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Sample records for repeat dna polymorphism

  1. Polymorphisms in the CAG repeat--a source of error in Huntington disease DNA testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S; Fimmel, A; Fung, D; Trent, R J

    2000-12-01

    Five of 400 patients (1.3%), referred for Huntington disease DNA testing, demonstrated a single allele on CAG alone, but two alleles when the CAG + CCG repeats were measured. The PCR assay failed to detect one allele in the CAG alone assay because of single-base silent polymorphisms in the penultimate or the last CAG repeat. The region around and within the CAG repeat sequence in the Huntington disease gene is a hot-spot for DNA polymorphisms, which can occur in up to 1% of subjects tested for Huntington disease. These polymorphisms may interfere with amplification by PCR, and so have the potential to produce a diagnostic error.

  2. The HumD21S11 system of short tandem repeat DNA polymorphisms in Japanese and Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H G; Sato, K; Nishimaki, Y; Fang, L; Hasekura, H

    1997-04-18

    HumD21S11 is a short tandem repeat DNA polymorphic system with a complex basic structure of (TCTA)4-6 (TCTG)5-6 (TCTA)3 TA (TCTA)3 TCA (TCTA)2 TCCA TA (TCTA)n. Using the allelic ladder prepared by us, the distribution of alleles among Japanese and Chinese was investigated, and four new alleles 28.2, 34, 35.2, and 36.2, were discovered. DNA sequencing was performed on the newly found alleles as well as on family samples and led to the discovery of different gene structures within alleles 28 and 32. Forensic materials, including hairs and seminal stains, were tested in parallel with blood samples from the same individual and were successfully typed for D21S11.

  3. Polymorphic tandem repeats within gene promoters act as modifiers of gene expression and DNA methylation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilez, Javier; Guilmatre, Audrey; Garg, Paras; Highnam, Gareth; Gymrek, Melissa; Erlich, Yaniv; Joshi, Ricky S; Mittelman, David; Sharp, Andrew J

    2016-05-05

    Despite representing an important source of genetic variation, tandem repeats (TRs) remain poorly studied due to technical difficulties. We hypothesized that TRs can operate as expression (eQTLs) and methylation (mQTLs) quantitative trait loci. To test this we analyzed the effect of variation at 4849 promoter-associated TRs, genotyped in 120 individuals, on neighboring gene expression and DNA methylation. Polymorphic promoter TRs were associated with increased variance in local gene expression and DNA methylation, suggesting functional consequences related to TR variation. We identified >100 TRs associated with expression/methylation levels of adjacent genes. These potential eQTL/mQTL TRs were enriched for overlaps with transcription factor binding and DNaseI hypersensitivity sites, providing a rationale for their effects. Moreover, we showed that most TR variants are poorly tagged by nearby single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) markers, indicating that many functional TR variants are not effectively assayed by SNP-based approaches. Our study assigns biological significance to TR variations in the human genome, and suggests that a significant fraction of TR variations exert functional effects via alterations of local gene expression or epigenetics. We conclude that targeted studies that focus on genotyping TR variants are required to fully ascertain functional variation in the genome. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Association of the polymorphism of the CAG repeat in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma gene (POLG) with testicular germ-cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, M; Leffers, H; Petersen, J H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A possible association between the polymorphic CAG repeat in the DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) gene and the risk of testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) was investigated in this study. The hypothesis was prompted by an earlier preliminary study proposing an association of the absence...... of the common 10-CAG-long POLG allele with testicular cancer as well as previously reported in some European populations' association with male subfertility, which is a condition carrying an increased risk of TGCT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The number of CAG repeats in both POLG alleles was established in 243.......001). The vast majority of the homozygous patients had a seminoma (11 of 12; 97%), despite that only about half (55%) of the studied patients had this tumour type. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that the POLG polymorphism may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of TGCT particularly in seminoma...

  5. DNA polymorphism among Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. elaeidis populations from oil palm, using a repeated and dispersed sequence "Palm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouyna, I; Renard, J L; Brygoo, Y

    1996-07-31

    A worldwide collection, of 76 F. oxysporum f.sp. elaeidis isolates (Foe), and of 21 F. oxysporum isolates from the soil of several palm grove was analysed by RFLP. As a probe, we used a random DNA fragment (probe 46) from a genomic library of a Foe isolate. This probe contains two different types of sequence, one being repeated and dispersed in the genome "Palm", the other being a single-copy sequence. All F. oxysporum isolates from the palm-grove soils were non-pathogenic to oil palm. They all had a simple restriction pattern with one band homologous to the single-copy sequence of probe 46. All Foe isolates were pathogenic to oil palm and they all had complex patterns due to hybridization with "Palm". This repetitive sequence reveals that Foe isolates are distinct from the other F. oxysporum palm-grove soils isolates. The sequence can reliably discriminate pathogenic from non-pathogenic oil palm isolates. Based on DNA fingerprint similarities, Foe populations were divided into ten groups consisting of isolates with the same geographic origin. Isolates from Brazil and Ecuador were an exception to that rule as they had the same restriction pattern as a few isolates from the Ivory Coast, suggesting they may originated from Africa.

  6. Improved set of short-tandem-repeat polymorphisms for screening the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Bo; Vaske, D.; Weber, J.L. [Marshfield Medical Research Foundation, WI (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Short-tandem-repeat (microsatellite) DNA polymorphisms are widely used for screening the human and other genomes in initial linkage mapping. Since the average spacing between polymorphisms in genome screens is usually {ge}10 cM and since many thousands of human short-tandem-repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) are now available, optimal subsets of STRPs must be selected for screening. Two screening sets of STRPs for humans have been described in the literature, both of which are based primarily on dinucleotide-repeat polymorphisms. Here we describe our eighth and most recent human screening set, which is based almost entirely on trinucleotide-and tetranucleotide-repeat polymorphisms. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  7. A polymorphism in the MSH3 mismatch repair gene is associated with the levels of somatic instability of the expanded CTG repeat in the blood DNA of myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Fernando; Vásquez, Melissa; Santamaría, Carolina; Cuenca, Patricia; Corrales, Eyleen; Monckton, Darren G

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism of the expanded CTG repeat in myotonic dystrophy type 1 is age-dependent, tissue-specific and expansion-biased, contributing toward the tissue-specificity and progressive nature of the symptoms. Previously, using regression modelling of repeat instability we showed that variation in the rate of somatic expansion in blood DNA contributes toward variation in age of onset, directly implicating somatic expansion in the disease pathway. Here, we confirm these results using a larger more genetically homogenous Costa Rican DM1 cohort (p<0.001). Interestingly, we also provide evidence that supports subtle sex-dependent differences in repeat length-dependent age at onset and somatic mutational dynamics. Previously, we demonstrated that variation in the rate of somatic expansion was a heritable quantitative trait. Given the important role that DNA mismatch repair genes play in mediating expansions in mouse models, we tested for modifier gene effects with 13 DNA mismatch gene polymorphisms (one each in MSH2, PMS2, MSH6 and MLH1; and nine in MSH3). After correcting for allele length and age effects, we identified three polymorphisms in MSH3 that were associated with variation in somatic instability: Rs26279 (p=0.003); Rs1677658 (p=0.009); and Rs10168 (p=0.031). However, only the association with Rs26279 remained significant after multiple testing correction. Although we revealed a statistically significant association between Rs26279 and somatic instability, we did not detect an association with the age at onset. Individuals with the A/A genotype for Rs26279 tended to show a greater propensity to expand the CTG repeat than other genotypes. Interestingly, this SNP results in an amino acid change in the critical ATPase domain of MSH3 and is potentially functionally dimorphic. These data suggest that MSH3 is a key player in generating somatic variation in DM1 patients and further highlight MSH3 as a potential therapeutic target.

  8. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  9. Polymorphic GGC repeat differentially regulates human reelin gene expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, A M; Levitt, P; Pimenta, A F

    2006-10-01

    The human gene encoding Reelin (RELN), a pivotal protein in neurodevelopment, includes a polymorphic GGC repeat in its 5' untranslated region (UTR). CHO cells transfected with constructs encompassing the RELN 5'UTR with 4-to-13 GGC repeats upstream of the luciferase reporter gene show declining luciferase activity with increasing GGC repeat number (P autism.

  10. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible...... to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range....

  11. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    OpenAIRE

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Hansen, Anders Johannes; Morling, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range.

  12. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible...... to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range....

  13. Study of simple sequence repeat (SSR) polymorphism for biotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    home

    2013-10-02

    Oct 2, 2013 ... back cross breeding; SSRs, simple sequence repeats; PIC, polymorphism ..... PIC values were reported in barley wheat and rice (Gu et ... doubled-haploid rice population. Theor. ... Grover A, Aishwarya V, Sharma PC (2007).

  14. Alu repeats as markers for forensic DNA analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kass, D.H. [Louisiana State Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

    1994-01-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 inch and 3 inch unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allow the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of the Alu repeat. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences probably inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem humans (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project. HS Alu family member insertions differ from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) in that polymorphisms due to Alu insertions arise as a result of a unique event which has occurred only one time in the human population and spread through the population from that point. Therefore, individuals that share HS Alu repeats inherited these elements from a common ancestor. Most VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times in parallel within a population.

  15. Rediscovery of historical Vitis vinifera varieties from the South Anatolia region by using amplified fragment length polymorphism and simple sequence repeat DNA fingerprinting methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilancioglu, Kaan; Cetiner, Selim

    2013-05-01

    Anatolia played an important role in the diversification and spread of economically important Vitis vinifera varieties. Although several biodiversity studies have been conducted with local cultivars in different regions of Anatolia, our aim is to gain a better knowledge on the biodiversity of endangered historical V. vinifera varieties in the northern Adana region of southern Anatolia, particularly those potentially displaying viticulture characteristics. We also demonstrate the genetic relatedness in a selected subset of widely cultivated and commercialized V. vinifera collection cultivars, which were obtained from the National Grapevine Germplasm located at the Institute of Viticulture, Turkey. In the present study, microsatellites were used in narrowing the sample size from 72 accessions down to a collection of 27 varieties. Amplified fragment length polymorphisms were then employed to determine genetic relatedness among this collection and local V. vinifera cultivars. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster and principal component analyses revealed that Saimbeyli local cultivars form a distinct group, which is distantly related to a selected subset of V. vinifera collection varieties from all over Turkey. To our knowledge, this is the first study conducted with these cultivars. Further preservation and use of these potential viticultural varieties will be helpful to avoid genetic erosion and to promote continued agriculture in the region.

  16. Characterization and compilation of polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR markers of peanut from public database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yongli

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several reports describing thousands of SSR markers in the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. genome. There is a need to integrate various research reports of peanut DNA polymorphism into a single platform. Further, because of lack of uniformity in the labeling of these markers across the publications, there is some confusion on the identities of many markers. We describe below an effort to develop a central comprehensive database of polymorphic SSR markers in peanut. Findings We compiled 1,343 SSR markers as detecting polymorphism (14.5% within a total of 9,274 markers. Amongst all polymorphic SSRs examined, we found that AG motif (36.5% was the most abundant followed by AAG (12.1%, AAT (10.9%, and AT (10.3%.The mean length of SSR repeats in dinucleotide SSRs was significantly longer than that in trinucleotide SSRs. Dinucleotide SSRs showed higher polymorphism frequency for genomic SSRs when compared to trinucleotide SSRs, while for EST-SSRs, the frequency of polymorphic SSRs was higher in trinucleotide SSRs than in dinucleotide SSRs. The correlation of the length of SSR and the frequency of polymorphism revealed that the frequency of polymorphism was decreased as motif repeat number increased. Conclusions The assembled polymorphic SSRs would enhance the density of the existing genetic maps of peanut, which could also be a useful source of DNA markers suitable for high-throughput QTL mapping and marker-assisted selection in peanut improvement and thus would be of value to breeders.

  17. Cloning, characterization, and properties of seven triplet repeat DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, K; Kang, S; Larson, J E; Wells, R D

    1996-07-12

    Several neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases are caused by genetically unstable triplet repeat sequences (CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, or AAG.CTT) in or near the responsible genes. We implemented novel cloning strategies with chemically synthesized oligonucleotides to clone seven of the triplet repeat sequences (GTA.TAC, GAT.ATC, GTT.AAC, CAC.GTG, AGG.CCT, TCG.CGA, and AAG.CTT), and the adjoining paper (Ohshima, K., Kang, S., Larson, J. E., and Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 16784-16791) describes studies on TTA.TAA. This approach in conjunction with in vivo expansion studies in Escherichia coli enabled the preparation of at least 81 plasmids containing the repeat sequences with lengths of approximately 16 up to 158 triplets in both orientations with varying extents of polymorphisms. The inserts were characterized by DNA sequencing as well as DNA polymerase pausings, two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, and chemical probe analyses to evaluate the capacity to adopt negative supercoil induced non-B DNA conformations. AAG.CTT and AGG.CCT form intramolecular triplexes, and the other five repeat sequences do not form any previously characterized non-B structures. However, long tracts of TCG.CGA showed strong inhibition of DNA synthesis at specific loci in the repeats as seen in the cases of CTG.CAG and CGG.CCG (Kang, S., Ohshima, K., Shimizu, M., Amirhaeri, S., and Wells, R. D.(1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 27014-27021). This work along with other studies (Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 2875-2878) on CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, and TTA.TAA makes available long inserts of all 10 triplet repeat sequences for a variety of physical, molecular biological, genetic, and medical investigations. A model to explain the reduction in mRNA abundance in Friedreich's ataxia based on intermolecular triplex formation is proposed.

  18. The CAG repeat polymorphism of mitochondrial polymerase gamma (POLG) is associated with male infertility in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklouti-Gargouri, S; Ghorbel, M; Chakroun, N; Sellami, A; Fakhfakh, F; Ammar-Keskes, L

    2012-05-01

    Male fertility largely depends on sperm quality, which may be affected by environmental and genetic factors. Recent data emphasised the implication of the polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) CAG repeats in male infertility. In this report, we explored a possible role of the (POLG) gene polymorphism in male infertility in Tunisian men. The polymorphic CAG repeat in the nuclear POLG gene was studied in 339 male subjects (216 patients with infertility (69 azoospermic, 115 oligoasthenoteratospermic and 32 normospermic) and 123 fertile) after DNA amplification by PCR, followed by genotyping using an automatic sequencer. The heterozygous and the homozygous mutant genotypes (10/ ≠ 10 and ≠ 10/ ≠ 10) were significantly more frequent among infertile patients than among fertile controls (11.2% versus 1.6%, P = 1.3 × 10(-3) and 4.6% versus 0.8%, P = 4.2 × 10(-7) respectively). We also found a significant difference between the frequencies of 10/ ≠ 10 genotype in azoospermic (4.4%) and in oligoasthenoteratospermic (15.6%) infertile patients (P = 2.6 × 10(-2) ). However, the homozygous mutant genotype (≠ 10/ ≠ 10) was seen at similar frequencies in azoospermic, normospermic and oligoasthenospermic men (4.4%, 3.1% and 5.2% respectively). Under our conditions, the findings showed an association between POLG CAG repeat polymorphism and male infertility in Tunisian population.

  19. Simple Sequence Repeat Polymorphisms (SSRPs for Evaluation of Molecular Diversity and Germplasm Classification of Minor Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Soo Kim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the genetic diversity among populations is an essential prerequisite for the preservation of endangered species. Thousands of new accessions are introduced into germplasm institutes each year, thereby necessitating assessment of their molecular diversity before elimination of the redundant genotypes. Of the protocols that facilitate the assessment of molecular diversity, SSRPs (simple sequence repeat polymorphisms or microsatellite variation is the preferred system since it detects a large number of DNA polymorphisms with relatively simple technical complexity. The paucity of information on DNA sequences has limited their widespread utilization in the assessment of genetic diversity of minor or neglected crop species. However, recent advancements in DNA sequencing and PCR technologies in conjunction with sophisticated computer software have facilitated the development of SSRP markers in minor crops. This review examines the development and molecular nature of SSR markers, and their utilization in many aspects of plant genetics and ecology.

  20. The DRPLA CAG repeats in an Italian population sample: evaluation of the polymorphism for forensic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelotti, S; Mantovani, V; Esposti, P D; D'Apote, L; Bragliani, M; Maiolini, E; Abbondanza, A; Pappalardo, G

    1998-03-01

    The DRPLA CAG repeats polymorphism has been studied in an Italian population sample. PCR amplification, manual PAGE and silver staining were employed. A total of 16 different alleles, spanning the range from 5 to 21 CAG triplettes, was observed. The heterozygosity was 0.81 and no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was found 81 meioses from parentage testing were also analyzed and a Mendelian pattern of inheritance was observed in all cases. In addition, we could successfully type DRPLA locus in some forensic specimens, 1 ng of DNA allowing clear definition of alleles. The authors conclude that the DRPLA CAG repeats analysis may be useful for forensic applications.

  1. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  2. Absence of association of a polymorphic GGC repeat at the 5' untranslated region of the reelin gene with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chia-Hsing; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2006-05-30

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that plays an important role in guiding neuronal migration, lamination and connection during embryonic brain development. Several reports suggest that reduced reelin expression is associated with human mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, mood disorders and autism. Human reelin cDNA has been cloned and contains a polymorphic GGC repeat at the 5' untranslated region. In view of the possible regulation of reelin gene expression by this GGC polymorphism, we investigated the association of the polymorphic GGC repeat with schizophrenia in a Chinese Han population from Taiwan. We found no differences of allelic and genotypic distributions of the polymorphic GGC triplets between 162 schizophrenic patients and 176 controls in this study. Our findings do not support the involvement of the polymorphic GGC triplets of the reelin gene in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in the population studied.

  3. PSSRdb: a relational database of polymorphic simple sequence repeats extracted from prokaryotic genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pankaj; Chaitanya, Pasumarthy S.; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A

    2010-01-01

    PSSRdb (Polymorphic Simple Sequence Repeats database) (http://www.cdfd.org.in/PSSRdb/) is a relational database of polymorphic simple sequence repeats (PSSRs) extracted from 85 different species of prokaryotes. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are the tandem repeats of nucleotide motifs of the sizes 1–6 bp and are highly polymorphic. SSR mutations in and around coding regions affect transcription and translation of genes. Such changes underpin phase variations and antigenic variations seen in s...

  4. A study of allelic polymorphism of four short tandem repeats in the population of northwestern Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aseev, M.V.; Skakun, V.N.; Baranov, V.S. [Ott Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-06-01

    Characteristics of the allelic polymorphisms of the trimeric AGC repeat of the androgen receptor gene (Xq11-12), exon 1 (AR); the tetrameric ATCT repeat of the von Willebrand factor gene (12p12), intron 40 (vWF); the AGAT repeat of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (Xq26) (HPRT); and the AGAT repeat of anonymous DNA sequences of the short arm of chromosome X (STRX1) were studied in 160 DNA samples from unrelated inhabitants of northwestern Russia using the method of polymerase chain reaction. Seventeen, ten, eight, and nine alleles were revealed electrophoretically for short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The heterozygosity indices for these repeats were 0.80, 0.70, 0.54, and 0.58, respectively. The values for AR and vWF correlated with those expected according to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, whereas the values for HPRT and STRX1 differed significantly from those theoretically expected. The individualization potentials were 0.045, 0.135, 0.095, and 0.061 for the short tandem repeats of AR, vWF, HPRT, and STRX1, respectively. The distribution of genotypes for the set of these four loci in the population studied was determined. The possibilities of using the studied polymorphic marker systems in molecular diagnosis of the corresponding monogenic diseases - spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (AR), Lesch-Nyhan disease (HPRT), and von Willebrand disease (vWF) - as well as in population human genetics, testing of personal identity, and molecular approaches to the estimation of mutagenic activity are discussed. 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Stable DNA methylation boundaries and expanded trinucleotide repeats: role of DNA insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Anja; Kraus, Cornelia; Hoogeveen, André; Ramirez, Christina M; Doerfler, Walter

    2014-07-15

    The human genome segment upstream of the FMR1 (fragile X mental retardation 1) gene (Xq27.3) contains several genetic signals, among them is a DNA methylation boundary that is located 65-70 CpGs upstream of the CGG repeat. In fragile X syndrome (FXS), the boundary is lost, and the promoter is inactivated by methylation spreading. Here we document boundary stability in spite of critical expansions of the CGG trinucleotide repeat in male or female premutation carriers and in high functioning males (HFMs). HFMs carry a full CGG repeat expansion but exhibit an unmethylated promoter and lack the FXS phenotype. The boundary is also stable in Turner (45, X) females. A CTCF-binding site is located slightly upstream of the methylation boundary and carries a unique G-to-A polymorphism (single nucleotide polymorphism), which occurs 3.6 times more frequently in genomes with CGG expansions. The increased frequency of this single nucleotide polymorphism might have functional significance. In CGG expansions, the CTCF region does not harbor additional mutations. In FXS individuals and often in cells transgenomic for EBV (Epstein Barr Virus) DNA or for the telomerase gene, the large number of normally methylated CpGs in the far-upstream region of the boundary is decreased about 4-fold. A methylation boundary is also present in the human genome segment upstream of the HTT (huntingtin) promoter (4p16.3) and is stable both in normal and Huntington disease chromosomes. Hence, the vicinity of an expanded repeat does not per se compromise methylation boundaries. Methylation boundaries exert an important function as promoter safeguards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of DNA Polymerases in Repeat-Mediated Genome Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik A. Shah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of simple DNA repeats cause numerous hereditary diseases in humans. We analyzed the role of DNA polymerases in the instability of Friedreich’s ataxia (GAAn repeats in a yeast experimental system. The elementary step of expansion corresponded to ∼160 bp in the wild-type strain, matching the size of Okazaki fragments in yeast. This step increased when DNA polymerase α was mutated, suggesting a link between the scale of expansions and Okazaki fragment size. Expandable repeats strongly elevated the rate of mutations at substantial distances around them, a phenomenon we call repeat-induced mutagenesis (RIM. Notably, defects in the replicative DNA polymerases δ and ∊ strongly increased rates for both repeat expansions and RIM. The increases in repeat-mediated instability observed in DNA polymerase δ mutants depended on translesion DNA polymerases. We conclude that repeat expansions and RIM are two sides of the same replicative mechanism.

  7. Polymorphisms in the control region of mitochondrial DNA associated with elite Japanese athlete status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, E; Fuku, N; Takahashi, H; Ohiwa, N; Pitsiladis, Y P; Higuchi, M; Kawahara, T; Tanaka, M

    2013-10-01

    The control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contains the main regulatory elements for mtDNA replication and transcription. Certain polymorphisms in this region would, therefore, contribute to elite athletic performance, because mitochondrial function is one of determinants of physical performance. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of polymorphisms in this region on elite athlete status by sequencing the mtDNA control region. Subjects comprised 185 elite Japanese athletes who had represented Japan at international competitions (i.e., 100 endurance/middle-power athletes: EMA; 85 sprint/power athletes: SPA), and 672 Japanese controls (CON). The mtDNA control region was analyzed by direct sequencing. Frequency differences of polymorphisms (minor allele frequency ≥ 0.05) in the mtDNA control region between EMA, SPA, and CON were examined. EMA displayed excess of three polymorphisms [m.152T>C, m.514(CA)n repeat (n ≥ 5), and poly-C stretch at m.568-573 (C ≥ 7)] compared with CON. On the other hand, SPA showed greater frequency of the m.204T>C polymorphism compared with CON. In addition, none of the SPA had m.16278C>T polymorphism, whereas the frequencies of this polymorphism in CON and EMA were 8.3% and 10.0%, respectively. These findings imply that several polymorphisms detected in the control region of mtDNA may influence physical performance probably in a functional manner.

  8. Polymorphic CAG and GGC repeat lengths in the androgen receptor gene and prostate cancer risk: analysis of a Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Neto, Brasil; Koff, Walter J; Biolchi, Vanderlei; Brenner, Cleber; Biolo, Karlo D; Spritzer, Poli Mara; Brum, Ilma S

    2008-02-01

    Variations in transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) are related to polymorphic CAG and GGC repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene. We investigated the association between CAG and GGC repeat length and the risk of prostate cancer in a case-control study from a Brazilian population. We evaluated 49 patients and 51 healthy controls. DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes and the AR gene was analyzed by fragment analysis (GeneMapper software, Applied Biosystems, Foster City, California, USA). CAG and GGC mean lengths were not different between cases and controls. The risk for prostate cancer was higher for CAG repeats repeat lengths (CAG + GGC) repeats ( 17) were not associated with risk for prostate cancer (OR = 1.13 [95% CI 0.47-2.75]). In conclusion, fewer number of CAG repeats and total repeats (CAG + GGC) in the AR gene may be associated with increased risk for prostate cancer.

  9. Isolation and characterization of human cerebellum cDNAs containing polymorphic CAG trinucleotide repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, S.; Onodera, O.; Tanaka, H. [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It has been discovered that neurologic diseases such as X linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, Huntington`s disease, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) are caused by unstable expansions of CAG repeats, which shed a light on a new mechanism of human hereditary diseases. The genetic anticipation, a common genetic feature in these diseases, can be explained by the trinucleotide repeat expansions, and an inverse correlation between the ages of onset and the numbers of trinucleotide repeats is demonstrated in these diseases. Furthermore, there have been diseases such as spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) and Machado-Joseph disease showing similar genetic anticipation, which suggests that their causative mutations are unstable expansions of trinucleotide repeats. To identify candidate genes for neurodegenerative diseases which are expressed in human cerebellum and contain CAG repeats, we screened a human cerebellum cDNA library with an oligonucleotide (CAG){sub 10}, labelled with [{gamma}{sup 32}P]ATP. Out of 78 clones we have isolated, 43 clones were partially sequenced and 31 clones were shown to contain CAG or CTG tinucleotide repeats. From homology searches, 12 of the 59 clones were identified to contain known sequences including human MAR/SAR DNA binding protein, human glial fibrillary acidic protein, human myelin transcription factor 1, human neuronal growth protein 43 and human myocyte-specific enhancer 2. From 6 clones out of the 43 novel genes, we were able to develop primer pairs flanking CAG repeats and determined chromosomal localizations with human and rodent hybrid mapping panels. These CAG repeats were shown to be polymorphic and mapped to 1, 15, 17 and 18. These novel cDNAs will be useful as candidate genes for hereditary neurologic diseases showing genetic anticipation.

  10. DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome short tandem repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.; Brenner, C.; Brinkmann, B.;

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a relat...... a relatively new area, namely Y-chromosome polymorphisms, with particular emphasis on short tandem repeats (STRs). This report addresses nomenclature, use of allelic ladders, population genetics and reporting methods Udgivelsesdato: 2001/12...

  11. Application of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers to ... used, 108 primers generated RAPD bands from genomic DNA of T. chinensis var. mairei ... Keywords: Cultivar identification, DNA extraction, parthenogenesis, pedigree, ...

  12. Analysis of Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism in an Iranian Sadat population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, M R; Sokhansanj, A; Naghizadeh, M A; Farazmand, A

    2009-08-01

    The molecular genotyping of individuals and reconstruction of kinship through short and highly polymorphic DNA markers, so called short tandem repeats (STR), has become one of the important and efficient methods in anthropology studies and forensic science. Although many populations have been analyzed, no study has yet been carried out on Sadat populations who are putative descendents of Prophet Mohammad (peace be upon him). Polymorphisms of 6 Y-STR loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS392, and DYS393) have been studied in an unrelated population of Sadat males. The aim of this study was to find possible similarities within Sadat males, resided in Iran. Among Sadat, DYS385b was proved to be the most polymorphic (GD = 0.8588), and DYS392 showed the lowest polymorphism (GD = 0.3527). In 50 samples, 45 different haplotypes were found, of which 39 haplotypes were unique. In the study, three samples had multi-allelic patterns. Haplotype diversity, in regard to these 7 markers was 0.9942.

  13. MSH3 polymorphisms and protein levels affect CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Tomé

    polymorphisms of DNA repair genes may have prognostic implications for various repeat-associated diseases.

  14. MSH3 polymorphisms and protein levels affect CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Stéphanie; Manley, Kevin; Simard, Jodie P; Clark, Greg W; Slean, Meghan M; Swami, Meera; Shelbourne, Peggy F; Tillier, Elisabeth R M; Monckton, Darren G; Messer, Anne; Pearson, Christopher E

    2013-01-01

    Expansions of trinucleotide CAG/CTG repeats in somatic tissues are thought to contribute to ongoing disease progression through an affected individual's life with Huntington's disease or myotonic dystrophy. Broad ranges of repeat instability arise between individuals with expanded repeats, suggesting the existence of modifiers of repeat instability. Mice with expanded CAG/CTG repeats show variable levels of instability depending upon mouse strain. However, to date the genetic modifiers underlying these differences have not been identified. We show that in liver and striatum the R6/1 Huntington's disease (HD) (CAG)∼100 transgene, when present in a congenic C57BL/6J (B6) background, incurred expansion-biased repeat mutations, whereas the repeat was stable in a congenic BALB/cByJ (CBy) background. Reciprocal congenic mice revealed the Msh3 gene as the determinant for the differences in repeat instability. Expansion bias was observed in congenic mice homozygous for the B6 Msh3 gene on a CBy background, while the CAG tract was stabilized in congenics homozygous for the CBy Msh3 gene on a B6 background. The CAG stabilization was as dramatic as genetic deficiency of Msh2. The B6 and CBy Msh3 genes had identical promoters but differed in coding regions and showed strikingly different protein levels. B6 MSH3 variant protein is highly expressed and associated with CAG expansions, while the CBy MSH3 variant protein is expressed at barely detectable levels, associating with CAG stability. The DHFR protein, which is divergently transcribed from a promoter shared by the Msh3 gene, did not show varied levels between mouse strains. Thus, naturally occurring MSH3 protein polymorphisms are modifiers of CAG repeat instability, likely through variable MSH3 protein stability. Since evidence supports that somatic CAG instability is a modifier and predictor of disease, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that variable levels of CAG instability associated with polymorphisms of

  15. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus;

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible ...

  16. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  17. Association between CAG repeat polymorphisms and the risk of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis by race, study design and the number of (CAG)n repeat polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Ah

    2013-11-01

    Although a number of studies have been conducted on the association between prostate cancer and CAG repeat polymorphisms of the androgen receptor gene, this association remains elusive and controversial. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to evaluate the effects of (CAG)n repeat genetic polymorphisms on the incidence of prostate cancer, particularly as regards race, study design and the number of (CAG)n repeats. To collect articles published on the association between CAG repeats and prostate cancer, publications were identified from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database of epidemiological studies published up to October 2011; our identification of publications was not limited by a language barrier. The following search keywords were used: prostate cancer risk, CAG repeat polymorphism, androgen receptor gene and human. Stata version 10 was used for the meta-analysis and the publication bias was measured through the Begg's test and Egger's test. This meta-analysis included 47 studies with 13,346 cases and 15,172 control or non-cases and consisted of 31 reports based on Caucasians, ten on Asians, one on Hispanics and four on combined ethnic groups. The carriers of a shorter CAG repeat sequence had an increased risk of prostate cancer (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.34 for all subjects; OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.34 for prospective studies; OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.15-1.51 for retrospective studies) regardless of the exact length of the CAG repeat, compared with carriers of a longer repeat sequence. In terms of race, the risk of carrying a shorter CAG repeat sequence was 1.10- and 1.83-fold higher than that of a longer repeat sequence in Caucasians and Asians, respectively. For the specific number of CAG repeat polymorphisms, carriers of repeats were observed to have a higher risk of prostate cancer (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04-1.29) compared with carriers with ≥ 22 CAG repeat polymorphisms, particularly for Asians (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.00-4.24). This meta

  18. Molecular cloning and expression of a novel human cDNA containing CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Chen, B K; Qiu, Y; Sonobe, H; Ohtsuki, Y

    1997-12-19

    A novel human cDNA containing CAG repeats, designated B120, was cloned by PCR amplification. An approximately 300-bp 3' untranslated region in this cDNA was followed by a 3426-bp coding region containing the CAG repeats. A computer search failed to find any significant homology between this cDNA and previously reported genes. The number of CAG trinucleotide repeats appeared to vary from seven to 12 in analyses of genomic DNA from healthy volunteers. An approximately 8-kb band was detected in brain, skeletal muscle and thymus by Northern blot analysis. The deduced amino-acid sequence had a polyglutamine chain encoded by CAG repeats as well as glutamine- and tyrosine-rich repeats, which has also been reported for several RNA binding proteins. We immunized mice with recombinant gene product and established a monoclonal antibody to it. On Western immunoblotting, this antibody detected an approximately 120-kDa protein in human brain tissue. In addition, immunohistochemical staining showed that the cytoplasm of neural cells was stained with this antibody. These findings indicated that B120 is a novel cDNA with a CAG repeat length polymorphism and that its gene product is a cytoplasmic protein with a molecular mass of 120 kDa.

  19. Comparative genomics and molecular dynamics of DNA repeats in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Guy-Franck; Kerrest, Alix; Dujon, Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Repeated elements can be widely abundant in eukaryotic genomes, composing more than 50% of the human genome, for example. It is possible to classify repeated sequences into two large families, "tandem repeats" and "dispersed repeats." Each of these two families can be itself divided into subfamilies. Dispersed repeats contain transposons, tRNA genes, and gene paralogues, whereas tandem repeats contain gene tandems, ribosomal DNA repeat arrays, and satellite DNA, itself subdivided into satellites, minisatellites, and microsatellites. Remarkably, the molecular mechanisms that create and propagate dispersed and tandem repeats are specific to each class and usually do not overlap. In the present review, we have chosen in the first section to describe the nature and distribution of dispersed and tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes in the light of complete (or nearly complete) available genome sequences. In the second part, we focus on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the fast evolution of two specific classes of tandem repeats: minisatellites and microsatellites. Given that a growing number of human neurological disorders involve the expansion of a particular class of microsatellites, called trinucleotide repeats, a large part of the recent experimental work on microsatellites has focused on these particular repeats, and thus we also review the current knowledge in this area. Finally, we propose a unified definition for mini- and microsatellites that takes into account their biological properties and try to point out new directions that should be explored in a near future on our road to understanding the genetics of repeated sequences.

  20. Automated discovery of single nucleotide polymorphism and simple sequence repeat molecular genetic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batley, Jacqueline; Jewell, Erica; Edwards, David

    2007-01-01

    Molecular genetic markers represent one of the most powerful tools for the analysis of genomes. Molecular marker technology has developed rapidly over the last decade, and two forms of sequence-based markers, simple sequence repeats (SSRs), also known as microsatellites, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), now predominate applications in modern genetic analysis. The availability of large sequence data sets permits mining for SSRs and SNPs, which may then be applied to genetic trait mapping and marker-assisted selection. Here, we describe Web-based automated methods for the discovery of these SSRs and SNPs from sequence data. SSRPrimer enables the real-time discovery of SSRs within submitted DNA sequences, with the concomitant design of PCR primers for SSR amplification. Alternatively, users may browse the SSR Taxonomy Tree to identify predetermined SSR amplification primers for any species represented within the GenBank database. SNPServer uses a redundancy-based approach to identify SNPs within DNA sequence data. Following submission of a sequence of interest, SNPServer uses BLAST to identify similar sequences, CAP3 to cluster and assemble these sequences, and then the SNP discovery software autoSNP to detect SNPs and insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphisms.

  1. Copy number of tandem direct repeats within the inverted repeats of Marek's disease virus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, A; Nakajima, K; Ikuta, K; Ueda, S; Kato, S; Hirai, K

    1986-12-01

    We previously reported that DNA of the oncogenic strain BC-1 of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1) contains three units of tandem direct repeats with 132 base pair (bp) repeats within the inverted repeats of the long regions of the MDV1 genome, whereas the attenuated, nononcogenic viral DNA contains multiple units of tandem direct repeats (Maotani et al., 1986). In the present study, the difference in the copy numbers of 132 bp repeats of oncogenic and nononcogenic MDV1 DNAs in other strains of MDV1 was investigated by Southern blot hybridization. The main copy numbers in different oncogenic MDV1 strains differed: those of BC-1, JM and highly oncogenic Md5 were 3, 5 to 12 and 2, respectively. The viral DNA population with two units of repeats was small, but detectable, in cells infected with either the oncogenic BC-1 or JM strain. The MDV1 DNA in various MD cell lines contained either two units or both two and three units of repeats. The significance of the copy number of repeats in oncogenicity of MDV1 is discussed.

  2. EVOLUTION AND RECOMBINATION OF BOVINE DNA REPEATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOBSE, C; BUNTJER, JB; HAAGSMA, N; BREUKELMAN, HJ; BEINTEMA, JJ; LENSTRA, JA

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species

  3. EVOLUTION AND RECOMBINATION OF BOVINE DNA REPEATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOBSE, C; BUNTJER, JB; HAAGSMA, N; BREUKELMAN, HJ; BEINTEMA, JJ; LENSTRA, JA

    1995-01-01

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species cattl

  4. Effects of As2O3 on DNA methylation, genomic instability, and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Aydin, Murat; Sigmaz, Burcu; Taspinar, M Sinan; Arslan, Esra; Agar, Guleray; Yagci, Semra

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is a well-known toxic substance on the living organisms. However, limited efforts have been made to study its DNA methylation, genomic instability, and long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon polymorphism causing properties in different crops. In the present study, effects of As2O3 (arsenic trioxide) on LTR retrotransposon polymorphism and DNA methylation as well as DNA damage in Zea mays seedlings were investigated. The results showed that all of arsenic doses caused a decreasing genomic template stability (GTS) and an increasing Random Amplified Polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) profile changes (DNA damage). In addition, increasing DNA methylation and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism characterized a model to explain the epigenetically changes in the gene expression were also found. The results of this experiment have clearly shown that arsenic has epigenetic effect as well as its genotoxic effect. Especially, the increasing of polymorphism of some LTR retrotransposon under arsenic stress may be a part of the defense system against the stress.

  5. Androgen receptor gene CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms in Chilean men with primary severe spermatogenic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Bacallao, Ketty; Parada-Bustamante, Alexis; Lardone, María C; López, Patricia V; Madariaga, Marcia; Valdevenito, Raúl; Piottante, Antonio; Ebensperger, Mauricio; Castro, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    There is ample documentation supporting the fact that androgens are required for normal spermatogenesis. A minority of infertile men have abnormal testosterone blood levels or mild androgen receptor mutations. We investigated the androgen receptor CAG and GGN repeat lengths in Chilean men with spermatogenic impairment. We studied 117 secretory azoospermic/oligozoospermic men (93 idiopathic and 24 excryptorchidic), without Y-chromosome microdeletions, and 121 controls with normal spermatogenesis (42 obstructive and 79 normozoospermic men). Peripheral blood was drawn to obtain genomic DNA for polymerase chain reaction and automated sequencing of CAG and GGN repeats. Testicular characterization included hormonal studies, physical evaluation, and seminal and biopsy analysis. The CAG and GGN polymorphism distributions were similar among idiopathic men, excryptorchidic men, and controls and among the different types of spermatogenic impairment. However, the proportion of the CAG 21 allele was significantly increased in idiopathic cases compared to controls (P = .012 by Bonferroni test, odds ratio = 2.99, 95% confidence interval, 1.27-7.0) and the CAG 32 allele only was observed in excryptorchidic patients (P CAG 21 allele (P = .024, χ(2) test). On the other hand, in idiopathic cases and controls the most common GGN allele was 23, followed by 24, but an inverse relation was found among excryptorchidic cases. The joint distribution of CAG and GGN in control, idiopathic, and excryptorchidic groups did not show an association between the 2 allele repeat polymorphisms (P > 0.05, χ(2) test). Our results suggest that the CAG 21 allele seems to increase the risk of idiopathic Sertoli cell-only syndrome. Moreover, the GGN 24 allele could be contributing to deranged androgen receptor function, associated with cryptorchidism and spermatogenic failure.

  6. Genomic and polyploid evolution in genus Avena as revealed by RFLPs of repeated DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Toshinobu; Nishihara, Miho

    2009-06-01

    Phylogenetic relationships and genome affinities were investigated by utilizing all the biological Avena species consisting of 11 diploid species (15 accessions), 8 tetraploid species (9 accessions) and 4 hexaploid species (5 accessions). Genomic DNA regions of As120a, avenin, and globulin were amplified by PCR. A total of 130 polymorphic fragments were detected out of 156 fragments generated by digesting the PCR-amplified fragments with 11 restriction enzymes. The number of fragments generated by PCR-amplification followed by digestion with restriction enzymes was almost the same as those among the three repeated DNA sequences. A high level of genetic distance was detected between A. damascena (Ad) and A. canariensis (Ac) genomes, which reflected their different morphology and reproductive isolation. The A. longiglumis (Al) and A. prostrata (Ap) genomes were closely related to the As genome group. The AB genome species formed a cluster with the AsAs genome artificial autotetraploid and the As genome diploids indicating near-autotetraploid origin. The A. macrostachya is an outbreeding autotetraploid closely related with the C genome diploid and the AC genome tetraploid species. The differences of genetic distances estimated from the repeated DNA sequence divergence among the Avena species were consistent with genome divergences and it was possible to compare the genetic intra- and inter-ploidy relationships produced by RFLPs. These results suggested that the PCR-mediated analysis of repeated DNA polymorphism can be used as a tool to examine genomic relationships of polyploidy species.

  7. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism and risk of isolated hypospadias: results from a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, G; Shan, W; Zeng, L; Huang, L

    2015-03-06

    Studies investigating the association between the CAG repeat polymorphism and the risk of isolated hypospadias have reported conflicting results. The aim of this study was to quantitatively summarize the evidence for such a relationship. Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase, CNKI, and Wanfang databases. Weighted mean difference and 95% confidence intervals for the CAG repeat polymorphism and isolated hypospadias were calculated using a random-effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed by race, study design, sample for DNA extraction, and hypospadias classifications. This meta-analysis included 6 case-control studies, including 444 isolated hypospadias cases and 727 controls. The results showed that patients with isolated hypospadias had longer CAG repeats in their androgen receptor gene sequence (weighted mean difference = 1.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.60-2.13; P = 0.0005). Similarly, stratified analyses also detected significant associations in all subgroups, excluding the group with severe hypospadias (weighted mean difference = 0.35, 95% confidence interval = -0.42-1.12; P = 0.38). This meta-analysis indicated that longer CAG repeats were associated with the risk of isolated hypospadias, and that longer CAG polymorphisms may be related to the etiology of isolated hypospadias. Future studies based on Asian and African-American patients should be performed to re-evaluate this association.

  8. MITOCHONDRIAL DNA POLYMORPHISM IN CONTROL REGION FROM CHINESE YUGU POPULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘新社; 李生斌

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mitochondrial DNA sequence polymorphism sites in Chinese YUGU ethnic group and to provide basic data used in forensic purpose. Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from the hole blood of 100 unrelated individuals of Chinese YUGU ethnic group by standard chelex-100 method. The sequence polymorphism sites was determined by PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Results 54 polymorphic sites were noted in mtDNA np16091-16418 region, and 46 haplotypes were identified. The genetic diversity was calculated to be 0.9691, and the genetic identity was calculated to be 0.0406. Conclusion There are some particular polymorphism sites in Chinese YUGU ethnic group. The results suggest that sequence polymorphism from np16091-16418 in human mitochondrial DNA can be used as a biological marker for forensic identity.

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of satellite DNA repeats from Phaseolus beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Tiago; Dos Santos, Karla G B; Richard, Manon M S; Sévignac, Mireille; Thareau, Vincent; Geffroy, Valérie; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) subtelomeres are highly enriched for khipu, the main satellite DNA identified so far in this genome. Here, we comparatively investigate khipu genomic organization in Phaseolus species from different clades. Additionally, we identified and characterized another satellite repeat, named jumper, associated to khipu. A mixture of P. vulgaris khipu clones hybridized in situ confirmed the presence of khipu-like sequences on subterminal chromosome regions in all Phaseolus species, with differences in the number and intensity of signals between species and when species-specific clones were used. Khipu is present as multimers of ∼500 bp and sequence analyses of cloned fragments revealed close relationship among khipu repeats. The new repeat, named jumper, is a 170-bp satellite sequence present in all Phaseolus species and inserted into the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) of the 5S rDNA in the P. vulgaris genome. Nevertheless, jumper was found as a high-copy repeat at subtelomeres and/or pericentromeres in the Phaseolus microcarpus lineage only. Our data argue for khipu as an important subtelomeric satellite DNA in the genus and for a complex satellite repeat composition of P. microcarpus subtelomeres, which also contain jumper. Furthermore, the differential amplification of these repeats in subtelomeres or pericentromeres reinforces the presence of a dynamic satellite DNA library in Phaseolus.

  10. [Polymorphisms of 21 short tandem repeat loci of Salar minority ethnic group in Qinghai Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Yan-bin; Li, Kai; Wang, Jian-wen

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the polymorphisms of 21 short tandem repeat (STR)loci of Salar minority ethnic group in Qinghai Province. Blood samples were collected from 120 unrelated healthy Salar individuals from Gandu town in Hualong county. DNA templates were screened by home-made AGCU21+1 kit. The findings were further compared with those of Hans in Zhejiang Province, Hans in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Tibetans in Tibet Autonomous Region, and Tujias in Hubei Province. The allele frequencies of 21 STR loci ranged 0.0042-0.4917, the genotype frequencies ranged 0.0083-0.3750, the power of discrimination ranged 0.796-0.948, the heterozygosity ranged 0.650-0.817, the polymorphism information contents ranged 0.590-0.810, and the power of exclusion ranged 0.355-0.630. The cumulative coupling probability was 1.75×10(-20), and the cumulative power of exclusion was 0.9999999. Significant differences were found at 14, 12, 12, 13 of the 21 STR loci between Salar and Hans of Zhejiang Province, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Tibetans of Tibet Autonomous Region, and Tujias of Hubei Province (Pethnic group from Qinghai Province and therefore suitable for population genetics study, screening of disease-related genes, and forensic individual identification.

  11. Size polymorphism of chicken major histocompatibility complex-encoded B-G molecules is due to length variation in the cytoplasmic heptad repeat region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K;

    1990-01-01

    that the extracellular regions of these molecules are very similar and that the length polymorphism is due to variations in the cytoplasmic regions. Inspection of the cDNA-derived protein sequence in this region shows many heptad repeats, which may allow variation in length by step deletion and alternative splicing...

  12. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene (AR) and its relationship to head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, M L; Sibov, T T; Nishimoto, I N; Kowalski, L P; Miracca, E C; Nagai, M A

    2004-02-01

    Sex hormones may play an important role in the tumorigenic process of the head and neck. The aim of our work was to investigate whether the androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat polymorphism is associated with an increased relative risk for head and neck cancer. Genomic DNA from 103 male patients with head and neck carcinomas and 100 male controls were analyzed for the AR CAG polymorphism by PCR amplification and direct sequencing or denaturing polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis. Logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between CAG repeat length and risk of head and neck cancer in individuals with more than 20 CAG repeats [OR=2.54 (95% CI, 1.3-4.8)]. For the group of individuals with oral and laryngeal cancer the estimated relative risk was increased to 2.79 (95% CI, 1.2-6.3) and 3.06 (95% CI, 1.0-9.6), respectively, in men with CAG repeat length >20. These results suggest, for the first time, that shorter AR CAG repeat alleles have a protective effect for head and neck cancer development.

  13. DNA profiling of extended tracts of primitive DNA repeats: Direct identification of unstable simple repeat loci in complex genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogaeva, E.A.; Korovaitseva, G.; St. George-Hyslop, P. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The most simple DNA repetitive elements, with repetitive monomer units of only 1-10 bp in tandem tracts, are an abundant component of the human genome. The expansion of at least one type of these repeats ((CCG)n and (CTG)n) have been detected for a several neurological diseases with anticipation in successive generations. We propose here a simple method for the identification of particularly expanded repeats and for the recovery of flanking sequences. We generated DNA probes using PCR to create long concatamers (n>100) by amplification of the di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotide repeat oligonucleotide primer pairs. To reduce the complexity of the background band pattern, the genomic DNA was restricted with a mixture of at least five different endonucleases, thereby reducing the size of restriction fragments containing short simple repeat arrays while leaving intact the large fragments containing the longer simple repeats arrays. Direct blot hybridization has shown different {open_quotes}DNA fingerprint{close_quotes} patterns with all arbitrary selected di-hexa nucleotide repeat probes. Direct hybridization of the (CTG)n and (CCG)n probes revealed simple or multiple band patterns depending upon stringency conditions. We were able to detect the presence of expanded unstable tri-nucleotide alleles by (CCG)n probe for some FRAXA subjects and by (CTG)n probe for some myotonic dystrophy subjects which were not present in the parental DNA patterns. The cloning of the unstable alleles for simple repeats can be performed by direct recover from agarose gels of the aberrant unstable bands detected above. The recovered flanking regions can be cloned, sequenced and used for PCR detection of expanded alleles or can be used to screen cDNA. This method may be used for testing of small families with diseases thought to display clinical evidence of anticipation.

  14. Telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats are chromosomal targets of the bloom syndrome DNA helicase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paric Enesa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is one of the most cancer-predisposing disorders and is characterized by genomic instability and a high frequency of sister chromatid exchange. The disorder is caused by loss of function of a 3' to 5' RecQ DNA helicase, BLM. The exact role of BLM in maintaining genomic integrity is not known but the helicase has been found to associate with several DNA repair complexes and some DNA replication foci. Results Chromatin immunoprecipitation of BLM complexes recovered telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats. The N-terminus of BLM, required for NB localization, is the same as the telomere association domain of BLM. The C-terminus is required for ribosomal DNA localization. BLM localizes primarily to the non-transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA repeat where replication forks initiate. Bloom syndrome cells expressing the deletion alleles lacking the ribosomal DNA and telomere association domains have altered cell cycle populations with increased S or G2/M cells relative to normal. Conclusion These results identify telomere and ribosomal DNA repeated sequence elements as chromosomal targets for the BLM DNA helicase during the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. BLM is localized in nuclear bodies when it associates with telomeric repeats in both telomerase positive and negative cells. The BLM DNA helicase participates in genomic stability at ribosomal DNA repeats and telomeres.

  15. Telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats are chromosomal targets of the bloom syndrome DNA helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawalder, James; Paric, Enesa; Neff, Norma F

    2003-10-27

    Bloom syndrome is one of the most cancer-predisposing disorders and is characterized by genomic instability and a high frequency of sister chromatid exchange. The disorder is caused by loss of function of a 3' to 5' RecQ DNA helicase, BLM. The exact role of BLM in maintaining genomic integrity is not known but the helicase has been found to associate with several DNA repair complexes and some DNA replication foci. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of BLM complexes recovered telomere and ribosomal DNA repeats. The N-terminus of BLM, required for NB localization, is the same as the telomere association domain of BLM. The C-terminus is required for ribosomal DNA localization. BLM localizes primarily to the non-transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA repeat where replication forks initiate. Bloom syndrome cells expressing the deletion alleles lacking the ribosomal DNA and telomere association domains have altered cell cycle populations with increased S or G2/M cells relative to normal. These results identify telomere and ribosomal DNA repeated sequence elements as chromosomal targets for the BLM DNA helicase during the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. BLM is localized in nuclear bodies when it associates with telomeric repeats in both telomerase positive and negative cells. The BLM DNA helicase participates in genomic stability at ribosomal DNA repeats and telomeres.

  16. DNA repair gene polymorphisms in relation to chromosome aberration frequencies in retired radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilding, Craig S. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: craig.wilding@westlakes.ac.uk; Relton, Caroline L. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Paediatric and Lifecourse Epidemiology Research Group, School of Clinical Medical Sciences (Child Health), Newcastle University, Sir James Spence Institute, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 4LP (United Kingdom); Rees, Gwen S. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Tarone, Robert E. [International Epidemiology Institute, 1455 Research Boulevard, Suite 550, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Whitehouse, Caroline A. [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom); Tawn, E. Janet [Genetics Department, Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3JY (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-15

    Polymorphic variation in DNA repair genes was examined in a group of retired workers from the British Nuclear Fuels plc facility at Sellafield in relation to previously determined translocation frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Variation at seven polymorphisms in four genes involved in the base excision repair (XRCC1 R194W, R399Q and a [AC]{sub n} microsatellite in the 3' UTR) and double strand break repair (XRCC3 T241M and a [AC]{sub n} microsatellite in intron 3 of XRCC3, XRCC4 I134T, and a GACTAn microsatellite located 120kb 5' of XRCC5) pathways was determined for 291 retired radiation workers who had received cumulative occupational external radiation doses of between 0 and 1873mSv. When the interaction between radiation dose and each DNA repair gene polymorphism was examined in relation to translocation frequency there was no evidence for any of the polymorphisms studied influencing the response to occupational exposure. A positive interaction observed between genotype (individuals with at least one allele >=20 repeat units) at a microsatellite locus in the XRCC3 gene and smoking status should be interpreted cautiously because interactions were investigated for seven polymorphisms and two exposures. Nonetheless, further research is warranted to examine whether this DNA repair gene variant might be associated with a sub-optimal repair response to smoking-induced DNA damage and hence an increased frequency of translocations.

  17. Association analysis of a highly polymorphic CAG Repeat in the human potassium channel gene KCNN3 and migraine susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovcaric Mick

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is a polygenic multifactorial disease, possessing environmental and genetic causative factors with multiple involved genes. Mutations in various ion channel genes are responsible for a number of neurological disorders. KCNN3 is a neuronal small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel gene that contains two polyglutamine tracts, encoded by polymorphic CAG repeats in the gene. This gene plays a critical role in determining the firing pattern of neurons and acts to regulate intracellular calcium channels. Methods The present association study tested whether length variations in the second (more 3' polymorphic CAG repeat in exon 1 of the KCNN3 gene, are involved in susceptibility to migraine with and without aura (MA and MO. In total 423 DNA samples from unrelated individuals, of which 202 consisted of migraine patients and 221 non-migraine controls, were genotyped and analysed using a fluorescence labelled primer set on an ABI310 Genetic Analyzer. Allele frequencies were calculated from observed genotype counts for the KCNN3 polymorphism. Analysis was performed using standard contingency table analysis, incorporating the chi-squared test of independence and CLUMP analysis. Results Overall, there was no convincing evidence that KCNN3 CAG lengths differ between Caucasian migraineurs and controls, with no significant difference in the allelic length distribution of CAG repeats between the population groups (P = 0.090. Also the MA and MO subtypes did not differ significantly between control allelic distributions (P > 0.05. The prevalence of the long CAG repeat (>19 repeats did not reach statistical significance in migraineurs (P = 0.15, nor was there a significant difference between the MA and MO subgroups observed compared to controls (P = 0.46 and P = 0.09, respectively, or between MA vs MO (P = 0.40. Conclusion This association study provides no evidence that length variations of the second polyglutamine array in

  18. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic mutations from dynamic DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard R Sinden; Vladimir N Potaman; Elena A Oussatcheva; Christopher E Pearson; Yuri L Lyubchenko; Luda S Shlyakhtenko

    2002-02-01

    Fourteen genetic neurodegenerative diseases and three fragile sites have been associated with the expansion of (CTG)n•(CAG)n, (CGG)n•(CCG)n, or (GAA)n•(TTC)n repeat tracts. Different models have been proposed for the expansion of triplet repeats, most of which presume the formation of alternative DNA structures in repeat tracts. One of the most likely structures, slipped strand DNA, may stably and reproducibly form within triplet repeat sequences. The propensity to form slipped strand DNA is proportional to the length and homogeneity of the repeat tract. The remarkable stability of slipped strand DNA may, in part, be due to loop-loop interactions facilitated by the sequence complementarity of the loops and the dynamic structure of three-way junctions formed at the loop-outs.

  19. Efficient development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers based on polymorphic repeats in transcriptome sequences of multiple individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukosavljev, M; Esselink, G D; van 't Westende, W P C; Cox, P; Visser, R G F; Arens, P; Smulders, M J M

    2015-01-01

    The first hurdle in developing microsatellite markers, cloning, has been overcome by next-generation sequencing. The second hurdle is testing to differentiate polymorphic from nonpolymorphic loci. The third hurdle, somewhat hidden, is that only polymorphic markers with a large effective number of alleles are sufficiently informative to be deployed in multiple studies. Both steps are laborious and still performed manually. We have developed a strategy in which we first screen reads from multiple genotypes for repeats that show the most length variants, and only these are subsequently developed into markers. We validated our strategy in tetraploid garden rose using Illumina paired-end transcriptome sequences of 11 roses. Of 48 tested two markers failed to amplify, but all others were polymorphic. Ten loci amplified more than one locus, indicating duplicated genes or gene families. Completely avoiding duplicated loci will be difficult because the range of numbers of predicted alleles of highly polymorphic single- and multilocus markers largely overlapped. Of the remainder, half were replicate markers (i.e. multiple primer pairs for one locus), indicating the difficulty of correctly filtering short reads containing repeat sequences. We subsequently refined the approach to eliminate multiple primer sets to the same loci. The remaining 18 markers were all highly polymorphic, amplifying on average 11.7 alleles per marker (range = 6-20) in 11 tetraploid roses, exceeding the 8.2 alleles per marker of the 24 most polymorphic markers genotyped previously. This strategy therefore represents a major step forward in the development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms in Phytophthora infestans: new haplotypes are identified and re-defined by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Hui; Qi, Ming-Xing; Qin, Yu-Xuan; Zhu, Jie-Hua; Gui, Xiu-Mei; Tao, Bu; Xu, Xiao-Hu; Zhang, Fu-Guang

    2013-11-01

    Polymorphisms of mitochondrial DNA (mt-DNA) are particularly useful for monitoring specific pathogen populations like Phytophthora infestans. Basically type I and II of P. infestans mt-DNA were categorized by means of polymorphism lengths caused by an ~2 kb insertion, which can be detected via restriction enzyme digestion. In addition genome sequencing of haplotype Ib has been used as a simple Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method to indirectly identify type I and II alterations through EcoR I restriction enzyme DNA fragment patterns of the genomic P4 area. However, with the common method, wrong mt-DNA typing occurs due to an EcoR I recognition site mutation in the P4 genomic area. Genome sequencing of the four haplotypes (Ia, Ib, IIa, and IIb) allowed us to thoroughly examine mt-DNA polymorphisms and we indentified two hypervariable regions (HVRs) named HVRi and HVRii. The HVRi length polymorphism caused by a 2 kb insertion/deletion was utilized to identify mt-DNA types I and II, while another length polymorphism in the HVRii region is caused by a variable number of tandem repeats (n = 1, 2, or 3) of a 36 bp sized DNA stretch and was further used to determine mt-DNA sub-types, which were described as R(n = 1, 2, or 3). Finally, the P. infestans mt-DNA haplotypes were re-defined as IR(1) or IIR(2) according to PCR derived HVRi and HVRii length polymorphisms. Twenty-three isolates were chosen to verify the feasibility of our new approach for identifying mt-DNA haplotypes and a total of five haplotypes (IR(1), IR(2), IR(3), IIR(2) and IIR(3)) were identified. Additionally, we found that six isolates determined as type I by our method were mistakenly identified as type II by the PCR-RFLP technique. In conclusion, we propose a simple and rapid PCR method for identification of mt-DNA haplotypes based on sequence analyses of the mitochondrial P. infestans genome.

  1. EGFR CA repeat polymorphism predict clinical outcome in EGFR mutation positive NSCLC patients treated with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther Larsen, Anne; Nissen, Peter Henrik; Meldgaard, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are predictors of efficacy for treatment with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A CA repeat polymorphism in intron 1 of the EGFR gene influences the transcription...... of the EGFR gene. This study evaluates the association between the CA repeat polymorphism and outcome in NSCLC patients treated with erlotinib.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Number of CA repeats in the EGFR gene was evaluated with PCR-fragment length analysis by capillary electrophoresis in 432 advanced NSCLC...... patients treated with erlotinib irrespective of EGFR mutation status. Patients were dichotomized into harboring short allele (CA≤16 in any allele) or long alleles (CA>16 in both alleles). Number of repeats was correlated with clinical characteristic and outcome. A subgroup analysis was performed based...

  2. Polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers in the penduline tit, Remiz pendulinus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meszaros, L. A.; Frauenfelder, N.; Van Der Velde, M.; Komdeur, J.; Szabad, J.

    2008-01-01

    To describe the exceptional mating system of the penduline tit, Remiz pendulinus, we aim to combine field observation records with DNA analysis based on polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers. Here we describe features of nine loci and their corresponding polymerase chain reaction primers. The obser

  3. Sexing birds using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lessells, C.M.; Mateman, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    We used random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers to sex birds from small tissue (usually blood) samples. Arbitrarily chosen 10-mer PCR primers were screened with DNA from known-sex individuals for the production of a bright female-specific band. Suitable primers were found for seven bird spec

  4. DNA polymorphism at the casein loci in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, P; Rando, A; Pieragostini, E; Masina, P

    1991-01-01

    By using seven endonucleases and four bovine cDNA probes specific for alpha S1-, alpha S2-, beta-, and kappa-casein genes, nine restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) have been found in the sheep orthologous DNA regions. In contrast to the low level of variation observed at the protein level, these DNA polymorphisms determine a high level of heterozygosity and, therefore, represent useful tools for genetic analyses since they can also be obtained without the need for gene expression. In fact, informative matings suggest that in sheep, as in cattle, the four loci are linked.

  5. Polymorphic CAG Repeat and Protein Expression of Androgen Receptor Gene in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Wang, Guiyu; Song, Yanni; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Bing; Tang, Qingchao; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yinggang; Zhang, Qian; Muhammad, Shan; Wang, Xishan

    2015-04-01

    Although somatic alterations in CAG repeats in the androgen receptor (AR) gene have been suggested to predispose to colorectal cancer, less is known about AR in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis. Because of lack of relevant analysis on CAG repeat length and AR expression in colorectal cancer, we aimed to investigate the prognostic value of polymorphic CAG and protein expression of the AR gene in patients with colorectal cancer. A case-control study was carried out on 550 patients with colorectal cancer and 540 healthy controls to investigate whether polymorphic CAG within the AR gene is linked to increased risk for colorectal cancer. Polymorphic CAG and AR expression were analyzed to clarify their relationship with clinicopathologic and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer. The study showed that the AR gene in patients with colorectal cancer had a longer CAG repeat sequence than those in the control group, as well as increased risk for colorectal cancer among females (P = 0.013), males (P = 0.002), and total colorectal cancer population (P CAG repeat sequence among males (P CAG repeat sequence and negative AR expression were associated with a short 5-year overall survival (OS) rate in colorectal cancer. Long CAG repeat sequences and the absence of AR expression were closely related to the development of colorectal cancer. Both long CAG and decreased AR expression were correlated with the poor 5-year OS in patients with colorectal cancer.

  6. PSSRdb: a relational database of polymorphic simple sequence repeats extracted from prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Chaitanya, Pasumarthy S; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A

    2011-01-01

    PSSRdb (Polymorphic Simple Sequence Repeats database) (http://www.cdfd.org.in/PSSRdb/) is a relational database of polymorphic simple sequence repeats (PSSRs) extracted from 85 different species of prokaryotes. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are the tandem repeats of nucleotide motifs of the sizes 1-6 bp and are highly polymorphic. SSR mutations in and around coding regions affect transcription and translation of genes. Such changes underpin phase variations and antigenic variations seen in some bacteria. Although SSR-mediated phase variation and antigenic variations have been well-studied in some bacteria there seems a lot of other species of prokaryotes yet to be investigated for SSR mediated adaptive and other evolutionary advantages. As a part of our on-going studies on SSR polymorphism in prokaryotes we compared the genome sequences of various strains and isolates available for 85 different species of prokaryotes and extracted a number of SSRs showing length variations and created a relational database called PSSRdb. This database gives useful information such as location of PSSRs in genomes, length variation across genomes, the regions harboring PSSRs, etc. The information provided in this database is very useful for further research and analysis of SSRs in prokaryotes.

  7. Direct detection of expanded trinucleotide repeats using DNA hybridization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petronis, A.; Tatuch, Y.; Kennedy, J.L. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recently, unstable trinucleotide repeats have been shown to be the etiologic factor in several neuropsychiatric diseases, and they may play a similar role in other disorders. To our knowledge, a method that detects expanded trinucleotide sequences with the opportunity for direct localization and cloning has not been achieved. We have developed a set of hybridization-based methods for direct detection of unstable DNA expansion. Our analysis of myotonic dystrophy patients that possess different degrees of (CTG){sub n} expansion, versus unaffected controls, has demonstrated the identification of the trinucleotide instability site without any prior information regarding genetic map location. High stringency modified Southern blot hybridization with a PCR-generated trinucleotide repeat probe allowed us to detect the DNA fragment containing the expansion in myotonic dystrophy patients. The same probe was used for fluorescent in situ hybridization and several regions of (CTG){sub n}/(CAG){sub n} repeats in the human genome were detected, including the myotonic dystrophy locus on chromosome 19q. These strategies can be applied to directly clone genes involved in disorders caused by unstable DNA.

  8. CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) gene of SBMA patients and a control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułek, Anna; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Krysa, Wioletta; Szirkowiec, Walentyna; Fidziańska, Elzbieta; Zaremba, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked form of motor neuron disease characterized by progressive atrophy of the muscles, dysphagia, dysarthria and mild androgen insensitivity. SBMA is caused by CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. CAG repeat polymorphism was analysed in a Polish control group (n = 150) and patients suspected of SBMA (n = 60). Normal and abnormal ranges of CAG repeats were established in the control group and in 21 patients whose clinical diagnosis of SBMA was molecularly confirmed. The ranges are similar to those reported for other populations.

  9. CTCF regulates the local epigenetic state of ribosomal DNA repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Nobelen Suzanne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CCCTC binding factor (CTCF is a highly conserved zinc finger protein, which is involved in chromatin organization, local histone modifications, and RNA polymerase II-mediated gene transcription. CTCF may act by binding tightly to DNA and recruiting other proteins to mediate its various functions in the nucleus. To further explore the role of this essential factor, we used a mass spectrometry-based approach to screen for novel CTCF-interacting partners. Results Using biotinylated CTCF as bait, we identified upstream binding factor (UBF and multiple other components of the RNA polymerase I complex as potential CTCF-interacting partners. Interestingly, CTCFL, the testis-specific paralog of CTCF, also binds UBF. The interaction between CTCF(L and UBF is direct, and requires the zinc finger domain of CTCF(L and the high mobility group (HMG-box 1 and dimerization domain of UBF. Because UBF is involved in RNA polymerase I-mediated ribosomal (rRNA transcription, we analyzed CTCF binding to the rDNA repeat. We found that CTCF bound to a site upstream of the rDNA spacer promoter and preferred non-methylated over methylated rDNA. DNA binding by CTCF in turn stimulated binding of UBF. Absence of CTCF in cultured cells resulted in decreased association of UBF with rDNA and in nucleolar fusion. Furthermore, lack of CTCF led to reduced binding of RNA polymerase I and variant histone H2A.Z near the rDNA spacer promoter, a loss of specific histone modifications, and diminished transcription of non-coding RNA from the spacer promoter. Conclusions UBF is the first common interaction partner of CTCF and CTCFL, suggesting a role for these proteins in chromatin organization of the rDNA repeats. We propose that CTCF affects RNA polymerase I-mediated events globally by controlling nucleolar number, and locally by regulating chromatin at the rDNA spacer promoter, similar to RNA polymerase II promoters. CTCF may load UBF onto rDNA, thereby forming

  10. DNA Polymorphisms in River Buffalo Leptin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Moioli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is a protein involved in the regulation of feed intake, fat metabolism, whole body energy balance, reproduction and hematopoiesis. In cattle Leptin gene has been considered a potential QTL influencing several production traits like meat production, milk performance and reproduction. Several studies on bovine leptin gene have found association between polymorphisms and traits like milk yield, feed intake, fat content, carcass and meat quality. With the aim to assess the presence of sequences polymorphisms in the Buffalo leptin gene, we sequenced the entire coding region and part of the introns on a panel of Italian River Buffalos. In this study we identified a new set of SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism useful for association studies.

  11. Analysis of the AHR gene proximal promoter GGGGC-repeat polymorphism in lung, breast, and colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spink, Barbara C. [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Bloom, Michael S. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Wu, Susan [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Sell, Stewart; Schneider, Erasmus [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Ding, Xinxin [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Spink, David C., E-mail: spink@wadsworth.org [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulates expression of numerous genes, including those of the CYP1 gene family. With the goal of determining factors that control AHR gene expression, our studies are focused on the role of the short tandem repeat polymorphism, (GGGGC){sub n}, located in the proximal promoter of the human AHR gene. When luciferase constructs containing varying GGGGC repeats were transfected into cancer cell lines derived from the lung, colon, and breast, the number of GGGGC repeats affected AHR promoter activity. The number of GGGGC repeats was determined in DNA from 327 humans and from 38 samples representing 5 species of non-human primates. In chimpanzees and 3 species of macaques, only (GGGGC){sub 2} alleles were observed; however, in western gorilla, (GGGGC){sub n} alleles with n = 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 were identified. In all human populations examined, the frequency of (GGGGC){sub n} was n = 4 > 5 ≫ 2, 6. When frequencies of the (GGGGC){sub n} alleles in DNA from patients with lung, colon, or breast cancer were evaluated, the occurrence of (GGGGC){sub 2} was found to be 8-fold more frequent among lung cancer patients in comparison with its incidence in the general population, as represented by New York State neonates. Analysis of matched tumor and non-tumor DNA samples from the same individuals provided no evidence of microsatellite instability. These studies indicate that the (GGGGC){sub n} short tandem repeats are inherited, and that the (GGGGC){sub 2} allele in the AHR proximal promoter region should be further investigated with regard to its potential association with lung cancer susceptibility. - Highlights: • The AHR proximal promoter contains a polymorphism, (GGGGC){sub n}, where n = 4 > 5 ≫ 2, 6 • Matched tumor and non-tumor DNA did not show (GGGGC){sub n} microsatellite instability • AHR promoter activity of a construct with (GGGGC){sub 2} was lower than that of (GGGGC){sub 4} • The frequency of (GGGGC){sub 2} in lung

  12. Genetic polymorphisms of 9 non-combined of DNA index system short tandem repeat loci in Guangdong Han population%九个非DNA联合索引系统核心短串联重复序列基因座在广东汉族人群的遗传多态性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晋湘; 薛天羽; 李海霞; 孙宏钰; 成建定

    2009-01-01

    目的 调查D7S3048等9个非DNA联合索引系统(combined of DNA index system,CODIS)指定的核心短串联重复序列(short tandem repeat,STR)基因座在广东汉族人群的遗传多态性.方法 采用荧光标记复合扩增和毛细管电泳技术,对广东汉族500名无关个体的DNA进行9个STR基因座分型.结果 500名无关个体在D7S3048等9个非CODIS核心STR基因座共检出115个等位基因,160种基因型,各基因座杂合度为0.824~0.884,个人识别能力为0.925~0.969,多态信息总量为0.77~0.86,均符合Hardy-Weinberg平衡(P>0.05),9个STR基因座的累计个体识别力达1.00×10~(-13),三联体累计非父排除率为0.999989488,二联体累计非父排除率为0.873436.结论 D7S3048等9个STR基因座在个体识别及亲子鉴定中是一个高效的检测系统,在二联体亲子鉴定中可作为补充基因座满足疑难、单亲和突变案件的需求.%Objective To investigate the genetic polymorphisms and their forensic application of 9 non-combined of DNA index system (CODIS) short tandem repeat (STR) loci in Guangdong Han population. Methods DNA samples from 500 unrelated individuals were extracted and amplified with fluorescence labeled multiplex PCR system. PCR products were separated and genotyped with capillary electrophoresis. Results One hundred and fifteen alleles and 160 genotypes were observed in the 9 STR loci, respectively. The heterozygosity was 0. 824-0. 884, the discrimination power (DP) was 0. 925-0. 969 and the polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0. 77-0. 86, respectively. The distribution met the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). The total discrimination power was 1.00×10~(-13), the combined probability of exclusion for trio-paternity testing was 0. 999989488. The combined probability of exclusion for duo-paternity testing was 0. 873436. Conclusion The 9 STR loci are powerful and reliable for personal identification and paternity testing. They can be used as supplementary loci

  13. Mental rotation in intellectually gifted boys is affected by the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Lakatošová, Silvia; Kubranská, Aneta; Laznibatová, Jolana; Ficek, Andrej; Ostatníková, Daniela; Celec, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Testosterone was shown to organize brain and modulate cognitive functions. It is currently unknown whether mental rotation is also associated with prenatal testosterone exposure and testosterone-related genetic polymorphisms. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between mental rotation performance, the actual testosterone levels, the prenatal testosterone level (expressed as 2D:4D ratio) and the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism in intellectually gifted boys. One hundred forty-seven boys aged 10-18 years with IQ>130 were enrolled. Saliva samples were collected and used for ELISA of actual levels of salivary testosterone. The 2D:4D finger length ratio as an indicator of prenatal testosterone was measured on both hands and averaged. Amthauer mental rotation test was used for the assessment of this spatial ability. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene was analyzed using PCR and capillary electrophoresis. Linear regression revealed that 2D:4D finger length ratio and the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene were associated with mental rotation. Actual levels of testosterone did not correlate significantly with mental rotation. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that after adjustment of age as a confounding variable, only the effect of the genetic polymorphism was significant. The results are in line with our previous genetic analysis of intellectually gifted boys showing the importance of CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene. Details of the interactions between androgen signaling, testosterone levels and its metabolism especially during the prenatal development of brain function remain to be elucidated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High Degree of Plasmodium vivax Diversity in the Peruvian Amazon Demonstrated by Tandem Repeat Polymorphism Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kosek, Margaret; Yori, Pablo P.; Gilman, Robert H.; Calderon, Maritza; Zimic, Mirko; CHUQUIYAURI, RAUL; JERI, CESAR; Pinedo-Cancino, Viviana; Michael A Matthias; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular tools to distinguish strains of Plasmodium vivax are important for studying the epidemiology of malaria transmission. Two sets of markers—tandem repeat (TR) polymorphisms and MSP3α—were used to study Plasmodium vivax in patients in the Peruvian Amazon region of Iquitos. Of 110 patients, 90 distinct haplotypes were distinguished using 9 TR markers. An MSP3α polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using HhaI and AluI revealed 8 and 9 profiles, res...

  15. Electroanalysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism by hairpin DNA architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi, Alireza; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2013-04-01

    Genetic analysis of infectious and genetic diseases and cancer diagnostics require the development of efficient tools for fast and reliable analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in targeted DNA and RNA sequences often responsible for signalling disease onset. Here, we highlight the main trends in the development of electrochemical genosensors for sensitive and selective detection of SNP that are based on hairpin DNA architectures exhibiting better SNP recognition properties compared with linear DNA probes. SNP detection by electrochemical hairpin DNA beacons is discussed, and comparative analysis of the existing SNP sensing strategies based on enzymatic and nanoparticle signal amplification schemes is presented.

  16. The CAG repeat polymorphism of androgen receptor gene and prostate cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mingliang; Dong, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Xuezhi; Niu, Wenquan

    2012-03-01

    The association between the polymorphic CAG repeat in androgen receptor gene (AR) and prostate cancer susceptibility has been studied extensively. However, the results are contradictory. The purpose of our meta-analysis was to investigate whether CAG repeat related to prostate cancer risk and had genetic heterogeneity across different geographic regions and study designs. Random-effects model was performed irrespective of between-study heterogeneity. Data and study quality were assessed in duplicate. Publication bias was assessed by the fail-safe number and Egger's test. There were 16 (patients/controls: 2972/3792), 19 (3835/4908) and 12 (3372/2631) study groups for comparisons of ≥ 20, 22 and 23 repeats of CAG sequence, respectively. Compared with CAG repeat repeats had 21% (95% CI: 0.61-1.02; P = 0.076), 5% (95% CI: 0.81-1.11; P = 0.508) and 5% (95% CI: 0.76-1.20; P = 0.681) decreased risk of prostate cancer. After classifying studies by geographic areas, carriers of ≥ 20 repeats had 11% decreased risk in populations from USA, 53% from Europe, and 20% from Asia (P > 0.05), whereas comparison of ≥ 23 repeats with others generated a significant prediction in European populations (OR = 1.17; P = 0.039). Stratification by study designs revealed no material changes in risk estimation. Meta-regression analysis found no significant sources of between-study heterogeneity for age, study design and geographic region for all comparisons. There was no identified publication bias. Taken together, our results demonstrated that AR CAG repeat polymorphism with ≥ 20 repeats might confer a protective effect among the prostate cancer patients with 45 years older but not all the prostate cancer patients.

  17. RANDOMLY AMPLIFIED POLYMORPHIC DNA-A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandani Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RAPD is a PCR based technique which involves the use of single arbitrary short primers (8-12 nucleotides, resulting in the amplification of many discrete DNA. The segments of DNA that are amplified are random. The technique was developed independently by two different laboratories and called as RAPD and AP-PCR (Arbitrary Primed PCR. This procedure detects nucleotide sequence polymorphisms in a DNA amplification based assay using only a single primer of arbitrary nucleotide sequence. The RAPD technology has provided a quick and efficient screen for DNA-sequence polymorphisms at a very large no of loci. The present communication gives emphasis on basic knowledge about RAPD, procedure, its advantages disadvantages, limitations and applications of RAPD.

  18. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K.; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  19. A Polymorphism in Mitochondrial DNA Associated with IQ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuder, Patricia; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Of 100 DNA markers examined in an allelic association study, only 1 showed a replicated association with IQ in samples totaling 107 children. How the gene marked by the particular restriction fragment length polymorphism was tracked and its mitochondrial origin identified is described. (SLD)

  20. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Frentz, G; Fugger, L

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DQA, -DQB, -DPA, and -DPB in 20 Danish patients with alopecia areata (AA) and in healthy Danes. The frequency in AA of the DQB1*0301 and DQw7 associated DQB Bgl/II 4.2 kb...

  1. Isolation of human minisatellite loci detected by synthetic tandem repeat probes: direct comparison with cloned DNA fingerprinting probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Vergnaud, G; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-08-01

    As a direct comparison with cloned 'DNA fingerprinting' probes, we present the results of screening an ordered array Charomid library for hypervariable human loci using synthetic tandem repeat (STR) probes. By recording the coordinates of positive hybridization signals, the subset of clones within the library detected by each STR probe can be defined, and directly compared with the set of clones detected by naturally occurring (cloned) DNA fingerprinting probes. The STR probes vary in the efficiency of detection of polymorphic minisatellite loci; among the more efficient probes, there is a strong overlap with the sets of clones detected by the DNA fingerprinting probes. Four new polymorphic loci were detected by one or more of the STR probes but not by any of the naturally occurring repeats. Sequence comparisons with the probe(s) used to detect the locus suggest that a relatively poor match, for example 10 out of 14 bases in a limited region of each repeat, is sufficient for the positive detection of tandem repeats in a clone in this type of library screening by hybridization. These results not only provide a detailed evaluation of the usefulness of STR probes in the isolation of highly variable loci, but also suggest strategies for the use of these multi-locus probes in screening libraries for clones from hypervariable loci.

  2. Association between a Tetranucleotide Repeat Polymorphism of SPAG16 Gene and Cataract in Male Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Mehra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Studies involving genotyping of STR markers at 2q34 have repeatedly found the region to host the disease haplotype for pediatric cataract. Present study investigated the association of D2S2944 marker, in sperm associated antigen 16 (SPAG16 gene and rs2289917 polymorphism, in γ-crystallin B gene, with childhood cataract. Methods. 97 pediatric cataract cases and 110 children with no ocular defects were examined for tetranucleotide repeat marker/SNP using PCR-SSLP/RFLP techniques. Polymorphisms were assessed for association using contingency tables and linkage disequilibrium among alleles of the markers was estimated. Energy-optimization program predicted the secondary structure models of repeats of D2S2944. Results. Seven alleles of D2S2944, with 9–15 “GATA” repeats, were observed. Frequency of the longer allele of D2S2944, ≥(GATA13 repeats, was 0.73 in cases and 0.56 in controls (P=0.0123. Male children bearing ≥(GATA13 repeats showed >3-fold higher risk for cataract (CI95% = 1.43–7.00, P=0.0043, Pc=0.0086 as compared to female children (OR=1.19, CI95% = 0.49–2.92, P=0.70. Cases with haplotype—≥(GATA13 of D2S2944 and “C” allele rs2289917—have a higher risk for pediatric cataract (OR=2.952, CI95% = 1.595~5.463, P=0.000453. >(GATA13 repeats formed energetically more favorable stem-loop structure. Conclusion. Intragenic microsatellite repeat expansion in SPAG16 gene increases predisposition to pediatric cataract by probably interfering posttranscriptional events and affecting the expression of adjacent lens transparency gene/s in a gender bias manner.

  3. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism and ovarian cancer risk: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yang; Wang, Jue; Wang, Ling; Du, Yan

    2017-02-28

    Ovarian cancer is one of the common gynecological malignancies worldwide. It is usually diagnosed at a later stage, thus missing the best opportunity for treatment. Despite the advancement of ovarian cancer treatment, the prognosis is still poor. Androgen receptor (AR) may play a role in ovarian carcinogenesis. Previous studies regarding the association between AR CAG repeat length and ovarian cancer risk reported inconsistent results. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between AR CAG repeat length and ovarian cancer risk following the MOOSE guidelines. PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO and other databases were searched up to September 15(th) 2016. Case control studies with clear definition of CAG repeat length and detailed genotype information were included. Two authors independently reviewed and extracted data. Pooled analysis and subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity were performed for different genetic models. Begg's funnel plot and Egger's test were performed for publication bias estimation. Overall, there was no association between the AR CAG repeat polymorphism and ovarian cancer risk. However, short CAG repeat polymorphism was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk in African Americans and Chinese under the dominant model, whereas a reverse association was observed in Caucasians and Italians under the other three models. Our study results should be interpreted with caution. Further well-designed epidemiological and functional studies are needed to elucidate the role of AR in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  4. Association study of the trinucleotide repeat polymorphism within SMARCA2 and schizophrenia

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    Danics Zoltan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brahma (BRM is a key component of the multisubunit SWI/SNF complex, a complex which uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to remodel chromatin. BRM contains an N-terminal polyglutamine domain, encoded by a polymorphic trinucleotide (CAA/CAG repeat, the only known polymorphism in the coding region of the gene (SMARCA2. We have examined the association of this polymorphism with schizophrenia in a family-based and case/control study. SMARCA2 was chosen as a candidate gene because of its specific role in developmental pathways, its high expression level in the brain and some evidence of its association with schizophrenia spectrum disorder from genome-wide linkage analysis. Results Family-based analysis with 281 complete and incomplete triads showed that there is no significant preferential transmission of any of the alleles to the affected offspring. Also, in the case/control analysis, similar allele and genotype distributions were observed between affected cases (n = 289 and unaffected controls (n = 273 in each of three Caucasian populations studied: French Canadian, Tunisian and other Caucasians of European origin. Conclusion Results from our family-based and case-control association study suggest that there is no association between the trinucleotide repeat polymorphism within SMARCA2 and schizophrenia.

  5. Flow cytometry-based DNA hybridization and polymorphism analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, H.; Kommander, K.; White, P.S.; Nolan, J.P.

    1998-07-01

    Functional analysis of the humane genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well-suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. The authors are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. The approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advances of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  6. A polymorphic repeat in the IGF1 promoter influences the risk of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Bolton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of high-throughput genetic assays for tandem repeats, there is a paucity of knowledge about the role they may play in disease. A polymorphic CA repeat in the promoter region of the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene (IGF1 has been studied extensively over the past 10 years for association with the risk of developing breast cancer, among other cancers, with variable results. The aim of this study was to determine if this CA repeat is associated with the risk of developing breast cancer and endometrial cancer. Using a case–control design, we analysed the length of this CA repeat in a series of breast cancer and endometrial cancer cases and compared this with a control population. Our results showed an association when both alleles were considered in breast and endometrial cancers (P=0.029 and 0.011, respectively, but this did not pass our corrected threshold for significance due to multiple testing. When the allele lengths were analysed categorically against the most common allele length of 19 CA repeats, an association was observed with the risk of endometrial cancer due to a reduction in the number of long alleles (P=0.013. This was confirmed in an analysis of the long alleles separately for endometrial cancer risk (P=0.0012. Our study found no association between the length of this polymorphic CA repeat and breast cancer risk. The significant association observed between the CA repeat length and the risk of developing endometrial cancer has not been previously reported.

  7. Genus-specific protein binding to the large clusters of DNA repeats (short regularly spaced repeats) present in Sulfolobus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Shen, Biao

    2003-01-01

    Short regularly spaced repeats (SRSRs) occur in multiple large clusters in archaeal chromosomes and as smaller clusters in some archaeal conjugative plasmids and bacterial chromosomes. The sequence, size, and spacing of the repeats are generally constant within a cluster but vary between clusters...... that are identical in sequence to one of the repeat variants in the S. solfataricus chromosome. Repeats from the pNOB8 cluster were amplified and tested for protein binding with cell extracts from S. solfataricus. A 17.5-kDa SRSR-binding protein was purified from the cell extracts and sequenced. The protein is N...... terminally modified and corresponds to SSO454, an open reading frame of previously unassigned function. It binds specifically to DNA fragments carrying double and single repeat sequences, binding on one side of the repeat structure, and producing an opening of the opposite side of the DNA structure. It also...

  8. Mucin variable number tandem repeat polymorphisms and severity of cystic fibrosis lung disease: significant association with MUC5AC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueliang Guo

    Full Text Available Variability in cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease is partially due to non-CFTR genetic modifiers. Mucin genes are very polymorphic, and mucins play a key role in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease; therefore, mucin genes are strong candidates as genetic modifiers. DNA from CF patients recruited for extremes of lung phenotype was analyzed by Southern blot or PCR to define variable number tandem repeat (VNTR length polymorphisms for MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC7. VNTR length polymorphisms were tested for association with lung disease severity and for linkage disequilibrium (LD with flanking single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. No strong associations were found for MUC1, MUC2, or MUC7. A significant association was found between the overall distribution of MUC5AC VNTR length and CF lung disease severity (p = 0.025; n = 468 patients; plus, there was robust association of the specific 6.4 kb HinfI VNTR fragment with severity of lung disease (p = 6.2×10(-4 after Bonferroni correction. There was strong LD between MUC5AC VNTR length modes and flanking SNPs. The severity-associated 6.4 kb VNTR allele of MUC5AC was confirmed to be genetically distinct from the 6.3 kb allele, as it showed significantly stronger association with nearby SNPs. These data provide detailed respiratory mucin gene VNTR allele distributions in CF patients. Our data also show a novel link between the MUC5AC 6.4 kb VNTR allele and severity of CF lung disease. The LD pattern with surrounding SNPs suggests that the 6.4 kb allele contains, or is linked to, important functional genetic variation.

  9. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Selma E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop.

  10. Genetic profiling of Klebsiella pneumoniae: comparison of pulsed field gel electrophoresis and random amplified polymorphic DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashayeri-Panah, Mitra; Eftekhar, Fereshteh; Ghamsari, Maryam Mobarak; Parvin, Mahmood; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the discriminatory power of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) methods for subtyping of 54 clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae were compared. All isolates were typeable by RAPD, while 3.6% of them were not typeable by PFGE. The repeatability of both typing methods were 100% with satisfying reproducibility (≥ 95%). Although the discriminatory power of PFGE was greater than RAPD, both methods showed sufficient discriminatory power (DI > 0.95) which reflects the heterogeneity among the K. pneumoniae isolates. An optimized RAPD protocol is less technically demanding and time consuming that makes it a reliable typing method and competitive with PFGE. PMID:24516423

  11. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

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    Katarzyna A. Wojcik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER. Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1 were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1 nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease.

  12. Programmable DNA-binding proteins from Burkholderia provide a fresh perspective on the TALE-like repeat domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Dietze, Jörn; Elsaesser, Janett; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The tandem repeats of transcription activator like effectors (TALEs) mediate sequence-specific DNA binding using a simple code. Naturally, TALEs are injected by Xanthomonas bacteria into plant cells to manipulate the host transcriptome. In the laboratory TALE DNA binding domains are reprogrammed and used to target a fused functional domain to a genomic locus of choice. Research into the natural diversity of TALE-like proteins may provide resources for the further improvement of current TALE technology. Here we describe TALE-like proteins from the endosymbiotic bacterium Burkholderia rhizoxinica, termed Bat proteins. Bat repeat domains mediate sequence-specific DNA binding with the same code as TALEs, despite less than 40% sequence identity. We show that Bat proteins can be adapted for use as transcription factors and nucleases and that sequence preferences can be reprogrammed. Unlike TALEs, the core repeats of each Bat protein are highly polymorphic. This feature allowed us to explore alternative strategies for the design of custom Bat repeat arrays, providing novel insights into the functional relevance of non-RVD residues. The Bat proteins offer fertile grounds for research into the creation of improved programmable DNA-binding proteins and comparative insights into TALE-like evolution.

  13. Chromosomal abnormalities and polymorphic variants in couples with repeated miscarriage in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente-Cortés, Beatriz E; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; García-Vielma, Catalina; De la Rosa Alvarado, Rosa M; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I

    2009-04-01

    Cytogenetic studies have an important role in the evaluation of couples with repeated miscarriages and poor obstetric history. To estimate the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and polymorphic variants in 158 couples with repeated miscarriages, a cross-sectional study was conducted in Monterrey, Mexico from 1995 to 2003. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for chromosomal studies using standard methods. Twelve couples showed chromosomal abnormalities (7.60%), two Robertsonian translocations (1.27%), two balanced translocations (1.27%), one inversion (0.63%), and one a novel insertion (0.63%). This insertion [46, XX, ins (15;8) (q26;p11p23)] is unique, and is the third reported in association with repeated abortion. Mosaicism was observed in six couples (3.80%, three with structural abnormalities and three with numerical abnormalities). A female to male ratio of 1.4:1 was observed. In addition to these chromosomal abnormalities, polymorphic variants in constitutive heterochromatin of the 1qh+, 9qh+, and 16qh+ chromosomes were observed in 25 couples (15.82%), of the Yqh+ chromosome in 21 couples (13.29%), and of satellite in 35 couples (22.15%). In conclusion, chromosome analysis is necessary for appropriate clinical management of these patients.

  14. The polymorphic integumentary mucin B.1 from Xenopus laevis contains the short consensus repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, J C; Hauser, F; Joba, W; Hoffmann, W

    1992-03-25

    The frog integumentary mucin B.1 (FIM-B.1), discovered by molecular cloning, contains a cysteine-rich C-terminal domain which is homologous with von Willebrand factor. With the help of the polymerase chain reaction, we now characterize a contiguous region 5' to the von Willebrand factor domain containing the short consensus repeat typical of many proteins from the complement system. Multiple transcripts have been cloned, which originate from a single animal and differ by a variable number of tandem repeats (rep-33 sequences). These different transcripts probably originate solely from two genes and are generated presumably by alternative splicing of an huge array of functional cassettes. This model is supported by analysis of genomic FIM-B.1 sequences from Xenopus laevis. Here, rep-33 sequences are arranged in an interrupted array of individual units. Additionally, results of Southern analysis revealed genetic polymorphism between different animals which is predicted to be within the tandem repeats. A first investigation of the predicted mucins with the help of a specific antibody against a synthetic peptide determined the molecular mass of FIM-B.1 to greater than 200 kDa. Here again, genetic polymorphism between different animals is detected.

  15. High Degree of Plasmodium vivax Diversity in the Peruvian Amazon Demonstrated by Tandem Repeat Polymorphism Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, Margaret; Yori, Pablo P.; Gilman, Robert H.; Calderon, Maritza; Zimic, Mirko; Chuquiyauri, Raul; Jeri, Cesar; Pinedo-Cancino, Viviana; Matthias, Michael A.; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular tools to distinguish strains of Plasmodium vivax are important for studying the epidemiology of malaria transmission. Two sets of markers—tandem repeat (TR) polymorphisms and MSP3α—were used to study Plasmodium vivax in patients in the Peruvian Amazon region of Iquitos. Of 110 patients, 90 distinct haplotypes were distinguished using 9 TR markers. An MSP3α polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using HhaI and AluI revealed 8 and 9 profiles, respectively, and 36 profiles when analyzed in combination. Combining TR and PCR-RFLP markers, 101 distinct molecular profiles were distinguished among these 110 patients. Nine TR markers arrayed along a 100 kB stretch of a P. vivax chromosome containing the gene for circumsporozoite protein showed non-linear linkage disequilibrium (ISA = 0.03, P = 0.001). These findings demonstrate the potential use of TR markers for molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:22492139

  16. A simple repeat polymorphism in the MITF-M promoter is a key regulator of white spotting in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Baranowska Körberg

    Full Text Available The white spotting locus (S in dogs is colocalized with the MITF (microphtalmia-associated transcription factor gene. The phenotypic effects of the four S alleles range from solid colour (S to extreme white spotting (s(w. We have investigated four candidate mutations associated with the s(w allele, a SINE insertion, a SNP at a conserved site and a simple repeat polymorphism all associated with the MITF-M promoter as well as a 12 base pair deletion in exon 1B. The variants associated with white spotting at all four loci were also found among wolves and we conclude that none of these could be a sole causal mutation, at least not for extreme white spotting. We propose that the three canine white spotting alleles are not caused by three independent mutations but represent haplotype effects due to different combinations of causal polymorphisms. The simple repeat polymorphism showed extensive diversity both in dogs and wolves, and allele-sharing was common between wolves and white spotted dogs but was non-existent between solid and spotted dogs as well as between wolves and solid dogs. This finding was unexpected as Solid is assumed to be the wild-type allele. The data indicate that the simple repeat polymorphism has been a target for selection during dog domestication and breed formation. We also evaluated the significance of the three MITF-M associated polymorphisms with a Luciferase assay, and found conclusive evidence that the simple repeat polymorphism affects promoter activity. Three alleles associated with white spotting gave consistently lower promoter activity compared with the allele associated with solid colour. We propose that the simple repeat polymorphism affects cooperativity between transcription factors binding on either flanking sides of the repeat. Thus, both genetic and functional evidence show that the simple repeat polymorphism is a key regulator of white spotting in dogs.

  17. Interaction of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and aflatoxin B1 in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is an important environmental carcinogen and can induce DNA damage and involve in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The deficiency of DNA repair capacity related to the polymorphisms of DNA repair genes might play a central role in the process of HCC tumorigenesis. However, the interaction of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and AFB1 in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether six polymorphisms (i...

  18. γA gene repeats polymorphism for the analysis of haplotypes of abnormal hemoglobins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejat Akar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to analyze γ A gene repeat polymorphism for the analysis of haplotypes of hemoglobin (Hb variants such as Hb S, Hb D-Punjab, Hb O-Arab. Sickle cell cases had mainly Benin and Arab/Indian haplotype. We found three different haplotypes among Hb S, Hb O Arab and Hb D-Punjab cases. We named these three variants as Anatolian-1 and Anatolian-2 and Asian. Our data revealed that Hb O Arab may arise twice one from Asia and the other from Europe.

  19. Simple tandem repeat (TTTAn polymorphism in CYP19 (aromatase gene and breast cancer risk in Nigerian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okobia Michael N

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in women worldwide. The incidence of the disease is increasing globally and this increase is occurring at a faster rate in population groups that hirtherto enjoyed low incidence. This study was designed to evaluate the role of a simple tandem repeat polymorphism (STRP in the aromatase (CYP19 gene in breast cancer susceptibility in Nigerian women, a population of indigenous sub-Saharan African ancestry. Methods A case-control study recruiting 250 women with breast cancer and 250 women without the disease from four University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria was carried out between September 2002 and April 2004. Participants were recruited from the surgical outpatient clinics and surgical wards of the Nigerian institutions. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based assay was employed for genotyping and product sizes were detected with an ABI 3730 DNA Analyzer. Results Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that harboring the putative high risk genotypes conferred a 29% increased risk of breast cancer when all women in the study were considered (Odds ratio [OR] = 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83–2.00, although this association was not statistically significant. Subgroup analysis based on menopausal status showed similar results among premenopausal women (OR = 1.35, 95% CI 0.76–2.41 and postmenopausal women (OR = 1.27, 95% CI 0.64–2.49. The data also demonstrated marked differences in the distribution of (TTTAn repeats in Nigerian women compared with other populations. Conclusion This study has shown that harboring 10 or more repeats of the microsatellite (TTTAn repeats of the CYY19 gene is associated with a modest increased risk of breast cancer in Nigerian women.

  20. Assessing genetic polymorphisms using DNA extracted from cells present in saliva samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemoda Zsofia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technical advances following the Human Genome Project revealed that high-quality and -quantity DNA may be obtained from whole saliva samples. However, usability of previously collected samples and the effects of environmental conditions on the samples during collection have not been assessed in detail. In five studies we document the effects of sample volume, handling and storage conditions, type of collection device, and oral sampling location, on quantity, quality, and genetic assessment of DNA extracted from cells present in saliva. Methods Saliva samples were collected from ten adults in each study. Saliva volumes from .10-1.0 ml, different saliva collection devices, sampling locations in the mouth, room temperature storage, and multiple freeze-thaw cycles were tested. One representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the catechol-0-methyltransferase gene (COMT rs4680 and one representative variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region were selected for genetic analyses. Results The smallest tested whole saliva volume of .10 ml yielded, on average, 1.43 ± .77 μg DNA and gave accurate genotype calls in both genetic analyses. The usage of collection devices reduced the amount of DNA extracted from the saliva filtrates compared to the whole saliva sample, as 54-92% of the DNA was retained on the device. An "adhered cell" extraction enabled recovery of this DNA and provided good quality and quantity DNA. The DNA from both the saliva filtrates and the adhered cell recovery provided accurate genotype calls. The effects of storage at room temperature (up to 5 days, repeated freeze-thaw cycles (up to 6 cycles, and oral sampling location on DNA extraction and on genetic analysis from saliva were negligible. Conclusions Whole saliva samples with volumes of at least .10 ml were sufficient to extract good quality and quantity DNA. Using

  1. Assessing genetic polymorphisms using DNA extracted from cells present in saliva samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Technical advances following the Human Genome Project revealed that high-quality and -quantity DNA may be obtained from whole saliva samples. However, usability of previously collected samples and the effects of environmental conditions on the samples during collection have not been assessed in detail. In five studies we document the effects of sample volume, handling and storage conditions, type of collection device, and oral sampling location, on quantity, quality, and genetic assessment of DNA extracted from cells present in saliva. Methods Saliva samples were collected from ten adults in each study. Saliva volumes from .10-1.0 ml, different saliva collection devices, sampling locations in the mouth, room temperature storage, and multiple freeze-thaw cycles were tested. One representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the catechol-0-methyltransferase gene (COMT rs4680) and one representative variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region) were selected for genetic analyses. Results The smallest tested whole saliva volume of .10 ml yielded, on average, 1.43 ± .77 μg DNA and gave accurate genotype calls in both genetic analyses. The usage of collection devices reduced the amount of DNA extracted from the saliva filtrates compared to the whole saliva sample, as 54-92% of the DNA was retained on the device. An "adhered cell" extraction enabled recovery of this DNA and provided good quality and quantity DNA. The DNA from both the saliva filtrates and the adhered cell recovery provided accurate genotype calls. The effects of storage at room temperature (up to 5 days), repeated freeze-thaw cycles (up to 6 cycles), and oral sampling location on DNA extraction and on genetic analysis from saliva were negligible. Conclusions Whole saliva samples with volumes of at least .10 ml were sufficient to extract good quality and quantity DNA. Using 10 ng of DNA per

  2. Expoldb: expression linked polymorphism database with inbuilt tools for analysis of expression and simple repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lancet Doron

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative variation in gene expression has been proposed to underlie phenotypic variation among human individuals. A facilitating step towards understanding the basis for gene expression variability is associating genome wide transcription patterns with potential cis modifiers of gene expression. Description EXPOLDB, a novel Database, is a new effort addressing this need by providing information on gene expression levels variability across individuals, as well as the presence and features of potentially polymorphic (TG/CAn repeats. EXPOLDB thus enables associating transcription levels with the presence and length of (TG/CAn repeats. One of the unique features of this database is the display of expression data for 5 pairs of monozygotic twins, which allows identification of genes whose variability in expression, are influenced by non-genetic factors including environment. In addition to queries by gene name, EXPOLDB allows for queries by a pathway name. Users can also upload their list of HGNC (HUGO (The Human Genome Organisation Gene Nomenclature Committee symbols for interrogating expression patterns. The online application 'SimRep' can be used to find simple repeats in a given nucleotide sequence. To help illustrate primary applications, case examples of Housekeeping genes and the RUNX gene family, as well as one example of glycolytic pathway genes are provided. Conclusion The uniqueness of EXPOLDB is in facilitating the association of genome wide transcription variations with the presence and type of polymorphic repeats while offering the feature for identifying genes whose expression variability are influenced by non genetic factors including environment. In addition, the database allows comprehensive querying including functional information on biochemical pathways of the human genes. EXPOLDB can be accessed at http://expoldb.igib.res.in/expol

  3. Simple sequence repeats in Neurospora crassa: distribution, polymorphism and evolutionary inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jongsun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simple sequence repeats (SSRs have been successfully used for various genetic and evolutionary studies in eukaryotic systems. The eukaryotic model organism Neurospora crassa is an excellent system to study evolution and biological function of SSRs. Results We identified and characterized 2749 SSRs of 963 SSR types in the genome of N. crassa. The distribution of tri-nucleotide (nt SSRs, the most common SSRs in N. crassa, was significantly biased in exons. We further characterized the distribution of 19 abundant SSR types (AST, which account for 71% of total SSRs in the N. crassa genome, using a Poisson log-linear model. We also characterized the size variation of SSRs among natural accessions using Polymorphic Index Content (PIC and ANOVA analyses and found that there are genome-wide, chromosome-dependent and local-specific variations. Using polymorphic SSRs, we have built linkage maps from three line-cross populations. Conclusion Taking our computational, statistical and experimental data together, we conclude that 1 the distributions of the SSRs in the sequenced N. crassa genome differ systematically between chromosomes as well as between SSR types, 2 the size variation of tri-nt SSRs in exons might be an important mechanism in generating functional variation of proteins in N. crassa, 3 there are different levels of evolutionary forces in variation of amino acid repeats, and 4 SSRs are stable molecular markers for genetic studies in N. crassa.

  4. Identification of polymorphic tandem repeats by direct comparison of genome sequence from different bacterial strains : a web-based resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergnaud Gilles

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic tandem repeat typing is a new generic technology which has been proved to be very efficient for bacterial pathogens such as B. anthracis, M. tuberculosis, P. aeruginosa, L. pneumophila, Y. pestis. The previously developed tandem repeats database takes advantage of the release of genome sequence data for a growing number of bacteria to facilitate the identification of tandem repeats. The development of an assay then requires the evaluation of tandem repeat polymorphism on well-selected sets of isolates. In the case of major human pathogens, such as S. aureus, more than one strain is being sequenced, so that tandem repeats most likely to be polymorphic can now be selected in silico based on genome sequence comparison. Results In addition to the previously described general Tandem Repeats Database, we have developed a tool to automatically identify tandem repeats of a different length in the genome sequence of two (or more closely related bacterial strains. Genome comparisons are pre-computed. The results of the comparisons are parsed in a database, which can be conveniently queried over the internet according to criteria of practical value, including repeat unit length, predicted size difference, etc. Comparisons are available for 16 bacterial species, and the orthopox viruses, including the variola virus and three of its close neighbors. Conclusions We are presenting an internet-based resource to help develop and perform tandem repeats based bacterial strain typing. The tools accessible at http://minisatellites.u-psud.fr now comprise four parts. The Tandem Repeats Database enables the identification of tandem repeats across entire genomes. The Strain Comparison Page identifies tandem repeats differing between different genome sequences from the same species. The "Blast in the Tandem Repeats Database" facilitates the search for a known tandem repeat and the prediction of amplification product sizes. The "Bacterial

  5. Rapid DNA extraction methods and new primers for randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of Giardia duodenalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, M Q; Cliver, D O

    1999-08-01

    A randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) procedure using simple genomic DNA preparation methods and newly designed primers was optimized for analyzing Giardia duodenalis strains. Genomic DNA was extracted from in vitro cultivated trophozoites by five freezing-thawing cycles or by sonic treatment. Compared to a conventional method involving proteinase K digestion and phenol extraction, both freezing-thawing and sonication were equally efficient, yet with the advantage of being much less time- and labor-intensive. Five of the 10 tested RAPD primers produced reproducible polymorphisms among five human origin G. duodenalis strains, and grouping of these strains based on RAPD profiles was in agreement among these primers. The consistent classification of two standard laboratory reference strains, Portland-1 and WB, in the same group confirmed previous results using other fingerprinting methods, indicating that the reported simple DNA extraction methods and the selected primers are useful in RAPD for molecular characterization of G. duodenalis strains.

  6. Twisting right to left: A…A mismatch in a CAG trinucleotide repeat overexpansion provokes left-handed Z-DNA conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Noorain; Kolimi, Narendar; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2015-04-01

    Conformational polymorphism of DNA is a major causative factor behind several incurable trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders that arise from overexpansion of trinucleotide repeats located in coding/non-coding regions of specific genes. Hairpin DNA structures that are formed due to overexpansion of CAG repeat lead to Huntington's disorder and spinocerebellar ataxias. Nonetheless, DNA hairpin stem structure that generally embraces B-form with canonical base pairs is poorly understood in the context of periodic noncanonical A…A mismatch as found in CAG repeat overexpansion. Molecular dynamics simulations on DNA hairpin stems containing A…A mismatches in a CAG repeat overexpansion show that A…A dictates local Z-form irrespective of starting glycosyl conformation, in sharp contrast to canonical DNA duplex. Transition from B-to-Z is due to the mechanistic effect that originates from its pronounced nonisostericity with flanking canonical base pairs facilitated by base extrusion, backbone and/or base flipping. Based on these structural insights we envisage that such an unusual DNA structure of the CAG hairpin stem may have a role in disease pathogenesis. As this is the first study that delineates the influence of a single A…A mismatch in reversing DNA helicity, it would further have an impact on understanding DNA mismatch repair.

  7. Twisting right to left: A…A mismatch in a CAG trinucleotide repeat overexpansion provokes left-handed Z-DNA conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorain Khan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Conformational polymorphism of DNA is a major causative factor behind several incurable trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders that arise from overexpansion of trinucleotide repeats located in coding/non-coding regions of specific genes. Hairpin DNA structures that are formed due to overexpansion of CAG repeat lead to Huntington's disorder and spinocerebellar ataxias. Nonetheless, DNA hairpin stem structure that generally embraces B-form with canonical base pairs is poorly understood in the context of periodic noncanonical A…A mismatch as found in CAG repeat overexpansion. Molecular dynamics simulations on DNA hairpin stems containing A…A mismatches in a CAG repeat overexpansion show that A…A dictates local Z-form irrespective of starting glycosyl conformation, in sharp contrast to canonical DNA duplex. Transition from B-to-Z is due to the mechanistic effect that originates from its pronounced nonisostericity with flanking canonical base pairs facilitated by base extrusion, backbone and/or base flipping. Based on these structural insights we envisage that such an unusual DNA structure of the CAG hairpin stem may have a role in disease pathogenesis. As this is the first study that delineates the influence of a single A…A mismatch in reversing DNA helicity, it would further have an impact on understanding DNA mismatch repair.

  8. The repeat domain of the type III effector protein PthA shows a TPR-like structure and undergoes conformational changes upon DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mário Tyago; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Neves, Jorge Luiz; Paiva, Joice Helena; Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Pereira, André Luiz Araujo; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    Many plant pathogenic bacteria rely on effector proteins to suppress defense and manipulate host cell mechanisms to cause disease. The effector protein PthA modulates the host transcriptome to promote citrus canker. PthA possesses unusual protein architecture with an internal region encompassing variable numbers of near-identical tandem repeats of 34 amino acids termed the repeat domain. This domain mediates protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, and two polymorphic residues in each repeat unit determine DNA specificity. To gain insights into how the repeat domain promotes protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts, we have solved the structure of a peptide corresponding to 1.5 units of the PthA repeat domain by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and carried out small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and spectroscopic studies on the entire 15.5-repeat domain of PthA2 (RD2). Consistent with secondary structure predictions and circular dichroism data, the NMR structure of the 1.5-repeat peptide reveals three α-helices connected by two turns that fold into a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like domain. The NMR structure corroborates the theoretical TPR superhelix predicted for RD2, which is also in agreement with the elongated shape of RD2 determined by SAXS. Furthermore, RD2 undergoes conformational changes in a pH-dependent manner and upon DNA interaction, and shows sequence similarities to pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR), a nucleic acid-binding motif structurally related to TPR. The results point to a model in which the RD2 structure changes its compactness as it embraces the DNA with the polymorphic diresidues facing the interior of the superhelix oriented toward the nucleotide bases.

  9. A CA-repeat polymorphism close to the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene offers improved diagnostic testing for familial APC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spirio, L.; Nelson, L.; Ward, K.; Burt, R.; White, R.; Leppert, M. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Presymptomatic genetic testing for the presence of a mutant allele causing familial adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) has been difficult to perform effectively in the past because DNA markers surrounding the APC gene on chromosome 5q have not been very informative. The authors report results of genetic linkage studies on both research families and clinical families by using D5S346, a highly polymorphic dinucleotide (CA)-repeat locus 30-70 kb from the APC gene. Linkage analysis with this marker in a large APC pedigree showed an increase of at least 9.0 LOD units, in likelihood of linkage of the disease-causing allele to the APC locus, when compared with the highest LOD score attained with any other closely linked marker. When the first 14 APC families that requested genotypic analysis by the DNA Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Utah were tested with D5S346, 20 of the 31 at-risk individuals were identified as either carriers or noncarriers of an APC-predisposing allele. The authors see this marker as an important tool for research studies and for the presymptomatic diagnosis of APC. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Imperfect DNA mirror repeats in E. coli TnsA and other protein-coding DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Dorothy M

    2005-09-01

    DNA imperfect mirror repeats (DNA-IMRs) are ubiquitous in protein-coding DNA. However, they overlap and often have different centers of symmetry, making it difficult to evaluate their relationship to each other and to specific DNA and protein motifs and structures. This paper describes a systematic method of determining a hierarchy for DNA-IMRs and evaluates their relationship to protein structural elements (PSEs)--helices, turns and beta-sheets. DNA-IMRs are identifed by two different methods--DNA-IMRs terminated by reverse dinucleotides (rd-IMRs) and DNA-IMRs terminated by a single (mono) matching nucleotide (m-IMRs). Both rd-IMRs and m-IMRs are evaluated in 17 proteins, and illustrated in detail for TnsA. For each of the proteins, Fisher's exact test (FET) is used to measure the coincidence between the terminal dinucleotides of rd-IMRs and the terminal amino acids of individual PSEs. A significant correlation over a span of about 3 nt was found for each protein. The correlation is robust and for most genes, all rd-IMRs16 nt contain approximately 88% of the potential functional motifs. The protein translation of the longest rd- and m-IMRs span sequences important to the protein's structure and function. In all 17 proteins studied, the population of rd-IMRs is substantially less than the expected number and the population of m-IMRs greater than the expected number, indicating strong selective pressures. The association of rd-IMRs with PSEs restricts their spatial distribution, and therefore, their number. The greater than predicted number of m-IMRs indicates that DNA symmetry exists throughout the entire protein-coding region and may stabilize the sequence.

  11. Predictive value of GGN and CAG repeat polymorphisms of androgen receptors in testicular cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weijun; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Shuaimei; Ni, Mengxia; Zhu, Peiran; Wu, Qiuyue; Li, Weiwei; Zhang, Mingchao; Xia, Xinyi

    2016-03-22

    The risk of testicular cancer (TC) is markedly increased in subjects with androgen insensitivity, and previous studies have proposed that GGN and CAG repeats in androgen receptors (AR) could be related to the risk of TC. To evaluate the association between the length of GGN and CAG repeats in AR and TC, a meta-analysis involving 3255 TC cases and 2804 controls was performed. The results suggested that long GGN repeats are associated with an increased risk of TC compared with those analysis revealed that this association occurred in studies with case sizes > 200, and in the mid-latitude, and seminoma subgroups. The subgroup analysis based on populations, high-latitude, and seminomas/non-seminomas suggested that AR CAG repeat polymorphisms with > 25 and 25 repeats might confer a protective effect to the patients with TC (in the high-latitude subgroup analysis, for > 25 vs. 21-25: OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.41-0.70). In contrast, an increased risk of TC was observed for AR CAG repeat polymorphisms with > 25 and 25 repeats in the mid-latitude subgroup (for > 25 vs. 21-25: OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.09-2.50). In addition, no associations between the remaining subgroups and male infertility were observed. In short, this meta-analysis suggested that AR GGN and CAG repeat polymorphisms may be involved in the etiology of TC.

  12. Methods for sequencing GC-rich and CCT repeat DNA templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Donna L.

    2007-02-20

    The present invention is directed to a PCR-based method of cycle sequencing DNA and other polynucleotide sequences having high CG content and regions of high GC content, and includes for example DNA strands with a high Cytosine and/or Guanosine content and repeated motifs such as CCT repeats.

  13. Methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites near the polymorphic CAG repeat in the human androgen-receptor gene correlates with X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Moseley, A.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Belmont, J.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The human androgen-receptor gene (HUMARA; GenBank) contains a highly polymorphic trinucleotide repeat in the first exon. The authors have found that the methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites less than 100 pb away from this polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) correlates with X inactivation. The close proximity of the restriction-enzyme sites to the STR allows the development of a PCR assay that distinguishes between the maternal and paternal alleles and identifies their methylation status. The accuracy of this assay was tested on (a) DNA from hamster/human hybrid cell lines containing either an active or inactive human X chromosome; (b) DNA from normal males and females; and (c) DNA from females showing nonrandom patterns of X inactivation. Data obtained using this assay correlated substantially with those obtained using the PGK, HPRT, and M27[beta] probes, which detect X inactivation patterns by Southern blot analysis. In order to demonstrate one application of this assay, the authors examined X inactivation patterns in the B lymphocytes of potential and obligate carriers of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem r...

  15. Significance of satellite DNA revealed by conservation of a widespread repeat DNA sequence among angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Shweta; Goel, Shailendra; Raina, Soom Nath; Rajpal, Vijay Rani

    2014-08-01

    The analysis of plant genome structure and evolution requires comprehensive characterization of repetitive sequences that make up the majority of plant nuclear DNA. In the present study, we analyzed the nature of pCtKpnI-I and pCtKpnI-II tandem repeated sequences, reported earlier in Carthamus tinctorius. Interestingly, homolog of pCtKpnI-I repeat sequence was also found to be present in widely divergent families of angiosperms. pCtKpnI-I showed high sequence similarity but low copy number among various taxa of different families of angiosperms analyzed. In comparison, pCtKpnI-II was specific to the genus Carthamus and was not present in any other taxa analyzed. The molecular structure of pCtKpnI-I was analyzed in various unrelated taxa of angiosperms to decipher the evolutionary conserved nature of the sequence and its possible functional role.

  16. Estrogen receptor alpha dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in Japanese patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozaki Teruaki

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs, comprising Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, appear to develop as a result of complex interactions between predisposing genes and environmental triggers. Susceptibility to AITDs is conferred by genes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA and genes unlinked to HLA, including the CTLA-4 gene. Recently, an association to some estrogen receptor (ERα genotypes with breast cancer, hypertension, osteoporosis, generalized osteoarthritis, and some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis has been reported. We have analyzed a dinucleotide (TAn repeat polymorphism lying upstream of the human ERα gene in patients with AITDs and in normal subjects. Results Seventeen different alleles were found in 130 patients with GD, 93 patients with HT, and 190 control subjects. There was no significant difference in the distributions of ERα alleles between patients and controls. Conclusions The present results do not support an association between the ERα gene and AITD in the Japanese population.

  17. Topology of a G-quadruplex DNA formed by C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeats associated with ALS and FTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Liu, Changdong; Geng, Yanyan; Zhu, Guang

    2015-11-13

    Abnormal expansions of an intronic hexanucleotide GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat of the C9orf72 gene are the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Previous studies suggested that the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion (HRE), either as DNA or the transcribed RNA, can fold into G-quadruplexes with distinct structures. These structural polymorphisms lead to abortive transcripts and contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS and FTD. Using circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we analyzed the structures of C9orf72 HRE DNA with various G4C2 repeats. They exhibited diverse G-quadruplex folds in potassium ions. Furthermore, we determined the topology of a G-quadruplex formed by d(G4C2)4. It favors a monomeric fold and forms a chair-type G-quadruplex with a four-layer antiparallel G-tetra core and three edgewise loops, which is distinct from known structures of chair-type G-quadruplexes. Our findings highlight the conformational heterogeneity of C9orf72 HRE DNA, and may lay the necessary structural basis for designing small molecules for the modulation of ALS/FTD pathogenesis.

  18. Evolution of ribosomal DNA-derived satellite repeat in tomato genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hur Cheol-Goo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tandemly repeated DNA, also called as satellite DNA, is a common feature of eukaryotic genomes. Satellite repeats can expand and contract dramatically, which may cause genome size variation among genetically-related species. However, the origin and expansion mechanism are not clear yet and needed to be elucidated. Results FISH analysis revealed that the satellite repeat showing homology with intergenic spacer (IGS of rDNA present in the tomato genome. By comparing the sequences representing distinct stages in the divergence of rDNA repeat with those of canonical rDNA arrays, the molecular mechanism of the evolution of satellite repeat is described. Comprehensive sequence analysis and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that a long terminal repeat retrotransposon was interrupted into each copy of the 18S rDNA and polymerized by recombination rather than transposition via an RNA intermediate. The repeat was expanded through doubling the number of IGS into the 25S rRNA gene, and also greatly increasing the copy number of type I subrepeat in the IGS of 25-18S rDNA by segmental duplication. Homogenization to a single type of subrepeat in the satellite repeat was achieved as the result of amplifying copy number of the type I subrepeat but eliminating neighboring sequences including the type II subrepeat and rRNA coding sequence from the array. FISH analysis revealed that the satellite repeats are commonly present in closely-related Solanum species, but vary in their distribution and abundance among species. Conclusion These results represent that the dynamic satellite repeats were originated from intergenic spacer of rDNA unit in the tomato genome. This result could serve as an example towards understanding the initiation and the expansion of the satellite repeats in complex eukaryotic genome.

  19. Translesion DNA polymerases Pol , Pol , Pol , Pol and Rev1 are not essential for repeat-induced point mutation in Neurospora crassa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjan Tamuli; C Ravindran; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2006-12-01

    Pol , Pol , Pol , Pol and Rev1 are specialized DNA polymerases that are able to synthesize DNA across a damaged template. DNA synthesis by such translesion polymerases can be mutagenic due to the miscoding nature of most damaged nucleotides. In fact, many mutational and hypermutational processes in systems ranging from yeast to mammals have been traced to the activity of such polymerases. We show however, that the translesion polymerases are dispensable for repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) in Neurospora crassa. Additionally, we demonstrate that the upr-1 gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of Pol , is a highly polymorphic locus in Neurospora.

  20. Unusual structures are present in DNA fragments containing super-long Huntingtin CAG repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Duzdevich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD, expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeat length beyond about 300 repeats induces a novel phenotype associated with a reduction in transcription of the transgene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed the structure of polymerase chain reaction (PCR-generated DNA containing up to 585 CAG repeats using atomic force microscopy (AFM. As the number of CAG repeats increased, an increasing proportion of the DNA molecules exhibited unusual structural features, including convolutions and multiple protrusions. At least some of these features are hairpin loops, as judged by cross-sectional analysis and sensitivity to cleavage by mung bean nuclease. Single-molecule force measurements showed that the convoluted DNA was very resistant to untangling. In vitro replication by PCR was markedly reduced, and TseI restriction enzyme digestion was also hindered by the abnormal DNA structures. However, significantly, the DNA gained sensitivity to cleavage by the Type III restriction-modification enzyme, EcoP15I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: "Super-long" CAG repeats are found in a number of neurological diseases and may also appear through CAG repeat instability. We suggest that unusual DNA structures associated with super-long CAG repeats decrease transcriptional efficiency in vitro. We also raise the possibility that if these structures occur in vivo, they may play a role in the aetiology of CAG repeat diseases such as HD.

  1. Comparative analysis of common CFTR polymorphisms poly-T, TG-repeats and M470V in a healthy Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Huang; Wei Ding; Mu-Xin Wei

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the three important cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) haplotypes po!y-T, TG-repeats and the M470V polymorphisms in the Chinese population, and to compare their distribution with that in Caucasians and other Asian populations.METHODS: Genomic DNA was extracted from blood leukocytes. Exons 9 and 10 of the CFTR gene were obtained through polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Exon 9 DNA sequences were directly detected by an automated sequencer and poly-T and TG-repeats were identified by direct sequence analysis. Pure exon 10 PCR-amplified products were digested by Hph I restriction enzyme and the M470V mutation was detected by the AGE photos of digestion products.RESULTS: T7 was the most common (93.6%) haplotype and the (TG)ll frequency of 57.2% and (TG)12 frequency of 40.9% were dominant haplotypes in the junction of intron 8 (IVS-8) and exon 9. The frequency of T5 was 3.8% and all T5 allele tracts (10 alleles) were joined with (TG)12. Four new alleles of T6 (1.5%) were found in three healthy individuals. In exon 10, the V allele (56.1%) was slightly more frequent than the M allele (43.9%), and the M/V (45.5%) was the dominant genotype in these individuals. The three major haplotypes T7-(TG)ll-V470, T7-(TG)12-M470 and T7-TG11-M470 were related to nearly 86.0% of the population.CONCLUSION: The polymorphisms of poly-T, TG-repeats, and M470V distribution were similar to those in other East Asians, but they had marked differences in frequency from those single haplotype polymorphisms or linkage haplotypes in Caucasians. Thus, they may be able to explain the low incidence of CF and CF-like diseases in Asians.

  2. A polymorphic GGC repeat in the NPAS2 gene and its association with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzoni, Alessandra; Markova-Car, Elitza; Dević-Pavlić, Sanja; Jurišić, Davor; Puppin, Cinzia; Mio, Catia; De Luca, Marila; Petruz, Giulia; Damante, Giuseppe; Pavelić, Sandra Kraljević

    2017-09-01

    Circadian clock regulation in mammals is controlled by feedback loops of a set of circadian genes. One of these circadian genes, NPAS2, encodes for a member of the bHLH-PAS class of transcription factors and is expressed in the forebrain and in some peripheral organs such as liver and skin. Other biological processes are also regulated by circadian genes. For example, NPAS2 is involved in cell proliferation, DNA damage repair and malignant transformation. Aberrant expression of clock genes has been previously observed in melanoma which led to our effort to sequence the NPAS2 promoter region in this cancer type. The NPAS2 putative promoter and 5' untranslated region of ninety-three melanoma patients and ninety-six control subjects were sequenced and several variants were identified. Among these is a novel microsatellite comprising a GGC repeat with different alleles ranging from 7 to 13 repeats located in the 5' untranslated exon. Homozygosity of an allele with nine repeats (9/9) was more prevalent in melanoma than in control subjects (22.6% and 13.5%, respectively, P: 0.0206) suggesting that some NPAS2 variants might contribute to melanoma susceptibility. Impact statement This report describes a variable microsatellite repeat sequence located in the 5' untranslated exon of NSPAS2, a gene encoding a clock transcription factor. Significantly, this study is the first to show that a variant copy number GGC repeat sequence in the NPAS2 clock gene associates with melanoma risk and which may be useful in the assessment of melanoma predisposition.

  3. Topological diversity of chromatin fibers: Interplay between nucleosome repeat length, DNA linking number and the level of transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Norouzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial organization of nucleosomes in 30-nm fibers remains unknown in detail. To tackle this problem, we analyzed all stereochemically possible configurations of two-start chromatin fibers with DNA linkers L = 10-70 bp (nucleosome repeat length NRL = 157-217 bp. In our model, the energy of a fiber is a sum of the elastic energy of the linker DNA, steric repulsion, electrostatics, and the H4 tail-acidic patch interaction between two stacked nucleosomes. We found two families of energetically feasible conformations of the fibers—one observed earlier, and the other novel. The fibers from the two families are characterized by different DNA linking numbers—that is, they are topologically different. Remarkably, the optimal geometry of a fiber and its topology depend on the linker length: the fibers with linkers L = 10n and 10n + 5 bp have DNA linking numbers per nucleosome DLk >>-1.5 and -1.0, respectively. In other words, the level of DNA supercoiling is directly related to the length of the inter-nucleosome linker in the chromatin fiber (and therefore, to NRL. We hypothesize that this topological polymorphism of chromatin fibers may play a role in the process of transcription, which is known to generate different levels of DNA supercoiling upstream and downstream from RNA polymerase. A genome-wide analysis of the NRL distribution in active and silent yeast genes yielded results consistent with this assumption.

  4. Tandem repeat DNA localizing on the proximal DAPI bands of chromosomes in Larix, Pinaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizume, Masahiro; Shibata, Fukashi; Matsumoto, Ayako; Maruyama, Yukie; Hayashi, Eiji; Kondo, Teiji; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Shozo; Hong, Deyuan

    2002-08-01

    Repetitive DNA was cloned from HindIII-digested genomic DNA of Larix leptolepis. The repetitive DNA was about 170 bp long, had an AT content of 67%, and was organized tandemly in the genome. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and subsequent DAPI banding, the repetitive DNA was localized in DAPI bands at the proximal region of one arm of chromosomes in L. leptolepis and Larix chinensis. Southern blot hybridization to genomic DNA of seven species and five varieties probed with cloned repetitive DNA showed that the repetitive DNA family was present in a tandem organization in genomes of all Larix taxa examined. In addition to the 170-bp sequence, a 220-bp sequence belonging to the same DNA family was also present in 10 taxa. The 220-bp repeat unit was a partial duplication of the 170-bp repeat unit. The 220-bp repeat unit was more abundant in L. chinensis and Larix potaninii var. macrocarpa than in other taxa. The repetitive DNA composed 2.0-3.4% of the genome in most taxa and 0.3 and 0.5% of the genome in L. chinensis and L. potaninii var. macrocarpa, respectively. The unique distribution of the 220-bp repeat unit in Larix indicates the close relationship of these two species. In the family Pinaceae, the LPD (Larix proximal DAPI band specific repeat sequence family) family sequence is widely distributed, but their amount is very small except in the genus Larix. The abundant LPD family in Larix will occur after its speciation.

  5. Allelic polymorphisms in the repeat and promoter regions of the interleukin-4 gene and malaria severity in Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyan, B A; Goka, B; Cvetkovic, J T

    2004-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E has been associated with severe malaria suggesting a regulatory role for interleukin (IL)-4 and/or IgE in the pathogenesis of severe malaria. We have investigated possible associations between polymorphisms in the IL-4 repeat region (intron 3) and promoter regions (IL-4 +33CT and...

  6. Generation of Hypertension-Associated STK39 Polymorphism Knockin Cell Lines With the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandai, Shintaro; Mori, Takayasu; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Uchida, Shinichi

    2015-12-01

    Previous genome-wide association studies identified serine threonine kinase 39 (STK39), encoding STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase, as one of a limited number of hypertension susceptibility genes. A recent meta-analysis confirmed the association of STK39 intronic polymorphism rs3754777 with essential hypertension, among previously reported hypertension-associated STK39 polymorphisms. However, the biochemical function of this polymorphism in the mechanism responsible for hypertension is yet to be clarified. We generated rs3754777G>A knockin human cell lines with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-mediated genome engineering. Homozygous (A/A) and heterozygous (G/A) knockin human embryonic kidney cell lines were generated using a double nickase, single-guide RNAs targeting STK39 intron 5 around single-nucleotide polymorphism, and a 100-bp donor single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction with sequencing analyses revealed the identical STK39 transcripts among the wild-type and both knockin cell lines. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed increased STK39 mRNA expression, and immunoblot analysis revealed increases in total and phosphorylated STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase with increased phosphorylated Na-K-Cl cotransporter isoform 1 in both knockin cell lines. The largest increases in these molecules were observed in the homozygous cell line. These findings indicated that this intronic polymorphism increases STK39 transcription, leading to activation of the STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase-solute carrier family 12A signaling cascade. Increased interactions between STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase and the target cation-chloride cotransporters may be responsible for hypertension susceptibility in individuals with this polymorphism.

  7. Spectroscopic investigation on the telomeric DNA base sequence repeat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Telomeres are protein-DNA complexes at the terminals of linear chromosomes, which protect chromosomal integrity and maintain cellular replicative capacity.From single-cell organisms to advanced animals and plants,structures and functions of telomeres are both very conservative. In cells of human and vertebral animals, telomeric DNA base sequences all are (TTAGGG)n. In the present work, we have obtained absorption and fluorescence spectra measured from seven synthesized oligonucleotides to simulate the telomeric DNA system and calculated their relative fluorescence quantum yields on which not only telomeric DNA characteristics are predicted but also possibly the shortened telomeric sequences during cell division are imrelative fluorescence quantum yield and remarkable excitation energy innerconversion, which tallies with the telomeric sequence of (TTAGGG)n. This result shows that telomeric DNA has a strong non-radiative or innerconvertible capability.``

  8. Genetic profiling of Klebsiella pneumoniae: comparison of pulsed field gel electrophoresis and random amplified polymorphic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Ashayeri-Panah

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the discriminatory power of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD methods for subtyping of 54 clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae were compared. All isolates were typeable by RAPD, while 3.6% of them were not typeable by PFGE. The repeatability of both typing methods were 100% with satisfying reproducibility (≥ 95%. Although the discriminatory power of PFGE was greater than RAPD, both methods showed sufficient discriminatory power (DI > 0.95 which reflects the heterogeneity among the K. pneumoniae isolates. An optimized RAPD protocol is less technically demanding and time consuming that makes it a reliable typing method and competitive with PFGE.

  9. Evolutionarily different alphoid repeat DNA on homologous chromosomes in human and chimpanzee.

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, A L; Laursen, H B; Jones, C; Bak, A L

    1992-01-01

    Centromeric alphoid DNA in primates represents a class of evolving repeat DNA. In humans, chromosomes 13 and 21 share one subfamily of alphoid DNA while chromosomes 14 and 22 share another subfamily. We show that similar pairwise homogenizations occur in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), where chromosomes 14 and 22, homologous to human chromosomes 13 and 21, share one partially homogenized alphoid DNA subfamily and chromosomes 15 and 23, homologous to human chromosomes 14 and 22, share anothe...

  10. Bovine proteins containing poly-glutamine repeats are often polymorphic and enriched for components of transcriptional regulatory complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barendse William

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About forty human diseases are caused by repeat instability mutations. A distinct subset of these diseases is the result of extreme expansions of polymorphic trinucleotide repeats; typically CAG repeats encoding poly-glutamine (poly-Q tracts in proteins. Polymorphic repeat length variation is also apparent in human poly-Q encoding genes from normal individuals. As these coding sequence repeats are subject to selection in mammals, it has been suggested that normal variations in some of these typically highly conserved genes are implicated in morphological differences between species and phenotypic variations within species. At present, poly-Q encoding genes in non-human mammalian species are poorly documented, as are their functions and propensities for polymorphic variation. Results The current investigation identified 178 bovine poly-Q encoding genes (Q ≥ 5 and within this group, 26 genes with orthologs in both human and mouse that did not contain poly-Q repeats. The bovine poly-Q encoding genes typically had ubiquitous expression patterns although there was bias towards expression in epithelia, brain and testes. They were also characterised by unusually large sizes. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed that the encoded proteins were strongly enriched for functions associated with transcriptional regulation and many contributed to physical interaction networks in the nucleus where they presumably act cooperatively in transcriptional regulatory complexes. In addition, the coding sequence CAG repeats in some bovine genes impacted mRNA splicing thereby generating unusual transcriptional diversity, which in at least one instance was tissue-specific. The poly-Q encoding genes were prioritised using multiple criteria for their likelihood of being polymorphic and then the highest ranking group was experimentally tested for polymorphic variation within a cattle diversity panel. Extensive and meiotically stable variation was

  11. Bovine proteins containing poly-glutamine repeats are often polymorphic and enriched for components of transcriptional regulatory complexes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whan, Vicki

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background About forty human diseases are caused by repeat instability mutations. A distinct subset of these diseases is the result of extreme expansions of polymorphic trinucleotide repeats; typically CAG repeats encoding poly-glutamine (poly-Q) tracts in proteins. Polymorphic repeat length variation is also apparent in human poly-Q encoding genes from normal individuals. As these coding sequence repeats are subject to selection in mammals, it has been suggested that normal variations in some of these typically highly conserved genes are implicated in morphological differences between species and phenotypic variations within species. At present, poly-Q encoding genes in non-human mammalian species are poorly documented, as are their functions and propensities for polymorphic variation. Results The current investigation identified 178 bovine poly-Q encoding genes (Q ≥ 5) and within this group, 26 genes with orthologs in both human and mouse that did not contain poly-Q repeats. The bovine poly-Q encoding genes typically had ubiquitous expression patterns although there was bias towards expression in epithelia, brain and testes. They were also characterised by unusually large sizes. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed that the encoded proteins were strongly enriched for functions associated with transcriptional regulation and many contributed to physical interaction networks in the nucleus where they presumably act cooperatively in transcriptional regulatory complexes. In addition, the coding sequence CAG repeats in some bovine genes impacted mRNA splicing thereby generating unusual transcriptional diversity, which in at least one instance was tissue-specific. The poly-Q encoding genes were prioritised using multiple criteria for their likelihood of being polymorphic and then the highest ranking group was experimentally tested for polymorphic variation within a cattle diversity panel. Extensive and meiotically stable variation was identified

  12. Tissue culture-induced DNA methylation polymorphisms in repetitive DNA of tomato calli and regenerated plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulders, M J; Rus-Kortekaas, W; Vosman, B

    1995-12-01

    The propagation of plants through tissue culture can induce a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes. Variation in DNA methylation has been proposed as a mechanism that may explain at least a part of these changes. In the present study, the methylation of tomato callus DNA was compared with that of leaf DNA, from control or regenerated plants, at MspI/HpaII sites around five middle-repetitive sequences. Although the methylation of the internal cytosine in the recognition sequence CCGG varied from zero to nearly full methylation, depending on the probe used, no differences were found between callus and leaf DNA. For the external cytosine, small differences were revealed between leaf and callus DNA with two probes, but no polymorphisms were detected among DNA samples of calli or DNA samples of leaves of regenerated plants. When callus DNA cut with HindIII was studied with one of the probes, H9D9, most of the signal was found in high-molecular-weight DNA, as opposed to control leaf DNA where almost all the signal was in a fragment of 530 bp. Also, an extra fragment of 630 bp was found in the callus DNA that was not present in control leaf DNA. Among leaves of plants regenerated from tissue culture, the 630-bp fragment was found in 10 of 68 regenerated plants. This 630-bp fragment was present among progeny of only 4 of these 10 plants after selfing, i.e. it was partly inherited. In these cases, the fragment was not found in all progeny plants, indicating heterozygosity of the regenerated plants. The data are interpreted as indicating that a HindIII site becomes methylated in callus tissue, and that some of this methylation persists in regenerated plants and is partly transmitted to their progeny.

  13. Solution properties of the archaeal CRISPR DNA repeat-binding homeodomain protein Cbp2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra; Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Kragelund, Birthe;

    2013-01-01

    in facilitating high affinity DNA binding of Cbp2 by tethering the two domains. Structural studies on mutant proteins provide support for Cys(7) and Cys(28) enhancing high thermal stability of Cbp2(Hb) through disulphide bridge formation. Consistent with their proposed CRISPR transcriptional regulatory role, Cbp2......Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) form the basis of diverse adaptive immune systems directed primarily against invading genetic elements of archaea and bacteria. Cbp1 of the crenarchaeal thermoacidophilic order Sulfolobales, carrying three imperfect repeats, binds...... specifically to CRISPR DNA repeats and has been implicated in facilitating production of long transcripts from CRISPR loci. Here, a second related class of CRISPR DNA repeat-binding protein, denoted Cbp2, is characterized that contains two imperfect repeats and is found amongst members of the crenarchaeal...

  14. Solution properties of the archaeal CRISPR DNA repeat-binding homeodomain protein Cbp2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra; Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Kragelund, Birthe

    2013-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) form the basis of diverse adaptive immune systems directed primarily against invading genetic elements of archaea and bacteria. Cbp1 of the crenarchaeal thermoacidophilic order Sulfolobales, carrying three imperfect repeats, binds...... specifically to CRISPR DNA repeats and has been implicated in facilitating production of long transcripts from CRISPR loci. Here, a second related class of CRISPR DNA repeat-binding protein, denoted Cbp2, is characterized that contains two imperfect repeats and is found amongst members of the crenarchaeal...... in facilitating high affinity DNA binding of Cbp2 by tethering the two domains. Structural studies on mutant proteins provide support for Cys(7) and Cys(28) enhancing high thermal stability of Cbp2(Hb) through disulphide bridge formation. Consistent with their proposed CRISPR transcriptional regulatory role, Cbp2...

  15. Linking short tandem repeat polymorphisms with cytosine modifications in human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhou; Zheng, Yinan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Cong; Joyce, Brian Thomas; Kibbe, Warren A; Hou, Lifang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Inter-individual variation in cytosine modifications has been linked to complex traits in humans. Cytosine modification variation is partially controlled by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), known as modified cytosine quantitative trait loci (mQTL). However, little is known about the role of short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs), a class of structural genetic variants, in regulating cytosine modifications. Utilizing the published data on the International HapMap Project lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), we assessed the relationships between 721 STRPs and the modification levels of 283,540 autosomal CpG sites. Our findings suggest that, in contrast to the predominant cis-acting mode for SNP-based mQTL, STRPs are associated with cytosine modification levels in both cis-acting (local) and trans-acting (distant) modes. In local scans within the ±1 Mb windows of target CpGs, 21, 9, and 21 cis-acting STRP-based mQTL were detected in CEU (Caucasian residents from Utah, USA), YRI (Yoruba people from Ibadan, Nigeria), and the combined samples, respectively. In contrast, 139,420, 76,817, and 121,866 trans-acting STRP-based mQTL were identified in CEU, YRI, and the combined samples, respectively. A substantial proportion of CpG sites detected with local STRP-based mQTL were not associated with SNP-based mQTL, suggesting that STRPs represent an independent class of mQTL. Functionally, genetic variants neighboring CpG-associated STRPs are enriched with genome-wide association study (GWAS) loci for a variety of complex traits and diseases, including cancers, based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) GWAS Catalog. Therefore, elucidating these STRP-based mQTL in addition to SNP-based mQTL can provide novel insights into the genetic architectures of complex traits.

  16. Molecular diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome: Parent-of-origin dependent methylation sites and non-isotopic detection of (CA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerer, I.; Meiner, V.; Pashut-Lavon, I.; Abeliovich, D.

    1994-08-01

    We describe our experience in the molecular diagnosis of 22 patients suspected of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) using a DNA probe PW71 (D15S63) which detects a parent-of-origin specific methylated site in the PWS critical region. The cause of the syndrome was determined as deletion or uniparental disomy according to the segregation of (CA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms of the PWS/AS region and more distal markers of chromosome 15. In 10 patients the clinical diagnosis was confirmed by the segregation of (CA){sub n}, probably due to paternal microdeletion in the PWs critical region which did not include the loci D15S97, D15S113, GABRB3, and GABRA5. This case demonstrates the advantage of the DNA probe PW71 in the diagnosis of PWS. 31 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Applications of inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) rDNA in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applications of inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) rDNA in detecting ... and phylogenetic relationships between Lymnaea natalensis collected from Giza, ... in water samples of all tested governorates with different significant differences.

  18. DNA Replication Dynamics of the GGGGCC Repeat of the C9orf72 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, Ryan Griffin; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-11-27

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures in addition to the normal B-form DNA, including hairpins and quadruplexes. These structures are implicated in a number of neurological diseases and cancer. Expansion of a GGGGCC repeat located at C9orf72 is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This repeat expands from two to 24 copies in normal individuals to several hundreds or thousands of repeats in individuals with the disease. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that as little as four repeats have the ability to form a stable DNA secondary structure known as a G-quadruplex. Quadruplex structures have the ability to disrupt normal DNA processes such as DNA replication and transcription. Here we examine the role of GGGGCC repeat length and orientation on DNA replication using an SV40 replication system in human cells. Replication through GGGGCC repeats leads to a decrease in overall replication efficiency and an increase in instability in a length-dependent manner. Both repeat expansions and contractions are observed, and replication orientation is found to influence the propensity for expansions or contractions. The presence of replication stress, such as low-dose aphidicolin, diminishes replication efficiency but has no effect on instability. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrates a replication stall with as few as 20 GGGGCC repeats. These results suggest that replication of the GGGGCC repeat at C9orf72 is perturbed by the presence of expanded repeats, which has the potential to result in further expansion, leading to disease.

  19. CAG repeat polymorphism in androgen receptor gene is not directly associated with polycystic ovary syndrome but influences serum testosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrgatic, L; Baldani, D Pavicic; Cerne, J Z; Ferk, P; Gersak, K

    2012-02-01

    Hyperandrogenemia has been the most consistent feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Androgens exert their effects through androgen receptors (ARs). The expansion of the codon CAG trinucleotide repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the AR gene represents a type of genetic alteration associated with changes in the AR gene function. The purpose of this study was to establish a possible association of the AR gene CAG repeat length polymorphism with PCOS, and its influence on clinical and biochemical androgen traits. Two hundred and fourteen Croatian women with PCOS and 209 healthy control women of reproductive age were enrolled. Phenotypic hyperandrogenism, BMI and waist to hip ratio were recorded. Hormonal profiles, fasting insulin and glucose levels were measured on cycle days 3-5. Genotyping of the CAG repeat polymorphism in the AR gene was performed. We found no significant difference in the mean CAG repeat number between the PCOS patients and controls (22.1±3.4 vs. 21.9±3.2, P=0.286). There was a positive correlation between the CAG repeat length and total testosterone (TT) in the PCOS group (R=0.225, P=0.015). A multiple linear regression model using mean CAG repeat length, BMI, age and HOMA-IR as predictors explained 8.5% (adjusted R²) of the variability in serum TT levels. In this model the CAG repeat polymorphism was found to be a significant predictor of serum TT levels in PCOS patients (P=0.015). The logistic regression analysis revealed that the CAG repeat length is not a significant predictor of hirsutism and acne status (P=0.921 and P=0.437, respectively). The model was adjusted for serum TT, free testosterone, androstendione and DHEAS levels as independent variables, which were also not found to be significant predictors of hirsutism (P=0.687, P=0.194, P=0.675 and P=0.938, respectively) or acne status (P=0.594, P=0.095, P=0.290 and P=0.151, respectively). In conclusion, the AR CAG repeat polymorphism is not a major determinant of PCOS in the

  20. Quality Control of Isothermal Amplified DNA Based on Short Tandem Repeat Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroneis, Thomas; El-Heliebi, Amin

    2015-01-01

    This protocol describes the use of a 16plex PCR for the purpose assessing DNA quality after isothermal whole genome amplification (WGA). In short, DNA products, generated by amplification multiple displacement amplification, are forwarded to PCR targeting 15 short tandem repeats (STR) as well as amelogenin generating up to 32 different PCR products. After amplification, the PCR products are separated via capillary electrophoresis and analyzed based on the obtained DNA profiles. Isothermal WGA products of good DNA quality will result in DNA profiles with efficiencies of >90 % of the full DNA profile.

  1. Molecular cytogenetic analysis and genomic organization of major DNA repeats in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, O S; Karlov, G I

    2016-04-01

    This article addresses the bioinformatic, molecular genetic, and cytogenetic study of castor bean (Ricinus communis, 2n = 20), which belongs to the monotypic Ricinus genus within the Euphorbiaceae family. Because castor bean chromosomes are small, karyotypic studies are difficult. However, the use of DNA repeats has yielded new prospects for karyotypic research and genome characterization. In the present study, major DNA repeat sequences were identified, characterized and localized on mitotic metaphase and meiotic pachytene chromosomes. Analyses of the nucleotide composition, curvature models, and FISH localization of the rcsat39 repeat suggest that this repeat plays a key role in building heterochromatic arrays in castor bean. Additionally, the rcsat390 sequences were determined to be chromosome-specific repeats located in the pericentromeric region of mitotic chromosome A (pachytene chromosome 1). The localization of rcsat39, rcsat390, 45S and 5S rDNA genes allowed for the development of cytogenetic landmarks for chromosome identification. General questions linked to heterochromatin formation, DNA repeat distribution, and the evolutionary emergence of the genome are discussed. The article may be of interest to biologists studying small genome organization and short monomer DNA repeats.

  2. Extensive sequence-influenced DNA methylation polymorphism in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Hellman Asaf; Chess Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Epigenetic polymorphisms are a potential source of human diversity, but their frequency and relationship to genetic polymorphisms are unclear. DNA methylation, an epigenetic mark that is a covalent modification of the DNA itself, plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. Most studies of DNA methylation in mammalian cells have focused on CpG methylation present in CpG islands (areas of concentrated CpGs often found near promoters), but there are also int...

  3. Exact Tandem Repeats Analyzer (E-TRA): A new program for DNA sequence mining

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Karaca; Mehmet Bilgen; A. Naci Onus; Ayse Gul Ince; Safinaz Y. Elmasulu

    2005-04-01

    Exact Tandem Repeats Analyzer 1.0 (E-TRA) combines sequence motif searches with keywords such as ‘organs’, ‘tissues’, ‘cell lines’ and ‘development stages’ for finding simple exact tandem repeats as well as non-simple repeats. E-TRA has several advanced repeat search parameters/options compared to other repeat finder programs as it not only accepts GenBank, FASTA and expressed sequence tags (EST) sequence files, but also does analysis of multiple files with multiple sequences. The minimum and maximum tandem repeat motif lengths that E-TRA finds vary from one to one thousand. Advanced user defined parameters/options let the researchers use different minimum motif repeats search criteria for varying motif lengths simultaneously. One of the most interesting features of genomes is the presence of relatively short tandem repeats (TRs). These repeated DNA sequences are found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, distributed almost at random throughout the genome. Some of the tandem repeats play important roles in the regulation of gene expression whereas others do not have any known biological function as yet. Nevertheless, they have proven to be very beneficial in DNA profiling and genetic linkage analysis studies. To demonstrate the use of E-TRA, we used 5,465,605 human EST sequences derived from 18,814,550 GenBank EST sequences. Our results indicated that 12.44% (679,800) of the human EST sequences contained simple and non-simple repeat string patterns varying from one to 126 nucleotides in length. The results also revealed that human organs, tissues, cell lines and different developmental stages differed in number of repeats as well as repeat composition, indicating that the distribution of expressed tandem repeats among tissues or organs are not random, thus differing from the un-transcribed repeats found in genomes.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA Polymorphism in Natural Populations of Drosophila albomicans (Ⅰ)——Remarkable mtDNA Polymorphism in the Population of D.albomicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文; 凌发瑶; 施立明

    1994-01-01

    The technique of mtDNA restriction fragments length polymorphism(RFLP)was used tosurvey the population structure of D.albomicans.Remarkable mtDNA polymorphism has been observed inD.albomicans populations.A total of 34 nucleomorphs were detected from 82 isofemale lines assayed by only8 restriction enzymes.The cause and the effect of this phenomenon were discussed.As a result,it is sug-gested that a mechanism which maintains mtDNA diversity exists in this fly,and that the high intra-popula-tional polymorphism could numerically conceal the extent of differentiation between populations.In addition,on the base of restriction maps,it was found that the mtDNA molecule of D.albomicans might be impactedby the selection pressure during its evolution process both on the nucleotide composition and on the function-al regions.

  5. Reelin gene polymorphisms in the Indian population: a possible paternal 5'UTR-CGG-repeat-allele effect on autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Shruti; Guhathakurta, Subhrangshu; Sinha, Swagata; Chatterjee, Anindita; Ahmed, Shabina; Ghosh, Saurabh; Gangopadhyay, Prasanta K; Singh, Manoranjan; Usha, Rajamma

    2007-01-05

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with high heritability factor and the reelin gene, which codes for an extracellular matrix protein involved with neuronal migration and lamination is being investigated as a positional and functional candidate gene for autism. It is located on chromosome 7q22 within the autism susceptible locus (AUTS1); identified in earlier genome scans and several investigations have been carried out on various ethnic groups to assess possible association and linkage of the gene with autism. However, the findings are still inconclusive. In the present study which represents the first report of such a study on the Indian population, genotyping analyses of CGG repeat polymorphism at 5'UTR, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at exon 6 and exon 50 were performed in 73 autistic subjects, 129 parents, and 80 controls. The allelic distributions of the repeat polymorphism and exon 50 T/C SNP were quite different from earlier reports in other populations. Allelic and genotypic distribution of the markers did not show any differences between the cases and controls. While our preliminary data on family-based association studies on 58 trios showed no preferential transmission of any allele from the parents to the affected offspring, TDT and HHRR analyses revealed significant paternal transmission distortions for 10- and > or =11-repeat alleles of CGG repeat polymorphism. Thus, the present study suggests that 5'UTR of reelin gene may have a role in the susceptibility towards autism with the paternal transmission and non-transmission respectively of 10- and > or =11-repeat alleles, to the affected offspring.

  6. CTCF regulates the local epigenetic state of ribosomal DNA repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van de Nobelen (Suzanne); M. Rosa-Garrido (Manuel); J. Leers (Joerg); H. Heath (Helen); W.S.W. Soochit (Widia); L. Joosen (Linda); I. Jonkers (Iris); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); M. van der Reijden (Michael); V. Torrano (Veránica); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); M.D. Delgado (Dolores); R. Renkawitz (Rainer); N.J. Galjart (Niels); F. Sleutels (Frank)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a highly conserved zinc finger protein, which is involved in chromatin organization, local histone modifications, and RNA polymerase II-mediated gene transcription. CTCF may act by binding tightly to DNA and recruiting other proteins to mediate

  7. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  8. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Institute of Cytology, St. Petersburg, (Russian Federation); Edlarov, M. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Center of Bioengineering, Moscow, (Russian Federation); Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  9. Association of condensin with chromosomes depends on DNA binding by its HEAT-repeat subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Ilaria; Rutkowska, Anna; Ori, Alessandro; Walczak, Marta; Metz, Jutta; Pelechano, Vicent; Beck, Martin; Haering, Christian H

    2014-06-01

    Condensin complexes have central roles in the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes during cell divisions, but how they interact with chromatin to promote chromosome segregation is largely unknown. Previous work has suggested that condensin, in addition to encircling chromatin fibers topologically within the ring-shaped structure formed by its SMC and kleisin subunits, contacts DNA directly. Here we describe the discovery of a binding domain for double-stranded DNA formed by the two HEAT-repeat subunits of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae condensin complex. From detailed mapping data of the interfaces between the HEAT-repeat and kleisin subunits, we generated condensin complexes that lack one of the HEAT-repeat subunits and consequently fail to associate with chromosomes in yeast and human cells. The finding that DNA binding by condensin's HEAT-repeat subunits stimulates the SMC ATPase activity suggests a multistep mechanism for the loading of condensin onto chromosomes.

  10. Preferential Nucleosome Assembly at DNA Triplet Repeats from the Myotonic Dystrophy Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Amirhaeri, Sorour; Kang, Seongman; Wells, Robert D.; Griffith, Jack D.

    1994-07-01

    The expansion of CTG repeats in DNA occurs in or near genes involved in several human diseases, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington's disease. Nucleosomes, the basic structural element of chromosomes, consist of 146 base pairs of DNA coiled about an octamer of histone proteins and mediate general transcriptional repression. Electron microscopy was used to examine in vitro the nucleosome assembly of DNA containing repeating CTG triplets. The efficiency of nucleosome formation increased with expanded triplet blocks, suggesting that such blocks may repress transcription through the creation of stable nucleosomes.

  11. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing, into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  12. A model of DNA repeat-assembled mitotic chromosomal skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  13. Human mitochondrial mTERF wraps around DNA through a left-handed superhelical tandem repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Menéndez, Nereida; Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Rubio-Cosials, Anna; Arnan, Carme; Montoya, Julio; Jacobs, Howard T; Bernadó, Pau; Coll, Miquel; Usón, Isabel; Solà, Maria

    2010-07-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) processes is slowly being characterized at a structural level. We present here crystal structures of human mitochondrial regulator mTERF, a transcription termination factor also implicated in replication pausing, in complex with double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the tRNA(Leu)(UUR) gene sequence. mTERF comprises nine left-handed helical tandem repeats that form a left-handed superhelix, the Zurdo domain.

  14. Genetic Association Between Androgen Receptor Gene CAG Repeat Length Polymorphism and Male Infertility: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bihui; Li, Rui; Chen, Yao; Tang, Qiuqin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Liping; Lu, Chuncheng; Pan, Feng; Ding, Hongjuan; Xia, Yankai; Hu, Lingqing; Chen, Daozhen; Sha, Jiahao; Wang, Xinru

    2016-03-01

    The association between polymorphism of androgen receptor gene CAG (AR-CAG) and male infertility in several studies was controversial. Based on studies on association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in recent years, an updated meta-analysis is needed. We aimed to evaluate the association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in advantage of the data in all published reports.We searched for reports published before August 2015 using PubMed, CNKI, VIP, and WanFang. Data on sample size, mean, and standard deviation (SD) of AR-CAG repeat length were extracted independently by 3 investigators.Forty-four reports were selected based on criteria. The overall infertile patients and azoospermic patients were found to have longer AR-CAG repeat length (standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.10-0.28, P CAG repeat length was longer in infertile men in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races (SMD = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.08-0.43, P CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility. The subgroup study on races shows that increased AR-CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in Asian, Caucasian, and mixed races. Increased AR-CAG repeat length was also associated with azoospermia.This meta-analysis supports that increased androgen receptor CAG length is capable of causing male infertility susceptibility.

  15. [The HindIII polymorphism of the ribosomal DNA in the German cockroach (Blattella germanica L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukha, D V; Lazebnaia, I V; Sidorenko, A P

    1997-01-01

    Structural polymorphism of rDNA from Blattella germanica was analyzed in six colonies of Moscow city different regions. Two electrophoretic variants of HindIII fragments of rDNA were detected by using 28S-like rDNA probe.

  16. DNA polymorphism at locus-2 of growth hormone gene of Madura cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NITA ETIKAWATI

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the research were to detect DNA polymorphism at locus 2 of bovine growth hormone gene of Madura cattle and to know its genetic diversity. DNA polymorphisms and their effect on phenotypic traits have been studied widely in dairy cattle but not for beef cattle, especially for Indonesian local cattle. Polymorphism was detected using PCR-RFLP using primer GH-5 and GH-6 for amplifying locus 2 of growth hormone gene. Genetic diversity was analyzed based on the formula of Nei (1973, 1975. DNA polymorphism was found on locus 2 of growth hormone gene using MspI restriction enzyme. This polymorphism may be caused the lost of restriction MspI site. The genetic diversity was 0.4422.

  17. Recombination frequency in plasmid DNA containing direct repeats--predictive correlation with repeat and intervening sequence length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pedro H; Lemos, Francisco; Monteiro, Gabriel A; Prazeres, Duarte M F

    2008-09-01

    In this study, a simple non-linear mathematical function is proposed to accurately predict recombination frequencies in bacterial plasmid DNA harbouring directly repeated sequences. The mathematical function, which was developed on the basis of published data on deletion-formation in multicopy plasmids containing direct-repeats (14-856 bp) and intervening sequences (0-3872 bp), also accounts for the strain genotype in terms of its recA function. A bootstrap resampling technique was used to estimate confidence intervals for the correlation parameters. More than 92% of the predicted values were found to be within a pre-established +/-5-fold interval of deviation from experimental data. The correlation does not only provide a way to predict, with good accuracy, the recombination frequency, but also opens the way to improve insight into these processes.

  18. CAG repeat polymorphisms in the androgen receptor and breast cancer risk in women: a meta-analysis of 17 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qixing; Qiu, Mantang; Dong, Gaochao; Xia, Wenjie; Zhang, Shuai; Xu, Youtao; Wang, Jie; Rong, Yin; Xu, Lin; Jiang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The association between polymorphic CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene in women and breast cancer susceptibility has been studied extensively. However, the conclusions regarding this relationship remain conflicting. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify whether androgen receptor CAG repeat lengths were related to breast cancer susceptibility. The MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE databases were searched through to December 2014 to identify eligible studies. Data and study quality were rigorously assessed by two investigators according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The publication bias was assessed by the Begg's test. Seventeen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. The overall analysis suggested no association between CAG polymorphisms and breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] 1.031, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.855-1.245). However, in the subgroup analysis, we observed that long CAG repeats significantly increased the risk of breast cancer in the Caucasian population (OR 1.447, 95% CI 1.089-1.992). Additionally, the risk was significantly increased in Caucasian women carrying two alleles with CAG repeats ≥22 units compared with those with two shorter alleles (OR 1.315, 95% CI 1.014-1.707). These findings suggest that long CAG repeats increase the risk of breast cancer in Caucasian women. However, larger scale case-control studies are needed to validate our results.

  19. Genetic Association Between Androgen Receptor Gene CAG Repeat Length Polymorphism and Male Infertility: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Bihui; Li, Rui; CHEN, YAO; Tang, Qiuqin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Liping; Lu, Chuncheng; Pan, Feng; Hongjuan DING; Xia,Yankai; Hu, Lingqing; Chen, Daozhen; Sha, Jiahao; Wang, Xinru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The association between polymorphism of androgen receptor gene CAG (AR-CAG) and male infertility in several studies was controversial. Based on studies on association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in recent years, an updated meta-analysis is needed. We aimed to evaluate the association between AR-CAG repeat length and male infertility in advantage of the data in all published reports. We searched for reports published before August 2015 using PubMed, CNKI, VIP, an...

  20. Absence of association between a polymorphic GGC repeat in the 5' untranslated region of the reelin gene and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, M O; Betancur, C; Leroy, S; Bourdel, M C; Gillberg, C; Leboyer, M

    2002-01-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with severe cognitive and communication disabilities, that has a strong genetic predisposition. Reelin, a protein involved in neuronal migration during development, is encoded by a gene located on 7q22, within the candidate region on 7q showing increased allele sharing in previous genome scans. A case/control and family-based association study recently reported a positive association between a trinucleotide repeat polymorphism (GGC) located in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the reelin gene and autism. We performed a transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) analysis of the 5'UTR polymorphism in 167 families including 218 affected subjects (117 trios and 50 affected sib pairs) and found no evidence of linkage/association. Our results do not support previous findings and suggest that this GGC polymorphism of the reelin gene is unlikely to be a major susceptibility factor in autism and/or genetic heterogeneity.

  1. No relationship exists between itai-itai disease and TA repeat polymorphisms of the estrogen receptor alpha gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadewa, Hamim Ahmad; Miyabe, Yuri; Nishio, Hisahide; Hayashi, Chiyo; Sutomo, Retno; Lee, Myeong Jin; Ayaki, Hitoshi; Koizumi, Naoko; Sumino, Kimiaki

    2002-08-01

    Itai-itai (ouch-ouch) disease is a syndrome accompanied by bone mineral disorders that may be related to oral cadmium exposure. Itai-itai predominantly affects postmenopausal women with a history of multiple childbirth. In a previous study we have examined the genotype distributions of PvuII and XbaI restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) gene in patients with itai-itai disease and compared them with those of controls. However, no significant differences were shown between the genotype distributions of the patients and controls. In the present study, we determined the TA repeat polymorphisms of the patients and controls. The distributions of the patients were: HH 25.0%, HL 50.0%, and LL 25.0%; where HH includes two alleles with a high number of TA repeats (TA> or =16), HL includes one high number allele and one low number allele (TAitai-itai disease.

  2. Direct detection of expanded trinucleotide repeats using PCR and DNA hybridization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petronis, A.; Tatuch, Y.; Klempan, T.A.; Kennedy, J.L. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1996-02-16

    Recently, unstable trinucleotide repeats have been shown to be the etiologic factor in seven neuropsychiatric diseases, and they may play a similar role in other genetic disorders which exhibit genetic anticipation. We have tested one polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based and two hybridization-based methods for direct detection of unstable DNA expansion in genomic DNA. This technique employs a single primer (asymmetric) PCR using total genomic DNA as a template to efficiently screen for the presence of large trinucleotide repeat expansions. High-stringency Southern blot hybridization with a PCR-generated trinucleotide repeat probe allowed detection of the DNA fragment containing the expansion. Analysis of myotonic dystrophy patients containing different degrees of (CTG){sub n} expansion demonstrated the identification of the site of trinucleotide instability in some affected individuals without any prior information regarding genetic map location. The same probe was used for fluorescent in situ hybridization and several regions of (CTG){sub n}/(CAG){sub n} repeats in the human genome were detected, including the myotonic dystrophy locus on chromosome 19q. Although limited at present to large trinucleotide repeat expansions, these strategies can be applied to directly clone genes involved in disorders caused by large expansions of unstable DNA. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Baldness and the androgen receptor: the AR polyglycine repeat polymorphism does not confer susceptibility to androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Justine A; Scurrah, Katrina J; Cobb, Joanna E; Zaloumis, Sophie G; Duncan, Anna E; Harrap, Stephen B

    2007-05-01

    Androgenetic alopecia, or male pattern baldness, is a complex condition with a strong heritable component. In 2001, we published the first significant evidence of a genetic association between baldness and a synonymous coding SNP (rs6152) in the androgen receptor gene, AR. Recently, this finding was replicated in three independent studies, confirming an important role for AR in the baldness phenotype. In one such replication study, it was claimed that the causative variant underlying the association was likely to be the polyglycine (GGN) repeat polymorphism, one of two apparently functional triplet repeat polymorphisms located in the exon 1 transactivating domain of the gene. Here, we extend our original association finding and present comprehensive evidence from approximately 1,200 fathers and sons drawn from 703 families of the Victorian Family Heart Study, a general population Caucasian cohort, that neither exon 1 triplet repeat polymorphism is causative in this condition. Seventy-eight percent of fathers (531/683) and 30% of sons (157/520) were affected to some degree with AGA. We utilised statistical methods appropriate for the categorical nature of the phenotype and familial structure of the cohort, and determined that whilst SNP rs6152 was strongly associated with baldness (P baldness, but also for the many other complex conditions that have thus far been linked to AR.

  4. Polymorphic DNA sequences and their application in paternity testing; Polimorficzne sekwencje DNA i ich zastosowanie w dochodzeniu spornego ojcostwa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slomski, R. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Poznan (Poland). Zaklad Genetyki Czlowieka]|[Akademia Rolnicza, Poznan (Poland)]|[Laboratorium Genetyki Molekularnej, Poznan (Poland); Kwiatkowska, J.; Chlebowska, H. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Poznan (Poland). Zaklad Genetyki Czlowieka; Siemieniallo, B. [Akademia Rolnicza, Poznan (Poland); Slomska, M. [Laboratorium Genetyki Molekularnej, Poznan (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Characteristics of polymorphic sequences of DNA, especially satellite, mini satellite and micro satellite sequences are presented. Own experience from the use of multi and single locus analysis of DNA in paternity testing has been compared with the results of research in other laboratories. Critical points of both types of analysis are discussed. (author). 53 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs.

  5. Initial determination of DNA polymorphism of some Primula veris L. populations from Kosovo and Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Berisha, Naim; Millaku, Fadil; Gashi, Bekim; Krasniqi, Elez; Novak, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Primula veris L. (Primulaceae) is a long lived perennial and well known pharmaceutical plant, widely collected for these reasons in almost all SE Europe and particularly in Kosovo. The aim of the study is to determine molecular polymorphism of cowslip (P. veris L.) populations from Kosovo. DNA extracted from leaves were  investigated in details for presence of polymorphism. RAPD analyses were conducted using 20 different short primers. Genomic DNA amplification profiles were analyzed and proc...

  6. Mitochondrial DNA Variability in Populations of Alectoris rufa: A Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Fresno, M.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A variable domain of the mitochondrial DNA of the red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa was analysed by single-stranded DNA polymorphism (SSCP, in animals of different populations. Ten mitochondrial types were detected unevenly distributed among samples. A preserved natural population in Northern Spain, Fuentes Carrionas, showed the highest degree of polymorphism. Farm bred animals seem to be less variable and show some genotypes not usually found in the natural sites, suggesting an alien origin of many breeders.

  7. Variable number of tandem repeat polymorphisms of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene IL-1RN: a novel association with the athlete status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryckman Kelli K

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interleukin-1 (IL-1 family of cytokines is involved in the inflammatory and repair reactions of skeletal muscle during and after exercise. Specifically, plasma levels of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra increase dramatically after intense exercise, and accumulating evidence points to an effect of genetic polymorphisms on athletic phenotypes. Therefore, the IL-1 family cytokine genes are plausible candidate genes for athleticism. We explored whether IL-1 polymorphisms are associated with athlete status in European subjects. Methods Genomic DNA was obtained from 205 (53 professional and 152 competitive non-professional Italian athletes and 458 non-athlete controls. Two diallelic polymorphisms in the IL-1β gene (IL-1B at -511 and +3954 positions, and a variable number tandem repeats (VNTR in intron 2 of the IL-1ra gene (IL-1RN were assessed. Results We found a 2-fold higher frequency of the IL-1RN 1/2 genotype in athletes compared to non-athlete controls (OR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.37-2.74, 41.0% vs. 26.4%, and a lower frequency of the 1/1 genotype (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.40-0.77, 43.9% vs. 58.5%. Frequency of the IL-1RN 2/2 genotype did not differ between groups. No significant differences between athletes and controls were found for either -511 or +3954 IL-1B polymorphisms. However, the haplotype (-511C-(+3954T-(VNTR2 was 3-fold more frequent in athletes than in non-athletes (OR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.16-7.87. Interestingly, the IL-1RN 1/2 genotype was more frequent in professional than in non-professional athletes (OR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.02-3.61, 52.8% vs. 36.8%. Conclusions Our study found that variants at the IL-1ra gene associate with athletic status. This confirms the crucial role that cytokine IL-1ra plays in human physical exercise. The VNTR IL-1RN polymorphism may have implications for muscle health, performance, and/or recovery capacities. Further studies are needed to assess these specific issues. As VNTR IL-1RN

  8. Amplification of a single-locus variable-number direct repeats with restriction fragment length polymorphism (DR-PCR/RFLP) for genetic typing of Acinetobacter baumannii strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Zaleska, Alicja; Krawczyk, Beata; Kotłowski, Roman; Mikucka, Agnieszka; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2008-01-01

    In search of an effective DNA typing technique for Acinetobacter baumannii strains for hospital epidemiology use, the performance and convenience of a new target sequence was evaluated. Using known genomic sequences of Acinetobacter baumannii strains AR 319754 and ATCC 17978, we developed single-locus variable-number direct-repeat analysis using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (DR-PCR/RFLP) method. A total of 90 Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from patients of the Clinical Hospital in Bydgoszcz, Poland, were examined. Initially, all strains were typed using macrorestriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (REA-PFGE). Digestion of the chromosomal DNA with the ApaI endonuclease and separation of the fragments by PFGE revealed 21 unique types. Application of DR-PCR/RFLP resulted in recognition of 12 clusters. The results showed that the DR-PCR/RFLP method is less discriminatory than REA-PFGE, however, the novel genotyping method can be used as an alternative technique for generating DNA profiles in epidemiological studies of intra-species genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii strains.

  9. (AC)n dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in 5' beta-globin gene in native and Mestizo Mexican populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaloza, R; Delgado, P; Arenas, D; Barrientos, C; Buentello, L; Loeza, F; Salamanca, F

    2001-12-01

    Repeated sequences are dispersed along the human genome. These sequences are useful as markers in diagnosis of inherited diseases, in forensic medicine, and in tracking the origin and evolution of human populations. The (AC)n repeated element is the most frequent in the human genome. In this paper, the (AC)n repeated element located in the 5' flanking region of the beta-globin gene was studied by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Four ethnic Mexican groups (Mixteca, Nahua, Otomí, Purépecha) and a Mestizo population were analyzed. We observed three alleles, A [(AC)16, B [(AC)14], and C [(AC)18], with a frequency of between 68.2% and 86.9%, 13.1% and 18.2%, and 6.7% and 13.7%, respectively. Allele C was present only in Purépecha and Mestizo groups. The absence of this allele in the other ethnic groups studied suggests that there is low genetic admixture of Purépecha and that this is a relatively isolated population. However, it could be that the C allele occurs in low frequencies in the other groups as a result of small sample sizes. The (AC)n repeat polymorphism in the beta-globin gene has not been previously studied in Amerindian populations.

  10. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpone, Silvia; Cozzi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR) can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER). In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:20798883

  11. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sterpone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER. In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer.

  12. Relationships among androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in Han adult men from China: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Min Ma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the correlations among androgen receptor (AR CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in healthy Chinese young adult men. Two hundred and fifty-three healthy men (aged 22.8 ± 3.1 years were enrolled. The individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAG S if they harbored repeat length of ≤20 or as CAG long (CAG L if their CAG repeat length was >20. Body height/weight, penile length and other parameters were examined and recorded by the specified physicians; CAG repeat polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR method; and the serum levels of the sex hormones were detected by radioimmunoassay. Student's t-test or linear regression analysis was used to assess the associations among AR CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length. This investigation showed that the serum total testosterone (T level was positively associated with the AR CAG repeat length (P = 0.01; whereas, no significant correlation of T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism with the penile length was found (P = 0.593. Interestingly, an inverse association was observed between serum prolactin (PRL levels and penile length by linear regression analyses (β= −0.024, P = 0.039, 95% confidence interval (CI: −0.047, 0. Collectively, this study provides the first evidence that serum PRL, but not T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism, is correlated with penile length in the Han adult population from northwestern China.

  13. Relationships among androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in Han adult men from China: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Min; Wu, Kai-Jie; Ning, Liang; Zeng, Jin; Kou, Bo; Xie, Hong-Jun; Ma, Zhen-Kun; Wang, Xin-Yang; Gong, Yong-Guang; He, Da-Lin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlations among androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in healthy Chinese young adult men. Two hundred and fifty-three healthy men (aged 22.8 ± 3.1 years) were enrolled. The individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAG S ) if they harbored repeat length of ≤ 20 or as CAG long (CAG L ) if their CAG repeat length was >20. Body height/weight, penile length and other parameters were examined and recorded by the specified physicians; CAG repeat polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method; and the serum levels of the sex hormones were detected by radioimmunoassay. Student's t-test or linear regression analysis was used to assess the associations among AR CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length. This investigation showed that the serum total testosterone (T) level was positively associated with the AR CAG repeat length (P = 0.01); whereas, no significant correlation of T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism with the penile length was found (P = 0.593). Interestingly, an inverse association was observed between serum prolactin (PRL) levels and penile length by linear regression analyses (β= -0.024, P = 0.039, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.047, 0). Collectively, this study provides the first evidence that serum PRL, but not T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism, is correlated with penile length in the Han adult population from northwestern China.

  14. Relationships among androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in Han adult men from China:a cross-sectional study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YanMin Ma; DaLin He; KaiJie Wu; Liang Ning; Jin Zeng; Bo Kou; HongJun Xie; ZhenKun Ma; XinYang Wang; YongGuang Gong

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlations among androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in healthy Chinese young adult men. Two hundred and iffty-three healthy men (aged 22.8 ± 3.1 years) were enrolled. The individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAGS) if they harbored repeat length of≤20 or as CAG long (CAGL) if their CAG repeat length was>20. Body height/weight, penile length and other parameters were examined and recorded by the speciifed physicians;CAG repeat polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method;and the serum levels of the sex hormones were detected by radioimmunoassay. Student’s t-test or linear regression analysis was used to assess the associations among AR CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length. This investigation showed that the serum total testosterone (T) level was positively associated with the AR CAG repeat length (P= 0.01); whereas, no signiifcant correlation of T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism with the penile length was found (P= 0.593). Interestingly, an inverse association was observed between serum prolactin (PRL) levels and penile length by linear regression analyses (b=-0.024, P= 0.039, 95%conifdence interval (CI):-0.047, 0). Collectively, this study provides the ifrst evidence that serum PRL, but not T or AR CAG repeat polymorphism, is correlated with penile length in the Han adult population from northwestern China.

  15. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in Hereditary and Sporadic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    DNA polymerase beta, and DNA ligase 3. Alternatively, in long patch BER, few bases are excised and removed by FEN-1, including bases adjacent to...the damaged base, and incorporation of new nucleotides are mediated by PCNA, Polymerase delta or epsilon and DNA ligase I. 7 The nucleotide...requires the DNA-end-binding protein Ku, which binds free DNA ends and recruits DNA-PKcs. Xrcc4 is then recruited along with DNA ligase IV. The Rad50

  16. Effect of repeated sequential ejaculation on sperm DNA integrity in subfertile males with asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, T M; Elariny, A F; Elabd, M M; Elgarem, Y F; Elsawy, M M

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the possible beneficial effect of repeated sequential ejaculation on sperm DNA integrity in subfertile males and its possible implementation in assisted reproduction. The study included 20 infertile males with idiopathic asthenozoospermia or oligoasthenozoospermia. They underwent detailed history taking, complete clinical assessment and hormonal assessment. Patients were asked to bring two semen samples (taken within 1-3 h). Two consecutive samples were assessed with regard to semen volume, sperm count, motility grading, and morphology and sperm DNA integrity using the comet assay. There was a significant improvement in the sperm motility pattern and DNA integrity in the second sample in comparison with the first sample. Therefore, it is concluded that due to its positive impact on sperm motility and DNA integrity, repeated sequential ejaculation is recommended in subfertile males with idiopathic asthenozoospermia who pursue assisted reproduction.

  17. A Novel Signal Processing Measure to Identify Exact and Inexact Tandem Repeat Patterns in DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Gupta

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification and analysis of repetitive patterns are active areas of biological and computational research. Tandem repeats in telomeres play a role in cancer and hypervariable trinucleotide tandem repeats are linked to over a dozen major neurodegenerative genetic disorders. In this paper, we present an algorithm to identify the exact and inexact repeat patterns in DNA sequences based on orthogonal exactly periodic subspace decomposition technique. Using the new measure our algorithm resolves the problems like whether the repeat pattern is of period P or its multiple (i.e., 2P, 3P, etc., and several other problems that were present in previous signal-processing-based algorithms. We present an efficient algorithm of O(NLw logLw, where N is the length of DNA sequence and Lw is the window length, for identifying repeats. The algorithm operates in two stages. In the first stage, each nucleotide is analyzed separately for periodicity, and in the second stage, the periodic information of each nucleotide is combined together to identify the tandem repeats. Datasets having exact and inexact repeats were taken up for the experimental purpose. The experimental result shows the effectiveness of the approach.

  18. DNApod: DNA polymorphism annotation database from next-generation sequence read archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Takako; Tanizawa, Yasuhiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Ohta, Tazro; Nikoh, Naruo; Shimizu, Tokurou; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kurata, Nori; Nagasaki, Hideki; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS), datasets for DNA polymorphisms among various species and strains have been produced, stored, and distributed. However, reliability varies among these datasets because the experimental and analytical conditions used differ among assays. Furthermore, such datasets have been frequently distributed from the websites of individual sequencing projects. It is desirable to integrate DNA polymorphism data into one database featuring uniform quality control that is distributed from a single platform at a single place. DNA polymorphism annotation database (DNApod; http://tga.nig.ac.jp/dnapod/) is an integrated database that stores genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets acquired under uniform analytical conditions, and this includes uniformity in the quality of the raw data, the reference genome version, and evaluation algorithms. DNApod genotypic data are re-analyzed whole-genome shotgun datasets extracted from sequence read archives, and DNApod distributes genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets and known-gene annotations for each DNA polymorphism. This new database was developed for storing genome-wide DNA polymorphism datasets of plants, with crops being the first priority. Here, we describe our analyzed data for 679, 404, and 66 strains of rice, maize, and sorghum, respectively. The analytical methods are available as a DNApod workflow in an NGS annotation system of the DNA Data Bank of Japan and a virtual machine image. Furthermore, DNApod provides tables of links of identifiers between DNApod genotypic data and public phenotypic data. To advance the sharing of organism knowledge, DNApod offers basic and ubiquitous functions for multiple alignment and phylogenetic tree construction by using orthologous gene information. PMID:28234924

  19. Thymidylate synthase (TS tandem repeat promoter polymorphism and susceptibility to colorectal cancer of romanian subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai TOMA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The risk of colorectal cancer (CRC is influence by polymorphisms located in the genes encoding enzymes of the folate pathway. The aim of this study was to evaluate if 2R/3R TS (rs34743033 polymorphism is involved in predisposition for colorectal in Romanian subjects. In the present case-control study, 75 sporadic CRC subjects and 60 healthy controls were genotyped by PCR method. The frequency of 3R/3R genotype was 40% in control group and 42.7% in cancer group. We found that there was no statistically significant association between the risk for CRC and 2R/3R TS polymorphism in Romanian subjects.

  20. Analysis of short tandem repeat (STR polymorphisms by the powerplex 16 system and capillary electrophoresis: application to forensic practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto O

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Allele and genotype frequencies for 15 short tandem repeat (STR polymorphisms--D3S1358, TH01, D21S11, D18S51, Penta E, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, CSF1PO, Penta D, vWA, D8S1179, TPOX and FGA--in a Japanese population were estimated. No deviations of the observed allele frequency from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations were found for any of the systems studied. Between 2 new pentanucleotide STR loci, Penta E and Penta D, for which there is only limited data regarding the allelic distribution in Japanese, the Penta E locus was found to be highly polymorphic and exhibited a tri- or tetra-modal distribution pattern having allelic peaks with 5, 11, 15 and 20 repeats. The distribution was significantly different from that of the other ethnic groups. Statistical parameters of forensic importance, the power of discrimination (PD, observed and expected heterozygosity values (H, polymorphism information content (PIC, power of discrimination (PD, matching probability (pM, power of exclusion (PE, and typical paternity index (PI, were calculated for the loci. These parameters indicated the usefulness of the loci in forensic personal identification and paternity testing among Japanese. The systems Penta E, FGA, D18S51 and D8S1179 were the most informative. This method was successfully applied to forensic personal identification and paternity testing among Japanese, thereby confirming its efficacy for forensic practice.

  1. Diversity Suppression-Subtractive Hybridization Array for Profiling Genomic DNA Polymorphisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Genomic DNA polymorphisms are very useful for tracing genetic traits and studying biological diversity among species. Here, we present a method we call the "diversity suppression-subtractive hybridization array" for effectively profiling genomic DNA polymorphisms. The method first obtains the subtracted gDNA fragments between any two species by suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) to establish a subtracted gDNA library,from which diversity SSH arrays are created with the selected subtracted clones. The diversity SSH array hybridizes with the DIG-labeled genomic DNA of the organism to be assayed. Six closely related Dendrobium species were studied as model samples. Four Dendrobium species as testers were used to perform SSH. A total of 617 subtracted positive clones were obtained from four Dendrobium species, and the average ratio of positive clones was 80.3%. We demonstrated that the average percentage of polymorphic fragments of pairwise comparisons of four Dendrobium species was up to 42.4%. A dendrogram of the relatedness of six Dendrobium species was produced according to their polymorphic profiles. The results revealed that the diversity SSH array is a highly effective platform for profiling genomic DNA polymorphisms and dendrograms.

  2. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Friis, J; Fugger, L;

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, and -DPB in 54 patients with pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (PJRA) and in healthy Danes. The frequencies of DNA fragments a...

  3. Analysis of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and survival in low-grade and anaplastic gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi; Wibom, Carl; Sjöström, Sara;

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the variation in DNA repair genes in adults with WHO grade II and III gliomas and their relationship to patient survival. We analysed a total of 1,458 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were selected to cover DNA repair genes, in 81 grade ...

  4. Linkage of congenital isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency to the corticotropin releasing hormone locus using simple sequence repeat polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyllo, J.H.; Collins, M.M.; Vetter, K.L. [Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-29

    Genetic screening techniques using simple sequence repeat polymorphisms were applied to investigate the molecular nature of congenital isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency. We hypothesize that this rare cause of hypocortisolism shared by a brother and sister with two unaffected sibs and unaffected parents is inherited as an autosomal recessive single gene mutation. Genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis controlling cortisol sufficiency were investigated for a causal role in this disorder. Southern blotting showed no detectable mutations of the gene encoding pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), the ACTH precursor. Other candidate genes subsequently considered were those encoding neuroendocrine convertase-1, and neuroendocrine convertase-2 (NEC-1, NEC-2), and corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Tests for linkage were performed using polymorphic di- and tetranucleotide simple sequence repeat markers flanking the reported map locations for POMC, NEC-1, NEC-2, and CRH. The chromosomal haplotypes determined by the markers flanking the loci for POMC, NEC-1, and NEC-2 were not compatible with linkage. However, 22 individual markers defining the chromosomal haplotypes flanking CRH were compatible with linkage of the disorder to the immediate area of this gene of chromosome 8. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the ACTH deficiency in this family is due to an abnormality of CRH gene structure or expression. These results illustrate the useful application of high density genetic maps constructed with simple sequence repeat markers for inclusion/exclusion studies of candidate genes in even very small nuclear families segregating for unusual phenotypes. 25 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Subnuclear relocalization and silencing of a chromosomal region by an ectopic ribosomal DNA repeat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociunas, Tadas; Domange Jordö, Marie Elise; Mebarek, Mazhoura Aït;

    2013-01-01

    dimerization, providing a mechanism for the observed relocalization. Replacing the full rDNA repeat with Reb1-binding sites, and using mutants lacking the histone H3K9 methyltransferase Clr4, indicated that the relocalized region was silenced redundantly by heterochromatin and another mechanism, plausibly...

  6. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at the SCN4A locus suggest allelic heterogeneity of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis and paramyotonia congenita

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchey, Andrea I.; Trofatter, James; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Raskind, Wendy; Bird, Thomas; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Gilchrist, James; Arahata, Kiichi; Radosavljevic, Danica; Worthen, Hilary G.; Van den Bergh, Peter; Haines, Jonathan L.; Gusella, James F.; Brown, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    Two polymorphic dinucleotide repeats–one (dGdA)n and one (dGdT)n –have been identified at the SCN4A locus, encoding the α-subunit of the adult skeletal muscle sodium channel. When typed using PCR, the dinucleotide repeats display 4 and 10 alleles, respectively, with a predicted heterozygosity of .81 for the combined haplotype. We have applied these polymorphisms to the investigation of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis and paramyotonia congenita, distinct neuromuscular disorders both of which are thought to involve mutation at SCN4A. Our data confirm the genetic linkage of both disorders with SCN4A. Haplotype analysis also indicates the strong likelihood of allelic heterogeneity in both disorders. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:1315122

  7. Establishment of Ecotilling for Discovery of DNA Polymorphisms in Brassica rapa Natural Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jian; SUN Ri-fei; ZHANG Yan-guo; WANG Xiao-wu

    2005-01-01

    Ecotilling is a new approach based on enzyme-mediated heteroduplex cleavage to discover DNA polymorphisms in natural population. We used mung bean nuclease(MBN) instead of routinely used CELI to cleave single base pair mismatches in heteroduplex DNA templates. Nested set of primers were designed to amplify targeted region to avoid the influence of the variation in quality and quantity of the genomic DNA. To reduce the costs in fluorescently labeled primers, we added M13 adapter to 5'end of gene specific primers to make IRD dye labeled M13 forward and reverse primers possibly universal for different genes. A Brassica rapa ZIP gene homologue was subjected to the analysis to practise the feasibility of the method in polymorphisms detection. Our experiment showed this method is efficient in discovering DNA polymorphisms in Brassica rapa natural population.

  8. Characterization of a highly repeated DNA sequence family in five species of the genus Eulemur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, M; Boniotto, M; Cardone, M F; Fulizio, L; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M; Crovella, S

    2001-09-19

    The karyotypes of Eulemur species exhibit a high degree of variation, as a consequence of the Robertsonian fusion and/or centromere fission. Centromeric and pericentromeric heterochromatin of eulemurs is constituted by highly repeated DNA sequences (including some telomeric TTAGGG repeats) which have so far been investigated and used for the study of the systematic relationships of the different species of the genus Eulemur. In our study, we have cloned a set of repetitive pericentromeric sequences of five Eulemur species: E. fulvus fulvus (EFU), E. mongoz (EMO), E. macaco (EMA), E. rubriventer (ERU), and E. coronatus (ECO). We have characterized these clones by sequence comparison and by comparative fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis in EMA and EFU. Our results showed a high degree of sequence similarity among Eulemur species, indicating a strong conservation, within the five species, of these pericentromeric highly repeated DNA sequences.

  9. CTG repeats distribution and Alu insertion polymorphism at myotonic dystrophy (DM) gene in Amhara and Oromo populations of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennarelli, M; Pavoni, M; Cruciani, F; De Stefano, G; Dallapiccola, B; Novelli, G

    1999-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a dominantly inherited neuromuscular disease, highly variable and multisystemic, which is caused by the expansion of a CTG repeat located in the 3' untranslated region of the DMPK gene. Normal alleles show a copy number of 5-37 repeats on normal chromosomes, amplified to 50-3000 copies on DM chromosomes. The trinucleotide repeat shows a trimodal allele distribution in the majority of the examined population. The first class includes alleles carrying (CTG)5, the second class, alleles in the range 7-18 repeats, and the third class, alleles (CTG) > or =19. The frequency of this third class is directly related to the prevalence of DM in different populations, suggesting that normal large-sized alleles predispose toward DM. We studied CTG repeat allele distribution and Alu insertion and/or deletion polymorphism at the myotonic dystrophy locus in two major Ethiopian populations, the Amhara and Oromo. CTG allele distribution and haplotype analysis on a total of 224 normal chromosomes showed significant differences between the two ethnic groups. These differences have a bearing on the out-of-Africa hypothesis for the origin of the DM mutation. In addition, (CTG) > or =19 were exclusively detected in the Amhara population, confirming the predisposing role of these alleles compared with the DM expansion-mutation.

  10. CAG repeat polymorphisms in the androgen receptor and breast cancer risk in women: a meta-analysis of 17 studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Q

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Qixing Mao,1–3,* Mantang Qiu,1–3,* Gaochao Dong,3 Wenjie Xia,1–3 Shuai Zhang,1,3 Youtao Xu,1,3 Jie Wang,3 Yin Rong,1,3 Lin Xu,1,3 Feng Jiang1,3 1Department of Thoracic Surgery, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, 2Fourth Clinical College of Nanjing Medical University, 3Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Translational Cancer Research, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The association between polymorphic CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene in women and breast cancer susceptibility has been studied extensively. However, the conclusions regarding this relationship remain conflicting. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify whether androgen receptor CAG repeat lengths were related to breast cancer susceptibility. The MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE databases were searched through to December 2014 to identify eligible studies. Data and study quality were rigorously assessed by two investigators according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The publication bias was assessed by the Begg’s test. Seventeen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. The overall analysis suggested no association between CAG polymorphisms and breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] 1.031, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.855–1.245. However, in the subgroup analysis, we observed that long CAG repeats significantly increased the risk of breast cancer in the Caucasian population (OR 1.447, 95% CI 1.089–1.992. Additionally, the risk was significantly increased in Caucasian women carrying two alleles with CAG repeats ≥22 units compared with those with two shorter alleles (OR 1.315, 95% CI 1.014–1.707. These findings suggest that long CAG repeats increase the risk of breast cancer in Caucasian women. However, larger scale case-control studies are needed to validate our results. Keywords: androgen, CAG repeat polymorphism, women

  11. Lack of association between estrogen receptor β dinucleotide repeat polymorphism and autoimmune thyroid diseases in Japanese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Motowo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs, such as Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, appear to develop as a result of complex interactions between predisposing genes and environmental triggers. Susceptibility to AITDs is conferred by genes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA and genes unlinked to HLA, including the CTLA-4 gene. Recently, estrogen receptor (ER β, located at human chromosome 14q23-24.1, was identifed. We analyzed a dinucleotide (CAn repeat polymorphism located in the flanking region of ERβ gene in patients with AITDs and in normal subjects. High heterozygosity makes this polymorphism a useful marker in the genetic study of disorders affecting female endocrine systems. We also correlated a ERβ gene microsatellite polymorphism with bone mineral density (BMD in the distal radius and biochemical markers of bone turnover in patients with GD in remission. Results Fourteen different alleles were found in 133 patients with GD, 114 patients with HT, and 179 controls subjects. The various alleles were designated as allele*1 through allele*14 according to the number of the repeats, from 18 to 30. There was no significant difference in the distributions of ERβ alleles between patient groups and controls. Although recent study demonstrated a significant relation between a allele*9 in the ERβ gene and BMD in postmenopausal Japanese women, there were no statistically significant interaction between this allele and BMD in the distal radius, nor biochemical markers in patients with GD in remission. Conclusions The present results do not support an association between the ERβ microsatellite marker and AITD in the Japanese population. We also suggest that the ERβ microsatellite polymorphism has at most a minor pathogenic importance in predicting the risk of osteoporosis as a complication of GD.

  12. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... The discrimination ability of individual markers was also determined. ... Abbreviations: PIC, Polymorphism information content; RAPD, random ..... funded by the Mini- stry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic ...

  13. Comparison of highly repeated DNA sequences in some Lemuridae and taxonomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnon, D; Crovella, S; Rumpler, Y

    1993-01-01

    Highly repeated DNA sequences of Eulemur fulvus mayottensis, E. coronatus, Lemur catta, and Hapalemur griseus griseus have been identified and compared. Sequence analysis of highly repeated DNA fragments isolated from L. catta and Hapalemur showed a high percentage of similarity (nearly 95%), as did fragments isolated from the two very close Eulemur species, whereas comparison of the DNA fragments isolated from the two Eulemur species and the L. catta/Hapalemur group showed a very low percentage (approximately 40%) of identity, as might be expected for distant species. These results confirm our previous data, obtained by Southern blot hybridization techniques on the same species, and strongly support the existence of a common trunk between L. catta and Hapalemur, but different from the leading to the Eulemur species.

  14. [Heterogeneity and homologies of the repeating and unique DNA of dragonflies (Odonata, Insecta)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, N B; Aleshin, V V

    1983-01-01

    A relative content of unique and reiterated nucleotide sequences in DNA of eleven dragonfly species was estimated. The degree of intra- and intergenomic divergence of these DNA sequences was determined by means of DNA-DNA hybridization. Species from different genera share 40-45% of the repetitive sequences and those from different families--from 11 to 20% only. Data on the thermostability of homo- and heteroduplexes suggest that new families of the repetitive sequences have arisen repeatedly during dragonflies evolution. The quality of homologous unique sequences in the DNA compared (20-97%) correlates with the taxonomic relationships of species. Phylogenesis of some dragonfly families is discussed in view of the results obtained.

  15. Extensive sequence-influenced DNA methylation polymorphism in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellman Asaf

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic polymorphisms are a potential source of human diversity, but their frequency and relationship to genetic polymorphisms are unclear. DNA methylation, an epigenetic mark that is a covalent modification of the DNA itself, plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. Most studies of DNA methylation in mammalian cells have focused on CpG methylation present in CpG islands (areas of concentrated CpGs often found near promoters, but there are also interesting patterns of CpG methylation found outside of CpG islands. Results We compared DNA methylation patterns on both alleles between many pairs (and larger groups of related and unrelated individuals. Direct observation and simulation experiments revealed that around 10% of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs reside in regions with differences in the propensity for local DNA methylation between the two alleles. We further showed that for the most common form of SNP, a polymorphism at a CpG dinucleotide, the presence of the CpG at the SNP positively affected local DNA methylation in cis. Conclusions Taken together with the known effect of DNA methylation on mutation rate, our results suggest an interesting interdependence between genetics and epigenetics underlying diversity in the human genome.

  16. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Institute of Cytology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Eldarov, M. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Center for Bioengineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic-growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation In that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RAD52, RAD1 and the RNC1 genes.

  17. Association Between Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Gene XRCC1 and DNA Damage in Asbestos-Exposed Workers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO-HONG ZHAO; GUANG JIA; YONG-QUAN LIU; SHAO-WEI LIU; LEI YAN; YU JIN; NIAN LIU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare the asbestos-induced DNA damage and repair capacities of DNA damage between 104 asbestos exposed workers and 101 control workers in Qingdao City of China and to investigate the possible association between polymorphisms in codon 399 of XRCC1 and susceptibility to asbestosis. Methods DNA damage levels in peripheral bloodlymphocytes were determined by comet assay, and XRCC 1 genetic polymorphisms of DNA samples from 51 asbestosis cases and 53 non-asbestosis workers with a similar asbestos exposure history were analyzed by PCR/RFLP. Results The basal comet scores (3.95±2.95) were significantly higher in asbestos-exposed workers than in control workers (0.10±0.28). After 1 h H2O2 stimulation, DNA damage of lymphocytes exhibited different increases. After a 4 h repair period, the comet scores were 50.98±19.53 in asbestos-exposed workers and 18.32±12.04 in controls. The residual DNA damage (RD) was significantly greater (P<0.01) in asbestos-exposed workers (35.62%) than in controls (27.75%). XRCC1 genetic polymorphism in 104 asbestos-exposed workers was not associated with increased risk of asbestosis. But compared with polymorphisms in the DNA repair gene XRCC1 (polymorphisms in codon 399) and the DNA damage induced by asbestos, the comet scores in asbestosis cases with Gln/Gln, Gln/Arg, and Arg/Arg were 40.26±18.94, 38.03±28.22, and 32.01±11.65, respectively, which were higher than those in non-asbestosis workers with the same genotypes (25.58±11.08, 37.08±14.74, and 29.38±10.15). There were significant differences in the comet scores between asbestosis cases and non-asbestosis workers with Gln/Gln by Student's t-test (P<0.05 or 0.01). The comet scores were higher in asbestosis workers with Gln/Gln than in those with Arg/Arg and in non-asbestosis workers exposed to asbestos, but without statistically significant difference. Conclusions Exposure to asbestos may be related to DNA damage or the capacity of cells to repair H2O2-induced

  18. Evolutionary Origin of Higher-Order Repeat Structure in Alpha-Satellite DNA of Primate Centromeres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Akihiko; Hirai, Yuriko; Terada, Shoko; Jahan, Israt; Baicharoen, Sudarath; Arsaithamkul, Visit; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-satellite DNA (AS) is a main DNA component of primate centromeres, consisting of tandemly repeated units of ∼170 bp. The AS of humans contains sequences organized into higher-order repeat (HOR) structures, in which a block of multiple repeat units forms a larger repeat unit and the larger units are repeated tandemly. The presence of HOR in AS is widely thought to be unique to hominids (family Hominidae; humans and great apes). Recently, we have identified an HOR-containing AS in the siamang, which is a small ape species belonging to the genus Symphalangus in the family Hylobatidae. This result supports the view that HOR in AS is an attribute of hominoids (superfamily Hominoidea) rather than hominids. A single example is, however, not sufficient for discussion of the evolutionary origin of HOR-containing AS. In the present study, we developed an efficient method for detecting signs of large-scale HOR and demonstrated HOR of AS in all the three other genera. Thus, AS organized into HOR occurs widely in hominoids. Our results indicate that (i) HOR-containing AS was present in the last common ancestor of hominoids or (ii) HOR-containing AS emerged independently in most or all basal branches of hominoids. We have also confirmed HOR occurrence in centromeric AS in the Hylobatidae family, which remained unclear in our previous study because of the existence of AS in subtelomeric regions, in addition to centromeres, of siamang chromosomes. PMID:24585002

  19. Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... HBV is distributed into various genotypes based on nucleic acid sequence variation. ... compared to genotype B and higher incidence of HCC in genotype D ... DNA sequencing technology to sequence HBV DNA polymerase ...

  20. 九个非DNA联合索引系统短串联重复序列基因座在河北汉族群体的遗传学调查及在亲子鉴定中的应用%Genetic polymorphisms of nine non-DNA combined index system short tandem repeat loci in Hebei Han population and application in paternity testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关亚卿; 付丽红; 张晓静; 李淑瑾; 丛斌; 马春玲

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the polymorphisms of 9 non-DNA combined index system(CODIS) short tandem repeats (STRs), i. e., D7S3048, D8S1132, D11S2368, D2S1772, D6S1043,D13S325, D12S391, GATA198B05, D18S1364 in Hebei Han population, and evaluate the usage of them in paternity testing. Methods One hundred and forty-seven unrelated healthy individuals from the Han population of Hebei province were genotyped using STRtyper10G kit including 9 STR loci on ABI 3130 Genetic Analyzer. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and population genetic parameters were calculated. Fourteen cases of motherless paternity testing and 2 cases of standard trios with mutation in 1 locus were detected using STRtyper 10G. Results (1) Ninety-nine alleles and 336 genotypes were observed in the 9 STR loci in the population. The cumulative discrimination power(DP) was higher than 0. 999 999 999. The cumulative probability of exclusion(PE) for trios and duos were 0. 999 974 and 0. 998 759 respectively. Departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was not observed in any of the 9 loci. (2) The combined paternity index (PI)of the 14 cases of motherless paternity testing ranged from 103-104 for 15 STR loci in ID, whereas it reached 105-109 for 22 independent STR loci included in ID and STRtyper 10G. Possible mutation in FGA and vWA was observed in 2 cases of trios, and the combined PI was 5945 and 1840 respectively for 15 STR loci in ID.Adding STRtyper 10G to detect these 2 cases, the combined PI reached 2. 76 × 107 and 4. 88 × 107respectively. Conclusion The genetic polymorphism of the 9 non-CODIS STR loci included in STRtyper 10G was quite high in Chinese Hebei Han population, indicating the 9 STR loci are valuable as complement markers for ID and PP16 kit in motherless paternity testing, paternity testing with mutation and other kinds of complicated paternity testing.%目的 调查9个非DNA联合索引系统(DNA combined index system,CODIS)的短串联重复序列(short tandem repeat,STR)基因座在河北

  1. Association of mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ gene POLG1 polymorphisms with parkinsonism in Chinese populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-xing Gui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG1 mutations were associated with levodopa-responsive Parkinsonism. POLG1 gene contains a number of common nonsynonymous SNPs and intronic regulatory SNPs which may have functional consequences. It is of great interest to discover polymorphisms variants associated with Parkinson's disease (PD, both in isolation and in combination with specific SNPs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a case-control study and genotyped twenty SNPs and poly-Q polymorphisms of POLG1 gene including in 344 Chinese sporadic PD patients and 154 healthy controls. All the polymorphisms of POLG1 we found in this study were sequenced by PCR products with dye terminator methods using an ABI-3100 sequencer. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage disequilibrium (LD for association between twenty POLG1 SNPs and PD were calculated using the program Haploview. PRINCIPAL RESULTS: We provided evidence for strong association of four intronic SNPs of the POLG1 gene (new report: c.2070-12T>A and rs2307439: c.2070-64G>A in intron 11, P = 0.00011, OR = 1.727; rs2302084: c.3105-11T>C and rs2246900: c.3105-36A>G in intron 19, P = 0.00031, OR = 1.648 with PD. However, we did not identify any significant association between ten exonic SNPs of POLG1 and PD. Linkage disequilibrium analysis indicated that c.2070-12T>A and c.2070-64G>A could be parsed into one block as Haplotype 1 as well as c.3105-11T>C and c.3105-36A>G in Haplotype 2. In addition, case and control study on association of POLG1 CAG repeat (poly-Q alleles with PD showed a significant association (P = 0.03, OR = 2.16 of the non-10/11Q variants with PD. Although intronic SNPs associated with PD didn't influence POLG1 mRNA alternative splicing, there was a strong association of c.2070-12T>A and c.2070-64G>A with decreased POLG1 mRNA level and protein levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that POLG1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of PD in Chinese populations.

  2. Association between interferon gamma 13-CA-repeats polymorphism and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a population of Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Kaifei; Yan, Zhaohui; Shuang, Yu; Sun, Jinsong; Tao, Shudong; Fu, Wenyuan; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Interferon Gamma gamma (IFN-γ) 13-CA-repeats polymorphism is associated with a variety of diseases; here we report its association with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) metastasis in a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 220 NPC patients in the northern China. The results showed that the distributions of CA13-/CA13-genotypes were significantly higher in the patients with lymph node metastasis (P<0.05) and distant metastasis (P<0.001); there was a significant difference between NPC patients with stage I+II and those with stage III+IV regarding CA13+/CA13-(P<0.001) and CA13-/CA13- genotypes (P<0.001); further analysis showed a more pronounced difference between NPC patients with stage I+II+III and those with stage IV for CA13-/CA13-genotype (P<0.001), whereas no difference was found for CA13+/CA13- genotype (P=0.790). Thus, we identify that IFN-γ 13-CA-repeat polymorphism is significantly associated with the metastasis of NPC, which may provide insights into its prognosis and individualized treatment.

  3. Negative association between androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism and polycystic ovary syndrome? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Goodarzi, Mark O; Xiong, Ting; Wang, Di; Azziz, Ricardo; Zhang, Hanwang

    2012-10-01

    A number of studies focusing on the association between the exon 1 CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor (AR) gene and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have revealed conflicting results. The current systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the strength of the association and to explore potential sources of heterogeneity that may have influenced the results. Studies matched to search terms from PubMed, EMBASE and HuGE Navigator published through to 31 January 2012 were retrieved. Data extraction from the included studies was carried out by two authors independently. Weighted mean differences (WMDs) of biallelic mean and odds ratios (ORs) of alleles and genotypes were pooled for meta-analysis. Sixteen articles reporting on 17 studies were included. In continuous data analysis, the summary WMD was -0.06 (95% confidence interval -0.29 to 0.16). In dichotomous data analysis, we divided the alleles into short and long alleles and calculated the summary ORs. No statistically significant results were identified by different comparison models or different cut-off point definitions. No publication bias was observed in continuous and dichotomous data analysis. In summary, the current systematic review and meta-analysis found that the AR CAG microsatellite repeat polymorphism is unlikely to be a major determining factor in the development of PCOS.

  4. Empirical Comparison of Simple Sequence Repeats and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Assessment of Maize Diversity and Relatedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Martha T.; Warburton, Marilyn L.; Buckler, Edward S.

    2007-01-01

    While Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) are extremely useful genetic markers, recent advances in technology have produced a shift toward use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The different mutational properties of these two classes of markers result in differences in heterozygosities and allele frequencies that may have implications for their use in assessing relatedness and evaluation of genetic diversity. We compared analyses based on 89 SSRs (primarily dinucleotide repeats) to analyses based on 847 SNPs in individuals from the same 259 inbred maize lines, which had been chosen to represent the diversity available among current and historic lines used in breeding. The SSRs performed better at clustering germplasm into populations than did a set of 847 SNPs or 554 SNP haplotypes, and SSRs provided more resolution in measuring genetic distance based on allele-sharing. Except for closely related pairs of individuals, measures of distance based on SSRs were only weakly correlated with measures of distance based on SNPs. Our results suggest that 1) large numbers of SNP loci will be required to replace highly polymorphic SSRs in studies of diversity and relatedness and 2) relatedness among highly-diverged maize lines is difficult to measure accurately regardless of the marker system. PMID:18159250

  5. Analysis of genetic polymorphism of nine short tandem repeat loci in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-15

    Mar 15, 2012 ... Short tandem repeat (STR) is widely used today for gene mapping ... minatory power for some difficult cases, such as complex kinship analysis ... Arlequin version 3.5 software (Computational and Molecular. Population ...

  6. Sequence polymorphism of human mitochondrial DNA control region in Chinese Dongxiang unrelated individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin-she; CHEN Teng; LI Sheng-bin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mitochondrial DNA sequence polymorphism in Chinese Dongxiang ethnic group and to provide basic data used in ethnic origin investigation and forensic purpose. Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted from the whole blood of 100 unrelated individuals of Chinese Dongxiang ethnic group by standard Chelex-100 method.The sequence polymorphism was determined by PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Results: Eighty-two polymorphic sites were identified in mtDNA D-loop region 16 091 - 16 418 np, and 88 haplotypes were found. The genetic diversity was calculated to be 0.996 9, and the genetic identity was 0.013 2. Conclusion: There are some particular polymorphic sites in Chinese Dongxiang ethnic group, and these sites provide an important basis to investigate the origin of Dongxiang and the relationship between Dongxiang and other ethnic groups. The result also suggested that sequence polymorphism from 16 091 -16 418 np in human mitochondrial DNA control region can be an useful tool for forensic identity.

  7. An association analysis between mitochondrial DNA A10398G polymorphism and temperament in Japanese young adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiro Kishida

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial (mt DNA C5178A and A10398G polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with mental disorders such as bipolar disorder. However, the effects of these polymorphisms on temperament in healthy people are poorly understood. Evaluating healthy subjects can have the advantage of providing new strategies for maintaining psychological health and preventing mental illness. We examined the association between mtDNA polymorphisms and temperament in Japanese students. There was no significant difference in examined temperament when analysed by genotypes, 5178-10398 haplotypes, or sex. The subgroup analysis based on sex indicated that there was an interactive effect of the mtDNA A10398G polymorphism and sex on anxiety and obsession. This finding is preliminary and cannot exclude the possibility of false-positive due to small sample size (144 subjects and multiple statistical testing. Further studies involving a larger sample size or other ethnic groups are necessary to confirm that mtDNA A10398G polymorphism can be a genetic factor for temperament.

  8. Cytogenetic analysis of Populus trichocarpa--ribosomal DNA, telomere repeat sequence, and marker-selected BACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam-Faridi, M N; Nelson, C D; DiFazio, S P; Gunter, L E; Tuskan, G A

    2009-01-01

    The 18S-28S rDNA and 5S rDNA loci in Populus trichocarpa were localized using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Two 18S-28S rDNA sites and one 5S rDNA site were identified and located at the ends of 3 different chromosomes. FISH signals from the Arabidopsis-type telomere repeat sequence were observed at the distal ends of each chromosome. Six BAC clones selected from 2 linkage groups based on genome sequence assembly (LG-I and LG-VI) were localized on 2 chromosomes, as expected. BACs from LG-I hybridized to the longest chromosome in the complement. All BAC positions were found to be concordant with sequence assembly positions. BAC-FISH will be useful for delineating each of the Populus trichocarpa chromosomes and improving the sequence assembly of this model angiosperm tree species.

  9. Cytogenetic Analysis of Populus trichocarpa - Ribosomal DNA, Telomere Repeat Sequence, and Marker-selected BACs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University

    2009-01-01

    The 18S-28S rDNA and 5S rDNA loci in Populus trichocarpa were localized using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Two 18S-28S rDNA sites and one 5S rDNA site were identified and located at the ends of 3 different chromosomes. FISH signals from the Arabidopsis -type telomere repeat sequence were observed at the distal ends of each chromosome. Six BAC clones selected from 2 linkage groups based on genome sequence assembly (LG-I and LG-VI) were localized on 2 chromosomes, as expected. BACs from LG-I hybridized to the longest chromosome in the complement. All BAC positions were found to be concordant with sequence assembly positions. BAC-FISH will be useful for delineating each of the Populus trichocarpa chromosomes and improving the sequence assembly of this model angiosperm tree species.

  10. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Intron 4, 27 bp Repeat Polymorphism and Essential Hypertension in the Kazakh Chinese Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengmei DENG; Huimin ZHANG; Juan ZHAO; Hua ZHONG; Ling HE; Jun LI; Le ZHANG; Shuren WANG; Qinghua HU; Bin TANG; Fang HE; Shuxia GUO; Jiang CHEN; Feng LI; Xuehua WU; Jun ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between 27 bp repeat polymorphism in intron 4 in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS4) gene and essential hypertension in the Kazakh Chinese population, 151 patients with essential hypertension and 138 healthy people were selected from the Boertonggu countryside of Shawan region in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China in 2006. The polymorphism of eNOS in the two groups was detected with polymerase chain reaction assays and the genotype frequencies in each group were calculated following the Hardy-Weinberg law. Four and five tandem 27 bp repeats were designated as "a" and "b", respectively. It was found that the frequencies of b/b, b/a and a/a genotypes of the eNOS4 gene were 84.06%, 15.22% and 0.72% in the control group, and 81.46%, 15.89% and 2.65% in the hypertension group, respectively. The frequencies of gene "b" and "a" were 91.67% and 8.33% in the control group and 89.40% and 10.60% in the hypertension group, respectively. It was found that plasma eNOS activity was not associated with genotypes and alleles of eNOS gene. Plasma eNOS activity in the hypertension group was significantly decreased compared with the control group (P<0.01). The results suggest that eNOS4 gene polymorphisms are unlikely to be the major genetic susceptibility factors for essential hypertension in the Xinjiang Kazakh population. However, a positive association between plasma eNOS activity and essential hypertension has been revealed.

  11. Controlled growth of DNA structures from repeating units using the vernier mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greschner, Andrea A; Bujold, Katherine E; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2014-08-11

    In this report, we demonstrate the assembly of length-programmed DNA nanostructures using a single 16 base sequence and its complement as building blocks. To achieve this, we applied the Vernier mechanism to DNA assembly, which uses a mismatch in length between two monomers to dictate the final length of the product. Specifically, this approach relies on the interaction of two DNA strands containing a different number (n, m) of complementary binding sites: these two strands will keep binding to each other until they come into register, thus generating a larger assembly whose length (n × m) is encoded by the number of binding sites in each strand. While the Vernier mechanism has been applied to other areas of supramolecular chemistry, here we present an application of its principles to DNA nanostructures. Using a single 16 base repeat and its complement, and varying the number of repeats on a given DNA strand, we show the consistent construction of duplexes up to 228 base pairs (bp) in length. Employing specific annealing protocols, strand capping, and intercalator chaperones allows us to further grow the duplex to 392 base pairs. We demonstrate that the Vernier method is not only strand-efficient, but also produces a cleaner, higher-yielding product than conventional designs.

  12. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of infertile Chinese men: karyotypic abnormalities, Y-chromosome microdeletions, and CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, T T; Ran, J; Ding, X P; Li, L J; Zhang, L Y; Zhang, Y P; Nie, S S; Chen, L

    2013-07-08

    Chromosome abnormalities, Y-chromosome microdeletions, and androgen receptor gene CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms in infertile Chinese men featuring severe oligospermia and azoospermia were analyzed. Ninety-six fertile men and 189 non-obstructive infertile men, including 125 patients with azoospermia and 64 with severe oligozoospermia, were studied. Seventeen infertile men (9.0%) carried a chromosome abnormality. Twenty (10.6%) carried a Y-chromosome microdeletion. In the remainder of the patients and controls, GGN and CAG repeats were sequenced. Short GGN repeats (n repeats strongly correlated with sperm counts. No significant difference in CAG repeats was found between patients and controls, nor were CAG repeats correlated with sperm counts. However, for CAG repeats ranging between 24 and 25, there was a >2.5-fold risk (OR = 2.539, 95%CI = 1.206-5.344, P repeats in Chinese male infertility.

  13. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rim Khlifi; Ahmed Rebai; Amel Hamza-Chaffai

    2012-12-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in some DNA repair proteins are associated with a number of malignant transformations like head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) and X-ray repair cross-complementing proteins 1 (XRCC1) and 3 (XRCC3) genes are involved in DNA repair and were found to be associated with HNSCC in numerous studies. To establish our overall understanding of possible relationships between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and development of HNSCC, we surveyed the literature on epidemiological studies that assessed potential associations with HNSCC risk in terms of gene–environment interactions, genotype-induced functional defects in enzyme activity and/or protein expression, and the influence of ethnic origin on these associations.We conclude that large, well-designed studies of common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes are needed. Such studies may benefit from analysis of multiple genes or polymorphisms and from the consideration of relevant exposures that may influence the likelihood of HNSCC when DNA repair capacity is reduced.

  14. Polymorphism of DNA conformation inside the bacteriophage capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leforestier, Amélie

    2013-03-01

    Double-stranded DNA bacteriophage genomes are packaged into their icosahedral capsids at the highest densities known so far (about 50 % w:v). How the molecule is folded at such density and how its conformation changes upon ejection or packaging are fascinating questions still largely open. We review cryo-TEM analyses of DNA conformation inside partially filled capsids as a function of the physico-chemical environment (ions, osmotic pressure, temperature). We show that there exists a wide variety of DNA conformations. Strikingly, the different observed structures can be described by some of the different models proposed over the years for DNA organisation inside bacteriophage capsids: either spool-like structures with axial or concentric symmetries, or liquid crystalline structures characterised by a DNA homogeneous density. The relevance of these conformations for the understanding of DNA folding and unfolding upon ejection and packaging in vivo is discussed.

  15. Analysis of sequence variation in Gnathostoma spinigerum mitochondrial DNA by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngarmamonpirat, Charinthon; Waikagul, Jitra; Petmitr, Songsak; Dekumyoy, Paron; Rojekittikhun, Wichit; Anantapruti, Malinee T

    2005-03-01

    Morphological variations were observed in the advance third stage larvae of Gnathostoma spinigerum collected from swamp eel (Fluta alba), the second intermediate host. Larvae with typical and three atypical types were chosen for partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequence analysis. A 450 bp polymerase chain reaction product of the COI gene was amplified from mitochondrial DNA. The variations were analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The nucleotide variations of the COI gene in the four types of larvae indicated the presence of an intra-specific variation of mitochondrial DNA in the G. spinigerum population.

  16. DNA-binding proteins from marine bacteria expand the known sequence diversity of TALE-like repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Thiel, Philipp; Krüger, Jens; Kleusch, Christian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lahaye, Thomas

    2015-11-16

    Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) of Xanthomonas bacteria are programmable DNA binding proteins with unprecedented target specificity. Comparative studies into TALE repeat structure and function are hindered by the limited sequence variation among TALE repeats. More sequence-diverse TALE-like proteins are known from Ralstonia solanacearum (RipTALs) and Burkholderia rhizoxinica (Bats), but RipTAL and Bat repeats are conserved with those of TALEs around the DNA-binding residue. We study two novel marine-organism TALE-like proteins (MOrTL1 and MOrTL2), the first to date of non-terrestrial origin. We have assessed their DNA-binding properties and modelled repeat structures. We found that repeats from these proteins mediate sequence specific DNA binding conforming to the TALE code, despite low sequence similarity to TALE repeats, and with novel residues around the BSR. However, MOrTL1 repeats show greater sequence discriminating power than MOrTL2 repeats. Sequence alignments show that there are only three residues conserved between repeats of all TALE-like proteins including the two new additions. This conserved motif could prove useful as an identifier for future TALE-likes. Additionally, comparing MOrTL repeats with those of other TALE-likes suggests a common evolutionary origin for the TALEs, RipTALs and Bats.

  17. Linker histone variant H1T targets rDNA repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Ruiko; Hayakawa, Koji; Tanaka, Satoshi; Shiota, Kunio

    2016-04-02

    H1T is a linker histone H1 variant that is highly expressed at the primary spermatocyte stage through to the early spermatid stage of spermatogenesis. While the functions of the somatic types of H1 have been extensively investigated, the intracellular role of H1T is unclear. H1 variants specifically expressed in germ cells show low amino acid sequence homology to somatic H1s, which suggests that the functions or target loci of germ cell-specific H1T differ from those of somatic H1s. Here, we describe the target loci and function of H1T. H1T was expressed not only in the testis but also in tumor cell lines, mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), and some normal somatic cells. To elucidate the intracellular localization and target loci of H1T, fluorescent immunostaining and ChIP-seq were performed in tumor cells and mESCs. We found that H1T accumulated in nucleoli and predominantly targeted rDNA repeats, which differ from somatic H1 targets. Furthermore, by nuclease sensitivity assay and RT-qPCR, we showed that H1T repressed rDNA transcription by condensing chromatin structure. Imaging analysis indicated that H1T expression affected nucleolar formation. We concluded that H1T plays a role in rDNA transcription, by distinctively targeting rDNA repeats.

  18. Mitochondrial Inverted Repeats Strongly Correlate with Lifespan: mtDNA Inversions and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiang-Nan; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects are implicated in aging and in a multitude of age-related diseases, such as cancer, heart failure, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. However, it is still unclear how mitochondrial defects arise under normal physiological conditions. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions caused by direct repeats (DRs) are implicated in the formation of mitochondrial defects, however, mitochondrial DRs show relatively weak (Pearson’s r = −0.22, p<0.002; Spearman’s ρ = −0.12, p = 0.1) correlation with maximum lifespan (MLS). Here we report a stronger correlation (Pearson’s r = −0.55, p<10–16; Spearman’s ρ = −0.52, p<10–14) between mitochondrial inverted repeats (IRs) and lifespan across 202 species of mammals. We show that, in wild type mice under normal conditions, IRs cause inversions, which arise by replication-dependent mechanism. The inversions accumulate with age in the brain and heart. Our data suggest that IR-mediated inversions are more mutagenic than DR-mediated deletions in mtDNA, and impose stronger constraint on lifespan. Our study identifies IR-induced mitochondrial genome instability during mtDNA replication as a potential cause for mitochondrial defects. PMID:24069185

  19. Mitochondrial inverted repeats strongly correlate with lifespan: mtDNA inversions and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Nan Yang

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial defects are implicated in aging and in a multitude of age-related diseases, such as cancer, heart failure, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. However, it is still unclear how mitochondrial defects arise under normal physiological conditions. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA deletions caused by direct repeats (DRs are implicated in the formation of mitochondrial defects, however, mitochondrial DRs show relatively weak (Pearson's r = -0.22, p<0.002; Spearman's ρ = -0.12, p = 0.1 correlation with maximum lifespan (MLS. Here we report a stronger correlation (Pearson's r = -0.55, p<10(-16; Spearman's ρ = -0.52, p<10(-14 between mitochondrial inverted repeats (IRs and lifespan across 202 species of mammals. We show that, in wild type mice under normal conditions, IRs cause inversions, which arise by replication-dependent mechanism. The inversions accumulate with age in the brain and heart. Our data suggest that IR-mediated inversions are more mutagenic than DR-mediated deletions in mtDNA, and impose stronger constraint on lifespan. Our study identifies IR-induced mitochondrial genome instability during mtDNA replication as a potential cause for mitochondrial defects.

  20. DNA methylation polymorphism in flue-cured tobacco and candidate markers for tobacco mosaic virus resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-hong ZHAO; Ji-shun ZHANG; Yi WANG; Ren-gang WANG; Chun WU; Long-jiang FAN; Xue-liang REN

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression during plant growth,development,and polyploidization.However,there is still no distinct evidence in tobacco regarding the distribution of the methylation pattern and whether it contributes to qualitative characteristics.We studied the levels and patterns of methylation polymorphism at CCGG sites in 48 accessions of allotetraploid flue-cured tobacco,Nicotiana tabacum,using a methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique.The results showed that methylation existed at a high level among tobacco accessions,among which 49.3% sites were methylated and 69.9% allelic sites were polymorphic.A cluster analysis revealed distinct patterns of geography-specific groups.In addition,three polymorphic sites significantly related to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) resistance were explored.This suggests that tobacco breeders should pay more attention to epigenetic traits.

  1. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes XRCC2 and XRCC3 risk of gastric cancer in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhami Gok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the prevalence of polymorphisms in genes XRCC2 and XRCC3 in stomach cancer patients who lived in North Eastern Turkey. A total of 61 cancer patients and 78 controls were included in this study. Single nucleotide changes were studied in XRCC2 and XRCC3 genes at locus Arg188His and Thr241Met. Blood samples were taken from the patients and controls, and DNA was isolated. The regions of interest were amplified using a polymerase chain reaction method. After amplification, we used restriction enzymes (HphI and NcoI to digest the amplified product. Digested product was then run through gel electrophoresis. We identified changes in the nucleotides in these specific regions. It was found that the Arg188His polymorphism of the XRCC2 gene was about 39% (24 out of the 61 among cancer patients. However, only 15% (12 out of 78 of the control group indicated this polymorphism. We also observed that 18 of the 61 cancer patients (29% carried the Thr241Met polymorphism of the XRCC3 gene whereas 11 of the 78 (14% individuals in the control group had the polymorphism. Our results showed a significant difference in polymorphism ratios between the cancer patients and health control group for the regions of interest. This result clearly showed that these polymorphisms increase the risk of stomach cancer and might be a strong marker for early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  2. DNA tandem repeat instability in the Escherichia coli chromosome is stimulated by mismatch repair at an adjacent CAG·CTG trinucleotide repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, John K.; Okely, Ewa A.; Zahra, Rabaab; Eykelenboom, John K.; Leach, David R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately half the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences classified into microsatellites, minisatellites, tandem repeats, and dispersed repeats. These repetitive sequences have coevolved within the genome but little is known about their potential interactions. Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a subclass of microsatellites that are implicated in human disease. Expansion of CAG·CTG TNRs is responsible for Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias. In yeast DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation has been proposed to be associated with instability and chromosome fragility at these sites and replication fork reversal (RFR) to be involved either in promoting or in preventing instability. However, the molecular basis for chromosome fragility of repetitive DNA remains poorly understood. Here we show that a CAG·CTG TNR array stimulates instability at a 275-bp tandem repeat located 6.3 kb away on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Remarkably, this stimulation is independent of both DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) and RFR but is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system. Our results provide a demonstration, in a simple model system, that MMR at one type of repetitive DNA has the potential to influence the stability of another. Furthermore, the mechanism of this stimulation places a limit on the universality of DSBR or RFR models of instability and chromosome fragility at CAG·CTG TNR sequences. Instead, our data suggest that explanations of chromosome fragility should encompass the possibility of chromosome gaps formed during MMR. PMID:21149728

  3. Discrimination of Shark species by simple PCR of 5S rDNA repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danillo Pinhal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sharks are suffering from intensive exploitation by worldwide fisheries leading to a severe decline in several populations in the last decades. The lack of biological data on a species-specific basis, associated with a k-strategist life history make it difficult to correctly manage and conserve these animals. The aim of the present study was to develop a DNA-based procedure to discriminate shark species by means of a rapid, low cost and easily applicable PCR analysis based on 5S rDNA repeat units amplification, in order to contribute conservation management of these animals. The generated agarose electrophoresis band patterns allowed to unequivocally distinguish eight shark species. The data showed for the first time that a simple PCR is able to discriminate elasmobranch species. The described 5S rDNA PCR approach generated species-specific genetic markers that should find broad application in fishery management and trade of sharks and their subproducts.

  4. Relative Telomere Repeat Mass in Buccal and Leukocyte-Derived DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnicum, Casey T.; Dolan, Conor V.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Weber, Zachary M.; Petersen, Jason L.; Beck, Jeffrey J.; Codd, Veryan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Davies, Gareth E.; Ehli, Erik A.

    2017-01-01

    Telomere length has garnered interest due to the potential role it may play as a biomarker for the cellular aging process. Telomere measurements obtained from blood-derived DNA are often used in epidemiological studies. However, the invasive nature of blood draws severely limits sample collection, particularly with children. Buccal cells are commonly sampled for DNA isolation and thus may present a non-invasive alternative for telomere measurement. Buccal and leukocyte derived DNA obtained from samples collected at the same time period were analyzed for telomere repeat mass (TRM). TRM was measured in buccal-derived DNA samples from individuals for whom previous TRM data from blood samples existed. TRM measurement was performed by qPCR and was normalized to the single copy 36B4 gene relative to a reference DNA sample (K562). Correlations between TRM from blood and buccal DNA were obtained and also between the same blood DNA samples measured in separate laboratories. Using the classical twin design, TRM heritability was estimated (N = 1892, MZ = 1044, DZ = 775). Buccal samples measured for TRM showed a significant correlation with the blood-1 (R = 0.39, p < 0.01) and blood-2 (R = 0.36, p < 0.01) samples. Sex and age effects were observed within the buccal samples as is the norm within blood-derived DNA. The buccal, blood-1, and blood-2 measurements generated heritability estimates of 23.3%, 47.6% and 22.2%, respectively. Buccal derived DNA provides a valid source for the determination of TRM, paving the way for non-invasive projects, such as longitudinal studies in children. PMID:28125671

  5. Plant somatic hybrid cytoplasmic DNA characterization by single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Fuster, Oscar; Hernández-Garrido, María; Guerri, José; Navarro, Luis

    2007-06-01

    Unlike maternal inheritance in sexual hybridization, plant somatic hybridization allows transfer, mixing and recombination of cytoplasmic genomes. In addition to the use of somatic hybridization in plant breeding programs, application of this unique tool should lead to a better understanding of the roles played by the chloroplastic and mitochondrial genomes in determining agronomically important traits. The nucleotide sequences of cytoplasmic genomes are much more conserved than those of nuclear genomes. Cytoplasmic DNA composition in somatic hybrids is commonly elucidated either by length polymorphism analysis of restricted genome regions amplified with universal primers (PCR-RF) or by hybridization of total DNA using universal cytoplasmic probes. In this study, we demonstrate that single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis is a powerful, quick and easy alternative method for cytoplasmic DNA characterization of somatic hybrids, especially for mitochondrial DNA. The technique allows detection of polymorphisms based on both size and sequence of amplified targets. Twenty-two species of the subfamily Aurantioideae were analyzed with eight universal primers (four from chloroplastic and four from mitochondrial regions). Differences in chloroplastic DNA composition were scored in 98% of all possible two-parent combinations, and different mitochondrial DNA profiles were found in 87% of them. Analysis by SSCP was also successfully used to characterize somatic hybrids and cybrids obtained by fusion of Citrus sinensis (L.) Osb. and C. excelsa Wester protoplasts.

  6. Analysis of Significance of Unite Examination of AFP and DNA Polymorphism of P3 Promoter of IGF-ⅡGene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Su; ZHANG Feng-chun; SUN Chang-jiang; LIU Cheng-bai; ZHUANG Jiang-xing; ZHANG Jin

    2004-01-01

    The DNA of P3 promoter region of IGF-Ⅱ gene was obtained by means of PCR technique. The examination of DNA polymorphism by restriction endonuclease BstE Ⅱ and the examination of AFP by bioluminescence immunoassay technique were carried out. The results have a significant difference(P<0.005). But the positive rate of AFP is higher than that of DNA polymorphism. The experimental result shows that the change of the DNA polymorphism of IGF-Ⅱis not the only carcinogenic factor. The suggested unite examination is the best method for the diagnosis of the primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Relationship between biological behaviour and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA profiles of Trypanosoma cruzi strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Díaz Rafael A

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Once known some biological characteristics of six Trypanosoma cruzi strains, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was made. Cluster analysis by UPGMA (unweighted pair group method analysis was then applied both to biological parameters and RAPD profiles. Inspection of the UPGMA phenograms indicates identical clusters, so supporting that usefulness of biological parameters to characterization of T. cruzi strains still remains.

  8. Selection of unique Escherichia coli clones by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen L; Godfrey, Paul A; Stegger, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and characterizing clonal diversity are important when analysing fecal flora. We evaluated random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR, applied for selection of Escherichia coli isolates, by whole genome sequencing. RAPD was fast, and reproducible as screening method for selection of ...

  9. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowland, J B; Andersen, V; Halberg, P

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, -DPB in 24 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and in 102 healthy Danes. A highly significant increase of the frequency of the DR3...

  10. Formation of Extrachromosomal Circular DNA from Long Terminal Repeats of Retrotransposons in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik D. Møller

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA derived from chromosomal Ty retrotransposons in yeast can be generated in multiple ways. Ty eccDNA can arise from the circularization of extrachromosomal linear DNA during the transpositional life cycle of retrotransposons, or from circularization of genomic Ty DNA. Circularization may happen through nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ of long terminal repeats (LTRs flanking Ty elements, by Ty autointegration, or by LTR–LTR recombination. By performing an in-depth investigation of sequence reads stemming from Ty eccDNAs obtained from populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c, we find that eccDNAs predominantly correspond to full-length Ty1 elements. Analyses of sequence junctions reveal no signs of NHEJ or autointegration events. We detect recombination junctions that are consistent with yeast Ty eccDNAs being generated through recombination events within the genome. This opens the possibility that retrotransposable elements could move around in the genome without an RNA intermediate directly through DNA circularization.

  11. Large-scale studies of the HphI insulin gene variable-number-of-tandem-repeats polymorphism in relation to Type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S K; Gjesing, A P; Rasmussen, S K

    2004-01-01

    The class III allele of the variable-number-of-tandem-repeats polymorphism located 5' of the insulin gene (INS-VNTR) has been associated with Type 2 diabetes and altered birthweight. It has also been suggested, although inconsistently, that the class III allele plays a role in glucose-induced ins......The class III allele of the variable-number-of-tandem-repeats polymorphism located 5' of the insulin gene (INS-VNTR) has been associated with Type 2 diabetes and altered birthweight. It has also been suggested, although inconsistently, that the class III allele plays a role in glucose...

  12. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Based on Variable Number of Tandem DNA Repeats Used Alone and in Association with Spoligotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filliol, Ingrid; Ferdinand, Severine; Negroni, Laetitia; Sola, Christophe; Rastogi, Nalin

    2000-01-01

    Fingerprinting based on variable numbers of tandem DNA repeats (VNTR), a recently described methodology, was evaluated for molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in an insular setting. In this study, VNTR fingerprinting was used alone or as a second-line test in association with spoligotyping, double-repetitive-element PCR (DRE-PCR), and IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and the discriminatory power for each method or the combination of methods was compared by calculating the Hunter-Gaston discriminative index (HGI). The results obtained showed that in 6 out of 12 (50%) cases, VNTR-defined clusters were further subdivided by spoligotyping, compared to 7 out of 18 (39%) cases where spoligotyping-defined clusters were further subdivided by VNTR. When used alone, VNTR was the least discriminatory method (HGI = 0.863). Although VNTR was significantly more discriminatory when used in association with spoligotyping (HGI = 0.982), the combination of spoligotyping and DRE-PCR (HGI = 0.992) was still the most efficient among rapid, PCR-based methodologies, giving results comparable to IS6110 RFLP analysis. Nonetheless, VNTR typing may provide additional phylogenetical information that may be helpful to trace the molecular evolution of tubercle bacilli. PMID:10878036

  13. Polymorphism of DNA conformation inside the bacteriophage capsid

    OpenAIRE

    Leforestier, Amélie

    2013-01-01

    Double-stranded DNA bacteriophage genomes are packaged into their icosahedral capsids at the highest densities known so far (about 50 % w:v). How the molecule is folded at such density and how its conformation changes upon ejection or packaging are fascinating questions still largely open. We review cryo-TEM analyses of DNA conformation inside partially filled capsids as a function of the physico-chemical environment (ions, osmotic pressure, temperature). We show that there exists a wide vari...

  14. PAH-DNA adducts in environmentally exposed population in relation to metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkova, Blanka [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Chvatalova, Irena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Lnenickova, Zdena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Milcova, Alena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Tulupova, Elena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Cancer Biomarkers and Prevention Group, Biocentre, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Farmer, Peter B. [Cancer Biomarkers and Prevention Group, Biocentre, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Sram, Radim J. [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: sram@biomed.cas.cz

    2007-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that prolonged exposure to particulate air pollution may be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer in general population. These effects may be attributable to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed to respirable air particles. It is expected that metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms may modulate individual susceptibility to PAH exposure. This study investigates relationships between exposure to PAHs, polymorphisms of these genes and DNA adducts in group of occupationally exposed policemen (EXP, N = 53, males, aged 22-50 years) working outdoors in the downtown area of Prague and in matched 'unexposed' controls (CON, N = 52). Personal exposure to eight carcinogenic PAHs (c-PAHs) was evaluated by personal samplers during working shift prior to collection of biological samples. Bulky-aromatic DNA adducts were analyzed in lymphocytes by {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay. Polymorphisms of metabolizing (GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, EPHX1, CYP1A1-MspI) and DNA repair (XRCC1, XPD) genes were determined by PCR-based RFLP assays. As potential modifiers and/or cofounders, urinary cotinine levels were analyzed by radioimmunoassay, plasma levels of vitamins A, C, E and folates by HPLC, cholesterol and triglycerides using commercial kits. During the sampling period ambient particulate air pollution was as follows: PM10 32-55 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, PM2.5 27-38 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, c-PAHs 18-22 ng/m{sup 3}; personal exposure to c-PAHs: 9.7 ng/m{sup 3} versus 5.8 ng/m{sup 3} (P < 0.01) for EXP and CON groups, respectively. The total DNA adduct levels did not significantly differ between EXP and CON groups (0.92 {+-} 0.28 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides versus 0.82 {+-} 0.23 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, P = 0.065), whereas the level of the B[a]P-'like' adduct was significantly higher in exposed group (0.122 {+-} 0.036 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides versus 0.099 {+-} 0.035 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, P = 0

  15. Polymorphic crystal structures of an all-AT DNA dodecamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Reyes, Francisco J; Subirana, Juan A; Pous, Joan; Sánchez-Giraldo, Raquel; Condom, Núria; Baldini, Roberto; Malinina, Lucy; Campos, J Lourdes

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we explore the influence of different solvents and ions on the crystallization behavior of an all-AT dodecamer d(AATAAATTTATT)2 In all cases, the oligonucleotides are found as continuous columns of stacked duplexes. The spatial organization of such columns is variable; consequently we have obtained seven different crystal forms. The duplexes can be made to crystallize in either parallel or crossed columns. Such versatility in the formation of a variety of crystal forms is characteristic for this sequence. It had not been previously reported for any other sequence. In all cases, the oligonucleotide duplexes have been found to crystallize in the B form. The crystallization conditions determine the organization of the crystal, although no clear local interactions have been detected. Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) can be used in order to obtain compact crossed structures. DNA-DNA interactions in the crystals of our all-AT duplexes present crossovers which are different from those previously reported for mixed sequence oligonucleotides. Our results demonstrate that changes in the ionic atmosphere and the crystallization solvent have a strong influence on the DNA-DNA interactions. Similar ionic changes will certainly influence the biological activity of DNA. Modulation of the crystal structure by ions should also be explored in DNA crystal engineering. Liquid crystals with a peculiar macroscopic shape have also been observed.

  16. Expanded CAG/CTG repeat DNA induces a checkpoint response that impacts cell proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangapriya Sundararajan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive DNA elements are mutational hotspots in the genome, and their instability is linked to various neurological disorders and cancers. Although it is known that expanded trinucleotide repeats can interfere with DNA replication and repair, the cellular response to these events has not been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that an expanded CAG/CTG repeat elicits a DNA damage checkpoint response in budding yeast. Using microcolony and single cell pedigree analysis, we found that cells carrying an expanded CAG repeat frequently experience protracted cell division cycles, persistent arrests, and morphological abnormalities. These phenotypes were further exacerbated by mutations in DSB repair pathways, including homologous recombination and end joining, implicating a DNA damage response. Cell cycle analysis confirmed repeat-dependent S phase delays and G2/M arrests. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the above phenotypes are due to the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, since expanded CAG repeats induced the phosphorylation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase in a rad52Δ recombination deficient mutant. Interestingly, cells mutated for the MRX complex (Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2, a central component of DSB repair which is required to repair breaks at CAG repeats, failed to elicit repeat-specific arrests, morphological defects, or Rad53 phosphorylation. We therefore conclude that damage at expanded CAG/CTG repeats is likely sensed by the MRX complex, leading to a checkpoint response. Finally, we show that repeat expansions preferentially occur in cells experiencing growth delays. Activation of DNA damage checkpoints in repeat-containing cells could contribute to the tissue degeneration observed in trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases.

  17. Expanded CAG/CTG repeat DNA induces a checkpoint response that impacts cell proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Rangapriya; Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2011-03-01

    Repetitive DNA elements are mutational hotspots in the genome, and their instability is linked to various neurological disorders and cancers. Although it is known that expanded trinucleotide repeats can interfere with DNA replication and repair, the cellular response to these events has not been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that an expanded CAG/CTG repeat elicits a DNA damage checkpoint response in budding yeast. Using microcolony and single cell pedigree analysis, we found that cells carrying an expanded CAG repeat frequently experience protracted cell division cycles, persistent arrests, and morphological abnormalities. These phenotypes were further exacerbated by mutations in DSB repair pathways, including homologous recombination and end joining, implicating a DNA damage response. Cell cycle analysis confirmed repeat-dependent S phase delays and G2/M arrests. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the above phenotypes are due to the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, since expanded CAG repeats induced the phosphorylation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase in a rad52Δ recombination deficient mutant. Interestingly, cells mutated for the MRX complex (Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2), a central component of DSB repair which is required to repair breaks at CAG repeats, failed to elicit repeat-specific arrests, morphological defects, or Rad53 phosphorylation. We therefore conclude that damage at expanded CAG/CTG repeats is likely sensed by the MRX complex, leading to a checkpoint response. Finally, we show that repeat expansions preferentially occur in cells experiencing growth delays. Activation of DNA damage checkpoints in repeat-containing cells could contribute to the tissue degeneration observed in trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases.

  18. Association Between Interleukin 4 Gene Seventy-Base-Pair Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Polymorphism and Uterine Leiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Uterine Leiomyoma (UL is the most common gynecological tumor and a public health problem. Higher serum interleukin 4 (IL-4 level, as an anti-inflammatory cytokine that regulates TH1/TH2 cells balance, has been observed in the uterine cavity. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association between IL4 gene variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR polymorphism and the risk of UL in southeast of Iran. Patients and Methods We compared of 99 patients with UL with that of 102 healthy controls. The IL4 VNTR polymorphism was genotyped by gel electrophoresis after PCR amplification. Results There was no significant association between RP*1/RP*2 and RP*2/RP*2 genotypes and UL; however, a significant association between RP*2/RP*2 genotype and UL was found after adjustment for age (OR, 4; 95% CI, 1.3-12.4; and P = 0.015. The frequency of RP*2 allele was significantly higher in women with UL (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.5; and P = 0.03. Conclusions The IL4 VNTR RP*2/RP*2 genotype could be an age-related risk factor for UL. Moreover, the frequency of RP*2 allele was significantly higher in women with UL.

  19. Characterization of Sporothrix schenckii by random amplification of polymorphic DNA assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓明; 廉翠红; 金礼吉; 安利佳; 杨国玲; 林熙然

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the DNA polymorphism of Sporothrix schenckii (S.schenckii) and to find the relationship between DNA patterns and geographic areas and clinical manifestations. Method The total DNA was extracted with hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide. Random A mplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay was used to study DNA typing of 24 strains of S.schenckii collected from different areas and isolated from di fferent clinical types. Results Of seven random primers used, three primers (OPAA11, OPD18 and OPB07) gave good reactions, the sequences of which were 5'-ACCCGACCTG-3', 5'-GAGAGCCAAC-3', 5 '-GGTGAC~GCAG-3' respectively. The RAPD patterns of the 24 isolates were not completely identical, showing certain degrees of hereditary variability. Differ ent isolates showed a common conserved DNA band with the same primer. Different clinical types showed different genotypes. Conclusion RAPD analysis is useful in DNA typing of S.schenckii, the DNA band type of which is related to geographic origin and Clinical manifestation.

  20. [Mutation in microsatellite repeats of DNA and embryonal death in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, T V; Nazarenko, S A

    2000-07-01

    In the analysis of tetranucleotide DNA repeats inheritance carried out in 55 families with a history of spontaneous miscarriages and normal karyotypes in respect to 21 loci located on seven autosomes, 8 embryos (14.5%) demonstrating 12 cases of the presence of alleles absent in both parents were described. The study of chromosome segregation using other DNA markers permitted highly probable exclusion of false paternity as well as uniparental disomy as the reasons for parent/child allele mismatches. The high probability of paternity together with the presence of a "new" allele at any offspring locus points to the mutation having occurred during game-togenesis in one of the parents. Examination of mutation in spontaneous abortuses revealed an increased number of tandem repeat units at microsatellite loci in three cases and an decreased number of these repeats in six cases. In two abortuses, a third allele absent in both parents, which resulted from a somatic mutation that occurred during embryonic development, was observed. The prevalence of the male germline mutations, revealed during investigation of the mutation origin, was probably associated with an increased number of DNA replication cycles in sperm compared to the oocytes. In spontaneous abortuses, the mean mutation rate of the tetranucleotide repeat complexes analyzed was 9.8 x 10(-3) per locus per gamete per generation. This was about five times higher than the spontaneous mutation rate of these STR loci. It can be suggested that genome instability detected at the level of repeated DNA sequences can involve not only genetically neutral loci but also active genomic regions crucial for embryonic viability. This results in cell death and termination of embryonic development. Our findings indicate that the death of embryos with normal karyotypes in most cases is associated with an increased frequency of germline and somatic microsatellite mutations. The data of the present study also provide a practical tool for

  1. Ginger DNA transposons in eukaryotes and their evolutionary relationships with long terminal repeat retrotransposons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotes, long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons such as Copia, BEL and Gypsy integrate their DNA copies into the host genome using a particular type of DDE transposase called integrase (INT. The Gypsy INT-like transposase is also conserved in the Polinton/Maverick self-synthesizing DNA transposons and in the 'cut and paste' DNA transposons known as TDD-4 and TDD-5. Moreover, it is known that INT is similar to bacterial transposases that belong to the IS3, IS481, IS30 and IS630 families. It has been suggested that LTR retrotransposons evolved from a non-LTR retrotransposon fused with a DNA transposon in early eukaryotes. In this paper we analyze a diverse superfamily of eukaryotic cut and paste DNA transposons coding for INT-like transposase and discuss their evolutionary relationship to LTR retrotransposons. Results A new diverse eukaryotic superfamily of DNA transposons, named Ginger (for 'Gypsy INteGrasE Related' DNA transposons is defined and analyzed. Analogously to the IS3 and IS481 bacterial transposons, the Ginger termini resemble those of the Gypsy LTR retrotransposons. Currently, Ginger transposons can be divided into two distinct groups named Ginger1 and Ginger2/Tdd. Elements from the Ginger1 group are characterized by approximately 40 to 270 base pair (bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs, and are flanked by CCGG-specific or CCGT-specific target site duplication (TSD sequences. The Ginger1-encoded transposases contain an approximate 400 amino acid N-terminal portion sharing high amino acid identity to the entire Gypsy-encoded integrases, including the YPYY motif, zinc finger, DDE domain, and, importantly, the GPY/F motif, a hallmark of Gypsy and endogenous retrovirus (ERV integrases. Ginger1 transposases also contain additional C-terminal domains: ovarian tumor (OTU-like protease domain or Ulp1 protease domain. In vertebrate genomes, at least two host genes, which were previously thought to be derived from

  2. Sex Determination from Fragmented and Degenerated DNA by Amplified Product-Length Polymorphism Bidirectional SNP Analysis of Amelogenin and SRY Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Kotoka; Shojo, Hideki; Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Inokuchi, Shota; Adachi, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    Sex determination is important in archeology and anthropology for the study of past societies, cultures, and human activities. Sex determination is also one of the most important components of individual identification in criminal investigations. We developed a new method of sex determination by detecting a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the amelogenin gene using amplified product-length polymorphisms in combination with sex-determining region Y analysis. We particularly focused on the most common types of postmortem DNA damage in ancient and forensic samples: fragmentation and nucleotide modification resulting from deamination. Amplicon size was designed to be less than 60 bp to make the method more useful for analyzing degraded DNA samples. All DNA samples collected from eight Japanese individuals (four male, four female) were evaluated correctly using our method. The detection limit for accurate sex determination was determined to be 20 pg of DNA. We compared our new method with commercial short tandem repeat analysis kits using DNA samples artificially fragmented by ultraviolet irradiation. Our novel method was the most robust for highly fragmented DNA samples. To deal with allelic dropout resulting from deamination, we adopted "bidirectional analysis," which analyzed samples from both sense and antisense strands. This new method was applied to 14 Jomon individuals (3500-year-old bone samples) whose sex had been identified morphologically. We could correctly identify the sex of 11 out of 14 individuals. These results show that our method is reliable for the sex determination of highly degenerated samples.

  3. Patterns of DNA structural polymorphism and their evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, M A; Elgin, S C

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of sites within purified DNA that are highly susceptible to double-stranded cleavage by micrococcal nuclease has been analyzed in the vicinity of over 20 genes from widely separated loci in Drosophila. These genes have uniformly exhibited a distinctive organization of cleavage sites such that at early times of digestion major sites are observed in the spacer regions surrounding the genes, but not within the protein coding regions themselves. Examples examined include Drosophila genes for heat-shock proteins, cytoplasmic actin, ribosomal protein 49, alcohol dehydrogenase, Sgs 4 glue protein, and other developmentally regulated transcripts, a human beta-globin gene, and mouse alpha 3-globin pseudogene. It seems probable that this gene/spacer pattern will be a general one in the genomes of eucaryotes, but not in the genomes of procaryotes, since neither pBR322 nor phage lambda DNA display such a pattern. One observes a nonrandom spacing of strong cleavage sites in Drosophila DNA, with the most frequent intervals being 195 bp and 411 bp. Such a pattern of variation in DNA structure may have evolved to facilitate the packaging of eucaryotic DNA into chromatin.

  4. Genomic relations among 31 species of Mammillaria haworth (Cactaceae) using random amplified polymorphic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattagajasingh, Ilwola; Mukherjee, Arup Kumar; Das, Premananda

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-one species of Mammillaria were selected to study the molecular phylogeny using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. High amount of mucilage (gelling polysaccharides) present in Mammillaria was a major obstacle in isolating good quality genomic DNA. The CTAB (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide) method was modified to obtain good quality genomic DNA. Twenty-two random decamer primers resulted in 621 bands, all of which were polymorphic. The similarity matrix value varied from 0.109 to 0.622 indicating wide variability among the studied species. The dendrogram obtained from the unweighted pair group method using arithmetic averages (UPGMA) analysis revealed that some of the species did not follow the conventional classification. The present work shows the usefulness of RAPD markers for genetic characterization to establish phylogenetic relations among Mammillaria species.

  5. Mutagenic roles of DNA "repair" proteins in antibody diversity and disease-associated trinucleotide repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slean, Meghan M; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Ranum, Laura P; Pearson, Christopher E

    2008-07-01

    While DNA repair proteins are generally thought to maintain the integrity of the whole genome by correctly repairing mutagenic DNA intermediates, there are cases where DNA "repair" proteins are involved in causing mutations instead. For instance, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) require the contribution of various DNA repair proteins, including UNG, MSH2 and MSH6 to mutate certain regions of immunoglobulin genes in order to generate antibodies of increased antigen affinity and altered effector functions. Another instance where "repair" proteins drive mutations is the instability of gene-specific trinucleotide repeats (TNR), the causative mutations of numerous diseases including Fragile X mental retardation syndrome (FRAXA), Huntington's disease (HD), myotonic dystrophy (DM1) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) all of which arise via various modes of pathogenesis. These healthy and deleterious mutations that are induced by repair proteins are distinct from the genome-wide mutations that arise in the absence of repair proteins: they occur at specific loci, are sensitive to cis-elements (sequence context and/or epigenetic marks) and transcription, occur in specific tissues during distinct developmental windows, and are age-dependent. Here we review and compare the mutagenic role of DNA "repair" proteins in the processes of SHM, CSR and TNR instability.

  6. The human [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13 is rich in highly polymorphic (CA)[sub n] repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatt, K.; Lalande, M. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States)); Sinnett, D. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptor [beta]33 (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 (GABRA5) subunit genes have been localized to the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome region of chromosome 15q11-q13. GABRB3, which encompasses 250 kb, is located 100 kb proximal of GABRA5, with the two genes arranged in head-to-head transcriptional orientation. In screening 135 kb of cloned DNA within a 260-kb interval extending from within GABRB3 to the 5[prime] end of GABRA5, 10 new (CA), repeats have been identified. Five of these have been analyzed in detail and found to be highly polymorphic, with the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranging from 0.7 to 0.85 and with heterozygosities of 67 to 94%. In the clones from GABRB3/GABRA5 region, therefore, the frequency of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 is 1 per 27 kb. Previous estimates of the density of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 in the human genome have been approximately 10-fold lower. The GABRB3/GABRA5 region appears, therefore, to be enriched for highly informative (CA)[sub n]. This set of closely spaced, short tandem repeat polymorphisms will be useful in the molecular analyses of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and in high-resolution studies of genetic recombination within this region. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Application of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-11

    Jun 11, 2014 ... Molecular markers are of great interest to plant breeders as a source of genetic information on crops and for use in selecting traits to ..... Biologia. 68:30-40. Degani C, Rowland LJ, Levi A, Hortynski JA, Galletta GJ (1998). DNA.

  8. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in Relation to Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Su

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the DNA repair genes are suspected to be related to the survival of lung cancer patients due to their possible influence on DNA repair capacity (DRC. However, the study results are inconsistent. Methods: A follow-up study of 610 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients was conducted to investigate genetic polymorphisms associated with the DNA repair genes in relation to NSCLC survival; 6 SNPs were genotyped, including XRCC1 (rs25487 G>A, hOGG1 (rs1052133 C>G, MUTYH (rs3219489 G>C, XPA (rs1800975 G>A, ERCC2 (rs1799793 G>A and XRCC3 (rs861539 C>T. Kaplan-Meier survival curve and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were performed. SNP-SNP interaction was also examined using the survival tree analysis. Results: Advanced disease stage and older age at diagnosis were associated with poor prognosis of NSCLC. Patients with the variant ‘G' allele of hOGG1 rs1052133 had poor overall survival compared with those with the homozygous wild ‘CC' genotype, especially in female patients, adenocarcinoma histology, early stage, light smokers and without family history of cancer. For never smoking female lung cancer patients, individuals carrying homozygous variant ‘AA' genotype of XPA had shorter survival time compared to those with wild ‘G' alleles. Furthermore, females carrying homozygous variant XPA and hOGG1 genotypes simultaneously had 2.78-fold increased risk for death. Among all 6 polymorphisms, the homozygous variant ‘AA' of XPA carriers had poor prognosis compared to the carriers of wild ‘G' alleles of XPA together with other base excision repair (BER polymorphisms. Conclusions: Besides disease stage and age, the study found DNA repair gene polymorphisms were associated with lung cancer survival.

  9. Androgen receptor CAG repeats length polymorphism and the risk of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Rajender

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS refers to an inheritable androgen excess disorder characterized by multiple small follicles located at the ovarian periphery. Hyperandrogenism in PCOS, and inverse correlation between androgen receptor (AR CAG numbers and AR function, led us to hypothesize that CAG length variations may affect PCOS risk. METHODS: CAG repeat region of 169 patients recruited following strictly defined Rotterdam (2003 inclusion criteria and that of 175 ethnically similar control samples, were analyzed. We also conducted a meta-analysis on the data taken from published studies, to generate a pooled estimate on 2194 cases and 2242 controls. RESULTS: CAG bi-allelic mean length was between 8.5 and 24.5 (mean = 17.43, SD = 2.43 repeats in the controls and between 11 and 24 (mean = 17.39, SD = 2.29 repeats in the cases, without any significant difference between the two groups. Further, comparison of bi-allelic mean and its frequency distribution in three categories (short, moderate and long alleles did not show any significant difference between controls and various case subgroups. Frequency distribution of bi-allelic mean in two categories (extreme and moderate alleles showed over-representation of extreme sized alleles in the cases with marginally significant value (50.3% vs. 61.5%, χ(2 = 4.41; P = 0.036, which turned insignificant upon applying Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. X-chromosome inactivation analysis showed no significant difference in the inactivation pattern of CAG alleles or in the comparison of weighed bi-allelic mean between cases and controls. Meta-analysis also showed no significant correlation between CAG length and PCOS risk, except a minor over-representation of short CAG alleles in the cases. CONCLUSION: CAG bi-allelic mean length did not differ between controls and cases/case sub-groups nor did the allele distribution. Over-representation of short

  10. Reduction in the structural instability of cloned eukaryotic tandem-repeat DNA by low-temperature culturing of host bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapana, Watcharaporn; Sujiwattanarat, Penporn; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Hirai, Hirohisa; Koga, Akihiko

    2014-10-27

    Summary For accurate analyses of eukaryotic tandem-repeat DNA, it is often required to clone a genomic DNA fragment into a bacterial plasmid. It is, however, a serious problem that tandem-repeat DNA is frequently subjected to structural changes during maintenance or amplification in the host bacteria. Here, we show an example of a clear difference in the instability of tandem-repeat DNA between different culturing temperatures. A fragment of monkey centromeric DNA carried by pUC19 was considerably degraded by culturing bacteria at 37 °C, but the damage was reduced at 25 °C. Thus, culturing temperature is a significant factor for avoiding degradation, in addition to the genotype of the host bacteria.

  11. Recombination-independent recognition of DNA homology for repeat-induced point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, Eugene; Kleckner, Nancy

    2017-06-01

    Numerous cytogenetic observations have shown that homologous chromosomes (or individual chromosomal loci) can engage in specific pairing interactions in the apparent absence of DNA breakage and recombination, suggesting that canonical recombination-mediated mechanisms may not be the only option for sensing DNA/DNA homology. One proposed mechanism for such recombination-independent homology recognition involves direct contacts between intact double-stranded DNA molecules. The strongest in vivo evidence for the existence of such a mechanism is provided by the phenomena of homology-directed DNA modifications in fungi, known as repeat-induced point mutation (RIP, discovered in Neurospora crassa) and methylation-induced premeiotically (MIP, discovered in Ascobolus immersus). In principle, Neurospora RIP can detect the presence of gene-sized DNA duplications irrespectively of their origin, underlying nucleotide sequence, coding capacity or relative, as well as absolute positions in the genome. Once detected, both sequence copies are altered by numerous cytosine-to-thymine (C-to-T) mutations that extend specifically over the duplicated region. We have recently shown that Neurospora RIP does not require MEI-3, the only RecA/Rad51 protein in this organism, consistent with a recombination-independent mechanism. Using an ultra-sensitive assay for RIP mutation, we have defined additional features of this process. We have shown that RIP can detect short islands of homology of only three base-pairs as long as many such islands are arrayed with a periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along a pair of DNA molecules. While the presence of perfect homology is advantageous, it is not required: chromosomal segments with overall sequence identity of only 35-36 % can still be recognized by RIP. Importantly, in order for this process to work efficiently, participating DNA molecules must be able to co-align along their lengths. Based on these findings, we have proposed a model, in which

  12. An integrated genetic linkage map of watermelon and genetic diversity based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) is an important vegetable fruit throughout the world. A high number of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers should provide large coverage of the watermelon genome and high phylogenetic resolution of germplasm acces...

  13. Comprehensive mutation analysis of 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms included in the AmpF lSTR® Yfiler® PCR amplification kit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Goedbloed (Miriam); M. Vermeulen (Mark); R.N. Fang (Rixun); M. Lembring (Maria); A. Wollstein (Andreas); K. Ballantyne (Kaye); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); S. Brauer (Silke); C. Krüger (Carmen); L. Roewer (Lutz); R. Lessig (Rüdiger); R. Ploski (Rafal); T. Dobosz (Tadeusz); J. Henke (Jürgen); M.R. Furtado (Manohar); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) polymorphisms included in the AmpF lSTR® Yfiler® polymerase chain reaction amplification kit have become widely used for forensic and evolutionary applications where a reliable knowledge on mutation properties is necessary for correct data in

  14. Clustering of Beijing genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the Mekong delta in Vietnam on the basis of variable number of tandem repeat versus restriction fragment length polymorphism typing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyen, M.N.; Kremer, K.; Lan, N.T.; Buu, T.N.; Cobelens, F.G.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Haas, P. de; Soolingen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In comparison to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing, variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) typing is easier to perform, faster and yields results in a simple, numerical format. Therefore, this technique has gained recognition as the new international gold standard i

  15. Improving global and regional resolution of male lineage differentiation by simple single-copy Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Vermeulen (Mark); A. Wollstein (Andreas); K. van der Gaag (Kristiaan); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); Y. Xue (Yali); Q. Wang (Qiuju); L. Roewer (Lutz); H. Knoblauch (Hans); C. Tyler-Smith (Chris); P. de Knijff (Peter); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe analyzed 67 short tandem repeat polymorphisms from the non-recombining part of the Y-chromosome (Y-STRs), including 49 rarely studied simple single-copy (ss)Y-STRs and 18 widely used Y-STRs, in 590 males from 51 populations belonging to 8 worldwide regions (HGDP-CEPH panel). Although

  16. Substitutions of short heterologous DNA segments of intragenomic or extragenomic origins produce clustered genomic polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Klaus; Lunnan, Asbjørn; Hülter, Nils;

    2016-01-01

    In a screen for unexplained mutation events we identified a previously unrecognized mechanism generating clustered DNA polymorphisms such as microindels and cumulative SNPs. The mechanism, short-patch double illegitimate recombination (SPDIR), facilitates short single-stranded DNA molecules...... to invade and replace genomic DNA through two joint illegitimate recombination events. SPDIR is controlled by key components of the cellular genome maintenance machinery in the gram-negative bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi. The source DNA is primarily intragenomic but can also be acquired through horizontal...... gene transfer. The DNA replacements are nonreciprocal and locus independent. Bioinformatic approaches reveal occurrence of SPDIR events in the gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae and in the human genome....

  17. DNA polymorphism in Cab locus of tomato induced by tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambisan, P; Chopra, V L; Mohapatra, T

    1992-03-01

    Plants were regenerated from callus induced from leaf disc explants of a tomato F1 hybrid heterozygous for three marker loci anthocyaninless (a), without anthocyanin (aw), and hairless (hl). Regenerants were studied for somaclonal variation at the phenotypic level by scoring for variation in the marker loci, and at the DNA level by probing geomic DNA blots with a chlorophyll a/b binding protein (Cab-3C) cDNA sequence. While no variation was observed at the phenotypic level in over 950 somaclones studied, DNA polymorphism for the Cab locus could be detected in two out of 17 somaclones tested. Tissue culture induced variation at the phenotypic level for specific loci is very low (less than 0.001 for a, aw or hl) but DNA sequence changes are induced at much greater frequency (approximately 0.1 for a multicopy gene family such as Cab).

  18. Intraspecific polymorphism of microsatellite DNA of russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii, Brandt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Malysheva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Determination of the peculiarities of intraspecific genetic polymorphism of Russian sturgeon based on microsatellite DNA markers. Methodology. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR with the detection of results based on capillary electrophoresis was used for the determination of intraspecific polymorphism of microsatellite DNA Russian sturgeon. Findings. On microsatellite DNA markers was investigated genetic polymorphism of Russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii Brandt Black Sea and Dnieper population. It was identified of 56 allelic variants of such DNA-markers investigated as LS-19, LS-68, LS-39, Aox-27, LS-54 and Aox-45. On locus LS-19 allelic variants have been identified, the locus LS-68 was the most polymorphic and consisted of 21 alleles, 11 allelic variants have been identified by the LS-39 locus, and 16 allelic variants have been identified for the LS-54 locus. Aox-27 locus was the least polymorphic microsatellite markers among the study and consisted of 7 allelic variants. For Aox-45 locus 16 allelic variants have been identified. A study of the genetic structure of the Russian Black Sea-Dnieper sturgeon population is not currently been carried out in full and reduced only to the evaluation of the number of identified allelic variants and relative frequency of alleles. Calculations of heterozygosity parameters for Russian sturgeon became complicated definition tetraploid genetic structure of this species on the studied DNA markers. Such studies are an important component in the further work on the conservation of genetic diversity of sturgeon, which will provide an opportunity to carry out the state control over reproduction and preservation of valuable and endangered species under increased anthropogenic impact on natural populations. Originality. For the first time, new data of the peculiarities of the intraspecific genetic polymorphism of Russian sturgeon was obtained using species-specific microsatellite DNA markers

  19. DNA methylation and triplet repeat stability: New proposals addressing actual questions on the CGG repeat of fragile X syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehrle, D.; Schwemmle, S.; Steinbach, P. [Univ. of Ulm (Germany)

    1996-08-09

    Methylation of expanded CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene may well have different consequences. One is that methylation, extending into upstream regulatory elements, could lead to gene inactivation. Another effect of methylation, which we have obtained evidence for, could be stabilization of the repeat sequence and even prevention of premutations from expansion to full mutation. The full mutation of the fragile X syndrome probably occurs in an early transitional stage of embryonic development. The substrate is a maternally inherited premutation. The product usually is a mosaic pattern of full mutations detectable in early fetal life. These full mutation patterns are mitotically stable as, for instance, different somatic tissues of full mutation fetuses show identical mutation patterns. This raised the following questions: What triggers repeat expansion in that particular stage of development and what causes subsequent mitotic stability of expanded repeats? 21 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Relationships among androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in Han adult men from China: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Yan-Min Ma; Kai-Jie Wu; Liang Ning; Jin Zeng; Bo Kou; Hong-Jun Xie; Zhen-Kun Ma; Xin-Yang Wang; Yong-Guang Gong; Da-Lin He

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlations among androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in healthy Chinese young adult men. Two hundred and fifty-three healthy men (aged 22.8 ± 3.1 years) were enrolled. The individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAG S ) if they harbored repeat length of ≤20 or as CAG long (CAG L ) if their CAG repeat length was >20. Body height/weight, penile length and other parameters were examined and recorded by the specified ...

  1. Obesity-induced sperm DNA methylation changes at satellite repeats are reprogrammed in rat offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil A Youngson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is now strong evidence that the paternal contribution to offspring phenotype at fertilisation is more than just DNA. However, the identity and mechanisms of this nongenetic inheritance are poorly understood. One of the more important questions in this research area is: do changes in sperm DNA methylation have phenotypic consequences for offspring? We have previously reported that offspring of obese male rats have altered glucose metabolism compared with controls and that this effect was inherited through nongenetic means. Here, we describe investigations into sperm DNA methylation in a new cohort using the same protocol. Male rats on a high-fat diet were 30% heavier than control-fed males at the time of mating (16-19 weeks old, n = 14/14. A small (0.25% increase in total 5-methyl-2Ͳ-deoxycytidine was detected in obese rat spermatozoa by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Examination of the repetitive fraction of the genome with methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing (MBD-Seq and pyrosequencing revealed that retrotransposon DNA methylation states in spermatozoa were not affected by obesity, but methylation at satellite repeats throughout the genome was increased. However, examination of muscle, liver, and spermatozoa from male 27-week-old offspring from obese and control fathers (both groups from n = 8 fathers revealed that normal DNA methylation levels were restored during offspring development. Furthermore, no changes were found in three genomic imprints in obese rat spermatozoa. Our findings have implications for transgenerational epigenetic reprogramming. They suggest that postfertilization mechanisms exist for normalising some environmentally-induced DNA methylation changes in sperm cells.

  2. Polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XRCC3 in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Márcia Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In several DNA repair genes, polymorphisms may result in reduced repair capacity, which has been implicated as a risk factor for various types of cancer. The frequency of the polymorphic alleles varies among populations, suggesting an ethnic distribution of genotypes. We genotyped 300 healthy Southeastern Brazilian individuals (262 of European ancestry and 38 of African ancestry for polymorphisms of codons 194 and 399 of the XRCC1 base excision repair pathway gene and of codon 241 of the XRCC3 homologous recombination repair pathway gene. The allele frequencies were 0.07 for the Arg194Trp and 0.33 for the Arg399Gln codons of the XRCC1 gene and 0.35 for the Thr241Met codon of the XRCC3 gene. The genotypic frequencies were within Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These frequencies showed ethnic variability when compared with those obtained for different populations from several countries.

  3. Optimization of random amplified polymorphic DNA techniques for use in genetic studies of Cuban Triatominae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Jorge; Rodriguez, Jinnay; Fuentes, Omar; Fernandez-Calienes, Aymé; Castex, Mayda

    2005-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique is a simple and reliable method to detect DNA polymorphism. Several factors can affect the amplification profiles, thereby causing false bands and non-reproducibility of assay. In this study, we analyzed the effect of changing the concentration of primer, magnesium chloride, template DNA and Taq DNA polymerase with the objective of determining their optimum concentration for the standardization of RAPD technique for genetic studies of Cuban Triatominae. Reproducible amplification patterns were obtained using 5 pmoL of primer, 2.5 mM of MgCl2, 25 ng of template DNA and 2 U of Taq DNA polymerase in 25 microL of the reaction. A panel of five random primers was used to evaluate the genetic variability of T. flavida. Three of these (OPA-1, OPA-2 and OPA-4) generated reproducible and distinguishable fingerprinting patterns of Triatominae. Numerical analysis of 52 RAPD amplified bands generated for all five primers was carried out with unweighted pair group method analysis (UPGMA). Jaccard's Similarity Coefficient data were used to construct a dendrogram. Two groups could be distinguished by RAPD data and these groups coincided with geographic origin, i.e. the populations captured in areas from east and west of Guanahacabibes, Pinar del Río. T. flavida present low interpopulation variability that could result in greater susceptibility to pesticides in control programs. The RAPD protocol and the selected primers are useful for molecular characterization of Cuban Triatominae.

  4. A Conserved DNA Repeat Promotes Selection of a Diverse Repertoire of Trypanosoma brucei Surface Antigens from the Genomic Archive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galadriel Hovel-Miner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are mammalian pathogens that must regularly change their protein coat to survive in the host bloodstream. Chronic trypanosome infections are potentiated by their ability to access a deep genomic repertoire of Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG genes and switch from the expression of one VSG to another. Switching VSG expression is largely based in DNA recombination events that result in chromosome translocations between an acceptor site, which houses the actively transcribed VSG, and a donor gene, drawn from an archive of more than 2,000 silent VSGs. One element implicated in these duplicative gene conversion events is a DNA repeat of approximately 70 bp that is found in long regions within each BES and short iterations proximal to VSGs within the silent archive. Early observations showing that 70-bp repeats can be recombination boundaries during VSG switching led to the prediction that VSG-proximal 70-bp repeats provide recombinatorial homology. Yet, this long held assumption had not been tested and no specific function for the conserved 70-bp repeats had been demonstrated. In the present study, the 70-bp repeats were genetically manipulated under conditions that induce gene conversion. In this manner, we demonstrated that 70-bp repeats promote access to archival VSGs. Synthetic repeat DNA sequences were then employed to identify the length, sequence, and directionality of repeat regions required for this activity. In addition, manipulation of the 70-bp repeats allowed us to observe a link between VSG switching and the cell cycle that had not been appreciated. Together these data provide definitive support for the long-standing hypothesis that 70-bp repeats provide recombinatorial homology during switching. Yet, the fact that silent archival VSGs are selected under these conditions suggests the 70-bp repeats also direct DNA pairing and recombination machinery away from the closest homologs (silent BESs and toward the rest of

  5. Association of the D repeat polymorphism in the ASPN gene with developmental dysplasia of the hip: a case-control study in Han Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common skeletal disease, which is characterized by abnormal seating of the femoral head in the acetabulum. Genetic factors play a considerable role in the etiology of DDH. Asporin (ASPN) is an ECM protein which can bind to TGF-β1 and sequentially inhibit TGF-β/Smad signaling. A functional aspartic acid (D) repeat polymorphism of ASPN was first described as an osteoarthritis-associated polymorphism. As TGF-β is well known as an important regulator in the development of skeletal components, ASPN may also be involved in the etiology of DDH. Our objective is to evaluate whether the D repeat polymorphism of ASPN is associated with DDH in Han Chinese. Methods The D repeat polymorphism was genotyped in 370 DDH patients and 445 control subjects, and the allelic association of the D repeat was examined. Results From D11 to D18, eight alleles were identified. D13 allele is the most common allele both in control and DDH groups, the frequencies are 67.3% and 58.1% respectively. In the DDH group, a significantly higher frequency of the D14 allele and significantly lower frequency of D13 was observed. The association of D14 and D13 was found in both females and males after stratification by gender. There was no significant difference in any other alleles we examined. Conclusions Our results show an obvious association between the D repeat polymorphism of ASPN and DDH. It indicates that ASPN is an important regulator in the etiology of DDH. PMID:21329514

  6. Association between monoamine oxidase A gene promoter 30 bp repeat polymorphism and tardive dyskinesia in Chinese schizophrenics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changhe Fan; Lihua Li; Yan Fu; Hehuang Deng; Xiangjiao Liao; Youcai Zhou

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathophysiology of tardive dyskinesia (TD) is not yet fully understood. With the hypothesis of altered dopaminergic neurotransmission, altered activities of dopamine degrading enzymes such as monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and their coding genes are supposed to be related to the pathophysiology of TD.OBJECTIVE: To investigate possible association between 30 bp variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the promoter of MAOA gene and susceptibility, severity of neuroleptic induced TD in Chinese Han people in Guandong Province.DESIGN: Non-randomization-synchronization controlled study. SETTING: Guangdong Mental Health Institute, Guangdong Provincial People's Hospital; Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital; Affiliated Psychiatric Hospital of Guangzhou Municipal Bureau of Civil Administration. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 179 subjects were enrolled in the study. All subjects were sporadic and genetically unrelated Chinese schizophrenic patients who were hospitalizing in Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital or Affiliated Psychiatric Hospital of Guangzhou Municipal Bureau of Civil Administration during January to April 2005. The diagnosis of schizophrenia was made according to the criteria of Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorder-the third edition-revised (DSM-Ⅲ-R). Among all patients, 88 were diagnosed as with TD and 91 without TD according to the research diagnostic criteria described by Schooler-Kane. Informed consent was obtained from all subjects or their relatives.METHODS: ① TD severity was assessed with the AIMS which was a 5-degree rating scale from 0 to 4 (corresponding to none, minimal, mild, moderate and severe, respectively). The study was approved by the Ethics Committees of the two hospitals and informed consent was obtained from all subjects or their relatives. ② The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) techniques were used to detect MAOA gene 30 bp VNTR polymorphism in schizophrenic patients

  7. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  8. DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

    2006-01-01

    We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

  9. PCR typing of DNA fragments of the short tandem repeat (STR) system HUMTH01 in Danes and Greenland Eskimos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, L J; Møller, A; Morling, N

    1994-01-01

    DNA from the short tandem repeat (STR) system HUMTH01 was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analyzed by vertical electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels followed by silver staining. DNA samples from 100 unrelated Danes, 147 unrelated Greenland Eskimos, and 89 Danish mother/child...

  10. Variation in CAG and GGN repeat lengths and CAG/GGN haplotype in androgen receptor gene polymorphism and prostate carcinoma in Nigerians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinloye, O; Gromoll, J; Simoni, M

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer has become the most common cancer in Nigerian men. The growth of the prostate gland depends on circulating androgens and intracellular steroid signalling pathways. The effects of androgens are mediated through the androgen receptor (AR), a nuclear transcription factor encoded by the AR gene. The common polymorphisms, CAG and GGN repeats, in exon 1 of this gene have been implicated as possible risk factors. Thus far, existing supporting data are scanty and none are from sub-Saharan African populations. Therefore, this study investigates the possible association between AR polymorphism repeat length (CAG and GGN) and prostate cancer in Nigerians. A total of 261 subjects (70 with prostate cancer, 68 with benign prostate hyperplasia [BPH], 123 age-matched apparently normal subjects as controls) were studied. CAG and GGN repeats length were determined by fragment length analysis using GeneScan. The CAG repeat length in prostate cancer and in BPH compared to the controls was significantly different (P CAG repeats showing a significant odds ratio (OR) in both cases. However, this was not observed in GGN repeat length, which showed no significant difference between cases and controls (P > 0.05). CAG and GGN haplotype variation showed no significant difference between cases and controls (P > 0.05), except that the haplotypes CAG > or =21 and GGN CAG repeat length is a risk factor for prostate cancer, and also suggests an association with BPH.

  11. Polymorphism Profile of Nine Short Tandem Repeat Loci in the Han Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuangding Li; Chunxia Yan; Yajun Deng; Ruilin Wang; Jian Wang; Huanming Yang; Shengbin Li

    2003-01-01

    Nine short tandem repeat (STR) markers (D3S1358, VWA, FGA, THO1, TPOX,CSFIPO, D5S818, D13S317, and D7S820) and a sex-identification marker (Amel-ogenin locus) were amplified with multiplex PCR and were genotyped with afour-color fluorescence method in samples from 174 unrelated Han individuals inNorth China. The allele frequencies, genotype frequencies, heterozygosity, prob-ability of discrimination powers, probability of paternity exclusion and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations were determined. The results demonstratedthat the genotypes at all these STR loci in Han population conform to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations. The combined discrimination power (DP) was1.05 × 10-10 within nine STR loci analyzed and the probability of paternity exclusion(EPP) was 0.9998. The results indicate that these nine STR loci and the Amelo-genin locus are useful markers for human identification, paternity and maternitytesting and sex determination in forensic sciences.

  12. Prion octapeptide-repeat polymorphism in Polish Black-and-White cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walawski, Krzysztof; Czarnik, Urszula

    2003-01-01

    The study was carried out in a Polish Black-and-White cattle population, represented by 167 AI sires, 200 young tested bulls, 190 bull-dams, and 606 randomly chosen cows from commercial herds. The fragment of the bovine prion protein gene (PRNP) coding the octapeptide-repeat sequence, was identified by PCR analysis. Two different gene variants of 349 bp and 373 bp in size, produced three genotypes: PRNP 6/6, PRNP 6/5 and PRNP 5/5, respectively. Allele frequency in all examined populations, on average 0.894 for PRNP 6 and 0.106 for PRNP 5, shows a significant difference between the group of cows from commercial herds, characterised by high frequency of PRNP 5 (q = 0.137) in comparison to AI sires (q = 0.077), young tested bulls (q = 0.052) and bull-dams (q = 0.084). Moreover, both analysed female groups of bull-dams and cows from commercial herds are distinguished by the presence of PRNP 5/5 homozygous animals, which were not recorded in the AI sires and young tested bulls, and had never been recognised in earlier examined Holstein-Friesian populations. Analysis of the genetic equilibrium indicates a very high conformity between observed and expected number of animals in the separate PRNP genotype groups. However, some tendency of difference is observed in highly selected cows, qualified as bull-dams on the basis of very high level of milk performance traits.

  13. A simplified method for screening siblings for HLA identity using short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jennifer J; Hopp, Kathleen A; Pietz, Bradley C; Bick, David P; Lau, Eduardo C; Ellis, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    Identifying an HLA-matched sibling donor for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is time-consuming and expensive, and often limited by reimbursement caps imposed by insurance providers. To improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening for HLA-matched siblings, we developed an assay for determining HLA identity using a panel of nine informative short tandem repeat (STR) loci located throughout the HLA complex. The STR panel was assessed for accuracy in identifying HLA-matched siblings in 88 family workups comprising a total of 132 related donor and recipient typing comparisons. All sibling pairs with identical STR alleles were also HLA identical. Of the 48 pairs mismatched at one or more STR alleles, all were genotypically HLA non-identical at one or more loci. The sensitivity and specificity of STR analysis for identifying HLA-matched siblings were 91% and 100%, respectively. Three false negatives occurred due to an STR mutation or possible HLA-DPB1/DQB1 recombination. Additionally, STR genotyping provided additional information allowing determination of the extent of HLA identity in families where HLA haplotype inheritance was ambiguous, due to extensive homozygosity or shared parental haplotypes. The HLA STR assay is a reliable and rapid test that can be used to inexpensively screen potential sibling donors for HLA identity.

  14. DNA-labelled cytidine assay for the quantification of CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bello, Dannelys; Xu, Z H; Higginson-Clarke, David; Rojas, Ana María Riverón; Le, Weidong; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine

    2008-03-30

    The sequencing procedure has been used to determine the size of the CAG repeat expansion for the diagnosis of genetic disorders. Likewise, standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis techniques are applied for screening large number of patients. The trinucleotide repeats (TNR) region amplification by means of the PCR procedure was initially performed using 32-P end-labelled primers and currently carried out with fluorescently end-labelled primers. The goal to obtain reliable TNR quantification assays, at low cost and short assay times, represents a challenge for the molecular diagnosis aimed at massive screening of affected populations. In the current work, we obtained preliminary results of a new methodology for the detection and size estimation of CAG expanded alleles. The assay was based on an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantifying the amount of labelled cytidines in DNA molecules. The label, 6-(p-bromobenzamido)caproyl radical, was introduced by the transamination and acylation reactions. A group of model sequences containing different numbers of CAG repeats, as well as the ATXN3 (ataxin 3) gene (from subjects suffering type 3 spinocerebellar ataxia SCA3) were used for assay standardization. The assay is simple, inexpensive, and easy to perform and differentiates distinct degrees of CAG expansions.

  15. Exploration of methods to identify polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair capacity phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Xi, T; Mohrenweiser, H W; Nelson, D O

    2006-07-03

    Elucidating the relationship between polymorphic sequences and risk of common disease is a challenge. For example, although it is clear that variation in DNA repair genes is associated with familial cancer, aging and neurological disease, progress toward identifying polymorphisms associated with elevated risk of sporadic disease has been slow. This is partly due to the complexity of the genetic variation, the existence of large numbers of mostly low frequency variants and the contribution of many genes to variation in susceptibility. There has been limited development of methods to find associations between genotypes having many polymorphisms and pathway function or health outcome. We have explored several statistical methods for identifying polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair phenotypes. The model system used was 80 cell lines that had been resequenced to identify variation; 191 single nucleotide substitution polymorphisms (SNPs) are included, of which 172 are in 31 base excision repair pathway genes, 19 in 5 anti-oxidation genes, and DNA repair phenotypes based on single strand breaks measured by the alkaline Comet assay. Univariate analyses were of limited value in identifying SNPs associated with phenotype variation. Of the multivariable model selection methods tested: the easiest that provided reduced error of prediction of phenotype was simple counting of the variant alleles predicted to encode proteins with reduced activity, which led to a genotype including 52 SNPs; the best and most parsimonious model was achieved using a two-step analysis without regard to potential functional relevance: first SNPs were ranked by importance determined by Random Forests Regression (RFR), followed by cross-validation in a second round of RFR modeling that included ever more SNPs in declining order of importance. With this approach 6 SNPs were found to minimize prediction error. The results should encourage research into utilization of multivariate

  16. Comparative typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by random amplification of polymorphic DNA or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of DNA macrorestriction fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Renders (Nicole); Y. Romling; A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractEighty-seven strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were typed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of macrorestriction fragments. Stains were clustered on the basis of interpretative criteria as presented

  17. Comparative typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by random amplification of polymorphic DNA or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of DNA macrorestriction fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Renders (Nicole); Y. Romling; A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractEighty-seven strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were typed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of macrorestriction fragments. Stains were clustered on the basis of interpretative criteria as presented

  18. Analysis of the trinucleotide CAG repeat from the human mitochondrial DNA polymerase gene in healthy and diseased individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovio, A; Tiranti, V; Bednarz, A L; Suomalainen, A; Spelbrink, J N; Lecrenier, N; Melberg, A; Zeviani, M; Poulton, J; Foury, F; Jacobs, H T

    1999-01-01

    The human nuclear gene (POLG) for the catalytic subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma) contains a trinucleotide CAG microsatellite repeat within the coding sequence. We have investigated the frequency of different repeat-length alleles in populations of diseased and healthy individuals. The predominant allele of 10 CAG repeats was found at a very similar frequency (approximately 88%) in both Finnish and ethnically mixed population samples, with homozygosity close to the equilibrium prediction. Other alleles of between 5 and 13 repeat units were detected, but no larger, expanded alleles were found. A series of 51 British myotonic dystrophy patients showed no significant variation from controls, indicating an absence of generalised CAG repeat instability. Patients with a variety of molecular lesions in mtDNA, including sporadic, clonal deletions, maternally inherited point mutations, autosomally transmitted mtDNA depletion and autosomal dominant multiple deletions showed no differences in POLG trinucleotide repeat-length distribution from controls. These findings rule out POLG repeat expansion as a common pathogenic mechanism in disorders characterised by mitochondrial genome instability.

  19. Forecast of the Heterosis of Imported Meat Sheep by Genetic Polymorphism of Microsatellite DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying-jie; LIU Yue-qin; SUN Hong-xin; SUN Shao-hua; LI Yu

    2007-01-01

    Forecast of the heterosis of Small Tail Han sheep crossed with imported meat sheep by genetic polymorphism of microsatellite DNA was done in different sheep breeds. The gene frequency, the polymorphism information contents, the number of effective alleles, the heterozygosity, and the genetic distances were studied in four imported meat sheep and Small Tail Han sheep using five microsatellite loci. The crossing effects on the Small Tail Han sheep with four imported meat sheep were tested. The results indicate that there are genetic polymorphisms at five microsatellite loci in five sheep breeds. Five microsatellite loci can be used for genetic diversity evaluation in sheep breeds. The genetic variability of Dorset is the highest, and that of the Small Tail Han sheep is the lowest in the five sheep breeds. The order of heterosis from large to small in four imported meat sheep by the analysis of genetic relationship is White-Suffolk, Black-Suffolk,Dorset, and Texel. This accords with the testing results of actual heterosis. It is feasible to forecast the heterosis of Small Tail Han sheep crossed with imported meat sheep by genetic polymorphism of microsatellite DNA, which will have an important value for sheep breeding in the future.

  20. Development of Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Based SCAR Marker for Identification of Ipomoea mauritiana Jacq (Convolvulaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiranda Devaiah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vidari is an Ayurvedic herbal drug used as aphrodisiac, galactagogue and is also used in the preparation of Chyavanaprash. Tubers of Ipomoea mauritiana Jacq. (Convolvulaceae, Pueraria tuberosa (Roxb. ex Willd. DC (Fabaceae, Adenia hondala (Gaertn. de Wilde (Passifloraceae and pith of Cycas circinalis L. (Cycadaceae are all traded in the name of Vidari, creating issues of botanical authenticity of the Ayurvedic raw drug. DNA-based markers have been developed to distinguish I. mauritiana from the other Vidari candidates. A putative 600-bp polymorphic sequence, specific to I. mauritiana was identified using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD technique. Furthermore, sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR primers (IM1F and IM1R were designed from the unique RAPD amplicon. The SCAR primers produced a specific 323-bp amplicon in authentic I. mauritiana and not in the allied species.

  1. Random amplified polymorphic DNA and amplified fragment length polymorphism assessment of genetic variation in Nicaraguan populations of Pinus oocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, V; Muñiz, L M; Ferrer, E

    2001-11-01

    Pinus oocarpa is the most widely distributed pine species of Mexico and Central America. The natural populations of Nicaragua have been affected by extensive human activities. As a consequence, their size has been reduced, and there is a serious threat to the development of mature woodland. Knowledge of population structures and the genetic diversity of the species is required for the design of sustainable use and conservation strategies. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to assess the genetic variation among 10 populations from three geographical regions of Nicaragua. Both markers revealed high levels of diversity in these populations. G(ST) values and analyses of molecular variance (AMOVA) found that most variation was within populations but there is still a significant differentiation between populations indicating that the populations sampled cannot be considered a single panmictic unit. The partitions created by AMOVA also showed that there was little differentiation between populations of different regions, although cluster analyses based on RAPDs and AFLPs indicated a closer relationship among most of the populations from a same geographical region. Management of P. oocarpa in Nicaragua should be aimed to maintain the high degree of genetic variation within individual populations that is still observed even in some of these highly degraded populations.

  2. Genotyping of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in DNA Isolated from Serum Using Sequenom MassARRAY Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess V Clendenen

    Full Text Available Large epidemiologic studies have the potential to make valuable contributions to the assessment of gene-environment interactions because they prospectively collected detailed exposure data. Some of these studies, however, have only serum or plasma samples as a low quantity source of DNA.We examined whether DNA isolated from serum can be used to reliably and accurately genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs using Sequenom multiplex SNP genotyping technology. We genotyped 81 SNPs using samples from 158 participants in the NYU Women's Health Study. Each participant had DNA from serum and at least one paired DNA sample isolated from a high quality source of DNA, i.e. clots and/or cell precipitates, for comparison.We observed that 60 of the 81 SNPs (74% had high call frequencies (≥95% using DNA from serum, only slightly lower than the 85% of SNPs with high call frequencies in DNA from clots or cell precipitates. Of the 57 SNPs with high call frequencies for serum, clot, and cell precipitate DNA, 54 (95% had highly concordant (>98% genotype calls across all three sample types. High purity was not a critical factor to successful genotyping.Our results suggest that this multiplex SNP genotyping method can be used reliably on DNA from serum in large-scale epidemiologic studies.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism A4917G is independently associated with age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Canter

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine if MTND2*LHON4917G (4917G, a specific non-synonymous polymorphism in the mitochondrial genome previously associated with neurodegenerative phenotypes, is associated with increased risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD. A preliminary study of 393 individuals (293 cases and 100 controls ascertained at Vanderbilt revealed an increased occurrence of 4917G in cases compared to controls (15.4% vs.9.0%, p = 0.11. Since there was a significant age difference between cases and controls in this initial analysis, we extended the study by selecting Caucasian pairs matched at the exact age at examination. From the 1547 individuals in the Vanderbilt/Duke AMD population association study (including 157 in the preliminary study, we were able to match 560 (280 cases and 280 unaffected on exact age at examination. This study population was genotyped for 4917G plus specific AMD-associated nuclear genome polymorphisms in CFH, LOC387715 and ApoE. Following adjustment for the listed nuclear genome polymorphisms, 4917G independently predicts the presence of AMD (OR = 2.16, 95%CI 1.20-3.91, p = 0.01. In conclusion, a specific mitochondrial polymorphism previously implicated in other neurodegenerative phenotypes (4917G appears to convey risk for AMD independent of recently discovered nuclear DNA polymorphisms.

  4. Formation of functional CENP-B boxes at diverse locations in repeat units of centromeric DNA in New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugou, Kazuto; Hirai, Hirohisa; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Koga, Akihiko

    2016-06-13

    Centromere protein B, which is involved in centromere formation, binds to centromeric repetitive DNA by recognizing a nucleotide motif called the CENP-B box. Humans have large numbers of CENP-B boxes in the centromeric repetitive DNA of their autosomes and X chromosome. The current understanding is that these CENP-B boxes are located at identical positions in the repeat units of centromeric DNA. Great apes also have CENP-B boxes in locations that are identical to humans. The purpose of the present study was to examine the location of CENP-B box in New World monkeys. We recently identified CENP-B box in one species of New World monkeys (marmosets). In this study, we found functional CENP-B boxes in CENP-A-assembled repeat units of centromeric DNA in 2 additional New World monkeys (squirrel monkeys and tamarins) by immunostaining and ChIP-qPCR analyses. The locations of the 3 CENP-B boxes in the repeat units differed from one another. The repeat unit size of centromeric DNA of New World monkeys (340-350 bp) is approximately twice that of humans and great apes (171 bp). This might be, associated with higher-order repeat structures of centromeric DNA, a factor for the observed variation in the CENP-B box location in New World monkeys.

  5. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of DNA extracted from Trichuris trichiura (Linnaeus, 1771) eggs and its prospective application to paleoparasitological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Elaine Machado; Correia, Jorge Antonio Santos; Villela, Erika Verissimo; Duarte, Antonio Nascimento; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2003-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was applied to DNAs extracted from Trichuris trichiura eggs recovered from human fecal samples. Four out of 6 primers tested displayed 18 distinct and well defined polymorphic patterns, ranging from 650 to 3200 base pairs. These results, upon retrieval and DNA sequencing of some of these bands from agarose gels, might help in establishing. T. trichiura specific genetic markers, not available yet, and an important step to design primers to be used in molecular diagnosis approaches.

  6. A graphical simulation model of the entire DNA process associated with the analysis of short tandem repeat loci

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Peter; Curran, James; Elliot, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The use of expert systems to interpret short tandem repeat DNA profiles in forensic, medical and ancient DNA applications is becoming increasingly prevalent as high-throughput analytical systems generate large amounts of data that are time-consuming to process. With special reference to low copy number (LCN) applications, we use a graphical model to simulate stochastic variation associated with the entire DNA process starting with extraction of sample, followed by the processing associated wi...

  7. Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA of Trichoderma isolates and antagonism against Rhizoctonia solani

    OpenAIRE

    Larissa Brandão Góes; Ana Bolena Lima da Costa; Laurineide Lopes de Carvalho Freire; Neiva Tinti de Oliveira

    2002-01-01

    Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) procedure was used to examine the genetic variability among fourteen isolates of Trichoderma and their ability to antagonize Rhizoctonia solani using a dual-culture assay for correlation among RAPD products and their hardness to R. solani. Seven oligodeoxynucleotide primers were selected for the RAPD assays which resulted in 197 bands for 14 isolates of Trichoderma. The data were entered into a binary matrix and a similarity matrix was constructed using...

  8. A highly polymorphic locus in human DNA revealed by cosmid-derived probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Litt, M.; White, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Human gene mapping would be greatly facilitated if marker loci with sufficient heterozygosity were generally available. As a source of such markers, we have used cosmids from a human genomic library. We have developed a rapid method for screening random cosmids to identify those that are homologous to genomic regions especially rich in restriction fragment length polymorphisms. This method allows whole cosmids to be used as probes against Southern transfers of genomic DNA; regions of cosmid p...

  9. Polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers for the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pause, K.C.; Nourisson, C.; Clark, A.; Kellogg, M.E.; Bonde, R.K.; McGuire, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are marine mammals that inhabit the coastal waters and rivers of the southeastern USA, primarily Florida. Previous studies have shown that Florida manatees have low mitochondrial DNA variability, suggesting that nuclear DNA loci are necessary for discriminatory analyses. Here we report 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci with an average of 4.2 alleles per locus, and average heterozygosity of 50.1%. These loci have been developed for use in population studies, parentage assignment, and individual identification. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Use of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis for Economically Important Food Crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Halima Hassan Salem; Bahy Ahmed Ali; Tian-Hua Huang; Da-Nian Qin; Xiao-Mei Wang; Qing-Dong Xie

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize numerous studies on the use of the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique on rice, corn, wheat, sorghum, barley, rye, and oats to examine its feasibility and validity for assessment of genetic variation, population genetics, mapping, linkage and marker assisted selection, phylogenetic analysis, and the detection of somaclonal variation.Also we discuss the advantages and limitations of RAPD.Molecular markers have entered the scene of genetic improvement in different fields of agricultural research.The simplicity of the RAPD technique made it ideal for genetic mapping, plant and animal breeding programs, and DNA fingerprinting, with particular utility in the field of population genetics.

  11. The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT val158met polymorphism affects brain responses to repeated painful stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco L Loggia

    Full Text Available Despite the explosion of interest in the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in pain sensitivity, conflicting findings have emerged for most of the identified "pain genes". Perhaps the prime example of this inconsistency is represented by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, as its substantial association to pain sensitivity has been reported in various studies, but rejected in several others. In line with findings from behavioral studies, we hypothesized that the effect of COMT on pain processing would become apparent only when the pain system was adequately challenged (i.e., after repeated pain stimulation. In the present study, we used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to investigate the brain response to heat pain stimuli in 54 subjects genotyped for the common COMT val158met polymorphism (val/val = n 22, val/met = n 20, met/met = n 12. Met/met subjects exhibited stronger pain-related fMRI signals than val/val in several brain structures, including the periaqueductal gray matter, lingual gyrus, cerebellum, hippocampal formation and precuneus. These effects were observed only for high intensity pain stimuli after repeated administration. In spite of our relatively small sample size, our results suggest that COMT appears to affect pain processing. Our data demonstrate that the effect of COMT on pain processing can be detected in presence of 1 a sufficiently robust challenge to the pain system to detect a genotype effect, and/or 2 the recruitment of pain-dampening compensatory mechanisms by the putatively more pain sensitive met homozygotes. These findings may help explain the inconsistencies in reported findings of the impact of COMT in pain regulation.

  12. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes and MDR1 and the Risk for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Nam Kim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The damage caused by oxidative stress and exposure to cigarette smoke and alcohol necessitate DNA damage repair and transport by multidrug resistance-1 (MDR1. To explore the association between polymorphisms in these genes and non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk, we analyzed 15 polymorphisms of 12 genes in a population-based study in Korea (694 cases and 1700 controls. Four genotypes of DNA repair pathway genes (XRCC1 399 GA, OGG1 326 GG, BRCA1 871 TT, and WRN 787 TT were associated with a decreased risk for NHL [odds ratio (ORXRCC1 GA = 0.80, p = 0.02; OROGG1 GG = 0.70, p = 0.008; ORBRCA1 TT = 0.71, p = 0.048; ORWRN TT = 0.68, p = 0.01]. Conversely, the MGMT 115 CT genotype was associated with an increased risk for NHL (OR = 1.25, p = 0.04. In the MDR1 gene, the 1236 CC genotype was associated with a decreased risk for NHL (OR = 0.74, p = 0.04, and the 3435 CT and TT genotypes were associated with an increased risk (OR3435CT = 1.50, p < 0.0001; OR3435TT = 1.43, p = 0.02. These results suggest that polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes XRCC1, OGG1, BRCA1, WRN1, and MGMT and in the MDR1 gene may affect the risk for NHL in Korean patients.

  13. Characterization of the human HOX 7 cDNA and identification of polymorphic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padanilam, B J; Stadler, H S; Mills, K A; McLeod, L B; Solursh, M; Lee, B; Ramirez, F; Buetow, K H; Murray, J C

    1992-09-01

    cDNA clones for a human HOX 7 gene obtained with homologous clones of Drosophila were used in human gene mapping studies. The human cDNA clone was isolated from a library constructed from human embryonic craniofacial material. The sequence of the cDNA demonstrates significant homology with mouse HOX 7. A search for RFLPs identified MboII and BstEII variants. A CA dinucleotide repeat with 5 alleles was also identified and allowed placement of HOX 7 into a defined linkage map. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium was found with markers tested. These results place the human HOX 7 gene in a defined position on 4p.

  14. Paternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA in the sheep (Ovine aries)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Xingbo; Chu, Mingxing; Li, Ning; Wu, Changxin

    2001-01-01

    Paternal inheritance of mitochondria DNA in sheep was discovered by examination of 152 sheep from 38 hybrid families for mtDNA D-loop polymorphisms using PCR-RFLP, amplification of repeated sequence...

  15. Role of androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism and X-inactivation in the manifestation of recurrent spontaneous abortions in Indian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meka Aruna

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of CAG repeat polymorphism and X-chromosome Inactivation (XCI pattern in Recurrent Spontaneous Abortions among Indian women which has not been hitherto explored. 117 RSA cases and 224 Controls were included in the study. Cases were recruited from two different hospitals--Lakshmi Fertility Clinic, Nellore and Fernandez Maternity Hospital, Hyderabad. Controls were roughly matched for age, ethnicity and socioeconomic status. The CAG repeats of the Androgen Receptor gene were genotyped using a PCR-based assay and were analysed using the GeneMapper software to determine the CAG repeat length. XCI analysis was also carried out to assess the inactivation percentages. RSA cases had a significantly greater frequency of allele sizes in the polymorphic range above 19 repeats (p = 0.006, which is the median value of the controls, and in the biallelic mean range above 21 repeats (p = 0.002. We found no evidence of abnormal incidence of skewed X-inactivation. We conclude that longer CAG repeat lengths are associated with increased odds for RSA with statistical power estimated to be ∼90%.

  16. Intragenomic polymorphisms among high-copy loci: a genus-wide study of nuclear ribosomal DNA in Asclepias (Apocynaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Weitemier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite knowledge that concerted evolution of high-copy loci is often imperfect, studies that investigate the extent of intragenomic polymorphisms and comparisons across a large number of species are rarely made. We present a bioinformatic pipeline for characterizing polymorphisms within an individual among copies of a high-copy locus. Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA across the milkweed genus, Asclepias. The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias. Reads were mapped back to each individual’s consensus and at each position reads differing from the consensus were tallied using a custom perl script. Low frequency polymorphisms existed in all individuals (mean = 5.8%. Most nrDNA positions (91% were polymorphic in at least one individual, with polymorphic sites being less frequent in subunit regions and loops. Highly polymorphic sites existed in each individual, with highest abundance in the “noncoding” ITS regions. Phylogenetic signal was present in the distribution of intragenomic polymorphisms across the genus. Intragenomic polymorphisms in nrDNA are common in Asclepias, being found at higher frequency than any other study to date. The high and variable frequency of polymorphisms across species highlights concerns that phylogenetic applications of nrDNA may be error-prone. The new analytical approach provided here is applicable to other taxa and other high-copy regions characterized by low coverage genome sequencing (genome skimming.

  17. Intragenomic polymorphisms among high-copy loci: a genus-wide study of nuclear ribosomal DNA in Asclepias (Apocynaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Shannon C.K.; Fishbein, Mark; Liston, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Despite knowledge that concerted evolution of high-copy loci is often imperfect, studies that investigate the extent of intragenomic polymorphisms and comparisons across a large number of species are rarely made. We present a bioinformatic pipeline for characterizing polymorphisms within an individual among copies of a high-copy locus. Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) across the milkweed genus, Asclepias. The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias. Reads were mapped back to each individual’s consensus and at each position reads differing from the consensus were tallied using a custom perl script. Low frequency polymorphisms existed in all individuals (mean = 5.8%). Most nrDNA positions (91%) were polymorphic in at least one individual, with polymorphic sites being less frequent in subunit regions and loops. Highly polymorphic sites existed in each individual, with highest abundance in the “noncoding” ITS regions. Phylogenetic signal was present in the distribution of intragenomic polymorphisms across the genus. Intragenomic polymorphisms in nrDNA are common in Asclepias, being found at higher frequency than any other study to date. The high and variable frequency of polymorphisms across species highlights concerns that phylogenetic applications of nrDNA may be error-prone. The new analytical approach provided here is applicable to other taxa and other high-copy regions characterized by low coverage genome sequencing (genome skimming). PMID:25653903

  18. Application of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to detect the genotoxic effect of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enan, Mohamed R

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the influence of lead, copper, manganese and cadmium on DNA integrity in plant cells. Plants, as biological indicators, can measure the potential effects of pollutants when they are used to measure effects of heavy metals. The genotoxicity of heavy metals in kidney-bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seedlings was subjected to RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) analysis. An RAPD 'fingerprinting' technique was used to detect DNA damage in the kidney-bean seedlings treated with two selected heavy metals at concentrations of 150 and 350 mg x l(-1). Polymorphisms became evident as the presence and/or absence of DNA fragments in treated samples compared with the untreated one. At 350 mg x l(-1), a high number of both missing bands and new amplified fragment were observed. Results suggested that a qualitative measure reflecting changes in RAPD profiles were significantly affected at higher concentrations (350 mg x l(-1)) of the tested heavy metals. A total of 467 RAPD fragments in RAPD profiles were detected by using six random primers (decamers) and 224 of these fragments showed polymorphism. There was a distinct distance between the band patterns of treated plants and the control samples when the cluster method was applied. In addition, the result derived from numerical analysis revealed a considerable distance between the band pattern of the plant samples treated with 350 mg x l(-1) heavy metals and the control sample. Finally, a comparison between untreated and treated genomes shows that RAPD analysis can be used to evaluate how the environmental pollutants modify the structure of DNA in living organisms.

  19. Disruption of Higher Order DNA Structures in Friedreich's Ataxia (GAA)(n) Repeats by PNA or LNA Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergquist, Helen; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Alvarez-Asencio, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated with epigen......Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated...... with epigenetic modifications. With the aim of interfering with higher order H-DNA (like) DNA structures within pathological (GAA)n expansions, we examined sequence-specific interaction of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with (GAA)n repeats of different lengths (short: n=9, medium: n=75 or long: n=115) by chemical...... probing of triple helical and single stranded regions. We found that a triplex structure (H-DNA) forms at GAA repeats of different lengths; however, single stranded regions were not detected within the medium size pathological repeat, suggesting the presence of a more complex structure. Furthermore, (GAA...

  20. Visualization and quantitative analysis of extrachromosomal telomere-repeat DNA in individual human cells by Halo-FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komosa, Martin; Root, Heather; Meyn, M Stephen

    2015-02-27

    Current methods for characterizing extrachromosomal nuclear DNA in mammalian cells do not permit single-cell analysis, are often semi-quantitative and frequently biased toward the detection of circular species. To overcome these limitations, we developed Halo-FISH to visualize and quantitatively analyze extrachromosomal DNA in single cells. We demonstrate Halo-FISH by using it to analyze extrachromosomal telomere-repeat (ECTR) in human cells that use the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) pathway(s) to maintain telomere lengths. We find that GM847 and VA13 ALT cells average ∼80 detectable G/C-strand ECTR DNA molecules/nucleus, while U2OS ALT cells average ∼18 molecules/nucleus. In comparison, human primary and telomerase-positive cells contain 300), range widely in length (200 kb) and are composed of primarily G- or C-strand telomere-repeat DNA. Halo-FISH enables, for the first time, the simultaneous analysis of ECTR DNA and chromosomal telomeres in a single cell. We find that ECTR DNA comprises ∼15% of telomere-repeat DNA in GM847 and VA13 cells, but FISH can facilitate the study of a wide variety of extrachromosomal DNA in mammalian cells.

  1. Localization of a new highly repeated DNA sequence of Lemur cafta (Lemuridae, Strepsirhini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniotto, Michele; Ventura, Mario; Cardone, Maria Francesca; Boaretto, Francesca; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Mariano; Crovella, Sergio

    2002-10-01

    We have isolated and cloned an 800-bp highly repeated DNA (HRDNA) sequence from Lemur catta (LCA) and described its localization on LCA chromosomes. Lemur catta HRDNA sequences were localized by performing FISH experiments on standard and elongated metaphasic chromosomes using an LCA HRDNA probe (LCASAT). A complex hybridization pattern was detected. A strong pericentromeric hybridization signal was observed on most LCA chromosomes. Chromosomes 7 and 13 were lit in pericentromeric regions, as well as in the interspersed heterochromatin. Chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 17, 19, X, and microchromosomes (20, 25, 26, and 27) showed no signals in the pericentromeric region, but chromosomes 3 and 4 showed a positive hybridization in heterochromatic regions. The 800-bp L catta HRDNA was species specific. We performed FISH experiments with the LCASAT probe on Eulemur macaco macaco (EMA) and Eulemur fulvus fulvus (EFU) metaphases and no positive signal of hybridization was detected. These findings were also confirmed by Southern blot analysis and PCR.

  2. Herpesvirus telomeric repeats facilitate genomic integration into host telomeres and mobilization of viral DNA during reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Benedikt B; Jarosinski, Keith W; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2011-03-14

    Some herpesviruses, particularly lymphotropic viruses such as Marek's disease virus (MDV) and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), integrate their DNA into host chromosomes. MDV and HHV-6, among other herpesviruses, harbor telomeric repeats (TMRs) identical to host telomeres at either end of their linear genomes. Using MDV as a natural virus-host model, we show that herpesvirus TMRs facilitate viral genome integration into host telomeres and that integration is important for establishment of latency and lymphoma formation. Integration into host telomeres also aids in reactivation from the quiescent state of infection. Our results and the presence of TMRs in many herpesviruses suggest that integration mediated by viral TMRs is a conserved mechanism, which ensures faithful virus genome maintenance in host cells during cell division and allows efficient mobilization of dormant viral genomes. This finding is of particular importance as reactivation is critical for virus spread between susceptible individuals and is necessary for continued herpesvirus evolution and survival.

  3. Assembling the Streptococcus thermophilus clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) array for multiplex DNA targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijun; Xu, Kun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Cunfang; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-06-01

    In addition to the advantages of scalable, affordable, and easy to engineer, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) technology is superior for multiplex targeting, which is laborious and inconvenient when achieved by cloning multiple gRNA expressing cassettes. Here, we report a simple CRISPR array assembling method which will facilitate multiplex targeting usage. First, the Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR3/Cas locus was cloned. Second, different CRISPR arrays were assembled with different crRNA spacers. Transformation assays using different Escherichia coli strains demonstrated efficient plasmid DNA targeting, and we achieved targeting efficiency up to 95% with an assembled CRISPR array with three crRNA spacers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA Methyltransferase 3B Gene Promoter and Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Polymorphisms in Childhood Immune Thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Pesmatzoglou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP is one of the most common blood diseases as well as the commonest acquired bleeding disorder in childhood. Although the etiology of ITP is unclear, in the pathogenesis of the disease, both environmental and genetic factors including polymorphisms of TNF-a, IL-10, and IL-4 genes have been suggested to be involved. In this study, we investigated the rs2424913 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP (C46359T in DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B gene promoter and the VNTR polymorphism of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 Ra intron-2 in 32 children (17 boys with the diagnosis of ITP and 64 healthy individuals. No significant differences were found in the genotype distribution of DNMT3B polymorphism between the children with ITP and the control group, whereas the frequency of allele T appeared significantly increased in children with ITP (P = 0.03, OR = 2, 95% CI: 1.06–3.94. In case of IL-1 Ra polymorphism, children with ITP had a significantly higher frequency of genotype I/II, compared to control group (P = 0.043, OR = 2.60, 95% CI: 1.02–6.50. Moreover, genotype I/I as well as allele I was overrepresented in the control group, suggesting that allele I may have a decreased risk for development of ITP. Our findings suggest that rs2424913 DNMT3B SNP as well as IL-1 Ra VNTR polymorphism may contribute to the susceptibility to ITP.

  5. Multiplex genotype determination at a DNA sequence polymorphism cluster in the human immunoglobulin heavy-chain region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Hood, L. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1995-03-20

    We have developed a method for multilocus genotype determination. The method involves using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) for allele discrimination. If a polymorphism is not an RFLP, it is converted into an RFLP during the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After amplification and restriction enzyme digestion, samples are analyzed by sequential gel loading during electrophoresis. The efficiency of this method was demonstrated by determining the genotypes of 108 semen samples at seven DNA sequence polymorphic sites identified in the human immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region. It was shown that more than 1000 PCR products could be easily analyzed per day per investigator. To show the reliability of this method, some of the typing results were confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. By computer simulation, most (98%) polymorphisms were shown to be natural or convertible (by changing 1 bp close to or next to each polymorphic site) RFLPs for the commercially available 4-base cutters. 47 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. The Science and Issues of Human DNA Polymorphisms: A Training Workshop for High School Biology Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micklos, David A.

    2006-10-30

    This project achieved its goal of implementing a nationwide training program to introduce high school biology teachers to the key uses and societal implications of human DNA polymorphisms. The 2.5-day workshop introduced high school biology faculty to a laboratory-based unit on human DNA polymorphisms â which provides a uniquely personal perspective on the science and Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. As proposed, 12 workshops were conducted at venues across the United States. The workshops were attended by 256 high school faculty, exceeding proposed attendance of 240 by 7%. Each workshop mixed theoretical, laboratory, and computer work with practical and ethical implications. Program participants learned simplified lab techniques for amplifying three types of chromosomal polymorphisms: an Alu insertion (PV92), a VNTR (pMCT118/D1S80), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mitochondrial control region. These polymorphisms illustrate the use of DNA variations in disease diagnosis, forensic biology, and identity testing - and provide a starting point for discussing the uses and potential abuses of genetic technology. Participants also learned how to use their Alu and mitochondrial data as an entrée to human population genetics and evolution. Our work to simplify lab techniques for amplifying human DNA polymorphisms in educational settings culminated with the release in 1998 of three Advanced Technology (AT) PCR kits by Carolina Biological Supply Company, the nationâÂÂs oldest educational science supplier. The kits use a simple 30-minute method to isolate template DNA from hair sheaths or buccal cells and streamlined PCR chemistry based on Pharmacia Ready-To-Go Beads, which incorporate Taq polymerase, deoxynucleotide triphosphates, and buffer in a freeze-dried pellet. These kits have greatly simplified teacher implementation of human PCR labs, and their use is growing at a rapid pace. Sales of human

  7. Microsatellite (SSR amplification by PCR usually led to polymorphic bands: Evidence which shows replication slippage occurs in extend or nascent DNA strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abasalt Hossienzadeh-Colagar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs are very effective molecular markers in population genetics, genome mapping, taxonomic study and other large-scale studies. Variation in number of tandem repeats within microsatellite refers to simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP; but there are a few studies that are showed SSRs replication slippage may be occurred during in vitro amplification which are produced ‘stutter products’ differing in length from the main products. The purpose of this study is introducing a reliable method to realize SSRs replication slippage. At first, three unique primers designed to amplify SSRs loci in the great gerbil (Rhombomys opimus by PCR. Crush and soak method used to isolate interesting DNA bands from polyacrylamide gel. PCR products analyzed using by sequencing methods. Our study has been shown that Taq DNA polymerase slipped during microsatellite in vitro amplification which led to insertion or deletion of repeats in sense or antisense DNA strands. It is produced amplified fragments with various lengths in gel electrophoresis showed as ‘stutter bands’. Thus, in population studies by SSRs markers recommend that replication slippage effects and stutter bands have been considered.

  8. Genetic alterations of hepatocellular carcinoma by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and cloning sequencing of tumor differential DNA fragment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong Xian; Wen-Ming Cong; Shu-Hui Zhang; Meng-Chao Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the genetic alterations and their association with clinicopathological characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and to find the tumor related DNA fragments.METHODS: DNA isolated from tumors and corresponding noncancerous liver tissues of 56 HCC patients was amplified by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)with 10 random 10-mer arbitrary primers. The RAPD bands showing obvious differences in tumor tissue DNA corresponding to that of normal tissue were separated,purified, cloned and sequenced. DNA sequences were analyzed and compared with GenBank data.RESULTS: A total of 56 cases of HCC were demonstrated to have genetic alterations, which were detected by at least one primer. The detestability of genetic alterations ranged from 20% to 70% in each case, and 17.9% to 50% in each primer. Serum HBV infection, tumor size,histological grade, tumor capsule, as well as tumor intrahepatic metastasis, might be correlated with genetic alterations on certain primers. A band with a higher intensity of 480 bp or so amplified fragments in tumor DNA relative to normal DNA could be seen in 27 of 56 tumor samples using primer 4. Sequence analysis of these fragments showed 91% homology with Homo sapiens double homeobox protein DUX10 gene.CONCLUSION: Genetic alterations are a frequent event in HCC, and tumor related DNA fragments have been found in this study, which may be associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. RAPD is an effective method for the identification and analysis of genetic alterations in HCC, and may provide new information for further evaluating the molecular mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  9. Chelating resin-based extraction of DNA from dental pulp and sex determination from incinerated teeth with Y-chromosomal alphoid repeat and short tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimochi, Tsukasa; Iwasa, Mineo; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Koyama, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Ichiro; Matoba, Ryoji; Yokoi, Motoo; Nagao, Masataka

    2002-09-01

    A procedure utilizing Chelex 100, chelating resin, was adapted to extract DNA from dental pulp. The procedure was simple and rapid, involved no organic solvents, and did not require multiple tube transfers. The extraction of DNA from dental pulp using this method was as efficient, or more so, than using proteinase K and phenol-chloroform extraction. In this study, the Chelex method was used with amplification and typing at Y-chromosomal loci to determine the effects of temperature on the sex determination of the teeth. The extracted teeth were incinerated in a dental furnace for 2 minutes at 100 degrees C, 200 degrees C, 300 degrees C, 400 degrees C, and 500 degrees C. After the isolation of DNA from the dental pulp by the Chelex method, alphoid repeats, and short tandem repeats, the human Y chromosome (DYZ3), DYS19, SYS389, DYS390, and DYS393 could be amplified and typed in all samples incinerated at up to 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. The DYS389 locus in some samples could not be amplified at 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. An autopsy case is described in which genotypings of DYS19, DYS390, and DYS393 from dental pulp obtained from a burned body were needed. The data presented in this report suggest that Chelex 100-based DNA extraction, amplification, and typing are possible in burned teeth in forensic autopsy cases.

  10. Association study of mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms with type 2 diabetes in Tunisian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsouna, Sana; Ben Halim, Nizar; Lasram, Khaled; Arfa, Imen; Jamoussi, Henda; Bahri, Sonia; Ammar, Slim Ben; Miladi, Najoua; Abid, Abdelmajid; Abdelhak, Sonia; Kefi, Rym

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation may play an important role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2Ds). In this study, we aimed to explore whether mtDNA variants contribute to the susceptibility to T2Ds in a Tunisian population. The hypervariable region 1 (HVS1) of the mtDNA of 64 T2Ds patients and 77 healthy controls was amplified and sequenced. Statistical analysis was performed using the STATA program. Analysis of the total screened variants (N = 88) from the HVS1 region showed no significant difference in the distribution of all polymorphisms between T2Ds and controls, except for the variant G16390A which was more frequent in T2Ds (15.9%) than in controls (5.4%) (p = 0.04). The association of G16390A was not detected after multivariate regression analysis. Similarly, analysis of the distribution of mitochondrial haplogroups within our dataset showed 18 distinct major haplogroups with no significant difference between T2Ds and controls. Except, the weakly association found for the G16390A variant, our results showed that none of the tested polymorphisms from the HVS1 region have a major role in T2Ds pathogenesis in the studied Tunisian population even when taking into account the population stratification.

  11. Random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RRACE) allows for cloning of multiple novel human cDNA fragments containing (CAG)n repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J P; McKnight, C; VanEpps, S; Kelley, M R

    1995-04-03

    We describe a new technique for isolating cDNA fragments in which (i) either a partial sequence of the cDNA is known or (ii) a repeat sequence is utilized. We have used this technique, termed random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (random RACE), to isolate a number of trinucleotide repeat (CAG)n-containing genes. Using the random RACE (RRACE) technique, we have isolated over a hundred (CAG)n-containing genes. The results of our initial analysis of ten clones indicate that three are identical to previously cloned (CAG)n-containing genes. Three of our clones matched with expressed sequence tags, one of which contained a CA repeat. The remaining four clones did not match with any sequence in GenBank. These results indicate that this approach provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating trinucleotide repeat-containing cDNA fragments. Finally, this technique may be used for purposes other than cloning repeat-containing cDNA fragments. If only a partial sequence of a gene is known, our system, described here, provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating a fragment of the gene of interest.

  12. Association of DNA methyltransferase polymorphisms with susceptibility to primary gouty arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaowu; Peng, Yuanhong; Yao, Chengjiao; Qing, Yufeng; Yang, Qibin; Guo, Xiaolan; Xie, Wenguang; Zhao, Mingcai; Cai, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jing-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Gouty arthritis is the most common type of inflammatory and immune disease, and the prevalence and incidence of gout increases annually. Genetic variations in the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) gene have not, to the best of our knowledge, been reported to influence gene expression and to participate in the pathogenesis of gout. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B polymorphisms contribute to gout susceptibility. These polymorphisms were screened for in 336 gout patients and 306 healthy control subjects (from a South China population) for association with gout. The distribution frequencies of DNMT1 rs2228611 AA genotype (P=0.007) and A allele (P=0.002; odds ratio=1.508, 95% confidence interval=1.158–1.964) were found to be significantly increased in the gout patients when compared with those in the healthy control subjects. The rs1550117 in DNMT3A and rs2424913 in DNMT3B exhibited no significant associations with gout susceptibility between the patients and control subjects. These results demonstrated that the DNMT1 rs2228611 polymorphism may be involved in the pathogenesis of gout, while DNMT3A rs1550117 and DNMT3B rs2424913 did not show any obvious significance in the current study; thus, may not be used as risk factors to predict the susceptibility to gout. However, further studies are required to investigate the functions and regulatory mechanism of the polymorphisms of DNMTs in gout. PMID:27699015

  13. Association of DNA methyltransferase polymorphisms with susceptibility to primary gouty arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaowu; Peng, Yuanhong; Yao, Chengjiao; Qing, Yufeng; Yang, Qibin; Guo, Xiaolan; Xie, Wenguang; Zhao, Mingcai; Cai, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jing-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Gouty arthritis is the most common type of inflammatory and immune disease, and the prevalence and incidence of gout increases annually. Genetic variations in the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) gene have not, to the best of our knowledge, been reported to influence gene expression and to participate in the pathogenesis of gout. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B polymorphisms contribute to gout susceptibility. These polymorphisms were screened for in 336 gout patients and 306 healthy control subjects (from a South China population) for association with gout. The distribution frequencies of DNMT1 rs2228611 AA genotype (P=0.007) and A allele (P=0.002; odds ratio=1.508, 95% confidence interval=1.158-1.964) were found to be significantly increased in the gout patients when compared with those in the healthy control subjects. The rs1550117 in DNMT3A and rs2424913 in DNMT3B exhibited no significant associations with gout susceptibility between the patients and control subjects. These results demonstrated that the DNMT1 rs2228611 polymorphism may be involved in the pathogenesis of gout, while DNMT3A rs1550117 and DNMT3B rs2424913 did not show any obvious significance in the current study; thus, may not be used as risk factors to predict the susceptibility to gout. However, further studies are required to investigate the functions and regulatory mechanism of the polymorphisms of DNMTs in gout.

  14. Intraspecific variability of Bipolaris sorokiniana isolates determined by random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Andréia M R; Matsumura, Aida T S; Prestes, Ariano M; Van Der Sand, Sueli T

    2002-01-01

    Isolates of Bipolaris sorokiniana were analyzed by random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) techniques to determine the amount of intraspecific genetic variability and to study host-pathogen interactions. Ten isolates originated from different regions of Brazil were examined. Plants of the wheat cultivars BR8, BH1146 (original host) and IAC-5 Maringá, classified as resistant, moderately resistant or susceptible to B. sorokiniana, respectively, were inoculated with these 10 isolates. Twenty-seven isolates were recovered from these cultivars and were analyzed by RAPD assay and compared to the RAPD of the original 10 isolates. According to the RAPD profiles there was a high level of genetic variability among the isolates. We detected 69 polymorphic fragments, ranging from 1.6 to 0.54 kb, in the original 10 isolates; 57 fragments with sizes between 1.98 and 0.38 kb from the isolates recovered from BH1146; 47 polymorphic bands, ranging from 1.96-0.54 kb, were detected in the isolates from BR8 and 32 fragments between 1.98 and 0.42 kb in isolates were recovered from IAC-5 Maringá. The number of polymorphic fragments varied, even for the same isolate, when the isolates were recovered from different cultivar hosts.

  15. Initial determination of DNA polymorphism of some Primula veris L. populations from Kosovo and Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisha, Naim; Millaku, Fadil; Gashi, Bekim; Krasniqi, Elez; Novak, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Primula veris L. (Primulaceae) is a long lived perennial and well known pharmaceutical plant, widely collected for these reasons in almost all SE Europe and particularly in Kosovo. The aim of the study is to determine molecular polymorphism of cowslip (P. veris L.) populations from Kosovo. DNA extracted from leaves were  investigated in details for presence of polymorphism. RAPD analyses were conducted using 20 different short primers. Genomic DNA amplification profiles were analyzed and processed using data labelling. Comparison between cowslip populations in genetic composition revealed that samples from Bogaj were too distinct on their own. Molecular variation was observed to be more within populations (73 %) as compared to among populations (27 %). On the other hand, genetic distance of populations revealed that the highest genetic distance is between Leqinat and Maja e Madhe. Mean values of expected heterozygosity were highest in Bogaj population, while lowest in Maja e Madhe population. The obtained results indicated that Bogaj population are more polymorphic. From the obtained data it can be concluded that RAPD markers provided a useful technique to study genetic diversity in P. veris L. populations. This technology allows identification and assessment of the genetic similarities and differences among plant populations.

  16. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the DNA of selected Naegleria and Acanthamoeba amebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, G L; Brandt, F H; Visvesvara, G S

    1988-09-01

    Fourteen strains of Naegleria fowleri, two strains of N. gruberi, and one strain each of N. australiensis, N. jadini, N. lovaniensis, Acanthamoeba sp., A. castellanii, A. polyphaga, and A. comandoni isolated from patients, soil, or water were characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Total cellular DNA (1 microgram) was digested with either HindIII, BglII, or EcoRI; separated on agarose gels; and stained with ethidium bromide. From 2 to 15 unusually prominent repetitive restriction fragment bands, totaling 15 to 50 kilobases in length and constituting probably more than 30% of the total DNA, were detected for all ameba strains. Each species displayed a characteristic pattern of repetitive restriction fragments. Digests of the four Acanthamoeba spp. displayed fewer, less intensely staining repetitive fragments than those of the Naegleria spp. All N. fowleri strains, whether isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of patients from different parts of the world or from hot springs, had repetitive restriction fragment bands of similar total lengths (ca. 45 kilobases), and most repetitive bands displayed identical mobilities. However, polymorphic bands were useful in identifying particular isolates. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis generally was consistent with taxonomy based on studies of infectivity, morphology, isoenzyme patterns, and antibody reactivity and suggests that this technique may help classify amebae isolated from clinical specimens or from the environment.

  17. DNA repair gene ERCC2 polymorphisms and associations with breast and ovarian cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabiau Nadège

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breast and ovarian cancers increased in the last decades. Except rare cases with a genetic predisposition and high penetrance, these pathologies are viewed as a polygenic disease. In this concept, association studies look for genetic variations such as polymorphisms in low penetrance genes, i.e. genes in interaction with environmental factors. DNA repair systems that protect the genome from deleterious endogenous and exogenous damages have been shown to have significantly reduced. In particular, enzymes of the nucleotide excision repair pathway are suspected to be implicated in cancer. In this study, 2 functional polymorphisms in a DNA repair gene ERCC2 were analyzed. The population included 911 breast cancer cases, 51 ovarian cancer cases and 1000 controls. The genotyping of 2 SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism was carried out on the population with the MGB (Minor Groove Binder probe technique which consists of the use of the allelic discrimination with the Taqman® method. This study enabled us to show an increase in risk of breast cancer with no oral contraceptive users and with women exhibiting a waist-to-hip ratio (WHR > 0.85 for Asn homozygous for ERCC2 312.

  18. Toxoplasma gondii: a bradyzoite-specific DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Akio; Dautu, George; Haga, Kaori; Munyaka, Biscah; Carmen, Gabriella; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Igarashi, Makoto

    2011-04-01

    The DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) gene (ToxoDB ID, TGME49_002020) is expressed predominantly at the bradyzoite stage. DnaK-TPR protein has a heat shock protein (DnaK) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains with amino acid sequence similarity to the counterparts of other organisms (40.2-43.7% to DnaK domain and 41.1-66.0% to TPR domain). These findings allowed us to infer that DnaK-TPR protein is important in the tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite development or maintenance of cyst structure although the function of this gene is still unknown. An immunofluorescence assay (IFA) revealed that DnaK-TPR protein was expressed in Toxoplasma gondii-encysted and in vitro-induced bradyzoites and distributed in the whole part of parasite cells. We conducted yeast two-hybrid screening to identify proteins interacting with DnaK-TPR protein, and demonstrated that DnaK-TPR protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein (Tgp23). It was expected that DnaK-TPR protein would have a function as a molecular chaperon in bradyzoite cells associated with Tgp23. Possible mechanisms for this gene are discussed.

  19. Random amplified polymorphic DNA and restriction enzyme analysis of PCR amplified rDNA in taxonomy: Two identification techniques for food-borne yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baleiras Couto, M.M.; Vogels, J.T.W.E.; Hofstra, H.; Veld, J.H.J. Huis in't; Vossen, J.M.B.M. van der

    1995-01-01

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay and the restriction enzyme analysis of PCR amplified rDNA are compared for the identification of the common spoilage yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Z. rouxii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida valida and C. lipolytica. Both techniques proved to be

  20. DNA dynamics is likely to be a factor in the genomic nucleotide repeats expansions related to diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boian S Alexandrov

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeats sequences (TRS represent a common type of genomic DNA motif whose expansion is associated with a large number of human diseases. The driving molecular mechanisms of the TRS ongoing dynamic expansion across generations and within tissues and its influence on genomic DNA functions are not well understood. Here we report results for a novel and notable collective breathing behavior of genomic DNA of tandem TRS, leading to propensity for large local DNA transient openings at physiological temperature. Our Langevin molecular dynamics (LMD and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulations demonstrate that the patterns of openings of various TRSs depend specifically on their length. The collective propensity for DNA strand separation of repeated sequences serves as a precursor for outsized intermediate bubble states independently of the G/C-content. We report that repeats have the potential to interfere with the binding of transcription factors to their consensus sequence by altered DNA breathing dynamics in proximity of the binding sites. These observations might influence ongoing attempts to use LMD and MCMC simulations for TRS-related modeling of genomic DNA functionality in elucidating the common denominators of the dynamic TRS expansion mutation with potential therapeutic applications.

  1. The Science and Issues of Human DNA Polymorphisms: A Training Workshop for High School Biology Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micklos, David A.

    2006-10-30

    This project achieved its goal of implementing a nationwide training program to introduce high school biology teachers to the key uses and societal implications of human DNA polymorphisms. The 2.5-day workshop introduced high school biology faculty to a laboratory-based unit on human DNA polymorphisms â which provides a uniquely personal perspective on the science and Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. As proposed, 12 workshops were conducted at venues across the United States. The workshops were attended by 256 high school faculty, exceeding proposed attendance of 240 by 7%. Each workshop mixed theoretical, laboratory, and computer work with practical and ethical implications. Program participants learned simplified lab techniques for amplifying three types of chromosomal polymorphisms: an Alu insertion (PV92), a VNTR (pMCT118/D1S80), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mitochondrial control region. These polymorphisms illustrate the use of DNA variations in disease diagnosis, forensic biology, and identity testing - and provide a starting point for discussing the uses and potential abuses of genetic technology. Participants also learned how to use their Alu and mitochondrial data as an entrée to human population genetics and evolution. Our work to simplify lab techniques for amplifying human DNA polymorphisms in educational settings culminated with the release in 1998 of three Advanced Technology (AT) PCR kits by Carolina Biological Supply Company, the nationâÂÂs oldest educational science supplier. The kits use a simple 30-minute method to isolate template DNA from hair sheaths or buccal cells and streamlined PCR chemistry based on Pharmacia Ready-To-Go Beads, which incorporate Taq polymerase, deoxynucleotide triphosphates, and buffer in a freeze-dried pellet. These kits have greatly simplified teacher implementation of human PCR labs, and their use is growing at a rapid pace. Sales of human

  2. A study of the CCG polymorphism in the IT15 cDNA in the Scottish Huntington`s disease and normal populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron, L.H.; Rae, A.; Brock, D.J.H. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The CCG rich sequence immediately 3{prime} to the CAG repeat that is expanded in Huntington`s disease (HD) has recently been shown to be polymorphic with at least 5 alleles differing by multiples of 3 bp being found in the normal population. We have studied the allele distribution in 200 Scottish HD families and have found very strong evidence for almost complete disequilibrium in this population. For all the families phase was unambiguously determined and 196 were shown to have a CCG repeat allele of 176 bp cosegregating with the HD chromosome. This observation is significantly different to the normal population distribution where 31% of people have an allele of 185 bp. This overrepresentation of the 176 bp allele is also seen in the normal population on chromosomes with greater than 26 CAG repeats. The DNA sequence across the CAG and CCG repeats has been obtained for the four HD patients that do not have a 176 bp CCG repeat size and will be presented. We present strong evidence of genetic heterogeneity in the Scottish HD population making it very unlikely that there is a founder effect in the Scottish HD population. These data suggest that we may have identified a region of the IT15 gene that is critical in the mechanism of Huntington`s disease CAG expansion.

  3. Huntington's disease and mitochondrial DNA deletions: event or regular mechanism for mutant huntingtin protein and CAG repeats expansion?!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoei, Mohammad Mehdi; Houshmand, Massoud; Panahi, Mehdi Shafa Shariat; Shariati, Parvin; Rostami, Maryam; Manshadi, Masoumeh Dehghan; Majidizadeh, Tayebeh

    2007-11-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of the respiratory chain complex activities in neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD). Research studies were conducted to determine the possible levels of mitochondrial defect (deletion) in HD patients and consideration of interaction between the expanded Huntingtin gene as a nuclear gene and mitochondria as a cytoplasmic organelle. To determine mtDNA damage, we investigated deletions based in four areas of mitochondrial DNA, in a group of 60 Iranian patients clinically diagnosed with HD and 70 healthy controls. A total of 41 patients out of 60 had CAG expansion (group A). About 19 patients did not show expansion but had the clinical symptoms of HD (group B). MtDNA deletions were classified into four groups according to size; 9 kb, 7.5 kb, 7 kb, and 5 kb. We found one of the four-mtDNA deletions in at least 90% of samples. Multiple deletions have also been observed in 63% of HD patients. None of the normal control (group C) showed mtDNA deletions. The sizes or locations of the deletions did not show a clear correlation with expanded CAG repeat and age in our samples. The study presented evidence that HD patients had higher frequencies of mtDNA deletions in lymphocytes in comparison to the controls. It is thus proposed that CAG repeats instability and mutant Htt are causative factor in mtDNA damage.

  4. Disruption of Higher Order DNA Structures in Friedreich's Ataxia (GAA)(n) Repeats by PNA or LNA Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergquist, Helen; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Alvarez-Asencio, Ruben;

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated with epigen......Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated...

  5. Tissue culture-induced DNA methylation polymorphisms in repetitive DNA of tomato calli and regenerated plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, M.J.M.; Rus-Kortekaas, W.; Vosman, B.

    1995-01-01

    The propagation of plants through tissue culture can induce a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes. Variation in DNA methylation has been proposed as a mechanism that may explain at least a part of these changes. In the present study, the methylation of tomato callus DNA was compared with that

  6. Folic acid, polymorphism of methyl-group metabolism genes, and DNA methylation in relation to GI carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing Yuan; Xiao, Shu Dong

    2003-01-01

    DNA methylation is the main epigenetic modification after replication in humans. DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase (DNMT) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to C5 of cytosine within CpG dinucleotide sequences in the genomic DNA of higher eukaryotes. There is considerable evidence that aberrant DNA methylation plays an integral role in carcinogenesis. Folic acid or folate is crucial for normal DNA synthesis and can regulate DNA methylation, and through this, it affects cellular SAM levels. Folate deficiency results in DNA hypomethylation. Epidemiological studies have indicated that folic acid protects against gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase (MS) are the enzymes involved in folate metabolism and are thought to influence DNA methylation. MTHFR is highly polymorphic, and the variant genotypes result in decreased MTHFR enzyme activity and lower plasma folate level. Two common MTHFR polymorphisms, 677CT (or 677TT) and A1298C, and an MS polymorphism, A-->G at 2756, have been identified. Most studies support an inverse association between folate status and the rate of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. During human GI carcinogenesis, MTHFR is highly polymorphic, and the variant genotypes result in decreased MTHFR enzyme activity and lower plasma folate level, as well as aberrant methylation.

  7. Association Between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in DNA Polymerase Kappa Gene and Breast Cancer Risk in Chinese Han Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhi-Jun; Liu, Xing-Han; Ma, Yun-Feng; Kang, Hua-Feng; Jin, Tian-Bo; Dai, Zhi-Ming; Guan, Hai-Tao; Wang, Meng; Liu, Kang; Dai, Cong; Yang, Xue-Wen; Wang, Xi-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract DNA polymerases are responsible for ensuring stability of the genome and avoiding genotoxicity caused by a variety of factors during DNA replication. Consequently, these proteins have been associated with an increased cancer risk. DNA polymerase kappa (POLK) is a specialized DNA polymerase involved in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) that allows DNA synthesis over the damaged DNA. Recently, some studies investigated relationships between POLK polymorphisms and cancer risk, but the role of POLK genetic variants in breast cancer (BC) remains to be defined. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of POLK polymorphisms on BC risk. We used the Sequenom MassARRAY method to genotype 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in POLK (rs3213801, rs10077427, and rs5744533), in order to determine the genotypes of 560 BC patients and 583 controls. The association of genotypes and BC was assessed by computing the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) from logistic regression analyses. We found a statistically significant difference between patient and control groups in the POLK rs10077427 genotypic groups, excluding the recessive model. A positive correlation was also found between positive progesterone receptor (PR) status, higher Ki67 index, and rs10077427 polymorphism. For rs5744533 polymorphism, the codominant, dominant, and allele models frequencies were significantly higher in BC patients compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, our results indicated that rs5744533 SNP has a protective role in the postmenopausal women. However, we failed to find any associations between rs3213801 polymorphism and susceptibility to BC. Our results indicate that POLK polymorphisms may influence the risk of developing BC, and, because of this, may serve as a prognostic biomarker among Chinese women. PMID:26765445

  8. Surveyor nuclease detection of mutations and polymorphisms of mtDNA in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilch, Jacek; Asman, Marek; Jamroz, Ewa; Kajor, Maciej; Kotrys-Puchalska, Elżbieta; Goss, Małgorzata; Krzak, Maria; Witecka, Joanna; Gmiński, Jan; Sieroń, Aleksander L

    2010-11-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are complex disorders with wide range of clinical manifestations. Particularly time-consuming is the identification of mutations in mitochondrial DNA. A group of 20 children with clinical manifestations of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies was selected for molecular studies. The aims were (a) to identify mutations in mtDNA isolated from muscle and (b) to verify detected mutations in DNA isolated from blood, in order to assess the utility of a Surveyor nuclease assay kit for patient screening. The most common changes found were polymorphisms, including a few missense mutations altering the amino acid sequence of mitochondrial proteins. In two boys with MELAS (i.e., mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes), a mutation A→G3243 was detected in the tRNALeu gene of mtDNA isolated from muscle and blood. In one boy, the carrier status of his mother was confirmed, based on molecular analysis of DNA isolated from blood. A method using Surveyor nuclease allows systematic screening for small mutations in mtDNA, using as its source blood of the patients and asymptomatic carriers. The method still requires confirmation studying a larger group. In some patients, the use of this method should precede and might limit indications for traumatic muscle and skin biopsy.

  9. Dramatic changes in DNA Conductance with stretching: Structural Polymorphism at a critical extension

    CERN Document Server

    Bag, Saientan; Goddard, William A; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-01-01

    In order to interpret recent experimental studies of the dependence of conductance of ds-DNA as the DNA is pulled from the 3'end1-3'end2 ends, which find a sharp conductance jump for a very short (4.5 %) stretching length, we carried out multiscale modeling, to predict the conductance of dsDNA as it is mechanically stretched to promote various structural polymorphisms. We calculate the current along the stretched DNA using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, non-equilibrium pulling simulations, quantum mechanics calculations, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. For 5'end1-5'end2 attachments we find an abrupt jump in the current within a very short stretching length (6 $ \\AA $ or 17 %) leading to a melted DNA state. In contrast, for 3'end1-3'end2 pulling it takes almost 32$ \\AA $ (84 %) of stretching to cause a similar jump in the current. Thus, we demonstrate that charge transport in DNA can occur over stretching lengths of several nanometers. We find that this unexpected behaviour in the B to S...

  10. Toward the design of new DNA G-quadruplex ligands through rational analysis of polymorphism and binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artese, Anna; Costa, Giosuè; Distinto, Simona; Moraca, Federica; Ortuso, Francesco; Parrotta, Lucia; Alcaro, Stefano

    2013-10-01

    Human telomeres play a key role in protecting chromosomal ends from fusion events; they are composed of d(TTAGGG) repeats, ranging in size from 3 to 15 kb. They form G-quadruplex DNA structures, stabilized by G-quartets in the presence of cations, and are involved in several biological processes. In particular, a telomere maintenance mechanism is provided by a specialized enzyme called telomerase, a reverse transcriptase able to add multiple copies of the 5'-GGTTAG-3' motif to the end of the G-strand of the telomere and which is over-expressed in the majority of cancer cells. The central cation has a crucial role in maintaining the stability of the structure. Based on its nature, it can be associated with different topological telomeric quadruplexes, which depend also on the orientation of the DNA strands and the syn/anti conformation of the guanines. Such a polymorphism, confirmed by the different structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), prompted us to apply a computational protocol in order to investigate the conformational properties of a set of known G-quadruplex ligands and their molecular recognition against six different experimental models of the human telomeric sequence d[AG3(T2AG3)3]. The average AutoDock correlation between theoretical and experimental data yielded an r2 value equal to 0.882 among all the studied models. Such a result was always improved with respect to those of the single folds, with the exception of the parallel structure (r2 equal to 0.886), thus suggesting a key role of this G4 conformation in the stacking interaction network. Among the studied binders, a trisubstituted acridine and a dibenzophenanthroline derivative were well recognized by the parallel and the mixed G-quadruplex structures, allowing the identification of specific key contacts with DNA and the further design of more potent or target specific G-quadruplex ligands.

  11. Nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location and protein stoichiometry influence base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E.; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, David M.; Merienne, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >fourteen genetic disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights as to how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely due to the lower level of APE1, FEN1 and LIG1. Damage located towards the 5’ end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired accumulating incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the centre or at the 3’ end of the repeats or within a control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5’ end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly under the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome, and suggest that a suboptimal LP-BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability. PMID:22497302

  12. Complex relationships between occupation, environment, DNA adducts, genetic polymorphisms and bladder cancer in a case-control study using a structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porru, Stefano; Pavanello, Sofia; Carta, Angela; Arici, Cecilia; Simeone, Claudio; Izzotti, Alberto; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA adducts are considered an integrate measure of carcinogen exposure and the initial step of carcinogenesis. Their levels in more accessible peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) mirror that in the bladder tissue. In this study we explore whether the formation of PBL DNA adducts may be associated with bladder cancer (BC) risk, and how this relationship is modulated by genetic polymorphisms, environmental and occupational risk factors for BC. These complex interrelationships, including direct and indirect effects of each variable, were appraised using the structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis. Within the framework of a hospital-based case/control study, study population included 199 BC cases and 213 non-cancer controls, all Caucasian males. Data were collected on lifetime smoking, coffee drinking, dietary habits and lifetime occupation, with particular reference to exposure to aromatic amines (AAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). No indirect paths were found, disproving hypothesis on association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk. DNA adducts were instead positively associated with occupational cumulative exposure to AAs (p = 0.028), whereas XRCC1 Arg 399 (poccupational cumulative exposure to AAs with DNA adducts and BC risk, strengthening the central role of AAs in bladder carcinogenesis. However the lack of an association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk advises that these snapshot measurements are not representative of relevant exposures. This would envisage new scenarios for biomarker discovery and new challenges such as repeated measurements at different critical life stages.

  13. Identification of a novel Getah virus by Virus-Discovery-cDNA random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tingsong; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Yan; Li, Gangshan; Qiu, Wei; Yu, Jing; Cui, Qinghua; Wang, Yiyin; Zhang, Chaoxiong; Zhou, Xiaofang; Feng, Ziliang; Zhou, Weiguo; Fan, Quanshui; Zhang, Fuqiang

    2012-12-27

    The identification of new virus strains is important for the study of infectious disease, but current (or existing) molecular biology methods are limited since the target sequence must be known to design genome-specific PCR primers. Thus, we developed a new method for the discovery of unknown viruses based on the cDNA--random amplified polymorphic DNA (cDNA-RAPD) technique. Getah virus, belonging to the family Togaviridae in the genus Alphavirus, is a mosquito-borne enveloped RNA virus that was identified using the Virus-Discovery-cDNA RAPD (VIDISCR) method. A novel Getah virus was identified by VIDISCR from suckling mice exposed to mosquitoes (Aedes albopictus) collected in Yunnan Province, China. The non-structural protein gene, nsP3, the structural protein gene, the capsid protein gene, and the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the novel Getah virus isolate were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence identities of each gene were determined to be 97.1-99.3%, 94.9-99.4%, and 93.6-99.9%, respectively, when compared with the genomes of 10 other representative strains of Getah virus. The VIDISCR method was able to identify known virus isolates and a novel isolate of Getah virus from infected mice. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the YN08 isolate was more closely related to the Hebei HB0234 strain than the YN0540 strain, and more genetically distinct from the MM2021 Malaysia primitive strain.

  14. DNA polymorphism analysis of candidate genes for type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Mexican ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Martínez, S E; Islas-Andrade, S; Machorro-Lazo, M V; Revilla, M C; Juárez, R E; Mújica-López, K I; Morán-Moguel, M C; López-Cardona, M G; Sánchez-Corona, J

    2004-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disorder resulting from the action and interaction of many genetic and environmental factors. It has been reported that polymorphisms in genes involved in the metabolism of glucose are associated with the susceptibility to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus increases with age, as well as with obesity and hypertension, its prevalence and incidence are different among geographical regions and ethnic groups. In Mexico, a higher prevalence and incidence has been described in the south of the country, and differences between urban and rural communities have been observed. We studied 73 individuals from Santiago Jamiltepec, a small indigenous community from Oaxaca State, Mexico. This population has shown a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between the Pst I (insulin gene), Nsi I (insulin receptor gene) and Gly972Arg (insulin receptor substrate 1 gene) polymorphisms and type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity and hypertension in this population. Clinical evaluation consisted of BMI and blood pressure measurements, and biochemical assays consisted of determination of fasting plasma insulin and glucose levels. PCR and restriction enzyme digestion analysis were applied to genomic DNA to identify the three polymorphisms. From statistical analysis carried out here, individually, the Pst I, Nsi I and Gly972Arg polymorphisms were not associated with the type 2 diabetes, obese or hypertensive phenotypes in this population. Nevertheless, there was an association between the Nsi I and Pst I polymorphisms and increased serum insulin levels.

  15. Genetic polymorphism of six DNA loci in six population groups of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shazia; Seshadri, M

    2007-08-01

    The genetic profile based on autosomal markers, four microsatellite DNA markers (D8S315, FES, D8S592, and D2S1328) and two minisatellite DNA markers (TPMT and PDGFA), were analyzed in six endogamous populations to examine the effect of geographic and linguistic affiliation on the genetic affinities among the groups. The six populations are from three different states of India and are linguistically different. Marathas from western India speak Marathi, an Indo-European language. Arayas, Muslims, Ezhavas, and Nairs from Kerala state of South India speak Malayalam, and Iyers from Tamil Nadu state speak Tamil. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of random, normal, healthy individuals. Locus-specific PCR amplification was carried out, followed by electrophoresis of the amplicons and genotyping. All the loci were highly polymorphic and followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, except for loci D8S315 and PDGFA in Iyers and Marathas, respectively. All six loci had high heterozygosity (average heterozygosity ranged from 0.73 to 0.76) and high polymorphism information content (0.57-0.90). The extent of gene differentiation among the six populations (G(ST) = 0.030) was greater than that for four Kerala populations (G(ST) = 0.011), suggesting proximity between the four Kerala populations. This result conforms with the cultural and linguistic background of the populations. The extent of diversity found among the populations probably resulted from the strict endogamous practices that they follow.

  16. Enhanced detection of polymorphic DNA by multiple arbitrary amplicon profiling of endonuclease-digested DNA: identification of markers tightly linked to the supernodulation locus in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano-Anollés, G; Bassam, B J; Gresshoff, P M

    1993-10-01

    Multiple endonuclease digestion of template DNA or amplification products can increase significantly the detection of polymorphic DNA in fingerprints generated by multiple arbitrary amplicon profiling (MAAP). This coupling of endonuclease cleavage and amplification of arbitrary stretches of DNA, directed by short oligonucleotide primers, readily allowed distinction of closely related fungal and bacterial isolates and plant cultivars. MAAP analysis of cleaved template DNA enabled the identification of molecular markers linked to a developmental locus of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill). Ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS)-induced supernodulating, near-isogenic lines altered in the nts locus, which controls nodule formation, could be distinguished from each other and from the parent cultivar by amplification of template pre-digested with 2-3 restriction enzymes. A total of 42 DNA polymorphisms were detected using only 19 octamer primers. In the absence of digestion, 25 primers failed to differentiate these soybean genotypes. Several polymorphic products co-segregated tightly with the nts locus in F2 families from crosses between the allelic mutants nts382 and nts1007 and the ancestral G. soja Sieb. & Succ. PI468.397. Our results suggest that EMS is capable of inducing extensive DNA alterations, probably around discrete mutational hot-spots. EMS-induced DNA polymorphisms may constitute sequence-tagged markers diagnostic of specific genomic regions.

  17. Molecular mechanisms for maintenance of G-rich short tandem repeats capable of adopting G4 DNA structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagama, Hitoshi [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)]. E-mail: hnakagam@gan2.res.ncc.go.jp; Higuchi, Kumiko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Tanaka, Etsuko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Naoto [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Nakashima, Katsuhiko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Katahira, Masato [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Fukuda, Hirokazu [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2006-06-25

    Mammalian genomes contain several types of repetitive sequences. Some of these sequences are implicated in various specific cellular events, including meiotic recombination, chromosomal breaks and transcriptional regulation, and also in several human disorders. In this review, we document the formation of DNA secondary structures by the G-rich repetitive sequences that have been found in several minisatellites, telomeres and in various triplet repeats, and report their effects on in vitro DNA synthesis. d(GGCAG) repeats in the mouse minisatellite Pc-1 were demonstrated to form an intra-molecular folded-back quadruplex structure (also called a G4' structure) by NMR and CD spectrum analyses. d(TTAGGG) telomere repeats and d(CGG) triplet repeats were also shown to form G4' and other unspecified higher order structures, respectively. In vitro DNA synthesis was substantially arrested within the repeats, and this could be responsible for the preferential mutability of the G-rich repetitive sequences. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using NIH3T3 cell extracts revealed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 and A3, which were tightly and specifically bound to d(GGCAG) and d(TTAGGG) repeats with K {sub d} values in the order of nM. HnRNP A1 unfolded the G4' structure formed in the d(GGCAG) {sub n} and d(TTAGGG) {sub n} repeat regions, and also resolved the higher order structure formed by d(CGG) triplet repeats. Furthermore, DNA synthesis arrest at the secondary structures of d(GGCAG) repeats, telomeres and d(CGG) triplet repeats was efficiently repressed by the addition of hnRNP A1. High expression of hnRNPs may contribute to the maintenance of G-rich repetitive sequences, including telomere repeats, and may also participate in ensuring the stability of the genome in cells with enhanced proliferation. Transcriptional regulation of genes, such as c-myc and insulin, by G4 sequences found in the promoter regions could be an intriguing field of

  18. Crystal Structure of DNA-PKcs Reveals a Large Open-Ring Cradle Comprised of HEAT Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Bancinyane L.; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2009-01-01

    Broken chromosomes arising from DNA double strand breaks result from endogenous events such as the production of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism, as well as from exogenous sources such as ionizing radiation1, 2, 3. Left unrepaired or incorrectly repaired they can lead to genomic changes that may result in cell death or cancer. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a holo-enzyme that comprises DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs)4, 5 and the heterodimer Ku70/Ku80, plays a major role in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the main pathway in mammals used to repair double strand breaks6, 7, 8. DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine protein kinase comprising a single polypeptide chain of 4128 amino acids and belonging to the phosphotidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)- related protein family9. DNA-PKcs is involved in the sensing and transmission of DNA damage signals to proteins such as p53, setting off events that lead to cell cycle arrest10, 11. It phosphorylates a wide range of substrates in vitro, including Ku70/Ku80, which is translocated along DNA12. Here we present the crystal structure of human DNA-PKcs at 6.6Å resolution, in which the overall fold is for the first time clearly visible. The many α-helical HEAT repeats (helix-turn-helix motifs) facilitate bending and allow the polypeptide chain to fold into a hollow circular structure. The C-terminal kinase domain is located on top of this structure and a small HEAT repeat domain that likely binds DNA is inside. The structure provides a flexible cradle to promote DNA double-strand-break repair. PMID:20023628

  19. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Burn Patients Using PCR- Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolaziz Rastegar Lari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the major opportunistic pathogens in patients with burninjuries is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which causes severe infectionsin burned patients. The objective of the study was to examinethe molecular epidemiology of P. aeruginosa colonization inthe burn unit of Shahid Motahari Hospital in Tehran, Iran. Restrictionfragment length polymorphism (RFLP and random amplifiedpolymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis were employed tostudy 127 clinical and two environmental P. aeruginosa isolatescollected from January to June 2008. In RFLP, the PCR productsof 16S rRNA gene were digested with restriction enzyme Alu I,Hae III, and Rsa I, and the fragments generated were analyzed byagarose electrophoresis. Molecular typing by RFLP did show nodiscriminatory power for P. aeruginosa isolates, but RAPD-PCRrevealed eight different genotypes; RAPD1to RAPD8 in clinicaland environmental isolates. RAPD1 was the major genotype inclinical (n=64, 50.4% and environmental isolates (n=1, 50%.The findings suggest that RAPD might have a superior typeabilityand discriminatory power over RFLP to study P. aeruginusa.Moreover, they highlight the need for further attention to the controlof infection sources in Burn Units to prevent the transmissionof the bacterium.

  20. [Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms shared between modern humans and neanderthals: adaptive convergence or evidence for interspecific hybridization?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliarchuk, B A

    2013-09-01

    An analysis of the variability of the nucleotide sequences in the mitochondrial genome of modern humans, neanderthals, Denisovans, and other primates has shown that there are shared polymorphisms at positions 2758 and 7146 between modern Homo sapiens (in phylogenetic cluster L2'3'4'5'6) and Homo neanderthalensis (in the group of European neanderthals younger than 48000 years). It is suggested that the convergence may be due to adaptive changes in the mitochondrial genomes of modern humans and neanderthals or interspecific hybridization associated with mtDNA recombination.

  1. GSTM1 and XRCC3 Polymorphisms: Effects on Levels of Aflatoxin B1-DNA Adducts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-dai Long; Yun Ma; Zhou-lin Deng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), which can cause the formation of AFB1-DNA adducts, is a known human carcinogen. AFB1-exposure individuals with inherited susceptible carcinogen-metabolizing or repairing genotypes may experience an increased risk of genotoxicity. This study was designed to investigate whether the polymorphisms of two genes, the metabolic gene Glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and DNA repair gene x-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3), can affect the levels of AFB1-DNA adducts in Guangxi Population (n= 966) from an AFB1-exposure area.Methods: AFB1-DNA adducts were measured by ELISA, and GSTM1 and XRCC3 codon 241 genotypes were identified by PCR-RFLP.Results: The GSTM1-null genotype [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.09; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.61(2.71] and XRCC3 genotypes with 241 Met alleles [i.e., XRCC3-TM and -MM, adjusted ORs (95% CI) were 1.43 (1.08(1.89) and 2.42 (1.13(5.22), respectively] were significantly associated with higher levels of AFB1-DNA adducts. Compared with those individuals who did not express any putative risk genotypes as reference (OR = 1), individuals featuring all of the putative risk genotypes did experience a significantly higher DNA-adduct levels (adjusted ORs were 2.87 for GSTM1-null and XRCC3-TM; 5.83 for GSTM1-null and XRCC3-MM). Additionally, there was a positive joint effect between XRCC3 genotypes and long-term AFB1 exposure in the formation of AFB1-DNA adducts.Conclusion: These results suggest that individuals with susceptible genotypes GSTM1-null, XRCC3-TM, or XRCC3-MM may experience an increased risk of DNA damage elicited by AFB1 exposure.

  2. Typing of bacteriophages by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to assess genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Martín-Platero, Antonio M; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; García, Pilar; Martínez, Beatriz

    2011-09-01

    The recent boom in phage therapy and phage biocontrol requires the design of suitable cocktails of genetically different bacteriophages. The current methods for typing phages need significant quantities of purified DNA, may require a priori genetic information and are cost and time consuming. We have evaluated the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR technique to produce unique and reproducible band patterns from 26 different bacteriophages infecting Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactococcus lactis, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus thermophilus, Bacillus subtilis and Lactobacillus casei bacterial strains. Initially, purified DNA and phage suspensions of seven selected phages were used as a template. The conditions that were found to be optimal 8 μM of 10-mer primers, 3 μM magnesium oxalacetate and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide. The RAPD genomic fingerprints using a phage titer suspension higher than 10(9) PFU mL(-1) were highly reproducible. Clustering by the Pearson correlation coefficient and the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages clustering algorithm correlated largely with genetically different phages infecting the same bacterial species, although closely related phages with a similar DNA restriction pattern were indistinguishable. The results support the use of RAPD-PCR for quick typing of phage isolates and preliminary assessment of their genetic diversity bypassing tedious DNA purification protocols and previous knowledge of their sequence.

  3. Extensive polymorphism and chromosomal characteristics of ribosomal DNA in the characid fish Triportheus venezuelensis (Characiformes, Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Nirchio

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The karyotype and chromosomal characteristics of the characid fish Triportheus venezuelensis were investigated using differential staining techniques (C-banding, Ag-NOR staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with an 18S rDNA probe. The diploid chromosome number (2n = 52, karyotype composition and sex chromosome determination system of the ZZ/ZW type were the same as previously described in other species of the genus Triportheus. However, extensive variation regarding nucleolus organizer regions (NOR different from other species was observed. 18S rDNA sequences were distributed on nine chromosome pairs, but the number of chromosomes with Ag-NORs was usually lower, reaching a maximum of four chromosomes. When sequential staining experiments were performed, it was demonstrated that: 1. active NORs usually corresponded to segments with 18S rDNA genes identified in FISH experiments; 2. several 18S rDNA sequences were not silver-stained, suggesting that they do not correspond to active NORs; and 3. some chromosomes with silver-stained regions did not display any 18S rDNA signals. These findings characterize an extensive polymorphism associated with the NOR-bearing chromosomes of T. venezuelensis and emphasize the importance of combining traditional and molecular techniques in chromosome studies.

  4. Stability of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting in genotyping clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-Chan Han; Han-Chong Ng; Bow Ho

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Hpylorigenomes are highly diversified. This project was designed to genotype Hpyloriisolates by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique and to verify its stability by Southern blotting and DNA sequencing.METHODS: Clinical isolates of Hpyloriwere cultured from gastric antra and cardia of 73 individuals, and genomic DNA was prepared for each isolate. RAPD was carried out under optimized conditions. 23S rDNA was regarded as an internal control, and a 361 bp rDNA fragment (RDF) was used as a probe to screen the RAPD products by Southern blotting.Ten RDFs from different clinical isolates and the flanking regions (both upstream and downstream) of four RDFs were amplified and sequenced.RESULTS: Hpyloriisolates from different individuals had different RAPD profiles, but the profiles for isolates cultured from different gastric sites of a given individual were identical in all but one case. Isolates from 27 individuals were RDF positive by Southern blotting. Sequences of the RDFs and their flanking regions were almost the same between the RDF positive and negative isolates as determined by Southern blotting. There was no binding site for random PCR primer inside the sequences.CONCLUSION: RAPD is very useful in genotyping H pylori grossly on a large scale. However, it seems unstable in amplification of low yield fragments, especially those that do not appear as visible bands on the agarose gel stained with EB, since the palmer is partially matched to the template.

  5. Polymorphisms and ambiguous sites present in DNA sequences of Leishmania clones: looking closer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boité, Mariana Côrtes; de Oliveira, Taíse Salgado; Ferreira, Gabriel Eduardo Melim; Trannin, Marcos; dos Santos, Barbara Neves; Porrozzi, Renato; Cupolillo, Elisa

    2014-07-01

    In genetic studies of Leishmania parasites, co-dominant markers are chosen for their ability to detect heterozygous polymorphisms, to infer the occurrence of inbreeding and to resolve genetic variability. The majority of DNA sequence based reports perform conventional dye terminator cycle sequencing where perfectly ambiguous sites or double peaks in the chromatogram are interpreted as heterozygous strains. However, molecular peculiarities of the parasite such as aneuploidy, mixed populations and homologous recombination advise that data from regular DNA sequence analysis should be carefully evaluated. We report here a closer look at ambiguous sites observed in 6pgd DNA sequences obtained for a multilocus sequence analysis project on Leishmania (Viannia) strains. After comparing 286 DNA sequences from biological and molecular clones of six L. (Viannia) strains we could distinguish events that contribute to genetic variation in Leishmania (recombination, mutation, chromosomal mosaics). Also, the results suggest how diversity might not be completely revealed through regular DNA sequence analysis and demonstrate the importance for molecular epidemiology research to be aware of such possibilities while choosing samples for studies.

  6. Detection of genomic variations and DNA polymorphisms and impact on analysis of meiotic recombination and genetic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ji; Chen, Yamao; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Ma, Hong

    2014-07-08

    DNA polymorphisms are important markers in genetic analyses and are increasingly detected by using genome resequencing. However, the presence of repetitive sequences and structural variants can lead to false positives in the identification of polymorphic alleles. Here, we describe an analysis strategy that minimizes false positives in allelic detection and present analyses of recently published resequencing data from Arabidopsis meiotic products and individual humans. Our analysis enables the accurate detection of sequencing errors, small insertions and deletions (indels), and structural variants, including large reciprocal indels and copy number variants, from comparisons between the resequenced and reference genomes. We offer an alternative interpretation of the sequencing data of meiotic products, including the number and type of recombination events, to illustrate the potential for mistakes in single-nucleotide polymorphism calling. Using these examples, we propose that the detection of DNA polymorphisms using resequencing data needs to account for nonallelic homologous sequences.

  7. Preliminary evidence for an association of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism at the MAOA gene with early onset alcoholism/substance abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanyukov, M.M.; Moss, H.B.; Tarter, R.E. [Univ. of Pittsburg, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-24

    An association between the liability to early onset alcoholism/substance abuse and a recently discovered dinucleotide repeat length polymorphism at the MAOA gene (MAOCA-1) was examined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A significant correlation between the presence/absence of the disorder and the length of the MAOCA-1 repeat was found in males, but not females, with {open_quotes}long{close_quotes} alleles (repeat length above 115 bp) associated with both increased risk for the disorder and lower age of onset of substance abuse. These preliminary data suggest that further exploration of the relationship between the MAOA gene and behavioral traits in an expanded sample is warranted. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Genetic polymorphisms in catalase and CYP1B1 determine DNA adduct formation by benzo(a)pyrene ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schults, Marten A; Chiu, Roland K; Nagle, Peter W; Wilms, Lonneke C; Kleinjans, Jos C; van Schooten, Frederik J; Godschalk, Roger W

    2013-03-01

    Genetic polymorphisms can partially explain the large inter-individual variation in DNA adduct levels following exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Effects of genetic polymorphisms on DNA adduct formation are difficult to assess in human studies because exposure misclassification attenuates underlying relationships. Conversely, ex vivo studies offer the advantage of controlled exposure settings, allowing the possibility to better elucidate genotype-phenotype relationships and gene-gene interactions. Therefore, we exposed lymphocytes of 168 non-smoking volunteers ex vivo to the environmental pollutant benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and BaP-related DNA adducts were quantified. Thirty-four genetic polymorphisms were assessed in genes involved in carcinogen metabolism, oxidative stress and DNA repair. Polymorphisms in catalase (CAT, rs1001179) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1, rs1800440) were significantly associated with DNA adduct levels, especially when combined. Moreover, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis in a subset of 30 subjects revealed that expression of catalase correlated strongly with expression of CYP1B1 (R = 0.92, P CYP1B1 and how they simultaneously affect BaP-related DNA adduct levels, catalase expression was transiently knocked down in the human lung epithelial cell line A549. Although catalase knockdown did not immediately change CYP1B1 gene expression, recovery of catalase expression 8 h after the knockdown coincided with a 2.2-fold increased expression of CYP1B1 (P polymorphism in the promoter region of CAT may determine the amount and activity of catalase, which may subsequently regulate the expression of CYP1B1. As a result, both genetic polymorphisms modulate DNA adduct levels in lymphocytes by BaP ex vivo.

  9. Demographic and random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses reveal high levels of genetic diversity in a clonal violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auge, H; Neuffer, B; Erlinghagen, F; Grupe, R; Brandl, R

    2001-07-01

    We performed demographic and molecular investigations on woodland populations of the clonal herb Viola riviniana in central Germany. We investigated the pattern of seedling recruitment, the amount of genotypic (clonal) variation and the partitioning of genetic variation among and within populations. Our demographic study was carried out in six violet populations of different ages and habitat conditions. It revealed that repeated seedling recruitment takes place in all of these populations, and that clonal propagation is accompanied by high ramet mortality. Our molecular investigations were performed on a subset of three of these six violet populations. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses using six primers yielded 45 scorable bands that were used to identify multilocus genotypes, i.e. putative clones. Consistent with our demographic results and independent of population age, we found a large genotypic diversity with a mean proportion of distinguishable genotypes of 0.93 and a mean Simpson's diversity index of 0.99. Using AMOVA we found a strong genetic differentiation among these violet populations with a PhiST value of 0.41. We suggest that a high selfing rate, limited gene flow due to short seed dispersal distances and drift due to founder effects are responsible for this pattern. Although Viola riviniana is a clonal plant, traits associated with sexual reproduction rather than clonality per se are moulding the pattern of genetic variation in this species.

  10. Polymorphism of the DNA repair gene XPA and susceptibility to lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinfu Zhu; Zhibin Hu; Hongxia Ma; Xiang Huo; Lin Xu; Jiannong Zhou; Hongbing Shen; Yijiang Chen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between one polymorphism in the promoter of the DNA repair gene XPA and the susceptibility to lung cancer. Methods: Genotypes were determined by the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)method in 310 histologically-confirmed lung cancer cases and 341 age and sex frequency-matched cancer-free controls. Results: The XPA A23G genotype frequencies were 27.1% (AA), 42.9% (AG), and 30.0% (GG) in case patients and 21.1% (AA), 52.8% (AG),and 26.1% (GG) in control subjects. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that individuals carrying at least one 23G variant allele (AG + GG genotypes) had a significantly decreased risk for lung cancer (adjusted OR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.44- 0.98) compared with the wild-type genotype (23AA). Stratified analysis showed that the protective effect was more evident in subjects with a family history of cancer. Conclusion: These results suggest that the XPA A23G polymorphism may have a role in lung cancer susceptibility in this study population.

  11. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of Anopheles nuneztovari (Diptera: Culicidae from Western and Northeastern Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Elisa Posso

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers were used to analyze 119 DNA samples of three Colombian Anopheles nuneztovari populations to study genetic variation and structure. Genetic diversity, estimated from heterozygosity, averaged 0.34. Genetic flow was greater between the two populations located in Western Colombia (F ST: 0.035; Nm: 6.8 but lower between these two and the northeastern population (F ST: 0.08; Nm: 2.8. According to molecular variance analysis, the genetic distance between populations was significant (phiST 0.1131, P < 0.001. The variation among individuals within populations (phiST 0.8869, P < 0.001was also significant, suggesting a greater degree of population subdivision, not considered in this study. Both the parameters evaluated and the genetic flow suggest that Colombian An. nuneztovari populations are co-specific.

  12. Genome relationship among nine species of Millettieae (Leguminosae: Papilionoideae) based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Laxmikanta; Mukherjee, Arup Kumar; Panda, Pratap Chandra

    2004-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker was used to establish intergeneric classification and phylogeny of the tribe Millettieae sensu Geesink (1984) (Leguminosae: Papilionoideae) and to assess genetic relationship between 9 constituent species belonging to 5 traditionally recognized genera under the tribe. DNA from pooled leaf samples was isolated and RAPD analysis performed using 25 decamer primers. The genetic similarities were derived from the dendrogram constructed by the pooled RAPD data using a similarity index, which supported clear grouping of species under their respective genera, inter- and intra-generic classification and phylogeny and also merger of Pongamia with Millettia. Elevation of Tephrosia purpurea var. pumila to the rank of a species (T. pumila) based on morphological characteristics is also supported through this study of molecular markers.

  13. Determination of paternity in dragonflies by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadrys, H; Schierwater, B; Dellaporta, S L; DeSalle, R; Buss, L W

    1993-04-01

    We used Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting to address issues of paternity in two odonate species. Amplification artifacts of RAPD markers were controlled by assessing paternity patterns relative to the banding patterns generated by quantitative mixtures of DNA from putative parents ('synthetic offspring'). In the aeshnid dragonfly Anax parthenope, for which the mating histories of both males and females were unknown, we found strong evidence for complete paternity success for the contact guarding male. In the highly polygamous libellulid dragonfly Orthetrum coerulescens, we detected and quantified mixed paternity in sequentially produced offspring clutches and demonstrated that fertilization success is correlated with the duration of copulation. Our results suggest that RAPD fingerprinting is suitable to address issues of paternity in systems which are genetically uncharacterized and produce large offspring clutches.

  14. DNA methyl transferase (DNMT gene polymorphisms could be a primary event in epigenetic susceptibility to schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koramannil Radha Saradalekshmi

    Full Text Available DNA methylation has been implicated in the etiopathology of various complex disorders. DNA methyltransferases are involved in maintaining and establishing new methylation patterns. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inherent genetic variations within DNA methyltransferase genes in predisposing to susceptibility to schizophrenia. We screened for polymorphisms in DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B and DNMT3L in 330 schizophrenia patients and 302 healthy controls for association with Schizophrenia in south Indian population. These polymorphisms were also tested for subgroup analysis with patient's gender, age of onset and family history. DNMT1 rs2114724 (genotype P = .004, allele P = 0.022 and rs2228611 (genotype P = 0.004, allele P = 0.022 were found to be significantly associated at genotypic and allelic level with Schizophrenia in South Indian population. DNMT3B rs2424932 genotype (P = 0.023 and allele (P = 0.0063 increased the risk of developing schizophrenia in males but not in females. DNMT3B rs1569686 (genotype P = 0.027, allele P = 0.033 was found to be associated with early onset of schizophrenia and also with family history and early onset (genotype P = 0.009. DNMT3L rs2070565 (genotype P = 0.007, allele P = 0.0026 confers an increased risk of developing schizophrenia at an early age in individuals with family history. In-silico prediction indicated functional relevance of these SNPs in regulating the gene. These observations might be crucial in addressing and understanding the genetic control of methylation level differences from ethnic viewpoint. Functional significance of genotype variations within the DNMTs indeed suggest that the genetic nature of methyltransferases should be considered while addressing epigenetic events mediated by methylation in Schizophrenia.

  15. A simple Duplex-PCR to evaluate the DNA quality of anthropological and forensic samples prior short tandem repeat typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Schwark, Thorsten; Harbeck, Michaela; Oehmichen, Manfred

    2004-04-01

    Typing of DNA from ancient or otherwise highly degraded material, e.g. formalin fixed tissues, can be difficult, time consuming and costly. Very often, genetic typing is not possible at all. We present an inexpensive and easy to use Duplex-PCR that amplifies a 164 bp fragment specific for nuclear DNA together with a 260 bp mitochondrial DNA fragment and that can be employed as a pretest prior to short tandem repeat (STR) typing. All together, we analyzed DNA from 20 ancient bones, 20 formalin fixed tissues and 20 other forensic samples in different concentrations. Each sample that failed in the presented Duplex-amplification was also negative for STR typing, while samples that showed strong and clear signals in the Duplex-PCR led to reproducible genetic profiles using the multiplex kits AmpFLSTR Identifiler and Powerplex ES. The Duplex-PCR worked as a reliable indicator of DNA quality in the sample.

  16. Comparative molecular cytogenetic analyses of a major tandemly repeated DNA family and retrotransposon sequences in cultivated jute Corchorus species (Malvaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Rabeya; Zakrzewski, Falk; Menzel, Gerhard; Weber, Beatrice; Alam, Sheikh Shamimul; Schmidt, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The cultivated jute species Corchorus olitorius and Corchorus capsularis are important fibre crops. The analysis of repetitive DNA sequences, comprising a major part of plant genomes, has not been carried out in jute but is useful to investigate the long-range organization of chromosomes. The aim of this study was the identification of repetitive DNA sequences to facilitate comparative molecular and cytogenetic studies of two jute cultivars and to develop a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) karyotype for chromosome identification. A plasmid library was generated from C. olitorius and C. capsularis with genomic restriction fragments of 100-500 bp, which was complemented by targeted cloning of satellite DNA by PCR. The diversity of the repetitive DNA families was analysed comparatively. The genomic abundance and chromosomal localization of different repeat classes were investigated by Southern analysis and FISH, respectively. The cytosine methylation of satellite arrays was studied by immunolabelling. Major satellite repeats and retrotransposons have been identified from C. olitorius and C. capsularis. The satellite family CoSat I forms two undermethylated species-specific subfamilies, while the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons CoRetro I and CoRetro II show similarity to the Metaviridea of plant retroelements. FISH karyotypes were developed by multicolour FISH using these repetitive DNA sequences in combination with 5S and 18S-5·8S-25S rRNA genes which enable the unequivocal chromosome discrimination in both jute species. The analysis of the structure and diversity of the repeated DNA is crucial for genome sequence annotation. The reference karyotypes will be useful for breeding of jute and provide the basis for karyotyping homeologous chromosomes of wild jute species to reveal the genetic and evolutionary relationship between cultivated and wild Corchorus species.

  17. Evaluation of DNA polymorphisms involving growth hormone relative to growth and carcass characteristics in Brahman steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchemin, V R; Thomas, M G; Franke, D E; Silver, G A

    2006-07-31

    Associations of DNA polymorphisms in growth hormone (GH) relative to growth and carcass characteristics in growing Brahman steers (N = 324 from 68 sires) were evaluated. Polymorphisms were an Msp-I RFLP and a leucine/valine SNP in the GH gene as well as a Hinf-I RFLP and a histidine/arginine SNP in transcriptional regulators of the GH gene, Pit-1 and Prop-1. Genotypic frequencies of the GH SNP, Pit-1 RFLP, and Prop-1 SNP were greater than 88% for one of the bi-allelic homozygous genotypes. Genotypic frequencies for the GH Msp-I RFLP genotypes were more evenly distributed with frequencies of 0.43, 0.42, and 0.15 for the genotypes of +/+, +/-, and -/-, respectively. Mixed model analyses of growth and carcass traits with genotype and contemporary group serving as fixed effects and sire fitted as a random effect suggested that sire was a significant source of variation (P carcass yield, and marbling score. However, measures of growth and carcass traits were similar across GH Msp-I genotypes as steers were slaughtered when fat thickness was estimated to be approximately 1.0 cm. These polymorphisms within the GH gene and/or its transcriptional regulators do not appear to be informative predictors of growth and carcass characteristics in Brahman steers. This is partly due to the high level of homozygosity of genotypes. These findings do not eliminate the potential importance of these polymorphisms as predictors of growth and carcass traits in Bos taurus or Bos taurus x Bos indicus composite cattle.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in Tribolium castaneum genome reveals abundant and highly dynamic tandem repeat families with satellite DNA features in euchromatic chromosomal arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlek, Martina; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Plohl, Miroslav; Meštrović, Nevenka

    2015-12-01

    Although satellite DNAs are well-explored components of heterochromatin and centromeres, little is known about emergence, dispersal and possible impact of comparably structured tandem repeats (TRs) on the genome-wide scale. Our bioinformatics analysis of assembled Tribolium castaneum genome disclosed significant contribution of TRs in euchromatic chromosomal arms and clear predominance of satellite DNA-typical 170 bp monomers in arrays of ≥5 repeats. By applying different experimental approaches, we revealed that the nine most prominent TR families Cast1-Cast9 extracted from the assembly comprise ∼4.3% of the entire genome and reside almost exclusively in euchromatic regions. Among them, seven families that build ∼3.9% of the genome are based on ∼170 and ∼340 bp long monomers. Results of phylogenetic analyses of 2500 monomers originating from these families show high-sequence dynamics, evident by extensive exchanges between arrays on non-homologous chromosomes. In addition, our analysis shows that concerted evolution acts more efficiently on longer than on shorter arrays. Efficient genome-wide distribution of nine TR families implies the role of transposition only in expansion of the most dispersed family, and involvement of other mechanisms is anticipated. Despite similarities in sequence features, FISH experiments indicate high-level compartmentalization of centromeric and euchromatic tandem repeats.

  19. Discovery of human inversion polymorphisms by comparative analysis of human and chimpanzee DNA sequence assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available With a draft genome-sequence assembly for the chimpanzee available, it is now possible to perform genome-wide analyses to identify, at a submicroscopic level, structural rearrangements that have occurred between chimpanzees and humans. The goal of this study was to investigate chromosomal regions that are inverted between the chimpanzee and human genomes. Using the net alignments for the builds of the human and chimpanzee genome assemblies, we identified a total of 1,576 putative regions of inverted orientation, covering more than 154 mega-bases of DNA. The DNA segments are distributed throughout the genome and range from 23 base pairs to 62 mega-bases in length. For the 66 inversions more than 25 kilobases (kb in length, 75% were flanked on one or both sides by (often unrelated segmental duplications. Using PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization we experimentally validated 23 of 27 (85% semi-randomly chosen regions; the largest novel inversion confirmed was 4.3 mega-bases at human Chromosome 7p14. Gorilla was used as an out-group to assign ancestral status to the variants. All experimentally validated inversion regions were then assayed against a panel of human samples and three of the 23 (13% regions were found to be polymorphic in the human genome. These polymorphic inversions include 730 kb (at 7p22, 13 kb (at 7q11, and 1 kb (at 16q24 fragments with a 5%, 30%, and 48% minor allele frequency, respectively. Our results suggest that inversions are an important source of variation in primate genome evolution. The finding of at least three novel inversion polymorphisms in humans indicates this type of structural variation may be a more common feature of our genome than previously realized.

  20. Identification of a glutamic acid repeat polymorphism of ALMS1 as a novel genetic risk marker for early-onset myocardial infarction by genome-wide linkage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Sahoko; Yamamoto, Ken; Asano, Hiroyuki; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Sukegawa, Mayo; Ichihara, Gaku; Izawa, Hideo; Hirashiki, Akihiro; Takatsu, Fumimaro; Umeda, Hisashi; Iwase, Mitsunori; Inagaki, Haruo; Hirayama, Haruo; Sone, Takahito; Nishigaki, Kazuhiko; Minatoguchi, Shinya; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Jang, Yangsoo; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Park, Jeong E; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Kitajima, Hidetoshi; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Sunagawa, Kenji; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Kimura, Akinori; Lee, Jong-Young; Murohara, Toyoaki; Inoue, Ituro; Yokota, Mitsuhiro

    2013-12-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Given that a family history is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease, genetic variants are thought to contribute directly to the development of this condition. The identification of susceptibility genes for coronary artery disease or MI may thus help to identify high-risk individuals and offer the opportunity for disease prevention. We designed a 5-step protocol, consisting of a genome-wide linkage study followed by association analysis, to identify novel genetic variants that confer susceptibility to coronary artery disease or MI. A genome-wide affected sib-pair linkage study with 221 Japanese families with coronary artery disease yielded a statistically significant logarithm of the odds score of 3.44 for chromosome 2p13 and MI. Further association analysis implicated Alström syndrome 1 gene (ALMS1) as a candidate gene within the linkage region. Validation association analysis revealed that representative single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the ALMS1 promoter region were significantly associated with early-onset MI in both Japanese and Korean populations. Moreover, direct sequencing of the ALMS1 coding region identified a glutamic acid repeat polymorphism in exon 1, which was subsequently found to be associated with early-onset MI. The glutamic acid repeat polymorphism of ALMS1 identified in the present study may provide insight into the pathogenesis of early-onset MI.

  1. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of DNA extracted from Trichuris trichiura (Linnaeus, 1771 eggs and its prospective application to paleoparasitological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Machado Martinez

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was applied to DNAs extracted from Trichuris trichiura eggs recovered from human fecal samples. Four out of 6 primers tested displayed 18 distinct and well defined polymorphic patterns, ranging from 650 to 3200 base pairs. These results, upon retrieval and DNA sequencing of some of these bands from agarose gels, might help in establishing T. trichiura specific genetic markers, not available yet, and an important step to design primers to be used in molecular diagnosis approaches.

  2. 'Hide-then-hit' to explain the importance of genotypic polymorphism of DNA repair genes in determining susceptibility to cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Ei Wu; Chen-Yang Shen

    2011-01-01

    Interindividual variations in DNA repair capacity/efficiency linked to the presence of polymorphisms in DNA repair-related genes have been suggested to account for different risk of developing cancers. In this review article, on the basis of breast cancer formation as a model, we propose a 'hide-then-hit' hypothesis indicating the importance of escaping checkpoint surveillance for sub-optimal DNA repair variants to cause cancer. Therefore, only cells with subtle defects in repair capacity arising from low-penetrance variants of DNA repair genes would have the opportunity to grow and accumulate the genetic changes needed for cancer formation, without triggering cell-cycle checkpoint surveillance. Furthermore, distinct from high-penetrance alleles, these polymorphic alleles of DNA repair genes would predispose carriers to a higher risk of developing cancer but would not necessarily cause cancer. To examine this,we simultaneously genotyped multiple SNPs of cell-cycle checkpoint genes and the DNA repair genes. Support for the hypothesis came from observations that breast cancer risk associated with variant genotypes of DNA repair genes became more significant in be confirmed by biological evidence in which a cause-effect relationship has to be established. However, based on this, possible gene-gene interaction is considered to play an important role in modifying the cancer risk associated with genotypic polymorphism of DNA repair gene in different study populations.

  3. Modeling genetic imprinting effects of DNA sequences with multilocus polymorphism data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staud Roland

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs represent the most widespread type of DNA sequence variation in the human genome and they have recently emerged as valuable genetic markers for revealing the genetic architecture of complex traits in terms of nucleotide combination and sequence. Here, we extend an algorithmic model for the haplotype analysis of SNPs to estimate the effects of genetic imprinting expressed at the DNA sequence level. The model provides a general procedure for identifying the number and types of optimal DNA sequence variants that are expressed differently due to their parental origin. The model is used to analyze a genetic data set collected from a pain genetics project. We find that DNA haplotype GAC from three SNPs, OPRKG36T (with two alleles G and T, OPRKA843G (with alleles A and G, and OPRKC846T (with alleles C and T, at the kappa-opioid receptor, triggers a significant effect on pain sensitivity, but with expression significantly depending on the parent from which it is inherited (p = 0.008. With a tremendous advance in SNP identification and automated screening, the model founded on haplotype discovery and statistical inference may provide a useful tool for genetic analysis of any quantitative trait with complex inheritance.

  4. Rapid and cost-effective polymorphism identification and genotyping using restriction site associated DNA (RAD) markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael R; Dunham, Joseph P; Amores, Angel; Cresko, William A; Johnson, Eric A

    2007-02-01

    Restriction site associated DNA (RAD) tags are a genome-wide representation of every site of a particular restriction enzyme by short DNA tags. Most organisms segregate large numbers of DNA sequence polymorphisms that disrupt restriction sites, which allows RAD tags to serve as genetic markers spread at a high density throughout the genome. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of RAD markers for both individual and bulk-segregant genotyping. First, we show that these markers can be identified and typed on pre-existing microarray formats. Second, we present a method that uses RAD marker DNA to rapidly produce a low-cost microarray genotyping resource that can be used to efficiently identify and type thousands of RAD markers. We demonstrate the utility of the former approach by using a tiling path array for the fruit fly to map a recombination breakpoint, and the latter approach by creating and using an enriched RAD marker array for the threespine stickleback. The high number of RAD markers enabled localization of a previously identified region, as well as a second region also associated with the lateral plate phenotype. Taken together, our results demonstrate that RAD markers, and the method to develop a RAD marker microarray resource, allow high-throughput, high-resolution genotyping in both model and nonmodel systems.

  5. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis of Heterodera cruciferae and H. schachtii populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell-Chen, E P; Williamson, V M; Wu, F F

    1992-09-01

    Heterodera schachtii and H. cruciferae are sympatric in California and frequently occur in the same field upon the same host. We have investigated the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of nematode DNA sequences to differentiate H. schachtii and H. cruciferae and to assess genetic variability within each species. Single, random oligodeoxyribonucleotide primers were used to generate PCR-amplified fragments, termed RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) markers, from genomic DNA of each species. Each of 19 different random primers yielded from 2 to 12 fragments whose size ranged from 200 to 1,500 bp. Reproducible differences in fragment patterns allowed differentiation of the two species with each primer. Similarities and differences among six different geographic populations of H. schachtii were detected. The potential application of RAPD analysis to relationships among nematode populations was assessed through cluster analysis of these six different populations, with 78 scorable markers from 10 different random primers. DNA from single cysts was successfully amplified, and genetic variability was revealed within geographic populations. The use of RAPD markers to assess genetic variability is a simple, reproducible technique that does not require radioisotopes. This powerful new technique can be used as a diagnostic tool and should have broad application in nematology.

  6. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene intron 4 variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in β-thalassemia major: relation to cardiovascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawy, Azza A G; Adly, Amira A M; Ismail, Eman A; Aly, Shereen H

    2015-06-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), an enzyme that generates nitric oxide, is a major determinant of endothelial function. Several eNOS gene polymorphisms have been reported as 'susceptibility genes' in various human diseases states, including cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal diseases. We studied the 27-base pair tandem repeat polymorphism in intron 4 of eNOS gene in 60 β-thalassemia major (β-TM) patients compared with 60 healthy controls and assessed its role in subclinical atherosclerosis and vascular complications. Patients were evaluated stressing on transfusion history, splenectomy, thrombotic events, echocardiography and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Analysis of eNOS intron 4 gene polymorphism was performed by PCR. No significant difference was found between β-TM patients and controls with regard to the distribution of eNOS4 alleles or genotypes. The frequency of eNOS4a allele (aa and ab genotypes) was significantly higher in β-TM patients with pulmonary hypertension or cardiomyopathy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that eNOS4a allele was an independent risk factor for pulmonary hypertension in β-TM patients [odds ratio (OR) 2.2, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.19-5.6; P < 0.001]. We suggest that eNOS intron 4 gene polymorphism is related to endothelial dysfunction and subclinical atherosclerosis and could be a possible genetic marker for prediction of increased susceptibility to cardiovascular complications.

  7. Paraoxonase-1 genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyender; Kumar, Vivek; Thakur, Sachin; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen; Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Ichhpujani, Rattan Lal; Rai, Arvind

    2011-04-15

    Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a lipoprotein-associated enzyme involved in the detoxification of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) by hydrolyzing the bioactive oxons. Polymorphisms of the PON1 gene are responsible for variation in the expression and catalytic activity of PON1 enzyme. In the present study, we have determined (a) the prevalence of two common PON1 polymorphisms, (b) the activity of PON1 and acetylcholinesterase enzymes, and (c) the influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes variation on DNA damage in workers exposed to OPs. We examined 230 subjects including 115 workers exposed to OPs and an equal number of normal healthy controls. The results revealed that PON1 activity toward paraoxon (179.19±39.36 vs. 241.52±42.32nmol/min/ml in controls) and phenylacetate (112.74±17.37 vs. 134.28±25.49μmol/min/ml in controls) was significantly lower in workers than in control subjects (p0.05). The PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was found to be significantly higher in the R/R (Arg/Arg) genotypes than Q/R (Gln/Arg) and lowest in Q/Q (Gln/Gln) genotypes in both workers and control subjects (p<0.001). For PON1(55)LM (Leu/Met), PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was observed to be higher in individuals with L/L (Leu/Leu) genotypes and lowest in individuals with M/M (Met/Met) genotypes in both groups (p<0.001). No influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes was seen on the activity of acetylcholinesterase and arylesterase. The DNA damage was observed to be significantly higher in workers than in control subjects (p<0.05). Further, the individuals who showed least paraoxonase activity i.e., those with (Q/Q [Gln/Gln] and M/M [Met/Met]) genotypes showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to other isoforms in workers exposed to OPs (p<0.05). The results indicate that the individuals with PON1 Q/Q and M/M genotypes are more susceptible toward genotoxicity. In conclusion, the study suggests wide variation in enzyme activities and DNA damage due to polymorphisms in PON1

  8. ‘‘Blind'' mapping of genic DNA sequence polymorphisms in Lolium perenne L. by high resolution melting curve analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studer, Bruno; Jensen, Louise Bach; Fiil, Alice;

    2009-01-01

    in vernalization response successfully discriminated genotypes in absence of allelic sequence information, and allowed to determine allele segregation in VrnA. Here we introduce the concept of "blind" mapping based on HRM as a powerful, fast and cheap method to map any DNA sequence polymorphisms without prior...... curves. In this study, HRM was used for simultaneous screening and genotyping of genic DNA sequence polymorphisms identified in the Lolium perenne F2 mapping population VrnA. Melting profiles of PCR products amplified from previously published gene loci and from a novel gene putatively involved...

  9. A family of DNA repeats in Aspergillus nidulans has assimilated degenerated retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.L.; Hermansen, T.D.; Aleksenko, Alexei Y.

    2001-01-01

    In the course of a chromosomal walk towards the centromere of chromosome IV of Aspergillus nidulans, several cross- hybridizing genomic cosmid clones were isolated. Restriction mapping of two such clones revealed that their restriction patterns were similar in a region of at least 15 kb, indicati......) phenomenon, first described in Neurospora crassa, may have operated in A. nidulans. The data indicate that this family of repeats has assimilated mobile elements that subsequently degenerated but then underwent further duplications as a part of the host repeats....... the presence of a large repeat. The nature of the repeat was further investigated by sequencing and Southern analysis. The study revealed a family of long dispersed repeats with a high degree of sequence similarity. The number and location of the repeats vary between wild isolates. Two copies of the repeat...

  10. Differential distribution and association of repeat DNA sequences in the lateral element of the synaptonemal complex in rat spermatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Hernández, Abrahan; Rincón-Arano, Héctor; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Ortiz, Rosario; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Echeverría, Olga M; Benavente, Ricardo; Vázquez-Nin, Gerardo H

    2008-02-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is an evolutionarily conserved structure that mediates synapsis of homologous chromosomes during meiotic prophase I. Previous studies have established that the chromatin of homologous chromosomes is organized in loops that are attached to the lateral elements (LEs) of the SC. The characterization of the genomic sequences associated with LEs of the SC represents an important step toward understanding meiotic chromosome organization and function. To isolate these genomic sequences, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in rat spermatocytes using an antibody against SYCP3, a major structural component of the LEs of the SC. Our results demonstrated the reproducible and exclusive isolation of repeat deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences, in particular long interspersed elements, short interspersed elements, long terminal direct repeats, satellite, and simple repeats. The association of these repeat sequences to the LEs of the SC was confirmed by in situ hybridization of meiotic nuclei shown by both light and electron microscopy. Signals were also detected over the chromatin surrounding SCs and in small loops protruding from the lateral elements into the SC central region. We propose that genomic repeat DNA sequences play a key role in anchoring the chromosome to the protein scaffold of the SC.

  11. Naphthyridine-Benzoazaquinolone: Evaluation of a Tricyclic System for the Binding to (CAG)n Repeat DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Sakata, Akihiro; He, Hanping; Bai, Li-Ping; Murata, Asako; Dohno, Chikara; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2016-07-05

    The expansion of CAG repeats in the human genome causes the neurological disorder Huntington's disease. The small-molecule naphthyridine-azaquinolone NA we reported earlier bound to the CAG/CAG motif in the hairpin structure of the CAG repeat DNA. In order to investigate and improve NA-binding to the CAG repeat DNA and RNA, we conducted systematic structure-binding studies of NA to CAG repeats. Among the five new NA derivatives we synthesized, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay showed that all of the derivatives modified from amide linkages in NA to a carbamate linkage failed to bind to CAG repeat DNA and RNA. One derivative, NBzA, modified by incorporating an additional ring to the azaquinolone was found to bind to both d(CAG)9 and r(CAG)9 . NBzA binding to d(CAG)9 was similar to NA binding in terms of large changes in the SPR assay and circular dichroism (CD) as well as pairwise binding, as assessed by electron spray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF) mass spectrometry. For the binding to r(CAG)9 , both NA and NBzA showed stepwise binding in ESI-TOF MS, and NBzA-binding to r(CAG)9 induced more extensive conformational change than NA-binding. The tricyclic system in NBzA did not show significant effects on the binding, selectivity, and translation, but provides a large chemical space for further modification to gain higher affinity and selectivity. These studies revealed that the linker structure in NA and NBzA was suitable for the binding to CAG DNA and RNA, and that the tricyclic benzoazaquinolone did not interfere with the binding.

  12. The CFTR polymorphisms poly-T, TG-repeats and M470V in Chinese males with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Hua Ni; Lei Jiang; Qian-Jin Fei; Jian-Yuan Jin; Xu Yang; Xue-Feng Huang

    2012-01-01

    Congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) is a frequent cause of obstructive azoospermia,and mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have also been frequently identified in patients with CBAVD.However,the distribution of the CFTR polymorphisms M470V,poly-T,TG-repeats and F508del mutation in the Chinese CBAVD population with presumed low cystic fibrosis (CF) frequency remains to be evaluated.Samples obtained from 109 Chinese infertile males with CBAVD and 104 normal controls were analyzed for the presence of CFTR (TG)m(T)n,M470V and F508del by PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing.Our study showed that the F508del mutation was not found in our patients.The 5T mutation was present with high frequency in Chinese CBAVD patients and IVS8-5T linked to either 12 or 13 TG repeats was highly prevalent among CBAVD patients (97.22% of 72 cases and 96.91% of 97 alleles with IVS8-5T).Moreover,a statistically significant relationship between TG12-5T-V470 haplotype and CBAVD was detected.This study indicated that the CFTR polymorphisms poly-T,TG-repeats and M470V might affect the process of CBAVD in the Chinese population.

  13. Kelvin probe force microscopy of DNA-capped nanoparticles for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Yang, Jaemoon; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoon, Dae Sung

    2016-07-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a robust toolkit for profiling the surface potential (SP) of biomolecular interactions between DNAs and/or proteins at the single molecule level. However, it has often suffered from background noise and low throughput due to instrumental or environmental constraints, which is regarded as limiting KPFM applications for detection of minute changes in the molecular structures such as single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here, we show KPFM imaging of DNA-capped nanoparticles (DCNP) that enables SNP detection of the BRCA1 gene owing to sterically well-adjusted DNA-DNA interactions that take place within the confined spaces of DCNP. The average SP values of DCNP interacting with BRCA1 SNP were found to be lower than the DCNP reacting with normal (non-mutant) BRCA1 gene. We also demonstrate that SP characteristics of DCNP with different substrates (e.g., Au, Si, SiO2, and Fe) provide us with a chance to attenuate or augment the SP signal of DCNP without additional enhancement of instrumentation capabilities.Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a robust toolkit for profiling the surface potential (SP) of biomolecular interactions between DNAs and/or proteins at the single molecule level. However, it has often suffered from background noise and low throughput due to instrumental or environmental constraints, which is regarded as limiting KPFM applications for detection of minute changes in the molecular structures such as single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here, we show KPFM imaging of DNA-capped nanoparticles (DCNP) that enables SNP detection of the BRCA1 gene owing to sterically well-adjusted DNA-DNA interactions that take place within the confined spaces of DCNP. The average SP values of DCNP interacting with BRCA1 SNP were found to be lower than the DCNP reacting with normal (non-mutant) BRCA1 gene. We also demonstrate that SP characteristics of DCNP with different substrates (e.g., Au, Si, SiO2, and Fe) provide us with a

  14. Gallium plasmonic nanoparticles for label-free DNA and single nucleotide polymorphism sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Antonio García; García-Mendiola, Tania; Bernabeu, Cristina Navio; Hernández, María Jesús; Piqueras, Juan; Pau, Jose Luis; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2016-05-01

    A label-free DNA and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sensing method is described. It is based on the use of the pseudodielectric function of gallium plasmonic nanoparticles (GaNPs) deposited on Si (100) substrates under reversal of the polarization handedness condition. Under this condition, the pseudodielectric function is extremely sensitive to changes in the surrounding medium of the nanoparticle surface providing an excellent sensing platform competitive to conventional surface plasmon resonance. DNA sensing has been carried out by immobilizing a thiolated capture probe sequence from Helicobacter pylori onto GaNP/Si substrates; complementary target sequences of Helicobacter pylori can be quantified over the range of 10 pM to 3.0 nM with a detection limit of 6.0 pM and a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.990. The selectivity of the device allows the detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a specific sequence of Helicobacter pylori, without the need for a hybridization suppressor in solution such as formamide. Furthermore, it also allows the detection of this sequence in the presence of other pathogens, such as Escherichia coli in the sample. The broad applicability of the system was demonstrated by the detection of a specific gene mutation directly associated with cystic fibrosis in large genomic DNA isolated from blood cells.A label-free DNA and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sensing method is described. It is based on the use of the pseudodielectric function of gallium plasmonic nanoparticles (GaNPs) deposited on Si (100) substrates under reversal of the polarization handedness condition. Under this condition, the pseudodielectric function is extremely sensitive to changes in the surrounding medium of the nanoparticle surface providing an excellent sensing platform competitive to conventional surface plasmon resonance. DNA sensing has been carried out by immobilizing a thiolated capture probe sequence from Helicobacter pylori

  15. Role of direct repeat and stem-loop motifs in mtDNA deletions: cause or coincidence?

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    Lakshmi Narayanan Lakshmanan

    Full Text Available Deletion mutations within mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA have been implicated in degenerative and aging related conditions, such as sarcopenia and neuro-degeneration. While the precise molecular mechanism of deletion formation in mtDNA is still not completely understood, genome motifs such as direct repeat (DR and stem-loop (SL have been observed in the neighborhood of deletion breakpoints and thus have been postulated to take part in mutagenesis. In this study, we have analyzed the mitochondrial genomes from four different mammals: human, rhesus monkey, mouse and rat, and compared them to randomly generated sequences to further elucidate the role of direct repeat and stem-loop motifs in aging associated mtDNA deletions. Our analysis revealed that in the four species, DR and SL structures are abundant and that their distributions in mtDNA are not statistically different from randomized sequences. However, the average distance between the reported age associated mtDNA breakpoints and their respective nearest DR motifs is significantly shorter than what is expected of random chance in human (p10 bp tend to decrease with increasing lifespan among the four mammals studied here, further suggesting an evolutionary selection against stable mtDNA misalignments associated with long DRs in long-living animals. In contrast to the results on DR, the probability of finding SL motifs near a deletion breakpoint does not differ from random in any of the four mtDNA sequences considered. Taken together, the findings in this study give support for the importance of stable mtDNA misalignments, aided by long DRs, as a major mechanism of deletion formation in long-living, but not in short-living mammals.

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF GYMNEMA SPECIES BY RANDOM AMPLIFIED POLYMORPHIC DNA TECHNIQUE AND CHLOROPLAST trnK GENE

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    Subashini Sekar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gymnema is one of the important anti-diabetic medicinal plants used from ancient times and is commonly known as ‘sugar killer’. Most of its species have been used in many applications in Indian traditional medicine. Nevertheless, their efficiency is critically dependent on the use of the correct material. The sharing of similar vernacular name and morphological features make confusion in the usage of Gymnema species. In the present study, Gymnema sp. were identified through random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD technique and species specific markers were generated for easy identification of G. elegans, G. montanum and G. sylvestre. Using the RAPD techniques of 3 species specific markers for G. sylvestre, 7 markers for G. elegans and 4 markers for G. montanum had been generated. Highest genetic identity was found between G. sylvestre and G. montanum and highest genetic distance was found between G. sylvestre and G. elegans. Further, DNA barcode was developed by sequencing chloroplast partial trnK DNA of these three species. No significant variation was found in partial trnK gene sequences between Gymnema species. But these sequences can efficiently differentiate the Gymnema and Mandevilla species. In-silico sequence–restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis revealed three fragments measuring G. sylvestre - 204, G. elegans - 174, and G. montanum - 168 bp Gymnema species. The present study concluded that RAPD markers were highly efficient for species detection than the partial trnK gene sequences. This could be used to confirm the Gymnema sp. identities and to ensure their safe application in pharmaceuticals.

  17. [Effects of Cu2+ stress on DNA polymorphism of genome in foxtail millet of different genotypes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Xian; Fu, Ya-Ping; Xiao, Zhi-Hua; Zhang, Xi-Wen; Li, Ping

    2013-10-01

    Cu2+ is an essential element for plant growth, and is one of the major elements in the environment. In order to investigate the physiological characteristics and geno-toxicity effects of foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L) Beauv) under different Cu2+ stress, four genotypes of foxtail millet (Zhaogu, Huangmi, An06, D2-8) from Shanxi, China were cultivated for 30 days in a pot filled with soil of with different mass concentrations of Cu2+ (0, 50, 100, 200, 400 mg.kg-l). Effects of Cu2+ stress on DNA damage of genome in foxtail millet were studied using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) , and the contents of soluble sugar, proline and MDA were tested. The result showed that the content of soluble sugar had a trend of initial increased followed by decline in all four foxtail millet seedlings in response to the rising Cu2+ concentration, and the maximum value was 50 mg.kg-1. At Cu2 concentrations of 200 mg. kg-1 or more, the soluble sugar content in the four kinds of millet showed an average reduction of 32.44% to 56.5% compared to that of the control group. The result showed that proline synthesis was enhanced at low concentrations (less than 50 mg.kg-1) , but inhibited at high concentrations (more than 100 mg.kg-1), and the contents of MDA in the four genotypes of foxtail millet were significantly increased compared with the control group (P different genotypes of millet showed different response in the physiological and genetic damage under Cu2+ stress. The change of DNA polymorphism using RAPD technique could be used as the biomarkers to find genotoxic effects of Cu2+.

  18. Repeated oral administration of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles delivers functional FVIII with the absence of antibodies in hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadwar, S S; Kiernan, J; Wen, J; Hortelano, G

    2010-12-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A is expensive and involves regular infusions of factor (F)VIII concentrates. The supply of functional FVIII is further compromised by the generation of neutralizing antibodies. Thus, the development of an alternative safe, cost effective, non-invasive treatment that circumvents immune response induction is desirable. To evaluate the feasibility of oral administration of chitosan nanoparticles containing FVIII DNA to provide sustainable FVIII activity in hemophilia A mice. Nanoparticles were characterized for morphology, DNA protection and transfection efficiency. Oral administration of nanoparticles containing canine FVIII in C57Bl/6 FVIII(-/-) hemophilia A mice was evaluated for biodistribution, plasma FVIII activity and phenotypic correction. Sustainable FVIII expression was elucidated after repeated nanoparticle administration. Immune responses to repeated oral nanoparticle administration were also investigated. Chitosan nanoparticles had a particle size range of 200-400 nm and protected DNA from endonuclease and pH degradation. In addition, nanoparticles transfected HEK 293 cells resulted in expression of eGFP, luciferase and FVIII. Hemophilia A mice that ingested chitosan nanoparticles demonstrated transient canine FVIII expression reaching > 100 mU 1 day after treatment, together with partial phenotypic correction. The delivered FVIII plasmid DNA was detected in the intestine and, to a lesser extent, in the liver. Importantly, repeated weekly administrations restored FVIII activity. Furthermore, inhibitors and non-neutralizing FVIII antibodies were not detectable. Repeat oral administration of FVIII DNA formulated in chitosan nanoparticles resulted in sustained FVIII activity in hemophilic mice, and thus may provide a non-invasive alternative treatment for hemophilia A. © 2010 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Repeat associated non-ATG translation initiation: one DNA, two transcripts, seven reading frames, potentially nine toxic entities!

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    Christopher E Pearson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Diseases associated with unstable repetitive elements in the DNA, RNA, and amino acids have consistently revealed scientific surprises. Most diseases are caused by expansions of trinucleotide repeats, which ultimately lead to diseases like Huntington's disease, myotonic dystrophy, fragile X syndrome, and a series of spinocerebellar ataxias. These repeat mutations are dynamic, changing through generations and within an individual, and the repeats can be bi-directionally transcribed. Unsuspected modes of pathogenesis involve aberrant loss of protein expression; aberrant over-expression of non-mutant proteins; toxic-gain-of-protein function through expanded polyglutamine tracts that are encoded by expanded CAG tracts; and RNA-toxic-gain-of-function caused by transcripts harboring expanded CUG, CAG, or CGG tracts. A recent advance reveals that RNA transcripts with expanded CAG repeats can be translated in the complete absence of a starting ATG, and this Repeat Associated Non-ATG translation (RAN-translation occurs across expanded CAG repeats in all reading frames (CAG, AGC, and GCA to produce homopolymeric proteins of long polyglutamine, polyserine, and polyalanine tracts. Expanded CTG tracts expressing CUG transcripts also show RAN-translation occurring in all three frames (CUG, UGC, and GCU, to produce polyleucine, polycysteine, and polyalanine. These RAN-translation products can be toxic. Thus, one unstable (CAG•(CTG DNA can produce two expanded repeat transcripts and homopolymeric proteins with reading frames (the AUG-directed polyGln and six RAN-translation proteins, yielding a total of potentially nine toxic entities. The occurrence of RAN-translation in patient tissues expands our horizons of modes of disease pathogenesis. Moreover, since RAN-translation counters the canonical requirements of translation initiation, many new questions are now posed that must be addressed. This review covers RAN-translation and some of the pertinent

  20. Improving global and regional resolution of male lineage differentiation by simple single-copy Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Mark; Wollstein, Andreas; van der Gaag, Kristiaan; Lao, Oscar; Xue, Yali; Wang, Qiuju; Roewer, Lutz; Knoblauch, Hans; Tyler-Smith, Chris; de Knijff, Peter; Kayser, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    We analysed 67 short tandem repeat polymorphisms from the non-recombining part of the Y-chromosome (Y-STRs), including 49 rarely-studied simple single-copy (ss)Y-STRs and 18 widely-used Y-STRs, in 590 males from 51 populations belonging to 8 worldwide regions (HGDP-CEPH panel). Although autosomal DNA profiling provided no evidence for close relationship, we found 18 Y-STR haplotypes (defined by 67 Y-STRs) that were shared by two to five men in 13 worldwide populations, revealing high and widespread levels of cryptic male relatedness. Maximal (95.9%) haplotype resolution was achieved with the best 25 out of 67 Y-STRs in the global dataset, and with the best 3-16 markers in regional datasets (89.6-100% resolution). From the 49 rarely-studied ssY-STRs, the 25 most informative markers were sufficient to reach the highest possible male lineage differentiation in the global (92.2% resolution), and 3-15 markers in the regional datasets (85.4-100%). Considerably lower haplotype resolutions were obtained with the three commonly-used Y-STR sets (Minimal Haplotype, PowerPlex Y®, and AmpFlSTR® Yfiler®). Six ssY-STRs (DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576 and DYS643) were most informative to supplement the existing Y-STR kits for increasing haplotype resolution, or – together with additional ssY-STRs - as a new set for maximizing male lineage differentiation. Mutation rates of the 49 ssY-STRs were estimated from 403 meiotic transfers in deep-rooted pedigrees, and ranged from ~4.8×10−4 for 31 ssY-STRs with no mutations observed to 1.3×10−2 and 1.5×10−2 for DYS570 and DYS576, respectively, the latter representing the highest mutation rates reported for human Y-STRs so far. Our findings thus demonstrate that ssY-STRs are useful for maximizing global and regional resolution of male lineages, either as a new set, or when added to commonly-used Y-STR sets, and support their application to forensic, genealogical and anthropological studies. PMID:19647704

  1. Oxidized dNTPs and the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases combine to induce CAG/CTG repeat instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli, Piera; Ventura, Ilenia; Minoprio, Anna; Meccia, Ettore; Martire, Alberto; Wilson, Samuel H.; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2016-01-01

    DNA trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion underlies several neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease (HD). Accumulation of oxidized DNA bases and their inefficient processing by base excision repair (BER) are among the factors suggested to contribute to TNR expansion. In this study, we have examined whether oxidation of the purine dNTPs in the dNTP pool provides a source of DNA damage that promotes TNR expansion. We demonstrate that during BER of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG) in TNR sequences, DNA polymerase β (POL β) can incorporate 8-oxodGMP with the formation of 8-oxodG:C and 8-oxodG:A mispairs. Their processing by the OGG1 and MUTYH DNA glycosylases generates closely spaced incisions on opposite DNA strands that are permissive for TNR expansion. Evidence in HD model R6/2 mice indicates that these DNA glycosylases are present in brain areas affected by neurodegeneration. Consistent with prevailing oxidative stress, the same brain areas contained increased DNA 8-oxodG levels and expression of the p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase. Our in vitro and in vivo data support a model where an oxidized dNTPs pool together with aberrant BER processing contribute to TNR expansion in non-replicating cells. PMID:26980281

  2. Highly Effective DNA Extraction Method for Nuclear Short Tandem Repeat Testing of Skeletal Remains from Mass Graves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoren, Jon; Vanek, Daniel; Konjhodzić, Rijad; Crews, John; Huffine, Edwin; Parsons, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Aim To quantitatively compare a silica extraction method with a commonly used phenol/chloroform extraction method for DNA analysis of specimens exhumed from mass graves. Methods DNA was extracted from twenty randomly chosen femur samples, using the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) silica method, based on Qiagen Blood Maxi Kit, and compared with the DNA extracted by the standard phenol/chloroform-based method. The efficacy of extraction methods was compared by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to measure DNA quantity and the presence of inhibitors and by amplification with the PowerPlex 16 (PP16) multiplex nuclear short tandem repeat (STR) kit. Results DNA quantification results showed that the silica-based method extracted on average 1.94 ng of DNA per gram of bone (range 0.25-9.58 ng/g), compared with only 0.68 ng/g by the organic method extracted (range 0.0016-4.4880 ng/g). Inhibition tests showed that there were on average significantly lower levels of PCR inhibitors in DNA isolated by the organic method. When amplified with PP16, all samples extracted by silica-based method produced 16 full loci profiles, while only 75% of the DNA extracts obtained by organic technique amplified 16 loci profiles. Conclusions The silica-based extraction method showed better results in nuclear STR typing from degraded bone samples than a commonly used phenol/chloroform method. PMID:17696302

  3. Tandemly repeated DNA is a target for the partial replacement of thymine by beta-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, F; Kieft, R; Cross, M; Borst, P

    2000-07-01

    In the DNA of African trypanosomes a small fraction of thymine is replaced by the modified base beta-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil (J). The function of this large base is unknown. The presence of J in the silent variant surface glycoprotein gene expression sites and the lack of J in the transcribed expression site indicates that DNA modification might play a role in control of gene repression. However, the abundance of J in the long telomeric repeat tracts and in subtelomeric arrays of simple repeats suggests that J may also have specific functions in repetitive DNA. We have now analyzed chromosome-internal repetitive sequences in the genome of Trypanosoma brucei and found J in the minichromosomal 177-bp repeats, in the long arrays of 5S RNA gene repeats, and in the spliced-leader RNA gene repeats. No J was found in the rDNA locus or in dispersed repetitive transposon-like elements. Remarkably, the rDNA of T. brucei is not organized in long arrays of tandem repeats, as in many other eukaryotes. T. brucei contains only approximately 15-20 rDNA repeat units that are divided over six to seven chromosomes. Our results show that J is present in many tandemly repeated sequences, either at a telomere or chromosome internal. The presence of J might help to stabilize the long arrays of repeats in the genome.

  4. Human {beta}-globin gene polymorphisms characterized in DNA extracted from ancient bones 12,000 years old

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beraud-Colomb, E. [Genetique Medicale et Developpement, Marseille (France)]|[Laboratoire d`Anthropologie, Marseille (France); Maroc, N. [Genetique Medicale et Developpement, Marseille (France); Roubin, R. [Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Analyzing the nuclear DNA from ancient human bones is an essential step to the understanding of genetic diversity in current populations, provided that such systematic studies are experimentally feasible. This article reports the successful extraction and amplification of nuclear DNA from the P-globin region from 5 of 10 bone specimens up to 12,000 years old. These have been typed for P-globin frameworks by sequencing through two variable positions and for a polymorphic (AT){sub x}(T){sub y} microsatellite 500 bp upstream of the P-globin gene. These specimens of human remains are somewhat older than those analyzed in previous nuclear gene sequencing reports and considerably older than those used to study high-copy-number human mtDNA. These results show that the systematic study of nuclear DNA polymorphisms of ancient populations is feasible. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Molecular polymorphism in Pistacia vera L. using non-coding regions of chloroplast DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Talebi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes plastid DNA polymorphism and reports a comparative analysis of two non-coding cpDNA regions (trnC–trnD and atpB–rbcL in pistachio. Seventeen different genotypes of domestic and wild pistachio from Iran, Syria, Turkey and America were sampled. Total genomic DNA was extracted and amplified with trnC–trnD and atpB–rbcL specific primers and then were sequenced. Phylogenetic relationships and depiction of phylogenetic trees were conducted. Cultivated genotypes of Pistacia vera were classified in a group regardless of their geographic location. P. vera was isolated from Sarakhs but they placed in the two close groups. Among cultivated genotypes, Jalab was separated from other cultivated genotypes. Pistacia Khinjuk was classified with Pistacia atlantica subsp. mutica. The findings confirm the common splitting hypothesis for commercial pistachio genotypes of the P. vera wild-type and also indicated the direct impact of Iranian genotypes in the evolutionary process of cultivated pistachios in other parts of the world. In conclusion it can be inferred that cultivated varieties of pistachio and P. vera var. sarakhs have the same origin, moreover genomic chloroplast could appropriately identify the interspecies relationships of pistachios.

  6. A germline polymorphism of DNA polymerase beta induces genomic instability and cellular transformation.

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    Jennifer Yamtich

    Full Text Available Several germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been identified in the POLB gene, but little is known about their cellular and biochemical impact. DNA Polymerase β (Pol β, encoded by the POLB gene, is the main gap-filling polymerase involved in base excision repair (BER, a pathway that protects the genome from the consequences of oxidative DNA damage. In this study we tested the hypothesis that expression of the POLB germline coding SNP (rs3136797 in mammalian cells could induce a cancerous phenotype. Expression of this SNP in both human and mouse cells induced double-strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and cellular transformation. Following treatment with an alkylating agent, cells expressing this coding SNP accumulated BER intermediate substrates, including single-strand and double-strand breaks. The rs3136797 SNP encodes the P242R variant Pol β protein and biochemical analysis showed that P242R protein had a slower catalytic rate than WT, although P242R binds DNA similarly to WT. Our results suggest that people who carry the rs3136797 germline SNP may be at an increased risk for cancer susceptibility.

  7. Correlation of inter-locus polyglutamine toxicity with CAG•CTG triplet repeat expandability and flanking genomic DNA GC content.

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    Colm E Nestor

    Full Text Available Dynamic expansions of toxic polyglutamine (polyQ-encoding CAG repeats in ubiquitously expressed, but otherwise unrelated, genes cause a number of late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington disease and the spinocerebellar ataxias. As polyQ toxicity in these disorders increases with repeat length, the intergenerational expansion of unstable CAG repeats leads to anticipation, an earlier age-at-onset in successive generations. Crucially, disease associated alleles are also somatically unstable and continue to expand throughout the lifetime of the individual. Interestingly, the inherited polyQ length mediating a specific age-at-onset of symptoms varies markedly between disorders. It is widely assumed that these inter-locus differences in polyQ toxicity are mediated by protein context effects. Previously, we demonstrated that the tendency of expanded CAG•CTG repeats to undergo further intergenerational expansion (their 'expandability' also differs between disorders and these effects are strongly correlated with the GC content of the genomic flanking DNA. Here we show that the inter-locus toxicity of the expanded polyQ tracts of these disorders also correlates with both the expandability of the underlying CAG repeat and the GC content of the genomic DNA flanking sequences. Inter-locus polyQ toxicity does not correlate with properties of the mRNA or protein sequences, with polyQ location within the gene or protein, or steady state transcript levels in the brain. These data suggest that the observed inter-locus differences in polyQ toxicity are not mediated solely by protein context effects, but that genomic context is also important, an effect that may be mediated by modifying the rate at which somatic expansion of the DNA delivers proteins to their cytotoxic state.

  8. Association of STin2 Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) Polymorphism of Serotonin Transporter Gene with Lifelong Premature Ejaculation: A Case-Control Study in Han Chinese Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiansheng; Gao, Jingjing; Tang, Dongdong; Gao, Pan; Peng, Dangwei; Liang, Chaozhao

    2016-01-01

    Background The STin2 VNTR polymorphism has a variable number of tandem repeats in intron 2 of the serotonin transporter gene. We aimed to explore the relationship between STin2 VNTR polymorphism and lifelong premature ejaculation (LPE). Material/Methods We recruited a total of 115 outpatients who complained of ejaculating prematurely and who were diagnosed as LPE, and 101 controls without PE complaint. Allelic variations of STin2 VNTR were genotyped using PCR-based technology. We evaluated the associations between STin2 VNTR allelic and genotypic frequencies and LPE, as well as the intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) of different STin2 VNTR genotypes among LPE patients. Results The patients and controls did not differ significantly in terms of any characteristic except age. A significantly higher frequency of STin2.12/12 genotype was found among LPE patients versus controls (P=0.026). Frequency of patients carrying at least 1 copy of the 10-repeat allele was significantly lower compared to the control group (28.3% vs. 41.8%, OR=0.55; 95%CI=0.31–0.97, P=0.040). In the LPE group, the mean IELT showed significant difference in STin2.12/12 genotype when compared to those with STin2.12/10 and STin2.10/10 genotypes. The mean IELT in10-repeat allele carriers was 50% longer compared to homozygous carriers of the STin2.12 allele. Conclusions Our results indicate the presence of STin2.10 allele is a protective factor for LPE. Men carrying the higher expression genotype STin2. 12/12 have shorter IELT than 10-repeat allele carriers. PMID:27713390

  9. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism independently influences recovery of male sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy in postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirabassi, Giacomo; Delli Muti, Nicola; Corona, Giovanni; Maggi, Mario; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    Few and contradictory studies have evaluated the possible influence of androgen receptor (AR) gene CAG repeat polymorphism on male sexual function. In this study we evaluated the role of AR gene CAG repeat polymorphism in the recovery of sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition which is often associated with hypopituitarism and in which the sexual benefits of TRT must be distinguished from those of pituitary-function replacement therapies. Fifteen men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism were retrospectively assessed before and after TRT. Main outcome measures included sexual parameters as assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire, levels of pituitary dependent hormones (total testosterone, free T3, free T4, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor-1 [IGF-1], prolactin), and results of genetic analysis (AR gene CAG repeat number). Plasma concentrations of free T3, free T4, cortisol, and prolactin did not vary significantly between the two phases, while testosterone and IGF-1 increased significantly after TRT. A significant improvement in all sexual parameters studied was found. The number of CAG triplets was negatively and significantly correlated with changes in all the sexual parameters, while opposite correlations were found between changes in sexual parameters and changes in testosterone levels; no correlation of change in IGF1 with change in sexual parameters was reported. On multiple linear regression analysis, after correction for changes in testosterone, nearly all the associations between the number of CAG triplets and changes in sexual parameters were confirmed. Shorter length AR gene CAG repeat number is associated with the recovery of sexual function after TRT in postsurgical male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, independently of the effects of concomitant pituitary-replacement therapies. © 2014 International Society

  10. 男乳癌与 AR 基因 CAG 重复多态性的相关性研究%Related research of male breast cancer and CAG repeat polymorphism of AR gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔佳琳; 黄睿; 姜永冬; 韩继广; 牛明; 魏巍; 郑伟; 宋燕妮

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨雄激素受体( AR)基因外显子CAG重复频数多态性与男性乳腺癌(男乳癌)发病风险的关系。方法研究对象为40例男性乳腺癌患者和40例男性健康者,从外周血提取DNA,对AR基因外显子CAG编码序列进行PCR扩增、测序和计算CAG重复频数,用χ2检验和Logistic回归分析AR基因CAG重复频数长度对男乳癌发病风险的影响。结果男性乳腺癌病例组和对照组CAG重复频数长度存在差异,其差异具有统计学意义,CAG重复频数长度超过22男性乳腺癌发病风险是重复频数长度少于21的3.52倍(OR=3.52,P=0.036)。结论 AR基因CAG重复频数长度是预测男性乳腺癌发病风险的指标,较长(超过22)的CAG重复序列可增加男乳癌的发病风险。%Objectiv e To investigate the correlation between ( CAG) n repeat polymorphism of androgen receptor(AR)geneandmalebreastcancer.Methods 40casesofmalebreastcancerand40controlswerecol-lected.DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and the AR gene CAG coding exon sequences for PCR amplifica -tion,sequencing and calculated the number of CAG repeats frquency .χ2 test and Logistic regression analysis were used assess the AR gene CAG repeat length frequency affect the number of male breast cancer risk .Results There was statistically significant difference in male breast cancer cases and controls the number of CAG repeat length frequency.Man for whom the(CAG)n≥22 repeat sequence had 3.52 times risk of male breast compared (CAG)n≤22(OR=3.52,P=0.036).Conclusion AR gene CAG repeat length is a predictor of the frequency of male breast cancer risk .Longer CAG repeats can increase the risk of male breast cancer .

  11. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in genes encoding ND1, COI and CYTB in canine malignant cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaska, Brygida; Grzybowska-Szatkowska, Ludmila; Nisztuk, Sylwia; Surdyka, Magdalena; Rozanska, Dorota

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to identify DNA changes in mitochondrial gene fragments: NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and cytochrome b (CYTB) in tumor tissue, normal tissue and blood, and to define their association with the tumor type in dogs. Molecular analysis included 144 tests in total. A functional effect of the non-synonymous protein coding SNP was predicted. The presence of polymorphisms in all tested gene fragments in individual tissues of dogs was observed. Heteroplasmic changes were found in ND1 and CYTB in epithelioma glandulae sebacei and in CYTB in lymphoma centroblasticum. The results of in silico analysis show the impact of these alleles (COI: 507, ND1: 450, 216, CYTB: 748) on the functioning of proteins and thus their potential role in carcinogenesis. The possible harmful effects of changes in polypeptides in positions T193N, V98M, V118M and H196P were evaluated. It seems that polymorphisms occurring in cells can have a negative impact on functioning of proteins. This promotes disorders of the energy level in cells.

  12. Microsatellite DNA polymorphism in selectively controlled Apis mellifera carnica and Apis mellifera caucasica populations from Poland

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    Nikolova Stanimila R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphism in selectively controlled honeybee populations of A. m. carnica and A. m. caucasica in Poland, was characterized by microsatellite DNA analysis. All honeybee samples were analyzed for nine microsatellite loci: Ac011; A024; A043; A088; Ap226; Ap238; Ap243; Ap249 and Ap256, which were found to be polymorphic in both populations. The mean number of alleles per locus was 6.222 for A. m. carnica and 4.556 for A. m. caucasica. Average observed and expected heterozygosity values were calculated as 0.976 and 0.734 in A. m. carnica and as 0.933 and 0.603 in A. m. caucasica, respectively. For the nine microsatellite loci, a total of 76 alleles were found in both populations. Thirty-five private alleles were observed in A. m. carnica and 20 in A. m. caucasica. Information about allele frequencies, FST values and genotypic differentiation is given. Nei’s genetic distance between studied populations of A. m. carnica and A. m. caucasica was calculated as 0.384.

  13. Identification of Diagnostic Mitochondrial DNA Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Specific to Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii Populations

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    Puji Rianti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The hypervariable region I of mitochondrial DNA has frequently been used to distinguish among populations, in particular in species with strong female philopatry. In such cases, populations are expected to diverge rapidly for hypervariable region I markers because of the smaller effective population size and thus increased genetic drift. This rapid divergence leads to the accumulation of mutations exclusively found in one population, which may serve as diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. To date, diagnostic SNPs distinctive to Sumatran orangutan populations have not yet been described. However, given the continuously declining numbers of Sumatran orangutans, this information can be vital for effective conservation measures, especially regarding reintroductions of orangutans in rehabilitation centers. Phylogenetic analyses of 54 samples of Sumatran orangutans from nine sampling sites with good provenance, we found five major clades and a total of 20 haplotypes. We propose a total of 52 diagnostic SNPs that are specific to Sumatran orangutan populations. Data can be used to develop restriction fragment length polymorphism assays to carry out genetic assignments using basic laboratory equipment to assign Sumatran orangutan to their population of origin.

  14. Genome relationships among Lotus species based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, L P; Raelson, J V; Grant, W F

    1994-06-01

    The ability of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to distinguish among different taxa of Lotus was evaluated for several geographically dispersed accessions of four diploid Lotus species, L. tennis Waldst. et Kit, L. alpinus Schleich., L. japonicus (Regel) Larsen, and L. uliginosus Schkuhr and for the tetraploid L. corniculatus L., in order to ascertain whether RAPD data could offer additional evidence concerning the origin of the tetraploid L. corniculatus. Clear bands and several polymorphisms were obtained for 20 primers used for each species/accession. The evolutionary pathways among the species/accessions presented in a cladogram were expressed in terms of treelengths giving the most parsimonious reconstructions. Accessions within the same species grouped closely together. It is considered that L. uliginosus which is most distantly related to L. corniculatus, may be excluded as a direct progenitor of L. corniculatus, confirming previous results from isoenzyme studies. Lotus alpinus is grouped with accessions of L. corniculatus, which differs from previous studies. With this exception, these findings are in agreement with previous experimental studies in the L. corniculatus group. The value of the RAPD data to theories on the origin of L. corniculatus is discussed.

  15. Investigation of five polymorphic DNA markers associated with late onset Alzheimer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharesouran Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a complex neurodegenerative disorder characterized by memory and cognitive impairment and is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. The aim of our study was to examine the polymorphic DNA markers CCR2 (+190 G/A, CCR5Δ32, TNF-α (-308 G/A, TNF-α (-863 C/A and CALHM1 (+394 C/T to determine the relationship between these polymorphisms and the risk of late onset Alzheimer's disease in the population of Eastern Azerbaijan of Iran. A total of 160 patient samples and 163 healthy controls were genotyped by PCR-RFLP and the results confirmed using bidirectional sequencing. Statistical analysis of obtained data revealed non-significant difference between frequency of CCR5Δ32 in case and control groups. The same result was observed for TNF-α (-863 C/A genotype and allele frequencies. Contrary to above results, significant differences were detected in frequency of TNF-α (-308 G/A and CCR2-64I genotypes between the cases and healthy controls. A weak significant difference observed between allele and genotype frequencies of rs2986017 in CALHM1 (+394 C/T; P86L in patient and control samples. It can be concluded that the T allele of P86L variant in CALHM1 & +190 G/A allele of CCR2 have a protective role against abnormal clinical features of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Amethod for genotoxicity detection using random amplified polymorphism DNA with Danio rerio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RongZY; YinHW

    2002-01-01

    The increasing presence of genotoxic pollutants in the equatic environment has led to the development of quick monitoring methods.We have applied the random amplified polymorphism DNA(RKAPD) method to evaluate the toxic effects of genotoxic chemicals.In all 22 of normal wild type Danio rerio(zebrafish),78 amplified bands were obtained after PCR using primers set,in which the frequency of emergency above 60 percent is 21.There do exist 4 stable bands in the amplifed product,which appear in all normal test samples.The zebrafish RAPD fingerprinting database is set up on this base.The RAPD pattern from zebrafishes exposed to genotoxic chemicals such as cyclophosphamide 0.1-10mg·L-1 and dimethoate 10-100mg·L-1 displayed some changes in polymorphism of band pattern including the lost of stable bands.There also exists distinct distance between the band pattern of exposed zebrafishes and the control samples via the cluster method.In addition,the result derived from numeric analysis is more sensitive than the result obtained from stable band analysis because it can reveal the distance between the band pattern of 0.05mg·L-1 cyclophosphamide exposed zebrafish and the control sample.These results showed the accuracy and the sensitivity of the two analyses of genotoxicity based on the RAPD fingerprinting research.

  17. Inheritance of random amplified polymorphic DNA markers in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, R; Angel, F; Bonierbale, M W; Rodriguez, F; Tohme, J; Roca, W M

    1996-10-01

    The informativeness and inheritance of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were investigated in an intraspecific F1 progeny derived from two heterozygous parents. The analysis confirmed the utility of RAPD markers for comparing candidate parents for the development of a molecular genetic map, and provided numerous markers for linkage analysis in a crop with a very limited history of classical or molecular genetic studies. Six potential parental lines (themselves F1 hybrid clones) showed between 1.82 and 0.62 segregating bands per primer in three hybrid families. Forty-three percent (309) of 722 primers produced polymorphic products in the most informative of these three crosses, revealing 328 single-dose (SD) markers segregating 1:1 for presence/absence in a progeny of 90 individuals. A second class of informative markers were those present in both parents but segregating in the progeny. Fifty-seven or 67% of the monomorphic but segregating markers exhibited the 3:1 ratio expected for SD dominant markers in a cross between heterozygotes. Linkage groups were constructed from the segregation of SD RAPD markers originating in the female (TMS 30572) and the male (CM2177-2) parent. Key words : RAPDs, molecular markers, genetic segregation, Manihot, single-dose markers.

  18. Genome-wide DNA polymorphisms in Kavuni, a traditional rice cultivar with nutritional and therapeutic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinasabapathi, Pasupathi; Purushothaman, Natarajan; Parani, Madasamy

    2016-05-01

    Although rice genome was sequenced in the year 2002, efforts in resequencing the large number of available accessions, landraces, traditional cultivars, and improved varieties of this important food crop are limited. We have initiated resequencing of the traditional cultivars from India. Kavuni is an important traditional rice cultivar from South India that attracts premium price for its nutritional and therapeutic properties. Whole-genome sequencing of Kavuni using Illumina platform and SNPs analysis using Nipponbare reference genome identified 1 150 711 SNPs of which 377 381 SNPs were located in the genic regions. Non-synonymous SNPs (62 708) were distributed in 19 251 genes, and their number varied between 1 and 115 per gene. Large-effect DNA polymorphisms (7769) were present in 3475 genes. Pathway mapping of these polymorphisms revealed the involvement of genes related to carbohydrate metabolism, translation, protein-folding, and cell death. Analysis of the starch biosynthesis related genes revealed that the granule-bound starch synthase I gene had T/G SNPs at the first intron/exon junction and a two-nucleotide combination, which were reported to favour high amylose content and low glycemic index. The present study provided a valuable genomics resource to study the rice varieties with nutritional and medicinal properties.

  19. Integrity of the human centromere DNA repeats is protected by CENP-A, CENP-C, and CENP-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, Simona; Funabiki, Hironori

    2017-02-21

    Centromeres are highly specialized chromatin domains that enable chromosome segregation and orchestrate faithful cell division. Human centromeres are composed of tandem arrays of α-satellite DNA, which spans up to several megabases. Little is known about the mechanisms that maintain integrity of the long arrays of α-satellite DNA repeats. Here, we monitored centromeric repeat stability in human cells using chromosome-orientation fluorescent in situ hybridization (CO-FISH). This assay detected aberrant centromeric CO-FISH patterns consistent with sister chromatid exchange at the frequency of 5% in primary tissue culture cells, whereas higher levels were seen in several cancer cell lines and during replicative senescence. To understand the mechanism(s) that maintains centromere integrity, we examined the contribution of the centromere-specific histone variant CENP-A and members of the constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN), CENP-C, CENP-T, and CENP-W. Depletion of CENP-A and CCAN proteins led to an increase in centromere aberrations, whereas enhancing chromosome missegregation by alternative methods did not, suggesting that CENP-A and CCAN proteins help maintain centromere integrity independently of their role in chromosome segregation. Furthermore, superresolution imaging of centromeric CO-FISH using structured illumination microscopy implied that CENP-A protects α-satellite repeats from extensive rearrangements. Our study points toward the presence of a centromere-specific mechanism that actively maintains α-satellite repeat integrity during human cell proliferation.

  20. XRCC1 and XPD DNA repair gene polymorphisms: a potential risk factor for glaucoma in the Pakistani population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yousaf, S.; Khan, M.I.; Micheal, S.; Akhtar, F.; Ali, S.H.; Riaz, M.; Ali, M.; Lall, P.; Waheed, N.K.; Hollander, A.I. den; Ahmed, A.; Qamar, R.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study was designed to determine the association of polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (c.1316G>A [rs25487]) and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) (c.2298A>C [rs13181]) with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) an

  1. Selection of Unique Escherichia coli Clones by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD): Evaluation by Whole Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Karen L.; Godfrey, Paul A.; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S.; Feldgarden, Michael; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and characterizing clonal diversity is important when analysing fecal flora. We evaluated random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR, applied for selection of Escherichia coli isolates, by whole genome sequencing. RAPD was fast, and reproducible as screening method for selection of distinct E. coli clones in fecal swabs. PMID:24912108

  2. Polymorphic distribution of Y-chromosome haplotype and mitochondrial DNA in the Bouyei people in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永念; 左丽; 文波; 柯越海; 黄薇; 金力

    2004-01-01

    @@ In the evolution of humans, many kinds of mutations in the human genome have been accumulated, providing credible genetic evidence for the study of human origins and migrations. The "out-of-Africa" hypothesis of modern human evolution and the genetic origin of the Japanese has come about by studying mitochondrial DNA.l,2 Recently, researchers have recognized the power of Y-chromosome markers in resolving migratory patterns of modern humans as more and more Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism markers have been found. The markers on the nonrecombinant part of the Y-chromosome allows for the reconstruction of intact haplotypes which are probably the best genetic tools to study human migrations. We can analyze the paternal history of some people in different areas by Y-chromosome haplotypes.

  3. 13915*G DNA polymorphism associated with lactase persistence in Africa interacts with Oct-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Lynne C; Ahn, Jong Kun; Sibley, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Lactase gene expression declines with aging (lactase non-persistence) in the majority of humans worldwide. Lactase persistence is a heritable autosomal dominant condition and has been strongly correlated with several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located ~14-kb upstream (-13907, -13910 and -13915) of the lactase gene in different ethnic populations. In contrast to the -13907*G and -13910*T SNPs, the -13915*G SNP was previously believed not to interact with Oct-1. In the present study, however, Oct-1 is shown to interact with the -13915*G SNP region DNA sequence by EMSAs and gel supershift. In addition, Oct-1 is capable of enhancing promoter activity of a lactase promoter-reporter construct harboring the 13915*G SNP sequence in cell culture. Oct-1 binding to the -13907 to -13915 SNP region therefore remains a candidate interaction involved in lactase persistence.

  4. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Dalhoff, K; Fugger, L;

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, -DPB, the serologically defined HLA-A, B, C, DR antigens, and the primed lymphocyte typing defined HLA-DP antigens in 23 Danish patients with primary......) associated DRB Bgl II 9.1 kilobase (kb) fragment (RR = 2.9; P less than 0.05, 'corrected' P greater than 0.05), the DQA1*0501 associated DQA Taq I 4.8 kb fragment (RR = 3.1; P less than 0.05, 'corrected' P greater than 0.05), the DQB1*0201 (DQw2) associated DQB Hin dIII 11.5 kb fragment (RR = 3.1; P less...

  5. The Label-Free Unambiguous Detection and Symbolic Display of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms on DNA Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hari K. K.; Chakraborty, Banani; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2011-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common genetic variation in the human genome. Kinetic methods based on branch migration have proved successful for detecting SNPs because a mispair inhibits the progress of branch migration in the direction of the mispair. We have combined the effectiveness of kinetic methods with AFM of DNA origami patterns to produce a direct visual readout of the target nucleotide contained in the probe sequence. The origami contains graphical representations of the four nucleotide alphabetic characters, A, T, G and C, and the symbol containing the test nucleotide identity vanishes in the presence of the probe. The system also works with pairs of probes, corresponding to heterozygous diploid genomes. PMID:21235216

  6. Leishmania major: genetic heterogeneity of Iranian isolates by single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequence analysis of ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashakori, Mahnaz; Mahnaz, Tashakori; Kuhls, Katrin; Katrin, Kuhls; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Amer, Al-Jawabreh; Mauricio, Isabel L; Isabel, Mauricio; Schönian, Gabriele; Gabriele, Schönian; Farajnia, Safar; Safar, Farajnia; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Hossein, Alimohammadian Mohammad

    2006-04-01

    Protozoan parasites of Leishmania major are the causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis in different parts of Iran. We applied PCR-based methods to analyze L. major parasites isolated from patients with active lesions from different geographic areas in Iran in order to understand DNA polymorphisms within L. major species. Twenty-four isolates were identified as L. major by RFLP analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) amplicons. These isolates were further studied by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and sequencing of ITS1 and ITS2. Data obtained from SSCP analysis of the ITS1 and ITS2 loci revealed three and four different patterns among all studied samples, respectively. Sequencing of ITS1 and ITS2 confirmed the results of SSCP analysis and showed the potential of the PCR-SSCP method for assessing genetic heterogeneity within L. major. Different patterns in ITS1 were due to substitution of one nucleotide, whereas in ITS2 the changes were defined by variation in the number of repeats in two polymorphic microsatellites. In total five genotypic groups LmA, LmB, LmC, LmD and LmE were identified among L. major isolates. The most frequent genotype, LmA, was detected in isolates collected from different endemic areas of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iran. Genotypes LmC, LmD and LmE were found only in the new focus of CL in Damghan (Semnan province) and LmB was identified exclusively among isolates of Kashan focus (Isfahan province). The distribution of genetic polymorphisms suggests the existence of distinct endemic regions of L. major in Iran.

  7. Understanding the mechanism(s) of mosaic trisomy 21 by using DNA polymorphism analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pangalos, C.; Abazis, D.; Avramopoulos, D.; Blouin, J.L.; Antonaraksi, S.E. (Univ. of Patras Medical School (Greece)); Raoul, O.; deBlois, M.C.; Prieur, M. (Cytogenetics Laboratory, Paris (France)); Schinzel, A.A.

    1994-03-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism(s) underlying mosaicism for trisomy 21, the authors genotyped 17 families with mosaic trisomy 21 probands, using 28 PCR-detectable DNA polymorphic markers that map in the pericentromeric region and long arm of chromosome 21. The percentage of cells with trisomy 21 in the probands' blood lymphocytes was 6%-94%. There were two classes of autoradiographic results: In class I, a third allele' of lower intensity was detected in the proband's DNA for at least two chromosome 21 markers. The interpretation of this result was that the proband had inherited three chromosomes 21 after meiotic nondisjunction (NDJ) (trisomy 21 zygote) and subsequently lost one because of mitotic (somatic) error, the lost chromosome 21 being that with the lowest-intensity polymorphic allele. The parental origin and the meiotic stage of NDJ could also be determined. In class II, a third allele' was never detected. In these cases, the mosaicism probably occurred either by a postzygotic, mitotic error in anormal zygote that followed a normal meiosis (class IIA mechanism); by premeiotic, mitotic NDJ yielding an aneusomic zygote after meiosis, and subsequent mitotic loss (class IIB mechanism); or by a meiosis II error with lack of crossover in the preceding meiosis I, followed by mitotic loss after fertilization (class IIC mechanism). Among class II mechanisms, the most likely is mechanism IIA, while IIC is the least likely. There were 10 cases of class I and 7 cases of class II results. Within class I, there were nine cases with maternal meitoic errors (six meiosis I and three meiosis II errors, on the basis of pericentromeric markers) and one with paternal meiosis I error. The postzygotic loss of chromosome 21 was determined in eight maternal class I cases, and it was maternally derived in five cases and paternally derived in three; this suggests that the postzygotic loss of chromosome 21 is probably random. 28 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation using high-throughput DNA sequencing of target-enriched pooled DNA samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullen Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central role of the somatotrophic axis in animal post-natal growth, development and fertility is well established. Therefore, the identification of genetic variants affecting quantitative traits within this axis is an attractive goal. However, large sample numbers are a pre-requisite for the identification of genetic variants underlying complex traits and although technologies are improving rapidly, high-throughput sequencing of large numbers of complete individual genomes remains prohibitively expensive. Therefore using a pooled DNA approach coupled with target enrichment and high-throughput sequencing, the aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms and estimate allele frequency differences across 83 candidate genes of the somatotrophic axis, in 150 Holstein-Friesian dairy bulls divided into two groups divergent for genetic merit for fertility. Results In total, 4,135 SNPs and 893 indels were identified during the resequencing of the 83 candidate genes. Nineteen percent (n = 952 of variants were located within 5' and 3' UTRs. Seventy-two percent (n = 3,612 were intronic and 9% (n = 464 were exonic, including 65 indels and 236 SNPs resulting in non-synonymous substitutions (NSS. Significant (P ® MassARRAY. No significant differences (P > 0.1 were observed between the two methods for any of the 43 SNPs across both pools (i.e., 86 tests in total. Conclusions The results of the current study support previous findings of the use of DNA sample pooling and high-throughput sequencing as a viable strategy for polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation. Using this approach we have characterised the genetic variation within genes of the somatotrophic axis and related pathways, central to mammalian post-natal growth and development and subsequent lactogenesis and fertility. We have identified a large number of variants segregating at significantly different frequencies between cattle groups divergent for calving

  9. Effect of variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism in the human dopamine transporter gene on conflict information processing according to event-related potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyu Han; Yuping Wang; Xin Wang; Ying Liu

    2010-01-01

    The dopamine transporter(DAT)is responsible for dopamine reuptake from the synaptic cleft.A variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism in the DAT gene is related to DAT availability and has been associated with cognition.With the advantage of high-time resolution,event-related potential is an important method to study the time course of human information processing.Previous results have suggested that dopamine exhibits a close relationship with conflicting information processing.Therefore,the present study assumed that conflicting information processing could be influenced by DAT variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism.To confirm this,the present study analyzed the influence of DAT genotypes on N270,which is presumed to reflect neural activity of conflict information processing in young healthy adults.A S1-S2 matching task was performed in healthy adults with 10/10 genotype(n = 14)and 10/9genotypes(n = 14),respectively,when event-related potentials were recorded.Results demonstrated that subjects with the 10/10 genotype exhibited shorter N270 latency and quicker reaction times compared with subjects with the 10/9 genotype.There were no differences in N270amplitude between the two genotypes.These results suggested that 10/10 genotype subjects more efficiently processed conflict information.

  10. DNA Damage/Repair and Polymorphism of the hOGG1 Gene in Lymphocytes of AMD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Wozniak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. We determined the extent of oxidative DNA damage and the kinetics of its removal as well as the genotypes of the Ser326Cys polymorphism of the hOGG1 gene in lymphocytes of 30 wet AMD patients and 30 controls. Oxidative DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide and its repair were evaluated by the comet assay and DNA repair enzymes. We observed a higher extent of endogenous oxidative DNA damage and a lower efficacy of its repair in AMD patients as compared with the controls. We did not find any correlation between the extent of DNA damage and efficacy of DNA repair with genotypes of the Ser326Cys polymorphism. The results obtained suggest that oxidative DNA damage and inefficient DNA repair can be associated with AMD and the variability of the hOOG1 gene may not contribute to this association.

  11. Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA of Trichoderma isolates and antagonism against Rhizoctonia solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Brandão Góes

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD procedure was used to examine the genetic variability among fourteen isolates of Trichoderma and their ability to antagonize Rhizoctonia solani using a dual-culture assay for correlation among RAPD products and their hardness to R. solani. Seven oligodeoxynucleotide primers were selected for the RAPD assays which resulted in 197 bands for 14 isolates of Trichoderma. The data were entered into a binary matrix and a similarity matrix was constructed using DICE similarity (SD index. A UPGMA cluster based on SD values was generated using NTSYS (Numerical Taxonomy System, Applied Biostatistics computer program. A mean coefficient of similarity obtained for pairwise comparisons among the most antagonics isolates was around 40%. The results presented here showed that the variability among the isolates of Trichoderma was very high. No relationship was found between the polymorphism showed by the isolates and their hardness, origin and substrata.A técnica de RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA foi utilizada para examinar a variabilidade genética em quatorze isolados de Trichoderma além de sua capacidade de antagonizar o fungo fitopatogênico Rhizoctonia solani usando pareamento in vitro, e a possível relação entre perfís de RAPD e agressividade dos isolados de Trichoderma a R. solani. Foram selecionados sete primers para os ensaios de RAPD, os quais produziram 197 bandas. Os dados foram introduzidos no programa de computador NTSYS (Numerical Taxonomy System, Applied Biostatisticsna forma de uma matrix binária, sendo construída uma matriz de similaridade utilizando-se o coeficiente de similaridade de DICE (SD e baseado nos valores SD, pelo método de agrupamento UPGMA um dendrograma. Observou-se que o grau de similaridade das amostras que apresentaram melhor desempenho antagônico foi bastante baixo, em torno de 40%. Os resultados demonstraram que a variabilidade entre os isolados de Trichoderma é muito

  12. Genome-wide stochastic adaptive DNA amplification at direct and inverted DNA repeats in the parasite Leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Ubeda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene amplification of specific loci has been described in all kingdoms of life. In the protozoan parasite Leishmania, the product of amplification is usually part of extrachromosomal circular or linear amplicons that are formed at the level of direct or inverted repeated sequences. A bioinformatics screen revealed that repeated sequences are widely distributed in the Leishmania genome and the repeats are chromosome-specific, conserved among species, and generally present in low copy number. Using sensitive PCR assays, we provide evidence that the Leishmania genome is continuously being rearranged at the level of these repeated sequences, which serve as a functional platform for constitutive and stochastic amplification (and deletion of genomic segments in the population. This process is adaptive as the copy number of advantageous extrachromosomal circular or linear elements increases upon selective pressure and is reversible when selection is removed. We also provide mechanistic insights on the formation of circular and linear amplicons through RAD51 recombinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. The whole genome of Leishmania is thus stochastically rearranged at the level of repeated sequences, and the selection of parasite subpopulations with changes in the copy number of specific loci is used as a strategy to respond to a changing environment.

  13. Genome-wide stochastic adaptive DNA amplification at direct and inverted DNA repeats in the parasite Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Jean-Michel; Raymond, Frédéric; Mukherjee, Angana; Plourde, Marie; Gingras, Hélène; Roy, Gaétan; Lapointe, Andréanne; Leprohon, Philippe; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Corbeil, Jacques; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Gene amplification of specific loci has been described in all kingdoms of life. In the protozoan parasite Leishmania, the product of amplification is usually part of extrachromosomal circular or linear amplicons that are formed at the level of direct or inverted repeated sequences. A bioinformatics screen revealed that repeated sequences are widely distributed in the Leishmania genome and the repeats are chromosome-specific, conserved among species, and generally present in low copy number. Using sensitive PCR assays, we provide evidence that the Leishmania genome is continuously being rearranged at the level of these repeated sequences, which serve as a functional platform for constitutive and stochastic amplification (and deletion) of genomic segments in the population. This process is adaptive as the copy number of advantageous extrachromosomal circular or linear elements increases upon selective pressure and is reversible when selection is removed. We also provide mechanistic insights on the formation of circular and linear amplicons through RAD51 recombinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. The whole genome of Leishmania is thus stochastically rearranged at the level of repeated sequences, and the selection of parasite subpopulations with changes in the copy number of specific loci is used as a strategy to respond to a changing environment.

  14. Evaluation of genetic diversity in Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. alboglabra Bailey) by using rapid amplified polymorphic DNA and sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Zhang, L G

    2014-02-14

    Chinese kale is an original Chinese vegetable of the Cruciferae family. To select suitable parents for hybrid breeding, we thoroughly analyzed the genetic diversity of Chinese kale. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity across 21 Chinese kale accessions from AVRDC and Guangzhou in China. A total of 104 bands were detected by 11 RAPD primers, of which 66 (63.5%) were polymorphic, and 229 polymorphic bands (68.4%) were observed in 335 bands amplified by 17 SRAP primer combinations. The dendrogram showed the grouping of the 21 accessions into 4 main clusters based on RAPD data, and into 6 clusters based on SRAP and combined data (RAPD + SRAP). The clustering of accessions based on SRAP data was consistent with petal colors. The Mantel test indicated a poor fit for the RAPD and SRAP data (r = 0.16). These results have an important implication for Chinese kale germplasm characterization and improvement.

  15. Effective DNA fragmentation technique for simple sequence repeat detection with a microsatellite-enriched library and high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Ohtake, Rumi; Yoshida, Saki; Shinohara, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    Two different techniques for genomic DNA fragmentation before microsatellite-enriched library construction-restriction enzyme (NlaIII and MseI) digestion and sonication-were compared to examine their effects on simple sequence repeat (SSR) detection using high-throughput sequencing. Tens of thousands of SSR regions from 5 species of the plant family Myrtaceae were detected when the output of individual samples was >1 million paired-end reads. Comparison of the two DNA fragmentation techniques showed that restriction enzyme digestion was superior to sonication for identification of heterozygous genotypes, whereas sonication was superior for detection of various SSR flanking regions with both species-specific and common characteristics. Therefore, choosing the most suitable DNA fragmentation method depends on the type of analysis that is planned.

  16. Comparison of microsatellite length polymorphism and multilocus sequence typing for DNA-Based typing of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Cabaret, Odile; Lecellier, Gael; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Hoinard, Damien; Raoux, Dorothée; Costa, Jean-Marc; Dromer, Françoise; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2007-12-01

    For genotyping Candida albicans isolates, two PCR-based methods have recently emerged: multilocus sequence typing (MLST), based on the sequence of selected genes, and microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP), based on the length of PCR products containing variable numbers of short DNA repeats. To compare the two methods in their abilities to differentiate and group C. albicans isolates, we selected 50 independent isolates collected at the National Reference Center for Mycoses and Antifungals. MLST typing was performed using sequencing of seven loci as described at (http://test1.mlst.net). The MLP method consisted of a single multiplex PCR testing three different loci. Dendrograms were constructed by the unweighted pair group cluster method with Euclidean metric for both methods. The correlation between the distance matrices was performed with a Mantel test tested with 1,000 random permutations. The sensitivity and specificity of the MLP typing system were determined after allocating MLST groups for the greater number of isolates of each distinct MLP group. The discriminatory power index was >0.99, and the distances between the isolates were highly correlated with both systems. The Mantel coefficient and the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient were 35,699 and 0.32, respectively (P < or = 1.2 x 10(-6)). Using MLP, the average specificity and sensitivity of clustering compared to MLST were 83% and 73%, respectively, when the singletons were excluded. The two methods are similarly discriminatory and can be interchangeable depending on the objectives. MLP is less expensive and faster than MLST. However, MLST is currently more accurate and additional standardization is needed for MLP.

  17. Long inverted repeat transiently stalls DNA replication by forming hairpin structures on both leading and lagging strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Pey Jiun; Lim, Chew Theng; Le, Hang Phuong; Katayama, Tsutomu; Leach, David R F; Furukohri, Asako; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-02-01

    Long inverted repeats (LIRs), often found in eukaryotic genomes, are unstable in Escherichia coli where they are recognized by the SbcCD (the bacterial Mre11/Rad50 homologue), an endonuclease/exonuclease capable of cleaving hairpin DNA. It has long been postulated that LIRs form hairpin structures exclusively on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication, and SbcCD cleaves these hairpin-containing lagging strands to generate DNA double-strand breaks. Using a reconstituted oriC plasmid DNA replication system, we have examined how a replication fork behaves when it meets a LIR on DNA. We have shown that leading-strand synthesis stalls transiently within the upstream half of the LIR. Pausing of lagging-strand synthesis at the LIR was not clearly observed, but the pattern of priming sites for Okazaki fragment synthesis was altered within the downstream half of the LIR. We have found that the LIR on a replicating plasmid was cleaved by SbcCD with almost equal frequency on both the leading- and lagging-strand templates. These data strongly suggest that the LIR is readily converted to a cruciform DNA, before the arrival of the fork, creating SbcCD-sensitive hairpin structures on both leading and lagging strands. We propose a model for the replication-dependent extrusion of LIRs to form cruciform structures that transiently impede replication fork movement.

  18. Detection of Ribosomal DNA Sequence Polymorphisms in the Protist Plasmodiophora brassicae for the Identification of Geographical Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawnak Laila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clubroot is a soil-borne disease caused by the protist Plasmodiophora brassicae (P. brassicae. It is one of the most economically important diseases of Brassica rapa and other cruciferous crops as it can cause remarkable yield reductions. Understanding P. brassicae genetics, and developing efficient molecular markers, is essential for effective detection of harmful races of this pathogen. Samples from 11 Korean field populations of P. brassicae (geographic isolates, collected from nine different locations in South Korea, were used in this study. Genomic DNA was extracted from the clubroot-infected samples to sequence the ribosomal DNA. Primers and probes for P. brassicae were designed using a ribosomal DNA gene sequence from a Japanese strain available in GenBank (accession number AB526843; isolate NGY. The nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA sequence of P. brassicae, comprising 6932 base pairs (bp, was cloned and sequenced and found to include the small subunits (SSUs and a large subunit (LSU, internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2, and a 5.8s. Sequence variation was observed in both the SSU and LSU. Four markers showed useful differences in high-resolution melting analysis to identify nucleotide polymorphisms including single- nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, oligonucleotide polymorphisms, and insertions/deletions (InDels. A combination of three markers was able to distinguish the geographical isolates into two groups.

  19. Polymorphism in the bovine BOLA-DRB3 upstream regulatory regions detected through PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoli, M V; Peral-García, P; Dulout, F N; Giovambattista, G

    2004-09-15

    In the present work, we describe through polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and DNA sequencing the polymorphism within the URR-BoLA-DRB3 in 15 cattle breeds. In total, seven PCR-SSCP defined alleles were detected. The alignment of studied sequences showed six polymorphic sites (four transitions, one transversion and one deletion) in the interconsensus regions of the BoLA-DRB3 upstream regulatory region (URR), while the consensus boxes were invariant. Five out of six detected polymorphic sites were of one nucleotide substitution in the interconsensus regions. It is expected that these mutations do not affect significantly the level of expression. In contrast, the deletion observed in the sequence between CCAAT and TATA boxes could have some effect on affinity interactions between the promoter region and the transcription factors. The URR-BoLA-DRB3 DNA analyzed sequences showed moderate level of nucleotide diversity, high level of identity among them and were grouped in the same clade in the phylogenetic tree. In addition, the phylogenetic tree, the similarity analysis and the sequence structure confirmed that the fragment analyzed in this study corresponds to the URR-BoLA-DRB3. The functional role of the observed polymorphic sites among the regulatory motifs in bovine needs to be analyzed and confirmed by means of gene expression assays.

  20. Identification of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Markers Linked to Sex Determination in Calamus simplicifolius C. F. Wei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua YANG; Si-Ming GAN; Guang-Tian YIN; Huang-Can XU

    2005-01-01

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular marker technique was used to determine the sex of Calamus simplicifolius C. F. Wei In the present study, DNA samples were extracted individually from 10 male and 10 female plants. After a total of 1 040 decamer primers had been tested, an approximate 500-bp male-specific DNA fragment was generated with the S1443 primer. It is feasible to identify sex at the early stages of plant life, which is beneficial for improving breeding programs of this dioecious species. In addition, we have obtained a proper RAPD protocol that is useful for other species of rattan.

  1. Buccal cells DNA extraction to obtain high quality human genomic DNA suitable for polymorphism genotyping by PCR-RFLP and Real-Time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, Erika Calvano; Tannure, Patricia Nivoloni; Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Lopes, Taliria Silva; Granjeiro, Jose Mauro; Amorim, Lidia Maria Fonte

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, by PCR-RFLP and real-time PCR, the yield and quality of genomic DNA collected from buccal cells by mouthwash after different storage times at room temperature. A group of volunteers was recruited to collect buccal cells using a mouthwash solution. The collected solution was divided into 3 tubes, one tube were used for immediate extraction and the remaining received ethanol and were kept at room temperature for 4 and 8 days followed by dna extraction. The concentration, purity and integrity of the dna were determined using spectrophotometry and electrophoresis. DNA quality differences among the three incubation times were also evaluated for genotyping EGF +61 a/g (rs 4444903) polymorphism by PCR-RFLP and for IRF6 polymorphism (rs 17015215) using real-time PCR. There was no significant difference of dna yield (p=0.75) and purity (p=0.86) among the three different incubation times. DNA obtained from different incubation times presented high-molecular weight. The PCR-RFLP and real time pcr reactions were successfully performed for all DNA samples, even those extracted after 8 days of incubation. All samples genotyped by real-time pcr presented c allele for irf6 gene polymorphism (homozygous: cc; heterozygous: Ct) and the C allele was used as a reference for Ct values. The samples presented the same genotype for the different times in both techniques. We demonstrated that the method described herein is simple and low cost, and that DNA can be extracted and pcr amplified after storage in mouthwash solution at room temperature.

  2. Buccal cells DNA extraction to obtain high quality human genomic DNA suitable for polymorphism genotyping by PCR-RFLP and Real-Time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Calvano Küchler

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate, by PCR-RFLP and real-time PCR, the yield and quality of genomic DNA collected from buccal cells by mouthwash after different storage times at room temperature. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A group of volunteers was recruited to collect buccal cells using a mouthwash solution. The collected solution was divided into 3 tubes, one tube were used for immediate extraction and the remaining received ethanol and were kept at room temperature for 4 and 8 days followed by dna extraction. The concentration, purity and integrity of the dna were determined using spectrophotometry and electrophoresis. DNA quality differences among the three incubation times were also evaluated for genotyping EGF +61 a/g (rs 4444903 polymorphism by PCR-RFLP and for IRF6 polymorphism (rs 17015215 using real-time PCR. RESULTS: There was no significant difference of dna yield (p=0.75 and purity (p=0.86 among the three different incubation times. DNA obtained from different incubation times presented high-molecular weight. The PCR-RFLP and real time pcr reactions were successfully performed for all DNA samples, even those extracted after 8 days of incubation. All samples genotyped by real-time pcr presented c allele for irf6 gene polymorphism (homozygous: cc; heterozygous: Ct and the C allele was used as a reference for Ct values. The samples presented the same genotype for the different times in both techniques. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that the method described herein is simple and low cost, and that DNA can be extracted and pcr amplified after storage in mouthwash solution at room temperature.

  3. Complex relationships between occupation, environment, DNA adducts, genetic polymorphisms and bladder cancer in a case-control study using a structural equation modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Porru

    Full Text Available DNA adducts are considered an integrate measure of carcinogen exposure and the initial step of carcinogenesis. Their levels in more accessible peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs mirror that in the bladder tissue. In this study we explore whether the formation of PBL DNA adducts may be associated with bladder cancer (BC risk, and how this relationship is modulated by genetic polymorphisms, environmental and occupational risk factors for BC. These complex interrelationships, including direct and indirect effects of each variable, were appraised using the structural equation modeling (SEM analysis. Within the framework of a hospital-based case/control study, study population included 199 BC cases and 213 non-cancer controls, all Caucasian males. Data were collected on lifetime smoking, coffee drinking, dietary habits and lifetime occupation, with particular reference to exposure to aromatic amines (AAs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. No indirect paths were found, disproving hypothesis on association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk. DNA adducts were instead positively associated with occupational cumulative exposure to AAs (p = 0.028, whereas XRCC1 Arg 399 (p<0.006 was related with a decreased adduct levels, but with no impact on BC risk. Previous findings on increased BC risk by packyears (p<0.001, coffee (p<0.001, cumulative AAs exposure (p = 0.041 and MnSOD (p = 0.009 and a decreased risk by MPO (p<0.008 were also confirmed by SEM analysis. Our results for the first time make evident an association between occupational cumulative exposure to AAs with DNA adducts and BC risk, strengthening the central role of AAs in bladder carcinogenesis. However the lack of an association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk advises that these snapshot measurements are not representative of relevant exposures. This would envisage new scenarios for biomarker discovery and new challenges such as repeated measurements at different

  4. High-resolution genotyping of Listeria monocytogenes by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis compared to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, ribotyping, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Fussing, V.; Ojeniyi, B.

    2004-01-01

    of different origin. The AFLP technique was compared with three other molecular typing methods - ribotyping, random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) - in terms of discriminatory ability. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism was included......The purpose of this study was to evaluate fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis for the inter- and intraspecies differentiation of a collection of 96 strains of Listeria monocytogenes and 10 non- L. monocytogenes strains representing six other Listeria species...... for virulence gene allele characterization. The 96 L. monocytogenes strains were divided into two major clusters by AFLP fingerprinting at a similarity level of 82% in concordance with the results of PFGE, RAPD, and ribotyping. One main cluster consisted of all of the 24 L. monocytogenes hly allele 1 strains...

  5. Development of Random Amplified Polymorphism DNA Markers Linked to Powdery Mildew Resistance Gene in Melon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Setiadi Daryono

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD marker linked to powdery mildew resistance gene (Pm-I in melon PI 371795 was reported. However, the RAPD marker has problem in scoring. To detect powdery mildew resistance gene (Pm-I in melon accurately, the RAPD marker was cloned and sequenced to design sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR markers. SCAPMAR5 marker derived from pUBC411 primer yielded a single DNA band at 1061 bp. Segregation of SCAPMAR5 marker in bulk of F2 plants demonstrated that the marker was co-segregated with RAPD marker from which the SCAR marker was originated. Moreover, results of SCAR analysis in diverse melons showed SCAPMAR5 primers obtained a single 1061 bp linked to Pm-I in resistant melon PI 371795 and PMAR5. On the other hand, SCAPMAR5 failed to detect Pm-I in susceptible melons. Results of this study revealed that SCAR analysis not only confirmed melons that had been clearly scored for resistance to Pm-I evaluated by RAPD markers, but also clarified the ambiguous resistance results obtained by the RAPD markers.   Key words: Cucumis melo L., Pm-I, RAPD, SCAPMAR5

  6. Are SNP-Smoking Association Studies Needed in Controls? DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Smoking Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verde, Zoraida; Reinoso, Luis; Chicharro, Luis Miguel; Resano, Pilar; Sánchez-Hernández, Ignacio; Rodríguez González-Moro, Jose Miguel; Bandrés, Fernando; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Santiago, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Variations in tobacco-related cancers, incidence and prevalence reflect differences in tobacco consumption in addition to genetic factors. Besides, genes related to lung cancer risk could be related to smoking behavior. Polymorphisms altering DNA repair capacity may lead to synergistic effects with tobacco carcinogen-induced lung cancer risk. Common problems in genetic association studies, such as presence of gene-by-environment (G x E) correlation in the population, may reduce the validity of these designs. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the independence assumption for selected SNPs and smoking behaviour in a cohort of 320 healthy Spanish smokers. We found an association between the wild type alleles of XRCC3 Thr241Met or KLC3 Lys751Gln and greater smoking intensity (OR = 12.98, 95% CI = 2.86-58.82 and OR=16.90, 95% CI=2.09-142.8; respectively). Although preliminary, the results of our study provide evidence that genetic variations in DNA-repair genes may influence both smoking habits and the development of lung cancer. Population-specific G x E studies should be carried out when genetic and environmental factors interact to cause the disease.

  7. Are SNP-Smoking Association Studies Needed in Controls? DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Smoking Intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoraida Verde

    Full Text Available Variations in tobacco-related cancers, incidence and prevalence reflect differences in tobacco consumption in addition to genetic factors. Besides, genes related to lung cancer risk could be related to smoking behavior. Polymorphisms altering DNA repair capacity may lead to synergistic effects with tobacco carcinogen-induced lung cancer risk. Common problems in genetic association studies, such as presence of gene-by-environment (G x E correlation in the population, may reduce the validity of these designs. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the independence assumption for selected SNPs and smoking behaviour in a cohort of 320 healthy Spanish smokers. We found an association between the wild type alleles of XRCC3 Thr241Met or KLC3 Lys751Gln and greater smoking intensity (OR = 12.98, 95% CI = 2.86-58.82 and OR=16.90, 95% CI=2.09-142.8; respectively. Although preliminary, the results of our study provide evidence that genetic variations in DNA-repair genes may influence both smoking habits and the development of lung cancer. Population-specific G x E studies should be carried out when genetic and environmental factors interact to cause the disease.

  8. PEGylation enhances tumor targeting of plasmid DNA by an artificial cationized protein with repeated RGD sequences, Pronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2004-05-31

    The objective of this study is to investigate feasibility of a non-viral gene carrier with repeated RGD sequences (Pronectin F+) in tumor targeting for gene expression. The Pronectin F+ was cationized by introducing spermine (Sm) to the hydroxyl groups to allow to polyionically complex with plasmid DNA. The cationized Pronectin F+ prepared was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules which have active ester and methoxy groups at the terminal, to form various PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+. The cationized Pronectin F+ with or without PEGylation at different extents was mixed with a plasmid DNA of LacZ to form respective cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes. The plasmid DNA was electrophoretically complexed with cationized Pronectin F+ and PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, irrespective of the PEGylation extent, although the higher N/P ratio of complexes was needed for complexation with the latter Pronectin F+. The molecular size and zeta potential measurements revealed that the plasmid DNA was reduced in size to about 250 nm and the charge was changed to be positive by the complexation with cationized Pronectin F+. For the complexation with PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, the charge of complex became neutral being almost 0 mV with the increasing PEGylation extents, while the molecular size was similar to that of cationized Pronectin F+. When cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes with or without PEGylation were intravenously injected to mice carrying a subcutaneous Meth-AR-1 fibrosarcoma mass, the PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complex specifically enhanced the level of gene expression in the tumor, to a significantly high extent compared with the cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes and free plasmid DNA. The enhanced level of gene expression depended on the percentage of PEG introduced, the N/P ratio, and the plasmid DNA dose. A fluorescent microscopic study revealed that the

  9. Identification of a new human mtDNA polymorphism (A14290G in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Houshmand

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a maternally inherited form of retinal ganglion cell degeneration leading to optic atrophy in young adults. Several mutations in different genes can cause LHON (heterogeneity. The ND6 gene is one of the mitochondrial genes that encodes subunit 6 of complex I of the respiratory chain. This gene is a hot spot gene. Fourteen Persian LHON patients were analyzed with single-strand conformational polymorphism and DNA sequencing techniques. None of these patients had four primary mutations, G3460A, G11788A, T14484C, and G14459A, related to this disease. We identified twelve nucleotide substitutions, G13702C, T13879C, T14110C, C14167T, G14199T, A14233G, G14272C, A14290G, G14365C, G14368C, T14766C, and T14798C. Eleven of twelve nucleotide substitutions had already been reported as polymorphism. One of the nucleotide substitutions (A14290G has not been reported. The A14290G nucleotide substitution does not change its amino acid (glutamic acid. We looked for base conservation using DNA star software (MEGALIGN program as a criterion for pathogenic or nonpathogenic nucleotide substitution in A14290G. The results of ND6 gene alignment in humans and in other species (mouse, cow, elegans worm, and Neurospora crassa mold revealed that the 14290th base was not conserved. Fifty normal controls were also investigated for this polymorphism in the Iranian population and two had A14290G polymorphism (4%. This study provides evidence that the mtDNA A14290G allele is a new nonpathogenic polymorphism. We suggest follow-up studies regarding this polymorphism in different populations.

  10. The CRISPRdb database and tools to display CRISPRs and to generate dictionaries of spacers and repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Vergnaud Gilles; Grissa Ibtissem; Pourcel Christine

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In Archeae and Bacteria, the repeated elements called CRISPRs for "clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats" are believed to participate in the defence against viruses. Short sequences called spacers are stored in-between repeated elements. In the current model, motifs comprising spacers and repeats may target an invading DNA and lead to its degradation through a proposed mechanism similar to RNA interference. Analysis of intra-species polymorphism shows t...

  11. Variation of TTC Repeat Pattern In The Dna of Mycobacterium Leprae Isolates Obtained from Archeological Bones and Leprosy Patients From East Nusa Tenggara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinar Adriaty

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence of leprosy or kusta or Morbus Hansen or Hansen’s disease has been known for years, including in Indonesia. Starting from the discovery of Mycobacterium leprae isolates from ancient bone (about 1.000 years B.C, the archaeological excavations results in East Nusa Tenggara, interesting questions arise about how the development of leprosy in eastern Indonesia is. Biology molecular study would become a powerful tool to investigate the presence of leprosy bacillary whether there are similarities between the genomes of M. leprae isolates in the primeval and the present. PCR examinations were performed on mandibular bone fragments from ancient human who lived 1000 years B.C. discovered in archaeological surveys on the island of Lembata and three leprosy patients from East Nusa Tenggara. The DNA extraction was performed using a kit from Qiagen products and its TTC repeating pattern was seen with the method of direct sequencing. It turned out that the TTC profile obtained from samples of archaeological was as many as 13 copies, while the repetition of TTC in three samples of leprosy patients were 15, 17 and 26 copies. The different number of TTC repetition shows the different isolates of M. leprae between in the ancient times and the present. Further studies are needed to verify the differences in the genome that occur, for example from the study of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms.

  12. Haplotype analyses of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and their role in ulcerative colitis.

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    Avinash Bardia

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC is a major clinical form of inflammatory bowel disease. UC is characterized by mucosal inflammation limited to the colon, always involving the rectum and a variable extent of the more proximal colon in a continuous manner. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes may influence the extent of repair functions, DNA damage, and thus the manifestations of UC. This study thus evaluated the role of polymorphisms of the genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms. A total of 171 patients and 213 controls were included. Genotyping was carried out by ARMS PCR and PCR-RFLP analyses for RAD51, XRCC3 and hMSH2 gene polymorphisms. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in both control & patient groups and data was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. The frequency of 'A' allele of hMSH2 in the UC group caused statistically significant increased risk for UC compared to controls (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.16-2.31, p = 0.004. Similarly, the CT genotype of XRCC3 gene was predominant in the UC group and increased the risk for UC by 1.75 fold compared to controls (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.15-2.67, p = 0.03, further confirming the risk of 'T' allele in UC. The GC genotype frequency of RAD51 gene was significantly increased (p = 0.02 in the UC group (50.3% compared to controls (38%. The GC genotype significantly increased the risk for UC compared to GG genotype by 1.73 fold (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.14-2.62, p = 0.02 confirming the strong association of 'C' allele with UC. Among the controls, the SNP loci combination of hMSH2:XRCC3 were in perfect linkage. The GTC and ACC haplotypes were found to be predominant in UC than controls with a 2.28 and 2.93 fold significant increase risk of UC.

  13. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction analysis of two different populations of cultured Korean catfish Silurus asotus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jong-Man Yoon; Gye-Woong Kim

    2001-12-01

    Genetic similarity and diversity of cultured catfish Silurus asotus populations collected from two areas in western Korea were examined using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). Out of 20 random primers tested, 5 produced 1344 RAPD bands ranging from 8.2 to 13.6 polymorphic bands per primer. The polymorphic bands in these populations ranged from 56.4% to 59.6%. Polymorphic bands per lane within populations ranged from 4.9% to 5.3%. The similarity within the Kunsan population varied from 0.39 to 0.82 with a mean (± SD) of 0.56 ± 0.08. The level of bandsharing values was 0.59 ± 0.07 within the catfish population from Yesan. The genetic similarity in cultured catfish populations may have been caused because individuals from two populations were reared in the same environmental conditions or by inbreeding during several generations. However, in view of bandsharing values, polymorphic bands and also the specific major bands that were inter-population-specific, significant genetic differentiation between these populations were present even if bandsharing (BS) values were somewhat numerically different. Therefore, the number of RAPD polymorphisms identified in this study may be sufficient to permit estimating genetic similarity and diversity. However, in future, additional populations, sampling sites and individuals will be necessary to make up for these weak points.

  14. Effect of G-quadruplex polymorphism on the recognition of telomeric DNA by a metal complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Musetti

    Full Text Available The physiological role(s played by G-quadruplexes renders these 'non-canonical' DNA secondary structures interesting new targets for therapeutic intervention. In particular, the search for ligands for selective recognition and stabilization of G-quadruplex arrangements has led to a number of novel targeted agents. An interesting approach is represented by the use of metal-complexes, their binding to DNA being modulated by ligand and metal ion nature, and by complex stoichiometry. In this work we characterized thermodynamically and stereochemically the interactions of a Ni(II bis-phenanthroline derivative with telomeric G-quadruplex sequences using calorimetric, chiroptical and NMR techniques. We employed three strictly related sequences based on the human telomeric repeat, namely Tel22, Tel26 and wtTel26, which assume distinct conformations in potassium containing solutions. We were able to monitor specific enthalpy/entropy changes according to the structural features of the target telomeric sequence and to dissect the binding process into distinct events. Interestingly, temperature effects turned out to be prominent both in terms of binding stoichiometry and ΔH/ΔS contributions, while the final G-quadruplex-metal complex architecture tended to merge for the examined sequences. These results underline the critical choice of experimental conditions and DNA sequence for practical use of thermodynamic data in the rational development of effective G-quadruplex binders.

  15. Analysis of Short Tandem Repeat and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Loci From Single-Source Samples Using a Custom HaloPlex Target Enrichment System Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Frank R; Zeng, Xiangpei; Churchill, Jennifer D; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-06-01

    Short tandem repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are used to individualize biological evidence samples. Short tandem repeat alleles are characterized by size separation during capillary electrophoresis (CE). Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) offers an alternative that can overcome limitations of the CE. With MPS, libraries are prepared for each sample, entailing target enrichment and bar coding, purification, and normalization. The HaloPlex Target Enrichment System (Agilent Technologies) uses a capture-based enrichment system with restriction enzyme digestion to generate fragments containing custom-selected markers. It offers another possible workflow for typing reference samples. Its efficacy was assessed using a panel of 275 human identity SNPs, 88 short tandem repeats, and amelogenin. The data analyzed included locus typing success, depth of sequence coverage, heterozygote balance, and concordance. The results indicate that the HaloPlex Target Enrichment System provides genetic data similar to that obtained by conventional polymerase chain reaction-CE methods with the advantage of analyzing substantially more markers in 1 sequencing run. The genetic typing performance of HaloPlex is comparable to other MPS-based sample preparation systems that utilize primer-based target enrichment.

  16. Curcusone C induces telomeric DNA-damage response in cancer cells through inhibition of telomeric repeat factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxue; Cao, Jiaojiao; Zhu, Jian-Yong; Qiu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Shu, Bing; Ou, Tian-Miao; Tan, Jia-Heng; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Yin, Sheng; Li, Ding

    2017-11-01

    Telomeric repeat factor 2 (known as TRF2 or TERF2) is a key component of telomere protection protein complex named as Shelterin. TRF2 helps the folding of telomere to form T-loop structure and the suppression of ATM-dependent DNA damage response activation. TRF2 has been recognized as a potentially new therapeutic target for cancer treatment. In our routine screening of small molecule libraries, we found that Curcusone C had significant effect in disrupting the binding between TRF2 and telomeric DNA, with potent antitumor activity against cancer cells. Our result showed that Curcusone C could bind with TRF2 without binding interaction with TRF1 (telomeric repeat factor 1) although these two proteins share high sequence homology, indicating that their binding conformations and biological functions in telomere could be different. Our mechanistic studies showed that Curcusone C bound with TRF2 possibly through its DNA binding site causing blockage of its interaction with telomeric DNA. Further in cellular studies indicated that the interaction of TRF2 with Curcusone C could activate DNA-damage response, inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and cause cell cycle arrest, resulting in tumor cell apoptosis. Our studies showed that Curcusone C could become a promising lead compound for further development for cancer treatment. Here, TRF2 was firstly identified as a target of Curcusone C. It is likely that the anti-cancer activity of some other terpenes and terpenoids are related with their possible effect for telomere protection proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic variability of Amorphophallus muelleri Blume in Java based on Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIYAH MARTANTI

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Amorphophallus muelleri Blume (Araceae is valued for its glucomanan content for use in food industry (healthy diet food, paper industry, pharmacy and cosmetics. The species is triploid (2n=3x=39 and the seed is developed apomictically. The present research is aimed to identify genetic variability of six population of A. muelleri from Java (consisted of 50 accessions using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD. The six populations of the species are: East Java: (1 Silo-Jember, (2 Saradan-Madiun, (3 IPB (cultivated, from Saradan-Madiun, (4 Panti-Jember, (5 Probolinggo; and Central Java: (6 Cilacap. The results showed that five RAPD primers generated 42 scorable bands of which 29 (69.05% were polymorphic. Size of the bands varied from 300bp to 1.5kbp. The 50 accessions of A. muelleri were divided into two main clusters, some of them were grouped based on their populations, and some others were not. The range of individual genetic dissimilarity was from 0.02 to 0.36. The results showed that among six populations investigated, Saradan population showed the highest levels of genetic variation with mean values of na = 1.500+ 0.5061, ne = 1.3174 + 0.3841, PLP = 50% and He = 0, 0.1832+0.2054, whereas Silo-Jember population showed the lowest levels of genetic variation with mean values na = 1.2619+ 0.4450, ne = 1.1890 + 0.3507, PLP = 26.19% and He = 0.1048+0.1887. Efforts to conserve, domesticate, cultivate and improve genetically should be based on the genetic properties of each population and individual within population, especially Saradan population which has the highest levels of genetic variation, need more attention for its conservation.

  18. Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric (TTAGG)n repeats in blue butterflies (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) with low and high chromosome numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershinina, Alisa O.; Anokhin, Boris A.; Lukhtanov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric repeats are important parts of eukaryotic genome. However, little is known about their organization and localization in karyotypes of organisms with holocentric chromosomes. Here we present first cytogenetic study of these molecular structures in seven blue butterflies of the genus Polyommatus Latreille, 1804 with low and high chromosome numbers (from n=10 to n=ca.108) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and (TTAGG)n telomeric probes. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe showed the presence of two different variants of the location of major rDNA clusters in Polyommatus species: with one or two rDNA-carrying chromosomes in haploid karyotype. We discuss evolutionary trends and possible mechanisms of changes in the number of ribosomal clusters. We also demonstrate that Polyommatus species have the classical insect (TTAGG)n telomere organization. This chromosome end protection mechanism probably originated de novo in small chromosomes that evolved via fragmentations. PMID:26140159

  19. A graphical simulation model of the entire DNA process associated with the analysis of short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Peter; Curran, James; Elliot, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The use of expert systems to interpret short tandem repeat DNA profiles in forensic, medical and ancient DNA applications is becoming increasingly prevalent as high-throughput analytical systems generate large amounts of data that are time-consuming to process. With special reference to low copy number (LCN) applications, we use a graphical model to simulate stochastic variation associated with the entire DNA process starting with extraction of sample, followed by the processing associated with the preparation of a PCR reaction mixture and PCR itself. Each part of the process is modelled with input efficiency parameters. Then, the key output parameters that define the characteristics of a DNA profile are derived, namely heterozygote balance (Hb) and the probability of allelic drop-out p(D). The model can be used to estimate the unknown efficiency parameters, such as pi(extraction). 'What-if' scenarios can be used to improve and optimize the entire process, e.g. by increasing the aliquot forwarded to PCR, the improvement expected to a given DNA profile can be reliably predicted. We demonstrate that Hb and drop-out are mainly a function of stochastic effect of pre-PCR molecular selection. Whole genome amplification is unlikely to give any benefit over conventional PCR for LCN.

  20. Chromosomal localization of a tandemly repeated DNA sequence in Trifilium repens L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUJM; NWELLISON; 等

    1996-01-01

    A karyotype of Trifolium repens constructed from mitotic cells revealed 13 pairs of metacentric and 3 pairs of submetacentric chromosomes including a pair of satellites located at the end of the short arm of chromosome 16.C-bands were identified around the centromeric regions of 8 pairs of chromosomes.A 350 bp tandemly repeated DNAsequence from T.repens labelled with digoxygenin hybridized to the proximal centromeric regions of 12 chromosome pairs.Some correlation between the distribution of the repeat sequence and the distribution of C-banding was demonstrated.

  1. Glycoprotein I of herpes simplex virus type 1 contains a unique polymorphic tandem-repeated mucin region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norberg, Peter; Olofsson, Sigvard; Tarp, Mads Agervig

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein I (gI) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) contains a tandem repeat (TR) region including the amino acids serine and threonine, residues that can be utilized for O-glycosylation. The length of this TR region was determined for 82 clinical HSV-1 isolates and the results revealed...

  2. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian;

    2007-01-01

    Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine......-repeat number correlated inversely with thigh and axial muscle area and with lower and upper extremity lean body mass. Except for upper extremity lean body mass, these findings remained significant in multivariate analyses controlling for circulating androgens, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake...

  3. Repeat Finding Techniques, Data Structures and Algorithms in DNA sequences: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeson Kaniwa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequencing technologies keep getting faster and cheaper leading to massive availability of entire human genomes. This massive availability calls for better analysis tools with a potential to realize a shift from reactive to predictive medicine. The challenge remains, since the entire human genomes need more space and processing power than that can be offered by a standard Desktop PC for their analysis. A background of key concepts surrounding the area of DNA analysis is given and a review of selected prominent algorithms used in this area. The significance of this paper would be to survey the concepts surrounding DNA analysis so as to provide a deep rooted understanding and knowledge transfer regarding existing approaches for DNA analysis using Burrows-Wheeler transform, Wavelet tree and their respective strengths and weaknesses. Consequent to this survey, the paper attempts to provide some directions for future research.

  4. Determination of genotoxic effects of boron and zinc on Zea mays using protein and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Nardemir, Gokce; Hilal, A Y; Arslan, Esra; Agar, Guleray

    2015-11-01

    In this research, we aimed to determine genotoxic effects of boron (B) and zinc (Zn) on Zea mays by using total soluble protein content and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. For the RAPD analysis, 16 RAPD primers were found to produce unique polymorphic band profiles on treated maize seedlings. With increased Zn and B concentrations, increased polymorphism rate was observed, while genomic template stability and total soluble protein content decreased. The treatment with Zn was more effective than that of B groups on the levels of total proteins. The obtained results from this study revealed that the total soluble protein levels and RAPD profiles were performed as endpoints of genotoxicity and these analyses can offer useful biomarker assays for the evaluation of genotoxic effects on Zn and B polluted plants. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. Risk-Association of DNA Methyltransferases Polymorphisms with Gastric Cancer in the Southern Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA hypomethylation and/or hypermethylation are presumed to be early events in carcinogenesis, and one or more DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs have been suggested to play roles in carcinogenesis of gastric cancer (GC. However, there have been no systematic studies regarding the association between DNMT gene polymorphisms and GC risk. Here, we examined the associations of 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from DNMT1 (rs2114724, rs2228611, rs2228612, rs8101866, rs16999593, DNMT2 (rs11695471, rs11254413, DNMT3A (rs1550117, rs11887120, rs13420827, rs13428812, rs6733301, DNMT3B (rs2424908, rs2424913, rs6087990 and DNMT3L (rs113593938 with GC in the Southern Chinese population. We assessed the associations of these 16 SNPs with GC in a case-control study that consisted of 242 GC cases and 294 controls, using the Sequenom MALDI-TOF-MS platform. Association analyses based on the χ2 test and binary logistic regression were performed to determine the odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (95%CI for each SNP. We found that rs16999593 in DNMT1, rs11254413 in DNMT2 and rs13420827 in DNMT3A were significantly associated with GC susceptibility (OR 1.45, 0.15, 0.66, respectively; 95% CI 1.00–2.11, p = 0.047; 0.08–0.27, p < 0.01; 0.45–0.97, p = 0.034, respectively, overdominant model. These results suggested that DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3A may play important roles in GC carcinogenesis. However, further studies are required to elucidate the mechanism.

  6. The population structure of Trypanosoma cruzi: expanded analysis of 54 strains using eight polymorphic CA-repeat microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riva P Oliveira

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently we cloned and sequenced the first eight Trypanosoma cruzi polymorphic microsatellite loci and studied 31 clones and strains to obtain valuable information about the population structure of the parasite. We have now studied 23 further strains, increasing from 11 to 31 the number of strains obtained from patients with chronic Chagas disease. This expanded set of 54 strains and clones analyzed with the eight microsatellites markers confirmed the previously observed diploidy, clonal population organization and very high polymorphism of T. cruzi. Moreover, this new study disclosed two new features of the population genetic structure of T. cruzi. The first was the discovery that, similarly to what we had previously shown for strains isolated from insect vectors, mammals and humans with acute disease, isolates from patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease could also be multiclonal, albeit at a reduced proportion. Second, when we used parsimony to display the genetic relationship among the clonal lineages in an unrooted Wagner network we observed, like before, a good correlation of the tree topography with the classification in three clusters on the basis of single locus analysis of the ribosomal RNA genes. However, a significant new finding was that now the strains belonging to cluster 2 split in two distant sub-clusters. This observation suggests that the evolutionary history of T. cruzi may be more complex than we previously thought.

  7. TAL effector specificity for base 0 of the DNA target is altered in a complex, effector- and assay-dependent manner by substitutions for the tryptophan in cryptic repeat -1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L Doyle

    Full Text Available TAL effectors are re-targetable transcription factors used for tailored gene regulation and, as TAL effector-nuclease fusions (TALENs, for genome engineering. Their hallmark feature is a customizable central string of polymorphic amino acid repeats that interact one-to-one with individual DNA bases to specify the target. Sequences targeted by TAL effector repeats in nature are nearly all directly preceded by a thymine (T that is required for maximal activity, and target sites for custom TAL effector constructs have typically been selected with this constraint. Multiple crystal structures suggest that this requirement for T at base 0 is encoded by a tryptophan residue (W232 in a cryptic repeat N-terminal to the central repeats that exhibits energetically favorable van der Waals contacts with the T. We generated variants based on TAL effector PthXo1 with all single amino acid substitutions for W232. In a transcriptional activation assay, many substitutions altered or relaxed the specificity for T and a few were as active as wild type. Some showed higher activity. However, when replicated in a different TAL effector, the effects of the substitutions differed. Further, the effects differed when tested in the context of a TALEN in a DNA cleavage assay, and in a TAL effector-DNA binding assay. Substitution of the N-terminal region of the PthXo1 construct with that of one of the TAL effector-like proteins of Ralstonia solanacearum, which have arginine in place of the tryptophan, resulted in specificity for guanine as the 5' base but low activity, and several substitutions for the arginine, including tryptophan, destroyed activity altogether. Thus, the effects on specificity and activity generated by substitutions at the W232 (or equivalent position are complex and context dependent. Generating TAL effector scaffolds with high activity that robustly accommodate sites without a T at position 0 may require larger scale re-engineering.

  8. Micronuclei in humans induced by exposure to low level of ionizing radiation: influence of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, Sabrina [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy) and Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden)]. E-mail: angelini@biocfarm.unibo.it; Kumar, Rajiv [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Carbone, Fabio [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Maffei, Francesca [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Forti, Giorgio Cantelli [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Violante, Francesco Saverio [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Occupational Medicine Unit, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Pelagi 9, Bologna 40100 (Italy); Lodi, Vittorio [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Curti, Stefania [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Hemminki, Kari [Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge 141 57 (Sweden); Hrelia, Patrizia [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, Bologna 40126 (Italy)

    2005-02-15

    Understanding the risks deriving from protracted exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has remarkable societal importance in view of the large number of work settings in which sources of IR are encountered. To address this question, we studied the frequency of micronuclei (MN), which is an indicator of DNA damage, in a population exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation and in matched controls. In both exposed population and controls, the possible influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in XRCC1, XRCC3 and XPD genes on the frequency of micronuclei was also evaluated. We also considered the effects of confounding factors, like smoking status, age and gender. The results indicated that MN frequency was significantly higher in the exposed workers than in the controls [8.62 {+-} 2.80 versus 6.86 {+-} 2.65; P = 0.019]. Radiological workers with variant alleles for XRCC1 or XRCC3 polymorphisms or wild-type alleles for XPD exon 23 or 10 polymorphisms showed a significantly higher MN frequency than controls with the same genotypes. Smoking status did not affect micronuclei frequency either in exposed workers or controls, while age was associated with increased MN frequency in the exposed only. In the combined population, gender but not age exerted an influence on the yield of MN, being higher in females than in males. Even though there is a limitation in this study due to the small number of subjects, these results suggest that even exposures to low level of ionizing radiation could have genotoxic effects and that XRCC3, XRCC1 and XPD polymorphisms might contribute to the increased genetic damage in susceptible individuals occupationally exposed to chronic low levels of ionizing radiation. For a clear conclusion on the induction of DNA damage caused by protracted exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and the possible influence of genetic polymorphism in DNA repair genes larger studies are needed.

  9. Repeatedly positive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA polymerase chain reaction in human immunodeficiency virus-exposed seroreverting infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, S S; Tetali, S; Abrams, E J; Paul, M O; Pahwa, S G

    1995-08-01

    Three human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-exposed children who had repeatedly positive DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for HIV in > or = 5 samples before seroreversion to HIV-negative status are reported. The children belong to a cohort of 210 infants who were born to HIV-infected mothers and were tested at intervals of 1 to 3 months by HIV viral culture, PCR, and p24 antigen; only the PCR was positive in > or = 5 samples in the children reported here. Their clinical features were indistinguishable from other seroreverters. All three children had a transient drop in CD4:CD8 ratio to < 1.0. The transiently positive DNA PCR in HIV-exposed infants may indicate either that HIV infection was eliminated by a strong host immune response or that infection was caused by an attenuated/defective strain of virus.

  10. Absence of association between a polymorphic GGC repeat in the 5' untranslated region of the reelin gene and autism

    OpenAIRE

    Krebs, Marie-Odile; Betancur, Catalina; Leroy, Sophie; Bourdel, Marie-Chantal; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion

    2002-01-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with severe cognitive and communication disabilities, that has a strong genetic predisposition predisposition.1 Reelin, a protein involved in neuronal migration during development, is encoded by a gene located on 7q22, 7q22,2 within the candidate region on 7q showing increased allele sharing in previous genome scans. 3–8 A case/control and family-based association study recently reported a positive association between a trinucleotide repeat poly...

  11. Detection of cryptic chromosomal abnormalities in unexplained mental retardation: A general strategy using hypervariable subtelomeric DNA polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkie, A.O.M.

    1993-09-01

    Given the availability of DNA from both parents, unusual segregation of hypervariable DNA polymorphisms (HVPs) in the offspring may be attributable to deletion, unbalanced chromosomal translocation, or uniparental disomy. The telomeric regions of chromosomes are rich in both genes and hypervariable minisatellite sequences and may also be particularly prone to cryptic breakage events. Here the author describes and analyzes a general approach to the detection of subtelomeric abnormalities and uniparental disomy in patients with unexplained mental retardation. With 29 available polymorphic systems, [approximately]50%-70% of these abnormalities could currently be detected. Development of subtelomeric HVPs physically localized with respect to their telomers should provide a valuable resource in routine diagnostics. 73 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter and the risk of carotid atherosclerosis related to arsenic exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meei-Maan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is a strong stimulus of heme oxygenase (HO-1 expression in experimental studies in response to oxidative stress caused by a stimulus. A functional GT-repeat polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter was inversely correlated to the development of coronary artery disease in diabetics and development of restenosis following angioplasty in patients. The role of this potential vascular protective factor in carotid atherosclerosis remains unclear. We previously reported a graded association of arsenic exposure in drinking water with an increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the relationship between HO-1 genetic polymorphism and the risk of atherosclerosis related to arsenic. Methods Three-hundred and sixty-seven participants with an indication of carotid atherosclerosis and an additional 420 participants without the indication, which served as the controls, from two arsenic exposure areas in Taiwan, a low arsenic-exposed Lanyang cohort and a high arsenic-exposed LMN cohort, were studied. Carotid atherosclerosis was evaluated using a duplex ultrasonographic assessment of the extracranial carotid arteries. Allelic variants of (GTn repeats in the 5'-flanking region of the HO-1 gene were identified and grouped into a short (S allele ( Results Analysis results showed that arsenic's effect on carotid atherosclerosis differed between carriers of the class S allele (OR 1.39; 95% CI 0.86-2.25; p = 0.181 and non-carriers (OR 2.65; 95% CI 1.03-6.82; p = 0.044 in the high-exposure LMN cohort. At arsenic exposure levels exceeding 750 μg/L, difference in OR estimates between class S allele carriers and non-carriers was borderline significant (p = 0.051. In contrast, no such results were found in the low-exposure Lanyang cohort. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that at a relatively high level of arsenic exposure, carriers of the short (GTn allele (

  13. Variable number of tandem repeat polymorphisms of DRD4: re-evaluation of selection hypothesis and analysis of association with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Eiji; Nakajima, Mizuho; Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Saitou, Naruya; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2009-01-01

    Associations have been reported between the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphisms in the exon 3 of dopamine D4 receptor gene gene and multiple psychiatric illnesses/traits. We examined the distribution of VNTR alleles of different length in a Japanese cohort and found that, as reported earlier, the size of allele ‘7R' was much rarer (0.5%) in Japanese than in Caucasian populations (∼20%). This presents a challenge to an earlier proposed hypothesis that positive selection favoring the allele 7R has contributed to its high frequency. To further address the issue of selection, we carried out sequencing of the VNTR region not only from human but also from chimpanzee samples, and made inference on the ancestral repeat motif and haplotype by use of a phylogenetic analysis program. The most common 4R variant was considered to be the ancestral haplotype as earlier proposed. However, in a gene tree of VNTR constructed on the basis of this inferred ancestral haplotype, the allele 7R had five descendent haplotypes in relatively long lineage, where genetic drift can have major influence. We also tested this length polymorphism for association with schizophrenia, studying two Japanese sample sets (one with 570 cases and 570 controls, and the other with 124 pedigrees). No evidence of association between the allele 7R and schizophrenia was found in any of the two data sets. Collectively, this study suggests that the VNTR variation does not have an effect large enough to cause either selection or a detectable association with schizophrenia in a study of samples of moderate size. PMID:19092778

  14. Genetic polymorphisms of short tandem repeat loci D13S305, D13S631 and D13S634 in the Han population of Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfang; Li, Xiaozhou; Ju, Duan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiuling; Zhang, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) markers, also known as microsatellites, are extensively used in mapping studies, forensics and disease diagnosis due to their small dimension and low mutation and high polymorphism rates. In recent years quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR) has been successfully used to amplify STR markers in the prenatal diagnosis of common chromosomal abnormalities. This method provides a diagnosis of common aneuploidies 24-48 h after sampling with low error rates and cost; however, the size of different alleles, frequency, heterozygosity and distribution of STR markers vary among different populations. In the present study three STR markers, D13S305, D13S631 and D13S634, on chromosome 13 were analyzed in 350 unrelated individuals (200 males and 150 females) from the Han population of Tianjin, China using QF-PCR. Eleven, seven and 11 alleles of each marker were observed, respectively. The frequencies of the genotypes were in good agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). The results showed that these three STR markers were highly polymorphic in the Han population of Tianjin, China. The study has provided basic data for use in the prenatal diagnosis of Patau syndrome.

  15. Genetic diversity in somatic mutants of grape (Vitis vinifera) cultivar Italia based on random amplified polymorphic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, S H Z; Mangolin, C A; Collet, S A O; Machado, M F P S

    2009-01-13

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to detect polymorphism and to examine relationships among four table grape clones from northwestern Paraná, in southern Brazil. The 10 primers used for RAPD fingerprints generated 126 reproducible fragments, of which 63, 68, 76, and 72 were polymorphic in cultivars Italia, Rubi, Benitaka, and Brasil, respectively. Among the primers, OPP-08 generated the highest number of fragments, whereas OPE-15 was the most efficient for discriminating polymorphic fragments. The distribution of the clones by cluster analysis indicated that there were no differences in RAPD markers between the colored mutant and the original clone (cultivar Italia), supporting the hypothesis that the non-colored and the colored mutant are the same cultivar. However, we found high levels of polymorphism within and between the cultivars Italia, Rubi, Benitaka, and Brasil (65.1%), contrary to a previous hypothesis that the four clones are genetically uniform. This confirmed our expectation of genetic variation among the clones and within each clone. We conclude that the primers are useful for analyzing the development of the genetic diversity within each of these clones.

  16. Local repeat sequence organization of an intergenic spacer in the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii leads to DNA expansion and sequence scrambling: a complex mode of “copy-choice replication”?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra D Wagle; Subhojit Sen; Basuthkar J Rao

    2001-12-01

    Parent-specific, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were obtained from total genomic DNA of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Such parent-specific RAPD bands (genomic fingerprints) segregated uniparentally (through mt+) in a cross between a pair of polymorphic interfertile strains of Chlamydomonas (C. reinhardtii and C. minnesotti), suggesting that they originated from the chloroplast genome. Southern analysis mapped the RAPD-markers to the chloroplast genome. One of the RAPD-markers, ``P2” (1.6 kb) was cloned, sequenced and was fine mapped to the 3 kb region encompassing 3′ end of 23S, full 5S and intergenic region between 5S and psbA. This region seems divergent enough between the two parents, such that a specific PCR designed for a parental specific chloroplast sequence within this region, amplified a marker in that parent only and not in the other, indicating the utility of RAPD-scan for locating the genomic regions of sequence divergence. Remarkably, the RAPD-product, ``P2” seems to have originated from a PCR-amplification of a much smaller (about 600 bp), but highly repeat-rich (direct and inverted) domain of the 3 kb region in a manner that yielded no linear sequence alignment with its own template sequence. The amplification yielded the same uniquely ``sequence-scrambled” product, whether the template used for PCR was total cellular DNA, chloroplast DNA or a plasmid clone DNA corresponding to that region. The PCR product, a ``unique” new sequence, had lost the repetitive organization of the template genome where it had originated from and perhaps represented a ``complex path” of copy-choice replication.

  17. Genetic variation and species identification of Thai Boesenbergia (Zingiberaceae) analyzed by chloroplast DNA polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techaprasan, Jiranan; Ngamriabsakul, Chatchai; Klinbunga, Sirawut; Chusacultanachai, Sudsanguan; Jenjittikul, Thaya

    2006-07-31

    Genetic variation and molecular phylogeny of 22 taxa representing 14 extant species and 3 unidentified taxa of Boesenbergia in Thailand and four outgroup species (Cornukaempferia aurantiflora, Hedychium biflorum, Kaempferia parviflora, and Scaphochlamys rubescens) were examined by sequencing of 3 chloroplast (cp) DNA regions (matK, psbA-trnH and petA-psbJ). Low interspecific genetic divergence (0.25-1.74%) were observed in these investigated taxa. The 50% majority-rule consensus tree constructed from combined chloroplast DNA sequences allocated Boesenbergia in this study into 3 different groups. Using psbA-1F/psbA-3R primers, an insertion of 491 bp was observed in B. petiolata. Restriction analysis of the amplicon (380-410 bp) from the remaining species with Rsa I further differentiated Boesenbergia to 2 groupings; I (B. basispicata, B. longiflora, B. longipes, B. plicata, B.pulcherrima, B. tenuispicata, B. thorelii, B. xiphostachya, Boesenbergia sp.1 and Boesenbergia sp.3; phylogenetic clade A) that possesses a Rsa I restriction site and II (B.curtisii, B. regalis, B. rotunda and Boesenbergia sp.2; phylogenetic clade B and B. siamensis; phylogenetic clade C) that lacks a restriction site of Rsa I. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and indels found can be unambiguously applied to authenticate specie-origin of all investigated samples and revealed that Boesenbergia sp.1, Boesenbergia sp.2 and B. pulcherrima (Mahidol University, Kanchanaburi), B. cf. pulcherrima1 (Prachuap Khiri Khan) and B. cf. pulcherrima2 (Thong Pha Phum, Kanchanaburi) are B. plicata, B. rotunda and B. pulcherrima, respectively. In addition, molecular data also suggested that Boesenbergia sp.3 should be further differentiated from B. longiflora and regarded as a newly unidentified Boesenbergia species.

  18. Relation between DNA damage measured by comet assay and OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism in antineoplastic drugs biomonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antineoplastic drugs are hazardous chemical agents used mostly in the treatment of patients with cancer, however health professionals that handle and administer these drugs can become exposed and develop DNA damage. Comet assay is a standard method for assessing DNA damage in human biomonitoring and, combined with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG enzyme, it specifically detects DNA oxidative damage.The aim of this study was to investigate genotoxic effects in workers occupationally exposed to cytostatics (n = 46, as compared to a control group with no exposure (n = 46 at two Portuguese hospitals, by means of the alkaline comet assay. The potential of the OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism as a susceptibility biomarker was also investigated. Exposure was evaluated by investigating the contamination of surfaces and genotoxic assessment was done by alkaline comet assay in peripheral blood lymphocytes. OGG1 Ser326Cys (rs1052133 polymorphism was studied by Real Time PCR.As for exposure assessment, there were 121 (37% positive samples out of a total of 327 samples analysed from both hospitals. No statistically significant differences (Mann-Whitney test, p > 0.05 were found between subjects with and without exposure, regarding DNA damage and oxidative DNA damage, nevertheless the exposed group exhibited higher values. Moreover, there was no consistent trend regarding the variation of both biomarkers as assessed by comet assay with OGG1 polymorphism.Our study was not statistically significant regarding occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs and genetic damage assessed by comet assay. However, health professionals should be monitored for risk behaviour, in order to ensure that safety measures are applied and protection devices are used correctly.

  19. Aromatic DNA adducts and polymorphisms in metabolic genes in healthy adults: findings from the EPIC-Spain cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, Antonio; Peluso, Marco; Sala, Núria; Capellá, Gabriel; Munnia, Armelle; Piro, Sara; Marín, Fátima; Ibáñez, Raquel; Amiano, Pilar; Tormo, M José; Ardanaz, Eva; Barricarte, Aurelio; Chirlaque, M Dolores; Dorronsoro, Miren; Larrañaga, Nerea; Martínez, Carmen; Navarro, Carmen; Quirós, J Ramón; Sánchez, M José; González, Carlos A

    2009-06-01

    Aromatic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, arylamines and heterocyclic amines require metabolic activation to form metabolites able to bind to DNA, a process mediated by polymorphic enzymes. We measured aromatic DNA adducts in white blood cells by the (32)P-post-labelling assay in a sample of 296 healthy adults (147 men and 149 women) from five regions of Spain. We also analyzed functional polymorphisms in the metabolic genes CYP1A1, CYP1A2, EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2 and SULT1A1. A significant increased level of DNA aromatic adducts was found related to the fast oxidation-hydrolysis phenotype defined by the polymorphism I462V in CYP1A1, the allele A in IVS1-154C>A of CYP1A2 and the combination Tyrosine-Arginine for Y113H and H139R of EPHX1. Geometric means (adducts per 10(-9) normal nucleotides) were 2.17, 4.04 and 6.30 for slow, normal and fast phenotypes, respectively (P-trend = 0.01). Slow acetylation by NAT2 was associated with a significant decrease in adduct level; subjects with slow alleles *5A and *7A/B had in average 1.56 x 10(-9)adducts, as compared with 5.60 for those with normal NAT2 activity (P-value = 0.01). No association was seen with polymorphisms of other metabolic genes such as GSTM1, GSTT1 or SULT1A1. We concluded that the metabolic pathways of oxidation, hydrolysis and acetylation are relevant to the formation of bulky DNA adducts. This could suggest a potential involvement of aromatic compounds in the formation of such adducts; however, given lack of specificity of the post-labeling assay, a firm conclusion cannot be drawn.

  20. Analisis Keragaman Genetik Tanaman Aren (Arenga pinnata Merr) di Tapanuli Selatan dengan Menggunakan Marka RAPD (Random Amlpified Polymorphic DNA)

    OpenAIRE

    Harahap, Mahyuni Khairiyah

    2013-01-01

    MAHYUNI KHAIRIYAH HARAHAP : RAPD analysis on genetic diversity of sugar palm ( Arenga pinnata Merr) in South Tapanuli population. Supervised by LOLLIE AGUSTINA P. PUTRI and MOHAMMAD BASYUNI. The objective of this research was to analysis genetic diversity of natural sugar palm in South Tapanuli using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD). A total of 24 acessions palm sugar the populations originated from various regions in South Tapanuli, consists of West Angkola, South Angkola, Batan...

  1. Characterization of porcine ENO3: genomic and cDNA structure, polymorphism and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Yuanzhu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, a full-length cDNA of the porcine ENO3 gene encoding a 434 amino acid protein was isolated. It contains 12 exons over approximately 5.4 kb. Differential splicing in the 5'-untranslated sequence generates two forms of mRNA that differ from each other in the presence or absence of a 142-nucleotide fragment. Expression analysis showed that transcript 1 of ENO3 is highly expressed in liver and lung, while transcript 2 is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and heart. We provide the first evidence that in skeletal muscle expression of ENO3 is different between Yorkshire and Meishan pig breeds. Furthermore, real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that, in Yorkshire pigs, skeletal muscle expression of transcript 1 is identical at postnatal day-1 and at other stages while that of transcript 2 is higher. Moreover, expression of transcript 1 is lower in skeletal muscle and all other tissue samples than that of transcript 2, with the exception of liver and kidney. Statistical analysis showed the existence of a polymorphism in the ENO3 gene between Chinese indigenous and introduced commercial western pig breeds and that it is associated with fat percentage, average backfat thickness, meat marbling and intramuscular fat in two different populations.

  2. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Gene XRCC3 and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer in Saudi Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Mohammed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated three common polymorphisms (SNPs in the XRCC3 gene (rs861539, rs1799794, and rs1799796 in 143 Saudi females suffering from breast cancer (median age = 51.4 years and 145 age matched normal healthy controls. DNA was extracted from whole blood and genotyping was conducted using PCR-RFLP. rs1799794 showed significant association, where AA and AA+AG occurred at a significantly higher frequency in the cancer patients compared to the control group (OR: 28.1; 95% CI: 3.76–21.12; χ2: 22.82; pT and rs1799796 A>G did not show a significant difference when the results in the patients and controls were compared. However, the frequency of rs1799796 differed significantly in patients with different age of diagnosis, tumor grade, and ER and HER2 status. The wild type A allele occurred at a higher frequency in the ER− and HER2− group. Our results among Saudis suggest that some variations in XRCC3 may contribute to breast cancer susceptibility. In conclusion, the results obtained during this study suggest that rs1799794 in XRCC3 shows strong association with breast cancer development in Saudi females.

  3. Genetic diversity within Streptococcus mutans evident from chromosomal DNA restriction fragment polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caufield, P W; Walker, T M

    1989-02-01

    Attempts to study the acquisition, transmission, and other aspects of the natural history of Streptococcus mutans infections in humans have been hampered by limitations and inconsistencies in methods by which phenotypic characteristics of individual isolates are examined. Because most mutans streptococci associated with human dental caries fall within the biotype I (serotypes c and f) grouping, designated S. mutans, these typing methods are of little value in distinguishing individual isolates. Here we show that strains of S. mutans obtained from over 30 individuals demonstrate unique "fingerprints" of chromosomal DNA digested with restriction endonuclease HaeIII. To demonstrate that this polymorphism in restriction fragments can be used to study the acquisition and transmission of this organism, we examined isolates of S. mutans from three mother-infant pairs obtained at the time the infant first became colonized by this organism. Results indicate that strains of S. mutans found in infants exhibit restriction fragment profiles identical to those of their mothers, strongly supporting the notion that mothers transmit this organism to their infants. Also, we show that strains of S. mutans with the same restriction fragment profile were stably maintained over a 3-year interval in the one mother-infant pair studied. Moreover, we found that mothers and their infants harbored only a few individual strains, suggesting that transmission of this organism is probably confined within discrete family cohorts. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential utility of genomic fingerprinting in studying the natural history of S. mutans infections in humans.

  4. DNA polymorphism analysis in families with recurrence of free trisomy 21

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    Pangalos, C.G.; Rethore, M.O.; Blois, M.C. de; Prieur, M.; Raoul, O.; Lejeune, J.; Talbot, C.C. Jr.; Lewis, J.G.; Adelsberger, P.A.; Peterson, M.B. (and others)

    1992-11-01

    The authors used DNA polymorphic markers on the long arm of human chromosome 21 in order to determine the parental and meiotic origin of the extra chromosome 21 in families with recurrent free trisomy 21. A total of 22 families were studied, 13 in which the individuals with trisomy 21 were siblings (category 1), four families in which the individuals with trisomy 21 were second-degree relatives (category 2), and five families in which the individuals with trisomy 21 were third-degree relatives, that is, their parents were siblings (category 3). In five category 1 families, parental mosaicism was detected, while in the remaining eight families, the origin of nondisjunction was maternal. In two of the four families of category 2 the nondisjunctions originated in individuals who were related. In only one of five category 3 families, the nondisjunctions originated in related individuals. These results suggest that parental mosaicism is an important etiologic factor in recurrent free trisomy 21 (5 of 22 families) and that chance alone can explain the recurrent trisomy 21 in many of the remaining families (14 of 22 families). However, in a small number of families (3 of 22), a familial predisposing factor or undetected mosaicism cannot be excluded. 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Characterization of Nomuraea rileyi strains using polymorphic DNA, virulence and enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas Lúcia Rosane Bertholdo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of entomopathogenic microorganisms is important for the selection of more effective strains for use in integrated pest-control programs. Five Nomuraea rileyi strains (SA86101, GU87401, SR86151, CG128 and VA9101 were characterized using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis, virulence studies and assessment of chitinolytic and proteolytic activity. RAPD analysis divided the strains into two groups with a similarity coefficient of 0,76%, group 1 consisting of strains SA86101, GU87401 and SR86151 and group 2 of strains CG128 and VA9101. The LT50 varied from 165h with strain VA9101 to 246h with strain GU87401. Chitinolytic and proteolytic activity of the fungi after 144h growth in minimal medium were tested using colloidal chitin as substrate. All strains exhibited enzyme activity, with strain VA9101 having the highest chitinase activity (0,0040 mumol/mL/min the 40ºC and strain SA86101 the highest proteolytic activity. No relationship was found between RAPD analysis, virulence and chitinase or protease activity.

  6. Genotyping by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA of bacteriocin producing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alli, John Adeolu; Iwalokun, Bamidele A; Oluwadun, Afolabi; Okonko, Iheanyi Omezuruike

    2015-01-01

    Yogurt and starter culture producers are still searching strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus to produce healthier yogurt with a longer shelf life and better texture, taste, and quality. This study determined the genotyping of bacteriocin producing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains recovered from Nigerian yogurts. Yogurt samples were collected from four different states of South West regions of Nigeria. Isolates were obtained from MRS Medium and biochemically characterized. This was further confirmed by API50CH. The bacteriocin positivity and activity was determined. Genomic characterization of our Lactobacillus acidophilus strains was done with randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR. All yogurt samples containing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains meet the probiotic requirement of ≥10(6) cfu/mL. The gel picture revealed 6 RAPD clonal types of Lactobacillus acidophilus strains with RAPD type C observed to be more common. Significant differences existed in the mean growth inhibition zone (t = -7.32, P 0.05 Staphylococcus aureus). No correlation between the bacteriocin production, activity, and their RAPD clonal division (X(2) = 7.49, P = 0.1610, df = 5). In conclusion, L. acidophilus isolated in Nigeria samples met the probiotic requirements of ≥10(6) cfu/mL and produce bacteriocins with good spectrum of activity.

  7. DNA polymorphism and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a population of North Xinjiang,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ilyar; Sheyhidin

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the role of metabolic enzyme and DNA repair genes in susceptibility of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma(ESCC). METHODS:A case-control study was designed with 454 samples from 128 ESCC patients and 326 gender, age and ethnicity-matched control subjects.Genotypes of 69 single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs)of metabolic enzyme(aldehyde dehydrogenase-2,ALDH2; alcohol dehydrogenase-1 B,ADHB1;Cytochrome P450 2A6,CYP2A6)and DNA repair capacity genes(excision repair cross complementing group 1,E...

  8. Combination of DNA-based and conventional methods to detect human leukocyte antigen polymorphism and its use for paternity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereszturya, László; Rajczya, Katalin; Lászikb, András; Gyódia, Eva; Pénzes, Mária; Falus, András; Petrányia, Gyõzõ G

    2002-03-01

    In cases of disputed paternity, the scientific goal is to promote either the exclusion of a falsely accused man or the affiliation of the alleged father. Until now, in addition to anthropologic characteristics, the determination of genetic markers included human leukocyte antigen gene variants; erythrocyte antigens and serum proteins were used for that reason. Recombinant DNA techniques provided a new set of highly variable genetic markers based on DNA nucleotide sequence polymorphism. From the practical standpoint, the application of these techniques to paternity testing provides greater versatility than do conventional genetic marker systems. The use of methods to detect the polymorphism of human leukocyte antigen loci significantly increases the chance of validation of ambiguous results in paternity testing. The outcome of 2384 paternity cases investigated by serologic and/or DNA-based human leukocyte antigen typing was statistically analyzed. Different cases solved by DNA typing are presented involving cases with one or two accused men, exclusions and nonexclusions, and tests of the paternity of a deceased man. The results provide evidence for the advantage of the combined application of various techniques in forensic diagnostics and emphasizes the outstanding possibilities of DNA-based assays. Representative examples demonstrate the strength of combined techniques in paternity testing.

  9. Structure and organization of the mitochondrial DNA control region with tandemly repeated sequence in the Amazon ornamental fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terencio, Maria Leandra; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Feldberg, Eliana; Porto, Jorge Ivan Rebelo

    2013-02-01

    Tandemly repeated sequences are a common feature of vertebrate mitochondrial DNA control regions. However, questions still remain about their mode of evolution and function. To better understand patterns of variation in length and to explore the existence of previously described domain, we have characterized the control region structure of the Amazonian ornamental fish Nannostomus eques and Nannostomus unifasciatus. The control region ranged from 1121 to 1142 bp in length and could be separated into three domains: the domain associated with the extended terminal associated sequences, the central conserved domain, and the conserved sequence blocks domain. In the first domain, we encountered a sequence repeated 10 times in tandem (variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)) that could adopt an "inverted repetitions" type structural conformation. The results suggest that the VNTR pattern encountered in both N. eques and N. unifasciatus is consistent with the prerequisites of the illegitimate elongation model in which the unequal pairing of the chains near the 5'-end of the control region favors the formation of repetitions.

  10. Development of polymorphic genic-SSR markers by cDNA library sequencing in boxwood, Buxus spp. (Buxaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genic microsatellites or simple sequence repeat (genic-SSR) markers were developed in boxwood (Buxus taxa) for genetic diversity analysis, identification of taxa, and to facilitate breeding. cDNA libraries were developed from mRNA extracted from leaves of Buxus sempervirens ‘Vardar Valley’ and seque...

  11. Expansion of CAG triplet repeats by human DNA polymerases λ and β in vitro, is regulated by flap endonuclease 1 and DNA ligase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Hübscher, Ulrich; Maga, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by the expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeats (TNR) in the N-terminal region of coding sequence of the Huntingtin's (HTT) gene. This results in the addition of a poly-glutamine tract within the Huntingtin protein, resulting in its pathological form. The mechanism by which TRN expansion takes place is not yet fully understood. We have recently shown that DNA polymerase (Pol) β can promote the microhomology-mediated end joining and triplet expansion of a substrate mimicking a double strand break in the TNR region of the HTT gene. Here we show that TNR expansion is dependent on the structure of the DNA substrate, as well as on the two essential Pol β co-factors: flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) and DNA ligase 1 (Lig1). We found that Fen1 significantly stimulated TNR expansion by Pol β, but not by the related enzyme Pol λ, and subsequent ligation of the DNA products by Lig1. Interestingly, the deletion of N-terminal domains of Pol λ, resulted in an enzyme which displayed properties more similar to Pol β, suggesting a possible evolutionary mechanism. These results may suggest a novel mechanism for