved corpus callosum and internal capsule (79.2%), and diffuse CWMD often combined gray matter injury, accounting for 50.0%. (4) There were well correlations in damage type and the infants neurological development result. 1-3 weeks to review after damage, there were 97.1% of focal CWMD characterized by disappearing or decreasing of the lesion range. They often had normal or slightly high signal on DWI, high T1WI signal, with or without high T2WI signal. But the diffuse CWMD all

  12. Social use of alcohol among adolescent offenders: a fundamental approach toward human needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo D?Andrea

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined some basic health care approaches toward human needs, with a particular focus on nursing. We aimed to incorporate these approaches into the discussion of the mental health of adolescent offenders who consume alcohol. We discuss specific needs of the delinquent group, critique policies that prioritize coercion of adolescent offenders, and the role that nurses could play in the sphere of juvenile delinquency.

  13. Settlement between the offender and the victim according to the criminal code of Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Ćorović Emir

    2011-01-01

    The Criminal Code of the Republic of Serbia from 2005 (which went into effect on January 1st, 2006) has envisaged a particular basis for remittance of punishment which had been unknown in our criminal law. It is about settlement between the offender and the victim, an institution reflecting ideas of restorative justice. Although the settlement between the offender and the victim offers great possibilities, it has not received enough attention in our criminal law literature. We usually c...

  14. Alcohol abuse as the strongest risk factor for violent offending in patients with paranoid schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Kudumija Slijepčević, Marija; Jukić, Vlado; Novalić, Darko; Žarković-Palijan, Tija; Milošević, Milan; Rosenzweig, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine predictive risk factors for violent offending in patients with paranoid schizophrenia in Croatia. Method The cross-sectional study including male in-patients with paranoid schizophrenia with (N = 104) and without (N = 102) history of physical violence and violent offending was conducted simultaneously in several hospitals in Croatia during one-year period (2010-2011). Data on their sociodemographic characteristics, duration of untreated illness phase (DUP), alcohol abuse, sui...

  15. A Pilot Study Examining ADHD and Behavioural Disturbance in Female Mentally Disordered Offenders

    OpenAIRE

    Jack Hollingdale; Emma Woodhouse; Philip Asherson; Gudjonsson, Gisli H; Susan Young

    2014-01-01

    Compared with general population rates, prevalence rates of ADHD have been consistently reported to be higher in both male and female offender populations, the latter estimated to range between 10–29%. Research in forensic institutional settings has reported that aggressive behaviour is a particularly prominent source of impairment among men with ADHD. However there is a paucity of research investigating the type of behavioural incidents that may arise in female offenders with ADHD. This pilo...

  16. [Social use of alcohol among adolescent offenders: a fundamental approach toward human needs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Gustavo; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; da Costa, Moacyr Lobo

    2014-02-01

    This study examined some basic health care approaches toward human needs, with a particular focus on nursing. We aimed to incorporate these approaches into the discussion of the mental health of adolescent offenders who consume alcohol. We discuss specific needs of the delinquent group, critique policies that prioritize coercion of adolescent offenders, and the role that nurses could play in the sphere of juvenile delinquency.

  17. A preliminary examination of offender needs assessment: are all those questions really necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farabee, David; Zhang, Sheldon; Yang, Joy

    2011-09-01

    Criminologists generally agree that offender recidivism can be reduced by addressing the criminogenic needs of this population. Two prominent assessments of offender risks and needs are the Level of Service Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) and the Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions (COMPAS). Both predict recidivism, but they are largely based on data from records. In contrast, the determination of inmates' service needs is based on lengthy (and costly) offender interviews. In light of evidence that many correctional systems have not adopted standardized assessments of service needs-and that time burden and costs are typically cited as barriers, the present study examined whether interviews involving complex scales improve the accuracy of offender needs assessment relative to a few single-item measures. To test this, 75 California prison inmates were administered the LSI-R, COMPAS, and a set of four yes/no items asking if they needed help with substance abuse, vocational training, housing, and education. Approximately 70% to 90% of inmates identified as needing these services according to the LSI-R or COMPAS could have been identified using these four supplemental items, though specificity rates were low for the financial and housing domains. The results suggest that simpler, less costly approaches to offender needs assessment might be achievable.

  18. Are risk factors for drug use and offending similar during the teenage years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Elizabeth V

    2015-04-01

    This paper explores whether at different stages of the developmental cycle of adolescence, drug use and offending are associated with a similar set of risk factors relating to: socio-structural position, informal social control, deviant peer group contexts, and deviant lifestyle behaviours. Multivariate regression was used to analyse data from the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime (ESYTC) self-report questionnaire. Early in the teenage years drug use was associated with a similar set of factors to offending. These include weak bonds to parents and teachers, and deviant lifestyle behaviours. However, later in the teenage years there were differences, e.g. drug use was associated with higher socio-economic status and importance of school, and a number of factors which were associated with offending were not associated with drug use, e.g. parent-child conflict, gang membership and hanging around. Results show that the factors included here are more appropriate to understanding offending than drug use. Different risk factors are associated with drug use and offending in the older, but not younger teens. It is argued that later in the teenage years drug use should be understood and addressed differently to offending. This is particularly important given the tendency for the 'drugs problem' to increasingly be dealt with as a 'crime problem' (Duke, 2006). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Characteristics of Parricide Offenders with Schizophrenia in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yeop; Lee, Jangkyu; Shim, Geumsook; Kim, Yeon; Do, Jin Ah; Lee, Soo Jung; Choi, Jong Hyuck; Lee, Jae Woo

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aims to examine the personality characteristics in parricide offenders, by using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) test, which is commonly used in clinical medicine. Methods A total of 73 parricide offenders with schizophrenia who were admitted to National Forensic Hospital in Gongju city between September 2014 and February 2015, and 104 comparison schizophrenia patients who had been admitted to Dankook University Hospital in Cheonan city the same hospital, completed the Korean version of the MMPI. Results The parricide offender group showed significantly higher on L, F, Hs, Hy and Pd than the comparison group. The result of the regression analysis indicated that Pd and Si significantly increased the odd ratio of the sexual offender group by 2.77 times and 0.32 times, respectively (p=0.029 and p=0.023). The offenders of parricide may have developed the following characteristics: hypochondriasis, hysteria and psychopathic deviate. Conclusion These results suggested that the psychopatholgy in the offenders of parricide might be different, compared to the control group.

  20. Psychopathic Traits and Their Relationship with the Cognitive Costs and Compulsive Nature of Lying in Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuere, Bruno; in ´t Hout, Willem

    2016-01-01

    The cognitive view on deception holds that lying typically requires additional mental effort as compared to truth telling. Psychopathy, however, has been associated with swift and even compulsive lying, leading us to explore the ease and compulsive nature of lying in psychopathic offenders. We explored the costs of instructed lying versus truth telling through RTs and error rates in 52 violent male offenders, who were assessed with the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI). Our deception paradigm also included trials with the free choice to lie or tell the truth. By coupling monetary loss to slow and erroneous responding, we hypothesized that the frequency of lying despite likely negative consequences, would provide an index of compulsive lying. Offenders were slower and erred more often when lying than when telling the truth, and there was no robust association between psychopathy and the cognitive cost of lying. From an applied perspective, this suggests that psychopathy may not threaten the validity of computerized cognition-based lie detection. In the face of probable negative consequences, high grandiose-manipulative offenders chose to lie three times as often as low grandiose-manipulative offenders. Our new lying frequency index is a first attempt to create a much needed tool to empirically examine compulsive lying, and provides preliminary support for the compulsive nature of lying in grandiose-manipulative offenders. Alternative interpretation of the findings are discussed. PMID:27391854