WorldWideScience

Sample records for repeat disease resistance

  1. Expanded complexity of unstable repeat diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Urszula; McIvor, Elizabeth; Dent, Sharon Y.R.; Wells, Robert D.; Napierala, Marek.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable Repeat Diseases (URDs) share a common mutational phenomenon of changes in the copy number of short, tandemly repeated DNA sequences. More than 20 human neurological diseases are caused by instability, predominantly expansion, of microsatellite sequences. Changes in the repeat size initiate a cascade of pathological processes, frequently characteristic of a unique disease or a small subgroup of the URDs. Understanding of both the mechanism of repeat instability and molecular consequen...

  2. Epigenetics and triplet repeat neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathiji eNageshwaran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘junk DNA’ has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterchromatinised resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasised following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA in 1991. In this review we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases.

  3. Discrepancies in reporting the CAG repeat lengths for Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarrell, Oliver W; Handley, Olivia; O'Donovan, Kirsty

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease results from a CAG repeat expansion within the Huntingtin gene; this is measured routinely in diagnostic laboratories. The European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY project centrally measures CAG repeat lengths on fresh samples; these were compared with the original...

  4. Powdery Mildew Disease Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somerville, Shauna C.

    2010-08-31

    The overall goal of this project was to characterize the PMR5 protein, a member of the DUF231/TBR family, and to determine its role in plant cell wall biogenesis. Since the pmr5 mutants are also resistant to the fungal powdery mildew pathogen, we wished to determine what specific cell wall changes are associated with disease resistance and why. The graduate student working on this project made mutations in the putative active site of PMR5, assuming it is a member of the SGNH/GDSL esterase superfamily (Anantharaman and Aravind, 2010, Biology Direct 5, 1). These mutants were inactive in planta suggesting that PMR5 is a functional enzyme and not a binding protein or chaperone. In addition, she determined that cell wall preparations from the pmr5 mutant exhibited a modest reduction (13%) in total acetyl groups. To pursue characterization further, the graduate student expressed the PMR5 protein in a heterologous E. coli system. She could purify PMR5 using a two step protocol based on tags added to the N and C terminus of the protein. She was able to show the PMR5 protein bound to pectins, including homogalacturonan, but not to other cell wall components (e.g., xyloglucans, arabinans). Based on these observations, a postdoctoral fellow is currently developing an enzyme assay for PMR5 based on the idea that it may be acetylating the homogalacturonic acid pectin fraction. Our initial experiments to localize PMR5 subcellularly suggested that it occurred in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, since the various pectins are believed to be synthesized in the Golgi apparatus, we felt it necessary to repeat our results using a native promoter expression system. Within the past year, we have demonstrated conclusively that PMR5 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, a location that sets it apart from most cell wall biogenesis and modification enzymes. The graduate student contributed to the characterization of two suppressor mutants, which were selected as restoring powdery

  5. Measurement and repeatability of interrupter resistance in unsedated newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, A M; Olden, C; Wertheim, D; Ives, A; Bridge, P D; Lenton, J; Seddon, P

    2009-12-01

    Interrupter resistance (R(int)) is a useful measure of airway caliber in young children, but has not been well characterized in infants-in whom there are concerns about the accurate measurement of driving pressure. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and repeatability of measuring R(int) in unsedated newborn infants, and to explore alternative algorithms for calculating driving pressure. R(int) measurement was attempted in 28 healthy term newborn infants during natural sleep using the MicroRint device. Paired R(int) measurements were achieved in 24 infants, but after screening of waveforms only 15 infants had at least 5 technically acceptable waveforms on both measurements. R(int) values obtained were comparable with reported values for airflow resistance in newborns using other methods. However, the repeatability coefficient (CR) was much higher than reported values in preschool children using standard back-extrapolation algorithms, with CR 2.47 KPa L(-1) sec (unscreened) and 2.93 KPa L(-1) sec (screened). Other algorithms gave only marginally better repeatability, with all CR values over 50% of the mean R(int) value. Using current commercially available equipment, R(int) is too poorly repeatable to be a reliable measurement of airflow resistance in newborn infants. Lower deadspace equipment is needed, but anatomical and physiological factors in the infant are also important.

  6. Disease Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Sekhwal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants have developed effective mechanisms to recognize and respond to infections caused by pathogens. Plant resistance gene analogs (RGAs, as resistance (R gene candidates, have conserved domains and motifs that play specific roles in pathogens’ resistance. Well-known RGAs are nucleotide binding site leucine rich repeats, receptor like kinases, and receptor like proteins. Others include pentatricopeptide repeats and apoplastic peroxidases. RGAs can be detected using bioinformatics tools based on their conserved structural features. Thousands of RGAs have been identified from sequenced plant genomes. High-density genome-wide RGA genetic maps are useful for designing diagnostic markers and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL or markers associated with plant disease resistance. This review focuses on recent advances in structures and mechanisms of RGAs, and their identification from sequenced genomes using bioinformatics tools. Applications in enhancing fine mapping and cloning of plant disease resistance genes are also discussed.

  7. Disease Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhwal, Manoj Kumar; Li, Pingchuan; Lam, Irene; Wang, Xiue; Cloutier, Sylvie; You, Frank M

    2015-08-14

    Plants have developed effective mechanisms to recognize and respond to infections caused by pathogens. Plant resistance gene analogs (RGAs), as resistance (R) gene candidates, have conserved domains and motifs that play specific roles in pathogens' resistance. Well-known RGAs are nucleotide binding site leucine rich repeats, receptor like kinases, and receptor like proteins. Others include pentatricopeptide repeats and apoplastic peroxidases. RGAs can be detected using bioinformatics tools based on their conserved structural features. Thousands of RGAs have been identified from sequenced plant genomes. High-density genome-wide RGA genetic maps are useful for designing diagnostic markers and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) or markers associated with plant disease resistance. This review focuses on recent advances in structures and mechanisms of RGAs, and their identification from sequenced genomes using bioinformatics tools. Applications in enhancing fine mapping and cloning of plant disease resistance genes are also discussed.

  8. Mutation supply and the repeatability of selection for antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Thomas; Hwang, Sungmin; Krug, Joachim; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Zwart, Mark P.

    2017-10-01

    Whether evolution can be predicted is a key question in evolutionary biology. Here we set out to better understand the repeatability of evolution, which is a necessary condition for predictability. We explored experimentally the effect of mutation supply and the strength of selective pressure on the repeatability of selection from standing genetic variation. Different sizes of mutant libraries of antibiotic resistance gene TEM-1 β-lactamase in Escherichia coli, generated by error-prone PCR, were subjected to different antibiotic concentrations. We determined whether populations went extinct or survived, and sequenced the TEM gene of the surviving populations. The distribution of mutations per allele in our mutant libraries followed a Poisson distribution. Extinction patterns could be explained by a simple stochastic model that assumed the sampling of beneficial mutations was key for survival. In most surviving populations, alleles containing at least one known large-effect beneficial mutation were present. These genotype data also support a model which only invokes sampling effects to describe the occurrence of alleles containing large-effect driver mutations. Hence, evolution is largely predictable given cursory knowledge of mutational fitness effects, the mutation rate and population size. There were no clear trends in the repeatability of selected mutants when we considered all mutations present. However, when only known large-effect mutations were considered, the outcome of selection is less repeatable for large libraries, in contrast to expectations. We show experimentally that alleles carrying multiple mutations selected from large libraries confer higher resistance levels relative to alleles with only a known large-effect mutation, suggesting that the scarcity of high-resistance alleles carrying multiple mutations may contribute to the decrease in repeatability at large library sizes.

  9. Neuropathological diagnosis and CAG repeat expansion in Huntington's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Xuereb, J H; MacMillan, J C; Snell, R; Davies, P.; Harper, P S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To correlate the degree of CAG repeat expansion with neuropathological findings in Huntington's disease. METHODS--The CAG repeat polymorphism was analysed in a large series of brain samples from 268 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Huntington's disease in which full neuropathological data was available. RESULTS--Analysis by polymerase chain reaction was successful in 63% of samples (169 of 268). Repeat expansions were detected in 152 of 153 (99%) samples with a neuropathologic...

  10. Linking SNPs to CAG repeat length in Huntington's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanzhao; Kennington, Lori A; Rosas, H Diana; Hersch, Steven; Cha, Jang-Ho; Zamore, Phillip D; Aronin, Neil

    2008-11-01

    Allele-specific silencing using small interfering RNAs targeting heterozygous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a promising therapy for human trinucleotide repeat diseases such as Huntington's disease. Linking SNP identities to the two HTT alleles, normal and disease-causing, is a prerequisite for allele-specific RNA interference. Here we describe a method, SNP linkage by circularization (SLiC), to identify linkage between CAG repeat length and nucleotide identity of heterozygous SNPs using Huntington's disease patient peripheral blood samples.

  11. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term “junk DNA” has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions f...

  12. Epigenetics and triplet repeat neurological diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sathiji eNageshwaran; Richard eFestenstein

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘junk DNA’ has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterchromatinised resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions fr...

  13. Engineering disease resistant cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, David M; Kerr, David E; Wall, Robert J

    2005-10-01

    Mastitis is a disease of the mammary gland caused by pathogens that find their way into the lumen of the gland through the teat canal. Mammary gland infections cost the US dairy industry approximately $2 billion dollars annually and have a similar impact in Europe. In the absence of effective treatments or breeding strategies to enhance mastitis resistance, we have created transgenic dairy cows that express lysostaphin in their mammary epithelium and secrete the antimicrobial peptide into milk. Staphylococcus aureus, a major mastitis pathogen, is exquisitely sensitive to lysostaphin. The transgenic cattle resist S. aureus mammary gland challenges, and their milk kills the bacteria, in a dose dependent manner. This first step in protecting cattle against mastitis will be followed by introduction of other genes to deal with potential resistance issues and other mastitis causing organisms. Care will be taken to avoid altering milk's nutritional and manufacturing properties. Multi-cistronic constructs may be required to achieve our goals as will other strategies possibly involving RNAi and gene targeting technology. This work demonstrates the possibility of using transgenic technology to address disease problems in agriculturally important species.

  14. Copy number of tandem direct repeats within the inverted repeats of Marek's disease virus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, A; Nakajima, K; Ikuta, K; Ueda, S; Kato, S; Hirai, K

    1986-12-01

    We previously reported that DNA of the oncogenic strain BC-1 of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1) contains three units of tandem direct repeats with 132 base pair (bp) repeats within the inverted repeats of the long regions of the MDV1 genome, whereas the attenuated, nononcogenic viral DNA contains multiple units of tandem direct repeats (Maotani et al., 1986). In the present study, the difference in the copy numbers of 132 bp repeats of oncogenic and nononcogenic MDV1 DNAs in other strains of MDV1 was investigated by Southern blot hybridization. The main copy numbers in different oncogenic MDV1 strains differed: those of BC-1, JM and highly oncogenic Md5 were 3, 5 to 12 and 2, respectively. The viral DNA population with two units of repeats was small, but detectable, in cells infected with either the oncogenic BC-1 or JM strain. The MDV1 DNA in various MD cell lines contained either two units or both two and three units of repeats. The significance of the copy number of repeats in oncogenicity of MDV1 is discussed.

  15. Huntington's disease as caused by 34 CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrich, Jürgen; Arning, Larissa; Wieczorek, Stefan; Kraus, Peter H; Gold, Ralf; Saft, Carsten

    2008-04-30

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of a polymorphic stretch of CAG repeats in the coding 5' part of the HD gene on chromosome 4p. Expansions of CAG blocks beyond 35 repeats are associated with the clinical presentation of HD. There is an intermediate range of rare alleles between 27 and 35 CAG repeats with a higher risk for further expansion in subsequent generations. Here, we report a 75-year-old male with clinical features of HD and 34 CAG repeat units.

  16. Genetic Contributors to Intergenerational CAG Repeat Instability in Huntington’s Disease Knock-In Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, João Luís; Lee, Jong-Min; Afridi, Ali; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R.; Dempsey, Stephani; Lager, Brenda; Alonso, Isabel; Wheeler, Vanessa C.; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro

    2017-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Longer repeat sizes are associated with increased disease penetrance and earlier ages of onset. Intergenerationally unstable transmissions are common in HD families, partly underlying the genetic anticipation seen in this disorder. HD CAG knock-in mouse models also exhibit a propensity for intergenerational repeat size changes. In this work, we examine intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat in over 20,000 transmissions in the largest HD knock-in mouse model breeding datasets reported to date. We confirmed previous observations that parental sex drives the relative ratio of expansions and contractions. The large datasets further allowed us to distinguish effects of paternal CAG repeat length on the magnitude and frequency of expansions and contractions, as well as the identification of large repeat size jumps in the knock-in models. Distinct degrees of intergenerational instability were observed between knock-in mice of six background strains, indicating the occurrence of trans-acting genetic modifiers. We also found that lines harboring a neomycin resistance cassette upstream of Htt showed reduced expansion frequency, indicative of a contributing role for sequences in cis, with the expanded repeat as modifiers of intergenerational instability. These results provide a basis for further understanding of the mechanisms underlying intergenerational repeat instability. PMID:27913616

  17. Age, CAG repeat length, and clinical progression in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Adam; Kumar, Brahma V; Mo, Alisa; Welsh, Claire S; Margolis, Russell L; Ross, Christopher A

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to further explore the effect of CAG repeat length on the rate of clinical progression in patients with Huntington's disease. The dataset included records for 569 subjects followed prospectively at the Baltimore Huntington's Disease Center. Participants were seen for a mean of 7.1 visits, with a mean follow-up of 8.2 years. Subjects were evaluated using the Quantified Neurologic Examination and its Motor Impairment subscale, the Mini-Mental State Examination, and the Huntington's disease Activities of Daily Living Scale. By itself, CAG repeat length showed a statistically significant but small effect on the progression of all clinical measures. Contrary to our previous expectations, controlling for age of onset increased the correlation between CAG repeat length and progression of all variables by 69% to 159%. Graphical models further supported the idea that individuals with smaller triplet expansions experience a more gradual decline. CAG repeat length becomes an important determinant of clinical prognosis when accounting for age of onset. This suggests that the aging process itself influences clinical outcomes in Huntington's disease. Inconsistent results in prior studies examining CAG repeat length and progression may indeed reflect a lack of age adjustment.

  18. Engineering disease resistance in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, J.H.H.V.

    2007-01-01

    The genetic engineering of plants for increased pathogen resistance has engaged researchers and companies for decades. Until now, thenumberof crops with genetically engineered disease resistance traits which have entered the market are limited to products displaying virus an

  19. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  20. Insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-12-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Triplet repeat primed PCR simplifies testing for Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jama, Mohamed; Millson, Alison; Miller, Christine E; Lyon, Elaine

    2013-03-01

    Diagnostic and predictive testing for Huntington disease (HD) requires an accurate determination of the number of CAG repeats in the Huntingtin (HHT) gene. Currently, when a sample appears to be homozygous for a normal allele, additional testing is required to confirm amplification from both alleles. If the sample still appears homozygous, Southern blot analysis is performed to rule out an undetected expanded HTT allele. Southern blot analysis is expensive, time-consuming, and labor intensive and requires high concentrations of DNA. We have developed a chimeric PCR process to help streamline workflow; true homozygous alleles are easily distinguished by this simplified method, and only very large expanded alleles still require Southern blot analysis. Two hundred forty-six HD samples, previously run with a different fragment analysis method, were analyzed with our new method. All samples were correctly genotyped, resulting in 100% concordance between the methods. The chimeric PCR assay was able to identify expanded alleles up to >150 CAG repeats. This method offers a simple strategy to differentiate normal from expanded CAG alleles, thereby reducing the number of samples reflexed to Southern blot analysis. It also provides assurance that expanded alleles are not routinely missed because of allele dropout.

  2. The chromatin remodeller ATRX: a repeat offender in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, David; Higgs, Douglas R; Gibbons, Richard J

    2013-09-01

    The regulation of chromatin structure is of paramount importance for a variety of fundamental nuclear processes, including gene expression, DNA repair, replication, and recombination. The ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling factor ATRX (α thalassaemia/mental retardation X-linked) has emerged as a key player in each of these processes. Exciting recent developments suggest that ATRX plays a variety of key roles at tandem repeat sequences within the genome, including the deposition of a histone variant, prevention of replication fork stalling, and the suppression of a homologous recombination-based pathway of telomere maintenance. Here, we provide a mechanistic overview of the role of ATRX in each of these processes, and propose how they may be connected to give rise to seemingly disparate human diseases.

  3. Discrepancies in reporting the CAG repeat lengths for Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrell, Oliver W; Handley, Olivia; O'Donovan, Kirsty; Dumoulin, Christine; Ramos-Arroyo, Maria; Biunno, Ida; Bauer, Peter; Kline, Margaret; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease results from a CAG repeat expansion within the Huntingtin gene; this is measured routinely in diagnostic laboratories. The European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY project centrally measures CAG repeat lengths on fresh samples; these were compared with the original results from 121 laboratories across 15 countries. We report on 1326 duplicate results; a discrepancy in reporting the upper allele occurred in 51% of cases, this reduced to 13.3% and 9.7% when we applied acceptable measurement errors proposed by the American College of Medical Genetics and the Draft European Best Practice Guidelines, respectively. Duplicate results were available for 1250 lower alleles; discrepancies occurred in 40% of cases. Clinically significant discrepancies occurred in 4.0% of cases with a potential unexplained misdiagnosis rate of 0.3%. There was considerable variation in the discrepancy rate among 10 of the countries participating in this study. Out of 1326 samples, 348 were re-analysed by an accredited diagnostic laboratory, based in Germany, with concordance rates of 93% and 94% for the upper and lower alleles, respectively. This became 100% if the acceptable measurement errors were applied. The central laboratory correctly reported allele sizes for six standard reference samples, blind to the known result. Our study differs from external quality assessment (EQA) schemes in that these are duplicate results obtained from a large sample of patients across the whole diagnostic range. We strongly recommend that laboratories state an error rate for their measurement on the report, participate in EQA schemes and use reference materials regularly to adjust their own internal standards.

  4. Insecticide resistance in vector Chagas disease: evolution, mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America. The disease is caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to human through the feces of infected triatomine insects. Because no treatment is available for the chronic forms of the disease, vector chemical control represents the best way to reduce the incidence of the disease. Chemical control has been based principally on spraying dwellings with insecticide formulations and led to the reduction of triatomine distribution and consequent interruption of disease transmission in several areas from endemic region. However, in the last decade it has been repeatedly reported the presence triatomnes, mainly Triatoma infestans, after spraying with pyrethroid insecticides, which was associated to evolution to insecticide resistance. In this paper the evolution of insecticide resistance in triatomines is reviewed. The insecticide resistance was detected in 1970s in Rhodnius prolixus and 1990s in R. prolixus and T. infestans, but not until the 2000s resistance to pyrthroids in T. infestans associated to control failures was described in Argentina and Bolivia. The main resistance mechanisms (i.e. enhanced metabolism, altered site of action and reduced penetration) were described in the T. infestans resistant to pyrethrods. Different resistant profiles were demonstrated suggesting independent origin of the different resistant foci of Argentina and Bolivia. The deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans was showed to be controlled by semi-dominant, autosomally inherited factors. Reproductive and developmental costs were also demonstrated for the resistant T. infestans. A discussion about resistance and tolerance concepts and the persistence of T. infestans in Gran Chaco region are presented. In addition, theoretical concepts related to toxicological, evolutionary and ecological aspects of insecticide resistance are discussed in order to understand the particular scenario of pyrethroid

  5. Insulin Resistance and Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Napolitano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In medical practice, almost every clinician may encounter patients with skin disease. However, it is not always easy for physicians of all specialties to face the daily task of determining the nature and clinical implication of dermatologic manifestations. Are they confined to the skin, representing a pure dermatologic event? Or are they also markers of internal conditions relating to the patient’s overall health? In this review, we will discuss the principal cutaneous conditions which have been linked to metabolic alterations. Particularly, since insulin has an important role in homeostasis and physiology of the skin, we will focus on the relationships between insulin resistance (IR and skin diseases, analyzing strongly IR-associated conditions such as acanthosis nigricans, acne, and psoriasis, without neglecting emerging and potential scenarios as the ones represented by hidradenitis suppurativa, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism.

  6. The wheat homolog of putative nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat resistance gene TaRGA contributes to resistance against powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Defu; Wang, Xiaobing; Mei, Yu; Dong, Hansong

    2016-03-01

    Powdery mildew, one of the most destructive wheat diseases worldwide, is caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), a fungal species with a consistently high mutation rate that makes individual resistance (R) genes ineffective. Therefore, effective resistance-related gene cloning is vital for breeding and studying the resistance mechanisms of the disease. In this study, a putative nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) R gene (TaRGA) was cloned using a homology-based cloning strategy and analyzed for its effect on powdery mildew disease and wheat defense responses. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses revealed that a Bgt isolate 15 and salicylic acid stimulation significantly induced TaRGA in the resistant variety. Furthermore, the silencing of TaRGA in powdery mildew-resistant plants increased susceptibility to Bgt15 and prompted conidia propagation at the infection site. However, the expression of TaRGA in leaf segments after single-cell transient expression assay highly increased the defense responses to Bgt15 by enhancing callose deposition and phenolic autofluorogen accumulation at the pathogen invading sites. Meanwhile, the expression of pathogenesis-related genes decreased in the TaRGA-silenced plants and increased in the TaRGA-transient-overexpressing leaf segments. These results implied that the TaRGA gene positively regulates the defense response to powdery mildew disease in wheat.

  7. Safety and Efficacy of Repeated-Dose Intravenous Ketamine for Treatment-Resistant Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    aan het Rot, Marije; Collins, Katherine A.; Murrough, James W.; Perez, Andrew M.; Reich, David L.; Charney, Dennis S.; Mathew, Sanjay J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A single subanesthetic (intravenous) IV dose of ketamine might have rapid but transient antidepressant effects in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Here we tested the tolerability, safety, and efficacy of repeated-dose open-label IV ketamine (six infusions over 12 days)

  8. Late-onset Huntington disease with intermediate CAG repeats: true or false?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, J.L.; de Bie, R.M.A.; Foncke, E.M.J.; Roos, R.A.C.; Leenders, K.L.; Tijssen, M.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat length in the huntingtin gene. 'Intermediate alleles' with 27 to 35 CAG repeats generally do not cause HD but are unstable upon germ-line transmission. Insights in CAG repeat mosaicism and en

  9. Late-onset Huntington disease with intermediate CAG repeats : true or false?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Justus L.; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Foncke, Elisabeth M. J.; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat length in the huntingtin gene. 'Intermediate alleles' with 27 to 35 CAG repeats generally do not cause HD but are unstable upon germ-line transmission. Insights in CAG repeat mosaicism and en

  10. Resistance of human spermatozoa to cryoinjury in repeated cycles of thaw-refreezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Verza Jr.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the resistance of human spermatozoa to cryoinjury in repeated cycles of thaw-refreezing by using the fast liquid nitrogen vapor method. Material and Methods: Semen specimens were obtained from sixteen normal and oligozoospermic individuals who required disposal at the sperm bank. Five of them had testicular cancer. Specimens were thawed and an aliquot was removed for analysis. The remaining specimens were refrozen without removing the cryomedia. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles were performed until no motile sperm were observed. Sperm motility, number of motile spermatozoa and viability were determined after thawing. Resistance to cryoinjury was compared between groups and also after each refreezing cycle within groups. Results: Motile spermatozoa were recovered after five and two refreeze-thawing cycles in normozoospermic and oligozoospermic specimens, respectively. There were no significant differences in the recovery of motile spermatozoa between thaws within each group of normal and oligozoospermic specimens, but percentage motility and total number of motile spermatozoa were significantly lower in the oligozoospermic one. Specimens from men with cancer were exposed to six refreeze-thawing cycles. Although recovery of motile spermatozoa was significantly impaired after each thawing, there were no significant differences in the recovery of motile sperm between thaws in cancer and non-cancer groups. Conclusions: Human spermatozoa resist repeated cryopreservation using the fast liquid nitrogen vapor method. Normozoospermic specimens withstand refreezing for an average two cycles longer than oligozoospermic ones. Specimens from cancer patients seem to resist repeated cryoinjury similarly to non-cancer counterparts. Resistance to repeated cryoinjury was related to the initial semen quality.

  11. The effect of heavy resistance exercise on repeated sprint performance in youth athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Daniel; Harsley, Paul; Shaw, Matthew; Peart, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This investigation assessed whether prior heavy resistance exercise would improve the repeated sprint performance of 16 trained youth soccer players (Age 17.05 ± 0.65 years; height 182.6 ± 8.9 cm; body mass 77.8 ± 8.2 kg). In session 1, individual 1 repetition max was measured utilising a squat movement. In sessions 2 and 3, participants performed a running-based repeated anaerobic sprint test with and without prior heavy resistance exercise of 91% of their 1 repetition max. Times were recorded for each of the 6 sprints performed in the repeated sprint test and summed to provide total time. T-tests compared the two exercise conditions via differences in corresponding sprint times and total time. Analysis revealed significantly reduced total time with use of heavy resistance exercise (33.48 (±1.27) vs. 33.59 (±1.27); P = 0.01). Sprints 1 (P = 0.05) and 2 (P = 0.02) were also faster in the heavy resistance exercise condition (5.09 (±0.16) vs. 5.11 (±0.16) and 5.36 (±0.24) vs. 5.45 (±0.26) seconds respectively) although no other differences were shown. Findings demonstrate improved sprint times of trained adolescent soccer players after heavy resistance exercise although benefits appear not as sustained as in adult participants.

  12. Determination of internal series resistance of PV devices: repeatability and uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentadue, Germana; Pavanello, Diego; Salis, Elena; Field, Mike; Müllejans, Harald

    2016-05-01

    The calibration of photovoltaic devices requires the measurement of their current-voltage characteristics at standard test conditions (STC). As the latter can only be reached approximately, a curve translation is necessary, requiring among others the internal series resistance of the photovoltaic device as an input parameter. Therefore accurate and reliable determination of the series resistance is important in measurement and test laboratories. This work follows standard IEC 60891 ed 2 (2009) for the determination of the internal series resistance and investigates repeatability and uncertainty of the result in three aspects for a number of typical photovoltaic technologies. Firstly the effect of varying device temperature on the determined series resistance is determined experimentally and compared to a theoretical derivation showing agreement. It is found that the series resistance can be determined with an uncertainty of better than 5% if the device temperature is stable within  ±0.1 °C, whereas the temperature range of  ±2 °C allowed by the standard leads to much larger variations. Secondly the repeatability of the series resistance determination with respect to noise in current-voltage measurement is examined yielding typical values of  ±5%. Thirdly the determination of the series resistance using three different experimental set-ups (solar simulators) shows agreement on the level of  ±5% for crystalline Silicon photovoltaic devices and deviations up to 15% for thin-film devices. It is concluded that the internal series resistance of photovoltaic devices could be determined with an uncertainty of better than 10%. The influence of this uncertainty in series resistance on the electrical performance parameters of photovoltaic devices was estimated and showed a contribution of 0.05% for open-circuit voltage and 0.1% for maximum power. Furthermore it is concluded that the range of device temperatures allowed during determination of series

  13. Hexanucleotide Repeat Expansion in C9ORF72 Is Not Detected in the Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia Patients of Chinese Han.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xijia; Xie, Shiping; Shi, Xiaomeng; Lv, Jie; Tang, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaolan; Lu, Shuiping; Wang, Mingzhong; Zhang, Xiaobing; Sun, Jing; Yao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion in C9ORF72 (HRE) causes frontotemporal lobar degeneration, frontotemporal dementia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. HRE was also seen in the genomes of patients suffering from several other degenerative diseases. However, whether it is present in the treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients remains unknown. Genotyping 386 patients suffering from treatment-resistant schizophrenia using the method of Repeat-Primed PCR, we reported here that no HRE was detected in the patients of Chinese Han.

  14. Transgenic Cotton and Disease Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAJASEKARAN; Kanniah

    2008-01-01

    Success in conventional breeding for resistance to mycotoxin-producing or other phytopathogenic fungi is dependent on the availability of resistance gene(s) in the germplasm.Even when it is available,breeding for disease-resistant crops is very time consuming,especially in perennial crops such as

  15. Natural disease resistance in threatened staghorn corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Steven V; Kline, David I

    2008-01-01

    Disease epidemics have caused extensive damage to tropical coral reefs and to the reef-building corals themselves, yet nothing is known about the abilities of the coral host to resist disease infection. Understanding the potential for natural disease resistance in corals is critically important, especially in the Caribbean where the two ecologically dominant shallow-water corals, Acropora cervicornis and A. palmata, have suffered an unprecedented mass die-off due to White Band Disease (WBD), and are now listed as threatened under the US Threatened Species Act and as critically endangered under the IUCN Red List criteria. Here we examine the potential for natural resistance to WBD in the staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis by combining microsatellite genotype information with in situ transmission assays and field monitoring of WBD on tagged genotypes. We show that six percent of staghorn coral genotypes (3 out of 49) are resistant to WBD. This natural resistance to WBD in staghorn corals represents the first evidence of host disease resistance in scleractinian corals and demonstrates that staghorn corals have an innate ability to resist WBD infection. These resistant staghorn coral genotypes may explain why pockets of Acropora have been able to survive the WBD epidemic. Understanding disease resistance in these corals may be the critical link to restoring populations of these once dominant corals throughout their range.

  16. Natural disease resistance in threatened staghorn corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven V Vollmer

    Full Text Available Disease epidemics have caused extensive damage to tropical coral reefs and to the reef-building corals themselves, yet nothing is known about the abilities of the coral host to resist disease infection. Understanding the potential for natural disease resistance in corals is critically important, especially in the Caribbean where the two ecologically dominant shallow-water corals, Acropora cervicornis and A. palmata, have suffered an unprecedented mass die-off due to White Band Disease (WBD, and are now listed as threatened under the US Threatened Species Act and as critically endangered under the IUCN Red List criteria. Here we examine the potential for natural resistance to WBD in the staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis by combining microsatellite genotype information with in situ transmission assays and field monitoring of WBD on tagged genotypes. We show that six percent of staghorn coral genotypes (3 out of 49 are resistant to WBD. This natural resistance to WBD in staghorn corals represents the first evidence of host disease resistance in scleractinian corals and demonstrates that staghorn corals have an innate ability to resist WBD infection. These resistant staghorn coral genotypes may explain why pockets of Acropora have been able to survive the WBD epidemic. Understanding disease resistance in these corals may be the critical link to restoring populations of these once dominant corals throughout their range.

  17. Tailor-made RNAi knockdown against triplet repeat disease-causing alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masaki; Watanabe, Shoko; Murata, Miho; Furuya, Hirokazu; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Wada, Keiji; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2010-12-14

    Nucleotide variations, including SNPs, in the coding regions of disease genes are important targets for RNAi treatment, which is a promising medical treatment for intractable diseases such as triplet repeat diseases. However, the identification of such nucleotide variations and the design of siRNAs conferring disease allele-specific RNAi are quite difficult. In this study we developed a pull-down method to rapidly identify coding SNP (cSNP) haplotypes of triple repeat, disease-causing alleles, and we demonstrated disease allele-specific RNAi that targeted cSNP sites in mutant Huntingtin alleles, each of which possessed a different cSNP haplotype. Therefore, the methods presented here allow for allele-specific RNAi knockdown against disease-causing alleles by using siRNAs specific to disease-linked cSNP haplotypes, and advanced progress toward tailor-made RNAi treatments for triplet repeat diseases.

  18. Radiation therapy for resistant sternal hydatid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulger, S.; Barut, H.; Tunc, M.; Aydinkarahaliloglu, E. [Ataturk Chest Disease and Thorasic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Aydin, E.; Karaoglanoglu, N. [Ataturk Chest Disease and Thorasic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Thorasic Surgery; Gokcek, A. [Ataturk Chest Disease and Thorasic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2013-06-15

    Hydatid disease is a zoonotic infectious disease for which there are known treatment procedures and effective antibiotics; however, there are resistant cases that do not respond to medication or surgery. We report a case diagnosed as hydatid disease of the chest wall and treated with radiation therapy (RT) after medical and surgical therapy had failed. In conclusion, RT represents an alternative treatment modality in resistant cases. (orig.)

  19. Abnormal Base Excision Repair at Trinucleotide Repeats Associated with Diseases: A Tissue-Selective Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathi-Vasiliki Goula

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available More than fifteen genetic diseases, including Huntington’s disease, myotonic dystrophy 1, fragile X syndrome and Friedreich ataxia, are caused by the aberrant expansion of a trinucleotide repeat. The mutation is unstable and further expands in specific cells or tissues with time, which can accelerate disease progression. DNA damage and base excision repair (BER are involved in repeat instability and might contribute to the tissue selectivity of the process. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms of trinucleotide repeat instability, focusing more specifically on the role of BER.

  20. Polymorphisms in the CAG repeat--a source of error in Huntington disease DNA testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S; Fimmel, A; Fung, D; Trent, R J

    2000-12-01

    Five of 400 patients (1.3%), referred for Huntington disease DNA testing, demonstrated a single allele on CAG alone, but two alleles when the CAG + CCG repeats were measured. The PCR assay failed to detect one allele in the CAG alone assay because of single-base silent polymorphisms in the penultimate or the last CAG repeat. The region around and within the CAG repeat sequence in the Huntington disease gene is a hot-spot for DNA polymorphisms, which can occur in up to 1% of subjects tested for Huntington disease. These polymorphisms may interfere with amplification by PCR, and so have the potential to produce a diagnostic error.

  1. Identification of the porcine homologous of human disease causing trinucleotide repeat sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Thomsen, Bo; Sølvsten, Christina Ane Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    expansion in the repeat number of intragenic trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) is associated with a variety of inherited human neurodegenerative diseases. To study the compositionof TNRs in a mammalian species representing an evolutionary intermediate between humans and arodents, we describe in this p...

  2. Characterization of conservative somatic instability of the CAG repeat region in Huntington`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, F.V.; Calikoglu, A.S.; Whetsell, L.H. [H.A. Chapman Research Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Instability and enlargement of a CAG repeat region at the beginning of the huntingtin gene (IT-15) has been linked with Huntington`s disease. The CAG repeat size shows a highly significant correlation with age-of-onset of clinicial features in individuals with 40 or more repeats who have Huntington disease. The clinical status of nonsymptomatic individuals with 30 to 39 CAG repeats is considered ambiguous. In order to define more carefully the nature of the HD expansion instability, we examined patients in our HD population using a discriminating fluorescence-based PCR approach. The degree of somatic mutation increases with both earlier age of onset and the size of the inherited allele. A single prominent band one repeat larger than the index peak was typical in individuals with 40-41 CAG repeats. Three to four larger bands are typically discerned in individuals with 50 or more repeats. In an extreme example, an individual with approximately 95 repeats had at least 8 prominent bands. Plotting the degree of somatic mutation relative to the size of the HD allele shows somatic mutation activity increases with size. By this approach 40-60% of the alleles in a 40-41 CAG repeat HD loci is represented in the primary allele. In contrast, the primary allele represents a relatively minor proportion of the total alleles for expansions greater than 50 CAG repeats (10-20%). The limited range of somatic mutation suggest that the instability is restricted to very early stages of embryogenesis before tissue development diverges or that persistent somatic instability occurs at a slow rate. Therefore, the properties of somatic instability in Huntington`s disease have aspects that are both in common but also different from that found in other trinucleotide repeat expanding diseases such as myotonic muscular dystrophy and fragile X syndrome.

  3. Chromatin structure of repeating CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG sequences in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2007-05-01

    In eukaryotic cells, chromatin structure organizes genomic DNA in a dynamic fashion, and results in regulation of many DNA metabolic processes. The CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeating sequences involved in several neuromuscular degenerative diseases display differential abilities for the binding of histone octamers. The effect of the repeating DNA on nucleosome assembly could be amplified as the number of repeats increases. Also, CpG methylation, and sequence interruptions within the triplet repeats exert an impact on the formation of nucleosomes along these repeating DNAs. The two most common triplet expansion human diseases, myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X syndrome, are caused by the expanded CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeats, respectively. In addition to the expanded repeats and CpG methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling factors, and noncoding RNA have been shown to coordinate the chromatin structure at both myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X loci. Alterations in chromatin structure at these two loci can affect transcription of these disease-causing genes, leading to disease symptoms. These observations have brought a new appreciation that a full understanding of disease gene expression requires a knowledge of the structure of the chromatin domain within which the gene resides.

  4. Normal CAG and CCG repeats in the Huntington`s disease genes of Parkinson`s disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J.; Barton, D.E. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-04-24

    The clinical features of Parkinson`s disease, particularly rigidity and bradykinesia and occasionally tremor, are seen in juvenile-onset Huntington`s disease. Therefore, the CAG and CCG repeats in the Huntington`s disease gene were investigated in 45 Parkinson`s disease patients and compared to 40 control individuals. All of the Parkinson`s disease chromosomes fell within the normal size ranges. In addition, the distributions of the two repeats in the Parkinson`s disease patients did not differ significantly from those of the control population. Therefore, abnormalities of these trinucleotide repeats in the Huntington`s disease gene are not likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson`s disease. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Selection pressure on human STR loci and its relevance in repeat expansion disease

    KAUST Repository

    Shimada, Makoto K.

    2016-06-11

    Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) comprise repeats of one to several base pairs. Because of the high mutability due to strand slippage during DNA synthesis, rapid evolutionary change in the number of repeating units directly shapes the range of repeat-number variation according to selection pressure. However, the remaining questions include: Why are STRs causing repeat expansion diseases maintained in the human population; and why are these limited to neurodegenerative diseases? By evaluating the genome-wide selection pressure on STRs using the database we constructed, we identified two different patterns of relationship in repeat-number polymorphisms between DNA and amino-acid sequences, although both patterns are evolutionary consequences of avoiding the formation of harmful long STRs. First, a mixture of degenerate codons is represented in poly-proline (poly-P) repeats. Second, long poly-glutamine (poly-Q) repeats are favored at the protein level; however, at the DNA level, STRs encoding long poly-Qs are frequently divided by synonymous SNPs. Furthermore, significant enrichments of apoptosis and neurodevelopment were biological processes found specifically in genes encoding poly-Qs with repeat polymorphism. This suggests the existence of a specific molecular function for polymorphic and/or long poly-Q stretches. Given that the poly-Qs causing expansion diseases were longer than other poly-Qs, even in healthy subjects, our results indicate that the evolutionary benefits of long and/or polymorphic poly-Q stretches outweigh the risks of long CAG repeats predisposing to pathological hyper-expansions. Molecular pathways in neurodevelopment requiring long and polymorphic poly-Q stretches may provide a clue to understanding why poly-Q expansion diseases are limited to neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  6. Transgenic Cotton and Disease Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAJASEKARAN Kanniah

    2008-01-01

    @@ Success in conventional breeding for resistance to mycotoxin-producing or other phytopathogenic fungi is dependent on the availability of resistance gene(s) in the germplasm.Even when it is available,breeding for disease-resistant crops is very time consuming,especially in perennial crops such as tree nut crops,and does not lend itself ready to combat the evolution of new virulent fungal races.

  7. Over-expression of rice leucine-rich repeat protein results in activation of defense response, thereby enhancing resistance to bacterial soft rot in Chinese cabbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Ho; Choi, Changhyun; Park, Eun Mi; Kim, Hyo Sun; Park, Hong Jae; Bae, Shin Cheol; Ahn, Ilpyung; Kim, Min Gab; Park, Sang Ryeol; Hwang, Duk-Ju

    2012-10-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum causes soft rot disease in various plants, including Chinese cabbage. The simple extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR) domain proteins have been implicated in disease resistance. Rice leucine-rich repeat protein (OsLRP), a rice simple eLRR domain protein, is induced by pathogens, phytohormones, and salt. To see whether OsLRP enhances disease resistance to bacterial soft rot, OsLRP was introduced into Chinese cabbage by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Two independent transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP were generated and further analyzed. Transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP showed enhanced disease resistance to bacterial soft rot compared to non-transgenic control. Bacterial growth was retarded in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP compared to non-transgenic controls. We propose that OsLRP confers enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot. Monitoring expression of defense-associated genes in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP, two different glucanases and Brassica rapa polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 2, PDF1 were constitutively activated in transgenic lines compared to non-transgenic control. Taken together, heterologous expression of OsLRP results in the activation of defense response and enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot.

  8. New primer for specific amplification of the CAG repeat in Huntington disease alleles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, C.E.; Hodes, M.E. [Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat near the 5{prime} end of the gene for Huntington disease (IT15). The CAG repeat is flanked by a variable-length CCG repeat that is included in the amplification product obtained with most currently used primer sets and PCR protocols. Inclusion of this adjacent CCG repeat complicates the accurate assessment of CAG repeat length and interferes with the genotype determination of those individuals carrying alleles in the intermediate range between normal and expanded sized. Due to the GC-rich nature of this region, attempts at designing a protocol for amplification of only the CAG repeat have proved unreliable and difficult to execute. We report here the development of a compatible primer set and PCR protocol that yields consistent amplification of the CAG-repeat region. PCR products can be visualized in ethidium bromide-stained agarose gels for rapid screening or in 6% polyacrylamide gels for determination of exact repeat length. This assay produces bands that can be sized accurately, while eliminating most nonspecific products. Fifty-five specimens examined showed consistency with another well-known method, but one that amplifies the CCG repeats as well. The results we obtained also matched the known carrier status of the donors.

  9. Null alleles at the Huntington disease locus: implications for diagnostics and CAG repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L C; Hegde, M R; Nagappan, R; Faull, R L; Giles, J; Winship, I; Snow, K; Love, D R

    2000-01-01

    PCR amplification of the CAG repeat in exon 1 of the IT15 gene is routinely undertaken to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Huntington disease (HD) and to provide predictive testing for at-risk relatives of affected individuals. Our studies have detected null alleles on the chromosome carrying the expanded repeat in three of 91 apparently unrelated HD families. Sequence analysis of these alleles has revealed the same mutation event, leading to the juxtaposition of uninterrupted CAG and CCG repeats. These data suggest that a mutation-prone region exists in the IT15 gene bounded by the CAG and CCG repeats and that caution should be exercised in designing primers that anneal to the region bounded by these repeats. Two of the HD families segregated null alleles with expanded uninterrupted CAG repeats at the lower end of the zone of reduced penetrance. The expanded repeats are meiotically unstable in these families, although this instability is within a small range of repeat lengths. The haplotypes of the disease-causing chromosomes in these two families differ, only one of which is similar to that reported previously as being specific for new HD mutations. Finally, no apparent mitotic instability of the uninterrupted CAG repeat was observed in the brain of one of the HD individuals.

  10. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, J-M; Ramos, E M; Lee, J-H;

    2012-01-01

    Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound...... implications for disease mechanism and modification, we tested whether the normal allele, interaction between the expanded and normal alleles, or presence of a second expanded allele affects age at onset of HD motor signs....

  11. Genetics and epigenetics of repeat derepression in human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, P.E.

    2016-01-01

    A large part of the human genome consists of repetitive DNA. In this thesis two human diseases have been studied in which deregulation of repetitive DNA is a central feature: facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and immunodeficiency, centromere instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrom

  12. Direct repeat unit (dru) typing and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from dogs in Atlantic Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Matthew E; Weese, J Scott; McClure, J T

    2017-07-01

    There are few reports investigating the characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) in dogs in Canada and none from Atlantic Canada. The objectives of this study were to strain type MRSP isolates cultured at a regional diagnostic laboratory using direct repeat unit (dru) typing and to describe their antimicrobial resistance profiles. Ninety-four isolates recovered from dogs between 2010 and 2012 had dru typing, cluster analysis, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing done. The majority of isolates belonged to type dt11a (30.9%), dt10h (24.5%), dt9a (18.1%), and dt11af (10.6%) with the remaining 15.9% of isolates distributed among 13 dru types. The predominant dru types identified were similar in Ontario; however, cluster 9a appears to be less common in Atlantic Canada. A significant difference in the distribution of clusters among Atlantic provinces was detected (P = 0.01). Resistance to ≥ 2 non-β-lactam antimicrobials was observed in 71.4% of the isolates. The MRSP isolates from this study were notably less resistant than those reported in the literature. A more comprehensive study of the MRSP dru types could help further elucidate the distribution of this pathogen in Canada.

  13. Insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, B M; Greene, E L; Goodfriend, T L

    2001-06-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors cluster in obese individuals. Insulin resistance emerges as a common pathogenetic denominator underlying the risk factor cluster. Defects in nonesterified fatty acids metabolism have been implicated in the abnormal lipid and glucose metabolism which characterize the cluster. Other evidence also leads to the adipocyte as an important contributor to the risk factor cluster and cardiovascular complications through effects not only on fatty acids but also on leptin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and angiotensinogen, to name a few. Fatty acids are elevated among abdominally obese individuals, are more resistant to suppression by insulin, and may contribute to hypertension. Fatty acids may affect blood pressure by inhibiting endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity and impairing endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Fatty acids increase alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated vascular reactivity and enhance the proliferation and migration of cultured vascular smooth-muscle cells. Several effects of fatty acids are mediated through oxidative stress. Fatty acids can also interact with other facets of cluster, including increased angiotensin II, to accentuate oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, in turn, is implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, hypertension, vascular remodeling, and vascular complications. A clearer delineation of the key reactive oxygen signaling pathways and the impact of various interventions on these pathways could facilitate a rationale approach to antioxidant therapy and improved outcomes among the rapidly growing number of high-risk, insulin-resistant, obese individuals.

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with Huntington's disease show CAG-repeat-expansion-associated phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded stretch of CAG trinucleotide repeats that results in neuronal dysfunction and death. Here, The HD Consortium reports the generation and characterization of 14 induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from HD patients and controls. Microarray profiling revealed CAG-repeat-expansion-associated gene expression patterns that distinguish patient lines from controls, and early onset versus late onset HD. Differentiated HD neural cells showed disease-associated changes in electrophysiology, metabolism, cell adhesion, and ultimately cell death for lines with both medium and longer CAG repeat expansions. The longer repeat lines were however the most vulnerable to cellular stressors and BDNF withdrawal, as assessed using a range of assays across consortium laboratories. The HD iPSC collection represents a unique and well-characterized resource to elucidate disease mechanisms in HD and provides a human stem cell platform for screening new candidate therapeutics.

  15. Striatal and extrastriatal atrophy in Huntington's disease and its relationship with length of the CAG repeat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. Ruocco

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that affects the striatum most severely. However, except for juvenile forms, relative preservation of the cerebellum has been reported. The objective of the present study was to perform MRI measurements of caudate, putamen, cerebral, and cerebellar volumes and correlate these findings with the length of the CAG repeat and clinical parameters. We evaluated 50 consecutive patients with HD using MRI volumetric measurements and compared them to normal controls. Age at onset of the disease ranged from 4 to 73 years (mean: 43.1 years. The length of the CAG repeat ranged from 40 to 69 (mean: 47.2 CAG. HD patients presented marked atrophy of the caudate and putamen, as well as reduced cerebellar and cerebral volumes. There was a significant correlation between age at onset of HD and length of the CAG repeat, as well as clinical disability and age at onset. The degree of basal ganglia atrophy correlated with the length of the CAG repeat. There was no correlation between cerebellar or cerebral volume and length of the CAG repeat. However, there was a tendency to a positive correlation between duration of disease and cerebellar atrophy. While there was a negative correlation of length of the CAG repeat with age at disease onset and with striatal degeneration, its influence on extrastriatal atrophy, including the cerebellum, was not clear. Extrastriatal atrophy occurs later in HD and may be related to disease duration.

  16. Striatal and extrastriatal atrophy in Huntington's disease and its relationship with length of the CAG repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, H H; Lopes-Cendes, I; Li, L M; Santos-Silva, M; Cendes, F

    2006-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that affects the striatum most severely. However, except for juvenile forms, relative preservation of the cerebellum has been reported. The objective of the present study was to perform MRI measurements of caudate, putamen, cerebral, and cerebellar volumes and correlate these findings with the length of the CAG repeat and clinical parameters. We evaluated 50 consecutive patients with HD using MRI volumetric measurements and compared them to normal controls. Age at onset of the disease ranged from 4 to 73 years (mean: 43.1 years). The length of the CAG repeat ranged from 40 to 69 (mean: 47.2 CAG). HD patients presented marked atrophy of the caudate and putamen, as well as reduced cerebellar and cerebral volumes. There was a significant correlation between age at onset of HD and length of the CAG repeat, as well as clinical disability and age at onset. The degree of basal ganglia atrophy correlated with the length of the CAG repeat. There was no correlation between cerebellar or cerebral volume and length of the CAG repeat. However, there was a tendency to a positive correlation between duration of disease and cerebellar atrophy. While there was a negative correlation of length of the CAG repeat with age at disease onset and with striatal degeneration, its influence on extrastriatal atrophy, including the cerebellum, was not clear. Extrastriatal atrophy occurs later in HD and may be related to disease duration.

  17. Short Tandem Repeats in Human Exons: A Target for Disease Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villesen Palle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years it has been demonstrated that structural variations, such as indels (insertions and deletions, are common throughout the genome, but the implications of structural variations are still not clearly understood. Long tandem repeats (e.g. microsatellites or simple repeats are known to be hypermutable (indel-rich, but are rare in exons and only occasionally associated with diseases. Here we focus on short (imperfect tandem repeats (STRs which fall below the radar of conventional tandem repeat detection, and investigate whether STRs are targets for disease-related mutations in human exons. In particular, we test whether they share the hypermutability of the longer tandem repeats and whether disease-related genes have a higher STR content than non-disease-related genes. Results We show that validated human indels are extremely common in STR regions compared to non-STR regions. In contrast to longer tandem repeats, our definition of STRs found them to be present in exons of most known human genes (92%, 99% of all STR sequences in exons are shorter than 33 base pairs and 62% of all STR sequences are imperfect repeats. We also demonstrate that STRs are significantly overrepresented in disease-related genes in both human and mouse. These results are preserved when we limit the analysis to STRs outside known longer tandem repeats. Conclusion Based on our findings we conclude that STRs represent hypermutable regions in the human genome that are linked to human disease. In addition, STRs constitute an obvious target when screening for rare mutations, because of the relatively low amount of STRs in exons (1,973,844 bp and the limited length of STR regions.

  18. Induced disease resistance signaling in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, B.W.M.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    To protect themselves from disease, plants have evolved sophisticated inducible defense mechanisms in which the signal molecules salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene often play crucial roles. Elucidation of signaling pathways controlling induced disease resistance is a major objective in resea

  19. Resistance repeatability study of ion-beam deposited vanadium oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, P.; Pearson, D. I. C.; Pochon, S.; Thomas, O.; Cooke, M.; Gunn, R.

    2016-09-01

    Ion Beam Sputter Deposition (IBSD) is a versatile technique particularly suited to applications requiring high quality, high performance layer materials as it allows independent and accurate control of the process parameters. Vanadium oxides, used for example in the fabrication of microbolometers, optical switches or optical storage, exhibit interesting properties such as a high Temperature Coefficient of Resistance (TCR), relatively low 1/f noise and a semiconductormetal phase transition close to room temperature. However, it is very challenging to control the stoichiometry of the deposited film as there are at least 25 different oxidation states of vanadium, few of which display the required electrical characteristics. In the present study, vanadium oxide thin layers were deposited by IBSD using an Oxford Ionfab300+ and analyzed with regard to their electrical properties. The impact of the system parameters on the resistance repeatability, wafer-to-wafer and batch-to-batch, was thoroughly investigated to provide the end user with a clear understanding of the factors affecting film resistivity while ensuring at the same time a steep variation of resistance with temperature, as notably required for uncooled bolometers. These parameters were balanced to also achieve a good deposition rate, throughput and uniformity over large device areas, compatible with the requirements of industrial applications.

  20. Affective Adaptation to Repeated SIT and MICT Protocols in Insulin Resistant Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saanijoki, Tiina; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Koivumäki, Mikko; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Hannukainen, Jarna C

    2017-08-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate affective responses to repeated sessions of sprint interval training (SIT) in comparison with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in insulin resistant subjects. Twenty-six insulin resistant adults (age: 49 (4) years, 10 women) were randomized into SIT (n=13) or MICT (n=13) groups. Subjects completed six supervised training sessions within 2 weeks (SIT session: 4-6 × 30 s all-out cycling/4-min recovery; MICT session: 40-60 min at 60% peak work load). Perceived exertion, stress and affective state were assessed with questionnaires prior to, during and after each training session. Perceived exertion, displeasure, and arousal were higher during the SIT compared with MICT sessions (all p SIT and MICT over the six days of training (all p SIT versus MICT exercise increased perceived stress and decreased positive affect and feeling of satisfaction acutely after exercise especially in the beginning of the intervention (all p 0.05). The perceptual and affective responses are more negative both during and acutely after SIT compared with MICT in untrained insulin resistant adults. These responses, however, show significant improvements already within six training sessions indicating rapid positive affective and physiological adaptations to continual exercise training, both SIT and MICT. These findings suggest that even very intense SIT is mentally tolerable alternative for untrained people with insulin resistance.

  1. Thyroid profiles in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone and episodes of thyrotoxicosis, including repeated painless thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyama, Matsuo; Otsuka, Fumiko; Tozaki, Teruaki; Ban, Yoshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    Thyrotoxic disease can be difficult to recognize in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) because the clinical symptoms of thyrotoxicosis cannot be observed, and thyrotropin (TSH) may not be suppressed because of hormone resistance. Painless thyroiditis is a relatively common cause of thyrotoxicosis, but its occurrence in RTH has not been reported. We assessed the thyroid profile in a patient with RTH and episodes of thyrotoxicosis who experienced repeated painless thyroiditis. A 44-year-old Japanese woman with RTH, which was confirmed by the presence of a P453A mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) gene, showed a slight elevation of the basal levels of thyroid hormones, which indicated that her pituitary RTH was mild. She experienced a slight exacerbation of hyperthyroxinemia concomitant with TSH suppression. A diagnosis of painless thyroiditis was made because of the absence of TSH receptor antibodies, low Tc-99m pertechnetate uptake by the thyroid gland, and transient suppression followed by a slight elevation of TSH following the elevation of thyroid hormones. The patient's complaints of general malaise and occasional palpitations did not change throughout the course of painless thyroiditis. Three years later, painless thyroiditis occurred again without any deterioration of the clinical manifestations. Mild pituitary RTH can be overcome by slight exacerbation of hyperthyroxinemia during mild thyrotoxicosis. When pituitary resistance is severe and TSH is not suppressed, thyrotoxicosis may be overlooked.

  2. The repeated bout effect of traditional resistance exercises on running performance across 3 bouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doma, Kenji; Schumann, Moritz; Leicht, Anthony Scott; Heilbronn, Brian Edward; Damas, Felipe; Burt, Dean

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the repeated bout effect of 3 typical lower body resistance-training sessions on maximal and submaximal effort running performance. Twelve resistance-untrained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 1.81 ± 0.10 m; body mass, 79.3 ± 10.9 kg; peak oxygen uptake, 48.2 ± 6.5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1); 6-repetition maximum squat, 71.7 ± 12.2 kg) undertook 3 bouts of resistance-training sessions at 6-repetitions maximum. Countermovement jump (CMJ), lower-body range of motion (ROM), muscle soreness, and creatine kinase (CK) were examined prior to and immediately, 24 h (T24), and 48 h (T48) after each resistance-training bout. Submaximal (i.e., below anaerobic threshold (AT)) and maximal (i.e., above AT) running performances were also conducted at T24 and T48. Most indirect muscle damage markers (i.e., CMJ, ROM, and muscle soreness) and submaximal running performance were significantly improved (P resistance-training bout compared with the second bout. Whilst maximal running performance was also improved following the third bout (P 0.05). In conclusion, the initial bout induced the greatest change in CK; however, at least 2 bouts were required to produce protective effects on other indirect muscle damage markers and submaximal running performance measures. This suggests that submaximal running sessions should be avoided for at least 48 h after resistance training until the third bout, although a greater recovery period may be required for maximal running sessions.

  3. Somatic expansion of the Huntington's disease CAG repeat in the brain is associated with an earlier age of disease onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Meera; Hendricks, Audrey E; Gillis, Tammy; Massood, Tiffany; Mysore, Jayalakshmi; Myers, Richard H; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2009-08-15

    The age of onset of Huntington's disease (HD) is determined primarily by the length of the HD CAG repeat mutation, but is also influenced by other modifying factors. Delineating these modifiers is a critical step towards developing validated therapeutic targets in HD patients. The HD CAG repeat is somatically unstable, undergoing progressive length increases over time, particularly in brain regions that are the targets of neurodegeneration. Here, we have explored the hypothesis that somatic instability of the HD CAG repeat is itself a modifier of disease. Using small-pool PCR, we quantified somatic instability in the cortex region of the brain from a cohort of HD individuals exhibiting phenotypic extremes of young and old disease onset as predicted by the length of their constitutive HD CAG repeat lengths. After accounting for constitutive repeat length, somatic instability was found to be a significant predictor of onset age, with larger repeat length gains associated with earlier disease onset. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that somatic HD CAG repeat length expansions in target tissues contribute to the HD pathogenic process, and support pursuing factors that modify somatic instability as viable therapeutic targets.

  4. Disease resistance in sugarcane – An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ramesh Sundar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is one of the important commercial crops cultivated world-wide both under tropical and sub-tropical conditions. The crop gains economic importance by virtue of its industrial potential in terms of products like crystal white sugar, bagasse, pressmud, power etc. Among the various production constraints of the crop, diseases are seen as a major threat for sustaining the productivity of sugarcane. Conventional Breeding is a lengthy process and it involves almost more than 10 years for the release of a commercial variety. Many varieties with superior agronomical traits have succumbed to diseases like red rot and smut during the course of cultivation, which hitherto at the time of release were rated to be resistant. The breakdown of disease resistance is attributed to the possible emergence of new virulent pathotypes. This situation has warranted a pertinent need to have a thorough understanding on inheritance pattern and mechanism of disease resistance in sugarcane, which would aid for quick screening of disease resistant clones and successful management of the diseases, respectively. Overall, there is a paradigm shift in the understanding of plant disease resistance, thanks to the advent of robust molecular tools. An integration of the tools of “Omics” namely genomics, proteomics, metabolomics etc. has further strengthened in deciphering plant-pathogen interactions at the molecular level. With the accomplishments in elucidating sugarcane ESTs, which was ably supported by employing the next generation sequencing platforms to unlock the secrets of pathogenomics in sugarcane, it is now made possible to further improve our understanding on disease resistance in sugarcane. Giving the scenario, the future looks evenmore promising, wherein convincing results are in the offing to thoroughly unravel the enigmatic relationship between sugarcane and its important pathogens.

  5. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic mutations from dynamic DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard R Sinden; Vladimir N Potaman; Elena A Oussatcheva; Christopher E Pearson; Yuri L Lyubchenko; Luda S Shlyakhtenko

    2002-02-01

    Fourteen genetic neurodegenerative diseases and three fragile sites have been associated with the expansion of (CTG)n•(CAG)n, (CGG)n•(CCG)n, or (GAA)n•(TTC)n repeat tracts. Different models have been proposed for the expansion of triplet repeats, most of which presume the formation of alternative DNA structures in repeat tracts. One of the most likely structures, slipped strand DNA, may stably and reproducibly form within triplet repeat sequences. The propensity to form slipped strand DNA is proportional to the length and homogeneity of the repeat tract. The remarkable stability of slipped strand DNA may, in part, be due to loop-loop interactions facilitated by the sequence complementarity of the loops and the dynamic structure of three-way junctions formed at the loop-outs.

  6. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-10-08

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Christopoulou et al.

  7. Parkinson's disease: leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 and autophagy, intimate enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Niso-Santano, Mireia; González-Polo, Rosa A; Fuentes Rodríguez, José M

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second common neurodegenerative disorder, after Alzheimer's disease. It is a clinical syndrome characterized by loss of dopamine-generating cells in the substancia nigra, a region of the midbrain. The etiology of Parkinson's disease has long been through to involve both genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene cause late-onset Parkinson's disease with a clinical appearance indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease idiopathic. Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic mechanism whereby a cell recycles or degrades damage proteins and cytoplasmic organelles. This degradative process has been associated with cellular dysfunction in neurodegenerative processes including Parkinson's disease. We discuss the role of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 in autophagy, and how the deregulations of this degradative mechanism in cells can be implicated in the Parkinson's disease etiology.

  8. Prevalence of Huntington's disease gene CAG repeat alleles in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Keagle, Pamela; Gillis, Tammy; Lowe, Patrick; Mysore, Jayalakshmi S; Leclerc, Ashley Lyn; Ratti, Antonia; Ticozzi, Nicola; Gellera, Cinzia; Gusella, James F; Silani, Vincenzo; Alonso, Isabel; Brown, Robert H; MacDonald, Marcy E; Landers, John E

    2012-05-01

    A higher prevalence of intermediate ataxin-2 CAG repeats in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients has raised the possibility that CAG expansions in other polyglutamine disease genes could contribute to ALS neurodegeneration. We sought to determine whether expansions of the CAG repeat of the HTT gene that causes Huntington's disease, are associated with ALS. We compared the HTT CAG repeat length on a total of 3144 chromosomes from 1572 sporadic ALS patients and 4007 control chromosomes, and also tested its possible effects on ALS-specific parameters, such as age and site of onset and survival rate. Our results show that the CAG repeat in the HTT gene is not a risk factor for ALS nor modifies its clinical presentation. These findings suggest that distinct neuronal degeneration processes are involved in these two different neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Single sperm analysis of the trinucleotide repeat in the Huntington`s disease gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeflang, E.P.; Zhang, L.; Hubert, R. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Huntington`s disease (HD) is one of several genetic diseases caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion. The CAG repeat is very unstable, with size changes occurring in more than 80% of transmissions. The degree of instability of this repeat in the male germline can be determined by analysis of individual sperm cells. An easy and sensitive PCR assay has been developed to amplify this trinucleotide repeat region from single sperm using two rounds of PCR. As many as 90% of the single sperm show amplification for the HD repeat. The PCR product can be easily detected on an ethidium bromide-stained agarose gel. Single sperm samples from an HD patient with 18 and 49 repeats were studied. We observed size variations for the expanded alleles while the size of the normal allele in sperm is very consistent. We did not detect any significant bias in the amplification of normal alleles over the larger HD alleles. Our preliminary study supports the observation made by PCR of total sperm that instability of the HD trinucleotide repeat occurs in the germline. HD preimplantation diagnosis on single embryo blastomeres may also possible.

  10. Critical nucleus size for disease-related polyglutamine aggregation is repeat length dependent

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Karunakar; Jayaraman, Murali; Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Kodali, Ravindra; Wetzel, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Since polyglutamine (polyQ) aggregate formation has been implicated as playing an important role in expanded CAG repeat diseases, it is important to understand the biophysics underlying the initiation of aggregation. Previously we showed that relatively long polyQ peptides aggregate by nucleated growth polymerization and a monomeric critical nucleus. We show here that, over a short repeat length range from Q26 to Q23, the size of the critical nucleus for aggregation increases from monomeric t...

  11. Studies of the CAG repeat in the Machado-Joseph disease gene in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, M; Tsai, H F; Lu, T M; Yang, C Y; Wu, H M; Li, S Y

    1997-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar degeneration characterized by cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal signs associated in varying degrees with a dystonic-rigid extrapyramidal syndrome or peripheral amyotrophy. Unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the MJD gene on the long arm of chromosome 14 has been identified as the pathological mutation for MJD. While investigating the distribution of CAG repeat lengths of the MJD gene in Taiwan's population, we have identified 18 MJD-affected patients and 12 at-risk individuals in seven families. In addition, we have analyzed the range of CAG repeat lengths in 96 control individuals. The CAG repeat number ranged from 13 to 44 in the controls and 72-85 in the affected and at-risk individuals. Our results indicated that the CAG repeat number was inversely correlated with the age of onset. The differences in CAG repeat length between parent and child and between siblings are greater with paternal transmission than maternal transmission. Our data show a tendency towards the phenomenon of anticipation in the MJD families but do not support unidirectional expansion of CAG repeats during transmission. We also demonstrated that PCR amplification of the CAG repeats in the MJD gene from villous DNA was possible and might prove useful as a diagnostic tool for affected families in the future.

  12. A study on the trinucleotide repeat associated with Huntington`s disease in the Chinese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing-wen Soong; Jih-tsuu Wang [Neurological Institute, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1994-09-01

    Analysis of the polymorphic (CAG)n repeat in the hungingtin gene in the chinese confirmed the presence of an expanded repeat on all Huntington`s disease chromosomes. Measurement of the specific CAG repeat sequence in 34 HD chromosomes from 15 unrelated families and 190 control chromosomes from the Chinese population showed a range from 9 to 29 repeats in normal subjects and 40 to 58 in affected subjects. The size distributions of normal and affected alleles did not overlap. A clear correlation bewteen early onset of symptoms and very high repeat number was seen, but the spread of the age-at-onset in the major repeat range producing characteristic HD it too wide to be of diagnostic value. There was also variability in the transmitted repeat size for both sexes in the HD size range. Maternal HD alleles showed a moderate instability with a preponderance of size decrease, while paternal HD alleles had a tendency to increase in repeat size on transmission, the degree of which appeared proportional to the initial size.

  13. Quantitative disease resistance and quantitative resistance Loci in breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Clair, Dina A

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative disease resistance (QDR) has been observed within many crop plants but is not as well understood as qualitative (monogenic) disease resistance and has not been used as extensively in breeding. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is a powerful tool for genetic dissection of QDR. DNA markers tightly linked to quantitative resistance loci (QRLs) controlling QDR can be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) to incorporate these valuable traits. QDR confers a reduction, rather than lack, of disease and has diverse biological and molecular bases as revealed by cloning of QRLs and identification of the candidate gene(s) underlying QRLs. Increasing our biological knowledge of QDR and QRLs will enhance understanding of how QDR differs from qualitative resistance and provide the necessary information to better deploy these resources in breeding. Application of MAS for QRLs in breeding for QDR to diverse pathogens is illustrated by examples from wheat, barley, common bean, tomato, and pepper. Strategies for optimum deployment of QRLs require research to understand effects of QDR on pathogen populations over time.

  14. Repeat testing is essential when estimating chronic kidney disease prevalence and associated cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, M O; Bottomley, M J; Mevada, C; Svistunova, A; Bielinska, A-M; James, T; Kalachik, A; Harden, P N

    2012-03-01

    Investigations into chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease in the CKD population may be misleading as they are often based on a single test of kidney function. To determine whether repeat testing at 3 months to confirm a diagnosis of CKD impacts on the estimated prevalence of CKD and the estimated 10-year general cardiovascular risk of the CKD population. Blood and urine samples from presumed healthy volunteers were analysed for evidence of CKD on recruitment and again 3 months later. Estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk was calculated using criteria determined by the Framingham study. Preliminary study: 512 volunteers were screened for CKD. Of the initial results, 206 indicated CKD or eGFR within one standard deviation of abnormal, and 142 (69%) of these were retested. Validation study: 528 volunteers were recruited and invited to return for repeat testing. A total of 214 (40.5%) participants provided repeat samples. A single test indicating CKD had a positive predictive value of 0.5 (preliminary) and 0.39 (validation) for repeat abnormalities 3 months later. Participants with CKD confirmed on repeat testing had a significant increase in estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk over the population as a whole (preliminary: 16.5 vs. 11.9%, P risk. Repeat testing for CKD after 3 months significantly reduces the estimated prevalence of disease and identifies a population with true CKD and a cardiovascular risk significantly in excess of the general population.

  15. Haplotype analysis of the CAG and CCG repeats in 21 Brazilian families with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinho, Luciana de A; Rocha, Catielly F; Medina-Acosta, Enrique; Barboza, Hazel N; da Silva, Antônio F Alves; Pereira, Simão P F; da Silva, Iane Dos Santos; Paradela, Eduardo R; Figueiredo, André L dos S; Nogueira, Eduardo de M; Alvarenga, Regina M P; Hernan Cabello, Pedro; dos Santos, Suely R; Paiva, Carmen L A

    2012-12-01

    We studied the allelic profile of CAG and CCG repeats in 61 Brazilian individuals in 21 independent families affected by Huntington's disease (HD). Thirteen individuals had two normal alleles for HD, two had one mutable normal allele and no HD phenotype, and forty-six patients carried at least one expanded CAG repeat allele. Forty-five of these individuals had one expanded allele and one individual had one mutable normal allele (27 CAG repeats) and one expanded allele (48 CAG repeats). Eleven of these forty-five subjects had a mutant allele with reduced penetrance, and thirty-four patients had a mutant allele with complete penetrance. Inter- and intragenerational investigations of CAG repeats were also performed. We found a negative correlation between the number of CAG repeats and the age of disease onset (r=-0.84; Pdisease onset (r=0.06). We found 40 different haplotypes and the analysis showed that (CCG)(10) was linked to a CAG normal allele in 19 haplotypes and to expanded alleles in two haplotypes. We found that (CCG)(7) was linked to expanded CAG repeats in 40 haplotypes (95.24%) and (CCG)(10) was linked to expanded CAG repeats in only two haplotypes (4.76%). Therefore, (CCG)(7) was the most common allele in HD chromosomes in this Brazilian sample. It was also observed that there was a significant association of (CCG)(7) with the expanded CAG alleles (χ(2)=6.97, P=0.0084). Worldwide, the most common CCG alleles have 7 or 10 repeats. In Western Europe, (CCG)(7) is the most frequent allele, similarly to our findings.

  16. Clinical features of Chinese patients with Huntington's disease carrying CAG repeats beyond 60 within HTT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z-J; Sun, Y-M; Ni, W; Dong, Y; Shi, S-S; Wu, Z-Y

    2014-02-01

    Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) carrying CAG repeats beyond 60 are less frequently seen and clinical features of them have been rarely reported. We identified four unrelated patients carrying CAG repeats beyond 60 (84.0 ± 13.76, ranging from 74 to 104) from 119 Chinese HD patients via direct sequencing. These four were all early onset with a mean age at presenting symptom of 9.8 ± 1.71 years. Paternal transmission was found in three of them and the fourth was apparently sporadic. In addition, they had atypical onset symptoms including epilepsy, intellectual decline, tics and walking instability, which might lead the clinicians to make the wrong diagnosis in the early stage of disease. Our work explores clinical features of Chinese HD patients with an expanded CAG repeat over 60 and may help the clinicians make a correct diagnosis in the early stage of disease.

  17. Relationship between CAG repeat length and brain volume in premanifest and early Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Susie M D; Wild, Edward J; Hobbs, Nicola Z; Scahill, Rachael I; Ridgway, Gerard R; Macmanus, David G; Barker, Roger A; Fox, Nick C; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2009-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG repeat on the gene encoding for the protein huntingtin. There are conflicting findings about the extent to which repeat length predicts signs of the disease or severity of disease progression in adults. This study examined the relationship between CAG repeat length and brain volume in a large cohort of pre- and post-motor onset HD gene carriers, using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), an approach which allowed us to investigate the whole brain without defining a priori regions of interest. We also used VBM to examine group differences between 20 controls, 21 premanifest, and 40 early HD subjects. In the 61 mutation-positive subjects higher CAG repeat length was significantly associated with reduced volume of the body of the caudate nucleus bilaterally, left putamen, right insula, right parahippocampal gyrus, right anterior cingulate, and right occipital lobe, after correcting for age. The group contrasts showed significant reduction in grey matter volume in the early HD group relative to controls in widespread cortical as well as subcortical areas but there was no evidence of difference between controls and premanifest subjects. Overall we have demonstrated that increased CAG repeat length is associated with atrophy in extra-striatal as well as striatal regions, which has implications for the monitoring of disease-modifying therapies in the condition.

  18. MSH3 polymorphisms and protein levels affect CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Tomé

    Full Text Available Expansions of trinucleotide CAG/CTG repeats in somatic tissues are thought to contribute to ongoing disease progression through an affected individual's life with Huntington's disease or myotonic dystrophy. Broad ranges of repeat instability arise between individuals with expanded repeats, suggesting the existence of modifiers of repeat instability. Mice with expanded CAG/CTG repeats show variable levels of instability depending upon mouse strain. However, to date the genetic modifiers underlying these differences have not been identified. We show that in liver and striatum the R6/1 Huntington's disease (HD (CAG∼100 transgene, when present in a congenic C57BL/6J (B6 background, incurred expansion-biased repeat mutations, whereas the repeat was stable in a congenic BALB/cByJ (CBy background. Reciprocal congenic mice revealed the Msh3 gene as the determinant for the differences in repeat instability. Expansion bias was observed in congenic mice homozygous for the B6 Msh3 gene on a CBy background, while the CAG tract was stabilized in congenics homozygous for the CBy Msh3 gene on a B6 background. The CAG stabilization was as dramatic as genetic deficiency of Msh2. The B6 and CBy Msh3 genes had identical promoters but differed in coding regions and showed strikingly different protein levels. B6 MSH3 variant protein is highly expressed and associated with CAG expansions, while the CBy MSH3 variant protein is expressed at barely detectable levels, associating with CAG stability. The DHFR protein, which is divergently transcribed from a promoter shared by the Msh3 gene, did not show varied levels between mouse strains. Thus, naturally occurring MSH3 protein polymorphisms are modifiers of CAG repeat instability, likely through variable MSH3 protein stability. Since evidence supports that somatic CAG instability is a modifier and predictor of disease, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that variable levels of CAG instability associated with

  19. MSH3 polymorphisms and protein levels affect CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Stéphanie; Manley, Kevin; Simard, Jodie P; Clark, Greg W; Slean, Meghan M; Swami, Meera; Shelbourne, Peggy F; Tillier, Elisabeth R M; Monckton, Darren G; Messer, Anne; Pearson, Christopher E

    2013-01-01

    Expansions of trinucleotide CAG/CTG repeats in somatic tissues are thought to contribute to ongoing disease progression through an affected individual's life with Huntington's disease or myotonic dystrophy. Broad ranges of repeat instability arise between individuals with expanded repeats, suggesting the existence of modifiers of repeat instability. Mice with expanded CAG/CTG repeats show variable levels of instability depending upon mouse strain. However, to date the genetic modifiers underlying these differences have not been identified. We show that in liver and striatum the R6/1 Huntington's disease (HD) (CAG)∼100 transgene, when present in a congenic C57BL/6J (B6) background, incurred expansion-biased repeat mutations, whereas the repeat was stable in a congenic BALB/cByJ (CBy) background. Reciprocal congenic mice revealed the Msh3 gene as the determinant for the differences in repeat instability. Expansion bias was observed in congenic mice homozygous for the B6 Msh3 gene on a CBy background, while the CAG tract was stabilized in congenics homozygous for the CBy Msh3 gene on a B6 background. The CAG stabilization was as dramatic as genetic deficiency of Msh2. The B6 and CBy Msh3 genes had identical promoters but differed in coding regions and showed strikingly different protein levels. B6 MSH3 variant protein is highly expressed and associated with CAG expansions, while the CBy MSH3 variant protein is expressed at barely detectable levels, associating with CAG stability. The DHFR protein, which is divergently transcribed from a promoter shared by the Msh3 gene, did not show varied levels between mouse strains. Thus, naturally occurring MSH3 protein polymorphisms are modifiers of CAG repeat instability, likely through variable MSH3 protein stability. Since evidence supports that somatic CAG instability is a modifier and predictor of disease, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that variable levels of CAG instability associated with polymorphisms of

  20. Capsule Switching and Antimicrobial Resistance Acquired during Repeated Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumonia Episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bin; Nariai, Akiyoshi; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Akeda, Yukihiro; Kuroda, Makoto; Oishi, Kazunori; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharyngeal mucus in healthy people and causes otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. In this study, we analyzed an S. pneumoniae strain that caused 7 repeated pneumonia episodes in an 80-month-old patient with cerebral palsy during a period of 25 months. A total of 10 S. pneumoniae strains were obtained from sputum samples, and serotype 6B was isolated from samples from the first 5 episodes, whereas serotype 6A was isolated from samples from the last 2. Whole-genome sequencing showed clonality of the 10 isolates with 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genomes. Among these SNPs, one single point mutation in the wciP gene was presumed to relate to the serotype switching from 6B to 6A, and the other mutations in parC and gyrA were related to fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggested that an S. pneumoniae strain, which asymptomatically colonized the patient's nasopharynx or was horizontally transmitted from an asymptomatic carrier, caused the repeated pneumonia events. Phenotypic variations in the capsule type and antimicrobial susceptibility occurred during the carrier state. Hyporesponsiveness to serotypes 6B and 6A of S. pneumoniae was found even after vaccination with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. After an additional vaccination with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, opsonic activities for both serotypes 6A and 6B significantly increased and are expected to prevent relapse by the same strain.

  1. The estrous cycle of the ewe is resistant to disruption by repeated, acute psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Breen, Kellie M; Oakley, Amy E; Tilbrook, Alan J; Karsch, Fred J

    2010-06-01

    Five experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that psychosocial stress interferes with the estrous cycle of sheep. In experiment 1, ewes were repeatedly isolated during the follicular phase. Timing, amplitude, and duration of the preovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH) surge were not affected. In experiment 2, follicular-phase ewes were subjected twice to a "layered stress" paradigm consisting of sequential, hourly application of isolation, restraint, blindfold, and predator cues. This reduced the LH pulse amplitude but did not affect the LH surge. In experiment 3, different acute stressors were given sequentially within the follicular phase: food denial plus unfamiliar noises and forced exercise, layered stress, exercise around midnight, and transportation. This, too, did not affect the LH surge. In experiment 4, variable acute psychosocial stress was given every 1-2 days for two entire estrous cycles; this did not disrupt any parameter of the cycle monitored. Lastly, experiment 5 examined whether the psychosocial stress paradigms of experiment 4 would disrupt the cycle and estrous behavior if sheep were metabolically stressed by chronic food restriction. Thirty percent of the food-restricted ewes exhibited deterioration of estrous cycle parameters followed by cessation of cycles and failure to express estrous behavior. However, disruption was not more evident in ewes that also encountered psychosocial stress. Collectively, these findings indicate the estrous cycle of sheep is remarkably resistant to disruption by acute bouts of psychosocial stress applied intermittently during either a single follicular phase or repeatedly over two estrous cycles.

  2. Unmasking levodopa resistance in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonnekes, Jorik; Timmer, Monique H M; de Vries, Nienke M; Rascol, Olivier; Helmich, Rick C; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-11-01

    Some motor and nonmotor features associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) do not seem to respond well to levodopa (or other forms of dopaminergic medication) or appear to become resistant to levodopa treatment with disease progression and longer disease duration. In this narrative review, we elaborate on this issue of levodopa resistance in PD. First, we discuss the possibility of pseudoresistance, which refers to dopamine-sensitive symptoms or signs that falsely appear to be (or have become) resistant to levodopa, when in fact other mechanisms are at play, resulting in suboptimal dopaminergic efficacy. Examples include interindividual differences in pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics and underdosing because of dose-limiting side effects or because of levodopa phobia. Moreover, pseudoresistance can emerge as not all features of PD respond adequately to the same dosage of levodopa. Second, we address that for several motor features (eg, freezing of gait or tremor) and several nonmotor features (eg, specific cognitive functions), the response to levodopa is fairly complex, with a combination of levodopa-responsive, levodopa-resistant, and even levodopa-induced characteristics. A possible explanation relates to the mixed presence of underlying dopaminergic and nondopaminergic brain lesions. We suggest that clinicians take these possibilities into account before concluding that symptoms or signs of PD are totally levodopa resistant. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  3. Repeated cognitive stimulation alleviates memory impairments in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Coria, Hilda; Yeung, Stephen T; Ager, Rahasson R; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J; Baglietto-Vargas, David; LaFerla, Frank M

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disease associated with progressive memory and cognitive decline. Previous studies have identified the benefits of cognitive enrichment on reducing disease pathology. Additionally, epidemiological and clinical data suggest that repeated exercise, and cognitive and social enrichment, can improve and/or delay the cognitive deficiencies associated with aging and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, 3xTg-AD mice were exposed to a rigorous training routine beginning at 3 months of age, which consisted of repeated training in the Morris water maze spatial recognition task every 3 months, ending at 18 months of age. At the conclusion of the final Morris water maze training session, animals subsequently underwent testing in another hippocampus-dependent spatial task, the Barnes maze task, and on the more cortical-dependent novel object recognition memory task. Our data show that periodic cognitive enrichment throughout aging, via multiple learning episodes in the Morris water maze task, can improve the memory performance of aged 3xTg-AD mice in a separate spatial recognition task, and in a preference memory task, when compared to naïve aged matched 3xTg-AD mice. Furthermore, we observed that the cognitive enrichment properties of Morris water maze exposer, was detectable in repeatedly trained animals as early as 6 months of age. These findings suggest early repeated cognitive enrichment can mitigate the diverse cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Repeated drought alters resistance of seed bank regeneration in baldcypress swamps of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ting; Middleton, Beth A.

    2017-01-01

    Recurring drying and wetting events are likely to increase in frequency and intensity in predicted future droughts in the central USA and alter the regeneration potential of species. We explored the resistance of seed banks to successive droughts in 53 sites across the nine locations in baldcypress swamps in the southeastern USA. Along the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley and northern Gulf of Mexico, we investigated the capacity of seed banks to retain viable seeds after successive periods of drying and wetting in a greenhouse study. Mean differences in species richness and seed density were compared to examine the interactions of successive droughts, geographical location and water regime. The results showed that both species richness and total density of germinating seedlings decreased over repeated drought trials. These responses were more pronounced in geographical areas with higher annual mean temperature. In seed banks across the southeastern swamp region, most species were exhausted after Trial 2 or 3, except for semiaquatic species in Illinois and Tennessee, and aquatic species in Texas. Distinct geographical trends in seed bank resistance to drought demonstrate that climate-induced drying of baldcypress swamps could influence the regeneration of species differently across their ranges. Despite the health of adult individuals, lack of regeneration may push ecosystems into a relict status. Seed bank depletion by germination without replenishment may be a major conservation threat in a future with recurring droughts far less severe than megadrought. Nevertheless, the protection of moist refugia might aid conservation.

  5. RISK OF REPEATED THROMBOTIC EVENTS IN PATIENTS SURVIVED ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME AND HAVING LABORATORY PROVEN RESISTANCE TO ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Puchinyan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate risk of repeated atherothrombotic events in patients survived acute coronary syndrome (ACS and having poorly reduced platelet aggregation (proven by optical aggregometry in response to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA therapy.Material and methods. 200 patients with ACS (aged 56,6±9,2 y.o. were included in the study. Platelet functional activity during ASA therapy was evaluated with laser aggregometer. ASA resistance was defined if the summarizing index of platelet aggregation (induced with ADP, 5 mμml/l was 50% or higher during ASA therapy. Observation period was 18±6 months. Atherothrombotic events (unstable angina, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular death were considered.Results. Lack ASA response rate was about 12%. Totally 22 repeated atherothrombotic events were registered: 5,6% among ASA sensitive patients and 50% - among ASA resistant patients. Repeated atherothrombotic events were registered in ASA resistance patients during first 14 days. ASA sensitive patients showed repeated atherothrombotic events in some months after ACS. The relative risk of cardiovascular event in ASA resistance patients was 8,92 (CI 95% 4,39; 17,84 р=0,05.Conclusion. The high level of the induced platelet aggregation (proven by laser aggregometry points to high risk of repeated atherothrombotic events in patients with ACS.

  6. Plant-pathogen interactions: toward development of next-generation disease-resistant plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejat, Naghmeh; Rookes, James; Mantri, Nitin L; Cahill, David M

    2017-03-01

    Briskly evolving phytopathogens are dire threats to our food supplies and threaten global food security. From the recent advances made toward high-throughput sequencing technologies, understanding of pathogenesis and effector biology, and plant innate immunity, translation of these means into new control tools is being introduced to develop durable disease resistance. Effectoromics as a powerful genetic tool for uncovering effector-target genes, both susceptibility genes and executor resistance genes in effector-assisted breeding, open up new avenues to improve resistance. TALENs (Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases), engineered nucleases and CRISPR (Clustered Regulatory Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas9 systems are breakthrough and powerful techniques for genome editing, providing efficient mechanisms for targeted crop protection strategies in disease resistance programs. In this review, major advances in plant disease management to confer durable disease resistance and novel strategies for boosting plant innate immunity are highlighted.

  7. Critical nucleus size for disease-related polyglutamine aggregation is repeat length dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Karunakar; Jayaraman, Murali; Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Kodali, Ravindra; Wetzel, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Since polyglutamine (polyQ) aggregate formation has been implicated as playing an important role in expanded CAG repeat diseases, it is important to understand the biophysics underlying the initiation of aggregation. Previously we showed that relatively long polyQ peptides aggregate by nucleated growth polymerization and a monomeric critical nucleus. We show here that, over a short repeat length range from Q26 to Q23, the size of the critical nucleus for aggregation increases from monomeric to dimeric to tetrameric. This variation in nucleus size suggests a common duplex anti-parallel β-sheet framework for the nucleus, and further supports the feasibility of an organized monomeric aggregation nucleus for longer polyQ repeat peptides. The data also suggest that a change in aggregation nucleus size may play a role in the pathogenicity of polyQ expansion in this series of familial neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21317897

  8. Effects of moxifloxacin exposure on the conjunctival flora and antibiotic resistance profile following repeated intravitreal injections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mustafa; Atas; Burhan; Baskan; Ayse; zkse; Fatma; Mutlu; Sarιgüzel; Süleyman; Demircan; Emine; Pangal

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the effects of moxifloxacin exposure on the conjunctival flora and antibiotic resistance profile following repeated intravitreal injections.METHODS:Seventy-two eyes of 36 patients [36 eyes in control group, 36 eyes in intravitreal injection(IVI) group]were enrolled in the study. All the eyes had at least one IVI and had diabetic macular edema(DME) or age-related macular degeneration(ARMD). Moxifloxacin was prescribed to all the patients four times a day for five days following injection. Conjunctival cultures were obtained from the lower fornix via standardized technique with every possible effort made to minimize contamination from the lids, lashes, or skin. Before the application of any ophthalmic medication, conjunctival cultures were obtained from both eyes using sterile cotton culture. An automated microbiology system was used to identify the growing bacteria and determine antibiotic sensitivity.RESULTS:The bacterial cultures were isolated from 72 eyes of 36 patients, sixteen of whom patients(44.4%)were male and twenty(55.6%) were female. Average age was 68.4 ±9.0(range 50-86). The average number of injections before taking cultures was 3.1+1.0. Forty-eight(66.7%) of 72 eyes had at least one significant organism.There was no bacterial growth in 8(20.5%) of IVI eyes and in 16(44.4%) of control eyes(P =0.03). Of the bacteria isolated from culture, 53.8% of coagulase negative staphylococci(CoNS) in IVI eyes and 47.2%CoNS in control eyes. This difference between IVI eyes and control eyes about bacteria isolated from culture was not statistically significant(P =0.2). Eleven of 25 bacteria(44.0%) isolated from IVI eyes and 11(57.9%) of 19 bacteria isolated from control eyes were resistant to oxacillin. The difference in frequency of moxifloxacine resistance between two groups was not statistically significant(12.0% in IVI eyes and 21.1% in control eyes)(P =0.44). There were no cases of resistance to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid

  9. Repeated applications of cold atmospheric pressure plasma does not induce resistance in Staphylococcus aureus embedded in biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthes, Rutger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: The increasing microbial resistance against antibiotics complicates the therapy of bacterial infections. Therefore new therapeutic options, particularly those causing no resistance, are of high interest. Cold atmospheric plasma is one possible option to eradicate multidrug resistant microorganisms, and so far no resistance development against physical plasma is known.Method: We tested 6-fold repeated plasma applications on a strain embedded in biofilm and compared the reduction of the colony forming units between the different treatment periods to asses a possible development of resistance.Result: For all treatment periods, the control biofilms were reduced by plasma in average by 1.7 log CFU, and decreased from 7.6 to 5.8 log (CFU/cm within 5 hours. The results demonstrated that repeated plasma doses not induce resistance or habituation against plasma applied within short time periods.Conclusion: The repeated application of cold plasma is a promising option for the treatment of infected wounds without the risk of development of resistance against plasma.

  10. Progress study on the mechanism of CAG repeats dynamic mutation in polyQ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chun-rong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyglutamine (polyQ disease is a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by abnormal expansion of CAG repeats within coding regions of certain causative genes, which are translated into a series of abnormally expanded polyQ tracts causing cytotoxicity. So far, nine diseases caused by expanded polyQ tracts have been demonstrated including Huntington's disease (HD, spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA and several spinocerebellar ataxias subtypes (SCA. In human, long CAG repeats tend to expand during transmissions from parent to offspring, named as dynamic mutation, leading to an earlier age of disease onset and more severe symptoms in subsequent generations. The review presents some novel mechanisms based on dynamic mutation.

  11. Repeated challenge with virulent Newcastle Disease Virus does not decrease the efficacy of vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the field, well-vaccinated birds may be repeatedly exposed to challenges with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (vNDV), which may infect macrophages and cause damage to the immune system. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that daily challenges with high doses of vNDV may overwh...

  12. Obesity, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaven, Gerald; Abbasi, Fahim; McLaughlin, Tracey

    2004-01-01

    The ability of insulin to stimulate glucose disposal varies more than six-fold in apparently healthy individuals. The one third of the population that is most insulin resistant is at greatly increased risk to develop cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes, hypertension, stroke, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovary disease, and certain forms of cancer. Between 25-35% of the variability in insulin action is related to being overweight. The importance of the adverse effects of excess adiposity is apparent in light of the evidence that more than half of the adult population in the United States is classified as being overweight/obese, as defined by a body mass index greater than 25.0 kg/m(2). The current epidemic of overweight/obesity is most-likely related to a combination of increased caloric intake and decreased energy expenditure. In either instance, the fact that CVD risk is increased as individuals gain weight emphasizes the gravity of the health care dilemma posed by the explosive increase in the prevalence of overweight/obesity in the population at large. Given the enormity of the problem, it is necessary to differentiate between the CVD risk related to obesity per se, as distinct from the fact that the prevalence of insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are increased in overweight/obese individuals. Although the majority of individuals in the general population that can be considered insulin resistant are also overweight/obese, not all overweight/obese persons are insulin resistant. Furthermore, the cluster of abnormalities associated with insulin resistance - namely, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, and elevated plasma C-reactive protein concentrations -- is limited to the subset of overweight/obese individuals that are also insulin resistant. Of greater clinical relevance is the fact that significant improvement in these metabolic abnormalities following weight loss is seen only in the subset of

  13. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Rowan; Salem, Yishay [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Shah, Amee; Lai, Wyman W. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York Presbyterian, New York, NY (United States); Nielsen, James C. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai Children' s Heart Center, Box 1201, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m{sup 2} and 20.2 ml/m{sup 2}, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  14. Large-scale assessment of polyglutamine repeat expansions in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lisa; Aasly, Jan O; Annesi, Grazia; Bardien, Soraya; Bozi, Maria; Brice, Alexis; Carr, Jonathan; Chung, Sun J; Clarke, Carl; Crosiers, David; Deutschländer, Angela; Eckstein, Gertrud; Farrer, Matthew J; Goldwurm, Stefano; Garraux, Gaetan; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Hicks, Andrew A; Hattori, Nobutaka; Klein, Christine; Jeon, Beom; Kim, Yun J; Lesage, Suzanne; Lin, Juei-Jueng; Lynch, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Lang, Anthony E; Mok, Vincent; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Mellick, George D; Morrison, Karen E; Opala, Grzegorz; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Pramstaller, Peter P; Park, Sung S; Quattrone, Aldo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Ross, Owen A; Stefanis, Leonidas; Stockton, Joanne D; Silburn, Peter A; Theuns, Jessie; Tan, Eng K; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Toft, Mathias; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Uitti, Ryan J; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Yueh, Kuo-Chu; Zhao, Yi; Gasser, Thomas; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Krüger, Rejko; Sharma, Manu

    2015-10-13

    We aim to clarify the pathogenic role of intermediate size repeat expansions of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 as risk factors for idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). We invited researchers from the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium to participate in the study. There were 12,346 cases and 8,164 controls genotyped, for a total of 4 repeats within the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes. Fixed- and random-effects models were used to estimate the summary risk estimates for the genes. We investigated between-study heterogeneity and heterogeneity between different ethnic populations. We did not observe any definite pathogenic repeat expansions for SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes in patients with idiopathic PD from Caucasian and Asian populations. Furthermore, overall analysis did not reveal any significant association between intermediate repeats and PD. The effect estimates (odds ratio) ranged from 0.93 to 1.01 in the overall cohort for the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 loci. Our study did not support a major role for definite pathogenic repeat expansions in SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes for idiopathic PD. Thus, results of this large study do not support diagnostic screening of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 gene repeats in the common idiopathic form of PD. Likewise, this largest multicentered study performed to date excludes the role of intermediate repeats of these genes as a risk factor for PD. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Trinucleotide repeat expansion and DRPLA (Smith`s disease): Molecular characterization of atrophin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolis, R.L.; Li, S.H.; Li, X.J.; Ross, C.A. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Balitmore, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Smith`s disease (also known as dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy or DRPLA) is a rare, progressive, fatal neuropsychiatric disorder similar to Huntington`s disease (HD). Smith`s disease is characterized by ataxia, choreoathetosis, myoclonic epilepsy, dementia, and genetic anticipation. Neuropathological findings include prominent cell loss in the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum, the globus pallidus, the red nucleus, and the subthalamic nucleus. An expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat encoding polyglutamine in a gene originally identified in our laboratory as part of a program to clone candidate genes for disorders with anticipation has recently been found to cause this disorder. We have identified two families that demonstrate the pathological and genetic features (expanded CAG repeat and anticipation) of this disease. Northern analysis indicates that the gene, which we have termed atrophin-1, is widely expressed as a 5 kb mRNA in normal human brain and peripheral tissues. Brain expression is highest in the cerebellum. The developmental expression of the rat homologues of IT-15 (the gene in which a CAG expansion causes HD) and atrophin-1 were compared. Atrophin-1 was most highly expressed in early rat embryo brain (E16), whereas the greatest expression of IT-15 was in the adult rat brain. Cloning and sequencing of the open reading frame from inserts contained in brain cDNA libraries is in progress. In addition to the CAG repeat, the ORF contains an unusual region of alternating acidic and basic amino acids. Further characterization of atrophin-1, and comparison of it to other genes in which trinucleotide repeat expansion leads to neuropsychiatric disorders, should lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology by which CAG repeat expansion causes human disease.

  16. Mood and cognition in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 G2019S Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Vicki; Groves, Mark; Heiman, Gary; Palmese, Christina; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Ozelius, Laurie; Raymond, Deborah; Bressman, Susan

    2011-08-15

    The behavioral and cognitive features of the leucine-rich repeat kinase G2019S mutation in Parkinson's disease in the Ashkenazi Jewish population are not well described; therefore, we sought to more systematically characterize these features using a semistructured psychiatric interview and neuropsychological testing. Twenty-one Ashkenazi Jewish patients having the leucine-rich repeat kinase G2019S mutation were compared with age- and sex-matched Ashkenazi Jewish patients with Parkinson's disease without mutations. Although overall rates of affective disorders were not greater in mutation carriers, the carriers exhibited a 6-fold increased risk of premorbid affective disorders (odds ratio, 6.0; P = .10), as determined by the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV. Of interest, we identified 2 leucine-rich repeat kinase carriers with bipolar disorder; no mutation-negative subjects had this diagnosis. Performance on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, Judgment of Line Orientation, and Frontal Assessment Battery was consistent with previous reports and did not differ between groups. Study findings suggest a possible association between premorbid mood disorders and leucine-rich repeat kinase Parkinson's disease, warranting further evaluation.

  17. Nonparametric modeling and analysis of association between Huntington's disease onset and CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanyuan; Wang, Yuanjia

    2014-04-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with a dominant genetic mode of inheritance caused by an expansion of CAG repeats on chromosome 4. Typically, a longer sequence of CAG repeat length is associated with increased risk of experiencing earlier onset of HD. Previous studies of the association between HD onset age and CAG length have favored a logistic model, where the CAG repeat length enters the mean and variance components of the logistic model in a complex exponential-linear form. To relax the parametric assumption of the exponential-linear association to the true HD onset distribution, we propose to leave both mean and variance functions of the CAG repeat length unspecified and perform semiparametric estimation in this context through a local kernel and backfitting procedure. Motivated by including family history of HD information available in the family members of participants in the Cooperative Huntington's Observational Research Trial (COHORT), we develop the methodology in the context of mixture data, where some subjects have a positive probability of being risk free. We also allow censoring on the age at onset of disease and accommodate covariates other than the CAG length. We study the theoretical properties of the proposed estimator and derive its asymptotic distribution. Finally, we apply the proposed methods to the COHORT data to estimate the HD onset distribution using a group of study participants and the disease family history information available on their family members.

  18. Insulin resistance and chronic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Taniguchi, Eitaro; Itou, Minoru; Sakata, Masahiro; Sumie, Shuji; Sata, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Increased insulin resistance is frequently associated with chronic liver disease and is a pathophysiological feature of hepatogenous diabetes. Distinctive factors including hepatic parenchymal cell damage, portal-systemic shunting and hepatitis C virus are responsible for the development of hepatogenous insulin resistance/diabetes. Although it remains unclear whether insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells is impaired as it is in type 2 diabetes, retinopathic and cardiovascular risk is low and major causes of death in cirrhotic patients with diabetes are liver failure, hepatocellular carcinoma and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemoglobin A1c is an inaccurate marker for the assessment and management of hepatogenous diabetes. Moreover, exogenous insulin or sulfonylureas may be harmful because these agents may promote hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, pathogenesis, cause of death, assessment and therapeutic strategy for hepatogenous insulin resistance/diabetes differ from those for lifestyle-related type 2 diabetes. In this article, we review features of insulin resistance in relationship to chronic liver disease. We also discuss the impact of anti-diabetic agents on interferon treatment and hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:21731901

  19. The Effect of Repeated Ketamine Infusion Over Facial Emotion Recognition in Treatment-Resistant Depression: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Paulo R; Albott, C Sophia; Johns, Brian; Thuras, Paul; Wels, Joseph; Lim, Kelvin O

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to improvement in emotion recognition bias by traditional antidepressants, the authors report preliminary findings that changes in facial emotion recognition are not associated with response of depressive symptoms after repeated ketamine infusions or relapse during follow-up in treatment-resistant depression.

  20. Transgenic animals resistant to infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiley, L

    2016-04-01

    The list of transgenic animals developed to test ways of producing livestock resistant to infectious disease continues to grow. Although the basic techniques for generating transgenic animals have not changed very much in the ten years since they were last reviewed for the World Organisation for Animal Health, one recent fundamental technological advance stands to revolutionise genome engineering. The advent of technically simple and efficient site-specific gene targeting has profound implications for genetically modifying livestock species.

  1. Recent Advances in Cloning and Characterization of Disease Resistance Genes in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Ying Dai; Xiong-Lun Liu; Ying-Hui Xiao; Guo-Liang Wang

    2007-01-01

    Rice diseases caused by fungi, bacteria and viruses are one of the major constraints for sustainable rice (Oryza sativa L.) production worldwide. The use of resistant cultivars is considered the most economical and effective method to control rice diseases. In the last decade, a dozen resistance genes against the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea and the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae have been cloned. Approximately half of them encode nuclear binding site (NBS) and leucine rich repeat (LRR)-containing proteins, the most common type of cloned plant resistance genes. Interestingly, four of them encode novel proteins which have not been identified in other plant species, suggesting that unique mechanisms might be involved in rice defense responses. This review summarizes the recent advances in cloning and characterization of disease resistance genes in rice and presents future perspectives for in-depth molecular analysis of the function and evolution of rice resistance genes and their interaction with avirulence genes in pathogens.

  2. Results of repeated transsphenoidal surgery in Cushing's disease. Long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrábano, Pablo; Aller, Javier; García-Valdecasas, Leopoldo; García-Uría, José; Martín, Laura; Palacios, Nuria; Estrada, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the treatment of choice for Cushing's disease (CD). However, the best treatment option when hypercortisolism persists or recurs remains unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the short and long-term outcome of repeat TSS in this situation and to search for response predictors. Data from 26 patients with persistent (n=11) or recurrent (n=15) hypercortisolism who underwent repeat surgery by a single neurosurgeon between 1982 and 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. Remission was defined as normalization of urinary free cortisol (UFC) levels, and recurrence as presence of elevated UFC levels after having achieved remission. The following potential outcome predictors were analyzed: adrenal status (persistence or recurrence) after initial TSS, tumor identification in imaging tests, degree of hypercortisolism before repeat TSS, same/different surgeon in both TSS, and time to repeat surgery. Immediate postoperative remission was achieved in 12 patients (46.2%). Five of the 10 patients with available follow-up data relapsed after surgery (median time to recurrence, 13 months). New hormone deficiencies were seen in seven patients (37%), and two patients had cerebrospinal fluid leakage. No other major complications occurred. None of the preoperative factors analyzed was predictive of surgical outcome. When compared to initial surgery, repeat TSS for CD is associated to a lower remission rate and a higher risk of recurrence and complications. Further studies are needed to define outcome predictors. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Anchoring skeletal muscle development and disease: The role of ankyrin repeat domain containing proteins in muscle physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-M. Tee (Jin-Ming); M.P. Peppelenbosch (Maikel)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe ankyrin repeat is a protein module with high affinity for other ankyrin repeats based on strong Van der Waals forces. The resulting dimerization is unusually resistant to both mechanical forces and alkanization, making this module exceedingly useful for meeting the extraordinary dema

  4. Modeling diseases of noncoding unstable repeat expansionsusing mutant pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations involving DNA repeat expansionsare responsible for over 20 different neuronal andneuromuscular diseases. All result from expanded tractsof repetitive DNA sequences (mostly microsatellites)that become unstable beyond a critical length when transmitted across generations. Nearly all are inheritedas autosomal dominant conditions and are typicallyassociated with anticipation. Pathologic unstablerepeat expansions can be classified according to theirlength, repeat sequence, gene location and underlyingpathologic mechanisms. This review summarizesthe current contribution of mutant pluripotent stemcells (diseased human embryonic stem cells andpatient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells) to theresearch of unstable repeat pathologies by focusingon particularly large unstable noncoding expansions.Among this class of disorders are Fragile X syndromeand Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome,myotonic dystrophy type 1 and myotonic dystrophytype 2, Friedreich ataxia and C9 related amyotrophiclateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia,Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy and potentiallymore. Common features that are typical to this subclassof conditions are RNA toxic gain-of-function, epigeneticloss-of-function, toxic repeat-associated non-ATGtranslation and somatic instability. For each mechanismwe summarize the currently available stem cell basedmodels, highlight how they contributed to betterunderstanding of the related mechanism, and discusshow they may be utilized in future investigations.

  5. Expanded CAG repeats in the murine Huntington’s disease gene increases neuronal differentiation of embryonic and neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lorincz, Matthew T.; Zawistowski, Virginia A.

    2008-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is an uncommon autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expanded polyglutamine repeats. Increased neurogenesis was demonstrated recently in Huntington’s disease postmortem samples. In this manuscript, neuronally differentiated embryonic stem cells with expanded CAG repeats in the murine Huntington’s disease homologue and neural progenitors isolated from the subventricular zone of an accurate mouse Huntington’s disease were examined for increased neurogenesi...

  6. Signaling in Plant Disease Resistance and Symbiosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songzi Zhao; Xiaoquan Qi

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between plants and microbes result in plant disease and symbiosis. The former causes considerable economic damage in modern agriculture, while the latter has produced great beneficial effects to our agriculture system. Comparison of the two interactions has revealed that a common panel of signaling pathways might participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between plant and microbes or its break-up. Plants appear to detect both pathogenic and symbiotic microbes by a similar set of genes. All symbiotic microbes seem to produce effectors to overcome plant basal defenses and it is speculated that symbiotic effectors have functions similar to pathogenic ones. Signaling molecules, salicylic acid (SA),jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET), are involved in both plant defense and symbiosis. Switching off signals contributing to deterioration of disease symptom would establish a new equilibrium between plant and pathogenic microbes. This would facilitate the development of strategies for durable disease resistance.

  7. Intergenerational and striatal CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease knock-in mice involve different DNA repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragileva, Ella; Hendricks, Audrey; Teed, Allison; Gillis, Tammy; Lopez, Edith T; Friedberg, Errol C; Kucherlapati, Raju; Edelmann, Winfried; Lunetta, Kathryn L; MacDonald, Marcy E; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2009-01-01

    Modifying the length of the Huntington's disease (HD) CAG repeat, the major determinant of age of disease onset, is an attractive therapeutic approach. To explore this we are investigating mechanisms of intergenerational and somatic HD CAG repeat instability. Here, we have crossed HD CAG knock-in mice onto backgrounds deficient in mismatch repair genes, Msh3 and Msh6, to discern the effects on CAG repeat size and disease pathogenesis. We find that different mechanisms predominate in inherited and somatic instability, with Msh6 protecting against intergenerational contractions and Msh3 required both for increasing CAG length and for enhancing an early disease phenotype in striatum. Therefore, attempts to decrease inherited repeat size may entail a full understanding of Msh6 complexes, while attempts to block the age-dependent increases in CAG size in striatal neurons and to slow the disease process will require a full elucidation of Msh3 complexes and their function in CAG repeat instability.

  8. Assess drug resistance pattern and genetic profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates by molecular typing methods using direct repeats and IS6110 in pulmonary tuberculosis cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalo, Deepika; Kant, Surya; Srivastava, Kanchan; Sharma, Ajay K

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB), a highly contagious disease that sees no gender, age, or race is mainly a disease of lungs. According to World Health Organization, a TB patient can be completely cured with 6–9 months of anti-TB treatment under directly observed treatment short course. Objectives: The aim of this study was to check the mono, multi- and triple-drug resistance to first line drugs (FLDs) among TB patients and to access their genetic profile using DR 3074, DR 0270, DR 0642, DR 2068, and DR 4110 using molecular techniques. Material and Methods: To gain a better understanding of drug resistant TB, we characterized 121 clinical isolates recovered from 159 drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis patients by IS6110 genotyping. MTB isolates recovered from HIV- negative, and smear positive cases of both genders, age varied from 18 to 70 years with drug resistant-TB that was refractory to chemotherapy given for > 12 months. Of a total of 159 sputum smear positive patients sum number of male and female patients was 121 (76.10%) and 38 (23.89%), respectively. Among these patients, number of literate and illiterate patients were 123 (77.3%) and 36 (22.6%). 25 (15.7%) patients had farming as their occupation, 80 (50.3%) had nonagricultural occupation and 54 (33.9%) women were housewives. Results: Mono drug resistant, multi-drug resistant, and totally drug resistant (TDR) cases of TB were calculated as 113.83%, 125.1%, and 67.9%. Isoniazid showed the highest percentage of resistance among the patients. Conclusion: Any noncompliance to TB medications, lack of knowledge, and poor management in health centers, etc., results in the emergence of deadly direct repeat forms of TB, which are further complicated and complex to treat. PMID:28360464

  9. [Triplet repeat disease, with particular emphasis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobue, G

    2000-12-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. To date, eight CAG-repeat diseases have been identified, including spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Huntington's disease (HD), dentatorubralpallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) and five spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs 1, 2, 3, 6, 7). These disorders likely share a common pathogenesis caused by the gain of a toxic function associated with the expanded polyglutamine tract. Several mechanisms have been postulated as a pathogenic process for neurodegeneration caused by the expanded polyglutamine tract. Processing of the polyglutamine containing proteins by proteases liberate truncated polyglutamine tract, which may cause neurodegeneration as demonstrated in transgenic mice and transfected cells. In addition to cellular toxicity, truncated and expanded polyglutamine tracts have been shown to form intranuclear inclusions (NI). The NIs formed by the disease protein are a common pathological feature of these diseases. In SBMA, NIs containing AR protein have been observed in regions of SBMA central nervous system susceptible to degenerations. Transcriptional factors or their cofactors, such as cerb or creb-binding protein (CBP) sequestrated in the NI may alter the major intracellular transcriptional signal transduction, and ultimately may result in neuronal degeneration. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may also contribute to the pathogenesis of CAG-repeat diseases. As for the therapeutic strategies, many possibilities have been demonstrated. Overexpression of Hsp70 and Hsp40 chaperones act together to protect a cultured neuronal cell model of SBMA from a cellular toxicity of expanded polyglutamine tract.

  10. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-M.; Ramos, E.M.; Lee, J.-H.; Gillis, T.; Mysore, J.S.; Hayden, M.R.; Warby, S.C.; Morrison, P.; Nance, M.; Ross, C.A.; Margolis, R.L.; Squitieri, F.; Orobello, S.; Di Donato, S.; Gomez-Tortosa, E.; Ayuso, C.; Suchowersky, O.; Trent, R.J.A.; McCusker, E.; Novelletto, A.; Frontali, M.; Jones, R.; Ashizawa, T.; Frank, S.; Saint-Hilaire, M.H.; Hersch, S.M.; Rosas, H.D.; Lucente, D.; Harrison, M.B.; Zanko, A.; Abramson, R.K.; Marder, K.; Sequeiros, J.; Paulsen, J.S.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B.; Myers, R.H.; MacDonald, M.E.; Durr, Alexandra; Rosenblatt, Adam; Frati, Luigi; Perlman, Susan; Conneally, Patrick M.; Klimek, Mary Lou; Diggin, Melissa; Hadzi, Tiffany; Duckett, Ayana; Ahmed, Anwar; Allen, Paul; Ames, David; Anderson, Christine; Anderson, Karla; Anderson, Karen; Andrews, Thomasin; Ashburner, John; Axelson, Eric; Aylward, Elizabeth; Barker, Roger A.; Barth, Katrin; Barton, Stacey; Baynes, Kathleen; Bea, Alexandra; Beall, Erik; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Biglan, Kevin; Bjork, Kristine; Blanchard, Steve; Bockholt, Jeremy; Bommu, Sudharshan Reddy; Brossman, Bradley; Burrows, Maggie; Calhoun, Vince; Carlozzi, Noelle; Chesire, Amy; Chiu, Edmond; Chua, Phyllis; Connell, R.J.; Connor, Carmela; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Craufurd, David; Cross, Stephen; Cysique, Lucette; Santos, Rachelle Dar; Davis, Jennifer; Decolongon, Joji; DiPietro, Anna; Doucette, Nicholas; Downing, Nancy; Dudler, Ann; Dunn, Steve; Ecker, Daniel; Epping, Eric A.; Erickson, Diane; Erwin, Cheryl; Evans, Ken; Factor, Stewart A.; Farias, Sarah; Fatas, Marta; Fiedorowicz, Jess; Fullam, Ruth; Furtado, Sarah; Garde, Monica Bascunana; Gehl, Carissa; Geschwind, Michael D.; Goh, Anita; Gooblar, Jon; Goodman, Anna; Griffith, Jane; Groves, Mark; Guttman, Mark; Hamilton, Joanne; Harrington, Deborah; Harris, Greg; Heaton, Robert K.; Helmer, Karl; Henneberry, Machelle; Hershey, Tamara; Herwig, Kelly; Howard, Elizabeth; Hunter, Christine; Jankovic, Joseph; Johnson, Hans; Johnson, Arik; Jones, Kathy; Juhl, Andrew; Kim, Eun Young; Kimble, Mycah; King, Pamela; Klimek, Mary Lou; Klöppel, Stefan; Koenig, Katherine; Komiti, Angela; Kumar, Rajeev; Langbehn, Douglas; Leavitt, Blair; Leserman, Anne; Lim, Kelvin; Lipe, Hillary; Lowe, Mark; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Mallonee, William M.; Mans, Nicole; Marietta, Jacquie; Marshall, Frederick; Martin, Wayne; Mason, Sarah; Matheson, Kirsty; Matson, Wayne; Mazzoni, Pietro; McDowell, William; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Miller, Michael; Mills, James; Miracle, Dawn; Montross, Kelsey; Moore, David; Mori, Sasumu; Moser, David J.; Moskowitz, Carol; Newman, Emily; Nopoulos, Peg; Novak, Marianne; O'Rourke, Justin; Oakes, David; Ondo, William; Orth, Michael; Panegyres, Peter; Pease, Karen; Perlman, Susan; Perlmutter, Joel; Peterson, Asa; Phillips, Michael; Pierson, Ron; Potkin, Steve; Preston, Joy; Quaid, Kimberly; Radtke, Dawn; Rae, Daniela; Rao, Stephen; Raymond, Lynn; Reading, Sarah; Ready, Rebecca; Reece, Christine; Reilmann, Ralf; Reynolds, Norm; Richardson, Kylie; Rickards, Hugh; Ro, Eunyoe; Robinson, Robert; Rodnitzky, Robert; Rogers, Ben; Rosenblatt, Adam; Rosser, Elisabeth; Rosser, Anne; Price, Kathy; Price, Kathy; Ryan, Pat; Salmon, David; Samii, Ali; Schumacher, Jamy; Schumacher, Jessica; Sendon, Jose Luis Lópenz; Shear, Paula; Sheinberg, Alanna; Shpritz, Barnett; Siedlecki, Karen; Simpson, Sheila A.; Singer, Adam; Smith, Jim; Smith, Megan; Smith, Glenn; Snyder, Pete; Song, Allen; Sran, Satwinder; Stephan, Klaas; Stober, Janice; Sü?muth, Sigurd; Suter, Greg; Tabrizi, Sarah; Tempkin, Terry; Testa, Claudia; Thompson, Sean; Thomsen, Teri; Thumma, Kelli; Toga, Arthur; Trautmann, Sonja; Tremont, Geoff; Turner, Jessica; Uc, Ergun; Vaccarino, Anthony; van Duijn, Eric; Van Walsem, Marleen; Vik, Stacie; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Vuletich, Elizabeth; Warner, Tom; Wasserman, Paula; Wassink, Thomas; Waterman, Elijah; Weaver, Kurt; Weir, David; Welsh, Claire; Werling-Witkoske, Chris; Wesson, Melissa; Westervelt, Holly; Weydt, Patrick; Wheelock, Vicki; Williams, Kent; Williams, Janet; Wodarski, Mary; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Wood, Jessica; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Wu, Shuhua; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; de Yebenes, Justo Garcia; Zhao, Yong Qiang; Zimbelman, Janice; Zschiegner, Roland; Aaserud, Olaf; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Andrews, Thomasin; Andrich, Jurgin; Antczak, Jakub; Arran, Natalie; Artiga, Maria J. Saiz; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Banaszkiewicz, Krysztof; di Poggio, Monica Bandettini; Bandmann, Oliver; Barbera, Miguel A.; Barker, Roger A.; Barrero, Francisco; Barth, Katrin; Bas, Jordi; Beister, Antoine; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Bertini, Elisabetta; Biunno, Ida; Bjørgo, Kathrine; Bjørnevoll, Inga

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound implications for disease mechanism and modification, we tested whether the normal allele, interaction between the expanded and normal alleles, or presence of a second expanded allele affects age at onset of HD motor signs. Methods: We modeled natural log-transformed age at onset as a function of CAG repeat lengths of expanded and normal alleles and their interaction by linear regression. Results: An apparently significant effect of interaction on age at motor onset among 4,068 subjects was dependent on a single outlier data point. A rigorous statistical analysis with a well-behaved dataset that conformed to the fundamental assumptions of linear regression (e.g., constant variance and normally distributed error) revealed significance only for the expanded CAG repeat, with no effect of the normal CAG repeat. Ten subjects with 2 expanded alleles showed an age at motor onset consistent with the length of the larger expanded allele. Conclusions: Normal allele CAG length, interaction between expanded and normal alleles, and presence of a second expanded allele do not influence age at onset of motor manifestations, indicating that the rate of HD pathogenesis leading to motor diagnosis is determined by a completely dominant action of the longest expanded allele and as yet unidentified genetic or environmental factors. Neurology® 2012;78:690–695 PMID:22323755

  11. Direct Repeat Unit (dru) Typing of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from Dogs and Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, Kristina; Schwarz, Stefan; Goering, Richard V; Weese, J Scott

    2015-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) has emerged in a remarkable manner as an important problem in dogs and cats. However, limited molecular epidemiological information is available. The aims of this study were to apply direct repeat unit (dru) typing in a large collection of well-characterized MRSP isolates and to use dru typing to analyze a collection of previously uncharacterized MRSP isolates. Two collections of MRSP isolates from dogs and cats were included in this study. The first collection comprised 115 well-characterized MRSP isolates from North America and Europe. The data for these isolates included multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and staphylococcal protein A gene (spa) typing results as well as SmaI macrorestriction patterns after pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The second collection was a convenience sample of 360 isolates from North America. The dru region was amplified by PCR, sequenced, and analyzed. For the first collection, the discriminatory indices of the typing methods were calculated. All isolates were successfully dru typed. The discriminatory power for dru typing (D = 0.423) was comparable to that of spa typing (D = 0.445) and of MLST (D = 0.417) in the first collection. Occasionally, dru typing was able to further discriminate between isolates that shared the same spa type. Among all 475 isolates, 26 different dru types were identified, with 2 predominant types (dt9a and dt11a) among 349 (73.4%) isolates. The results of this study underline that dru typing is a useful tool for MRSP typing, being an objective, standardized, sequence-based method that is relatively cost-efficient and easy to perform.

  12. Measuring the Activity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2: A Kinase Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Li, Xiaojie; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has multiple functional domains including a kinase domain. The kinase activity of LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Developing an assay to understand the mechanisms of LRRK2 kinase activity is important for the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe how to measure in vitro LRRK2 kinase activity and its inhibition. PMID:21960214

  13. Repeated Challenge with Virulent Newcastle Disease Virus Does Not Decrease the Efficacy of Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tonya L; Miller, Patti J; Olivier, Timothy L; Montiel, Enrique; Cardenas Garcia, Stivalis; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Afonso, Claudio L

    2017-06-01

    Globally, poultry producers report that birds well-vaccinated for Newcastle disease (ND) often present clinical disease and mortality after infection with virulent strains of Newcastle disease (vNDV), which is contrary to what is observed in experimental settings. One hypothesis for this discrepancy is that the birds in the field may be exposed to multiple successive challenges with vNDV, rather than one challenge dose, and that the repeated infection may overwhelm the immune system and neutralizing antibodies available to prevent clinical disease. In this study, we evaluated this hypothesis under highly controlled conditions. We challenged well-vaccinated chickens with high doses of vNDV daily for 10 days, and looked for signs of clinical disease, changes in antibody titers, and mortality. All sham-vaccinated birds died by the fourth day postchallenge. No morbidity or mortality was observed in any of the NDV-vaccinated birds up to 14 days postchallenge; repeated high-dose challenges of vNDV was not sufficient to overcome vaccine immunity.

  14. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelmore, R.W. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    We are developing a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce to clone genes for resistance to the fungal pathogen, Bremia lactucae. Activity of heterologous transposons is being studied in transgenic plants. Southern analysis of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} plants containing Tam3 from Antirrhinum provided ambiguous results. Multiple endonuclease digests indicated that transposition had occurred; however, in no plant were all endonuclease digests consistent with a simple excision event. Southern or PCR analysis of over 50 plans containing Ac from maize have also failed to reveal clear evidence of transposition; this is contrast to experiments by others with the same constructs who have observed high rates of Ac excision in other plant species. Nearly all of 65 T{sub 2} families containing Ac interrupting a chimeric streptomycin resistance gene (Courtesy J. Jones, Sainsbury Lab., UK) clearly segregated for streptomycin resistance. Southern analyses, however, showed no evidence of transposition, indicating restoration of a functional message by other mechanisms, possibly mRNA processing. Transgenic plants have also been generated containing CaMV 35S or hsp70 promoters fused to transposase coding sequences or a Ds element interrupting a chimeric GUS gene (Courtesy M. Lassner, UC Davis). F{sub 1} plants containing both constructs were analyzed for transposition. Only two plants containing both constructs were obtained from 48 progeny, far fewer than expected, and neither showed evidence of transposition in Southerns and GUS assays. We are currently constructing further chimeric transposase fusions. To test for the stability of the targeted disease resistance genes, 50,000 F{sub 1} plants heterozygous for three resistance genes were generated; no mutants have been identified in the 5000 so far screened.

  15. Triplet repeat mutation length gains correlate with cell-type specific vulnerability in Huntington disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelbourne, Peggy F; Keller-McGandy, Christine; Bi, Wenya Linda; Yoon, Song-Ro; Dubeau, Louis; Veitch, Nicola J; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Wexler, Nancy S; Arnheim, Norman; Augood, Sarah J

    2007-05-15

    Huntington disease is caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat encoding an extended glutamine tract in a protein called huntingtin. Here, we provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that somatic increases of mutation length play a role in the progressive nature and cell-selective aspects of HD pathogenesis. Results from micro-dissected tissue and individual laser-dissected cells obtained from human HD cases and knock-in HD mice indicate that the CAG repeat is unstable in all cell types tested although neurons tend to have longer mutation length gains than glia. Mutation length gains occur early in the disease process and continue to accumulate as the disease progresses. In keeping with observed patterns of cell loss, neuronal mutation length gains tend to be more prominent in the striatum than in the cortex of low-grade human HD cases, less so in more advanced cases. Interestingly, neuronal sub-populations of HD mice appear to have different propensities for mutation length gains; in particular, smaller mutation length gains occur in nitric oxide synthase-positive striatal interneurons (a relatively spared cell type in HD) compared with the pan-striatal neuronal population. More generally, the data demonstrate that neuronal changes in HD repeat length can be at least as great, if not greater, than those observed in the germline. The fact that significant CAG repeat length gains occur in non-replicating cells also argues that processes such as inappropriate mismatch repair rather than DNA replication are involved in generating mutation instability in HD brain tissue.

  16. Continuous and periodic expansion of CAG repeats in Huntington's disease R6/1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllersen, Linda; Rowe, Alexander D; Larsen, Elisabeth; Rognes, Torbjørn; Klungland, Arne

    2010-12-09

    Huntington's disease (HD) is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of CAG repeats in a coding gene. Somatic CAG expansion rates in HD vary between organs, and the greatest instability is observed in the brain, correlating with neuropathology. The fundamental mechanisms of somatic CAG repeat instability are poorly understood, but locally formed secondary DNA structures generated during replication and/or repair are believed to underlie triplet repeat expansion. Recent studies in HD mice have demonstrated that mismatch repair (MMR) and base excision repair (BER) proteins are expansion inducing components in brain tissues. This study was designed to simultaneously investigate the rates and modes of expansion in different tissues of HD R6/1 mice in order to further understand the expansion mechanisms in vivo. We demonstrate continuous small expansions in most somatic tissues (exemplified by tail), which bear the signature of many short, probably single-repeat expansions and contractions occurring over time. In contrast, striatum and cortex display a dramatic--and apparently irreversible--periodic expansion. Expansion profiles displaying this kind of periodicity in the expansion process have not previously been reported. These in vivo findings imply that mechanistically distinct expansion processes occur in different tissues.

  17. Continuous and periodic expansion of CAG repeats in Huntington's disease R6/1 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Møllersen

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of CAG repeats in a coding gene. Somatic CAG expansion rates in HD vary between organs, and the greatest instability is observed in the brain, correlating with neuropathology. The fundamental mechanisms of somatic CAG repeat instability are poorly understood, but locally formed secondary DNA structures generated during replication and/or repair are believed to underlie triplet repeat expansion. Recent studies in HD mice have demonstrated that mismatch repair (MMR and base excision repair (BER proteins are expansion inducing components in brain tissues. This study was designed to simultaneously investigate the rates and modes of expansion in different tissues of HD R6/1 mice in order to further understand the expansion mechanisms in vivo. We demonstrate continuous small expansions in most somatic tissues (exemplified by tail, which bear the signature of many short, probably single-repeat expansions and contractions occurring over time. In contrast, striatum and cortex display a dramatic--and apparently irreversible--periodic expansion. Expansion profiles displaying this kind of periodicity in the expansion process have not previously been reported. These in vivo findings imply that mechanistically distinct expansion processes occur in different tissues.

  18. Expanded CAG repeats in the murine Huntington's disease gene increases neuronal differentiation of embryonic and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Matthew T; Zawistowski, Virginia A

    2009-01-01

    Huntington's disease is an uncommon autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expanded polyglutamine repeats. Increased neurogenesis was demonstrated recently in Huntington's disease post-mortem samples. In this manuscript, neuronally differentiated embryonic stem cells with expanded CAG repeats in the murine Huntington's disease homologue and neural progenitors isolated from the subventricular zone of an accurate mouse Huntington's disease were examined for increased neurogenesis. Embryonic stem cells with expanded CAG repeats in the murine Huntington's disease homologue were demonstrated to undergo facilitated differentiation first into neural progenitors, then into more mature neurons. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of a Huntington's disease knock-in animal displayed increased production of neural progenitors and increased neurogenesis. These findings suggested that neuronally differentiating embryonic stem cells with expanded CAG repeats is a reasonable system to identify factors responsible for increased neurogenesis in Huntington's disease. Expression profiling analysis comparing neuronally differentiating embryonic stem cells with expanded CAG repeats to neuronally differentiating embryonic stem cells without expanded CAG repeats identified transcripts involved in development and transcriptional regulation as factors possibly mediating increased neurogenesis in response to expanded CAG repeats.

  19. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Disease Resistance Gene Analogues from Three Wild Rice Species in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ji-mei; CHENG Zai-quan; YANG Ming-zhi; WU Cheng-jun; WANG Ling-xian; SUN Yi-ding; HUANG Xing-qi

    2003-01-01

    Two sets of degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed according to amino acid conservedregions of reported plant disease resistance genes which encode proteins that contain nucleotide-binding site andleucine-rich repeats(NBS-LRR), and the plant disease resistance genes which encode serine/threonine proteinkinase(STK). By polymerase chain reaction(PCR), disease resistance gene analogues have been amplified fromthree wild rice species in Yunnan Province, China. The DNA fragments from amplification have been clonedinto the pGEM-T vector respectively. Sequencing of the DNA fragments indicated that 7 classes, 2 classes and6 classes NBS-LRR disease resistance gene analogues from Oryza rufipogon Griff. , Oryza officinalis Wall. ,and Oryza meyeriana Baill. were obtained respectively. The two representative fragments of TO12 from Ory-za officinalis Wall. and TR19 from Oryza rufipogon Griff. belong to the same class and homology of theirsequences are 100%. The result shows that the sequences of the same class disease resistance gene analogueshave no difference among different species of wild rice. 5 classes STK disease resistance gene analogues werealso obtained among which 4 classes from Oryza rufipogon Griff. , 1 class from Oryza officinalis Wall. Bycomparison analysis of amino acid sequences, we found that the obtained disease resistance gene analogues havevery iow identity(low to 25%) with the reported disease resistance gene L6, N, Bs2, Prf, Pto, Lr10 and Xa21etc. The finding suggests that the obtained disease resistance gene analogues are analogues of putative diseaseresistance genes that have not been isolated so far.

  20. A pathogenic mechanism in Huntington's disease involves small CAG-repeated RNAs with neurotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañez-Coronel, Mónica; Porta, Silvia; Kagerbauer, Birgit; Mateu-Huertas, Elisabet; Pantano, Lorena; Ferrer, Isidre; Guzmán, Manuel; Estivill, Xavier; Martí, Eulàlia

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by the expansion of CAG repeats in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. The abnormally extended polyglutamine in the HTT protein encoded by the CAG repeats has toxic effects. Here, we provide evidence to support that the mutant HTT CAG repeats interfere with cell viability at the RNA level. In human neuronal cells, expanded HTT exon-1 mRNA with CAG repeat lengths above the threshold for complete penetrance (40 or greater) induced cell death and increased levels of small CAG-repeated RNAs (sCAGs), of ≈21 nucleotides in a Dicer-dependent manner. The severity of the toxic effect of HTT mRNA and sCAG generation correlated with CAG expansion length. Small RNAs obtained from cells expressing mutant HTT and from HD human brains significantly decreased neuronal viability, in an Ago2-dependent mechanism. In both cases, the use of anti-miRs specific for sCAGs efficiently blocked the toxic effect, supporting a key role of sCAGs in HTT-mediated toxicity. Luciferase-reporter assays showed that expanded HTT silences the expression of CTG-containing genes that are down-regulated in HD. These results suggest a possible link between HD and sCAG expression with an aberrant activation of the siRNA/miRNA gene silencing machinery, which may trigger a detrimental response. The identification of the specific cellular processes affected by sCAGs may provide insights into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying HD, offering opportunities to develop new therapeutic approaches.

  1. Estrogen receptor alpha dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in Japanese patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozaki Teruaki

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs, comprising Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, appear to develop as a result of complex interactions between predisposing genes and environmental triggers. Susceptibility to AITDs is conferred by genes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA and genes unlinked to HLA, including the CTLA-4 gene. Recently, an association to some estrogen receptor (ERα genotypes with breast cancer, hypertension, osteoporosis, generalized osteoarthritis, and some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis has been reported. We have analyzed a dinucleotide (TAn repeat polymorphism lying upstream of the human ERα gene in patients with AITDs and in normal subjects. Results Seventeen different alleles were found in 130 patients with GD, 93 patients with HT, and 190 control subjects. There was no significant difference in the distributions of ERα alleles between patients and controls. Conclusions The present results do not support an association between the ERα gene and AITD in the Japanese population.

  2. Role of the short telomeric repeat region in Marek's disease virus replication, genomic integration, and lymphomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Annachiara; Fester, Nadine; Engel, Annemarie T; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2014-12-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a cell-associated alphaherpesvirus that causes generalized polyneuritis and T-cell lymphomas in chickens. MDV is able to integrate its genome into host telomeres, but the mechanism of integration is poorly understood. The MDV genome harbors two arrays of telomeric repeats (TMR) at the ends of its linear genome: multiple telomeric repeats (mTMR), with a variable number of up to 100 repeats, and short telomeric repeats (sTMR), with a fixed number of 6 repeats. The mTMR have recently been shown to play an important role in MDV integration and tumor formation; however, the functions of the sTMR have remained unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of the sTMR in the MDV genome abrogates virus replication, while extensive mutation of the sTMR does not, indicating that the presence of the sTMR but not the sTMR sequence itself is important. Furthermore, we generated a panel of truncation mutants to determine the minimal length of the sTMR and observed a direct correlation between sTMR length and MDV replication. To address the role of sTMR in MDV replication, integration, and tumorigenesis, sTMR sequences were replaced by a scrambled repeated sequence (vsTMR_mut). vsTMR_mut replicated comparably to parental and revertant viruses in vitro. In vivo, however, a significant reduction in disease and tumor incidence was observed in chickens infected with vsTMR_mut that also correlated with a reduced number of viral integration sites in tumor cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the sTMR play a central role in MDV genome replication, pathogenesis, and MDV-induced tumor formation. Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic alphaherpesvirus that infects chickens and causes high economic losses in the poultry industry. MDV integrates its genetic material into host telomeres, a process that is crucial for efficient tumor formation. The MDV genome harbors two arrays of telomeric repeats (TMR) at the ends of its linear

  3. Effect of CAG repeat length on psychiatric disorders in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassos, Evangelos; Panas, Marios; Kladi, Athina; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios

    2008-06-01

    There is strong evidence that the length of CAG repeats, in patients with Huntington's disease (HD), govern the age of onset and the rate of clinical progression of neurological symptoms. However, psychiatric manifestations of the disease have not been examined as comprehensively. Seventy two Greek patients with Huntington's disease had DNA testing and were clinically assessed by means of a semi-structured interview (SCID) and four self-rated questionnaires. Genotype-phenotype correlations were examined. The CAG repeat length had a significant negative association with the age of onset of psychiatric disorders, the total level of functioning and the MMSE. However, the probability of developing a psychiatric disorder and the severity of psychiatric symptoms were not determined by the trinucleotide expansion, after controlling for the duration of illness, sex, and age of the subjects. The factors that determine the development of psychiatric symptoms in HD patients seem not to be limited to a dose related toxicity of the expanded Huntington. It is hypothesized that alternative genetic or environmental factors underlie the pathogenesis of the psychiatric phenotype.

  4. The relationship between CAG repeat length and clinical progression in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravina, Bernard; Romer, Megan; Constantinescu, Radu; Biglan, Kevin; Brocht, Alicia; Kieburtz, Karl; Shoulson, Ira; McDermott, Michael P

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between CAG repeat length (CAGn) and clinical progression in patients with Huntington's disease (HD). There are conflicting reports about the relationship between CAGn and clinical progression of HD. We conducted an analysis of data from the Coenzyme Q10 and Remacemide Evaluation in Huntington's Disease (CARE-HD) clinical trial. We modeled progression over 30 months on the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) and supplemental neuropsychological and behavioral tests using multiple linear regression. Mean subject age was 47.9 +/- 10.5 years and mean CAGn was 45.0 +/- 4.1. Multiple linear regression revealed statistically significant associations between CAGn and worsening on several motor, cognitive, and functional outcomes, but not behavioral outcomes. Many effects were clinically important; 10 additional CAG repeats were associated with an 81% increase in progression on the Independence Scale. These associations were not observed in the absence of age adjustment. Age at the time of assessment confounds the association between CAGn and progression. Adjusting for age shows that longer CAGn is associated with greater clinical progression of HD. This finding may account for the variable results from previous studies examining CAGn and progression. Adjusting for CAGn may be important for clinical trials.

  5. Molecular analysis of the (CAGN repeat causing Huntington′s disease in 34 Iranian families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hormozian F

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington′s disease (HD is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by chorea and progressive dementia. The mutation causing the disease has been identified as an unstable expansion of a trinucleotide (CAG n at the 5′ end of the IT 15 gene on chromosome 4. We have analyzed the distribution of CAG repeats in 71 Iranian individuals (34 patients and 37 unaffected family members belonging to 31 unrelated families thought to segregate HD. We found one expanded CAG allele in 22 individuals (65% belonging to 21 unrelated families. In these HD patients, expanded alleles varied from 40 to 83 CAG units and normal alleles varied from 13 to 36 CAGs. A significant negative correlation between age at onset of symptoms and size of the expanded CAG allele was found (r= - 0.51; P=0. 1. In addition, we genotyped 25 unrelated control individuals (total of 50 alleles and found normal CAG repeats varying from 10 to 34 units. In conclusion, our results showed that molecular confirmation of the clinical diagnosis in HD should be sought in all suspected patients, making it possible for adequate genetic counseling. This Study is the first report of molecular diagnosis of Huntington disease among Iranian population and ever in Middle East and with regard to high frequency of consanguinity marriage in this region.

  6. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations and Parkinson’s disease: three questions

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Greggio; Cookson, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) were first identified in 2004 and have since been shown to be the single most common cause of inherited Parkinson's disease. The protein is a large GTP-regulated serine/threonine kinase that additionally contains several protein–protein interaction domains. In the present review, we discuss three important, but unresolved, questions concerning LRRK2. We first ask: what is the normal function of LRRK2? Related to this, we disc...

  7. MARKER ASSISTED SELECTION IN DISEASE RESISTANCE BREEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasimhulu Ragimekula

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Feeding ever-increasing population is the main challenge faced by the agricultural scientists and to meet this plant breeders have to put continuous efforts to develop new crop varieties on fast track basis. DNA based polymorphism, commonly known as DNA markers can be used for genetic improvement through selection for favourable traits such as disease resistance. Molecular markers are becoming an essential component in backcross breeding programs for tracking the resistance genes in gene pyramiding. Marker assisted selection (MAS, is expected to increase genetic response by affecting efficiency and accuracy of selection. Even though marker-assisted selection now plays a prominent role in the field of plant breeding, examples of successful, practical outcomes are rare. MAS, with few exceptions, has not yet delivered its expected benefits in commercial breeding. It is clear that DNA markers hold great promise, but realizing that promise remains elusive. The economic and biological constraints such as a low return of investment in small-grain cereal breeding, lack of diagnostic markers, and the prevalence of QTL-background effects hinder the broad implementation of MAS. Until complex traits can be fully dissected, the application of MAS will be limited to genes of moderate-to-large effect and to applications that do not endanger the response to conventional selection. Till then, observable phenotype will remain an important component of genetic improvement programmes, because it takes in to account the collective effect of all genes. In future, chip-based, high-throughput genotyping platforms and the introduction of genomic selection will reduce the current problems of integrating MAS in practical breeding programs and open new avenues for a molecular-based resistance breeding.

  8. A Familial Factor Independent of CAG Repeat Length Influences Age at Onset of Machado-Joseph Disease

    OpenAIRE

    DeStefano, Anita L.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Maciel, Patricia; Gaspar, Claudia; Radvany, Joao; Dawson, David M.; Sudarsky, Lewis; Corwin, Lee; Coutinho, Paula; MacLeod, Patrick; Sequeiros, Jorge; Rouleau, Guy A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    1996-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is a late-onset, progressive, neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of an unstable trinucleotide (CAG) repeat sequence in a novel gene (MJD1) on chromosome 14. Previous studies showed that age at onset is negatively correlated with the number of CAG repeat units, but only part of the variation in onset age is explained by CAG repeat length. Ages at onset and CAG repeat lengths of 136 MJD patients from 23 kindreds of Portuguese descent were analyzed, t...

  9. Behavioral impact of sickle cell disease in young children with repeated hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H Bakri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sickle cell disease (SCD in children with a history of repeated hospitalization is distressing for children as well as their parents leading to anxiety and has negative effects on the psychological state of children and their families. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the overall effect of SCD on the behavior of young children age 1½ to 5 years old who had repeated history of hospitalization, compared to a control group of healthy children attended a vaccination clinic. Patients and Methods: Thirty-five children of age 1½ to 5 years who have SCD and repeated history of hospitalization were recruited from pediatric clinic as the study group and matched with same number of healthy children who attended vaccination clinic, as a control group. Both groups were administered the child behavior checklist (CBCL 1½ to 5 years and diagnostic and statistical (DSM-oriented scale. Behavior data were collected through a semi-structured questionnaire. Results: Children who have SCD had statistically significant behavioral changes on CBCL compared to the control group: Anxiety/depression (65.2 vs. 55.1; P < 0.001, somatic complaint (66.7 vs. 54.4; P < 0.001 withdrawn (63.4 vs. 53.2; P < 0.001, aggressive behavior (60.4 vs. 56; P=0.04, and internalizing symptoms (64.7 vs. 51.5; P < 0.001, respectively. The DSM scale showed that children with SCD scored significantly higher in pervasive developmental disorder compared to the control group (60.9 vs. 53.9; P < 0.001 respectively. Conclusion: Children with SCD who had history of repeated hospitalization are at an increased risk of developing behavioral problems. Psychological counseling, social support, and proper pain management could minimize these behavioral consequences.

  10. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease.

  11. Polymicrobial Gardnerella biofilm resists repeated intravaginal antiseptic treatment in a subset of women with bacterial vaginosis: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swidsinski, Alexander; Loening-Baucke, Vera; Swidsinski, Sonja; Verstraelen, Hans

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a recalcitrant polymicrobial biofilm infection that often resists standard antibiotic treatment. We therefore considered repeated treatment with octenidine, a local antiseptic that has previously been shown to be highly effective in several biofilm-associated infections. Twenty-four patients with recurrent BV were treated with a 7-day course of octenidine (octenidine dihydrochloride spray application with the commercial product Octenisept). In case of treatment failure or relapse within 6 months, patients were re-treated with a 28-day course of octenidine. In case of recurrence within 6 months after the second treatment course, patients were treated again with a 28-day course followed by weekly applications for 2 months. Treatment effect was evaluated by assessment of the presence of the biofilm on voided vaginal epithelial cells through fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The initial cure rate following a 7-day course of octenidine was as high as 87.5%. The 6-month relapse rate was, however, as high as 66.6%. Repeated treatment for 28 days led to an overall cure rate of 75.0%; however, it was also associated with emergence of complete resistance to octenidine in a subset of women. The overall cure rate after three treatment courses with 1-year follow-up was 62.5 %, with 37.5 % of the patients showing complete resistance to octenidine. Our preliminary results showed that octenidine dihydrochloride was initially highly effective, but the efficacy of repeated and prolonged treatment dropped quickly as challenge with the antiseptic rapidly led to bacterial resistance in a considerable subset of women.

  12. Selecting soybean resistant to the cyst nematode Heterodera glycines using simple sequence repeat (microssatellite) markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, S M C G; Hamawaki, O T; Oliveira, A P; Hamawaki, C D L; Hamawaki, R L; Takahashi, L M

    2016-03-11

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is a major cause of soybean yield reduction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of marker-assisted selection to identify genotypes resistant to SCN race 3 infection, using Sat_168 and Sat-141 resistance quantitative trait loci. The experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions, using soybean populations originated from crosses between susceptible and resistant parent stock: CD-201 (susceptible) and Foster IAC (resistant), Conquista (susceptible) and S83-30 (resistant), La-Suprema (susceptible) and S57-11 (resistant), and Parecis (susceptible) and S65-50 (resistant). Plants were inoculated with SCN and evaluated according to the female index (FI), those with FI < 10% were classified as resistant to nematode infection. Plants were genotyped for SCN resistance using microsatellite markers Sat-141 and Sat_168. Marker selection efficiency was analyzed by a contingency table, taking into account genotypic versus phenotypic evaluations for each line. These markers were shown to be useful tool for selection of SCN race 3.

  13. Complete genome sequence of a recombinant Marek's disease virus field strain with one reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shuai; Cui, Ning; Cui, Zhizhong; Zhao, Peng; Li, Yanpeng; Ding, Jiabo; Dong, Xuan

    2012-12-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) Chinese strain GX0101, isolated in 2001 from a vaccinated flock of layer chickens with severe tumors, was the first reported recombinant MDV field strain with one reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) long terminal repeat (LTR) insert. GX0101 belongs to very virulent MDV (vvMDV) but has higher horizontal transmission ability than the vvMDV strain Md5. The complete genome sequence of GX0101 is 178,101 nucleotides (nt) and contains only one REV-LTR insert at a site 267 nt upstream of the sorf2 gene. Moreover, GX0101 has 5 repeats of a 217-nt fragment in its terminal repeat short (TRS) region and 3 repeats in internal repeat short (IRS) region, compared to the other 10 strains with only 1 or 2 repeats in both TRS and IRS.

  14. Autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease caused by deletion at a dinucleotide repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casimir, C.M.; Bu-Ghanim, H.N.; Rowe, P.; Segal, A.W. (University College London (England)); Rodaway, A.R.F.; Bentley, D.L. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund Lab., London (England))

    1991-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited condition rendering neutrophils incapable of killing invading pathogens. This condition is due to the failure of a multicomponent microbicidal oxidase that normally yields a low-midpoint-potential b cytochrome (cytochrome b{sub 245}). Although defects in the X chromosome-linked cytochrome account for the majority of CGD patients, as many as 30% of CGD cases are due to an autosomal recessive disease. Of these, {gt}90% have been shown to be defective in the synthesis of a 47-kDa cytosolic component of the oxidase. The authors demonstrate here in three unrelated cases of autosomal recessive CGD that the identical underlying molecular lesion is a dinucleotide deletion at a GTGT tandem repeat, corresponding to the acceptor site of the first intron - exon junction. Slippage of the DNA duplex at this site may contribute to the high frequency of defects in this gene.

  15. Repeated exposure to heat stress results in a diaphragm phenotype that resists ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Toshinori; Ichinoseki-Sekine, Noriko; Kakigi, Ryo; Tsuzuki, Takamasa; Sugiura, Takao; Powers, Scott K; Naito, Hisashi

    2015-11-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) is a life-saving intervention for patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) results in diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction, both of which are predicted to contribute to problems in weaning patients from the ventilator. Therefore, developing a strategy to protect the diaphragm against ventilator-induced weakness is important. We tested the hypothesis that repeated bouts of heat stress result in diaphragm resistance against CMV-induced atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six experimental groups: 1) control; 2) single bout of whole body heat stress; 3) repeated bouts of whole body heat stress; 4) 12 h CMV; 5) single bout of whole body heat stress 24 h before CMV; and 6) repeated bouts of whole body heat stress 1, 3, and 5 days before 12 h of CMV. Our results revealed that repeated bouts of heat stress resulted in increased levels of heat shock protein 72 in the diaphragm and protection against both CMV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction at submaximal stimulation frequencies. The specific mechanisms responsible for this protection remain unclear: this heat stress-induced protection against CMV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and weakness may be partially due to reduced diaphragmatic oxidative stress, diminished activation of signal transducer/transcriptional activator-3, lower caspase-3 activation, and decreased autophagy in the diaphragm.

  16. SENSITIVE RESPONSE AND RESISTANCE TO BERY DISEASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Key words : Colletotrichum kahawae, Coffee, resistant, susceptible, Kenya. RESUME. SENSIBILITE ET .... when further changes were minimal. The experiments were ..... to the ability of the fungus to overcome the resistance mechanisms, or ...

  17. Enhanced resistance to UV-B radiation in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Cyanophyceae) by repeated exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hongjie; Li, Dunhai

    2014-07-01

    In natural habitats, organisms especially phytoplankton are not always continuously subjected to ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR). By simulation of the natural situation, the N2-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was subjected to UV-B exposure and recovery cycles. A series of morphological and physiological changes were observed in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 under repeated UVBR when compared with controls. Such as the breakage of filaments, intervals between heterocysts, heterocyst frequency, total carbohydrate, and carotenoids were increased, while the nitrogenase activity and photosynthetic activity were inhibited by repeated UVBR; however, these activities could recover when UV-B stress was removed. Unexpectedly, the over-compensatory growth was observed at the end of the second round of exposure and recovery cycle. Our results showed that discontinuous UVBR could increase the growth rate and the tolerance as well as repair capacity of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. These results indicate that moderate UVBR may increase the growth of cyanobacteria in natural habitats.

  18. Comparative semi-automated analysis of (CAG) repeats in the Huntington disease gene: use of internal standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L C; Hegde, M R; Herrera, G; Stapleton, P M; Love, D R

    1999-08-01

    Huntington disease (HD) belongs to the group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by unstable expanded trinucleotide repeats. In the case of HD, the expansion of a CAG repeat occurs in the IT15 gene. The detection of the expanded CAG repeats has usually involved the electrophoretic separation of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification products using conventional agarose and acrylamide gel electrophoresis. We have undertaken the comparative analysis of sizing CAG repeats of the IT15 gene using radioactive and fluorescent PCR amplification, and the subsequent separation of these products by slab gel and capillary electrophoresis. The assays have been performed on both cloned and sequenced CAG repeats, as well as genomic DNA from HD patients with a wide range of repeat lengths. The mobility of the CAG repeat amplification products of the IT15 gene is greater using capillary electrophoresis compared to slab gel electrophoresis. The analysis of 40 DNA samples from HD patients indicates that the mobility difference increases with the length of the repeat. However, we have devised an allele ladder for sizing the CAG repeats. This ladder provides a mandatory internal calibration system for diagnostic purposes and enables the confident use of either capillary or slab gel electrophoresis for sizing HD alleles.

  19. Biomarkers and mechanisms of natural disease resistance in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altena, van S.E.C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to define and test biomarkers for disease resistance in dairy cows and to determine the underlying mechanism in natural disease resistance. The health status of the cows is an important issue in dairy farming. Due to the mandatory reduction in the use of antibiotics, alter

  20. Modeling deployment of Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deployment of Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines is a key solution to mitigating economic losses caused by Xylella fastidiosa. While Pierce’s disease resistant grapevines under development display mild symptoms and have lower bacterial populations than susceptible varieties, all appear to remain ...

  1. Working Towards Disease Resistance in Peanuts Through Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistant cultivars are the most desirable approach to disease control in agriculture. Early and late leaf spot are the most important foliar diseases of peanut worldwide. Significant progress for leaf spot resistance in peanut can be achieved through biotechnology. The National Peanut Research ...

  2. Targeting CAG repeat RNAs reduces Huntington’s disease phenotype independently of huntingtin levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rué, Laura; Bañez-Coronel, Mónica; Creus-Muncunill, Jordi; Giralt, Albert; Alcalá-Vida, Rafael; Mentxaka, Gartze; Kagerbauer, Birgit; Aranda, Zeus; Venturi, Veronica; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a polyglutamine disorder caused by a CAG expansion in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene exon 1. This expansion encodes a mutant protein whose abnormal function is traditionally associated with HD pathogenesis; however, recent evidence has also linked HD pathogenesis to RNA stable hairpins formed by the mutant HTT expansion. Here, we have shown that a locked nucleic acid–modified antisense oligonucleotide complementary to the CAG repeat (LNA-CTG) preferentially binds to mutant HTT without affecting HTT mRNA or protein levels. LNA-CTGs produced rapid and sustained improvement of motor deficits in an R6/2 mouse HD model that was paralleled by persistent binding of LNA-CTG to the expanded HTT exon 1 transgene. Motor improvement was accompanied by a pronounced recovery in the levels of several striatal neuronal markers severely impaired in R6/2 mice. Furthermore, in R6/2 mice, LNA-CTG blocked several pathogenic mechanisms caused by expanded CAG RNA, including small RNA toxicity and decreased Rn45s expression levels. These results suggest that LNA-CTGs promote neuroprotection by blocking the detrimental activity of CAG repeats within HTT mRNA. The present data emphasize the relevance of expanded CAG RNA to HD pathogenesis, indicate that inhibition of HTT expression is not required to reverse motor deficits, and further suggest a therapeutic potential for LNA-CTG in polyglutamine disorders. PMID:27721240

  3. Repeated Administration of Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Prevents Disease Progression in Experimental Silicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquéias Lopes-Pacheco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs reduced mechanical and histologic changes in the lung in a murine model of silicosis, but these beneficial effects did not persist in the course of lung injury. We hypothesized that repeated administration of BMDCs may decrease lung inflammation and remodeling thus preventing disease progression. Methods: One hundred and two C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into SIL (silica, 20 mg intratracheally [IT] and control (C groups (saline, IT. C and SIL groups were further randomized to receive BMDCs (2×106 cells or saline IT 15 and 30 days after the start of the protocol. Results: By day 60, BMDCs had decreased the fractional area of granuloma and the number of polymorphonuclear cells, macrophages (total and M1 phenotype, apoptotic cells, the level of transforming growth factor (TGF-β‚ and types I and III collagen fiber content in the granuloma. In the alveolar septa, BMDCs reduced the amount of collagen and elastic fibers, TGF-β, and the number of M1 and apoptotic cells. Furthermore, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-1R1, caspase-3 mRNA levels decreased and the level of IL-1RN mRNA increased. Lung mechanics improved after BMDC therapy. The presence of male donor cells in lung tissue was not observed using detection of Y chromosome DNA. Conclusion: repeated administration of BMDCs reduced inflammation, fibrogenesis, and elastogenesis, thus improving lung mechanics through the release of paracrine factors.

  4. Resistance and resilience of removal efficiency and bacterial community structure of gas biofilters exposed to repeated shock loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Léa; Malhautier, Luc; Poly, Franck; Roux, Xavier Le; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2012-11-01

    Since full-scale biofilters are often operated under fluctuating conditions, it is critical to understand their response to transient states. Four pilot-scale biofilters treating a composting gas mixture and undergoing repeated substrate pulses of increasing intensity were studied. A systematic approach was proposed to quantify the resistance and resilience capacity of their removal efficiency, which enabled to distinguish between recalcitrant (ammonia, DMDS, ketones) and easily degradable (esters and aldehyde) compounds. The threshold of disturbing shock intensity and the influence of disturbance history depended on the contaminant considered. The spatial and temporal distribution of the bacterial community structure in response to the perturbation regime was analysed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Even if the substrate-pulses acted as a driving force for some community characteristics (community stratification), the structure-function relationships were trickier to evidence: the distributions of resistance and composition were only partially coupled, with contradictory results depending on the contaminant considered.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from areas of repeated emergence of drug resistant malaria show no evidence of hypermutator phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tyler S; Jacob, Christopher G; Silva, Joana C; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Djimdé, Abdoulaye; Dondorp, Arjen M; Fukuda, Mark; Noedl, Harald; Nyunt, Myaing Myaing; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Mayxay, Mayfong; Hien, Tran Tinh; Plowe, Christopher V; Cummings, Michael P

    2015-03-01

    Multiple transcontinental waves of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum have originated in Southeast Asia before spreading westward, first into the rest of Asia and then to sub-Saharan Africa. In vitro studies have suggested that hypermutator P. falciparum parasites may exist in Southeast Asia and that an increased rate of acquisition of new mutations in these parasites may explain the repeated emergence of drug resistance in Southeast Asia. This study is the first to test the hypermutator hypothesis using field isolates. Using genome-wide SNP data from human P. falciparum infections in Southeast Asia and West Africa and a test for relative rate differences we found no evidence of increased relative substitution rates in P. falciparum isolates from Southeast Asia. Instead, we found significantly increased substitution rates in Mali and Bangladesh populations relative to those in populations from Southeast Asia. Additionally we found no association between increased relative substitution rates and parasite clearance following treatment with artemisinin derivatives.

  6. Inverted-repeat transgenic maize plants resistant to sugarcane mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    RNA silencing is a post-transcriptional genesilencing phenomenon induced by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA).In an attempt to generate dsRNA-mediated transgenic maize plants resistant to sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV),we cloned SCMV Nib gene-specificsequences and inserted it into the binary vector p3301 in the sense and antisense orientations (named SCMVir-Nib),which could produce RNAs capable of duplex formation in plant cells.Maize immature embryos were co-cultured with Agrobacterium carrying two vectors,one marker-free vector harboring the SCMVirNIb and one vector harboring bar gene as the selective marker.Resistant calli were recovered by selection on medium containing Biolaphos.Among the regenerated plantlets from resistant calli,14 plants have been certified to contain SCMVirNIb by PCR amplification and DNA dot blot.T1 plants derived from the 14 plants were challenged in a greenhouse with SCMV inoculums and the percentages of resistant plants in 11 T1 lines were higher than 60%.One plant in the T1 line was found to carry SCMVirNIb without bar gene by PCR assay.T2 plants derived from T1 SCMV resistant transgenic plants were challenged with SCMV inoculums in field.The percentages of resistant plants from 3 lines,including the line derived from the marker-free transgenic plant,were higher than 85%.The non-transgenic control plants were all susceptible.Further molecular analysis confirmed that the resistant plants from the marker-free transgenic line contained SCMVirNIb but not the bar gene.

  7. Evaluation of resistance development and viability recovery by a non-enveloped virus after repeated cycles of aPDT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Tomé, João P C; Neves, Maria G P M S; Tomé, Augusto C; Cavaleiro, José A S; Faustino, Maria A F; Cunha, Ângela; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays, the emergence of drug resistant microorganisms is a public health concern. The antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has an efficient action against a wide range of microorganisms and can be viewed as an alternative approach for treating microbial infections. The aim of this study was to determine if a model target virus (T4-like bacteriophage), in the presence of the tricationic porphyrin 5,10,15-tris(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-20-(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin tri-iodide (Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF), can develop resistance to aPDT and recover its viability after photodynamic treatments. To assess the development of aPDT resistance after repeated treatments, a suspension of T4-like bacteriophage was irradiated with white light (40 Wm(-2)) for 120 min in the presence of 5.0 μM of Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF (99.99% of inactivation) and new phage suspensions were produced from the surviving phages, after each cycle of light exposure. The procedure was repeated ten times. To evaluate the recovery of viral viability after photoinactivation, a suspension of T4-like bacteriophage was irradiated with white light for 120 min in the presence of 5.0 μM of Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF on five consecutive days. In each day, an aliquot of the irradiated suspension was plated and the number of lysis plaques was counted after 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h of dark incubation at 37 °C. The profile of bacteriophage photoinactivation did not change after ten consecutive cycles and no recovery of viability was detected after five accumulated cycles of photodynamic treatment. The results suggest that aPDT represents a valuable and promising alternative therapy to treat viral infections, overcoming the problem of microbial resistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Cross-Sectional Study on the Perceptions and Practices of Teenagers With Inflammatory Bowel Disease About Repeated Stool Sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Anke; Dijkstra, Alie; Dantuma, Sietske K.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Repeated stool sampling to monitor disease activity is increasingly used in teenagers with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Knowledge about their perceptions and practices regarding collection of feces will increase the success rate of this monitoring strategy. Methods: We sent a survey to

  9. Repeatable change in electrical resistance of Si surface by mechanical and electrical nanoprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Shojiro; Suzuki, Shota

    2014-01-01

    The properties of mechanically and electrically processed silicon surfaces were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Silicon specimens were processed using an electrically conductive diamond tip with and without vibration. After the electrical processing, protuberances were generated and the electric current through the silicon surface decreased because of local anodic oxidation. Grooves were formed by mechanical processing without vibration, and the electric current increased. In contrast, mechanical processing with vibration caused the surface to protuberate and the electrical resistance increased similar to that observed for electrical processing. With sequential processing, the local oxide layer formed by electrical processing can be removed by mechanical processing using the same tip without vibration. Although the electrical resistance is decreased by the mechanical processing without vibration, additional electrical processing on the mechanically processed area further increases the electrical resistance of the surface.

  10. Outbreak of amoxicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae type b: variable number of tandem repeats as novel molecular markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); W.J. Melchers; C. IJsseldijk; L. Nohlmans; J.F. Meis; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAn outbreak caused by amoxicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae type b was noted among patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Since infections were clustered in time and place, an ongoing outbreak was suspected. The spread of the s

  11. Huntington CAG repeat size does not modify onset age in familial Parkinson’s disease: The GenePD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicoll, Christopher F.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Lew, Mark F.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Klein, Christine; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Mark, Margery H.; Growdon, John H.; Wooten, G. Frederick; Watts, Ray L.; Guttman, Mark; Racette, Brad A.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Ahmed, Anwar; Shill, Holly A.; Singer, Carlos; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Massood, Tiffany; Huskey, Karen W.; DeStefano, Anita L.; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pezzoli, Gianni; Baker, Kenneth B.; Itin, Ilia; Litvan, Irene; Nicholson, Garth; Corbett, Alastair; Nance, Martha; Drasby, Edward; Isaacson, Stuart; Burn, David J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Al-hinti, Jomana; Moller, Anette T.; Ostergaard, Karen; Sherman, Scott J.; Roxburgh, Richard; Snow, Barry; Slevin, John T.; Cambi, Franca; Gusella, James F.; Myers, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    The ATP/ADP ratio reflects mitochondrial function and has been reported to be influenced by the size of the Huntington disease gene (HD) repeat. Impaired mitochondrial function has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and therefore, we evaluated the relationship of the HD CAG repeat size to PD onset age in a large sample of familial PD cases. PD affected siblings (n=495) with known onset ages from 248 families, were genotyped for the HD CAG repeat. Genotyping failed in 11 cases leaving 484 for analysis, including 35 LRRK2 carriers. All cases had HD CAG repeats (range 15 to 34) below the clinical range for HD, although 5.2 percent of the sample (n=25) had repeats in the intermediate range (the intermediate range lower limit=27; upper limit=35 repeats), suggesting that the prevalence of intermediate allele carriers in the general population is significant. No relation between the HD CAG repeat size and the age at onset for PD was found in this sample of familial PD. PMID:18649400

  12. Identification of candidate genome regions controlling disease resistance in Arachis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pike Jodie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, diseases are important reducers of peanut (Arachis hypogaea yield. Sources of resistance against many diseases are available in cultivated peanut genotypes, although often not in farmer preferred varieties. Wild species generally harbor greater levels of resistance and even apparent immunity, although the linkage of agronomically un-adapted wild alleles with wild disease resistance genes is inevitable. Marker-assisted selection has the potential to facilitate the combination of both cultivated and wild resistance loci with agronomically adapted alleles. However, in peanut there is an almost complete lack of knowledge of the regions of the Arachis genome that control disease resistance. Results In this work we identified candidate genome regions that control disease resistance. For this we placed candidate disease resistance genes and QTLs against late leaf spot disease on the genetic map of the A-genome of Arachis, which is based on microsatellite markers and legume anchor markers. These marker types are transferable within the genus Arachis and to other legumes respectively, enabling this map to be aligned to other Arachis maps and to maps of other legume crops including those with sequenced genomes. In total, 34 sequence-confirmed candidate disease resistance genes and five QTLs were mapped. Conclusion Candidate genes and QTLs were distributed on all linkage groups except for the smallest, but the distribution was not even. Groupings of candidate genes and QTLs for late leaf spot resistance were apparent on the upper region of linkage group 4 and the lower region of linkage group 2, indicating that these regions are likely to control disease resistance.

  13. Genetic analysis of resistance gene analogues from a sugarcane cultivar resistant to red rot disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the important approaches for disease control in sugarcane is to develop a disease resistant variety; this may be accomplished through identification of resistance genes in sugarcane. In this study, PCR primers targeting the conserved motifs of the nucleotide-binding site (NBS) class and kinas...

  14. Repeated local emergence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a single hospital ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham Thanh, Duy; Tran Do Hoan, Nhu; Wick, Ryan R.; Ingle, Danielle J.; Hawkey, Jane; Edwards, David J.; Kenyon, Johanna J.; Phu Huong Lan, Nguyen; Campbell, James I.; Thwaites, Guy; Thi Khanh Nhu, Nguyen; Hall, Ruth M.; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Baker, Stephen; Holt, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported a dramatic increase in the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a Vietnamese hospital. This upsurge was associated with a specific oxa23-positive clone that was identified by multilocus VNTR analysis. Here, we used whole-genome sequence analysis to dissect the emergence of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii causing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in the ICU during 2009–2012. To provide historical context and distinguish microevolution from strain introduction, we compared these genomes with those of A. baumannii asymptomatic carriage and VAP isolates from this same ICU collected during 2003–2007. We identified diverse lineages co-circulating over many years. Carbapenem resistance was associated with the presence of oxa23, oxa40, oxa58 and ndm1 genes in multiple lineages. The majority of resistant isolates were oxa23-positive global clone GC2; fine-scale phylogenomic analysis revealed five distinct GC2 sublineages within the ICU that had evolved locally via independent chromosomal insertions of oxa23 transposons. The increase in infections caused by carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii was associated with transposon-mediated transmission of a carbapenemase gene, rather than clonal expansion or spread of a carbapenemase-harbouring plasmid. Additionally, we found evidence of homologous recombination creating diversity within the local GC2 population, including several events resulting in replacement of the capsule locus. We identified likely donors of the imported capsule locus sequences amongst the A. baumannii isolated on the same ward, suggesting that diversification was largely facilitated via reassortment and sharing of genetic material within the localized A. baumannii population.

  15. Association between repeated unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS procedures with a high fat diet: a model of fluoxetine resistance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Isingrini

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder is a debilitating disease. Unfortunately, treatment with antidepressants (ADs has limited therapeutic efficacy since resistance to AD is common. Research in this field is hampered by the lack of a reliable natural animal model of AD resistance. Depression resistance is related to various factors, including the attendance of cardiovascular risk factors and past depressive episodes. We aimed to design a rodent model of depression resistance to ADs, associating cardiovascular risk factors with repeated unpredicted chronic mild stress (UCMS. Male BALB/c mice were given either a regular (4% fat or a high fat diet (45% fat and subjected to two 7-week periods of UCMS separated by 6 weeks. From the second week of each UCMS procedure, vehicle or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p. was administrated daily. The effects of the UCMS and fluoxetine in both diet conditions were assessed using physical (coat state and body weight and behavioural tests (the reward maze test and the splash test. The results demonstrate that during the second procedure, UCMS induced behavioural changes, including coat state degradation, disturbances in self-care behaviour (splash test and anhedonia (reward maze test and these were reversed by fluoxetine in the regular diet condition. In contrast, the high-fat diet regimen prevented the AD fluoxetine from abolishing the UCMS-induced changes. In conclusion, by associating UCMS-an already validated animal model of depression-with high-fat diet regimen, we designed a naturalistic animal model of AD resistance related to a sub-nosographic clinical entity of depression.

  16. Association between Repeated Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress (UCMS) Procedures with a High Fat Diet: A Model of Fluoxetine Resistance in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isingrini, Elsa; Camus, Vincent; Le Guisquet, Anne-Marie; Pingaud, Maryse; Devers, Séverine; Belzung, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a debilitating disease. Unfortunately, treatment with antidepressants (ADs) has limited therapeutic efficacy since resistance to AD is common. Research in this field is hampered by the lack of a reliable natural animal model of AD resistance. Depression resistance is related to various factors, including the attendance of cardiovascular risk factors and past depressive episodes. We aimed to design a rodent model of depression resistance to ADs, associating cardiovascular risk factors with repeated unpredicted chronic mild stress (UCMS). Male BALB/c mice were given either a regular (4% fat) or a high fat diet (45% fat) and subjected to two 7-week periods of UCMS separated by 6 weeks. From the second week of each UCMS procedure, vehicle or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was administrated daily. The effects of the UCMS and fluoxetine in both diet conditions were assessed using physical (coat state and body weight) and behavioural tests (the reward maze test and the splash test). The results demonstrate that during the second procedure, UCMS induced behavioural changes, including coat state degradation, disturbances in self-care behaviour (splash test) and anhedonia (reward maze test) and these were reversed by fluoxetine in the regular diet condition. In contrast, the high-fat diet regimen prevented the AD fluoxetine from abolishing the UCMS-induced changes. In conclusion, by associating UCMS—an already validated animal model of depression—with high-fat diet regimen, we designed a naturalistic animal model of AD resistance related to a sub-nosographic clinical entity of depression. PMID:20436931

  17. Mutagenic roles of DNA "repair" proteins in antibody diversity and disease-associated trinucleotide repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slean, Meghan M; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Ranum, Laura P; Pearson, Christopher E

    2008-07-01

    While DNA repair proteins are generally thought to maintain the integrity of the whole genome by correctly repairing mutagenic DNA intermediates, there are cases where DNA "repair" proteins are involved in causing mutations instead. For instance, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) require the contribution of various DNA repair proteins, including UNG, MSH2 and MSH6 to mutate certain regions of immunoglobulin genes in order to generate antibodies of increased antigen affinity and altered effector functions. Another instance where "repair" proteins drive mutations is the instability of gene-specific trinucleotide repeats (TNR), the causative mutations of numerous diseases including Fragile X mental retardation syndrome (FRAXA), Huntington's disease (HD), myotonic dystrophy (DM1) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) all of which arise via various modes of pathogenesis. These healthy and deleterious mutations that are induced by repair proteins are distinct from the genome-wide mutations that arise in the absence of repair proteins: they occur at specific loci, are sensitive to cis-elements (sequence context and/or epigenetic marks) and transcription, occur in specific tissues during distinct developmental windows, and are age-dependent. Here we review and compare the mutagenic role of DNA "repair" proteins in the processes of SHM, CSR and TNR instability.

  18. Problems and solutions for the analysis of somatic CAG repeat expansion and their relationship to Huntington's disease toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budworth, Helen; McMurray, Cynthia T

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's Disease is caused by inheritance of a single disease-length allele harboring an expanded CAG repeat, which continues to expand in somatic tissues with age. Whether somatic expansion contributed to toxicity was unknown. From extensive work from multiple laboratories, it has been made clear that toxicity depended on length of the inherited allele, but whether preventing or delaying somatic repeat expansion in vivo would be beneficial was unknown, since the inherited disease allele was still expressed. In Budworth et al., we provided definitive evidence that suppressing the somatic expansion in mice substantially delays disease onset in littermates that inherit the same disease-length allele. This key discovery opens the door for therapeutic approaches targeted at stopping or shortening the CAG tract during life. The analysis was difficult and, at times, non-standard. Here, we take the opportunity to discuss the challenges, the analytical solutions, and to address some controversial issues with respect to expansion biology.

  19. Analysis of the trinucleotide CAG repeat from the human mitochondrial DNA polymerase gene in healthy and diseased individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovio, A; Tiranti, V; Bednarz, A L; Suomalainen, A; Spelbrink, J N; Lecrenier, N; Melberg, A; Zeviani, M; Poulton, J; Foury, F; Jacobs, H T

    1999-01-01

    The human nuclear gene (POLG) for the catalytic subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma) contains a trinucleotide CAG microsatellite repeat within the coding sequence. We have investigated the frequency of different repeat-length alleles in populations of diseased and healthy individuals. The predominant allele of 10 CAG repeats was found at a very similar frequency (approximately 88%) in both Finnish and ethnically mixed population samples, with homozygosity close to the equilibrium prediction. Other alleles of between 5 and 13 repeat units were detected, but no larger, expanded alleles were found. A series of 51 British myotonic dystrophy patients showed no significant variation from controls, indicating an absence of generalised CAG repeat instability. Patients with a variety of molecular lesions in mtDNA, including sporadic, clonal deletions, maternally inherited point mutations, autosomally transmitted mtDNA depletion and autosomal dominant multiple deletions showed no differences in POLG trinucleotide repeat-length distribution from controls. These findings rule out POLG repeat expansion as a common pathogenic mechanism in disorders characterised by mitochondrial genome instability.

  20. The number of CAG repeats within the normal allele does not influence the age of onset in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klempíř, Jiří; Zidovská, Jana; Stochl, Jan; Ing, Věra Kebrdlová; Uhrová, Tereza; Roth, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by the expansion of the number of CAG repeats on the chromosome 4p16.3, which results in elongated glutamine tract of huntingtin. The purpose of this work was to examine the interaction between the normal and mutant alleles of this gene and their effect on the clinical onset of HD. We hypothesized that in patients with identical number of CAG repeats within the mutant allele, the age of onset of HD is influenced by the number of CAG repeats within the normal allele. We analyzed the relations between the number of CAG repeats within the normal and mutant alleles, the age at HD onset, and the character of initial symptoms in 468 patients with clinically expressed HD. Although the Cox regression coefficient of 0.15 was significant (P CAG repeats within normal allele. Within the groups of patients with the same number of CAG repeats of the mutant allele, number of CAG repeats of the normal allele was found uncorrelated to the age at onset. Furthermore, when analyzing subgroups of patients with the same allelic composition on both alleles, we failed to observe any correlation with the age at the onset. Our analysis gives no corroboration to the idea of a normal allele having a share in the modification of the age at HD onset. We believe that with the current state of knowledge it is not possible to devise a mathematical model for HD onset prediction because too many entirely unknown modifying factors are still involved.

  1. Transgenic strategies for improving rice disease resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-04

    May 4, 2009 ... This RTSV Rep-mediated resistance was effective against geographically ..... ethylene (ET)/jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated signaling pathways, which are ... allene oxide synthase, a key enzyme in the JA biosyn- thetic pathway ...

  2. Molecular genetics and evolution of disease resistance in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krattinger, Simon G; Keller, Beat

    2016-10-01

    Contents 320 I. 320 II. 321 III. 321 IV. 322 V. 324 VI. 328 VII. 329 330 References 330 SUMMARY: Cereal crops produce a large part of the globally consumed food and feed. Because of the constant presence of devastating pathogens, the molecular characterization of disease resistance is a major research area and highly relevant for breeding. There has been recent and accelerating progress in the understanding of three distinct resistance mechanisms in cereals: resistance conferred by plasma membrane-localized receptor proteins; race-specific resistance conferred by intracellular immune receptors; and quantitative disease resistance. Intracellular immune receptors provide a particularly rich source for evolutionary studies, and have, for example, resulted in the recent discovery of a novel detection mechanism based on integrated decoy domains. Evolutionary studies have also revealed the origins of active resistance genes in both wild progenitors of today's cereals as well as in cultivated forms. In addition, independent evolution of orthologous genes in related cereals has resulted in resistance to different pathogen species. Quantitative resistance genes have been best characterized in wheat. The quantitative resistance genes identified so far in wheat encode transporter proteins or unusual kinase proteins. The recent discoveries in these three different resistance mechanisms have contributed to the basic molecular understanding of cereal immunity against pathogens and have suggested novel applications for resistance breeding.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance and associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlinar, Barbara; Marc, Janja; Janez, Andrej; Pfeifer, Marija

    2007-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a state in which higher than normal concentrations of insulin are required for normal response. The most common underlying cause is central obesity, although primary insulin resistance in normal-weight individuals is also possible. Excess abdominal adipose tissue has been shown to release increased amounts of free fatty acids which directly affect insulin signalling, diminish glucose uptake in muscle, drive exaggerated triglyceride synthesis and induce gluconeogenesis in the liver. Other factors presumed to play the role in insulin resistance are tumour necrosis factor alpha, adiponectin, leptin, IL-6 and some other adipokines. Hyperinsulinaemia which accompanies insulin resistance may be implicated in the development of many pathological states, such as hypertension and hyperandrogenaemia. Insulin resistance underlies metabolic syndrome and is further associated with polycystic ovary syndrome and lipodystrophies. When beta-cells fail to secrete the excess insulin needed, diabetes mellitus type 2 emerges, which is, besides coronary heart disease, the main complication of insulin resistance and associated diseases.

  4. TAA repeat variation in the GRIK2 gene does not influence age at onset in Huntington's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Min; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi S.; Kishikawa, Shotaro; Hadzi, Tiffany; Hendricks, Audrey E.; Hayden, Michael R.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Nance, Martha; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russell L.; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Gellera, Cinzia; Gomez-Tortosa, Estrella; Ayuso, Carmen; Suchowersky, Oksana; Trent, Ronald J.; McCusker, Elizabeth; Novelletto, Andrea; Frontali, Marina; Jones, Randi; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Frank, Samuel; Saint-Hilaire, Marie-Helene; Hersch, Steven M.; Rosas, Herminia D.; Lucente, Diane; Harrison, Madaline B.; Zanko, Andrea; Abramson, Ruth K.; Marder, Karen; Sequeiros, Jorge; Landwehrmeyer, G. Bernhard; Network, Ira Shoulson; Myers, Richard H.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat whose length is the major determinant of age at onset but remaining variation appears to be due in part to the effect of genetic modifiers. GRIK2, which encodes GluR6, a mediator of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain, has been suggested in several studies to be a modifier gene based upon a 3′ untranslated region TAA trinucleotide repeat polymorphism. Prior to investing in detailed studies of the functional impact of this polymorphism, we sought to confirm its effect on age at onset in a much larger dataset than in previous investigations. We genotyped the HD CAG repeat and the GRIK2 TAA repeat in DNA samples from 2,911 Huntington's disease subjects with known age at onset, and tested for a potential modifier effect of GRIK2 using a variety of statistical approaches. Unlike previous reports, we detected no evidence of an influence of the GRIK2 TAA repeat polymorphism on age at motor onset. Similarly, the GRIK2 polymorphism did not show significant modifier effect on psychiatric and cognitive age at onset in HD. Comprehensive analytical methods applied to a much larger sample than in previous studies do not support a role for GRIK2 as a genetic modifier of age at onset of clinical symptoms in Huntington's disease. PMID:22771793

  5. Genetic background modifies nuclear mutant huntingtin accumulation and HD CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Alejandro; Dragileva, Ella; Teed, Allison; Espinola, Janice; Fossale, Elisa; Gillis, Tammy; Lopez, Edith; Myers, Richard H; MacDonald, Marcy E; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2006-06-15

    Genetically precise models of Huntington's disease (HD), Hdh CAG knock-in mice, are powerful systems in which phenotypes associated with expanded HD CAG repeats are studied. To dissect the genetic pathways that underlie such phenotypes, we have generated Hdh(Q111) knock-in mouse lines that are congenic for C57BL/6, FVB/N and 129Sv inbred genetic backgrounds and investigated four Hdh(Q111) phenotypes in these three genetic backgrounds: the intergenerational instability of the HD CAG repeat and the striatal-specific somatic HD CAG repeat expansion, nuclear mutant huntingtin accumulation and intranuclear inclusion formation. Our results reveal increased intergenerational and somatic instability of the HD CAG repeat in C57BL/6 and FVB/N backgrounds compared with the 129Sv background. The accumulation of nuclear mutant huntingtin and the formation of intranuclear inclusions were fastest in the C57BL/6 background, slowest in the 129Sv background and intermediate in the FVB/N background. Inbred strain-specific differences were independent of constitutive HD CAG repeat size and did not correlate with Hdh mRNA levels. These data provide evidence for genetic modifiers of both intergenerational HD CAG repeat instability and striatal-specific phenotypes. Different relative contributions of C57BL/6 and 129Sv genetic backgrounds to the onset of nuclear mutant huntingtin and somatic HD CAG repeat expansion predict that the initiation of each of these two phenotypes is modified by different genes. Our findings set the stage for defining disease-related genetic pathways that will ultimately provide insight into disease mechanism.

  6. Pelvic inflammatory disease and salpingitis: incidence of primary and repeat episodes in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M J; Ades, A E; Welton, N J; Simms, I; Horner, P J

    2017-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and more specifically salpingitis (visually confirmed inflammation) is the primary cause of tubal factor infertility and is an important risk factor for ectopic pregnancy. The risk of these outcomes increases following repeated episodes of PID. We developed a homogenous discrete-time Markov model for the distribution of PID history in the UK. We used a Bayesian framework to fully propagate parameter uncertainty into the model outputs. We estimated the model parameters from routine data, prospective studies, and other sources. We estimated that for women aged 35-44 years, 33·6% and 16·1% have experienced at least one episode of PID and salpingitis, respectively (diagnosed or not) and 10·7% have experienced one salpingitis and no further PID episodes, 3·7% one salpingitis and one further PID episode, and 1·7% one salpingitis and ⩾2 further PID episodes. Results are consistent with numerous external data sources, but not all. Studies of the proportion of PID that is diagnosed, and the proportion of PIDs that are salpingitis together with the severity distribution in different diagnostic settings and of overlap between routine data sources of PID would be valuable.

  7. The soybean-Phytophthora resistance locus Rps1-k encompasses coiled coil-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat-like genes and repetitive sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Madan K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A series of Rps (resistance to Pytophthora sojae genes have been protecting soybean from the root and stem rot disease caused by the Oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora sojae. Five Rps genes were mapped to the Rps1 locus located near the 28 cM map position on molecular linkage group N of the composite genetic soybean map. Among these five genes, Rps1-k was introgressed from the cultivar, Kingwa. Rps1-k has been providing stable and broad-spectrum Phytophthora resistance in the major soybean-producing regions of the United States. Rps1-k has been mapped and isolated. More than one functional Rps1-k gene was identified from the Rps1-k locus. The clustering feature at the Rps1-k locus might have facilitated the expansion of Rps1-k gene numbers and the generation of new recognition specificities. The Rps1-k region was sequenced to understand the possible evolutionary steps that shaped the generation of Phytophthora resistance genes in soybean. Results Here the analyses of sequences of three overlapping BAC clones containing the 184,111 bp Rps1-k region are reported. A shotgun sequencing strategy was applied in sequencing the BAC contig. Sequence analysis predicted a few full-length genes including two Rps1-k genes, Rps1-k-1 and Rps1-k-2. Previously reported Rps1-k-3 from this genomic region 1 was evolved through intramolecular recombination between Rps1-k-1 and Rps1-k-2 in Escherichia coli. The majority of the predicted genes are truncated and therefore most likely they are nonfunctional. A member of a highly abundant retroelement, SIRE1, was identified from the Rps1-k region. The Rps1-k region is primarily composed of repetitive sequences. Sixteen simple repeat and 63 tandem repeat sequences were identified from the locus. Conclusion These data indicate that the Rps1 locus is located in a gene-poor region. The abundance of repetitive sequences in the Rps1-k region suggested that the location of this locus is in or near a

  8. Nucleoporins Nup160 and Seh1 are required for disease resistance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Charlotte; Wiermer, Marcel

    2012-10-01

    Arabidopsis Nup160 and Seh1, encoding two predicted nucleoporins of the Nup107-160 nuclear pore sub-complex, were identified in a reverse genetics screen based on their requirement for basal disease resistance. Both genes also contribute to immunity conferred by Toll interleukin 1 receptor/nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat (TNL)-type R proteins and constitutive resistance activated in the deregulated TNL mutant, snc1. Protein amounts of EDS1, a central regulator of TNL-triggered resistance, are reduced in seh1 and severely depleted in nup160 single mutants. Here, we investigate the impact of mutations in Nup160, Seh1 and a third complex member, MOS3/Nup96, on EDS1 protein accumulation in the snc1 auto-immune mutant background. In addition, we examine the subcellular localization of Seh1 in root tissues.

  9. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of Huntington disease: detection of the paternally inherited expanded CAG repeat in maternal plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oever, J.M. van den; Bijlsma, E.K.; Feenstra, I.; Muntjewerff, N.; Mathijssen, I.B.; Bakker, E. de; Belzen, M.J. van; Boon, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: With a shift towards noninvasive testing, we have explored and validated the use of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) for Huntington disease (HD). METHODS: Fifteen couples have been included, assessing a total of n = 20 pregnancies. Fetal paternally inherited CAG repeat length was det

  10. [C-11]raclopride-PET studies of the Huntington's disease rate of progression : Relevance of the trinucleotide repeat length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonini, A; Leenders, KL; Eidelberg, D

    1998-01-01

    We used [C-11]raclopride and positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the relationship between striatal dopamine D2 receptor binding, trinucleotide repeat number (GAG), and subject age in 10 asymptomatic and 8 symptomatic carriers of the Huntington's disease (HD) mutation. In both preclinical an

  11. Maternal intermediate repeat expansion into the affected range in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Belzen, M.J.; Belfroid, R.D.M.; Losekoot, M.; Walstra, G.J.M.; Van Langen, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Intermediate repeat alleles are usually stable when transmitted to the next generation. However, in a small percentage of transmissions these repeats expand into the affected range, leading to a new mutation and a sporadic patient. Until now, expansions of intermediate alleles into the a

  12. Maternal intermediate repeat expansion into the affected range in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Belzen, M.J.; Belfroid, R.D.M.; Losekoot, M.; Walstra, G.J.M.; Van Langen, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Intermediate repeat alleles are usually stable when transmitted to the next generation. However, in a small percentage of transmissions these repeats expand into the affected range, leading to a new mutation and a sporadic patient. Until now, expansions of intermediate alleles into the a

  13. The effect of combined resisted agility and repeated sprint training vs. strength training on female elite soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalfawi, Shaher A I; Haugen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Tore A; Enoksen, Eystein; Tønnessen, Espen

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of in-season combined resisted agility and repeated sprint training with strength training on soccer players' agility, linear single sprint speed, vertical jump, repeated sprint ability (RSA), and aerobic capacity. Twenty well-trained elite female soccer players of age ± SD 19.4 ± 4.4 years volunteered to participate in this study. The participants were randomly assigned to either the agility and repeated sprint training group or to the strength training group. All the participants were tested before and after a 10-week specific conditioning program. The pretest and posttest were conducted on 3 separate days with 1 day of low-intensity training in between. Test day 1 consisted of squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and RSA. Test day 2 consisted of a 40-m maximal linear sprint and an agility test, whereas a Beep test was conducted on test day 3 to assess aerobic capacity. The agility and repeated sprint training implemented in this study did not have a significant effect on agility, although there was a tendency for moderate improvements from 8.23 ± 0.32 to 8.06 ± 0.21 seconds (d = 0.8). There was a significant (p < 0.01) and moderate-positive effect on Beep-test performance from level 9.6 ± 1.4 to level 10.8 ± 1.0, and only a trivial small effect on all other physical variables measured in this study. The strength training group had a positive, moderate, and significant (p < 0.01) effect on Beep-test performance from level 9.7 ± 1.3 to level 10.9 ± 1.2 (d = 1.0) and a significant (p < 0.05) but small effect (d = 0.5) on SJ performance (25.9 ± 2.7 to 27.5 ± 4.1 cm). Furthermore, the strength training implemented in this study had a trivial and negative effect on agility performance (d = -0.1). No between-group differences were observed. The outcome of this study indicates the importance of a well-planned program of conditioning that does not result in a decreased performance of the players, the

  14. Effects of Repeated Ethanol Exposures on NMDA Receptor Expression and Locomotor Sensitization in Mice Expressing Ethanol Resistant NMDA Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Carolina R.; Gilstrap, Meghin; Eaton, Bethany; Lench, Daniel H.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Homanics, Gregg. E.; Woodward, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence from a large number of preclinical studies suggests that chronic exposure to drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants or ethanol induces changes in glutamatergic transmission in key brain areas associated with reward and control of behavior. These changes include alterations in the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) that are important for regulating neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity. NMDA receptors are inhibited by ethanol and reductions in NMDA-mediated signaling are thought to trigger homestatic responses that limit ethanol's effects on glutamatergic transmission. Following repeated exposures to ethanol, these homeostatic responses may become unstable leading to an altered glutamatergic state that contributes to the escalations in drinking and cognitive deficits observed in alcohol-dependent subjects. An important unanswered question is whether ethanol-induced changes in NMDAR expression are modulated by the intrinsic sensitivity of the receptor to ethanol. In this study, we examined the effects of ethanol on NMDAR subunit expression in cortical (orbitofrontal, medial prefrontal), striatal (dorsal and ventral striatum) and limbic (dorsal hippocampus, basolateral amygdala) areas in mice genetically modified to express ethanol-resistant receptors (F639A mice). These mice have been previously shown to drink more ethanol than their wild-type counterparts and have altered behavioral responses to certain actions of ethanol. Following long-term voluntary drinking, F639A mice showed elevations in GluN2A but not GluN1 or GluN2B expression as compared to wild-type mice. Mice treated with repeated injections with ethanol (2–3.5 g/kg; i.p.) showed changes in NMDAR expression that varied in a complex manner with genotype, brain region, subunit type and exposure protocol all contributing to the observed response. F639A mice, but not wild-type mice, showed enhanced motor activity following repeated

  15. Repeated adjacent segment diseases and fractures in osteoporotic patients: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen HY

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hsin-Yao Chen,1 Chiu-Liang Chen,1,2 Wei-Liang Chen3 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua City, 2Liberal Arts Center of Da Yeh University, Dacun Township, Changhua County, Taiwan; 3Department of Clinical Image, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua City, Changhua County, Taiwan Background: Pedicle screw instrumentation for treating spinal disorder is becoming increasingly widespread. Many studies have advocated its use to facilitate rigid fixation for spine; however, adjacent segmental disease is a known complication. Instrumented fusion for osteoporotic spines remains a significant challenge for spine surgeons. Prophylactic vertebroplasty for adjacent vertebra has been reported to reduce the complications of junctional compression fractures but has raised a new problem of vertebral subluxation. This case report is a rare and an extreme example with many surgical complications caused by repeated instrumented fusion for osteoporotic spine in a single patient. This patient had various complications including adjacent segmental disease, vertebral subluxation, and junctional fractures on radiographs and magnetic resonance images.Case presentation: An 81-year-old Taiwanese woman underwent decompression and instrumented fusion of L4-L5 in Taiwan 10 years ago. Due to degenerative spinal stenosis of L3-L4 and L2-L3, she had decompression with instrumented fusion from L5 to L1 at the previous hospital. However, catastrophic vertebral subluxations with severe neurologic compromise occurred, and she underwent salvage surgeries twice with prolonged instrumented fusion from L5 to T2. The surgeries did not resolve her problems of spinal instability and neurologic complications. Eventually, the patient remained with a Frankel Grade C spinal cord injury.Conclusion: Adjacent segmental disease, junctional fracture, and vertebral subluxation are familiar complications following instrumented spinal fusion surgeries for

  16. A novel PCR-based approach for the detection of the Huntington disease associated trinucleotide repeat expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, I; Lassen, C; Kristoffersson, U; Aman, P

    1999-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder associated with expansions of an unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat in exon 1 of the IT15 gene. In normal individuals, IT15 contains up to 35 CAG repeats, while in affected the repeat length is >36. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used to estimate the number of CAG repeats but may be inefficient in long repeats because of the high C+G content of the HD locus. We present a novel PCR approach for the diagnosis of HD, which permits direct visualization of the amplified products on agarose gel, using ethidium bromide. It is based on the methylation-sensitive conversion of C residues to U by bisulfite treatment of single-stranded DNA and subsequent amplification of the sense strand with specific primers. The bisulfite treatment dramatically reduces the C + G content of the region; thus, the high Tm and stable secondary structures are no longer obstacles to PCR. In both normal and affected individuals, UAG repeats (5'- CAG-3', before bisulfite treatment) in the sense strand can easily be amplified and visualized on a gel by ethidium bromide staining. The method has considerable advantages compared with other described PCR-based diagnostic tests for HD.

  17. Measurement of insulin resistance in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hien; Utzschneider, Kristina M; de Boer, Ian H

    2011-11-01

    Insulin resistance is a known complication of end-stage renal disease that also appears to be present in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and an important potential therapeutic target in this population. Measurement of insulin resistance is reviewed in the context of known pathophysiologic abnormalities in CKD. Insulin resistance in CKD is due to a high prevalence of known risk factors (e.g. obesity) and to unique metabolic abnormalities. The site of insulin resistance in CKD is localized to skeletal muscle. Estimates based on fasting insulin concentration may not adequately capture insulin resistance in CKD because they largely reflect hepatic defects and because CKD impairs insulin catabolism. A variety of dynamic tests are available to directly measure insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Insulin resistance may be an important therapeutic target in CKD. Complementary methods are available to assess insulin resistance, and each method has unique advantages, disadvantages, and levels of complexity. These characteristics, and the likelihood that CKD alters the performance of some insulin resistance measurements, must be considered when designing and interpreting clinical studies.

  18. Breeding for disease resistance in cacao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacao production must increase in order to meet the projected rise in the demand for chocolate. Approximately one-third of global production is lost annually to diseases and insects. Four diseases account for the greatest losses worldwide: black pod, caused by four Phytophthora spp; witches’ broom...

  19. Insulin resistance: The linchpin between prediabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Martin R; Carbajal, Horacio A; Espeche, Walter G; Aizpurúa, Marcelo; Leiva Sisnieguez, Carlos E; Leiva Sisnieguez, Betty C; Stavile, Rodolfo N; March, Carlos E; Reaven, Gerald M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that cardiovascular disease occurs to the greatest extent in persons with prediabetes mellitus who are also insulin resistant. In 2003, 664 non-diabetic women (n = 457) and men (n = 207), aged 52 ± 16 and 53 ± 15 years, were surveyed during a programme for cardiovascular disease prevention. Fasting plasma glucose concentrations defined participants as having normal fasting plasma glucose (fasting plasma glucose cardiovascular disease risk factors were accentuated in prediabetes mellitus versus normal fasting glucose, particularly in prediabetes mellitus/insulin resistant. In 2012, 86% of the sample were surveyed again, and the crude incidence for cardiovascular disease was higher in subjects with prediabetes mellitus versus normal fasting glucose (13.7 vs 6.0/100 persons/10 years; age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.88, p = 0.052). In prediabetes mellitus, the crude incidences were 22.9 versus 9.6/100 persons/10 years in insulin resistant versus non-insulin resistant persons (age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio = 2.36, p = 0.040). In conclusion, cardiovascular disease risk was accentuated in prediabetes mellitus/insulin resistant individuals, with a relative risk approximately twice as high compared to prediabetes mellitus/non-insulin resistant subjects.

  20. Identification of genes contributing to quantitative disease resistance in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of quantitative disease resistance during a plant’s life, little is known about the molecular basis of this type of host-pathogen interaction, because most of the genes underlying resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are unknown. To identify genes contributing to resistance QTLs in rice, we analyzed the colocalization of a set of characterized rice defense-responsive genes and resistance QTLs against different pathogens. We also examined the expression patterns of these genes in response to pathogen infection in the parents of the mapping populations, based on the strategy of validation and functional analysis of the QTLs. The results suggest that defense-responsive genes are important resources of resistance QTLs in rice. OsWRKY45-1 is the gene contributing to a major resistance QTL.NRR,OsGH3-1,and OsGLP members on chromosome 8 contribute alone or collectively to different minor resistance QTLs. These genes function in a basal resistance pathway or in major disease resistance gene-mediated race-specific pathways.

  1. Marker-assisted selection for disease resistance in lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is the most popular leafy vegetable that is cultivated mainly in moderate climate. Consumers demand lettuce with good visual appearance and free of disease. Improved disease resistance of new cultivars is achieved by combining desirable genes (or alleles) from existing cu...

  2. SSR Markers Assessed for Peanut Smut Disease Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanut smut disease, caused by Thecaphora frezii (Carranza & Lindquist), can result in yield losses higher than 50%. Several strategies have been developed for disease management but they are still insufficient. The smut genetic resistance found in wild species and Bolivian landraces is currently th...

  3. Five-Year, Disease-Free Survival after Repeat Palliative Multimodality Therapy in a Patient with Recurrent Metastastic Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Fetscher

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In appropriately selected cases, palliative therapeutic strategies can be adapted to those special features of cancer biographies that indicate an atypical course of disease. Elucidating these features, and adapting multimodal treatment strategies to them, can lead to significantly superior effects when compared to the routine application of conventional treatment algorhythms. A case of regionally metastactic bladder cancer is presented that documents the value of repeat debulking-surgery and repeat radiotherapy leading to unexpected short-term and long-term treatment results.

  4. Evaluation on Diseases Resistance of Cotton Material and Its Utilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Hua-lan; HE Lian; YE Peng-sheng; ZHANG Yu; WEI Shu-gu

    2008-01-01

    @@ Fusarium wilt and Verticillium wilt are important worldwide fungal diseases on cotton that cause damage to yield and quality.The pathogens survive in soil as microsclerotia for many years,and can be transmitted through seeds,soil,stream,and plant residues.And currently,no effective chemical control is available for those diseases.Production practices have established that planting wilt diseaseresistance varieties was one of the most effective and safe measures to control those diseases with low cost.However,screening for wilt-resistance germplasm resources is the basis for resistance breeding.

  5. Application and Research Development of Ectomycorrhizae on Forest Disease Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYuan; JIAXiuzhen; LIANGJun; ZHANGXingyao

    2004-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizae (ECM) is becoming the research hotspot because it can improve plant nutrient cycling and storage and strengthen plant resistance to adversity and disease. It is well known that ECM can enhance plant resistance to soil-borne and stem diseases. The mechanisms mainly include: plant tender roots will be protected well by sheath; ECM can facilitate uptake and transport capacity of nutrition and water to roots and increase plants vigor; ECM can control or block pathogens to invade trees; ECM can activate resistance-related enzymes of the hosts; it also can form rhizosphere microbial colony and establish root-rhizosphere micro-ecological environment. So mycorrhizal technology has become one of the most important methods of ecological control and biological control of plant diseases. This paper summarizes the application and development of ECM in forest disease control and also raises some ideas on their theory and application researches in the future.

  6. No relationship exists between itai-itai disease and TA repeat polymorphisms of the estrogen receptor alpha gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadewa, Hamim Ahmad; Miyabe, Yuri; Nishio, Hisahide; Hayashi, Chiyo; Sutomo, Retno; Lee, Myeong Jin; Ayaki, Hitoshi; Koizumi, Naoko; Sumino, Kimiaki

    2002-08-01

    Itai-itai (ouch-ouch) disease is a syndrome accompanied by bone mineral disorders that may be related to oral cadmium exposure. Itai-itai predominantly affects postmenopausal women with a history of multiple childbirth. In a previous study we have examined the genotype distributions of PvuII and XbaI restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) gene in patients with itai-itai disease and compared them with those of controls. However, no significant differences were shown between the genotype distributions of the patients and controls. In the present study, we determined the TA repeat polymorphisms of the patients and controls. The distributions of the patients were: HH 25.0%, HL 50.0%, and LL 25.0%; where HH includes two alleles with a high number of TA repeats (TA> or =16), HL includes one high number allele and one low number allele (TAitai-itai disease.

  7. Molecular markers for resistance against infectious diseases of economic importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, B. M.; Gupta, J. P.; Pandey, D. P.; Parmar, G. A.; Chaudhari, J. D.

    2017-01-01

    Huge livestock population of India is under threat by a large number of endemic infectious (bacterial, viral, and parasitic) diseases. These diseases are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, particularly in exotic and crossbred cattle. Beside morbidity and mortality, economic losses by these diseases occur through reduced fertility, production losses, etc. Some of the major infectious diseases which have great economic impact on Indian dairy industries are tuberculosis (TB), Johne’s disease (JD), mastitis, tick and tick-borne diseases (TTBDs), foot and mouth disease, etc. The development of effective strategies for the assessment and control of infectious diseases requires a better understanding of pathogen biology, host immune response, and diseases pathogenesis as well as the identification of the associated biomarkers. Indigenous cattle (Bos indicus) are reported to be comparatively less affected than exotic and crossbred cattle. However, genetic basis of resistance in indigenous cattle is not well documented. The association studies of few of the genes associated with various diseases, namely, solute carrier family 11 member 1, Toll-like receptors 1, with TB; Caspase associated recruitment domain 15, SP110 with JD; CACNA2D1, CD14 with mastitis and interferon gamma, BoLA­-DRB3.2 alleles with TTBDs, etc., are presented. Breeding for genetic resistance is one of the promising ways to control the infectious diseases. High host resistance is the most important method for controlling such diseases, but till today no breed is total immune. Therefore, work may be undertaken under the hypothesis that the different susceptibility to these diseases are exhibited by indigenous and crossbred cattle is due to breed-specific differences in the dealing of infected cells with other immune cells, which ultimately influence the immune response responded against infections. Achieving maximum resistance to these diseases is the ultimate goal, is technically

  8. Review of aspirin and clopidogrel resistance in peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirgis, Mina; Thompson, Peter; Jansen, Shirley

    2017-09-08

    Aspirin resistance (AR) and clopidogrel resistance (CR) are terms used to describe a reduction in the medication's efficacy in inhibiting platelet aggregation despite regular dosing. This review gives context to the clinical role and implications of antiplatelet resistance in peripheral arterial disease (PAD). A review of English-language literature on AR and CR in PAD involving human subjects using PubMed and MEDLINE databases was performed in April 2017. A total of 2075 patients in 22 relevant studies were identified. To give this issue context, a review of the larger, more established literature on antiplatelet resistance in coronary disease was undertaken, identifying significant research associating resistance to major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs). Studies in the coronary arterial disease literature have strongly associated antiplatelet resistance with increased MACE. Prevalence of AR or CR in coronary disease appears to be >55% for each in some studies. Meta-analyses of >50 studies revealed that AR and CR are significantly associated with MACE (relative risk of 2.09 and 2.8, respectively). This adds further weight to the literature reporting antiplatelet resistance as an independent predictor of and a threefold risk factor for major adverse cardiovascular events. The prevalence of resistance in PAD in this review was comparable to that in the coronary disease literature, with AR and CR prevalence up to 60% and 65%, respectively. There is evidence that the adverse effects of antiplatelet resistance are significant in PAD. In fact, research directly studying stent thrombosis populations with either coronary arterial disease or PAD revealed more significantly impaired platelet responsiveness to clopidogrel and aspirin in PAD compared with similar individuals with coronary disease. AR in PAD was found in studies to be a significant risk factor for iliofemoral stent reocclusion (P = .0093) and stroke in patients with symptomatic carotid disease (P

  9. A new polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the trinucleotide repeat that is unstable and expanded on Huntington's disease chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, J P; Barron, L H; Brock, D J

    1993-06-01

    The Huntington's Disease (HD) Collaborative Research Group has recently published the sequence of a new cDNA, IT15, containing a polymorphic trinucleotide (CAG)n repeat that is expanded and unstable on HD chromosomes. There is a correlation between the repeat size and the age of onset of symptoms. The suggested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay of the (CAG)n repeat requires unusual reaction components and primer concentrations and the use of 5% polyacrylamide sequencing gels to resolve the amplification products. We present a simple PCR assay that produces a smaller product using standard reaction conditions. This gives better resolution of the (CAG)n expansion observed on HD chromosomes by acrylamide gel electrophoresis and allows sufficient product to be obtained to perform assays using agarose gels. This will allow diagnostic labs to do rapid and accurate presymptomatic testing of HD in high risk families.

  10. Previous antibiotic exposure and antimicrobial resistance in invasive pneumococcal disease: results from prospective surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Stefan P; Rudnick, Wallis; Shigayeva, Altynay; Green, Karen; Baqi, Mahin; Gold, Wayne L; Lovinsky, Reena; Muller, Matthew P; Powis, Jeff E; Rau, Neil; Simor, Andrew E; Walmsley, Sharon L; Low, Donald E; McGeer, Allison

    2014-10-01

    Estimating the risk of antibiotic resistance is important in selecting empiric antibiotics. We asked how the timing, number of courses, and duration of antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months affected antibiotic resistance in isolates causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). We conducted prospective surveillance for IPD in Toronto, Canada, from 2002 to 2011. Antimicrobial susceptibility was measured by broth microdilution. Clinical information, including prior antibiotic use, was collected by chart review and interview with patients and prescribers. Clinical information and antimicrobial susceptibility were available for 4062 (90%) episodes; 1193 (29%) of episodes were associated with receipt of 1782 antibiotic courses in the prior 3 months. Selection for antibiotic resistance was class specific. Time elapsed since most recent antibiotic was inversely associated with resistance (cephalosporins: adjusted odds ratio [OR] per day, 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], .96-1.00; P = .02; macrolides: OR, 0.98; 95% CI, .96-.99; P = .005; penicillins: OR [log(days)], 0.62; 95% CI, .44-.89; P = .009; fluoroquinolones: profile penalized-likelihood OR [log(days)], 0.62; 95% CI, .39-1.04; P = .07). Risk of resistance after exposure declined most rapidly for fluoroquinolones and penicillins and reached baseline in 2-3 months. The decline in resistance was slowest for macrolides, and in particular for azithromycin. There was no significant association between duration of therapy and resistance for any antibiotic class. Too few patients received multiple courses of the same antibiotic class to assess the significance of repeat courses. Time elapsed since last exposure to a class of antibiotics is the most important factor predicting antimicrobial resistance in pneumococci. The duration of effect is longer for macrolides than other classes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved

  11. In silico identification of coffee genome expressed sequences potentially associated with resistance to diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Sequences potentially associated with coffee resistance to diseases were identified by in silico analyses using the database of the Brazilian Coffee Genome Project (BCGP). Keywords corresponding to plant resistance mechanisms to pathogens identified in the literature were used as baits for data mining. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) related to each of these keywords were identified with tools available in the BCGP bioinformatics platform. A total of 11,300 ESTs were mined. These ESTs were clustered and formed 979 EST-contigs with similarities to chitinases, kinases, cytochrome P450 and nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins, as well as with proteins related to disease resistance, pathogenesis, hypersensitivity response (HR) and plant defense responses to diseases. The 140 EST-contigs identified through the keyword NBS-LRR were classified according to function. This classification allowed association of the predicted products of EST-contigs with biological processes, including host defense and apoptosis, and with molecular functions such as nucleotide binding and signal transducer activity. Fisher's exact test was used to examine the significance of differences in contig expression between libraries representing the responses to biotic stress challenges and other libraries from the BCGP. This analysis revealed seven contigs highly similar to catalase, chitinase, protein with a BURP domain and unknown proteins. The involvement of these coffee proteins in plant responses to disease is discussed. PMID:21637594

  12. Mechanisms linking brain insulin resistance to Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Niures P.S. Matioli; Ricardo Nitrini

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that Diabetes Mellitus (DM) can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review briefly describes current concepts in mechanisms linking DM and insulin resistance/deficiency to AD. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) resistance can contribute to neurodegeneration by several mechanisms which involve: energy and metabolism deficits, impairment of Glucose transporter-4 function, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dy...

  13. Nationwide Surveillance of Azole Resistance in Aspergillus Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Edith; Maertens, Johan; De Bel, Annelies; Nulens, Eric; Boelens, Jerina; Surmont, Ignace; Mertens, Anna; Boel, An; Lagrou, Katrien

    2015-08-01

    Aspergillus disease affects a broad patient population, from patients with asthma to immunocompromised patients. Azole resistance has been increasingly reported in both clinical and environmental Aspergillus strains. The prevalence and clinical impact of azole resistance in different patient populations are currently unclear. This 1-year prospective multicenter cohort study aimed to provide detailed epidemiological data on Aspergillus resistance among patients with Aspergillus disease in Belgium. Isolates were prospectively collected in 18 hospitals (April 2011 to April 2012) for susceptibility testing. Clinical and treatment data were collected with a questionnaire. The outcome was evaluated to 1 year after a patient's inclusion. A total of 220 Aspergillus isolates from 182 patients were included. The underlying conditions included invasive aspergillosis (n = 122 patients), allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (APBA) (n = 39 patients), chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (n = 10 patients), Aspergillus bronchitis (n = 7 patients), and aspergilloma (n = 5 patients). The overall azole resistance prevalence was 5.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.8 to 10.2%) and was 7.0% (4/57; 95% CI, 2.3 to 17.2%) in patients with APBA, bronchitis, aspergilloma, or chronic aspergillosis and 4.6% in patients with invasive aspergillosis (5/108; 95% CI, 1.7 to 10.7%). The 6-week survival in invasive aspergillosis was 52.5%, while susceptibility testing revealed azole resistance in only 2/58 of the deceased patients. The clinical impact of Aspergillus fumigatus resistance was limited in our patient population with Aspergillus diseases.

  14. De novo characterization of the Dialeurodes citri transcriptome: mining genes involved in stress resistance and simple sequence repeats (SSRs) discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, E-H; Wei, D-D; Shen, G-M; Yuan, G-R; Bai, P-P; Wang, J-J

    2014-02-01

    The citrus whitefly, Dialeurodes citri (Ashmead), is one of the three economically important whitefly species that infest citrus plants around the world; however, limited genetic research has been focused on D. citri, partly because of lack of genomic resources. In this study, we performed de novo assembly of a transcriptome using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). In total, 36,766 unigenes with a mean length of 497 bp were identified. Of these unigenes, we identified 17,788 matched known proteins in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database, as determined by Blast search, with 5731, 4850 and 14,441 unigenes assigned to clusters of orthologous groups (COG), gene ontology (GO), and SwissProt, respectively. In total, 7507 unigenes were assigned to 308 known pathways. In-depth analysis of the data showed that 117 unigenes were identified as potentially involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and 67 heat shock protein (Hsp) genes were associated with environmental stress. In addition, these enzymes were searched against the GO and COG database, and the results showed that the three major detoxification enzymes and Hsps were classified into 18 and 3, 6, and 8 annotations, respectively. In addition, 149 simple sequence repeats were detected. The results facilitate the investigation of molecular resistance mechanisms to insecticides and environmental stress, and contribute to molecular marker development. The findings greatly improve our genetic understanding of D. citri, and lay the foundation for future functional genomics studies on this species.

  15. Interplay Between Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence During Disease Promoted by Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisinger, Edward; Isberg, Ralph R

    2017-02-15

    Diseases caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals are the outcome of complex relationships between several dynamic factors, including bacterial pathogenicity, the fitness costs of resistance in the human host, and selective forces resulting from interventions such as antibiotic therapy. The emergence and fate of mutations that drive antibiotic resistance are governed by these interactions. In this review, we will examine how different forms of antibiotic resistance modulate bacterial fitness and virulence potential, thus influencing the ability of pathogens to evolve in the context of nosocomial infections. We will focus on 3 important multidrug-resistant pathogens that are notoriously problematic in hospitals: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus. An understanding of how antibiotic resistance mutations shape the pathobiology of multidrug-resistant infections has the potential to drive novel strategies that can control the development and spread of drug resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. RNAi-derived field resistance to Cassava brown streak disease persists across the vegetative cropping cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odipio, John; Ogwok, Emmanuel; Taylor, Nigel J; Halsey, Mark; Bua, Anton; Fauquet, Claude M; Alicai, Titus

    2014-01-01

    A confined field trial was established to determine durability of RNAi-mediated resistance to Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD). Stem cuttings were obtained from field-grown cassava plants of cv 60444 transgenic for construct p718, consisting of an 894 bp inverted repeat sequence from the Ugandan Cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) coat protein. Plants were established from three transgenic lines previously shown to provide complete resistance to UCBSV and differing levels of protection to the non-homologous virus species Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV), and grown for 11 months. CBSD symptoms were observed on shoots and storage roots of all non-transgenic cv 60444 control plants and transgenic lines p718-002 and p718-005, but not on p718-001. RT-PCR diagnostic showed tissues of plant lines p718-002 and p718-005 to be infected with CBSV, but free of UCBSV. All leaves and roots of p718-001 plants were to carry no detectable levels of either pathogen. Plants of cv 60444 in this field trial showed severe cassava mosaic disease symptoms, indicating that presence of replicating geminiviruses did not cause significant suppression of RNAi-mediated resistance to CBSD. Resistance to CBSD across a vegetative cropping cycle confirms earlier field data, and provides an important step in proof of concept for application of RNAi technology to control of CBSD under conditions encountered in farmers' fields.

  17. Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9ORF72 in the spectrum of motor neuron diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rheenen, W. van; Blitterswijk, M. van; Huisman, M.H.; Vlam, L.; Doormaal, P.T. van; Seelen, M.; Medic, J.; Dooijes, D.; Visser, M. de; Kooi, A.J. van der; Raaphorst, J.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Pol, W.L. van der; Veldink, J.H.; Berg, L.H. van den

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and phenotype of hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9ORF72 in a large cohort of patients of Dutch descent with familial (fALS) and sporadic (sALS) amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), progressive muscular atrophy (PMA), and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). METHOD

  18. Factors influencing the clinical expression of intermediate CAG repeat length mutations of the Huntington's disease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegyres, Peter K; Shu, Chen-Chun; Chen, Huei-Yang; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-02-01

    Our aim is to elucidate the clinical variables associated with the development of manifest HD in patients with intermediate CAG repeat lengths. 2,167 participants were seen throughout 44 research sites in the United States, Canada or Australia over a five-year natural history observational study (2006-2011) (Trial # NCT00313495). The Chi-square test and a generalised linear model were used to examine the differences in demographics and cognitive tests among three groups of CAG repeat length. The mixed model was then used to examine the time effect on cognitive assessments by CAG groups. No patient with CAG repeat length 27-35 developed manifest HD, whereas three patients with 36-39 did. Total motor score, maximal chorea score and maximal dystonia score were significantly different at baseline (p CAG 36-39; those with an associated university degree or higher education were less frequently diagnosed as manifest HD (OR 0.10, 95 % CI 0.02-0.54, p = 0.007). Age, smoking and lower education achievement were found to be significantly associated with higher odds of manifest HD in patients with intermediate CAG repeat length mutations.

  19. Specific multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis genotypes of Mycoplasma pneumoniae are associated with diseases severity and macrolide susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuxin Qu

    Full Text Available Clinical relevance of multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR analysis (MLVA in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP by Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae is unknown. A multi-center, prospective study was conducted from November 2010 to April 2012. Nine hundred and fifty-four CAP patients were consecutively enrolled. M. pneumoniae clinical isolates were obtained from throat swabs. MLVA typing was applied to all isolates. Comparison of pneumonia severity index (PSI and clinical features among patients infected with different MLVA types of M. pneumoniae were conducted. One hundred and thirty-six patients were positive with M. pneumoniae culture. The clinical isolates were clustered into 18 MLVA types. One hundred and fourteen (88.3% isolates were resistant to macrolide, covering major MLVA types. The macrolide non-resistant rate of M. pneumoniae isolates with Mpn13-14-15-16 profile of 3-5-6-2 was significantly higher than that of other types (p ≤ 0.001. Patients infected with types U (5-4-5-7-2 and J (3-4-5-7-2 had significantly higher PSI scores (p<0.001 and longer total duration of cough (p = 0.011. Therefore it seems that there is a correlation between certain MLVA types and clinical severity of disease and the presence of macrolide resistance.

  20. Insulin resistance and gray matter volume in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J K; Vidoni, E D; Perea, R D; Rada, R; Johnson, D K; Lyons, K; Pahwa, R; Burns, J M; Honea, R A

    2014-06-13

    The goal of this study was to compare insulin resistance in aging and aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, and to determine the relationship between insulin resistance and gray matter volume (GMV) in each cohort using an unbiased, voxel-based approach. Insulin resistance was estimated in apparently healthy elderly control (HC, n=21) and neurodegenerative disease (Alzheimer's disease (AD), n=20; Parkinson's disease (PD), n=22) groups using Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance 2 (HOMA2) and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). HOMA2 and GMV were assessed within groups through General Linear Model multiple regression. We found that HOMA2 was increased in both AD and PD compared to the HC group (HC vs. AD, p=0.002, HC vs. PD, p=0.003), although only AD subjects exhibited increased fasting glucose (p=0.005). Furthermore, our voxel-based morphometry analysis revealed that HOMA2 was related to GMV in all cohorts in a region-specific manner (p<0.001, uncorrected). Significant relationships were observed in the medial prefrontal cortex (HC), medial temporal regions (AD), and parietal regions (PD). Finally, the directionality of the relationship between HOMA2 and GMV was disease-specific. Both HC and AD subjects exhibited negative relationships between HOMA2 and brain volume (increased HOMA2 associated with decreased brain volume), while a positive relationship was observed in PD. This cross-sectional study suggests that insulin resistance is increased in neurodegenerative disease, and that individuals with AD appear to have more severe metabolic dysfunction than individuals with PD or PD dementia.

  1. A novel triple repeat mutant tau transgenic model that mimics aspects of pick's disease and fronto-temporal tauopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Rockenstein

    Full Text Available Tauopathies are a group of disorders leading to cognitive and behavioral impairment in the aging population. While four-repeat (4R Tau is more abundant in corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Alzheimer's disease, three-repeat (3R Tau is the most abundant splice, in Pick's disease. A number of transgenic models expressing wild-type and mutant forms of the 4R Tau have been developed. However, few models of three-repeat Tau are available. A transgenic mouse model expressing three-repeat Tau was developed bearing the mutations associated with familial forms of Pick's disease (L266V and G272V mutations. Two lines expressing high (Line 13 and low (Line 2 levels of the three-repeat mutant Tau were analyzed. By Western blot, using antibodies specific to three-repeat Tau, Line 13 expressed 5-times more Tau than Line 2. The Tau expressed by these mice was most abundant in the frontal-temporal cortex and limbic system and was phosphorylated at residues detected by the PHF-1, AT8, CP9 and CP13 antibodies. The higher-expressing mice displayed hyperactivity, memory deficits in the water maze and alterations in the round beam. The behavioral deficits started at 6-8 months of age and were associated with a progressive increase in the accumulation of 3R Tau. By immunocytochemistry, mice from Line 13 displayed extensive accumulation of 3R Tau in neuronal cells bodies in the pyramidal neurons of the neocortex, CA1-3 regions, and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Aggregates in the granular cells had a globus appearance and mimic Pick's-like inclusions. There were abundant dystrophic neurites, astrogliosis and synapto-dendritic damage in the neocortex and hippocampus of the higher expresser line. The hippocampal lesions were moderately argyrophilic and Thioflavin-S negative. By electron microscopy, discrete straight filament aggregates were detected in some neurons in the hippocampus. This model holds promise for better understanding the

  2. Insulin resistance: an emerging link in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhi, Bikash; Chakrabarty, Mrinmoy

    2013-10-01

    Relentless progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) poses a grave situation for the biomedical community to tackle. Agents starting as hot favorites in clinical trials have failed in later stages and it is time we reconsidered our approaches to intervene the disease. Quite some interesting work in the last decade has introduced a new school of thought which factors in neuronal glycemic imbalance as a major component for the development of AD. Insulin resistance in the brain has brought forward subsequent sequelae which might work towards amyloid accretion and/or tau hyperphosphorylation. It is also pointed out that insulin works by distributing iron to neuronal tissue and an insulin resistant state throws it off gear leading to iron overloading of neurons which is ultimately detrimental. A relatively recent investigation finds the role of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK3) in AD which also seems to bear a link with insulin resistance.

  3. Resistant Kawasaki disease, case report and literatures review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Saffar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A child with aggressive and resistant Kawasaki disease with coronary aneurysm is described. Despite two doses of immune globulin and high dose of aspirin the patient was treated with the third dose of immune globulin. The patient apparently responded to normalization of symptoms and signs, with no more progression of coronary artery abnormalities.

  4. Quantitative disease resistance: dissection and adoption in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize is the world’s most widely cultivated crop, providing food, feed, and biofuel. Maize production is constantly threatened by the presence of devastating pathogens worldwide. Characterization of the genetic components underlying disease resistance is a major research area in maize which is highl...

  5. Evaluating paradox walnut rootstocks for resistance to Armillaria root disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The most common Juglans regia (English walnut) rootstock in California is Paradox, a hybrid between J. hindsii (Northern California black walnut) and J. regia. Unfortuntely, Paradox rootstock is highly susceptible to Armillaria root disease. The relative resistance of new clonal, Paradox rootstock...

  6. Regeneration systems for pyramiding disease resistance into walnut rootstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to regenerate selected walnut rootstocks adventitiously. This is an essential step to be able to produce transgenic walnut rootstocks with superior traits, such as disease resistance. A series of plant tissue culture experiments were conducted on RX1 and VX211 rootstocks wit...

  7. Identification of blast resistance genes for managing rice blast disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. In the present study, an international set of monogenic differentials carrying 24 major blast resistance (R) genes (Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pita2,...

  8. The Italian elm breeding program for Dutch elm disease resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto Santini; Francesco Pecori; Luisa Ghelardini

    2012-01-01

    In the 20th century, elms across Europe and North America were devastated by two pandemics of Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by the introduction of two fungal pathogens: Ophiostoma ulmi, followed by O. novo-ulmi. At the end of 1920s, research into a resistance to DED began in Europe and then in the United States. No...

  9. The role of ethylene perception in plant disease resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraats, Bart Peter Johan

    2003-01-01

    Ethylene is a plant hormone that is involved in responses of the plant to various stress situations, such as pathogen attack. The role of ethylene in plant-pathogen interactions seems to be diverse. Exposure of plants to ethylene can induce disease resistance, but treatment with ethylene during

  10. Why is antibiotic resistance a deadly emerging disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courvalin, P

    2016-05-01

    Evolution of bacteria towards resistance to antimicrobial agents, including multidrug resistance, is unavoidable because it represents a particular aspect of the general evolution of bacteria that is unstoppable. Therefore, the only means of dealing with this situation is to delay the emergence and subsequent dissemination of resistant bacteria or resistance genes. In this review, we will consider the biochemical mechanisms and the genetics that bacteria use to offset antibiotic selective pressure. The data provided are mainly, if not exclusively, taken from the work carried out in the laboratory, although there are numerous other examples in the literature. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Three Different Resistance Training Frequencies on Jump, Sprint, and Repeated Sprint Ability Performance in Professional Futsal Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Franco, Adrián; Rey, Ezequiel; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto

    2017-02-21

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of 3 different resistance training frequencies (one strength training session per week (1W), two strength training sessions per week (2W) or one strength training session every second week (0.5W)) on jump, sprint and repeated sprint performance (RSA) in professional futsal players. Thirty-five futsal players were randomized into 1 of 3 groups, the 1W group (n= 12), 2W group (n= 12), or the 0.5W group (n= 11). The players performed the same resistance training during 6 weeks and only training frequency differed between the groups. Within-group analysis showed significant improvements in jump (p≤0.001, Effect Size (ES)= 0.13-0.35), sprint (p≤0.001, ES= 0.48-0.71), and RSA (p≤0.01, ES= 0.22-0.63) from pretest to posttest in 1W and 2W. However, no significant (p>0.05) pre-post changes were observed for the 0.5W in any variable. In the between-groups analysis, significant better results were found in jump (p≤0.01), sprint (p≤0.01), and RSA performance (p≤0.01) in the 1W group and 2W group in comparison with 0.5W group. Also, jump (p≤0.05) and 5 m sprint (p≤0.05) performances was significantly better in the 2W group in comparison with 1W group. In conclusion, the current study showed that 6 weeks of RT one or two times per week in addition to typical futsal training, produced significant improvements in jump, sprint and RSA performance. Additionally, RT one every second week may be sufficient to maintain physical fitness in professional futsal players. This information may be useful for coaches when planning training contents during congested fixture schedules or in periods where the emphasis need to be put on other qualities and spend as little time as possible on maintaining or increasing physical performance.

  12. Animal genomics and infectious disease resistance in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J; Gheyas, A; Burt, D W

    2016-04-01

    Avian pathogens are responsible for major costs to society, both in terms of huge economic losses to the poultry industry and their implications for human health. The health and welfare of millions of birds is under continued threat from many infectious diseases, some of which are increasing in virulence and thus becoming harder to control, such as Marek's disease virus and avian influenza viruses. The current era in animal genomics has seen huge developments in both technologies and resources, which means that researchers have never been in a better position to investigate the genetics of disease resistance and determine the underlying genes/mutations which make birds susceptible or resistant to infection. Avian genomics has reached a point where the biological mechanisms of infectious diseases can be investigated and understood in poultry and other avian species. Knowledge of genes conferring disease resistance can be used in selective breeding programmes or to develop vaccines which help to control the effects of these pathogens, which have such a major impact on birds and humans alike.

  13. Antibodies against analogous heptad repeat peptide HR212 of Newcastle Disease Virus inhibit virus-cell membrane fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying; TIEN Po

    2007-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a key step in enveloped virus entry. Highly conserved heptad repeat regions (HR1 and HR2) of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) fusion protein (F) are critical functional domains for viral membrane fusion. They display different conformations in the membrane fusion states and are viewed as candidate targets for neutralizing antibody responses. We previously reported that an analog of heptad repeat peptides HR2-HR1-HR2(HR212) and HR2 could inhibit NDV induced cell-cell membrane fusion. Here, we show that HR212 can induce the production of highly potent antibody in immunized rabbits, which could recognize full length peptides of both HR1 and HR2, and inhibit NDV hemagglutination and NDV entry. These suggest that either HR212 or its antibody could be an inhibitor of virus-induced cell-cell membrane fusion.

  14. P-Glycoprotein and Drug Resistance in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Picchianti-Diamanti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA are chronic inflammatory disorders of unknown etiology characterized by a wide range of abnormalities of the immune system that may compromise the function of several organs, such as kidney, heart, joints, brain and skin. Corticosteroids (CCS, synthetic and biologic immunosuppressive agents have demonstrated the capacity to improve the course of autoimmune diseases. However, a significant number of patients do not respond or develop resistance to these therapies over time. P-glycoprotein (P-gp is a transmembrane protein that pumps several drugs out of the cell, including CCS and immunosuppressants; thus, its over-expression or hyper-function has been proposed as a possible mechanism of drug resistance in patients with autoimmune disorders. Recently, different authors have demonstrated that P-gp inhibitors, such as cyclosporine A (CsA and its analogue Tacrolimus, are able to reduce P-gp expression and or function in SLE, RA and PsA patients. These observations suggest that P-gp antagonists could be adopted to revert drug resistance and improve disease outcome. The complex inter-relationship among drug resistance, P-gp expression and autoimmunity still remains elusive.

  15. Modulation of Phytoalexin Biosynthesis in Engineered Plants for Disease Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Cordelier

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytoalexins are antimicrobial substances of low molecular weight produced by plants in response to infection or stress, which form part of their active defense mechanisms. Starting in the 1950’s, research on phytoalexins has begun with biochemistry and bio-organic chemistry, resulting in the determination of their structure, their biological activity as well as mechanisms of their synthesis and their catabolism by microorganisms. Elucidation of the biosynthesis of numerous phytoalexins has permitted the use of molecular biology tools for the exploration of the genes encoding enzymes of their synthesis pathways and their regulators. Genetic manipulation of phytoalexins has been investigated to increase the disease resistance of plants. The first example of a disease resistance resulting from foreign phytoalexin expression in a novel plant has concerned a phytoalexin from grapevine which was transferred to tobacco. Transformations were then operated to investigate the potential of other phytoalexin biosynthetic genes to confer resistance to pathogens. Unexpectedly, engineering phytoalexins for disease resistance in plants seem to have been limited to exploiting only a few phytoalexin biosynthetic genes, especially those encoding stilbenes and some isoflavonoids. Research has rather focused on indirect approaches which allow modulation of the accumulation of phytoalexin employing transcriptional regulators or components of upstream regulatory pathways. Genetic approaches using gain- or less-of functions in phytoalexin engineering together with modulation of phytoalexin accumulation through molecular engineering of plant hormones and defense-related marker and elicitor genes have been reviewed.

  16. A latitudinal cline in disease resistance of a host tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, M G; Williams, D R; Tilyard, P A; Pinkard, E A; Wardlaw, T J; Glen, M; Vaillancourt, R E; Potts, B M

    2013-04-01

    The possible drivers and implications of an observed latitudinal cline in disease resistance of a host tree were examined. Mycosphaerella leaf disease (MLD) damage, caused by Teratosphaeria species, was assessed in five Eucalyptus globulus (Tasmanian blue gum) common garden trials containing open-pollinated progeny from 13 native-forest populations. Significant population and family within population variation in MLD resistance was detected, which was relatively stable across different combinations of trial sites, ages, seasons and epidemics. A distinct genetic-based latitudinal cline in MLD damage among host populations was evident. Two lines of evidence argue that the observed genetic-based latitudinal trend was the result of direct pathogen-imposed selection for MLD resistance. First, MLD damage was positively associated with temperature and negatively associated with a prediction of disease risk in the native environment of these populations; and, second, the quantitative inbreeding coefficient (QST) significantly exceeded neutral marker FST at the trial that exhibited the greatest MLD damage, suggesting that diversifying selection contributed to differentiation in MLD resistance among populations. This study highlights the potential for spatial variation in pathogen risk to drive adaptive differentiation across the geographic range of a foundation host tree species.

  17. Mapping QTL affecting resistance to Marek's disease in an F6 advanced intercross population of commercial layer chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marek's disease (MD is a T-cell lymphoma of chickens caused by the Marek's disease virus (MDV, an oncogenic avian herpesvirus. MD is a major cause of economic loss to the poultry industry and the most serious and persistent infectious disease concern. A full-sib intercross population, consisting of five independent families was generated by crossing and repeated intercrossing of two partially inbred commercial White Leghorn layer lines known to differ in genetic resistance to MD. At the F6 generation, a total of 1615 chicks were produced (98 to 248 per family and phenotyped for MD resistance measured as survival time in days after challenge with a very virulent plus (vv+ strain of MDV. Results QTL affecting MD resistance were identified by selective DNA pooling using a panel of 15 SNPs and 217 microsatellite markers. Since MHC blood type (BT is known to affect MD resistance, a total of 18 independent pool pairs were constructed according to family × BT combination, with some combinations represented twice for technical reasons. Twenty-one QTL regions (QTLR affecting post-challenge survival time were identified, distributed among 11 chromosomes (GGA1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 15, 18, 26 and Z, with about two-thirds of the MD resistance alleles derived from the more MD resistant parental line. Eight of the QTLR associated with MD resistance, were previously identified in a backcross (BC mapping study with the same parental lines. Of these, 7 originated from the more resistant line, and one from the less resistant line. Conclusion There was considerable evidence suggesting that MD resistance alleles tend to be recessive. The width of the QTLR for these QTL appeared to be reduced about two-fold in the F6 as compared to that found in the previous BC study. These results provide a firm basis for high-resolution linkage disequilibrium mapping and positional cloning of the resistance genes.

  18. Enhanced Tomato Disease Resistance Primed by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan eSong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roots of most terrestrial plants form symbiotic associations (mycorrhiza with soil- borne arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. Many studies show that mycorrhizal colonization enhances plant resistance against pathogenic fungi. However, the mechanism of mycorrhiza-induced disease resistance remains equivocal. In this study, we found that mycorrhizal inoculation with AMF Funneliformis mosseae significantly alleviated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill. early blight disease caused by Alternaria solani Sorauer. AMF pre-inoculation led to significant increases in activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL and lipoxygenase (LOX in tomato leaves upon pathogen inoculation. Mycorrhizal inoculation alone did not influence the transcripts of most genes tested. However, pathogen attack on AMF-inoculated plants provoked strong defense responses of three genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR proteins, PR1, PR2 and PR3, as well as defense-related genes LOX, AOC and PAL, in tomato leaves. The induction of defense responses in AMF pre-inoculated plants was much higher and more rapid than that in un-inoculated plants in present of pathogen infection. Three tomato genotypes: a Castlemart wild-type (WT plant, a jasmonate (JA biosynthesis mutant (spr2, and a prosystemin-overexpressing 35S::PS plant were used to examine the role of the JA signaling pathway in AMF-primed disease defense. Pathogen infection on mycorrhizal 35S::PS plants led to higher induction of defense-related genes and enzymes relative to WT plants. However, pathogen infection did not induce these genes and enzymes in mycorrhizal spr2 mutant plants. Bioassays showed that 35S::PS plants were more resistant and spr2 plants were more susceptible to early blight compared with WT plants. Our finding indicates that mycorrhizal colonization enhances tomato resistance to early blight by priming systemic defense response, and the JA signaling pathway is essential for

  19. Enhanced tomato disease resistance primed by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanyuan; Chen, Dongmei; Lu, Kai; Sun, Zhongxiang; Zeng, Rensen

    2015-01-01

    Roots of most terrestrial plants form symbiotic associations (mycorrhiza) with soil- borne arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Many studies show that mycorrhizal colonization enhances plant resistance against pathogenic fungi. However, the mechanism of mycorrhiza-induced disease resistance remains equivocal. In this study, we found that mycorrhizal inoculation with AMF Funneliformis mosseae significantly alleviated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.) early blight disease caused by Alternaria solani Sorauer. AMF pre-inoculation led to significant increases in activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in tomato leaves upon pathogen inoculation. Mycorrhizal inoculation alone did not influence the transcripts of most genes tested. However, pathogen attack on AMF-inoculated plants provoked strong defense responses of three genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins, PR1, PR2, and PR3, as well as defense-related genes LOX, AOC, and PAL, in tomato leaves. The induction of defense responses in AMF pre-inoculated plants was much higher and more rapid than that in un-inoculated plants in present of pathogen infection. Three tomato genotypes: a Castlemart wild-type (WT) plant, a jasmonate (JA) biosynthesis mutant (spr2), and a prosystemin-overexpressing 35S::PS plant were used to examine the role of the JA signaling pathway in AMF-primed disease defense. Pathogen infection on mycorrhizal 35S::PS plants led to higher induction of defense-related genes and enzymes relative to WT plants. However, pathogen infection did not induce these genes and enzymes in mycorrhizal spr2 mutant plants. Bioassays showed that 35S::PS plants were more resistant and spr2 plants were more susceptible to early blight compared with WT plants. Our finding indicates that mycorrhizal colonization enhances tomato resistance to early blight by priming systemic defense response, and the JA signaling pathway is essential for mycorrhiza

  20. A recombinant field strain of Marek's disease (MD) virus with reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat insert lacking the meq gene as a vaccine against MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shuai; Cui, Ning; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Zimeng; Li, Yanpeng; Ding, Jiabo; Wang, Yixin; Duan, Luntao; Cui, Zhizhong

    2015-01-29

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) GX0101, which is a field strain with a naturally occurring insertion of the reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) long terminal repeat (LTR) fragment, shows distinct biological activities. Deletion of the meq gene in GX0101 contributes to its complete loss of pathogenicity and oncogenicity in SPF chickens, but this virus has a kanamycin resistance gene (kan(r)) residual at the site of meq gene. In the present study, the kan(r) was knocked out and a meq-null virus with a good replicative ability termed SC9-1 was selected. In vivo studies showed that SC9-1 had no pathogenicity or tumorigenicity to chickens. There were no obvious impacts on chicken weight, immune organ index or antibody levels induced by avian influenza virus (AIV)/newcastle disease virus (NDV) inactivated vaccines compared with the control group. The SC9-1 virus provided superior protection than CVI988/Rispens vaccine in both SPF chickens and Hy-line brown chickens when challenged with a very virulent MDV (rMd5 strain). There was no obvious change in SC9-1 protection against MDV rMd5 in SPF chickens after 20 passages in chicken embryonic fibroblast cells (CEFs). In conclusion, SC9-1 is a safe and effective vaccine candidate for the prevention of Marek's disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural and Biochemical Consequences of Disease-Causing Mutations in the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of the Human TRPV4 Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Hitoshi; Procko, Erik; Sotomayor, Marcos; Gaudet, Rachelle (Harvard-Med); (Harvard)

    2012-10-23

    The TRPV4 calcium-permeable cation channel plays important physiological roles in osmosensation, mechanosensation, cell barrier formation, and bone homeostasis. Recent studies reported that mutations in TRPV4, including some in its ankyrin repeat domain (ARD), are associated with human inherited diseases, including neuropathies and skeletal dysplasias, probably because of the increased constitutive activity of the channel. TRPV4 activity is regulated by the binding of calmodulin and small molecules such as ATP to the ARD at its cytoplasmic N-terminus. We determined structures of ATP-free and -bound forms of human TRPV4-ARD and compared them with available TRPV-ARD structures. The third inter-repeat loop region (Finger 3 loop) is flexible and may act as a switch to regulate channel activity. Comparisons of TRPV-ARD structures also suggest an evolutionary link between ARD structure and ATP binding ability. Thermal stability analyses and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ATP increases stability in TRPV-ARDs that can bind ATP. Biochemical analyses of a large panel of TRPV4-ARD mutations associated with human inherited diseases showed that some impaired thermal stability while others weakened ATP binding ability, suggesting molecular mechanisms for the diseases.

  2. Cognitive change in patients with Huntington disease on the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beglinger, Leigh J; Duff, Kevin; Allison, Jessica; Theriault, Danielle; O'Rourke, Justin J F; Leserman, Anne; Paulsen, Jane S

    2010-07-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with cognitive, motor, and psychiatric deterioration over time. Although there is currently no cure for HD, there has been a surge of clinical trials available to patients with HD over the past 5 years. However, cognitive measures have generally been lacking from these trials. A brief, repeatable neuropsychological battery is needed to assess cognitive endpoints. The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) may be useful for assessing change in interventional studies or for clinical monitoring. A total of 38 patients with HD were assessed using the RBANS, other cognitive tests, and the standardized HD battery (Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale, UHDRS) at two clinic visits approximately 16 months apart. The RBANS Attention Index, as well as individual subtest scores on Coding, Digit Span, List Recognition, Figure Copy, and Figure Recall all declined significantly over this interval. Performance on the UHDRS cognitive tests (Symbol Digit Modalities; Stroop Color, and Stroop Word) also declined, as did functional capacity. Results suggest that cognitive changes were detected both on established cognitive tasks used in HD research and on the RBANS in patients with measurable functional decline. The RBANS provided additional information about other cognitive domains affected (e.g., memory) and may be a useful measure for tracking longitudinal change.

  3. Thrombospondin-1 type 1 repeats in a model of inflammatory bowel disease: transcript profile and therapeutic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenaida P Lopez-Dee

    Full Text Available Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 is a matricellular protein with regulatory functions in inflammation and cancer. The type 1 repeats (TSR domains of TSP-1 have been shown to interact with a wide range of proteins that result in the anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor properties of TSP-1. To ascertain possible functions and evaluate potential therapeutic effects of TSRs in inflammatory bowel disease, we conducted clinical, histological and microarray analyses on a mouse model of induced colitis. We used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS to induce colitis in wild-type (WT mice for 7 days. Simultaneously, mice were injected with either saline or one form of TSP-1 derived recombinant proteins, containing either (1 the three type 1 repeats of the TSP-1 (3TSR, (2 the second type 1 repeat (TSR2, or (3 TSR2 with the RFK sequence (TSR2+RFK. Total RNA isolated from the mice colons were processed and hybridized to mouse arrays. Array data were validated by real-time qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Histological and disease indices reveal that the mice treated with the TSRs show different patterns of leukocytic infiltration and that 3TSR treatment was the most effective in decreasing inflammation in DSS-induced colitis. Transcriptional profiling revealed differentially expressed (DE genes, with the 3TSR-treated mice showing the least deviation from the WT-water controls. In conclusion, this study shows that 3TSR treatment is effective in attenuating the inflammatory response to DSS injury. In addition, the transcriptomics work unveils novel genetic data that suggest beneficial application of the TSR domains in inflammatory bowel disease.

  4. Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into CVI988 strain of Marek’s disease virus results in enhanced growth and protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been reported that co-cultivation of a JM/102W strain, a virulent strain of Marek’s disease virus (MDV), with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in the integration of REV long terminal repeat (LTR) into the MDV repeat region. The resulting virus, RM1, was unable to transform T-cells ...

  5. DNA dynamics is likely to be a factor in the genomic nucleotide repeats expansions related to diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boian S Alexandrov

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeats sequences (TRS represent a common type of genomic DNA motif whose expansion is associated with a large number of human diseases. The driving molecular mechanisms of the TRS ongoing dynamic expansion across generations and within tissues and its influence on genomic DNA functions are not well understood. Here we report results for a novel and notable collective breathing behavior of genomic DNA of tandem TRS, leading to propensity for large local DNA transient openings at physiological temperature. Our Langevin molecular dynamics (LMD and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulations demonstrate that the patterns of openings of various TRSs depend specifically on their length. The collective propensity for DNA strand separation of repeated sequences serves as a precursor for outsized intermediate bubble states independently of the G/C-content. We report that repeats have the potential to interfere with the binding of transcription factors to their consensus sequence by altered DNA breathing dynamics in proximity of the binding sites. These observations might influence ongoing attempts to use LMD and MCMC simulations for TRS-related modeling of genomic DNA functionality in elucidating the common denominators of the dynamic TRS expansion mutation with potential therapeutic applications.

  6. CAG repeat lengths > or =335 attenuate the phenotype in the R6/2 Huntington's disease transgenic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragatsis, I; Goldowitz, D; Del Mar, N; Deng, Y P; Meade, C A; Liu, Li; Sun, Z; Dietrich, P; Yue, J; Reiner, A

    2009-03-01

    With spontaneous elongation of the CAG repeat in the R6/2 transgene to > or =335, resulting in a transgene protein too large for passive entry into nuclei via the nuclear pore, we observed an abrupt increase in lifespan to >20 weeks, compared to the 12 weeks common in R6/2 mice with 150 repeats. In the > or =335 CAG mice, large ubiquitinated aggregates of mutant protein were common in neuronal dendrites and perikaryal cytoplasm, but intranuclear aggregates were small and infrequent. Message and protein for the > or =335 CAG transgene were reduced to one-third that in 150 CAG R6/2 mice. Neurological and neurochemical abnormalities were delayed in onset and less severe than in 150 CAG R6/2 mice. These findings suggest that polyQ length and pathogenicity in Huntington's disease may not be linearly related, and pathogenicity may be less severe with extreme repeats. Both diminished mutant protein and reduced nuclear entry may contribute to phenotype attenuation.

  7. C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions are a frequent cause of Huntington disease phenocopies in the Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Kartanou, Chrisoula; Kladi, Athina; Panas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in C9ORF72 has been identified as the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia in many populations, including the Greek. Recently, C9ORF72 expansions were reported as the most common genetic cause of Huntington disease (HD) phenocopies in a UK population. In the present study, we screened a selected cohort of 40 Greek patients with HD phenocopies for C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions using repeat-primed polymerase chain reaction. We identified 2 patients (5%) with pathologic expansions. The first patient had chorea, behavioral-psychiatric disturbance, cognitive impairment, and a positive family history, fulfilling the strictest criteria for HD phenocopy. The second patient was sporadic and had parkinsonism, behavioral-psychiatric disturbance, and cognitive impairment, corresponding to a broader definition of HD phenocopy. These findings identify C9ORF72 expansions as a frequent cause of HD phenocopies in the Greek population, confirming recent findings in other populations and supporting proposed diagnostic testing for C9ORF72 expansions in patients with HD-like syndromes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Influence of Repeat Surgery and Residual Disease on Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Anne; Bjerre, Karsten; Offersen, Birgitte V;

    2015-01-01

    . Within 2 months after initial BCS, 1342 (11 %) of these women had a re-excision, and 756 (6 %) of the women had a mastectomy. Residual disease was found in 20 % of re-excisions and 59 % of mastectomies. In adjusted analysis, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) outside the invasive tumor, positive initial...... margin, and age younger than 50 years were associated with increased risk of residual disease. In the adjusted analysis, patients with residual disease after re-excision had an increased risk of IBTR regardless whether residual findings were invasive carcinoma [hazard ratio (HR), 2.97; 95 % confidence...

  9. Sphingolipids: the nexus between Gaucher disease and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Maria

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sphingolipids constitute a diverse array of lipids in which fatty acids are linked through amide bonds to a long-chain base, and, structurally, they form the building blocks of eukaryotic membranes. Ceramide is the simplest and serves as a precursor for the synthesis of the three main types of complex sphingolipids; sphingomyelins, glycosphingolipids and gangliosides. Sphingolipids are no longer considered mere structural spectators, but bioactive molecules with functions beyond providing a mechanically stable and chemically resistant barrier to a diverse array of cellular processes. Although sphingolipids form a somewhat minor component of the total cellular lipid pool, their accumulation in certain cells forms the basis of many diseases. Human diseases caused by alterations in the metabolism of sphingolipids are conventionally inborn errors of degradation, the most common being Gaucher disease, in which the catabolism of glucosylceramide is defective and accumulates. Insulin resistance has been reported in patients with Gaucher disease and this article presents evidence that this is due to perturbations in the metabolism of sphingolipids. Ceramide and the more complex sphingolipids, the gangliosides, are constituents of specialised membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts. Lipid rafts play a role in facilitating and regulating lipid and protein interactions in cells, and their unique lipid composition enables them to carry out this role. The lipid composition of rafts is altered in cell models of Gaucher disease which may be responsible for impaired lipid and protein sorting observed in this disorder, and consequently pathology. Lipid rafts are also necessary for correct insulin signalling, and a perturbed lipid raft composition may impair insulin signalling. Unravelling common nodes of interaction between insulin resistance and Gaucher disease may lead to a better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms behind pathology.

  10. [Susceptible and resistant factors in neuro-immune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinya; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2013-05-01

    Neuro-immune diseases (NIDs) are caused by a complex interaction between multiple genetic and environmental factors, both of which can have some impacts on susceptibility or resistance to each disease. Remarkable advance in genome technology made possible the effective screening of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms in thousands of samples. Additionally, epidemiological science, supported by microbiology, immunology and biochemistry, has revealed many possible environmental factors. Integrating genetic and environmental research data will pave the way to inform and personalize therapeutic decision-making in NIDs. This review aims to discuss susceptible and resistant factors that have attracted the most attention in the recent years, especially focusing on multiple sclerosis, which is one of the most common NIDs.

  11. Intergenerational Instability of the CAG Repeat of the Gene for Machado-Joseph Disease (MJD1) is Affected by the Genotype of the Normal Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    五十嵐, 修一; Igarashi, Shuichi

    1997-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat in the MJD1 gene at 14q32.1. To identify elements affecting the intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat, we investigated whether the CGG/GGG polymorphism at the 3' end of the CAG repeat affects the intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat. The [expanded (CAG) n-CGG]/[normal (CAG) n-GGG] haplotypes were found to result in significantly greater instability...

  12. Genome-Editing Technologies for Enhancing Plant Disease Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Iovieno, Paolo; Frusciante, Luigi; Ercolano, Maria R.

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for agricultural science in the 21st century is to improve yield stability through the progressive development of superior cultivars. The increasing numbers of infectious plant diseases that are caused by plant-pathogens make it ever more necessary to develop new strategies for plant disease resistance breeding. Targeted genome engineering allows the introduction of precise modifications directly into a commercial variety, offering a viable alternative to traditional breeding methods. Genome editing is a powerful tool for modifying crucial players in the plant immunity system. In this work, we propose and discuss genome-editing strategies and targets for improving resistance to phytopathogens. First of all, we present the opportunities to rewrite the effector-target sequence for avoiding effector-target molecular interaction and also to modify effector-target promoters for increasing the expression of target genes involved in the resistance process. In addition, we describe potential approaches for obtaining synthetic R-genes through genome-editing technologies (GETs). Finally, we illustrate a genome editing flowchart to modify the pathogen recognition sites and engineer an R-gene that mounts resistance to some phylogenetically divergent pathogens. GETs potentially mark the beginning of a new era, in which synthetic biology affords a basis for obtaining a reinforced plant defense system. Nowadays it is conceivable that by modulating the function of the major plant immunity players, we will be able to improve crop performance for a sustainable agriculture. PMID:27990151

  13. Fluconazole resistance in cryptococcal disease: emerging or intrinsic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jenny Wan Sai; McCormack, Joe

    2013-04-01

    With the widespread use of long-term fluconazole prophylaxis and suppressive treatment, the potential development of fluconazole resistance poses a threat to the management of cryptococcal disease. Interpretive breakpoints for the in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of C. neoformans have not been established and it is unclear whether the fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) is clinically relevant. To gain insight into the management of patients with cryptococcosis who fail fluconazole therapy, we conducted a PubMed literature search for cases of fluconazole-resistant cryptococcosis reported from 1991 to 2011. A total of 20 such cases were identified in which most patients had AIDS and 30% had never had prior exposure to fluconazole. Fluconazole failure in patients with cryptococcal disease cannot be fully attributed to emerging resistance of the etiologic agent and heteroresistance is a potential alternative mechanism. There is a need to refine the definition of fluconazole-resistant cryptococcosis and additional studies of such patients will improve treatment strategies and outcomes.

  14. Insulin Resistance and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Michelle D; Hedlin, Haley; Stefanick, Marcia L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance is associated with diabetes mellitus, but it is uncertain whether it improves cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified 15,288 women from the Women's Health Initiative Biomarkers s......-cholesterol and did not provide independent prognostic information in postmenopausal women without diabetes mellitus. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION INFORMATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrial.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00000611....

  15. Pathophysiology of resistant hypertension in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campese, Vito M

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension associated with chronic kidney diseases often is resistant to drug treatment. This review deals with two main aspects of the management of CKD patients with hypertension: the role of sodium/volume and the need for dietary salt restriction, as well as appropriate use of diuretics and what currently is called sequential nephron blockade; the second aspect that is addressed extensively in this review is the role of the sympathetic nervous system and the possible clinical use of renal denervation.

  16. Role of Dehydrodiferulates in Maize Resistance to Pests and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa A. Malvar

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic esters have attracted considerable interest due to the potential they offer for peroxidase catalysed cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides. Particularly, feruloyl residues undergo radical coupling reactions that result in cross-linking (intra-/intermolecular between polysaccharides, between polysaccharides and lignin and, between polysaccharides and proteins. This review addresses for the first time different studies in which it is established that cross-linking by dehydrodiferulates contributes to maize’s defences to pests and diseases. Dehydrodiferulate cross-links are involved in maize defence mechanisms against insects such as the European, Mediterranean, and tropical corn borers and, storage pest as the maize weevil. In addition, cross-links are also discussed to be involved in genetic resistance of maize to fungus diseases as Gibberella ear and stalk rot. Resistance against insects and fungus attending dehydrodiferulates could go hand in hand. Quantitative trait loci mapping for these cell wall components could be a useful tool for enhancing resistance to pest and diseases in future breeding programs.

  17. Introduction of Bottle Gourd DNA into Watermelon by Soaking Embryo for Resistance to Wilt Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to utilize wilt disease resistance of bottle gourd, total DNA of bottle gourd was introduced into watermelon through the method of soaking embryo. The DNA-introduced variant offsprings were cultured in contaminated soil to elect the wilt disease resistance for more than 3 generations. 2 high- resistant and 2 middle-resistant watermelon materials were obtained.

  18. The Association between C9orf72 Repeats and Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD in Caucasian populations. However, the relationship between C9orf72 repeats and Alzheimer’s disease (AD was not clear. Additionally, there were few articles assessing C9orf72 in other ethnicities with ALS. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to investigate the relationship between C9orf72 repeat expansions (≥30 repeats and intermediate repeat copies (20–29 repeats and AD or ALS. The results suggested positive correlations between C9orf72 repeat expansions and the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (OR = 6.36, 95% CI = 3.13–12.92, and p<0.00001, while intermediate repeat copies of C9orf72 gene were not associated with the risk of the disease. C9orf72 repeat expansions were positively correlated with the risk of familial and sporadic ALS (OR = 293.25, 95% CI = 148.17–580.38, and p<0.00001; OR = 35.57, 95% CI = 19.61–64.51, and p<0.00001. There was a positive correlation between the gene variations and ALS risk among Caucasians and Asians (OR = 57.56, 95% CI = 36.73–90.22, and p<0.00001; OR = 6.35, 95% CI = 1.39–29.02, and p=0.02.

  19. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot-based analysis of the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat in different motor neuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübers, Annemarie; Marroquin, Nicolai; Schmoll, Birgit; Vielhaber, Stefan; Just, Marlies; Mayer, Benjamin; Högel, Josef; Dorst, Johannes; Mertens, Thomas; Just, Walter; Aulitzky, Anna; Wais, Verena; Ludolph, Albert C; Kubisch, Christian; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Volk, Alexander E

    2014-05-01

    The GGGGCC-hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This study determined the frequency of C9orf72 repeat expansions in different motor neuron diseases (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), motor neuron diseases affecting primarily the first or the second motor neuron and hereditary spastic paraplegia). Whereas most studies on C9orf72 repeat expansions published so far rely on a polymerase chain reaction-based screening, we applied both polymerase chain reaction-based techniques and Southern blotting. Furthermore, we determined the sensitivity and specificity of Southern blotting of the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat in DNA derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines. C9orf72 repeat expansions were found in 27.1% out of 166 familial ALS patients, only once in 68 sporadic ALS patients, and not in 61 hereditary spastic paraplegia patients or 52 patients with motor neuron diseases affecting clinically primarily either the first or the second motor neuron. We found hints for a correlation between C9orf72 repeat length and the age of onset. Somatic instability of the C9orf72 repeat was observed in lymphoblastoid cell lines compared with DNA derived from whole blood from the same patient and therefore caution is warranted for repeat length determination in immortalized cell lines.

  20. Drosophila melanogaster As a Model Organism to Study RNA Toxicity of Repeat Expansion-Associated Neurodegenerative and Neuromuscular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Alex C.; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin

    2017-01-01

    For nearly a century, the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has proven to be a valuable tool in our understanding of fundamental biological processes, and has empowered our discoveries, particularly in the field of neuroscience. In recent years, Drosophila has emerged as a model organism for human neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. In this review, we highlight a number of recent studies that utilized the Drosophila model to study repeat-expansion associated diseases (READs), such as polyglutamine diseases, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2), and C9ORF72-associated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (C9-ALS/FTD). Discoveries regarding the possible mechanisms of RNA toxicity will be focused here. These studies demonstrate Drosophila as an excellent in vivo model system that can reveal novel mechanistic insights into human disorders, providing the foundation for translational research and therapeutic development. PMID:28377694

  1. Repeated sessions of transcranial direct current stimulation evaluation on fatigue and daytime sleepiness in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forogh, Bijan; Rafiei, Maryam; Arbabi, Amin; Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Madani, Seyed Pezhman; Sajadi, Simin

    2017-02-01

    Parkinson is a common and disabling disease that affects patient's and career's quality of life. Unfortunately, medications, such as dopaminergic and sedative-hypnotic drugs, as an effective treatment have unwilling side effects. Recently, Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) in conjunction with medication becomes popular as a complementary safe treatment and several studies have proved its effectiveness on controlling motor and specially non-motor aspects of Parkinson's disease. In this randomized double-blind parallel study, 23 patients with Parkinson's disease divided into two groups of real tDCS plus occupational therapy and sham tDCS plus occupational therapy and the effects of therapeutic sessions (eight sessions tDCS with 0.06 mA/cm(2) current, 20 min on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) were evaluated on fatigue and daytime sleepiness just after therapeutic course and in 3-month follow-up. tDCS had a significant effect on fatigue and no effect on daytime sleepiness reduction in patients with Parkinson's disease. tDCS is an effective and safe complementary treatment on fatigue reduction in Parkinson's disease.

  2. Allopurinol Resistance in Leishmania infantum from Dogs with Disease Relapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Yasur-Landau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis caused by the protozoan Leishmania infantum is a zoonotic, life threatening parasitic disease. Domestic dogs are the main peridomestic reservoir, and allopurinol is the most frequently used drug for the control of infection, alone or in combination with other drugs. Resistance of Leishmania strains from dogs to allopurinol has not been described before in clinical studies.Following our observation of clinical disease relapse in dogs under allopurinol treatment, we tested susceptibility to allopurinol of L. infantum isolated from groups of dogs pre-treatment, treated in remission, and with disease relapse during treatment. Promastigote isolates obtained from four treated relapsed dogs (TR group showed an average half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 996 μg/mL. A significantly lower IC50 (P = 0.01 was found for isolates from ten dogs before treatment (NT group, 200 μg/mL, as well as for five isolates obtained from treated dogs in remission (TA group, 268 μg/mL. Axenic amastigotes produced from isolates of the TR group also showed significantly higher (P = 0.002 IC50 compared to the NT group (1678 and 671 μg/mL, respectively. The lower sensitivity of intracellular amastigotes from the TR group relative to those from the NT group (P = 0.002 was confirmed using an infected macrophage model (6.3% and 20% growth inhibition, respectively at 300 μg/mL allopurinol.This is the first study to demonstrate allopurinol resistance in L. infantum and to associate it with disease relapse in the canine host. These findings are of concern as allopurinol is the main drug used for long term control of the disease in dogs, and resistant L. infantum strains may enhance uncontrolled transmission to humans and to other dogs.

  3. A critical window of CAG repeat-length correlates with phenotype severity in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Damian M; Alaghband, Yasaman; Hickey, Miriam A; Joshi, Prasad R; Hong, S Candice; Zhu, Chunni; Ando, Timothy K; André, Véronique M; Cepeda, Carlos; Watson, Joseph B; Levine, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    The R6/2 mouse is the most frequently used model for experimental and preclinical drug trials in Huntington's disease (HD). When the R6/2 mouse was first developed, it carried exon 1 of the huntingtin gene with ~150 cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeats. The model presented with a rapid and aggressive phenotype that shared many features with the human condition and was particularly similar to juvenile HD. However, instability in the CAG repeat length due to different breeding practices has led to both decreases and increases in average CAG repeat lengths among colonies. Given the inverse relationship in human HD between CAG repeat length and age at onset and to a degree, the direct relationship with severity of disease, we have investigated the effect of altered CAG repeat length. Four lines, carrying ~110, ~160, ~210, and ~310 CAG repeats, were examined using a battery of tests designed to assess the basic R6/2 phenotype. These included electrophysiological properties of striatal medium-sized spiny neurons, motor activity, inclusion formation, and protein expression. The results showed an unpredicted, inverted "U-shaped" relationship between CAG repeat length and phenotype; increasing the CAG repeat length from 110 to 160 exacerbated the R6/2 phenotype, whereas further increases to 210 and 310 CAG repeats greatly ameliorated the phenotype. These findings demonstrate that the expected relationship between CAG repeat length and disease severity observed in humans is lost in the R6/2 mouse model and highlight the importance of CAG repeat-length determination in preclinical drug trials that use this model.

  4. Occupational hazards of traditional healers: repeated unprotected blood exposures risk infectious disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Carolyn M; Salato, José; Blevins, Meridith; Silva, Wilson; González-Calvo, Lázaro; Vermund, Sten H; Gaspar, Felisbela

    2016-11-01

    Healers provide support for acute and chronic illnesses in rural Mozambique, such as socially acceptable traditional 'vaccinations' (subcutaneous cuts in the skin to rub herbs directly into the bloody lesion). We aimed to document the frequency of blood exposure by traditional practitioners in Mozambique. We conducted surveys with a simple random sample of 236 traditional healers in Zambézia province. Chi-square and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to compare 'injection' behaviours across districts. Healers treated a median of eight patients in the past month (IQR: 4-15). About 75% conducted 'injections'. These healers 'injected' a median of four patients (IQR: 1-8), used a new razor a median of three times (IQR: 1-8), and almost never used gloves. Lifetime blood exposures among those who provided 'injections' during treatments were estimated to be 1758 over a healer's career. The majority of healers are exposed repeatedly to patient blood. Given the high prevalence of HIV, hepatitis B and C virus, and other blood-borne agents, specific healer practices are an occupational hazard and reuse of razors is risky for their clients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Repeated holdout Cross-Validation of Model to Estimate Risk of Lyme Disease by Landscape Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    We previously modeled Lyme disease (LD) risk at the landscape scale; here we evaluate the model's overall goodness-of-fit using holdout validation. Landscapes were characterized within road-bounded analysis units (AU). Observed LD cases (obsLD) were ascertained per AU. Data were ...

  6. Relationships between repeated instruction on inhalation therapy, medication adherence, and health status in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Takemura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Masaya Takemura1, Katsumi Mitsui2, Ryo Itotani1, Manabu Ishitoko1, Shinko Suzuki1, Masataka Matsumoto1, Kensaku Aihara1, Tsuyoshi Oguma1, Tetsuya Ueda1, Hitoshi Kagioka1, Motonari Fukui11Division of Respiratory Medicine, 2Division of Pharmacy, Tazuke Kofukai, Medical Research Institute, Kitano Hospital, Osaka, JapanPurpose: Adherence to inhalation therapy is a critical determinant of the success of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD management. However, in practice, nonadherence to inhalation therapy is very common in COPD patients. The effects of adherence to inhalation therapy in COPD have not been fully studied, and less is known about the relationship between medication adherence and quality of life in COPD. Our aim is to assess the factors that contribute to adherence to inhalation therapy and examine their correlation with quality of life.Patients and methods: A cross-sectional analysis of 88 COPD patients was performed using a self-reported adherence questionnaire with responses on a 5-point Likert scale.Results: Of the 88 patients who were potential participants, 55 (63% responded with usable information. The only significant factor associated with the overall mean adherence score was receiving repeated instruction about inhalation techniques (P = 0.032. Of the 55 respondents, 22 (40.0% were given repeated verbal instruction and/or demonstrations of inhalation technique by a respiratory physician. Significant correlations were found between the overall mean adherence score and the health-related quality of life score (St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire: total, r = −0.35, P = 0.023; symptoms, r = −0.43, P = 0.002; impacts, r = −0.35, P = 0.011. Furthermore, patients with repeated instruction showed better quality of life scores than those who did not receive instruction (total, P = 0.030; symptoms, P = 0.038; impacts, P = 0.019.Conclusions: Repeated instruction for inhalation techniques may contribute to adherence to

  7. The occurrence of postharvest diseases on apples resistant to scab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Bryk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of storage diseases on fruit of seven scab resistant apple cultivars (Freedom, Rajka, Topaz, Rubinola, Enterprise, Goldstar, GoldRush grafted on M.9 was investigated in 2001-2005. The trees were planted in 1995. It was found that after storage (4 and 6 months at 2°C, 85-90% RH the most severe appeared to be bull's eye rot (Pezicula spp.. The most sensitive cultivars to this disease were: Topaz, Freedom, Goldstar, the least sensitive were Rubinola, Enterprise, Rajka. Other postharvest diseases like gray mold (Botrytis cinerea, blue mold (Penicillium expansum and brown rot (Monilinia fructigena were not common. 'Rajka' and 'Goldstar' were susceptible to bitter pit, and 'Freedom' to superficial scald.

  8. Relationship between drug resistance and the clustered, regularly interspaced, short, palindromic repeat-associated protein genes cas1 and cas2 in Shigella from giant panda dung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lu; Deng, Lin-Hua; Zhang, Ri-Peng; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Li, De-Sheng; Xi, Li-Xin; Chen, Zhen-rong; Yang, Rui; Huang, Jie; Zeng, Yang-ru; Wu, Hong-Lin; Cao, San-Jie; Wu, Rui; Huang, Yong; Yan, Qi-Gui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: To detect drug resistance in Shigella obtained from the dung of the giant panda, explore the factors leading to drug resistance in Shigella, understand the characteristics of clustered, regularly interspaced, short, palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and assess the relationship between CRISPR and drug resistance. Methods: We collected fresh feces from 27 healthy giant pandas in the Giant Panda Conservation base (Wolong, China). We identified the strains of Shigella in the samples by using nucleotide sequence analysis. Further, the Kirby-Bauer paper method was used to determine drug sensitivity of the Shigella strains. CRISPR-associated protein genes cas1 and cas2 in Shigella were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the PCR products were sequenced and compared. Results: We isolated and identified 17 strains of Shigella from 27 samples, including 14 strains of Shigella flexneri, 2 strains of Shigella sonnei, and 1 strain of Shigella dysenteriae. Further, drug resistance to cefazolin, imipenem, and amoxicillin–clavulanic acid was identified as a serious problem, as multidrug-resistant strains were detected. Further, cas1 and cas2 showed different degrees of point mutations. Conclusion: The CRISPR system widely exists in Shigella and shares homology with that in Escherichia coli. The cas1 and cas 2 mutations contribute to the different levels of resistance. Point mutations at sites 3176455, 3176590, and 3176465 in cas1 (a); sites 3176989, 3176992, and 3176995 in cas1 (b); sites 3176156 and 3176236 in cas2 may affect the resistance of bacteria, cause emergence of multidrug resistance, and increase the types of drug resistance. PMID:28207509

  9. Relationship between drug resistance and the clustered, regularly interspaced, short, palindromic repeat-associated protein genes cas1 and cas2 in Shigella from giant panda dung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lu; Deng, Lin-Hua; Zhang, Ri-Peng; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Li, De-Sheng; Xi, Li-Xin; Chen, Zhen-Rong; Yang, Rui; Huang, Jie; Zeng, Yang-Ru; Wu, Hong-Lin; Cao, San-Jie; Wu, Rui; Huang, Yong; Yan, Qi-Gui

    2017-02-01

    To detect drug resistance in Shigella obtained from the dung of the giant panda, explore the factors leading to drug resistance in Shigella, understand the characteristics of clustered, regularly interspaced, short, palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and assess the relationship between CRISPR and drug resistance. We collected fresh feces from 27 healthy giant pandas in the Giant Panda Conservation base (Wolong, China). We identified the strains of Shigella in the samples by using nucleotide sequence analysis. Further, the Kirby-Bauer paper method was used to determine drug sensitivity of the Shigella strains. CRISPR-associated protein genes cas1 and cas2 in Shigella were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the PCR products were sequenced and compared. We isolated and identified 17 strains of Shigella from 27 samples, including 14 strains of Shigella flexneri, 2 strains of Shigella sonnei, and 1 strain of Shigella dysenteriae. Further, drug resistance to cefazolin, imipenem, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was identified as a serious problem, as multidrug-resistant strains were detected. Further, cas1 and cas2 showed different degrees of point mutations. The CRISPR system widely exists in Shigella and shares homology with that in Escherichia coli. The cas1 and cas 2 mutations contribute to the different levels of resistance. Point mutations at sites 3176455, 3176590, and 3176465 in cas1 (a); sites 3176989, 3176992, and 3176995 in cas1 (b); sites 3176156 and 3176236 in cas2 may affect the resistance of bacteria, cause emergence of multidrug resistance, and increase the types of drug resistance.

  10. A Cluster of Nucleotide-Binding Site-Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes Resides in a Barley Powdery Mildew Resistance Quantitative Trait Loci on 7HL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalapiedra, Carlos P; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Silvar, Cristina; Perovic, Dragan; Ordon, Frank; Gracia, María Pilar; Igartua, Ernesto; Casas, Ana M

    2016-07-01

    Powdery mildew causes severe yield losses in barley production worldwide. Although many resistance genes have been described, only a few have already been cloned. A strong QTL (quantitative trait locus) conferring resistance to a wide array of powdery mildew isolates was identified in a Spanish barley landrace on the long arm of chromosome 7H. Previous studies narrowed down the QTL position, but were unable to identify candidate genes or physically locate the resistance. In this study, the exome of three recombinant lines from a high-resolution mapping population was sequenced and analyzed, narrowing the position of the resistance down to a single physical contig. Closer inspection of the region revealed a cluster of closely related NBS-LRR (nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat containing protein) genes. Large differences were found between the resistant lines and the reference genome of cultivar Morex, in the form of PAV (presence-absence variation) in the composition of the NBS-LRR cluster. Finally, a template-guided assembly was performed and subsequent expression analysis revealed that one of the new assembled candidate genes is transcribed. In summary, the results suggest that NBS-LRR genes, absent from the reference and the susceptible genotypes, could be functional and responsible for the powdery mildew resistance. The procedure followed is an example of the use of NGS (next-generation sequencing) tools to tackle the challenges of gene cloning when the target gene is absent from the reference genome.

  11. A Cluster of Nucleotide-Binding Site–Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes Resides in a Barley Powdery Mildew Resistance Quantitative Trait Loci on 7HL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos P. Cantalapiedra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew causes severe yield losses in barley production worldwide. Although many resistance genes have been described, only a few have already been cloned. A strong QTL (quantitative trait locus conferring resistance to a wide array of powdery mildew isolates was identified in a Spanish barley landrace on the long arm of chromosome 7H. Previous studies narrowed down the QTL position, but were unable to identify candidate genes or physically locate the resistance. In this study, the exome of three recombinant lines from a high-resolution mapping population was sequenced and analyzed, narrowing the position of the resistance down to a single physical contig. Closer inspection of the region revealed a cluster of closely related NBS-LRR (nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat containing protein genes. Large differences were found between the resistant lines and the reference genome of cultivar Morex, in the form of PAV (presence-absence variation in the composition of the NBS-LRR cluster. Finally, a template-guided assembly was performed and subsequent expression analysis revealed that one of the new assembled candidate genes is transcribed. In summary, the results suggest that NBS-LRR genes, absent from the reference and the susceptible genotypes, could be functional and responsible for the powdery mildew resistance. The procedure followed is an example of the use of NGS (next-generation sequencing tools to tackle the challenges of gene cloning when the target gene is absent from the reference genome.

  12. Transfer of genetic therapy across human populations: molecular targets for increasing patient coverage in repeat expansion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Miguel A; Curtis, Helen J; Douglas, Andrew G L; Hammond, Suzan M; O'Loughlin, Aisling J; Sobrido, Maria J; Scholefield, Janine; Wood, Matthew J A

    2016-02-01

    Allele-specific gene therapy aims to silence expression of mutant alleles through targeting of disease-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, SNP linkage to disease varies between populations, making such molecular therapies applicable only to a subset of patients. Moreover, not all SNPs have the molecular features necessary for potent gene silencing. Here we provide knowledge to allow the maximisation of patient coverage by building a comprehensive understanding of SNPs ranked according to their predicted suitability toward allele-specific silencing in 14 repeat expansion diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy 1, myotonic dystrophy 2, Huntington's disease and several spinocerebellar ataxias. Our systematic analysis of DNA sequence variation shows that most annotated SNPs are not suitable for potent allele-specific silencing across populations because of suboptimal sequence features and low variability (>97% in HD). We suggest maximising patient coverage by selecting SNPs with high heterozygosity across populations, and preferentially targeting SNPs that lead to purine:purine mismatches in wild-type alleles to obtain potent allele-specific silencing. We therefore provide fundamental knowledge on strategies for optimising patient coverage of therapeutics for microsatellite expansion disorders by linking analysis of population genetic variation to the selection of molecular targets.

  13. A method to construct a points system to predict cardiovascular disease considering repeated measures of risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbayo-Herencia, Julio Antonio; Vigo, Maria Isabel; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Current predictive models for cardiovascular disease based on points systems use the baseline situation of the risk factors as independent variables. These models do not take into account the variability of the risk factors over time. Predictive models for other types of disease also exist that do consider the temporal variability of a single biological marker in addition to the baseline variables. However, due to their complexity these other models are not used in daily clinical practice. Bearing in mind the clinical relevance of these issues and that cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide we show the properties and viability of a new methodological alternative for constructing cardiovascular risk scores to make predictions of cardiovascular disease with repeated measures of the risk factors and retaining the simplicity of the points systems so often used in clinical practice (construction, statistical validation by simulation and explanation of potential utilization). We have also applied the system clinically upon a set of simulated data solely to help readers understand the procedure constructed. PMID:26893963

  14. Pilot study: Assessing repeatability of the EcoWalk platform resistive pressure sensors to measure plantar pressure during barefoot standing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zequera, Martha; Perdomo, Oscar; Wilches, Carlos; Vizcaya, Pedro

    2013-06-01

    Plantar pressure provides useful information to assess the feet's condition. These systems have emerged as popular tools in clinical environment. These systems present errors and no compensation information is presented by the manufacturer, leading to uncertainty in the measurements. Ten healthy subjects, 5 females and 5 males, were recruited. Lateral load distribution, antero-posterior load distribution, average pressure, contact area, and force were recorded. The aims of this study were to assess repeatability of the EcoWalk system and identify the range of pressure values observed in the normal foot. The coefficient of repeatability was less than 4% for all parameters considered.

  15. Gene expression profiling of R6/2 transgenic mice with different CAG repeat lengths reveals genes associated with disease onset and progression in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Seredenina, Tamara; Coppola, Giovanni; Kuhn, Alexandre; Geschwind, Daniel H; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Thomas, Elizabeth A

    2011-06-01

    R6/2 transgenic mice with expanded CAG repeats (>300) have a surprisingly prolonged disease progression and longer lifespan than prototypical parent R6/2 mice (carrying 150 CAGs); however, the mechanism of this phenotype amelioration is unknown. We compared gene expression profiles in the striatum of R6/2 transgenic mice carrying ~300 CAG repeats (R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice) to those carrying ~150 CAG repeats (R6/2(Q150) transgenic mice) and littermate wildtype controls in order to identify genes that may play determinant roles in the time course of phenotypic expression in these mice. Of the top genes showing concordant expression changes in the striatum of both R6/2 lines, 85% were decreased in expression, while discordant expression changes were observed mostly for genes upregulated in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice. Upregulated genes in the R6/2(Q300) mice were associated with the ubiquitin ligase complex, cell adhesion, protein folding, and establishment of protein localization. We qPCR-validated increases in expression of genes related to the latter category, including Lrsam1, Erp29, Nasp, Tap1, Rab9b, and Pfdn5 in R6/2(Q300) mice, changes that were not observed in R6/2 mice with shorter CAG repeats, even in late stages (i.e., 12 weeks of age). We further tested Lrsam1 and Erp29, the two genes showing the greatest upregulation in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice, for potential neuroprotective effects in primary striatal cultures overexpressing a mutated human huntingtin (htt) fragment. Overexpression of Lrsam1 prevented the loss of NeuN-positive cell bodies in htt171-82Q cultures, concomitant with a reduction of nuclear htt aggregates. Erp29 showed no significant effects in this model. This is consistent with the distinct pattern of htt inclusion localization observed in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice, in which smaller cytoplasmic inclusions represent the major form of insoluble htt in the cell, as opposed to large nuclear inclusions observed in R6/2(Q150) transgenic mice

  16. Modeling mass drug treatment and resistant filaria disease transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuady, A. M.; Nuraini, N.; Soewono, E.; Tasman, H.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    It has been indicated that a long term application of combined mass drug treatment may contribute to the development of drug resistance in lymphatic filariasis. This phenomenon is not well understood due to the complexity of filaria life cycle. In this paper we formulate a mathematical model for the spread of mass drug resistant in a filaria endemic region. The model is represented in a 13-dimensional Host-Vector system. The basic reproductive ratio of the system which is obtained from the next generation matrix, and analysis of stability of both the disease free equilibrium and the coexistence equilibria are shown. Numerical simulation for long term dynamics for possible field conditions is also shown.

  17. Mucin variable number tandem repeat polymorphisms and severity of cystic fibrosis lung disease: significant association with MUC5AC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueliang Guo

    Full Text Available Variability in cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease is partially due to non-CFTR genetic modifiers. Mucin genes are very polymorphic, and mucins play a key role in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease; therefore, mucin genes are strong candidates as genetic modifiers. DNA from CF patients recruited for extremes of lung phenotype was analyzed by Southern blot or PCR to define variable number tandem repeat (VNTR length polymorphisms for MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC7. VNTR length polymorphisms were tested for association with lung disease severity and for linkage disequilibrium (LD with flanking single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. No strong associations were found for MUC1, MUC2, or MUC7. A significant association was found between the overall distribution of MUC5AC VNTR length and CF lung disease severity (p = 0.025; n = 468 patients; plus, there was robust association of the specific 6.4 kb HinfI VNTR fragment with severity of lung disease (p = 6.2×10(-4 after Bonferroni correction. There was strong LD between MUC5AC VNTR length modes and flanking SNPs. The severity-associated 6.4 kb VNTR allele of MUC5AC was confirmed to be genetically distinct from the 6.3 kb allele, as it showed significantly stronger association with nearby SNPs. These data provide detailed respiratory mucin gene VNTR allele distributions in CF patients. Our data also show a novel link between the MUC5AC 6.4 kb VNTR allele and severity of CF lung disease. The LD pattern with surrounding SNPs suggests that the 6.4 kb allele contains, or is linked to, important functional genetic variation.

  18. Expressional and Biochemical Characterization of Rice Disease Resistance Gene Xa3/Xa26 Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songjie Xu; Yinglong Cao; Xianghua Li; Shiping Wang

    2007-01-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa L.) Xa3/Xa26 gene, conferring race-specific resistance to bacterial blight disease and encoding a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor kinase-like protein, belongs to a multigene family consisting of tandem clustered homologous genes, colocalizing with several uncharacterized genes for resistance to bacterial blight or fungal blast. To provide more information on the expressional and biochemical characteristics of the Xa3/Xa26 family, we analyzed the family members. Four Xa3/Xa26 family members in the indica rice variety Teqing, which carries a bacterial blight resistance gene with a chromosomal location tightly linked to Xa3/Xa26, and five Xa3/Xa26 family members in the japonica rice variety Nipponbare, which carries at least one uncharacterized blast resistance gene, were constitutively expressed in leaf tissue. The result suggests that some of the family members may be candidates of these uncharacterized resistance genes. At least five putative N-glycosylation sites in the LRR domain of XA3/XA26 protein are not glycosylated. The XA3/XA26 and its family members MRKa and MRKc all possess the consensus sequences of paired cysteines, which putatively function in dimerization of the receptor proteins for signal transduction, immediately before the first LRR and immediately after the last LRR. However, no homo-dimer between the XA3/XA26 molecules or hetero-dimer between XA3/XA26 and MRKa or MRKc were formed, indicating that XA3/XA26 protein might function either as a monomer or a hetero-dimer formed with other protein outside of the XA3/XA26 family. These results provide valuable information for further extensive investigation into this multiple protein family.

  19. Huntington's disease and mitochondrial DNA deletions: event or regular mechanism for mutant huntingtin protein and CAG repeats expansion?!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoei, Mohammad Mehdi; Houshmand, Massoud; Panahi, Mehdi Shafa Shariat; Shariati, Parvin; Rostami, Maryam; Manshadi, Masoumeh Dehghan; Majidizadeh, Tayebeh

    2007-11-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of the respiratory chain complex activities in neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD). Research studies were conducted to determine the possible levels of mitochondrial defect (deletion) in HD patients and consideration of interaction between the expanded Huntingtin gene as a nuclear gene and mitochondria as a cytoplasmic organelle. To determine mtDNA damage, we investigated deletions based in four areas of mitochondrial DNA, in a group of 60 Iranian patients clinically diagnosed with HD and 70 healthy controls. A total of 41 patients out of 60 had CAG expansion (group A). About 19 patients did not show expansion but had the clinical symptoms of HD (group B). MtDNA deletions were classified into four groups according to size; 9 kb, 7.5 kb, 7 kb, and 5 kb. We found one of the four-mtDNA deletions in at least 90% of samples. Multiple deletions have also been observed in 63% of HD patients. None of the normal control (group C) showed mtDNA deletions. The sizes or locations of the deletions did not show a clear correlation with expanded CAG repeat and age in our samples. The study presented evidence that HD patients had higher frequencies of mtDNA deletions in lymphocytes in comparison to the controls. It is thus proposed that CAG repeats instability and mutant Htt are causative factor in mtDNA damage.

  20. Resistive index for kidney evaluation in normal and diseased cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipisca, Vlad; Murino, Carla; Cortese, Laura; Mennonna, Giuseppina; Auletta, Luigi; Vulpe, Vasile; Meomartino, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    The objectives were to determine the resistive index (RI) in normal cats and in cats with various renal diseases, and to evaluate the effect of age on RI. The subjects were cats that had ultrasonography (US) of the urinary tract and RI measurement at our centre between January 2003 and April 2014. Based on clinical evaluation, biochemical and haematological tests, urinalysis and US, the cats were classified as healthy or diseased. RI measurements were made from the interlobar or arcuate arteries. Data were analysed for differences between the right and the left kidney, the two sexes, different age groups in healthy cats, and between healthy and diseased cats. A total of 116 cats (68 males, 48 females) were included: 24 healthy and 92 diseased. In the healthy cats, RI (mean ± SD) differed significantly (P = 0.02) between the right kidney (0.54 ± 0.07) and the left kidney (0.59 ± 0.08). For the left kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.73 ± 0.12) and acute kidney injury (0.72 ± 0.08) (P = 0.0008). For the right kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.72 ± 0.11), acute kidney injury (0.74 ± 0.08), polycystic kidney disease (0.77 ± 0.11) and renal tumour (0.74 ± 0.001) (P cats, useful in the differential diagnosis of diffuse renal diseases. While it does not change with the age of the cat, ultrasonographers should be aware that RI may differ between the two kidneys. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  1. Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) as a potential therapeutic target for Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is caused by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Although the etiology for most PD remains elusive, the identification of specific genetic defects in familial cases of PD and the signaling pathways governed by these genes has provided tremendous insight into PD pathogenesis. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are frequently found in familial and sporadic PD. Although current knowledge regarding the regulatory mechanisms of LRRK2 activation is limited, it is becoming increasingly evident that aberrant kinase activity of the pathologic mutants of LRRK2 is associated with neurodegeneration, suggesting that the kinase activity of LRRK2 is a potential therapeutic target. In addition, LRRK2 inhibitors might provide valuable tools to understand the pathophysiological and physiological roles of LRRK2 as well as the etiology of PD. We discuss here the potential and feasibility of targeting LRRK2 as a therapeutic strategy for PD. PMID:22578536

  2. Burden of Hospital Admission and Repeat Angiography in Angina Pectoris Patients with and without Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Lasse; Abildstrom, Steen Z; Hvelplund, Anders

    2014-01-01

    )(all PMean accumulated hospitalization time was 3.5(3.0-4.0)(days/10 years follow-up) in reference individuals and 4.5(3.8-5.2)/7.0(5.4-8.6)/6.7(5.2-8.1)/6.1(5.2-7.4)/8.6(6.6-10.7) in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries/angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD/1-, 2......AIMS: To evaluate risk of hospitalization due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and repeat coronary angiography (CAG) in stable angina pectoris (SAP) with no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) versus obstructive CAD, and asymptomatic reference individuals. METHODS AND RESULTS: We followed 11...... of hospitalization for CVD irrespective of CAG findings and cardiovascular comorbidity. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios(95%CI) for patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries was 3.0(2.5-3.5), for angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD 3.9(3.3-4.6) and for 1-3-vessel disease 3.6-4.1(range...

  3. Differential Short-Term Repeated Forearm Hyperaemic Reactivity in Coronary Artery Disease Patients Compared to Healthy Low Risk Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon L. Bacon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hyperaemic response of the forearm is a widely used technique to assess the vascular reactivity. Little is known about the short-term reproducibility and the possible exhaustion of this response in normal or diseased states. As such, the current study was conducted to assess this phenomenon using a unique nuclear medicine- (NM- based technique. 19 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD undergoing NM exercise stress tests and 15 low risk (LR participants completed 2 reactive hyperaemia tests, using a SPECT-based technique, separated by 15  min. Analyses revealed that CAD patients had lower hyperaemic responses than LR participants (P<.001, and that there was a significant group × time interaction (P<.005, such that LR participants showed a larger decrease in the reactivity (5.2±0.4 to 3.6±0.4 than the CAD patients (2.9±0.3 to 2.6±0.3. These results suggest that there is a variability, due to disease states, in the reproducibility of the hypaeremic reactivity. This needs to be taken into account in short-term repeated measure studies.

  4. Lack of association between estrogen receptor β dinucleotide repeat polymorphism and autoimmune thyroid diseases in Japanese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Motowo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs, such as Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, appear to develop as a result of complex interactions between predisposing genes and environmental triggers. Susceptibility to AITDs is conferred by genes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA and genes unlinked to HLA, including the CTLA-4 gene. Recently, estrogen receptor (ER β, located at human chromosome 14q23-24.1, was identifed. We analyzed a dinucleotide (CAn repeat polymorphism located in the flanking region of ERβ gene in patients with AITDs and in normal subjects. High heterozygosity makes this polymorphism a useful marker in the genetic study of disorders affecting female endocrine systems. We also correlated a ERβ gene microsatellite polymorphism with bone mineral density (BMD in the distal radius and biochemical markers of bone turnover in patients with GD in remission. Results Fourteen different alleles were found in 133 patients with GD, 114 patients with HT, and 179 controls subjects. The various alleles were designated as allele*1 through allele*14 according to the number of the repeats, from 18 to 30. There was no significant difference in the distributions of ERβ alleles between patient groups and controls. Although recent study demonstrated a significant relation between a allele*9 in the ERβ gene and BMD in postmenopausal Japanese women, there were no statistically significant interaction between this allele and BMD in the distal radius, nor biochemical markers in patients with GD in remission. Conclusions The present results do not support an association between the ERβ microsatellite marker and AITD in the Japanese population. We also suggest that the ERβ microsatellite polymorphism has at most a minor pathogenic importance in predicting the risk of osteoporosis as a complication of GD.

  5. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyuha Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr effectors by resistance (R genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1 R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  6. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  7. Pathogen corruption and site-directed recombination at a plant disease resistance gene cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Ervin D.; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.

    2008-01-01

    The Pc locus of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) determines dominant sensitivity to a host-selective toxin produced by the fungal pathogen Periconia circinata. The Pc region was cloned by a map-based approach and found to contain three tandemly repeated genes with the structures of nucleotide binding site–leucine-rich repeat (NBS–LRR) disease resistance genes. Thirteen independent Pc-to-pc mutations were analyzed, and each was found to remove all or part of the central gene of the threesome. Hence, this central gene is Pc. Most Pc-to-pc mutations were associated with unequal recombination. Eight recombination events were localized to different sites in a 560-bp region within the ∼3.7-kb NBS–LRR genes. Because any unequal recombination located within the flanking NBS–LRR genes would have removed Pc, the clustering of cross-over events within a 560-bp segment indicates that a site-directed recombination process exists that specifically targets unequal events to generate LRR diversity in NBS–LRR loci. PMID:18719093

  8. PDT in periodontal disease of HAART resistance patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovani, Elcio M.; Noro-Filho, Gilberto A.; Caputo, Bruno V.; Casarin, Renato; Costa, Claudio; Salgado, Daniela; Santos, Camila C.

    2016-03-01

    HIV/Aids patients present a change of microbiota associated with host immunodeficiency. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) showed as a promising and viable alternative in reducing microbiota. Present study evaluate effectiveness of photodynamic therapy in periodontal disease of AIDS patients with highly activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) failure, measuring the clinical periodontal parameters and periodontal microbiota. Twelve patients with HARRT resistance (R group) divided into two groups (control and PDT) and 12 patients with no HAART resistance (NR group) divided into two groups (control and PDT). The results show the difference in baseline of CD4 cells count, NR group 640.0 +/- 176.2 cells/mm3 R group and 333.3 +/- 205.8 cells / mm3 (pperiodontal parameters (PD and CAL), PDT was more effective than the control group only in the NR group (p periodontal parameters between the both R groups (p>0.05%). Microbiological evaluation in R group presents a general reduction in the Aa at 3 and 6 months. Furthermore, demonstrated a reduction of Pg in all groups at 6 months and in R group at 3 months. The impact assessment of photodynamic therapy in patients with different levels of immunosuppression determined that the combination of mechanical periodontal treatment with photodynamic therapy in patients with HAART failure did not cause additional benefits. Therefore, PDT in this study could not been indicated in HAART resistance patients.

  9. Mechanisms linking brain insulin resistance to Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Niures P.S. Matioli

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated that Diabetes Mellitus (DM can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD. This review briefly describes current concepts in mechanisms linking DM and insulin resistance/deficiency to AD. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF resistance can contribute to neurodegeneration by several mechanisms which involve: energy and metabolism deficits, impairment of Glucose transporter-4 function, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of AGEs, ROS and RNS with increased production of neuro-inflammation and activation of pro-apoptosis cascade. Impairment in insulin receptor function and increased expression and activation of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE have also been described. These processes compromise neuronal and glial function, with a reduction in neurotransmitter homeostasis. Insulin/IGF resistance causes the accumulation of AβPP-Aβ oligomeric fibrils or insoluble larger aggregated fibrils in the form of plaques that are neurotoxic. Additionally, there is production and accumulation of hyper-phosphorylated insoluble fibrillar tau which can exacerbate cytoskeletal collapse and synaptic disconnection.

  10. Are stomatal responses the key to understanding the cost of fungal disease resistance in plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Catherine M; Gay, Alan P; Mur, Luis A J

    2011-07-01

    Preventing disease in cereal crops is important for maintaining productivity and as the availability and efficacy of chemical control becomes reduced the emphasis on breeding for disease resistance increases. However, there is evidence that disease resistance may be physiologically costly to the plant and we ask if understanding stomatal responses to fungal attack is the key to minimising reductions in growth associated with disease resistance.

  11. Resistance induced component of management of diseases of grapevine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusciélio Barbosa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of induced resistance presents as a viable alternative in the management of diseases of the vine. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of Agro Mos® and potassium phosphite in controlling diseases of grapevine under field conditions in the Valley San Francisco. O test was conducted under field conditions in the experimental area IFSertão Pernambucano, Petrolina, PE, using the cultivar Petit Sirah. The experimental design was in randomized blocks, composed of five treatments and five replicates: T1 - control; T2 - Cabrio Top® - CT (2kg ha-1; T3 - Agro Mos® - AM (3mL L-1; T4 - Fosfito de potássio - FP (4mL L-1; T5 - Agro Mos® - AM (3mL L-1 interleaved with the fungicide Cabrio Top® - CT (2kg ha-1. Each plot consisted of eight plants. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and averages compared by Tukey test at 5%. Conditions in which the experiment was developed, the use of potassium phosphite and Agro-Mos® promoted a significant reduction in the incidence of Plasmopara viticola and Uncinula necator.Key-words: resistance induced, Plasmopara viticola, Uncinula necator.

  12. Nanotechnology and pulmonary delivery to overcome resistance in infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Fernanda; Rafael, Diana; Videira, Mafalda; Ferreira, Domingos; Sosnik, Alejandro; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-11-01

    Used since ancient times especially for the local treatment of pulmonary diseases, lungs and airways are a versatile target route for the administration of both local and systemic drugs. Despite the existence of different platforms and devices for the pulmonary administration of drugs, only a few formulations are marketed, partly due to physiological and technological limitations. Respiratory infections represent a significant burden to health systems worldwide mainly due to intrahospital infections that more easily affect immune-compromised patients. Moreover, tuberculosis (TB) is an endemic infectious disease in many developing nations and it has resurged in the developed world associated with the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic. Currently, medicine faces the specter of antibiotic resistance. Besides the development of new anti-infectious drugs, the development of innovative and more efficient delivery systems for drugs that went off patent appears as a promising strategy pursued by the pharmaceutical industry to improve the therapeutic outcomes and to prolong the utilities of their intellectual property portfolio. In this context, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems (nano-DDS) emerged as a promising approach to circumvent the limitations of conventional formulations and to treat drug resistance, opening the hypothesis for new developments in this area. © 2013.

  13. Disease Resistance and the Definition of Genetic Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Derek; Kleiderman, Erika; Touré, Seydina B; Joly, Yann

    2017-01-01

    Recent gene editing experiments carried out in human embryos have raised the question of whether interventions like the introduction of a CCR5-Δ32 deletion, which could provide heritable resistance to HIV infection, ought to be considered enhancements. Many authors have used the term "enhancement" in different ways, some based on patients' biomedical outcomes and others on their social context. These classifications are often considered overly imprecise. Nevertheless, the concept of "enhancement" could affect the ways in which these applications are regulated in different jurisdictions, the availability of coverage by insurers or public health care, and the force of public opinion in shaping future policy on gene editing. In order to ethically situate resistance to communicable disease with reference to other techniques, this article provides an overview of its similarities and differences with disease gene therapy in embryos, gene therapy in consenting adults, and vaccination. In discussing key ethical features of CCR5-Δ32 deletion (including its frequency in various populations, biological mechanism, benefits for individuals, and use in previous clinical trials) we offer some potential guideposts for the continuing discussion on how to classify "enhancements" in the age of CRISPR gene editing.

  14. Insulin Resistance in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Tser Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome and its components are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD development. Insulin resistance (IR plays a central role in the metabolic syndrome and is associated with increased risk for CKD in nondiabetic patients. IR is common in patients with mild-to-moderate stage CKD, even when the glomerular filtration rate is within the normal range. IR, along with oxidative stress and inflammation, also promotes kidney disease. In patients with end stage renal disease, IR is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and is linked to protein energy wasting and malnutrition. Systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, elevated serum adipokines and fetuin-A, metabolic acidosis, vitamin D deficiency, depressed serum erythropoietin, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and suppressors of cytokine signaling all cause IR by suppressing insulin receptor-PI3K-Akt pathways in CKD. In addition to adequate renal replacement therapy and correction of uremia-associated factors, thiazolidinedione, ghrelin, protein restriction, and keto-acid supplementation are therapeutic options. Weight control, reduced daily prednisolone dosage, and the use of cyclosporin decrease the risk of developing new-onset diabetes after kidney transplantation. Improved understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying IR in CKD may lead to more effective therapeutic strategies to reduce uremia-associated morbidity and mortality.

  15. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L; Nally, Joseph V; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-08-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in chronic kidney disease patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1962 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005, to October 2011) from an existing chronic kidney disease registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60%-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70), and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure, and the use of β blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.65; Pchronic kidney disease. Noncardiovascular/non-malignancy-related deaths were higher in those with RRI≥0.70. RRI≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes.

  16. Comparative Genomics of Non-TNL Disease Resistance Genes from Six Plant Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Madhav P; Andersen, Ethan J; Neupane, Surendra; Benson, Benjamin V

    2017-09-30

    Disease resistance genes (R genes), as part of the plant defense system, have coevolved with corresponding pathogen molecules. The main objectives of this project were to identify non-Toll interleukin receptor, nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat (nTNL) genes and elucidate their evolutionary divergence across six plant genomes. Using reference sequences from Arabidopsis, we investigated nTNL orthologs in the genomes of common bean, Medicago, soybean, poplar, and rice. We used Hidden Markov Models for sequence identification, performed model-based phylogenetic analyses, visualized chromosomal positioning, inferred gene clustering, and assessed gene expression profiles. We analyzed 908 nTNL R genes in the genomes of the six plant species, and classified them into 12 subgroups based on the presence of coiled-coil (CC), nucleotide binding site (NBS), leucine rich repeat (LRR), resistance to Powdery mildew 8 (RPW8), and BED type zinc finger domains. Traditionally classified CC-NBS-LRR (CNL) genes were nested into four clades (CNL A-D) often with abundant, well-supported homogeneous subclades of Type-II R genes. CNL-D members were absent in rice, indicating a unique R gene retention pattern in the rice genome. Genomes from Arabidopsis, common bean, poplar and soybean had one chromosome without any CNL R genes. Medicago and Arabidopsis had the highest and lowest number of gene clusters, respectively. Gene expression analyses suggested unique patterns of expression for each of the CNL clades. Differential gene expression patterns of the nTNL genes were often found to correlate with number of introns and GC content, suggesting structural and functional divergence.

  17. Cryptogenic cirrhosis: Metabolic liver disease due to insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binay K De

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Etiopathogenesis of cryptogenic cirrhosis (CC is not yet well established. Up to 20% of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD may progress to cirrhosis, mostly termed as cryptogenic. Insulin resistance and altered metabolic parameters form a major pathogenic link between NAFLD and CC. CC may thus be actually a metabolic liver disease. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four patients of CC and 32 patients having cirrhosis due to chronic hepatitis B (Hep B were assessed in a cross-sectional study in a tertiary hospital for insulin resistance, % β-cell activity, obesity indices, plasma glucose, lipid profiles, and many other parameters. Results: CC patients had higher homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR compared to Hep B group (P = 0.000016. A positive correlation between IR values and Child-Pugh score among CC patients was found ("r" = 0.87; P < 0.00001. Out of 34 CC patients, 15 (44.1% had obesity contrary to 6 (18.8% in the control group (P = 0.0022. Differences were observed in subcutaneous fat (P = 0.0022, intra-abdominal fat (P = 0.0055, waist circumference (P = 0.014, and percentage body fat (P = 0.047 between the two groups. Significant differences were observed in the levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL. Conclusion: Most of the CC patients showed significantly higher prevalence of HOMA-IR, obesity indices, and various parameters of "lipotoxicity" and metabolic syndrome, suggesting that CC may be the long-term consequence of a type of "metabolic liver disease." Further studies are required to evaluate the role of therapeutic interventions to enhance insulin sensitivity in such patients.

  18. Identification of Resistance to Wet Bubble Disease and Genetic Diversity in Wild and Cultivated Strains of Agaricus bisporus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongping Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of wet bubble disease (WBD caused by Mycogone perniciosa are increasing across the world and seriously affecting the yield of Agaricus bisporus. However, highly WBD-resistant strains are rare. Here, we tested 28 A. bisporus strains for WBD resistance by inoculating M. perniciosa spore suspension on casing soil, and assessed genetic diversity of these strains using 17 new simple sequence repeat (SSR markers developed in this study. We found that 10 wild strains originating from the Tibetan Plateau in China were highly WBD-resistant strains, and 13 cultivated strains from six countries were highly susceptible strains. A total of 88 alleles were detected in these 28 strains, and the observed number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 8. Cluster and genetic structure analysis results revealed the wild resources from China have a relatively high level of genetic diversity and occur at low level of gene flow and introgression with cultivated strains. Moreover, the wild strains from China potentially have the consensus ancestral genotypes different from the cultivated strains and evolved independently. Therefore, the highly WBD-resistant wild strains from China and newly developed SSR markers could be used as novel sources for WBD-resistant breeding and quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping of WBD-resistant gene of A. bisporus.

  19. Identification of Resistance to Wet Bubble Disease and Genetic Diversity in Wild and Cultivated Strains of Agaricus bisporus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongping; Wang, Xinxin; Li, Dan; Liu, Yuan; Song, Bing; Zhang, Chunlan; Wang, Qi; Chen, Meiyuan; Zhang, Zhiwu; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of wet bubble disease (WBD) caused by Mycogone perniciosa are increasing across the world and seriously affecting the yield of Agaricus bisporus. However, highly WBD-resistant strains are rare. Here, we tested 28 A. bisporus strains for WBD resistance by inoculating M. perniciosa spore suspension on casing soil, and assessed genetic diversity of these strains using 17 new simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed in this study. We found that 10 wild strains originating from the Tibetan Plateau in China were highly WBD-resistant strains, and 13 cultivated strains from six countries were highly susceptible strains. A total of 88 alleles were detected in these 28 strains, and the observed number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 8. Cluster and genetic structure analysis results revealed the wild resources from China have a relatively high level of genetic diversity and occur at low level of gene flow and introgression with cultivated strains. Moreover, the wild strains from China potentially have the consensus ancestral genotypes different from the cultivated strains and evolved independently. Therefore, the highly WBD-resistant wild strains from China and newly developed SSR markers could be used as novel sources for WBD-resistant breeding and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of WBD-resistant gene of A. bisporus. PMID:27669211

  20. Rapid and Longer-Term Antidepressant Effects of Repeated Ketamine Infusions in Treatment-Resistant Major Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murrough, James W.; Perez, Andrew M.; Pillemer, Sarah; Stern, Jessica; Parides, Michael K.; aan het Rot, Marije; Collins, Katherine A.; Mathew, Sanjay J.; Charney, Dennis S.; Iosifescu, Dan V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ketamine is reported to have rapid antidepressant effects; however, there is limited understanding of the time-course of ketamine effects beyond a single infusion. A previous report including 10 participants with treatment-resistant major depression (TRD) found that six ketamine

  1. Rapid and Longer-Term Antidepressant Effects of Repeated Ketamine Infusions in Treatment-Resistant Major Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murrough, James W.; Perez, Andrew M.; Pillemer, Sarah; Stern, Jessica; Parides, Michael K.; aan het Rot, Marije; Collins, Katherine A.; Mathew, Sanjay J.; Charney, Dennis S.; Iosifescu, Dan V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ketamine is reported to have rapid antidepressant effects; however, there is limited understanding of the time-course of ketamine effects beyond a single infusion. A previous report including 10 participants with treatment-resistant major depression (TRD) found that six ketamine infusion

  2. Tomato Ve disease resistance genes encode cell surface-like receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawchuk, Lawrence M.; Hachey, John; Lynch, Dermot R.; Kulcsar, Frank; van Rooijen, Gijs; Waterer, Doug R.; Robertson, Albert; Kokko, Eric; Byers, Robert; Howard, Ronald J.; Fischer, Rainer; Prüfer, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    In tomato, Ve is implicated in race-specific resistance to infection by Verticillium species causing crop disease. Characterization of the Ve locus involved positional cloning and isolation of two closely linked inverted genes. Expression of individual Ve genes in susceptible potato plants conferred resistance to an aggressive race 1 isolate of Verticillium albo-atrum. The deduced primary structure of Ve1 and Ve2 included a hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide, leucine-rich repeats containing 28 or 35 potential glycosylation sites, a hydrophobic membrane-spanning domain, and a C-terminal domain with the mammalian E/DXXXLφ or YXXφ endocytosis signals (φ is an amino acid with a hydrophobic side chain). A leucine zipper-like sequence occurs in the hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide of Ve1 and a Pro-Glu-Ser-Thr (PEST)-like sequence resides in the C-terminal domain of Ve2. These structures suggest that the Ve genes encode a class of cell-surface glycoproteins with receptor-mediated endocytosis-like signals and leucine zipper or PEST sequences. PMID:11331751

  3. Comparison of protein profiles of beech bark disease-resistant or beech bark disease-susceptible American beech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary E. Mason; Marek Krasowski; Judy Loo; Jennifer. Koch

    2011-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of beech bark proteins from trees resistant and susceptible to beech bark disease (BBD) was conducted. Sixteen trees from eight geographically isolated stands, 10 resistant (healthy) and 6 susceptible (diseased/infested) trees, were studied. The genetic complexity of the sample unit, the sampling across a wide geographic area, and the complexity of...

  4. Molecular communications between plant heat shock responses and disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hoon; Yun, Hye Sup; Kwon, Chian

    2012-08-01

    As sessile, plants are continuously exposed to potential dangers including various abiotic stresses and pathogen attack. Although most studies focus on plant responses under an ideal condition to a specific stimulus, plants in nature must cope with a variety of stimuli at the same time. This indicates that it is critical for plants to fine-control distinct signaling pathways temporally and spatially for simultaneous and effective responses to various stresses. Global warming is currently a big issue threatening the future of humans. Reponses to high temperature affect many physiological processes in plants including growth and disease resistance, resulting in decrease of crop yield. Although plant heat stress and defense responses share important mediators such as calcium ions and heat shock proteins, it is thought that high temperature generally suppresses plant immunity. We therefore specifically discuss on interactions between plant heat and defense responses in this review hopefully for an integrated understanding of these responses in plants.

  5. Remodelling of the microarchitecture of resistance arteries in cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Leurgans, Thomas;

    is largely unknown, and the presented project aims to investigate this. Innovative multiphoton excitation microscopy will be applied on live (vital), isolated, cannulated and pressurized arteries from parietal pericardial biopsies obtained during open cardiac surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting......, and endothelial and smooth muscle cells will be determined in relation to a range of distending pressures (50, 100, 150, 200 mmHg) and in relation to the frequently determined M:L. We present here our initial results from (pig) pericardial biopsies where we describe the microarchitecture of the tissue...... in comparison to other well-studied microvascular beds (e.g. rat mesentery). In the future we aim to compare the microarchitecture of small resistance arteries from parietal pericardial biopsies between patients with and without (treated) hypertension, diabetes and/or ischemic heart disease. 1. Buus, N.H., et...

  6. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiLi-jia; SongYun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Htl, Htnl and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhml and Rhm2,maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdml, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsml, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2. 1 of tomato, and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i. e. , chromosomesl, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3. 25) except for genes Rhml, Rhm2, Mdml and Wsml which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  7. Insulin resistance, small LDL particles, and risk for atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter P

    2014-01-01

    There is a global epidemic of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. Insulin resistance (IR) is etiologic for both metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus. IR induces a broad range of toxic systemic effects, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, hyperglycemia, increased production of advanced glycosylation end products, increased inflammatory tone, as well as a prothrombotic and pro-oxidative state. Patients with IR are highly vulnerable to the development of accelerated atherosclerosis as well its clinical sequelae, including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, carotid artery disease and ischemic stroke, peripheral arterial disease and claudication/lower extremity amputation, and coronary mortality. Among the most important risk factors patients afflicted with IR develop is the so-called atherogenic lipid triad: large numbers of small, dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL) particles, hypertriglyceridemia, and low serum concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Though controversial, much recent evidence suggests that the formation of sdLDL particles in the setting of IR is an important metabolic transition. Some studies suggest that these smaller particles are more atherogenic than their larger, more buoyant counterparts. At least part of the explanation for the apparent augmented atherogenicity of small LDL particles is their reduced systemic clearance by the LDL receptor, increased vulnerability to oxidation rendering them more apt for scavenging by macrophages, and possible increased flux into the subendothelial space of arterial walls. Numerous small studies suggest that sdLDL is highly correlated with cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular medicine is in need of a large prospective, randomized study that would more definitively investigate the impact of small, dense LDL (sdLDL) on risk for cardiovascular disease and whether therapeutic interventions designed to specifically reduce the burden of sdLDL are associated

  8. Design and analysis of post-fusion 6-helix bundle of heptad repeat regions from Newcastle disease virus F protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jieqing; Li, Pengyun; Wu, Tinghe; Gao, Feng; Ding, Yi; Zhang, Catherine W-H; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F; Tien, Po

    2003-05-01

    Fusion of paramyxovirus to the cell involves receptor binding of the HN glycoprotein and a number of conformational changes of F glycoprotein. The F protein is expressed as a homotrimer on the virus surface. In the present model, there are at least three conformations of F protein, i.e. native form, pre-hairpin intermediate and the post-fusion state. In the post-fusion state, the two highly conserved heptad repeat (HR) regions of F protein form a stable 6-helix coiled-coil bundle. However, no crystal structure is known for this state for the Newcastle disease virus, although the crystal structure of the F protein native form has been solved recently. Here we deployed an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system to engineer this 6-helix bundle by fusion of either the two HR regions (HR1, linker and HR2) or linking the 6-helix [3 x (HR1, linker and HR2)] together as a single chain. Subsequently, both of them form a stable 6-helix bundle in vitro judging by gel filtration and chemical cross-linking and the proteins show salient features of an alpha-helix structure. Crystals diffracting X-rays have been obtained from both protein preparations and the structure determination is under way. This method could be used for crystallization of the post-fusion state HR structures of other viruses.

  9. Globular Glial Mixed Four Repeat Tau and TDP-43 Proteinopathy with Motor Neuron Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ryoko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Tada, Mari; Tanaka, Hidetomo; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shiga, Atsushi; Miura, Takeshi; Aoki, Kenju; Aikawa, Akane; Ishizawa, Shin; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be accompanied by frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We report a case of glial mixed tau and TDP-43 proteinopathies in a Japanese patient diagnosed clinically as having ALS-D. Autopsy revealed loss of lower motor neurons and degeneration of the pyramidal tracts in the spinal cord and brain stem. The brain showed frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the most severe neuronal loss and gliosis being evident in the precentral gyrus. Although less severe, such changes were also observed in other brain regions, including the basal ganglia and substantia nigra. AT8 immunostaining revealed that predominant occurrence of astrocytic tau lesions termed globular astrocytic inclusions (GAIs) was a feature of the affected regions. These GAIs were Gallyas-Braak negative. Neuronal and oligodendrocytic tau lesions were comparatively scarce. pS409/410 immunostaining also revealed similar neuronal and glial TDP-43 lesions. Interestingly, occasional co-localization of tau and TDP-43 was evident in the GAIs. Immunoblot analyses revealed band patterns characteristic of a 4-repeat (4R) tauopathy, corticobasal degeneration and a TDP-43 proteinopathy, ALS/FTLD-TDP Type B. No mutations were found in the MAPT or TDP-43 genes. We consider that this patient harbored a distinct, sporadic globular glial mixed 4R tau and TDP-43 proteinopathy associated with motor neuron disease and FTD.

  10. Association of Repeatedly Measured High-Sensitivity-Assayed Troponin I with Cardiovascular Disease Events in a General Population from the MORGAM/BiomarCaRE Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, Maria F; Ojeda, Francisco; Saarela, Olli;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-sensitivity troponin I (hs-cTnI) concentrations reflect myocardial stress. The role of hs-cTnI in predicting long-term changes in the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in general populations is not clearly defined. METHODS: We investigated whether the change in 3 repeated meas...

  11. Artifically inserting a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of Marek's disease virus (MDV) alters expression of nearby MDV genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) was inserted into the very virulent Marek’s disease virus (MDV) Md5 bacterial artificial chromosome clone. The insertion site was nearly identical to the REV LTR that was naturally inserted into the JM/102W strain of MDV fo...

  12. Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of a very virulent Marek's disease virus alters its pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co-cultivation of strain JM/102W of Marek’s disease virus (MDV) with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in the generation of a recombinant MDV containing REV long terminal repeat (LTR) named RM1 strain of MDV; a strain that was highly attenuated for oncogenicity, but induced severe bursal an...

  13. Screening for anthracnose disease resistance in strawberry using a detached leaf assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoculation of detached strawberry leaves with Colletotrichum species may provide a rapid, non-destructive method of identifying anthracnose resistant germplasm. The reliability and validity of assessing disease severity is critical to disease management decisions. We inoculated detached strawberr...

  14. Effects of CAG repeat length, HTT protein length and protein context on cerebral metabolism measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy in transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Bruce G; Andreassen, Ole A; Dedeoglu, Alpaslan; Leavitt, Blair; Hayden, Michael; Borchelt, David; Ross, Christopher A; Ferrante, Robert J; Beal, M Flint

    2005-10-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative illness caused by expansion of CAG repeats at the N-terminal end of the protein huntingtin. We examined longitudinal changes in brain metabolite levels using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy in five different mouse models. There was a large (>50%) exponential decrease in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) with time in both striatum and cortex in mice with 150 CAG repeats (R6/2 strain). There was a linear decrease restricted to striatum in N171-82Q mice with 82 CAG repeats. Both the exponential and linear decreases of NAA were paralleled in time by decreases in neuronal area measured histologically. Yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice with 72 CAG repeats, but low expression levels, had less striatal NAA loss than the N171-82Q mice (15% vs. 43%). We evaluated the effect of gene context in mice with an approximate 146 CAG repeat on the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (HPRT). HPRT mice developed an obese phenotype in contrast to weight loss in the R6/2 and N171-82Q mice. These mice showed a small striatal NAA loss (21%), and a possible increase in brain lipids detectable by magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy and decreased brain water T1. Our results indicate profound metabolic defects that are strongly affected by CAG repeat length, as well as gene expression levels and protein context.

  15. Current Situation of Antimicrobial Resistance and Genetic Differences in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Complex Isolates by Multilocus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is one of several opportunistic pathogens of growing significance. Several studies on the molecular epidemiology of S. maltophilia have shown clinical isolates to be genetically diverse. Materials and Methods A total of 121 clinical isolates tentatively identified as S. malophilia from seven tertiary-care hospitals in Korea from 2007 to 2011 were included. Species and groups were identified using partial gyrB gene sequences and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using a broth microdilution method. Multi locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) surveys are used for subtyping. Results Based on partial gyrB gene sequences, 118 isolates were identified as belonging to the S. maltophilia complex. For all S. maltophilia isolates, the resistance rates to trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) and levofloxacin were the highest (both, 30.5%). Resistance rate to ceftazidime was 28.0%. 11.0% and 11.9% of 118 S. maltophilia isolates displayed resistance to piperacillin/tazobactam and tigecycline, respectively. Clade 1 and Clade 2 were definitely distinguished from the data of MLVA with amplification of loci. All 118 isolates were classified into several clusters as its identification. Conclusion Because of high resistance rates to TMP/SMX and levofloxacin, the clinical laboratory department should consider providing the data about other antimicrobial agents and treatment of S. maltophilia infections with a combination of antimicrobials can be considered in the current practice. The MLVA evaluated in this study provides a fast, portable, relatively low cost genotyping method that can be employed in genotypic linkage or transmission networks comparing to analysis of the gyrB gene. PMID:28032486

  16. Dominant effects of the Huntington's disease HTT CAG repeat length are captured in gene-expression data sets by a continuous analysis mathematical modeling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Galkina, Ekaterina I; Levantovsky, Rachel M; Fossale, Elisa; Anne Anderson, Mary; Gillis, Tammy; Srinidhi Mysore, Jayalakshmi; Coser, Kathryn R; Shioda, Toshi; Zhang, Bin; Furia, Matthew D; Derry, Jonathan; Kohane, Isaac S; Seong, Ihn Sik; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E

    2013-08-15

    In Huntington's disease (HD), the size of the expanded HTT CAG repeat mutation is the primary driver of the processes that determine age at onset of motor symptoms. However, correlation of cellular biochemical parameters also extends across the normal repeat range, supporting the view that the CAG repeat represents a functional polymorphism with dominant effects determined by the longer allele. A central challenge to defining the functional consequences of this single polymorphism is the difficulty of distinguishing its subtle effects from the multitude of other sources of biological variation. We demonstrate that an analytical approach based upon continuous correlation with CAG size was able to capture the modest (∼21%) contribution of the repeat to the variation in genome-wide gene expression in 107 lymphoblastoid cell lines, with alleles ranging from 15 to 92 CAGs. Furthermore, a mathematical model from an iterative strategy yielded predicted CAG repeat lengths that were significantly positively correlated with true CAG allele size and negatively correlated with age at onset of motor symptoms. Genes negatively correlated with repeat size were also enriched in a set of genes whose expression were CAG-correlated in human HD cerebellum. These findings both reveal the relatively small, but detectable impact of variation in the CAG allele in global data in these peripheral cells and provide a strategy for building multi-dimensional data-driven models of the biological network that drives the HD disease process by continuous analysis across allelic panels of neuronal cells vulnerable to the dominant effects of the HTT CAG repeat.

  17. Potential Transfer of Polyglutamine and CAG-Repeat RNA in Extracellular Vesicles in Huntington's Disease: Background and Evaluation in Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Abels, Erik R; Redzic, Jasmina S; Margulis, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steve; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2016-04-01

    In Huntington's disease (HD) the imperfect expanded CAG repeat in the first exon of the HTT gene leads to the generation of a polyglutamine (polyQ) protein, which has some neuronal toxicity, potentially mollified by formation of aggregates. Accumulated research, reviewed here, implicates both the polyQ protein and the expanded repeat RNA in causing toxicity leading to neurodegeneration in HD. Different theories have emerged as to how the neurodegeneration spreads throughout the brain, with one possibility being the transport of toxic protein and RNA in extracellular vesicles (EVs). Most cell types in the brain release EVs and these have been shown to contain neurodegenerative proteins in the case of prion protein and amyloid-beta peptide. In this study, we used a model culture system with an overexpression of HTT-exon 1 polyQ-GFP constructs in human 293T cells and found that the EVs did incorporate both the polyQ-GFP protein and expanded repeat RNA. Striatal mouse neural cells were able to take up these EVs with a consequent increase in the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and polyQ-GFP RNAs, but with no evidence of uptake of polyQ-GFP protein or any apparent toxicity, at least over a relatively short period of exposure. A differentiated striatal cell line expressing endogenous levels of Hdh mRNA containing the expanded repeat incorporated more of this mRNA into EVs as compared to similar cells expressing this mRNA with a normal repeat length. These findings support the potential of EVs to deliver toxic expanded trinucleotide repeat RNAs from one cell to another, but further work will be needed to evaluate potential EV and cell-type specificity of transfer and effects of long-term exposure. It seems likely that expanded HD-associated repeat RNA may appear in biofluids and may have use as biomarkers of disease state and response to therapy.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella that caused foodborne disease outbreaks: United States, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A C; Grass, J E; Richardson, L C; Nisler, A L; Bicknese, A S; Gould, L H

    2017-03-01

    Although most non-typhoidal Salmonella illnesses are self-limiting, antimicrobial treatment is critical for invasive infections. To describe resistance in Salmonella that caused foodborne outbreaks in the United States, we linked outbreaks submitted to the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System to isolate susceptibility data in the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System. Resistant outbreaks were defined as those linked to one or more isolates with resistance to at least one antimicrobial drug. Multidrug resistant (MDR) outbreaks had at least one isolate resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes. Twenty-one per cent (37/176) of linked outbreaks were resistant. In outbreaks attributed to a single food group, 73% (16/22) of resistant outbreaks and 46% (31/68) of non-resistant outbreaks were attributed to foods from land animals (P foodborne Salmonella outbreaks can help determine which foods are associated with resistant infections.

  19. Development of inducible leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) cell lines for therapeutics development in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Shimoji, Mika; Wang, Juan; Shah, Salim; Kamila, Sukanta; Biehl, Edward R; Lim, Seung; Chang, Allison; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A; Su, Xiaomin; Federoff, Howard J

    2013-10-01

    The pathogenic mechanism(s) contributing to loss of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD) remain obscure. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) mutations are linked, as a causative gene, to PD. LRRK2 mutations are estimated to account for 10% of familial and between 1 % and 3 % of sporadic PD. LRRK2 proximate single nucleotide polymorphisms have also been significantly associated with idiopathic/sporadic PD by genome-wide association studies. LRRK2 is a multidomain-containing protein and belongs to the protein kinase super-family. We constructed two inducible dopaminergic cell lines expressing either human-LRRK2-wild-type or human-LRRK2-mutant (G2019S). Phenotypes of these LRRK2 cell lines were examined with respect to cell viability, morphology, and protein function with or without induction of LRRK2 gene expression. The overexpression of G2019S gene promoted (1) low cellular metabolic activity without affecting cell viability, (2) blunted neurite extension, and (3) increased phosphorylation at S910 and S935. Our observations are consistent with reported general phenotypes in LRRK2 cell lines by other investigators. We used these cell lines to interrogate the biological function of LRRK2, to evaluate their potential as a drug-screening tool, and to investigate screening for small hairpin RNA-mediated LRRK2 G2019S gene knockdown as a potential therapeutic strategy. A proposed LRRK2 kinase inhibitor (i.e., IN-1) decreased LRRK2 S910 and S935 phosphorylation in our MN9DLRRK2 cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Lentivirus-mediated transfer of LRRK2 G2019S allele-specific small hairpin RNA reversed the blunting of neurite extension caused by LRRK2 G2019S overexpression. Taken together, these inducible LRRK2 cell lines are suitable reagents for LRRK2 functional studies, and the screening of potential LRRK2 therapeutics.

  20. Association of Variable Number of Tandem Repeats in Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Salimi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Endo-derived nitric oxide (NO is synthesized from L-arginine by endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS. Since reduced NO synthesis has been implicated in the development of coronary atherosclerosis; we hypothesized that polymorphisms of NOS gene might be associated with increased susceptibility to this disorder and coronary artery disease (CAD. We studied the 27 base pair tandem repeat polymorphism in intron4 of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS gene in 141 unrelated CAD patients with positive coronary angiograms in Shahid Rajaee Heart Hospital and 159 age matched control subjects without a history of symptomatic CAD. The study protocol was approved by the Iran University of Medical Sciences Ethics Committee. The eNOS gene intron4a/b VNTR polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction. The plasma lipids levels and other risk factors were also determined. The genotype frequencies for eNOS4b/b, eNOS4a/b and eNOS4a/a were 68.8, 29.1 and 2.1% in CAD subjects, and 81, 18.4 and 0.6 % in control subjects, respectively. The genotype frequencies differed significantly between the two groups (χ²= 6.38 P= 0.041. The frequency of the allele was 16.7% in CAD subjects and 9.8% in control subjects and was significantly higher in the patients (χ²= 6.18 P= 0.013, odds ratio=1.84. Plasma lipids, except HDL-C were also remarkablely increased in CAD group.

  1. Global investigation and meta-analysis of the C9orf72 (G4C2)n repeat in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuns, Jessie; Verstraeten, Aline; Sleegers, Kristel; Wauters, Eline; Gijselinck, Ilse; Smolders, Stefanie; Crosiers, David; Corsmit, Ellen; Elinck, Ellen; Sharma, Manu; Krüger, Rejko; Lesage, Suzanne; Brice, Alexis; Chung, Sun Ju; Kim, Mi-Jung; Kim, Young Jin; Ross, Owen A; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Xi, Zhengrui; Lang, Anthony E; Klein, Christine; Weissbach, Anne; Mellick, George D; Silburn, Peter A; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Hattori, Nobutaka; Ogaki, Kotaro; Tan, Eng-King; Zhao, Yi; Aasly, Jan; Valente, Enza Maria; Petrucci, Simona; Annesi, Grazia; Quattrone, Aldo; Ferrarese, Carlo; Brighina, Laura; Deutschländer, Angela; Puschmann, Andreas; Nilsson, Christer; Garraux, Gaëtan; LeDoux, Mark S; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; Boczarska-Jedynak, Magdalena; Opala, Grzegorz; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Cras, Patrick; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2014-11-18

    The objective of this study is to clarify the role of (G4C2)n expansions in the etiology of Parkinson disease (PD) in the worldwide multicenter Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease (GEO-PD) cohort. C9orf72 (G4C2)n repeats were assessed in a GEO-PD cohort of 7,494 patients diagnosed with PD and 5,886 neurologically healthy control individuals ascertained in Europe, Asia, North America, and Australia. A pathogenic (G4C2)n>60 expansion was detected in only 4 patients with PD (4/7,232; 0.055%), all with a positive family history of neurodegenerative dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or atypical parkinsonism, while no carriers were detected with typical sporadic or familial PD. Meta-analysis revealed a small increase in risk of PD with an increasing number of (G4C2)n repeats; however, we could not detect a robust association between the C9orf72 (G4C2)n repeat and PD, and the population attributable risk was low. Together, these findings indicate that expansions in C9orf72 do not have a major role in the pathogenesis of PD. Testing for C9orf72 repeat expansions should only be considered in patients with PD who have overt symptoms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or apparent family history of neurodegenerative dementia or motor neuron disease. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  3. Isolation and genetic mapping of NBS-LRR disease resistance gene analogs in watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixty-six watermelon disease resistance gene analogs (WRGA) were isolated from genotypes possessing disease resistance to fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum races 0, 1, and 2, zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus watermelon strain, cucumber mosaic virus, and watermelon mosaic virus. Deg...

  4. Insulin resistance and adipose tissue in the development of vascular diseases in high-risk patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The work in this thesis focused on the relationship between presence of insulin resistance and advanced vascular damage in patients with manifest atherosclerotic vascular disease, and on the occurrence of (new) vascular events in insulin resistant patients with and without evident vascular disease.

  5. Characterization of partial resistance to black spot disease of Rosa spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black spot disease (BSD) is one of the most serious diseases of garden roses. Both complete (vertical) resistance and partial (horizontal) resistance have been identified in 16 rose genotypes using two laboratory assays, the detached leaf assay (DLA) and the whole plant inoculation (WPI) approaches...

  6. The renal arterial resistive index and stage of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal allograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine O; Thiesson, Helle C; Poulsen, Lene N;

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft.......The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft....

  7. Searching for Factors that Distinguish Disease-Prone and Disease-Resistant Prions via Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Kurgan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The exact mechanisms of prion misfolding and factors that predispose an individual to prion diseases are largely unknown. Our approach to identifying candidate factors in-silico relies on contrasting the C-terminal domain of PrPC sequences from two groups of vertebrate species: those that have been found to suffer from prion diseases, and those that have not. We propose that any significant differences between the two groups are candidate factors that may predispose individuals to develop prion disease, which should be further analyzed by wet-lab investigations. Using an array of computational methods we identified possible point mutations that could predispose PrPC to misfold into PrPSc. Our results include confirmatory findings such as the V210I mutation, and new findings including P137M, G142D, G142N, D144P, K185T, V189I, H187Y and T191P mutations, which could impact structural stability. We also propose new hypotheses that give insights into the stability of helix-2 and -3. These include destabilizing effects of Histidine and T188-T193 segment in helix-2 in the disease-prone prions, and a stabilizing effect of Leucine on helix-3 in the disease-resistant prions.

  8. The Association Between Insulin Resistance And Advanced Renal Disease In Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duţă Irina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Insulin resistance is documented in type 1 diabetes and it has been associated with chronic complications. Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this article is to quantify insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes subjects according to the presence or absence of advanced renal disease. A secondary objective was to study the possible association between insulin resistance and advanced renal disease.

  9. Rapid identification of international multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones by multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis and investigation of their susceptibility to lytic bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larché, Jérôme; Pouillot, Flavie; Essoh, Christiane; Libisch, Balázs; Straut, Monica; Lee, Je Chul; Soler, Charles; Lamarca, Richard; Gleize, Elodie; Gabard, Jérôme; Vergnaud, Gilles; Pourcel, Christine

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated over a period of 12 months in two French hospitals and to test their susceptibility to bacteriophages. A total of 47 MDR isolates recovered from hospitalized patients were genotyped using multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis. The genotypes were distributed into five clones (including 19, 5, 5, 3, and 3 isolates, respectively) and 12 singletons. Comparison to 77 MDR strains from three other countries, and MLST analysis of selected isolates showed the predominance of international MDR clones. The larger clone, CC235, contained 59 isolates displaying different antibiotic resistance mechanisms, including the presence of the GES1, VIM-2, VIM-4, and IMP-1 β-lactamases. Three newly isolated P. aeruginosa bacteriophages were found to lyse 42 of the 44 analyzed strains, distributed into the different clonal complexes. This pilot study suggests that systematic genotyping of P. aeruginosa MDR strains could improve our epidemiological understanding of transmission at both the local (hospital) and the national level and that phage therapy could be an alternative or a complementary treatment to antibiotics for treating MDR-infected patients.

  10. Molecular marker for screening yellow mosaic disease resistance in blackgram [Vigna mungo (L. Hepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Prasanthi, B.V.Bhaskara Reddy, B.Geetha, Ramya Jyothi and Abhishek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Yellow mosaic disease is a serious disease in blackgram which causes severe yield losses. Screening of 45 lines along with PU-31 and PU-19 resistant checks for YMD under field conditions with artificial inoculation, identified 19 lines having 1 score with no disease symptoms. PCR reactions using SCAR marker for screening the disease reaction with genomic DNA of these lines resulted in identification of 19 resistant sources with specific amplification for resistance to YMV at 532bp with SCAR 20F/20R developed from OPQ1 RARD primer linked to YMV disease. Considering the YMV reaction and resistance linked SCAR marker, it is possible to identify the new resistance sources in a short time and they can be utilized in breeding programme or for direct release.

  11. Elastin organization in pig and cardiovascular disease patients' pericardial resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Leurgans, Thomas; Nissen, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral vascular resistance is increased in essential hypertension. This involves structural changes of resistance arteries and stiffening of the arterial wall, including remodeling of the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that biopsies of the human parietal pericardium, obtained during...... coronary artery bypass grafting or cardiac valve replacement surgeries, can serve as a source of resistance arteries for structural research in cardiovascular disease patients. We applied two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy to study the parietal pericardium and isolated pericardial resistance...

  12. [A case of environmental infection with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease from a residential bathroom of a patient suggested by variable-number tandem-repeat typing of Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taga, Shu; Niimi, Masaki; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Nakagawa, Taku; Ogawa, Kenji

    2012-05-01

    A 63-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of bilateral infiltrations and nodular opacities in her chest radiograph taken in the mass radiography screening in September 2010. The chest computed tomography showed patchy infiltrations with bronchiectasis in the lower lung fields on both sides. She was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease based on the bacteria recovered from the sputum and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. To elucidate an environmental MAC source, we investigated her home, and isolated M. avium and M. gordonae from the bathtub and shower tap, respectively, in her residential bathroom. Analysis of the hsp65-PRA variants digested with BamHI and some insertion sequences showed that the clinical strains recovered from sputum and strains from the bathtub were M. avium subsp. hominissuis. A dendrogram of the Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci variable-number tandem-repeat (MATR-VNTR) analysis of the MAC strains showed that the bathtub strains formed a polyclonal colonization, and that 1 of the 5 MATR-VNTR patterns was identical to the corresponding pattern of the sputum strain from the patient. In conclusion, we believe that the residential bathroom of the patient was the environmental source of her pulmonary MAC disease, as has been previously reported.

  13. Induce systemic resistance in lupine against root rot diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abeer A; Ghoneem, K M; El-Metwally, M A; Abd El-Hai, K M

    2009-02-01

    Root rot caused by soil borne pathogenic fungi is the most sever disease attacks lupine plants. Isolation trials from diseased plants in some areas of Dakahlia Province (Egypt) was carried out. Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium solani proved to be the most dominant isolates. Meanwhile, Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolfsii were less frequent. Efficacies of some plant resistance elicitors viz.: chitosan (CHI), Salicylic Acid (SA) and hydroquinone (HQ) in comparing to the fungicide Rhizolex T-50 as seed treatments showed significant reduction in the fungal growth in vitro. Chitosan at 8 g L(-1) and fungicide completely inhibited the growth of all isolated fungi, while SA at 1.4 g L(-1) and HQ at 1.2 g L(-1) inhibited the growth of Fusarium solani and F. oxysporum, respectively. The greenhouse experiments showed that S. rolfesii (No. 6) and R. solani (No. 2) followed by F. solani (No. 5) and F. oxysporum (No. 9) were the most aggressive root rot fungi. Soaking susceptible lupine seeds (Giza 1) in each one of the three selected elicitors showed a significant reduction in seedlings mortality. CHI at 8 g L(-1) was superior in increasing the percentage of healthy plants to record 72.5, 80.9, 62.7and 64.3%, when seeds were grown in soil infested with of F. solani, F. oxysporum, R. solani and S. rolfesii, respectively. These results were confirmed under field conditions in two different locations i.e., Tag El-Ezz and El-Serow Research Stations. CHI 8 g L(-1) proved to be the best elicitor after fungicide, in reducing lupine root rot disease. It showed 41 and 60% reduction in the plants mortality comparing to 56.37 and 69.13% in case of Rhizolex-T in Tag El-Ezz and El-Serow locations, respectively. The treatments were accompanied with a significant increase in lupine growth parameters, yield components and physiological aspects. Application of CHI at 8 g L(-1) or HQ at 1.2 g L(-1) was the most potent in this respect as compared to check treatment.

  14. Molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid resistance in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sara De Iudicibus; Raffaella Franca; Stefano Martelossi; Alessandro Ventura; Giuliana Decorti

    2011-01-01

    Natural and synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely employed in a number of inflammatory, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, and, despite the introduction of novel therapies, remain the first-line treatment for inducing remission in moderate to severe active Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Despite their extensive therapeutic use and the proven effectiveness, consider-able clinical evidence of wide inter-individual differences in GC efficacy among patients has been reported, in particular when these agents are used in inflammatory diseases. In recent years, a detailed knowledge of the GC mechanism of action and of the genetic variants affecting GC activity at the molecular level has arisen from several studies. GCs interact with their cytoplasmic receptor, and are able to repress inflammatory gene expression through several distinct mechanisms. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is therefore crucial for the effects of these agents: mutations in the GR gene (NR3C1, nuclear re-ceptor subfamily 3, group C, member 1) are the primary cause of a rare, inherited form of GC resistance; in ad-dition, several polymorphisms of this gene have been described and associated with GC response and toxicity. However, the GR is not self-standing in the cell and the receptor-mediated functions are the result of a complex interplay of GR and many other cellular partners. The latter comprise several chaperonins of the large coopera-tive hetero-oligomeric complex that binds the hormone-free GR in the cytosol, and several factors involved in the transcriptional machinery and chromatin remodeling, that are critical for the hormonal control of target genes transcription in the nucleus. Furthermore, variants in the principal effectors of GCs (e.g. cytokines and their regulators) have also to be taken into account for a com-prehensive evaluation of the variability in GC response. Polymorphisms in genes involved in the transport and/or metabolism of these hormones have also been

  15. Rational design of ligands targeting triplet repeating transcripts that cause RNA dominant disease: application to myotonic muscular dystrophy type 1 and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushechnikov, Alexei; Lee, Melissa M; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Sobczak, Krzysztof; French, Jonathan M; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2009-07-22

    Herein, we describe the design of high affinity ligands that bind expanded rCUG and rCAG repeat RNAs expressed in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. These ligands also inhibit, with nanomolar IC(50) values, the formation of RNA-protein complexes that are implicated in both disorders. The expanded rCUG and rCAG repeats form stable RNA hairpins with regularly repeating internal loops in the stem and have deleterious effects on cell function. The ligands that bind the repeats display a derivative of the bisbenzimidazole Hoechst 33258, which was identified by searching known RNA-ligand interactions for ligands that bind the internal loop displayed in these hairpins. A series of 13 modularly assembled ligands with defined valencies and distances between ligand modules was synthesized to target multiple motifs in these RNAs simultaneously. The most avid binder, a pentamer, binds the rCUG repeat hairpin with a K(d) of 13 nM. When compared to a series of related RNAs, the pentamer binds to rCUG repeats with 4.4- to >200-fold specificity. Furthermore, the affinity of binding to rCUG repeats shows incremental gains with increasing valency, while the background binding to genomic DNA is correspondingly reduced. Then, it was determined whether the modularly assembled ligands inhibit the recognition of RNA repeats by Muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) protein, the expanded-rCUG binding protein whose sequestration leads to splicing defects in DM1. Among several compounds with nanomolar IC(50) values, the most potent inhibitor is the pentamer, which also inhibits the formation of rCAG repeat-MBNL1 complexes. Comparison of the binding data for the designed synthetic ligands and MBNL1 to repeating RNAs shows that the synthetic ligand is 23-fold higher affinity and more specific to DM1 RNAs than MBNL1. Further studies show that the designed ligands are cell permeable to mouse myoblasts. Thus, cell permeable ligands that bind repetitive RNAs have been designed

  16. Genome Wide Analysis of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenglong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding site (NBS disease resistance genes play an important role in defending plants from a variety of pathogens and insect pests. Many R-genes have been identified in various plant species. However, little is known about the NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium distachyon. In this study, using computational analysis of the B. distachyon genome, we identified 126 regular NBS-encoding genes and characterized them on the bases of structural diversity, conserved protein motifs, chromosomal locations, gene duplications, promoter region, and phylogenetic relationships. EST hits and full-length cDNA sequences (from Brachypodium database of 126 R-like candidates supported their existence. Based on the occurrence of conserved protein motifs such as coiled-coil (CC, NBS, leucine-rich repeat (LRR, these regular NBS-LRR genes were classified into four subgroups: CC-NBS-LRR, NBS-LRR, CC-NBS, and X-NBS. Further expression analysis of the regular NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium database revealed that these genes are expressed in a wide range of libraries, including those constructed from various developmental stages, tissue types, and drought challenged or nonchallenged tissue.

  17. The C9orf72 repeat size correlates with onset age of disease, DNA methylation and transcriptional downregulation of the promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijselinck, I; Van Mossevelde, S; van der Zee, J; Sieben, A; Engelborghs, S; De Bleecker, J; Ivanoiu, A; Deryck, O; Edbauer, D; Zhang, M; Heeman, B; Bäumer, V; Van den Broeck, M; Mattheijssens, M; Peeters, K; Rogaeva, E; De Jonghe, P; Cras, P; Martin, J-J; de Deyn, P P; Cruts, M; Van Broeckhoven, C

    2016-08-01

    Pathological expansion of a G4C2 repeat, located in the 5' regulatory region of C9orf72, is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). C9orf72 patients have highly variable onset ages suggesting the presence of modifying factors and/or anticipation. We studied 72 Belgian index patients with FTLD, FTLD-ALS or ALS and 61 relatives with a C9orf72 repeat expansion. We assessed the effect of G4C2 expansion size on onset age, the role of anticipation and the effect of repeat size on methylation and C9orf72 promoter activity. G4C2 expansion sizes varied in blood between 45 and over 2100 repeat units with short expansions (45-78 units) present in 5.6% of 72 index patients with an expansion. Short expansions co-segregated with disease in two families. The subject with a short expansion in blood but an indication of mosaicism in brain showed the same pathology as those with a long expansion. Further, we provided evidence for an association of G4C2 expansion size with onset age (Pdisease anticipation. Also, intermediate repeats (7-24 units) showed a slightly higher methylation degree (Pdisease mechanisms and have important implications for diagnostic counseling and potential therapeutic approaches.

  18. The relationship between CAG repeat length and age of onset differs for Huntington's disease patients with juvenile onset or adult onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, J Michael; Gayán, Javier; Djoussé, Luc; Roberts, Simone; Brocklebank, Denise; Cherny, Stacey S; Cardon, Lon R; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Myers, Richard H; Housman, David E; Wexler, Nancy S

    2007-05-01

    Age of onset for Huntington's disease (HD) varies inversely with the length of the disease-causing CAG repeat expansion in the HD gene. A simple exponential regression model yielded adjusted R-squared values of 0.728 in a large set of Venezuelan kindreds and 0.642 in a North American, European, and Australian sample (the HD MAPS cohort). We present evidence that a two-segment exponential regression curve provides a significantly better fit than the simple exponential regression. A plot of natural log-transformed age of onset against CAG repeat length reveals this segmental relationship. This two-segment exponential regression on age of onset data increases the adjusted R-squared values by 0.012 in the Venezuelan kindreds and by 0.035 in the HD MAPS cohort. Although the amount of additional variance explained by the segmental regression approach is modest, the two slopes of the two-segment regression are significantly different from each other in both the Venezuelan kindreds [F(2, 439) = 11.13, P= 2 x 10(-5)] and in the HD MAPS cohort [F(2, 688) = 38.27, P= 2 x 10(-16)]. In both populations, the influence of each CAG repeat on age of onset appears to be stronger in the adult-onset range of CAG repeats than in the juvenile-onset range.

  19. Host mating system and the spread of a disease-resistant allele in a population

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Koslow, Jennifer M.; Jiang, J.; Ruan, S.

    2008-01-01

    The model presented here modifies a susceptible-infected (SI) host-pathogen model to determine the influence of mating system on the outcome of a host-pathogen interaction. Both deterministic and stochastic (individual-based) versions of the model were used. This model considers the potential consequences of varying mating systems on the rate of spread of both the pathogen and resistance alleles within the population. We assumed that a single allele for disease resistance was sufficient to confer complete resistance in an individual, and that both homozygote and heterozygote resistant individuals had the same mean birth and death rates. When disease invaded a population with only an initial small fraction of resistant genes, inbreeding (selfing) tended to increase the probability that the disease would soon be eliminated from a small population rather than become endemic, while outcrossing greatly increased the probability that the population would become extinct due to the disease.

  20. Toughing It Out--Disease-Resistant Potato Mutants Have Enhanced Tuber Skin Defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavel, Tamilarasan; Tegg, Robert S; Wilson, Calum R

    2016-05-01

    Common scab, a globally important potato disease, is caused by infection of tubers with pathogenic Streptomyces spp. Previously, disease-resistant potato somaclones were obtained through cell selections against the pathogen's toxin, known to be essential for disease. Further testing revealed that these clones had broad-spectrum resistance to diverse tuber-invading pathogens, and that resistance was restricted to tuber tissues. The mechanism of enhanced disease resistance was not known. Tuber periderm tissues from disease-resistant clones and their susceptible parent were examined histologically following challenge with the pathogen and its purified toxin. Relative expression of genes associated with tuber suberin biosynthesis and innate defense pathways within these tissues were also examined. The disease-resistant somaclones reacted to both pathogen and toxin by producing more phellem cell layers in the tuber periderm, and accumulating greater suberin polyphenols in these tissues. Furthermore, they had greater expression of genes associated with suberin biosynthesis. In contrast, signaling genes associated with innate defense responses were not differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible clones. The resistance phenotype is due to induction of increased periderm cell layers and suberization of the tuber periderm preventing infection. The somaclones provide a valuable resource for further examination of suberization responses and its genetic control.

  1. Differential responses of healthy and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseased human bronchial epithelial cells repeatedly exposed to air pollution-derived PM4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, B; Happillon, M; Antherieu, S; Hardy, E M; Alleman, L Y; Grova, N; Perdrix, E; Appenzeller, B M; Lo Guidice, J-M; Coddeville, P; Garçon, G

    2016-11-01

    While the knowledge of the underlying mechanisms by which air pollution-derived particulate matter (PM) exerts its harmful health effects is still incomplete, detailed in vitro studies are highly needed. With the aim of getting closer to the human in vivo conditions and better integrating a number of factors related to pre-existing chronic pulmonary inflammatory, we sought to develop primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-diseased human bronchial epithelial (DHBE) cells, grown at the air-liquid interface. Pan-cytokeratin and MUC5AC immunostaining confirmed the specific cell-types of both these healthy and diseased cell models and showed they are closed to human bronchial epithelia. Thereafter, healthy and diseased cells were repeatedly exposed to air pollution-derived PM4 at the non-cytotoxic concentration of 5 μg/cm(2). The differences between the oxidative and inflammatory states in non-exposed NHBE and COPD-DHBE cells indicated that diseased cells conserved their specific physiopathological characteristics. Increases in both oxidative damage and cytokine secretion were reported in repeatedly exposed NHBE cells and particularly in COPD-DHBE cells. Diseased cells repeatedly exposed had lower capacities to metabolize the organic chemicals-coated onto the air-pollution-derived PM4, such as benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), but showed higher sensibility to the formation of OH-B[a]P DNA adducts, because their diseased state possibly affected their defenses. Differential profiles of epigenetic hallmarks (i.e., global DNA hypomethylation, P16 promoter hypermethylation, telomere length shortening, telomerase activation, and histone H3 modifications) occurred in repeatedly exposed NHBE and particularly in COPD-DHBE cells. Taken together, these results closely supported the highest responsiveness of COPD-DHBE cells to a repeated exposure to air pollution-derived PM4. The use of these innovative in

  2. Coeliac disease as the cause of resistant sideropenic anaemia in children with Down's syndrome: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Momčilo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Coeliac disease (CD is a permanent intolerance of gluten, i.e. of gliadin and related proteins found in the endosperm of wheat, rye and barley. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, autoimmune nature, predominantly asymptomatic or atypical clinical course, as well as by high prevalence in patients with Down's syndrome (DS and some other diseases. Outline of Cases. We are presenting a girl and two boys, aged 6-7 (X=6.33 years with DS and CD recognized under the feature of sideropenic anaemia resistant to oral therapy with iron. Beside mental retardation, low stature and the morphological features characteristic of DS, two patients had a congenital heart disease; one ventricular septal defect and the other atrioventricular canal. In two patients, trisomy on the 21st chromosome pair (trisomy 21 was disclosed in all cells, while one had a mosaic karyotype. All three patients had classical laboratory parameters of sideropenic anaemia: blood Hb 77-89 g/l (X=81.67, HCT 0.26-0.29% (X=0.28, MCV 69-80 fl (X=73, MCH 24.3-30 pg (X=26.77 and serum iron 2-5 μmol/L (X=4.0. Beside anaemia and in one patient a mild isolated hypertransaminasemia (AST 67 U/l, ALT 62 U/l, other indicators of CD were not registered in any of the children. In addition, in all three patients, we also detected an increased level of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase (atTG of IgA class (45-88 U/l so that we performed endoscopic enterobiopsy in order to reliably confirm the diagnosis of CD. In all three patients, the pathohistological finding of the duodenal mucosa specimen showed mild to moderate destructive enteropathy associated with high intraepithelial lymphocyte infiltration, cryptic hyperplasia and lympho-plasmocytic infiltration of the stroma. In all three patients, the treatment with a strict gluten-free diet and iron therapy applied orally for 3-4 months resulted in blood count normalization and the correction of sideropenia. Serum level of the at

  3. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li-jia; Song Yun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Ht1, Htn1 and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhm1 and Rhm2, maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdm1, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm1, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2.1 of tomato,and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes1, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3.25) except for genes Rhm1, Rhm2, Mdm1 and Wsm1 which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  4. The association between resistance exercise and cardiovascular disease risk in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenowatz, Clemens; Sui, Xuemei; Fritz, Stacy; Lavie, Carl J; Beattie, Paul F; Church, Timothy S; Blair, Steven N

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between resistance exercise and cardiovascular disease risk, independent of body composition, physical activity and aerobic capacity, in healthy women. A cross-sectional analysis including 7321 women with no history of heart disease, hypertension or diabetes was performed. Participation in resistance exercise was self-reported and body weight and height was measured. A single cardiovascular disease risk score was established via factor analysis including percent body fat, mean arterial pressure, fasting glucose, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Physical activity level was determined based on questionnaire data and aerobic capacity was assessed via a maximal treadmill exercise test. Women reporting resistance exercise had lower total cardiovascular disease risk at any age. Specifically, resistance exercise was associated with lower body fat, fasting glucose and total cholesterol. The association between resistance exercise and cardiovascular disease risk, however, remained only in normal weight women after adjusting for physical activity and aerobic capacity. Results of the present study underline the importance of resistance exercise as part of a healthy and active lifestyle in women across all ages. Our results suggest that resistance exercise may be particularly beneficial to independently improve cardiovascular disease risk profiles in women with normal weight. In overweight/obese women, total physical activity and aerobic capacity may have a stronger association with cardiovascular disease risk. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Resistance screening trials on coconut varieties to Cape Saint Paul Wilt Disease in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaicoe Robert Nketsia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Cape Saint Paul Wilt Disease (CSPWD is a coconut lethal yellowing type disease (LY and is the single most serious threat to coconut cultivation in Ghana. The recommended disease management strategy is the cultivation of disease-resistant coconut varieties. More than 38 varieties have been screened for their resistance to CSPWD since 1956 and the results are reviewed in this paper. Two varieties, Sri Lanka Green Dwarf (SGD and Vanuatu Tall (VTT, have shown high resistance to the disease, and their hybrid (SGD × VTT is under observation to determine its performance. A programme to rehabilitate the CSPWD-devastated areas was started in 1999. Emerging results indicate that the MYD × VTT hybrid being used for the programme, succumbs to the disease under intense disease pressure. A redirection of the rehabilitation programme and the screening of more varieties are recommended.

  6. Primary antituberculosis drug resistance at Turkish military chest diseases hospital in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartaloglu, Zafer; Bozkanat, Erkan; Ozturkeri, Hakan; Okutan, Oguzhan; Ilvan, Ahmet

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of primary drug resistance to tuberculosis. We evaluated the clinical data, radiological features and sputum samples from 365 newly diagnosed patients with a positive culture of pulmonary tuberculosis at the Turkish Military Chest Diseases Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. No patients had taken antituberculosis drugs previously. The Bactec method was used to perform drug susceptibility testing for isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and streptomycin. Primary resistance to one or more drugs was detected in 87 (23.8%) patients; resistance to isoniazid was most common (54 patients) followed by resistance to ethambutol (n = 39), rifampicin (n = 11), and streptomycin (n = 9). One-drug resistance was detected in 69 patients; two-drug resistance in 11, three-drug resistance in 6, and four-drug resistance in 1. Multidrug resistance (resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin) was detected in 10 patients. In logistic-regression analysis, primary drug resistance was associated with radiological advanced tuberculosis (p < 0.001). Primary resistance to one or more drugs used in treating tuberculosis is relatively high. It is necessary to regularly screen for and treat drug resistance among those who live in close quarters, such as army barracks, school dormitories and prisons. Regular surveillance of drug sensitivity patterns should be maintained to determine appropriate alternate drug regimens and detect the spread of resistant stains in the population. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Fulminant ulcerative colitis associated with steroid-resistant minimal change disease and psoriasis: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Lok, Ka-Ho; Hung, Hiu-Gong; Yip, Wai-Man; Li, Kin-Kong; Li, Kam-Fu; Szeto, Ming-Leung

    2007-01-01

    A 43-year-old Chinese patient with a history of psoriasis developed fulminant ulcerative colitis after immunosuppressive therapy for steroid-resistant minimal change disease was stopped. Minimal change disease in association with inflammatory bowel disease is a rare condition. We here report a case showing an association between ulcerative colitis, minimal change disease, and psoriasis. The possible pathological link between 3 diseases is discussed.

  8. Fulminant ulcerative colitis associated with steroid-resistant minimal change disease and psoriasis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Ka-Ho; Hung, Hiu-Gong; Yip, Wai-Man; Li, Kin-Kong; Li, Kam-Fu; Szeto, Ming-Leung

    2007-08-07

    A 43-year-old Chinese patient with a history of psoriasis developed fulminant ulcerative colitis after immunosuppressive therapy for steroid-resistant minimal change disease was stopped. Minimal change disease in association with inflammatory bowel disease is a rare condition. We here report a case showing an association between ulcerative colitis, minimal change disease, and psoriasis. The possible pathological link between 3 diseases is discussed.

  9. Fulminant ulcerative colitis associated with steroid-resistant minimal change disease and psoriasis: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A 43-year-old Chinese patient with a history of psoriasis developed fulminant ulcerative colitis after immunosuppressive therapy for steroid-resistant minimal change disease was stopped. Minimal change disease in association with inflammatory bowel disease is a rare condition. We here report a case showing an association between ulcerative colitis, minimal change disease,and psoriasis. The possible pathological link between 3 diseases is discussed.

  10. Altered disease development in the eui mutants and Eui overexpressors indicates that gibberellins negatively regulate rice basal disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong-Lei; Li, Qun; Deng, Yi-Wen; Lou, Yong-Gen; Wang, Mu-Yang; Zhou, Guo-Xing; Zhang, Ying-Ying; He, Zu-Hua

    2008-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) form a group of important plant tetracyclic diterpenoid hormones that are involved in many aspects of plant growth and development. Emerging evidence implicates that GAs also play roles in stress responses. However, the role of GAs in biotic stress is largely unknown. Here, we report that knockout or overexpression of the Elongated uppermost internode (Eui) gene encoding a GA deactivating enzyme compromises or increases, respectively, disease resistance to bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oyrzae) and rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae). Exogenous application of GA(3) and the inhibitor of GA synthesis (uniconazol) could increase disease susceptibility and resistance, respectively, to bacterial blight. Similarly, uniconazol restored disease resistance of the eui mutant and GA(3) decreased disease resistance of the Eui overexpressors to bacterial blight. Therefore, the change of resistance attributes to GA levels. In consistency with this, the GA metabolism genes OsGA20ox2 and OsGA2ox1 were down-regulated during pathogen challenge. We also found that PR1a induction was enhanced but the SA level was decreased in the Eui overexpressor, while the JA level was reduced in the eui mutant. Together, our current study indicates that GAs play a negative role in rice basal disease resistance, with EUI as a positive modulator through regulating the level of bioactive GAs.

  11. Altered Disease Development in the eui Mutants and Eui Overexpressors Indicates that Gibberellins Negatively Regulate Rice Basal Disease Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Lei Yang; Qun Li; Yi-Wen Deng; Yong-Gen Lou; Mu-Yang Wang; Guo-Xing Zhou; Ying-Ying Zhang; Zu-Hua He

    2008-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) form a group of important plant tetracyclic diterpenoid hormones that are involved in many aspects of plant growth and development. Emerging evidence implicates that GAs also play roles in stress responses. However, the role of GAs in biotic stress is largely unknown. Here, we report that knockout or overexpression of the Elongated uppermost internode (Eui) gene encoding a GA deactivating enzyme compromises or increases, respectively, disease resistance to bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oyrzae) and rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae). Exogenous application of GA and the inhibitor of GA synthesis (uniconazol) could increase disease susceptibility and resistance, respectively, to bacterial blight. Similarly, uniconazol restored disease resistance of the eui mutant and GA3 decreased disease resistance of the Eui overexpressors to bacterial blight. Therefore, the change of resistance attributes to GA levels. In consistency with this, the GA metabolism genes OsGA2Oox2 and OsGA2oxl were down-regulated during pathogen challenge. We also found that PR1a induction was enhanced but the SA level was decreased in the Eui overexpressor, while the JA level was reduced in the eui mutant. Together, our current study indicates that GAs play a negative role in rice basal disease resistance, with EUI as a positive modulator through regulating the level of bioactive GAs.

  12. Ganciclovir-resistant, cytomegalic interstitial lung disease in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Eduardo; Romaldini, Helio; Lewi, David Salomão; Scheinberg, Morton Aaron

    2007-10-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus developed interstitial lung disease initially felt to be a manifestation of the disease but that, on further workup, proved to be a manifestation of cytomegalic disease resistant to ganciclovir. Treatment with foscarnet was associated with prompt improvement.

  13. Risk Factors of Repeated Infectious Disease Incidence among Substance Dependent Girls and Boys Court-Referred to Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Maria E.; Maietti, Candice M.; Levine, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    A small portion of Americans account for a disproportionate amount of the incidences of sexually transmitted infection observed over a short period of time. Studies with adults have begun to characterize this population, yet there is very little data on adolescent sexually transmitted infection repeaters (STIR). This study explores characteristics…

  14. Molecular Breeding Strategy and Challenges toward Improvement of Blast Disease Resistance in Rice Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh eAshkani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rice is a staple and most important security food crop consumed by almost half of the world’s population. More rice production is needed due to the rapid population growth in the world. Rice blast caused by the fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most destructive diseases of this crop in different part of the world. Breakdown of blast resistance is the major cause of yield instability in several rice growing areas. There is a need to develop strategies providing long-lasting disease resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, giving protection for a long time over a broad geographic area, promising for sustainable rice production in the future. So far, molecular breeding approaches involving DNA markers, such as QTL mapping, marker-aided selection, gene pyramiding, allele mining and genetic transformation have been used to develop new resistant rice cultivars. Such techniques now are used as a low-cost, high-throughput alternative to conventional methods allowing rapid introgression of disease resistance genes into susceptible varieties as well as the incorporation of multiple genes into individual lines for more durable blast resistance. The paper briefly reviewed the progress of studies on this aspect to provide the interest information for rice disease resistance breeding. This review includes examples of how advanced molecular method have been used in breeding programs for improve blast resistance. New information and knowledge gained from previous research on the recent strategy and challenges toward improvement of blast disease such as pyramiding disease resistance gene for creating new rice varieties with high resistance against multiple diseases will undoubtedly provide new insights into the rice disease control.

  15. Molecular Breeding Strategy and Challenges Towards Improvement of Blast Disease Resistance in Rice Crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkani, Sadegh; Rafii, Mohd Y; Shabanimofrad, Mahmoodreza; Miah, Gous; Sahebi, Mahbod; Azizi, Parisa; Tanweer, Fatah A; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Nasehi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a staple and most important security food crop consumed by almost half of the world's population. More rice production is needed due to the rapid population growth in the world. Rice blast caused by the fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most destructive diseases of this crop in different part of the world. Breakdown of blast resistance is the major cause of yield instability in several rice growing areas. There is a need to develop strategies providing long-lasting disease resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, giving protection for a long time over a broad geographic area, promising for sustainable rice production in the future. So far, molecular breeding approaches involving DNA markers, such as QTL mapping, marker-aided selection, gene pyramiding, allele mining and genetic transformation have been used to develop new resistant rice cultivars. Such techniques now are used as a low-cost, high-throughput alternative to conventional methods allowing rapid introgression of disease resistance genes into susceptible varieties as well as the incorporation of multiple genes into individual lines for more durable blast resistance. The paper briefly reviewed the progress of studies on this aspect to provide the interest information for rice disease resistance breeding. This review includes examples of how advanced molecular method have been used in breeding programs for improving blast resistance. New information and knowledge gained from previous research on the recent strategy and challenges towards improvement of blast disease such as pyramiding disease resistance gene for creating new rice varieties with high resistance against multiple diseases will undoubtedly provide new insights into the rice disease control.

  16. Multi-Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Analysis for Rapid and Accurate Typing of Virulent Multidrug Resistant Escherichia coli Clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer, Umaer; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro E.; Woodford, Neil; Dhanji, Hiran; Cantón, Rafael; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Lindstedt, Bjørn-Arne

    2012-01-01

    One hundred E. coli isolates from Norway (n = 37), Sweden (n = 24), UK (n = 20) and Spain (n = 19), producing CTX-M-type - (n = 84), or SHV-12 (n = 4) extended spectrum β-lactamases, or the plasmid mediated AmpC, CMY-2 (n = 12), were typed using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and multi-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Isolates clustered into 33 Sequence Types (STs) and 14 Sequence Type Complexes (STCs), and 58 MLVA-Types (MTs) and 25 different MLVA-Type Complexes (MTCs). A strong agreement between the MLST profile and MLVA typing results was observed, in which all ST131-isolates (n = 39) and most of the STC-648 (n = 10), STC-38 (n = 9), STC-10 (n = 9), STC-405 (n = 8) and STC-23 (n = 6) isolates were clustered distinctly into MTC-29, -36, -20, -14, -10 and -39, respectively. MLVA is a rapid and accurate tool for genotyping isolates of globally disseminated virulent multidrug resistant E. coli lineages, including ST131. PMID:22859970

  17. multiple disease resistance in snap bean genotypes in kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    bimodal pattern of rainfall with an annual mean of 1000 mm. .... the parent lines had intermediate resistance (Table. 6). Variety Star 2053 was ..... the parental varieties used as checks in the current study did ..... Authority), 2009. Export statistics ...

  18. Is Insulin Resistance a Feature of or a Primary Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Markku

    2015-12-01

    The two major pathophysiological abnormalities in type 2 diabetes are insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion. Insulin resistance is a general term meaning that insulin does not exert its normal effects in insulin-sensitive target tissues, such as skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver, the major target tissues for insulin action in glucose metabolism. Insulin resistance (IR) promotes cardiovascular disease via multiple mechanisms, including changes in classic cardiovascular risk factors and downregulation of the insulin signaling pathways in different tissues. This review presents evidence for the association of insulin resistance with cardiovascular disease from clinical and population-based studies. The causality of the association of insulin resistance with cardiovascular disease is discussed on the basis of recent findings from the Mendelian randomization studies.

  19. Genetic Signature of Resistance to White Band Disease in the Caribbean Staghorn Coral Acropora cervicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libro, Silvia; Vollmer, Steven V

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are declining worldwide due to multiple factors including rising sea surface temperature, ocean acidification, and disease outbreaks. Over the last 30 years, White Band Disease (WBD) alone has killed up to 95% of the Caribbean`s dominant shallow-water corals--the staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis and the elkhorn coral A. palmata. Both corals are now listed on the US Endangered Species Act, and while their recovery has been slow, recent transmission surveys indicate that more than 5% of staghorn corals are disease resistant. Here we compared transcriptome-wide gene expression between resistant and susceptible staghorn corals exposed to WBD using in situ transmission assays. We identified constitutive gene expression differences underlying disease resistance that are independent from the immune response associated with disease exposure. Genes involved in RNA interference-mediated gene silencing, including Argonaute were up-regulated in resistant corals, whereas heat shock proteins (HSPs) were down-regulated. Up-regulation of Argonaute proteins indicates that post-transcriptional gene silencing plays a key, but previously unsuspected role in coral immunity and disease resistance. Constitutive expression of HSPs has been linked to thermal resilience in other Acropora corals, suggesting that the down-regulation of HSPs in disease resistant staghorn corals may confer a dual benefit of thermal resilience.

  20. Genetic Signature of Resistance to White Band Disease in the Caribbean Staghorn Coral Acropora cervicornis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Libro

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are declining worldwide due to multiple factors including rising sea surface temperature, ocean acidification, and disease outbreaks. Over the last 30 years, White Band Disease (WBD alone has killed up to 95% of the Caribbean`s dominant shallow-water corals--the staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis and the elkhorn coral A. palmata. Both corals are now listed on the US Endangered Species Act, and while their recovery has been slow, recent transmission surveys indicate that more than 5% of staghorn corals are disease resistant. Here we compared transcriptome-wide gene expression between resistant and susceptible staghorn corals exposed to WBD using in situ transmission assays. We identified constitutive gene expression differences underlying disease resistance that are independent from the immune response associated with disease exposure. Genes involved in RNA interference-mediated gene silencing, including Argonaute were up-regulated in resistant corals, whereas heat shock proteins (HSPs were down-regulated. Up-regulation of Argonaute proteins indicates that post-transcriptional gene silencing plays a key, but previously unsuspected role in coral immunity and disease resistance. Constitutive expression of HSPs has been linked to thermal resilience in other Acropora corals, suggesting that the down-regulation of HSPs in disease resistant staghorn corals may confer a dual benefit of thermal resilience.

  1. In vitro propagation of the new disease resistant Coffea arabica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-11

    Jun 11, 2014 ... coffee berry disease and coffee leaf rust which are the main coffee diseases in Kenya. Coupled with .... increased in size and synthesized photosynthetic pigments (Figure 2A). These pigments facilitate photo- synthetic activity ...

  2. Disease resistance breeding in rose: current status and potential of biotechnological tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debener, Thomas; Byrne, David H

    2014-11-01

    The cultivated rose is a multispecies complex for which a high level of disease protection is needed due to the low tolerance of blemishes in ornamental plants. The most important fungal diseases are black spot, powdery mildew, botrytis and downy mildew. Rose rosette, a lethal viral pathogen, is emerging as a devastating disease in North America. Currently rose breeders use a recurrent phenotypic selection approach and perform selection for disease resistance for most pathogen issues in a 2-3 year field trial. Marker assisted selection could accelerate this breeding process. Thus far markers have been identified for resistance to black spot (Rdrs) and powdery mildew and with the ability of genotyping by sequencing to generate 1000s of markers our ability to identify markers useful in plant improvement should increase exponentially. Transgenic rose lines with various fungal resistance genes inserted have shown limited success and RNAi technology has potential to provide virus resistance. Roses, as do other plants, have sequences homologous to characterized R-genes in their genomes, some which have been related to specific disease resistance. With improving next generation sequencing technology, our ability to do genomic and transcriptomic studies of the resistance related genes in both the rose and the pathogens to reveal novel gene targets to develop resistant roses will accelerate. Finally, the development of designer nucleases opens up a potentially non-GMO approach to directly modify a rose's DNA to create a disease resistant rose. Although there is much potential, at present rose breeders are not using marker assisted breeding primarily because a good suite of marker/trait associations (MTA) that would ensure a path to stable disease resistance is not available. As our genomic analytical tools improve, so will our ability to identify useful genes and linked markers. Once these MTAs are available, it will be the cost savings, both in time and money, that will

  3. Differential disease resistance response in the barley necrotic mutant nec1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunga Laura

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although ion fluxes are considered to be an integral part of signal transduction during responses to pathogens, only a few ion channels are known to participate in the plant response to infection. CNGC4 is a disease resistance-related cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel. Arabidopsis thaliana CNGC4 mutants hlm1 and dnd2 display an impaired hypersensitive response (HR, retarded growth, a constitutively active salicylic acid (SA-mediated pathogenesis-related response and elevated resistance against bacterial pathogens. Barley CNGC4 shares 67% aa identity with AtCNGC4. The barley mutant nec1 comprising of a frame-shift mutation of CNGC4 displays a necrotic phenotype and constitutively over-expresses PR-1, yet it is not known what effect the nec1 mutation has on barley resistance against different types of pathogens. Results nec1 mutant accumulated high amount of SA and hydrogen peroxide compared to parental cv. Parkland. Experiments investigating nec1 disease resistance demonstrated positive effect of nec1 mutation on non-host resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst at high inoculum density, whereas at normal Pst inoculum concentration nec1 resistance did not differ from wt. In contrast to augmented P. syringae resistance, penetration resistance against biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh, the causal agent of powdery mildew, was not altered in nec1. The nec1 mutant significantly over-expressed race non-specific Bgh resistance-related genes BI-1 and MLO. Induction of BI-1 and MLO suggested putative involvement of nec1 in race non-specific Bgh resistance, therefore the effect of nec1on mlo-5-mediated Bgh resistance was assessed. The nec1/mlo-5 double mutant was as resistant to Bgh as Nec1/mlo-5 plants, suggesting that nec1 did not impair mlo-5 race non-specific Bgh resistance. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that nec1 mutation alters activation of systemic acquired resistance

  4. Identification of a QTL for postharvest disease resistance to Penicillium expansum in Malus sieversii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue mold of apple caused by Penicillium expansum is one of the most important postharvest rots of apple fruit. Little attention has been devoted to postharvest disease resistance in apple breeding programs due both to a lack of sources of genetic resistance and to the time required for seedlings t...

  5. The prodromal phase of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-associated Parkinson disease: Clinical and imaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Tolosa, Eduardo; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea; Coffey, Christopher; Alcalay, Roy N; Chan, Piu; Duda, John E; Facheris, Maurizio; Fernández-Santiago, Rubén; Marek, Kenneth; Lomeña, Francisco; Marras, Connie; Mondragon, Elisabet; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Waro, Bjorg

    2017-05-01

    Asymptomatic, nonmanifesting carriers of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations are at increased risk of developing PD. Clinical and neuroimaging features may be associated with gene carriage and/or may demarcate individuals at greater risk for phenoconversion to PD. To investigate clinical and dopamine transporter single-photon emission computed tomography imaging characteristics of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 asymptomatic carriers. A total of 342 carriers' and 259 noncarriers' relatives of G2019S leucine-rich repeat kinase 2/PD patients and 39 carriers' and 31 noncarriers' relatives of R1441G leucine-rich repeat kinase 2/PD patients were evaluated. Motor and nonmotor symptoms were assessed using specific scales and questionnaires. Neuroimaging quantitative data were obtained in 81 carriers and compared with 41 noncarriers. G2019S carriers scored higher in motor scores and had lower radioligand uptake compared to noncarriers, but no differences in nonmotor symptoms scores were observed. R1441G carriers scored higher in motor scores, had lower radioligand uptake, and had higher scores in depression, dysautonomia, and Rapid Eye Movements Sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire scores, but had better cognition scores than noncarriers. Among G2019S carriers, a group with "mild motor signs" was identified, and was significantly older, with worse olfaction and lower radioligand uptake. G2019S and R1441G carriers differ from their noncarriers' relatives in higher motor scores and slightly lower radioligand uptake. Nonmotor symptoms were mild, and different nonmotor profiles were observed in G2019S carriers compared to R1441G carriers. A group of G2019S carriers with known prodromal features was identified. Longitudinal studies are required to determine whether such individuals are at short-term risk of developing overt parkinsonism. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  6. The SCA1 (Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and MJD (Machado-Joseph disease CAG repeats in normal individuals: segregation analysis and allele frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Emília Vieira Wiezel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3 are autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases caused by expansions of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the SCA1 and MJD genes. These expanded sequences are unstable upon transmission, leading to an intergeneration increase in the number of repeats (dynamic mutation. The transmission of the CAG repeat was studied in normal mother-father-child trios, referred for paternity testing (SCA1, n = 367; MJD, n = 879. No segregation distortion was detected. The CAG allele frequencies were determined in 330 unrelated individuals (fathers from couples tested for paternity. The allele frequency distributions did not differ from those previously reported for European populations. The estimated values for the statistic parameters indicating diversity at the SCA1 locus did not differ much from those reported previously for other STRs in the Brazilian population, while those for the MJD locus were close to or higher than the maximum values of previous reports. This shows that SCA1 and MJD are highly informative loci for applications in genetic and population studies and for forensic analysis.

  7. Pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus: Important mosquito vectors of human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Letícia B; Kasai, Shinji; Scott, Jeffrey G

    2016-10-01

    Aedes aegypti and A. albopictus mosquitoes are vectors of important human disease viruses, including dengue, yellow fever, chikungunya and Zika. Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control adult Aedes mosquitoes, especially during disease outbreaks. Herein, we review the status of pyrethroid resistance in A. aegypti and A. albopictus, mechanisms of resistance, fitness costs associated with resistance alleles and provide suggestions for future research. The widespread use of pyrethroids has given rise to many populations with varying levels of resistance worldwide, albeit with substantial geographical variation. In adult A. aegypti and A. albopictus, resistance levels are generally lower in Asia, Africa and the USA, and higher in Latin America, although there are exceptions. Susceptible populations still exist in several areas of the world, particularly in Asia and South America. Resistance to pyrethroids in larvae is also geographically widespread. The two major mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance are increased detoxification due to P450-monooxygenases, and mutations in the voltage sensitive sodium channel (Vssc) gene. Several P450s have been putatively associated with insecticide resistance, but the specific P450s involved are not fully elucidated. Pyrethroid resistance can be due to single mutations or combinations of mutations in Vssc. The presence of multiple Vssc mutations can lead to extremely high levels of resistance. Suggestions for future research needs are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel BAC mouse model of Huntington’s disease with 225 CAG repeats exhibits an early widespread and stable degenerative phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzynowicz, Michal; Bichell, Terry Jo; Soares, Barbara D.; Loth, Meredith K.; McGlothan, Jennifer L.; Alikhan, Fatima S.; Hua, Kegang; Coughlin, Jennifer M.; Holt, Hunter K.; Jetter, Christopher S.; Mori, Susumu; Pomper, Martin G.; Osmand, Alexander P.; Guilarte, Tomás R.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unusually large CAG repeat expansions (>60) in exon one of Huntingtin (HTT) are invariably associated with a juvenile-onset form of Huntington’s disease (HD), characterized by a more extensive and rapidly progressing neuropathology than the more prevalent adult-onset form. However, existing mouse models of HD that express the full-length Htt gene with CAG repeat lengths associated with juvenile HD (ranging between ~75 to ~150 repeats in published models) exhibit selective neurodegenerative phenotypes more consistent with adult-onset HD. OBJECTIVE To determine if a very large CAG repeat (>200) in full-length Htt elicits neurodegenerative phenotypes consistent with juvenile HD. METHODS Using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system, we generated mice expressing full-length mouse Htt with ~225 CAG repeats under control of the mouse Htt promoter. Mice were characterized using behavioral, neuropathological, biochemical and brain imaging methods. RESULTS BAC-225Q mice exhibit phenotypes consistent with a subset of features seen in juvenile-onset HD: very early motor behavior abnormalities, reduced body weight, widespread and progressive increase in Htt aggregates, gliosis, and neurodegeneration. Early striatal pathology was observed, including reactive gliosis and loss of dopamine receptors, prior to detectable volume loss. HD-related blood markers of impaired energy metabolism and systemic inflammation were also increased. Aside from an age-dependent progression of diffuse nuclear aggregates at 6 months of age to abundant neuropil aggregates at 12 months of age, other pathological and motor phenotypes showed little to no progression. CONCLUSIONS The HD phenotypes present in animals 3 to 12 months of age make the BAC-225Q mice a unique and stable model of full-length mutant Htt associated phenotypes, including body weight loss, behavioral impairment and HD-like neurodegenerative phenotypes characteristic of juvenile-onset HD and/or late-stage adult

  9. [Fosfomycin--its significance for treatment of diseases due to multidrug-resistant bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Fosfomycin is a bactericidal phosphonic acid derivative, which engages by inhibiting pyruvyltransferase at an early stage in the peptidoglycan synthesis. It shows a broad spectrum of activity that includes many multidrug-resistant gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Fosfomycin is active against most strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and several multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, e.g., Escherichia coli strains expressing extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains with decreased susceptibilities to carbapenems. Most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains as well as enterococci with and without vancomycin resistance are also sensitive to fosfomycin. During the last decade, a variety of studies showed that fosfomycin is not only suitable for treating uncomplicated urinary tract diseases, but also for the treatment of many other diseases caused by bacterial pathogens with and without multidrug resistance. However, large controlled studies demonstrating the efficacy of the drug to treat diseases caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are still missing. Considering the low number of antibacterial agents with good activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria, fosfomycin should be evaluated as an important antibiotic for the treatment of several severe illnesses due to these pathogens. However, because some multidrug-resistant bacteria are also resistant to fosfomycin, this agent should only be applied if the pathogen is sensitive to this drug. In addition, because rapid development of resistance cannot be excluded if fosfomycin will be applied alone, this drug should only be given in combination with other effective drugs for the treatment of serious systemic diseases due to multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens.

  10. RESISTANCE TO ANTIPLATELET DRUGS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Aynetdinova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical, cell and genetic factors are distinguished among reasons for resistance to antiplatelet drugs. There are many methods to detect sensitivity to antiplatelet drugs, but they all have disadvantages. Moreover, there is no unified approach for interpretation of received results, and no recommendations for their practical use. It is necessary to work out unified procedure to assess platelet function, to define indications for its usage and to work out unified criteria of resistance. Individualized approach and each patient’s peculiarities consideration are essential when prescribing antiplatelet therapy.

  11. Intragenic tandem repeat variation between Legionella pneumophila strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarraud Sophie

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial genomes harbour a large number of tandem repeats, yet the possible phenotypic effects of those found within the coding region of genes are only beginning to be examined. Evidence exists from other organisms that these repeats can be involved in the evolution of new genes, gene regulation, adaptation, resistance to environmental stresses, and avoidance of the immune system. Results In this study, we have investigated the presence and variability in copy number of intragenic tandemly repeated sequences in the genome of Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Within the genome of the Philadelphia strain, we have identified 26 intragenic tandem repeat sequences using conservative selection criteria. Of these, seven were "polymorphic" in terms of repeat copy number between a large number of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains. These strains were collected from a wide variety of environments and patients in several geographical regions. Within this panel of strains, all but one of these seven genes exhibited statistically different patterns in repeat copy number between samples from different origins (environmental, clinical, and hot springs. Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that intragenic tandem repeats could play a role in virulence and adaptation to different environments. While tandem repeats are an increasingly popular focus of molecular typing studies in prokaryotes, including in L. pneumophila, this study is the first examining the difference in tandem repeat distribution as a function of clinical or environmental origin.

  12. Ectopic Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of an NB-ARC Encoding Putative Disease Resistance Gene from Wild Chinese Vitis pseudoreticulata Enhances Resistance to Phytopathogenic Fungi and Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifeng eWen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant resistance proteins mediate pathogen recognition and activate innate immune responses to restrict pathogen proliferation. One common feature of these proteins is an NB-ARC domain. In this study, we characterized a gene encoding a protein with an NB-ARC domain from wild Chinese grapevine Vitis pseudoreticulata accession Baihe-35-1, which was identified in a transcriptome analysis of the leaves following inoculation with Erysiphe necator (Schw., a causal agent of powdery mildew. Transcript levels of this gene, designated VpCN (GenBank accession number KT265084, increased strongly after challenge of grapevine leaves with E. necator. The deduced amino acid sequence was predicted to contain an NB-ARC domain in the C-terminus and an RxCC-like domain similar to CC domain of Rx protein in the N-terminus. Ectopic expression of VpCN in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in either a wild-type phenotype or a dwarf phenotype. The phenotypically normal transgenic A. thaliana showed enhance resistance to A. thaliana powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum, as well as to a virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Moreover, promoter::GUS (β-glucuronidase analysis revealed that powdery mildew infection induced the promoter activity of VpCN in grapevine leaves. Finally, a promoter deletion analysis showed that TC rich repeat elements likely play an important role in the response to E. necator infection. Taken together, our results suggest that VpCN contribute to powdery mildew disease resistant in grapevine.

  13. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  14. Breeding for Improved Disease Resistance in Organic Farming – Possibilities and Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Ulf

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Lowered incidences of disease may be reached in several ways: management and rearing measures, vaccination programmes and preventive medications as well as breeding for improved disease resistance. Here the focus is on breeding for improved resistance to infectious diseases. In comparison to conventional farming, one has to acknowledge that the spectrum of diseases in animals reared under organic conditions is different and that the proportion of the breeding stock of animals in organic farming is considerably smaller. There are at least four different approaches that may be used in breeding towards resistance to infectious diseases. The most obvious is to record disease incidence in the progeny and select those parents that produce the progeny with the lowest incidences of disease. Another approach is to use breeders possessing certain major histo-compatibility complex antigens suggested being associated with resistance to certain infections. A third approach is to analyse the heritability of a set of immune functions or related traits crucial for resistance to infections and then use the traits with high heritability in breeding programmes. Finally, one may genetically select animals for high immune response using an index that combines estimated breeding values for several immunological traits. Examples of these various approaches are given and the feasibility for using these in organic farming are discussed.

  15. Inter- and Intra-Observer Repeatability of Quantitative Whole-Body, Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (WBDWI in Metastatic Bone Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Blackledge

    Full Text Available Quantitative whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WB-DWI is now possible using semi-automatic segmentation techniques. The method enables whole-body estimates of global Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (gADC and total Diffusion Volume (tDV, both of which have demonstrated considerable utility for assessing treatment response in patients with bone metastases from primary prostate and breast cancers. Here we investigate the agreement (inter-observer repeatability between two radiologists in their definition of Volumes Of Interest (VOIs and subsequent assessment of tDV and gADC on an exploratory patient cohort of nine. Furthermore, each radiologist was asked to repeat his or her measurements on the same patient data sets one month later to identify the intra-observer repeatability of the technique. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC estimation method provided full posterior probabilities of repeatability measures along with maximum a-posteriori values and 95% confidence intervals. Our estimates of the inter-observer Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICCinter for log-tDV and median gADC were 1.00 (0.97-1.00 and 0.99 (0.89-0.99 respectively, indicating excellent observer agreement for these metrics. Mean gADC values were found to have ICCinter = 0.97 (0.81-0.99 indicating a slight sensitivity to outliers in the derived distributions of gADC. Of the higher order gADC statistics, skewness was demonstrated to have good inter-user agreement with ICCinter = 0.99 (0.86-1.00, whereas gADC variance and kurtosis performed relatively poorly: 0.89 (0.39-0.97 and 0.96 (0.69-0.99 respectively. Estimates of intra-observer repeatability (ICCintra demonstrated similar results: 0.99 (0.95-1.00 for log-tDV, 0.98 (0.89-0.99 and 0.97 (0.83-0.99 for median and mean gADC respectively, 0.64 (0.25-0.88 for gADC variance, 0.85 (0.57-0.95 for gADC skewness and 0.85 (0.57-0.95 for gADC kurtosis. Further investigation of two anomalous patient cases revealed that a very small

  16. RAPD markers associated with resistance to blackleg disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-11-16

    Nov 16, 2006 ... OPE12, and OPI01) were polymorphic, while the SSR markers were monomorphic. Chi-square analysis indicated that 5 .... Therefore, molecular markers linked to resistant genes must be developed so that, the ..... The polymorphism information content (PIC value) indi- cates that some primers were more ...

  17. A Nomadic Subtelomeric Disease Resistance Gene Cluster in Common Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    The B4 resistance (R)-gene cluster, located in subtelomeric region of chromosome 4, is one of the largest clusters known in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, Pv). We sequenced 650 kb spanning this locus and annotated 97 genes, 26 of which correspond to Coiled-coil-Nucleotide-Binding-Site-Leucine-Rich...

  18. Prevalence of and risk factors for aspirin resistance in elderly patients with coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Feng Liu; Jian Cao; Li Fan; Lin Liu; Jian Li; Guo-Liang Hu; Yi-Xin Hu; Xiao-Li Li

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of and related risk factors for aspirin resistance in elderly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods Two hundred and forty-six elderly patients (75.9 ± 7.4 years) with CAD who received daily aspirin therapy (≥ 75 mg) over one month were recruited. The effect of aspirin was assessed using light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and thrombelastography platelet mapping assay (TEG). Aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 20% arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation and ≥ 70% adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation in the LTA assay. An aspirin semi-responder was defined as meeting one (but not both) of the criteria described above. Based on the results of TEG, aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 50% aggregation induced by AA. Results As determined by LTA, 23 (9.3%) of the elderly CAD patients were resistant to aspirin therapy; 91 (37.0%) were semi-responders. As determined by TEG, 61 patients (24.8%) were aspirin resistant. Of the 61 patients who were aspirin resistant by TEG, 19 were aspirin resistant according to LTA results. Twenty-four of 91 semi-responders by LTA were aspirin resistant by TEG. Multivariate logistic risk factor for aspirin resistance as determined by TEG. Conclusions A significant number of elderly patients with CAD are resistant to aspirin therapy. Fasting blood glucose level is closely associated with aspirin resistance in elderly CAD patients.

  19. Quantitative Trait Loci for Resistance to Stripe Disease in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to map the quantitative trait loci for rice stripe resistance, a molecular linkage map was constructed based on the lines to rice stripe were investigated by both artificial inoculation at laboratory and natural infection in the field, and the ratios of ranged from 0 to 134.08 and from 6.25 to 133.6 under artificial inoculation at laboratory and natural infection in the field, respectively,and showed a marked bias towards resistant parent (Zhaiyeqing 8), indicating that the resistance to rice stripe was controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTL). QTL analysis showed that the QTLs detected by the two inoculation methods were completely different.Only one QTL, qSTV7, was detected under artificial inoculation, at which the Zhaiyeqing 8 allele increased the resistance to rice stripe, while two QTLs, qSTV5 and qSTV1, were detected under natural infection, in which resistant alleles came from Zhaiyeqing 8and Wuyujing 3, respectively. These results showed that resistant parent Zhaiyeqing 8 carried the alleles associated with the resistance to rice stripe virus and the small brown planthopper, and susceptible parent Wuyujing 3 also carried the resistant allele to rice stripe virus. In comparison with the results previously reported, QTLs detected in the study were new resistant genes to rice stripe disease. This will provide a new resistant resource for avoiding genetic vulnerability for single utilization of the resistant gene Stvb-i.

  20. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  1. Multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms may determine Crohn's disease behavior in patients from Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa P. Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Conflicting data from studies on the potential role of multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease may result from the analysis of genetically and geographically distinct populations. Here, we investigated whether multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms are associated with inflammatory bowel diseases in patients from Rio de Janeiro. METHODS: We analyzed 123 Crohn's disease patients and 83 ulcerative colitis patients to determine the presence of the multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms C1236T, G2677T and C3435T. In particular, the genotype frequencies of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients were analyzed. Genotype-phenotype associations with major clinical characteristics were established, and estimated risks were calculated for the mutations. RESULTS: No significant difference was observed in the genotype frequencies of the multidrug resistance 1 G2677T/A and C3435T polymorphisms between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. In contrast, the C1236T polymorphism was significantly more common in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis (p = 0.047. A significant association was also found between the multidrug resistance 1 C3435T polymorphism and the stricturing form of Crohn's disease (OR: 4.13; p = 0.009, whereas no association was found with penetrating behavior (OR: 0.33; p = 0.094. In Crohn's disease, a positive association was also found between the C3435T polymorphism and corticosteroid resistance/refractoriness (OR: 4.14; p = 0.010. However, no significant association was found between multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms and UC subphenotypic categories. CONCLUSION: The multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphism C3435T is associated with the stricturing phenotype and an inappropriate response to therapy in Crohn's disease. This association with Crohn's disease may support additional pathogenic roles for the multidrug resistance 1 gene in regulating gut

  2. Powdery Mildew Resistance Conferred by Loss of the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 Protein Kinase Is Suppressed by a Missense Mutation in KEEP ON GOING, a Regulator of Abscisic Acid Signaling1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzynska, Anna; Christiansen, Katy M.; Lan, Yinan; Rodibaugh, Natalie L.; Innes, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced resistance to infection by powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum). EDR1 encodes a protein kinase, but its substrates and the pathways regulated by EDR1 are unknown. To identify components of the EDR1 signal transduction pathway(s), we conducted a forward genetic screen for mutations that suppressed edr1-mediated disease resistance. Genetic mapping and cloning of one of these suppressor mutations revealed a recessive missense mutation in the KEEP ON GOING gene (KEG; At5g13530), which we designated keg-4. KEG encodes a multidomain protein that includes a RING E3 ligase domain, a kinase domain, ankyrin repeats, and HERC2-like repeats. The KEG protein has previously been shown to have ubiquitin ligase activity and to negatively regulate protein levels of the transcription factor ABCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5. KEG mRNA levels were found to be 3-fold higher in edr1 mutant plants compared to wild type. Loss-of-function mutations in KEG are seedling lethal and are hypersensitive to glucose and abscisic acid (ABA). The keg-4 mutation, in contrast, conferred resistance to 6% glucose and suppressed edr1-mediated hypersensitivity to ABA, suggesting that the keg-4 mutation suppresses ABA signaling by altering KEG function. Several ABA-responsive genes were found to be further up-regulated in the edr1 mutant following ABA treatment, and this up-regulation was suppressed by the keg-4 mutation. We conclude that edr1-mediated resistance to powdery mildew is mediated, in part, by enhanced ABA signaling. PMID:18815384

  3. Powdery mildew resistance conferred by loss of the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 protein kinase is suppressed by a missense mutation in KEEP ON GOING, a regulator of abscisic acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzynska, Anna; Christiansen, Katy M; Lan, Yinan; Rodibaugh, Natalie L; Innes, Roger W

    2008-11-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced resistance to infection by powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum). EDR1 encodes a protein kinase, but its substrates and the pathways regulated by EDR1 are unknown. To identify components of the EDR1 signal transduction pathway(s), we conducted a forward genetic screen for mutations that suppressed edr1-mediated disease resistance. Genetic mapping and cloning of one of these suppressor mutations revealed a recessive missense mutation in the KEEP ON GOING gene (KEG; At5g13530), which we designated keg-4. KEG encodes a multidomain protein that includes a RING E3 ligase domain, a kinase domain, ankyrin repeats, and HERC2-like repeats. The KEG protein has previously been shown to have ubiquitin ligase activity and to negatively regulate protein levels of the transcription factor ABCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5. KEG mRNA levels were found to be 3-fold higher in edr1 mutant plants compared to wild type. Loss-of-function mutations in KEG are seedling lethal and are hypersensitive to glucose and abscisic acid (ABA). The keg-4 mutation, in contrast, conferred resistance to 6% glucose and suppressed edr1-mediated hypersensitivity to ABA, suggesting that the keg-4 mutation suppresses ABA signaling by altering KEG function. Several ABA-responsive genes were found to be further up-regulated in the edr1 mutant following ABA treatment, and this up-regulation was suppressed by the keg-4 mutation. We conclude that edr1-mediated resistance to powdery mildew is mediated, in part, by enhanced ABA signaling.

  4. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD and Its Connection with Insulin Resistance, Dyslipidemia, Atherosclerosis and Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Gastaldelli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is marked by hepatic fat accumulation not due to alcohol abuse. Several studies have demonstrated that NAFLD is associated with insulin resistance leading to a resistance in the antilipolytic effect of insulin in the adipose tissue with an increase of free fatty acids (FFAs. The increase of FFAs induces mitochondrial dysfunction and development of lipotoxicity. Moreover, in subjects with NAFLD, ectopic fat also accumulates as cardiac and pancreatic fat. In this review we analyzed the mechanisms that relate NAFLD with metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia and its association with the development and progression of cardiovascular disease.

  5. Obtaining transgenic rice resistant to rice fungal blast disease by controlled cell death strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Shengji; GU Hongya; QU Lijia; CHEN Zhangliang

    2003-01-01

    The strategy of the two-component system, composed of Barnase and Barstar which encode RNase and a specific inhibitor to the RNase respectively, is adopted to obtain transgenic rice resistant to rice fungal blast disease. In this study, two chimeric promoters, induced by rice blast fungus pathogen (Magnaporthe grisea), are fused with Barnase respectively to construct two plant expression vectors, pWBNBS and pPBNBS together with the Barstar driven by CaMV 35S promoter. The resistance of the transgenic rice lines to rice blast fungus disease and rice blight disease are evaluated. The results show that (1) the expression of Barnase is induced in rice leaves when inoculated with the spores of Magnaporthe grisea; (2) the induced expression level of Barnase surpasses the level of Barstar, which elicits a similar hypersensitive response (HR) in the leaves, and the transgenic plant shows high resistance to the rice fungal blast disease; and (3) transgenic rice plants also show obvious resistance to rice bacterial blight disease. Taken together, these results suggest that the transgenic rice plants harboring this two-component system acquire relatively broad spectrum resistance against pathogens, especially high resistance to rice fungal pathogen.

  6. A review of microsatellite markers and their applications in rice breeding programs to improve blast disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Islam, Kh Nurul; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2013-11-14

    Over the last few decades, the use of molecular markers has played an increasing role in rice breeding and genetics. Of the different types of molecular markers, microsatellites have been utilized most extensively, because they can be readily amplified by PCR and the large amount of allelic variation at each locus. Microsatellites are also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR), and they are typically composed of 1-6 nucleotide repeats. These markers are abundant, distributed throughout the genome and are highly polymorphic compared with other genetic markers, as well as being species-specific and co-dominant. For these reasons, they have become increasingly important genetic markers in rice breeding programs. The evolution of new biotypes of pests and diseases as well as the pressures of climate change pose serious challenges to rice breeders, who would like to increase rice production by introducing resistance to multiple biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent advances in rice genomics have now made it possible to identify and map a number of genes through linkage to existing DNA markers. Among the more noteworthy examples of genes that have been tightly linked to molecular markers in rice are those that confer resistance or tolerance to blast. Therefore, in combination with conventional breeding approaches, marker-assisted selection (MAS) can be used to monitor the presence or lack of these genes in breeding populations. For example, marker-assisted backcross breeding has been used to integrate important genes with significant biological effects into a number of commonly grown rice varieties. The use of cost-effective, finely mapped microsatellite markers and MAS strategies should provide opportunities for breeders to develop high-yield, blast resistance rice cultivars. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge concerning the linkage of microsatellite markers to rice blast resistance genes, as well as to explore the use of MAS in rice breeding

  7. A Review of Microsatellite Markers and Their Applications in Rice Breeding Programs to Improve Blast Disease Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdul Latif

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, the use of molecular markers has played an increasing role in rice breeding and genetics. Of the different types of molecular markers, microsatellites have been utilized most extensively, because they can be readily amplified by PCR and the large amount of allelic variation at each locus. Microsatellites are also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR, and they are typically composed of 1–6 nucleotide repeats. These markers are abundant, distributed throughout the genome and are highly polymorphic compared with other genetic markers, as well as being species-specific and co-dominant. For these reasons, they have become increasingly important genetic markers in rice breeding programs. The evolution of new biotypes of pests and diseases as well as the pressures of climate change pose serious challenges to rice breeders, who would like to increase rice production by introducing resistance to multiple biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent advances in rice genomics have now made it possible to identify and map a number of genes through linkage to existing DNA markers. Among the more noteworthy examples of genes that have been tightly linked to molecular markers in rice are those that confer resistance or tolerance to blast. Therefore, in combination with conventional breeding approaches, marker-assisted selection (MAS can be used to monitor the presence or lack of these genes in breeding populations. For example, marker-assisted backcross breeding has been used to integrate important genes with significant biological effects into a number of commonly grown rice varieties. The use of cost-effective, finely mapped microsatellite markers and MAS strategies should provide opportunities for breeders to develop high-yield, blast resistance rice cultivars. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge concerning the linkage of microsatellite markers to rice blast resistance genes, as well as to explore the use of MAS

  8. Comparative analysis of multiple disease resistance in ryegrass and cereal crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young-Ki; Barker, Reed; Pfender, William; Warnke, Scott; Sim, Sung-Chur; Jung, Geunhwa

    2008-08-01

    Ryegrass (Lolium spp.) is among the most important forage crops in Europe and Australia and is also a popular turfgrass in North America. Previous genetic analysis based on a three-generation interspecific (L. perennexL. multiflorum) ryegrass population identified four quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for resistance to gray leaf spot (Magneporthe grisea) and four QTLs for resistance to crown rust (Puccinia coronata). The current analysis based on the same mapping population detected seven QTLs for resistance to leaf spot (Bipolaris sorokiniana) and one QTL for resistance to stem rust (Puccinia graminis) in ryegrass for the first time. Three QTLs for leaf spot resistance on linkage groups (LGs) 2 and 4 were in regions of conserved synteny to the positions of resistance to net blotch (Drechslera teres) in barley (Hordeum vulgare). One ryegrass genomic region spanning 19 cM on LG 4, which contained three QTLs for resistance to leaf spot, gray leaf spot, and stem rust, had a syntenic relationship with a segment of rice chromosome 3, which contained QTLs for resistance to multiple diseases. However, at the genome-wide comparison based on 72 common RFLP markers between ryegrass and cereals, coincidence of QTLs for disease resistance to similar fungal pathogens was not statistically significant.

  9. Structural Insights Reveal the Dynamics of the Repeating r(CAG) Transcript Found in Huntington's Disease (HD) and Spinocerebellar Ataxias (SCAs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawani, Arpita; Kumar, Amit

    2015-01-01

    In humans, neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD) and many spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) have been found to be associated with CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion. An important RNA-mediated mechanism that causes these diseases involves the binding of the splicing regulator protein MBNL1 (Muscleblind-like 1 protein) to expanded r(CAG) repeats. Moreover, mutant huntingtin protein translated from expanded r(CAG) also yields toxic effects. To discern the role of mutant RNA in these diseases, it is essential to gather information about its structure. Detailed insight into the different structures and conformations adopted by these mutant transcripts is vital for developing therapeutics targeting them. Here, we report the crystal structure of an RNA model with a r(CAG) motif, which is complemented by an NMR-based solution structure obtained from restrained Molecular Dynamics (rMD) simulation studies. Crystal structure data of the RNA model resolved at 2.3 Å reveals non-canonical pairing of adenine in 5´-CAG/3´-GAC motif samples in different syn and anti conformations. The overall RNA structure has helical parameters intermediate to the A- and B-forms of nucleic acids due to the global widening of major grooves and base-pair preferences near internal AA loops. The comprehension of structural behaviour by studying the spectral features and the dynamics also supports the flexible nature of the r(CAG) motif.

  10. Structural Insights Reveal the Dynamics of the Repeating r(CAG Transcript Found in Huntington's Disease (HD and Spinocerebellar Ataxias (SCAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Tawani

    Full Text Available In humans, neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD and many spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs have been found to be associated with CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion. An important RNA-mediated mechanism that causes these diseases involves the binding of the splicing regulator protein MBNL1 (Muscleblind-like 1 protein to expanded r(CAG repeats. Moreover, mutant huntingtin protein translated from expanded r(CAG also yields toxic effects. To discern the role of mutant RNA in these diseases, it is essential to gather information about its structure. Detailed insight into the different structures and conformations adopted by these mutant transcripts is vital for developing therapeutics targeting them. Here, we report the crystal structure of an RNA model with a r(CAG motif, which is complemented by an NMR-based solution structure obtained from restrained Molecular Dynamics (rMD simulation studies. Crystal structure data of the RNA model resolved at 2.3 Å reveals non-canonical pairing of adenine in 5´-CAG/3´-GAC motif samples in different syn and anti conformations. The overall RNA structure has helical parameters intermediate to the A- and B-forms of nucleic acids due to the global widening of major grooves and base-pair preferences near internal AA loops. The comprehension of structural behaviour by studying the spectral features and the dynamics also supports the flexible nature of the r(CAG motif.

  11. Melhoramento visando a resistência do cafeeiro à ferrugem Breeding for resistance to leaf rust disease in C. arabica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Bettencourt

    1968-01-01

    Full Text Available A ferrugem alaranjada, uma das mais graves moléstias do cafeeiro, ainda não foi observada no continente americano. Com a mais freqüente e rápida ligação entre os países africanos e o Brasil, tem aumentado consideràvelmente o perigo de introdução neste continente. No presente trabalho, são fornecidos elementos sôbre a especialização fisiológica da H. vastatrix,fontes de resistência ao fungo, hereditariedade dessa resistência e dados já obtidos sôbre os fatôres de resistência que ocorrem nos cafeeiros existentes no Instituto Agronômico, em Campinas. Apresentam-se também as diretrizes para o prosseguimento do plano de melhoramento visando a obtenção de linhagens portadoras de fatôres genéticos que lhes proporcionem resistência ao maior número possível de raças da ferrugem.Coffee leaf rust, one of the most destructive diseases of this crop plant, does not occur in the American continent. However, the frequent commercial flights and the ever increasing speed of the planes that connect Africa and Brazil increase the probability of introduction of the disease into this continent. This paper reviews the characteristics of the coffee leaf rust fungus, Hemileia vastatrix, its physiological races and their geographic distribution, and the main sources of resistance already determined in Coffea spp.The genetic basis of the disease resistance is discussed and the collected, data indicate the presence of five pairs of genes for resistance in the imported coffee plants of the: Campinas collection. The breeding program which is being carried on at the Instituto Agronômico, Campinas, is discussed in regard to the isolation of coffee progenies resistant to the most known races of Hemileia vastatrix.

  12. Selection for immunoresponsiveness in chickens : effects of the major histocompatibility complex and resistance to Marek's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinard, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    Improving genetic disease resistance may be an attractive preventive measure in the control of infectious diseases in livestock production. Chickens were selected for high and low antibody response to sheep red blood cells for ten generations. Divergent selection was successfully achieved

  13. Application of hordothionins and cecropin B for engineering bacterial disease resistance into plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florack, D.

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial diseases can cause a drastic decrease of yield in certain crops. Breeding for bacterial disease resistance therefore is of utmost necessity. Up to now, traditional plant breeding was the only method to reach this goal. Recent developments in genetic engineering technology however provide n

  14. Rapid cloning of disease-resistance genes in plants using mutagenesis and sequence capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic solutions to protect crops against pests and pathogens are preferable to agrichemicals 1. Wild crop relatives carry immense diversity of disease resistance (R) genes that could enable more sustainable disease control. However, recruiting R genes for crop improvement typically involves long b...

  15. Theoretical model of the three-dimensional structure of a disease resistance gene homolog encoding resistance protein in Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Jolly; Bahadur, Ranjit P

    2006-10-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes, the key players of innate immunity system in plants encode 'R' proteins. 'R' protein recognizes product of avirulance gene from the pathogen and activate downstream signaling responses leading to disease resistance. No three dimensional (3D) structural information of any 'R' proteins is available as yet. We have reported a 'R' gene homolog, the 'VMYR1', encoding 'R' protein in Vigna mungo. Here, we describe the homology modeling of the 'VMYR1' protein. The model was created by using the 3D structure of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Vibrio cholerae as a template. The strategy for homology modeling was based on the high structural conservation in the superfamily of P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase in which target and template proteins belong. This is the first report of theoretical model structure of any 'R' proteins.

  16. Resistance to Fusarium dry root rot disease in cassava accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Alves Santos de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to identify sources of resistance to dry root rot induced by Fusarium sp. in cassava accessions. A macroconidial suspension (20 µL of 11 Fusarium sp. isolates was inoculated in cassava roots, from 353 acessions plus seven commercial varieties. Ten days after inoculation, the total area colonized by the pathogen on the root pulp was evaluated by digital image analysis. Cluster analysis revealed the presence of five groups regarding resistance. The root lesion areas ranged from 18.28 to 1,096.07 mm² for the accessions BGM 1518 and BGM 556, respectively. The genotypes BGM 1042, BGM 1552, BGM 1586, BGM 1598, and BGM 1692 present the best agronomical traits.

  17. Resistance of determinant tomato varieties to the causal agents of bacterial wilt disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Víchová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of determinant tomato varieties to pathogens causing bacterial wilt disease – Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm and Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs – was tested under greenhouse conditions. In tests to Cmm resistance, two inoculation methods were compared (inoculation “to the cut off top” of a plant and inoculation by three punctures into a stalk. The inoculation method “into a stalk” appeared to be most suitable. In both cases of inoculation, the highest level of resistance was found in Minigold variety. The rather high level of resistance was also found in varieties Aneta and Orange. In tests to Rs resistance, the most resistant varieties were Minigold, Aneta and Orange, which are recommended for direct consumption.

  18. Disease resistance is related to inherent swimming performance in Atlantic salmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Like humans, fish can be classified according to their athletic performance. Sustained exercise training of fish can improve growth and physical capacity, and recent results have documented improved disease resistance in exercised Atlantic salmon. In this study we investigated the effects of inherent swimming performance and exercise training on disease resistance in Atlantic salmon. Atlantic salmon were first classified as either poor or good according to their swimming performance in a screening test and then exercise trained for 10 weeks using one of two constant-velocity or two interval-velocity training regimes for comparison against control trained fish (low speed continuously. Disease resistance was assessed by a viral disease challenge test (infectious pancreatic necrosis and gene expression analyses of the host response in selected organs. Results An inherently good swimming performance was associated with improved disease resistance, as good swimmers showed significantly better survival compared to poor swimmers in the viral challenge test. Differences in mortalities between poor and good swimmers were correlated with cardiac mRNA expression of virus responsive genes reflecting the infection status. Although not significant, fish trained at constant-velocity showed a trend towards higher survival than fish trained at either short or long intervals. Finally, only constant training at high intensity had a significant positive effect on fish growth compared to control trained fish. Conclusions This is the first evidence suggesting that inherent swimming performance is associated with disease resistance in fish.

  19. An assessment of antimicrobial resistant disease threats in Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Garner

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance (AMR of infectious agents is a growing concern for public health organizations. Given the complexity of this issue and how widespread the problem has become, resources are often insufficient to address all concerns, thus prioritization of AMR pathogens is essential for the optimal allocation of risk management attention. Since the epidemiology of AMR pathogens differs between countries, country-specific assessments are important for the determination of national priorities.To develop a systematic and transparent approach to AMR risk prioritization in Canada.Relevant AMR pathogens in Canada were selected through a transparent multi-step consensus process (n=32. Each pathogen was assessed using ten criteria: incidence, mortality, case-fatality, communicability, treatability, clinical impact, public/political attention, ten-year projection of incidence, economic impact, and preventability. For each pathogen, each criterion was assigned a numerical score of 0, 1, or 2, and multiplied by criteria-specific weighting determined through researcher consensus of importance. The scores for each AMR pathogen were summed and ranked by total score, where a higher score indicated greater importance. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the effects of changing the criteria-specific weights.The AMR pathogen with the highest total weighted score was extended spectrum B-lactamase-producing (ESBL Enterobacteriaceae (score=77. When grouped by percentile, ESBL Enterobacteriaceae, Clostridium difficile, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were in the 80-100th percentile.This assessment provides useful information for prioritising public health strategies regarding AMR resistance at the national level in Canada. As the AMR environment and challenges change over time and space, this systematic and transparent approach can be adapted for use by other stakeholders domestically and

  20. An assessment of antimicrobial resistant disease threats in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Michael J; Carson, Carolee; Lingohr, Erika J; Fazil, Aamir; Edge, Victoria L; Trumble Waddell, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) of infectious agents is a growing concern for public health organizations. Given the complexity of this issue and how widespread the problem has become, resources are often insufficient to address all concerns, thus prioritization of AMR pathogens is essential for the optimal allocation of risk management attention. Since the epidemiology of AMR pathogens differs between countries, country-specific assessments are important for the determination of national priorities. To develop a systematic and transparent approach to AMR risk prioritization in Canada. Relevant AMR pathogens in Canada were selected through a transparent multi-step consensus process (n=32). Each pathogen was assessed using ten criteria: incidence, mortality, case-fatality, communicability, treatability, clinical impact, public/political attention, ten-year projection of incidence, economic impact, and preventability. For each pathogen, each criterion was assigned a numerical score of 0, 1, or 2, and multiplied by criteria-specific weighting determined through researcher consensus of importance. The scores for each AMR pathogen were summed and ranked by total score, where a higher score indicated greater importance. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the effects of changing the criteria-specific weights. The AMR pathogen with the highest total weighted score was extended spectrum B-lactamase-producing (ESBL) Enterobacteriaceae (score=77). When grouped by percentile, ESBL Enterobacteriaceae, Clostridium difficile, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were in the 80-100th percentile. This assessment provides useful information for prioritising public health strategies regarding AMR resistance at the national level in Canada. As the AMR environment and challenges change over time and space, this systematic and transparent approach can be adapted for use by other stakeholders domestically and

  1. Disease Resistance and the Definition of Genetic Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    So, Derek; Kleiderman, Erika; Touré, Seydina B.; Joly, Yann

    2017-01-01

    Recent gene editing experiments carried out in human embryos have raised the question of whether interventions like the introduction of a CCR5-Δ32 deletion, which could provide heritable resistance to HIV infection, ought to be considered enhancements. Many authors have used the term “enhancement” in different ways, some based on patients’ biomedical outcomes and others on their social context. These classifications are often considered overly imprecise. Nevertheless, the concept of “enhancem...

  2. Modelling studies on neurodegenerative disease-causing triplet repeat sequences d(GGC/GCC)n and d(CAG/CTG)n

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shibasish Chowdhury; Manju Bansal

    2001-12-01

    Model building and molecular mechanics studies have been carried out to examine the potential structures for d(GGC/GCC)5 and d(CAG/CTG)5 that might relate to their biological function and association with triplet repeat expansion diseases. Model building studies suggested that hairpin and quadruplex structures could be formed with these repeat sequences. Molecular mechanics studies have demonstrated that the hairpin and hairpin dimer structures of triplet repeat sequences formed by looping out of the two strands are as favourable as the corresponding B-DNA type hetero duplex structures. Further, at high salt condition, Greek key type quadruplex structures are energetically comparable with hairpin dimer and B-DNA type duplex structures. All tetrads in the quadruplex structures are well stacked and provide favourable stacking energy values. Interestingly, in the energy minimized hairpin dimer and Greek key type quadruplex structures, all the bases even in the non-G tetrads are cyclically hydrogen bonded, even though the A, C and T-tetrads were not hydrogen bonded in the starting structures.

  3. Three Huntington's Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Laureen; Neueder, Andreas; Földes, Gabor; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Hobbs, Carl; Jolinon, Nelly; Mioulane, Maxime; Sakai, Takao; Harding, Sian E; Ilic, Dusko

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ) motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients.

  4. Three Huntington's Disease Specific Mutation-Carrying Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Have Stable Number of CAG Repeats upon In Vitro Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureen Jacquet

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD; OMIM 143100, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG (polyQ motif in the HTT gene. Cardiovascular symptoms, often present in early stage HD patients, are, in general, ascribed to dysautonomia. However, cardio-specific expression of polyQ peptides caused pathological response in murine models, suggesting the presence of a nervous system-independent heart phenotype in HD patients. A positive correlation between the CAG repeat size and severity of symptoms observed in HD patients has also been observed in in vitro HD cellular models. Here, we test the suitability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines carrying HD-specific mutation as in vitro models for understanding molecular mechanisms of cardiac pathology seen in HD patients. We have differentiated three HD-hESC lines into cardiomyocytes and investigated CAG stability up to 60 days after starting differentiation. To assess CAG stability in other tissues, the lines were also subjected to in vivo differentiation into teratomas for 10 weeks. Neither directed differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vitro nor in vivo differentiation into teratomas, rich in immature neuronal tissue, led to an increase in the number of CAG repeats. Although the CAG stability might be cell line-dependent, induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with larger numbers of CAG repeats could have an advantage as a research tool for understanding cardiac symptoms of HD patients.

  5. Nucleotide Base Variation of Blast Disease Resistance Gene Pi33 in Rice Selected Broad Genetic Background

    OpenAIRE

    DWINITA WIKAN UTAMI; KALIA BARNITA; SITI YURIAH; IDA HANARIDA

    2011-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important crops for human beings, thus increasing productivity are continually persecuted. Blast disease can reduce the rate of productivity of rice cultivation. Therefore, the program of blast disease-resistant varieties needs to do effectively. One of broad-spectrum blast disease-resistant gene is Pi33. This study was aimed to identify the variation in the sequence of nucleotide bases of Pi33 gene in five interspesific lines which derived from Bio46 (IR64/Oryza rufip...

  6. [Ability to Overcome the Thrombocyte Resistance to Acetylsalicylic Acid in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease After Myocardial Revascularization With Coronary Stenting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershukov, I V; Ostaschenko, S L; Kuznetsova, T N; Scherbo, S N; Karben, Z A; Sokryukina, E V; Omarov, A A; Ramazanov, D M; Bosak, N V; Shulzhenko, L V; Kalmatov, R K; Batyraliev, T A; Sidorenko, B A

    2016-07-01

    Resistance to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in patients with coronary artery disease is a poor predictor for the development of atherothrombotic complications. In 277 patients with coronary artery disease suffered uncomplicated coronary angioplasty with stent implantation, we was estimated arachidon-induced platelet aggregation during treatment with acetylsalicylic acid by bedside VerifyNow Assay test at 28-90 days after the intervention. It was found that 18.9% of the 144 patients receiving a combination of ASA 75 mg with 15.2 mg of magnesium hydroxide had true (laboratory) resistance to ASA. At the same time on the original enteric coated ASA 100 mg, we can found only 0.8% resistance to ASA among 129 patients. We made switch from combination of ASA 75 mg with 15.2 mg of magnesium hydroxide to original enteric coated ASA 100 mg and repeat VerifyNow Assay test at 2-4 days and found lost of resistance in 92% of 28 patients. Thus, resistance to the ASA is not constant, it depends on the form and the applied dose of ASA, and eliminating more than 92% when ASA changes from ineffective to effective form.

  7. Evidence of Multiple Disease Resistance (MDR and implication of meta-analysis in marker assisted selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Ali

    Full Text Available Meta-analysis was performed for three major foliar diseases with the aim to find out the total number of QTL responsible for these diseases and depict some real QTL for molecular breeding and marker assisted selection (MAS in maize. Furthermore, we confirmed our results with some major known disease resistance genes and most well-known gene family of nucleotide binding site (NBS encoding genes. Our analysis revealed that disease resistance QTL were randomly distributed in maize genome, but were clustered at different regions of the chromosomes. Totally 389 QTL were observed for these three major diseases in diverse maize germplasm, out of which 63 QTL were controlling more than one disease revealing the presence of multiple disease resistance (MDR. 44 real-QTLs were observed based on 4 QTL as standard in a specific region of genome. We also confirmed the Ht1 and Ht2 genes within the region of real QTL and 14 NBS-encoding genes. On chromosome 8 two NBS genes in one QTL were observed and on chromosome 3, several cluster and maximum MDR QTL were observed indicating that the apparent clustering could be due to genes exhibiting pleiotropic effect. Significant relationship was observed between the number of disease QTL and total genes per chromosome based on the reference genome B73. Therefore, we concluded that disease resistance genes are abundant in maize genome and these results can unleash the phenomenon of MDR. Furthermore, these results could be very handy to focus on hot spot on different chromosome for fine mapping of disease resistance genes and MAS.

  8. Evaluation of drug resistance in pulmonary tuberculosis patients at Sureyyapasa Chest Diseases Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagoz, T; Pazarli, P; Mocin, O Y; Duman, D; Duman, G; Salturk, C; Unal, O

    2008-06-01

    Sureyyapasa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. To determine levels of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to first-line drugs in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Between 1 January and 31 December 2005, all hospitalised PTB patients with culture-positive M. tuberculosis specimens and corresponding drug susceptibility tests (DST) for isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP), streptomycin (SM) and ethambutol, routinely performed for every tuberculosis (TB) case at our centre, were included. Of a total of 1513 cases, 1277 (84.4%) were new and 236 (15.6%) were previously treated cases. Of the 1513 isolates, 290 (19%) isolates were resistant to at least one of the drugs tested. Resistance among new and previously treated cases was respectively 16.3% (209 of 1277) and 34.3% (81/236). Any SM resistance and any INH resistance were the most common drug resistance in new cases, while any RMP resistance was the most common drug resistance in previously treated cases. Multidrug resistance was detected in 3.2% (n = 41) of new cases and in 13.5% (n = 32) of previously treated cases. Planning for TB control requires an assessment of the number and distribution of drug-resistant cases, with laboratories providing accurate and reliable results.

  9. Retroviral sequence located in border region of short unique region and short terminal repeat of Md5 strain of Marek's disease virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, D; Ito, M; Cho, K O; Kon, Y; Morimura, T; Hayashi, M; Kuwabara, M

    1998-02-01

    A 246-base pair (bp) retroviral sequence, which was homologous to a long terminal repeat of avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV), was detected and cloned from Md5 strain (Md5) of Marek's disease virus type 1 (MDV1) by representational difference analysis (RDA). The retroviral sequence was thought to be located in the border region of short unique region (U(s) and short terminal repeat (TRs), but did not exist in the border region of U(s) and the inverted short repeat (IRs) of the Md5 genome. A cloned fragment of the US/TRs border region of the Md5 genome showed a construction of U-E'-R-U'-E-TRs with the regions designated as follows: E, expanded TRs reported by Jones et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 3855, 1993]; E', a partial copy of the expanded TRs; R, the retroviral sequence detected in Md5 genome; U, TRs-end sequence of U(s); U', a partial copy of TRs-end sequence of U(s). The sequence unit indicated as E'-R-U' was thought to be heterogeneously repeated in the Md5 genome. Since this retroviral sequence reportedly did not exist in the original stock of Md5, the retroviral sequence is thought to be inserted in the Md5 genome without experimental co-infection of avian cells with retrovirus and MDV1. These results suggest that RDA could be useful for the detection of retroviral sequences in the herpesvirus genome.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of DNA methylation patterns for ALVE and TVB genes in a neoplastic disease susceptible and resistant chicken model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yu

    Full Text Available Chicken endogenous viruses, ALVE (Avian Leukosis Virus subgroup E, are inherited as LTR (long terminal repeat retrotransposons, which are negatively correlated with disease resistance, and any changes in DNA methylation may contribute to the susceptibility to neoplastic disease. The relationship between ALVE methylation status and neoplastic disease in the chicken is undefined. White Leghorn inbred lines 7(2 and 6(3 at the ADOL have been respectively selected for resistance and susceptibility to tumors that are induced by avian viruses. In this study, the DNA methylation patterns of 3 approximately 6 CpG sites of four conserved regions in ALVE, including one unique region in ALVE1, the promoter region in the TVB (tumor virus receptor of ALV subgroup B, D and E locus, were analyzed in the two lines using pyrosequencing methods in four tissues, i.e., liver, spleen, blood and hypothalamus. A significant CpG hypermethylation level was seen in line 7(2 in all four tissues, e.g., 91.86 +/- 1.63% for ALVE region2 in blood, whereas the same region was hemimethylated (46.16 +/- 2.56% in line 6(3. CpG methylation contents of the ALVE regions were significantly lower in line 6(3 than in line 7(2 in all tissues (P < 0.01 except the ALVE region 3/4 in liver. RNA expressions of ALVE regions 2 and 3 (PPT-U3 were significantly higher in line 6(3 than in line 7(2 (P < 0.01. The methylation levels of six recombinant congenic strains (RCSs closely resembled to the background line 6(3 in ALVE-region 2, which imply the methylation pattern of ALVE-region 2 may be a biomarker in resistant disease breeding. The methylation level of the promoter region in the TVB was significantly different in blood (P < 0.05 and hypothalamus (P < 0.0001, respectively. Our data disclosed a hypermethylation pattern of ALVE that may be relevant for resistance against ALV induced tumors in chickens.

  11. The Role of Peroxidase Isozymes in Resistance to Wheat Stem Rust Disease 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seevers, P. M.; Daly, J. M.; Catedral, F. F.

    1971-01-01

    In common with other disease situations, rust-resistant wheat leaves show a large increase in peroxidase activity during infection. Peroxidase isozymes from healthy or infected lines of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) near isogenic for resistance and susceptibility to race 56 of Puccinia graminis tritici were separated by gel electrophoresis and the activity of each was estimated by photometric scanning. In order to ensure that the activity of isozymes observed on gels reflected the changes found in peroxidase enzymes assayed spectrophotometrically in extracts, a study was made of extraction procedures, substrates, and reaction conditions for both types of enzyme measurements. Of the 14 isozymes detected in both healthy and infected leaves, increases in only 1 (isozyme 9) were associated consistently with the development of resistant disease reaction at 20 C. Additional evidence was obtained to show that this isozyme can account for the increased peroxidase activity observed in extracts from resistant plants. When plants with high induced peroxidase activity due to resistance at 20 C were treated with ethylene or transferred to 25 C, they reverted to complete susceptibility. However, the disease-induced activity of isozyme 9 did not fall. The data suggest that, in this case, the association of peroxidase with resistance was a consequence of, not a determinant in, resistance. PMID:16657797

  12. The role of peroxidase isozymes in resistance to wheat stem rust disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seevers, P M; Daly, J M; Catedral, F F

    1971-09-01

    In common with other disease situations, rust-resistant wheat leaves show a large increase in peroxidase activity during infection. Peroxidase isozymes from healthy or infected lines of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) near isogenic for resistance and susceptibility to race 56 of Puccinia graminis tritici were separated by gel electrophoresis and the activity of each was estimated by photometric scanning. In order to ensure that the activity of isozymes observed on gels reflected the changes found in peroxidase enzymes assayed spectrophotometrically in extracts, a study was made of extraction procedures, substrates, and reaction conditions for both types of enzyme measurements. Of the 14 isozymes detected in both healthy and infected leaves, increases in only 1 (isozyme 9) were associated consistently with the development of resistant disease reaction at 20 C. Additional evidence was obtained to show that this isozyme can account for the increased peroxidase activity observed in extracts from resistant plants. When plants with high induced peroxidase activity due to resistance at 20 C were treated with ethylene or transferred to 25 C, they reverted to complete susceptibility. However, the disease-induced activity of isozyme 9 did not fall. The data suggest that, in this case, the association of peroxidase with resistance was a consequence of, not a determinant in, resistance.

  13. The genetic architecture of disease resistance in plants and the maintenance of recombination by parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kover, P X; Caicedo, A L

    2001-01-01

    Parasites represent strong selection on host populations because they are ubiquitous and can drastically reduce host fitness. It has been hypothesized that parasite selection could explain the widespread occurrence of recombination because it is a coevolving force that favours new genetic combinations in the host. A review of deterministic models for the maintenance of recombination reveals that for recombination to be favoured, multiple genes that interact with each other must be under selection. To evaluate whether parasite selection can explain the maintenance of recombination, we review 85 studies that investigated the genetic architecture of plant disease resistance and discuss whether they conform to the requirements that emerge from theoretical models. General characteristics of disease resistance in plants and problems in evaluating resistance experimentally are also discussed. We found strong evidence that disease resistance in plants is determined by multiple loci. Furthermore, in most cases where loci were tested for interactions, epistasis between loci that affect resistance was found. However, we found weak support for the idea that specific allelic combinations determine resistance to different host genotypes and there was little data on whether epistasis between resistance genes is negative or positive. Thus, the current data indicate that it is possible that parasite selection can favour recombination, but more studies in natural populations that specifically address the nature of the interactions between resistance genes are necessary. The data summarized here suggest that disease resistance is a complex trait and that environmental effects and fitness trade-offs should be considered in future models of the coevolutionary dynamics of host and parasites.

  14. Multiple Insecticide Resistances in the Disease Vector Culex p. Quinquefasciatus from Western Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocquet, Nicolas; Milesi, Pascal; Makoundou, Patrick; Unal, Sandra; Zumbo, Betty; Atyame, Célestine; Darriet, Frédéric; Dehecq, Jean-Sébastien; Thiria, Julien; Bheecarry, Ambicadutt; Iyaloo, Diana P.; Weill, Mylène; Chandre, Fabrice; Labbé, Pierrick

    2013-01-01

    Several mosquito-borne diseases affect the Western Indian Ocean islands. Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus is one of these vectors and transmits filariasis, Rift Valley and West Nile viruses and the Japanese encephalitis. To limit the impact of these diseases on public health, considerable vector control efforts have been implemented since the 50s, mainly through the use of neurotoxic insecticides belonging to Organochlorines (OC), Organophosphates (OP) and pyrethroids (PYR) families. However, mosquito control failures have been reported on site, and they were probably due to the selection of resistant individuals in response to insecticide exposure. In this study, we used different approaches to establish a first regional assessment of the levels and mechanisms of resistance to various insecticides. Bioassays were used to evaluate resistance to various insecticides, enzyme activity was measured to assess the presence of metabolic resistances through elevated detoxification, and molecular identification of known resistance alleles was investigated to determine the frequency of target-site mutations. These complementary approaches showed that resistance to the most used insecticides families (OC, OP and PYR) is widespread at a regional scale. However, the distribution of the different resistance genes is quite heterogeneous among the islands, some being found at high frequencies everywhere, others being frequent in some islands and absent in others. Moreover, two resistance alleles displayed clinal distributions in Mayotte and La Réunion, probably as a result of a heterogeneous selection due to local treatment practices. These widespread and diverse resistance mechanisms reduce the capacity of resistance management through classical strategies (e.g. insecticide rotation). In case of a disease outbreak, it could undermine the efforts of the vector control services, as only few compounds could be used. It thus becomes urgent to find alternatives to control populations

  15. High level resistance against rhizomania disease by simultaneously integrating two distinct defense mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ourania I Pavli

    Full Text Available With the aim of achieving durable resistance against rhizomania disease of sugar beet, the employment of different sources of resistance to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus was pursued. To this purpose, Nicotiana benthamiana transgenic plants that simultaneously produce dsRNA originating from a conserved region of the BNYVV replicase gene and the HrpZ(Psph protein in a secreted form (SP/HrpZ(Psph were produced. The integration and expression of both transgenes as well as proper production of the harpin protein were verified in all primary transformants and selfed progeny (T1, T2. Transgenic resistance was assessed by BNYVV-challenge inoculation on T2 progeny by scoring disease symptoms and DAS-ELISA at 20 and 30 dpi. Transgenic lines possessing single transformation events for both transgenes as well as wild type plants were included in inoculation experiments. Transgenic plants were highly resistant to virus infection, whereas in some cases immunity was achieved. In all cases, the resistant phenotype of transgenic plants carrying both transgenes was superior in comparison with the ones carrying a single transgene. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for a first time, that the combination of two entirely different resistance mechanisms provide high level resistance or even immunity against the virus. Such a novel approach is anticipated to prevent a rapid virus adaptation that could potentially lead to the emergence of isolates with resistance breaking properties.

  16. High level resistance against rhizomania disease by simultaneously integrating two distinct defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Ourania I; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Skaracis, George N

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of achieving durable resistance against rhizomania disease of sugar beet, the employment of different sources of resistance to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus was pursued. To this purpose, Nicotiana benthamiana transgenic plants that simultaneously produce dsRNA originating from a conserved region of the BNYVV replicase gene and the HrpZ(Psph) protein in a secreted form (SP/HrpZ(Psph)) were produced. The integration and expression of both transgenes as well as proper production of the harpin protein were verified in all primary transformants and selfed progeny (T1, T2). Transgenic resistance was assessed by BNYVV-challenge inoculation on T2 progeny by scoring disease symptoms and DAS-ELISA at 20 and 30 dpi. Transgenic lines possessing single transformation events for both transgenes as well as wild type plants were included in inoculation experiments. Transgenic plants were highly resistant to virus infection, whereas in some cases immunity was achieved. In all cases, the resistant phenotype of transgenic plants carrying both transgenes was superior in comparison with the ones carrying a single transgene. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for a first time, that the combination of two entirely different resistance mechanisms provide high level resistance or even immunity against the virus. Such a novel approach is anticipated to prevent a rapid virus adaptation that could potentially lead to the emergence of isolates with resistance breaking properties.

  17. HOPM1 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sheng Yang [Okemos, MI; Nomura, Kinya [East Lansing, MI

    2011-11-15

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein HopM1.sub.1-300 mediated protection is enhanced, such as increased protection to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1 and/or there is an increase in activity of an ATMIN associated plant protection protein, such as ATMIN7. Reagents of the present invention further provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  18. Overexpression of a Modified Plant Thionin Enhances Disease Resistance to Citrus Canker and Huanglongbing (HLB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guixia; Stover, Ed; Gupta, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening disease) caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is a great threat to the US citrus industry. There are no proven strategies to eliminate HLB disease and no cultivar has been identified with strong HLB resistance. Citrus canker is also an economically important disease associated with a bacterial pathogen (Xanthomonas citri). In this study, we characterized endogenous citrus thionins and investigated their expression in different citrus tissues. Since no HLB-resistant citrus cultivars have been identified, we attempted to develop citrus resistant to both HLB and citrus canker through overexpression of a modified plant thionin. To improve effectiveness for disease resistance, we modified and synthesized the sequence encoding a plant thionin and cloned into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS. The construct was then introduced into Agrobacterium strain EHA105 for citrus transformation. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified plant thionin were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Successful transformation and transgene gene expression was confirmed by molecular analysis. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified thionin gene were challenged with X. citri 3213 at a range of concentrations, and a significant reduction in canker symptoms and a decrease in bacterial growth were demonstrated compared to nontransgenic plants. Furthermore, the transgenic citrus plants were challenged with HLB via graft inoculation. Our results showed significant Las titer reduction in roots of transgenic Carrizo compared with control plants and reduced scion Las titer 12 months after graft inoculation. These data provide promise for engineering citrus disease resistance against HLB and canker.

  19. Unbiased screen for interactors of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 supports a common pathway for sporadic and familial Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilina, Alexandria; Rudenko, Iakov N.; Kaganovich, Alice; Civiero, Laura; Chau, Hien; Kalia, Suneil K.; Kalia, Lorraine V.; Lobbestael, Evy; Chia, Ruth; Ndukwe, Kelechi; Ding, Jinhui; Nalls, Mike A.; Olszewski, Maciej; Hauser, David N.; Kumaran, Ravindran; Lozano, Andres M.; Baekelandt, Veerle; Greene, Lois E.; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Greggio, Elisa; Cookson, Mark R.; Nalls, Mike A.; Plagnol, Vincent; Martinez, Maria; Hernandez, Dena G; Sharma, Manu; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Saad, Mohamad; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Sigurlaug; Arepalli, Sampath; Barker, Roger; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M A; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Bras, Jose M; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E; Cookson, Mark R; Cooper, J Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T; van Dijk, Karin D; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Dürr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R; Foltynie, Thomas; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J Raphael; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Gústafsson, Ómar; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; München, Helmholtz Zentrum; Jónsson, Pálmi V; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; München, Helmholtz Zentrum; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw R; Morrison, Karen E; Mudanohwo, Ese; O’Sullivan, Sean S; Pearson, Justin; Perlmutter, Joel S; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Shoulson, Ira; Sidransky, Ellen; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C A; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stockton, Joanna D; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, François; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J; Uitterlinden, André G; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefánsson, Kári; Hardy, John; Heutink, Peter; Brice, Alexis; Gasser, Thomas; Singleton, Andrew B; Wood, Nicholas W; Chinnery, Patrick F; Arepalli, Sampath; Cookson, Mark R; Dillman, Allissa; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gibbs, J Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G; Johnson, Robert; Longo, Dan L; Majounie, Elisa; Nalls, Michael A; O’Brien, Richard; Singleton, Andrew B; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; van der Brug, Marcel; Zielke, H Ronald; Zonderman, Alan B

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) cause inherited Parkinson disease (PD), and common variants around LRRK2 are a risk factor for sporadic PD. Using protein–protein interaction arrays, we identified BCL2-associated athanogene 5, Rab7L1 (RAB7, member RAS oncogene family-like 1), and Cyclin-G–associated kinase as binding partners of LRRK2. The latter two genes are candidate genes for risk for sporadic PD identified by genome-wide association studies. These proteins form a complex that promotes clearance of Golgi-derived vesicles through the autophagy–lysosome system both in vitro and in vivo. We propose that three different genes for PD have a common biological function. More generally, data integration from multiple unbiased screens can provide insight into human disease mechanisms. PMID:24510904

  20. An antisense CAG repeat transcript at JPH3 locus mediates expanded polyglutamine protein toxicity in Huntington's disease-like 2 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, Brian; Rudnicki, Dobrila D; Zhao, Jing; Weitz, Tara Murphy; Cheng, Yin; Gu, Xiaofeng; Greiner, Erin; Park, Chang Sin; Wang, Nan; Sopher, Bryce L; La Spada, Albert R; Osmand, Alex; Margolis, Russell L; Sun, Yi E; Yang, X William

    2011-05-12

    Huntington's disease-like-2 (HDL2) is a phenocopy of Huntington's disease caused by CTG/CAG repeat expansion at the Junctophilin-3 (JPH3) locus. The mechanisms underlying HDL2 pathogenesis remain unclear. Here we developed a BAC transgenic mouse model of HDL2 (BAC-HDL2) that exhibits progressive motor deficits, selective neurodegenerative pathology, and ubiquitin-positive nuclear inclusions (NIs). Molecular analyses reveal a promoter at the transgene locus driving the expression of a CAG repeat transcript (HDL2-CAG) from the strand antisense to JPH3, which encodes an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) protein. Importantly, BAC-HDL2 mice, but not control BAC mice, accumulate polyQ-containing NIs in a pattern strikingly similar to those in the patients. Furthermore, BAC mice with genetic silencing of the expanded CUG transcript still express HDL2-CAG transcript and manifest polyQ pathogenesis. Finally, studies of HDL2 mice and patients revealed CBP sequestration into NIs and evidence for interference of CBP-mediated transcriptional activation. These results suggest overlapping polyQ-mediated pathogenic mechanisms in HD and HDL2.

  1. Cisgenic Approach for improved disease resistance in apple

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broggini, G.A.L.; Durel, C.E.; Vergne, E.; Chevreau, E.; Fahrentrapp, J.; Vanblaere, T.; Peil, A.; Flachowsky, H.; Hanke, M.V.; Krens, F.A.; Schouten, H.J.; Gessler, C.

    2013-01-01

    Swiss and more generally European apple (Malus × domestica) production is hampered by several diseases, the most destructive being fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora. On the other hand, there are apple scab, caused by Venturia inaequalis and powdery mildew, caused by Podosphaera leucotricha, w

  2. Simultaneous laurel wilt disease biology and resistance research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason A. Smith; Randy C. Ploetz

    2012-01-01

    Laurel wilt (LW) is a devastating, emerging disease of native and non-native members of the Lauraceae family in the southeastern United States. Currently, the fungal pathogen (Raffaelea lauricola) and its vector (Xyleborus glabratus) are found in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, and North and South Carolina. The wilt is...

  3. QTLs for Snow Mold Disease Resistance in Creeping Bentgrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow molds caused by Typhula spp. are the most economically important winter diseases of turfgrass in the northern and alpine regions of the United States and Canada. During winter, the psychrophilic pathogens take advantage of the weakened host plants at low temperatures under persistent snow cover...

  4. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Bacteria Causing Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Associated with Vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaskolskiy, Boris; Dementieva, Ekaterina; Leinsoo, Arvo; Runina, Anastassia; Vorobyev, Denis; Plakhova, Xenia; Kubanov, Alexey; Deryabin, Dmitrii; Gryadunov, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Here, we review sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) caused by pathogenic bacteria and vaginal infections which result from an overgrowth of opportunistic bacterial microflora. First, we describe the STDs, the corresponding pathogens and the antimicrobials used for their treatment. In addition to the well-known diseases caused by single pathogens (i.e., syphilis, gonococcal infections, and chlamydiosis), we consider polymicrobial reproductive tract infections (especially those that are difficult to effectively clinically manage). Then, we summarize the biochemical mechanisms that lead to antimicrobial resistance and the most recent data on the emergence of drug resistance in STD pathogens and bacteria associated with vaginosis. A large amount of research performed in the last 10-15 years has shed light on the enormous diversity of mechanisms of resistance developed by bacteria. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of antimicrobials action and the emergence of resistance is necessary to modify existing drugs and to develop new ones directed against new targets.

  5. Prospects for exploitation of disease resistance from Hordeum chilense in cultivated cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiales, D; Niks, R E; Carver, T L; Ballesteros, J; Martín, A

    2001-01-01

    Hordeum chilense is a South American wild barley with high potential for cereal breeding given its high crossability with other members of the Triticeae. In the present paper we consider the resistance of H. chilense to several fungal diseases and the prospects for its transference to cultivated cereals. All H. chilense accessions studied are resistant to the barley, wheat and rye brown rusts, the powdery mildews of wheat, barley, rye and oat, to Septoria leaf blotch, common bunt and to loose smuts, which suggests that H. chilense is a non-host of these diseases. There are also lines resistant to wheat and barley yellow rust, stem rust and to Agropyron leaf rust, as well as lines giving moderate levels of resistance to Septoria glume blotch, tan spot and Fusarium head blight. Some H. chilense lines display pre-appressorial avoidance to brown rust. Lines differ in the degree of haustorium formation by rust and mildew fungi they permit, and in the degree to which a hypersensitive response occurs after haustoria are formed. Unfortunately, resistance of H. chilense to rust fungi is not expressed in tritordeum hybrids, nor in chromosome addition lines in wheat. In tritordeum, H. chilense contributes quantitative resistance to wheat powdery mildew, tan spot and loose smut. The resistance to mildew, expressed as a reduced disease severity, is not associated with macroscopically visible necrosis. Hexaploid tritordeums are immune to Septoria leaf blotch and to common bunt although resistance to both is slightly diluted in octoploid tritordeums. Studies with addition lines in wheat indicate that the resistance of H. chilense to powdery mildew, Septoria leaf blotch and common bunt is of broad genetic basis, conferred by genes present on various chromosomes.

  6. The Expanding Pathogenic Role of Insulin Resistance in Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-07

    The December 2011 issue of Diabetic Medicine celebrated the outstanding personal contributions of the renowned clinical scientist Prof. Sir Harold Himsworth in characterizing impaired insulin action in relation to phenotypes of diabetes. The commissioned articles in the special issue of the journal were assembled in recognition of the publication in 1936 of a landmark paper in which Himsworth summarized his innovative research, to which much of our current understanding of insulin resistance can be readily traced. The collection of invited articles that marked the 75th anniversary of the Lancet publication provided a state-of-the-art summary from internationally renowned investigators of what has become an increasingly diverse field reaching into myriad aspects of clinical medicine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Alu-Repeat-Induced Deletions Within the NCF2 Gene Causing p67-phox-Deficient Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Gentsch; A. Kaczmarczyk; K. van Leeuwen; M. de Boer; M. Kaus-Drobek; M.C. Dagher; P. Kaiser; P.D. Arkwright; M. Gahr; A. Rösen-Wolff; M. Bochtler; E. Secord; P. Britto-Williams; G.M. Saifi; A. Maddalena; G. Dbaibo; J. Bustamante; J.L. Casanova; D. Roos; J. Roesler

    2010-01-01

    Mutations that impair express. ion or function of the components, of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase complex cause. chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), which is associated with life-threatening infections and dysregulated granulomatous inflammation. In five CGD patients from four consanguineous familie

  8. Ankyrin repeat and zinc-finger domain-containing 1 mutations are associated with infantile-onset inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Haaften-Visser, Désirée Y.; Harakalova, Magdalena; Mocholi, Enric; Van Montfrans, Joris M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243039069; Elkadri, Abdul; Rieter, Ester; Fiedler, Karoline; Van Hasselt, Peter M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304814423; Triffaux, Emily M.M.; Van Haelst, Mieke M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33889392X; Nijman, Isaac J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/185967833; Kloosterman, Wigard P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304076953; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.; Muise, Aleixo M.; Cuppen, Edwin|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/183050487; Houwen, Roderick H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/087887991; Coffer, Paul J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304813915

    2017-01-01

    Infantile-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IO IBD) is an invalidating illness with an onset before 2 years of age and has a complex pathophysiology in which genetic factors are important. Homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in an IO IBD patient and subsequent sequencing of the candidate

  9. Isolation, cloning and sequencing of AFLP markers related to disease-resistance traits in Fenneropenaeus chinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) technique was used to analyze the fingerprinting of four successive generations of Fenneropenaeus chinensis to reveal their disease-resistance traits. Some loci showed quite different genetic frequencies due to artificial selection, which implied that these fragments were putative markers related to the disease-resistance trait. We developed a simple and effective method to further characterize these AFLP fragments. Specific AFLP bands were cut directly from polyacrylamide gels,re-amplified, cloned and sequenced. Eight putative genetic markers were sequenced and their sizes ranged from 63 to 209 bp. The sequences were submitted to dbGSS (database of Genome Sequence Survey); and the BLAST analysis showed low similarity to the function genes, indicating these markers were tightly linked to a disease-resistance trait but were not functional genes.

  10. Burden of hospital admission and repeat angiography in angina pectoris patients with and without coronary artery disease: a registry-based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Jespersen

    Full Text Available AIMS: To evaluate risk of hospitalization due to cardiovascular disease (CVD and repeat coronary angiography (CAG in stable angina pectoris (SAP with no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD versus obstructive CAD, and asymptomatic reference individuals. METHODS AND RESULTS: We followed 11,223 patients with no prior CVD having a first-time CAG in 1998-2009 due to SAP symptoms and 5,695 asymptomatic reference individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study through registry linkage for 7.8 years (median. In recurrent event survival analysis, patients with SAP had 3-4-fold higher risk of hospitalization for CVD irrespective of CAG findings and cardiovascular comorbidity. Multivariable adjusted hazard ratios(95%CI for patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries was 3.0(2.5-3.5, for angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD 3.9(3.3-4.6 and for 1-3-vessel disease 3.6-4.1(range(all P<0.001. Mean accumulated hospitalization time was 3.5(3.0-4.0(days/10 years follow-up in reference individuals and 4.5(3.8-5.2/7.0(5.4-8.6/6.7(5.2-8.1/6.1(5.2-7.4/8.6(6.6-10.7 in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries/angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD/1-, 2-, and 3-vessel disease, respectively (all P<0.05, age-adjusted. SAP symptoms predicted repeat CAG with multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries being 2.3(1.9-2.9, for angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD 5.5(4.4-6.8 and for obstructive CAD 6.6-9.4(range(all P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with SAP symptoms and angiographically normal coronary arteries or angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD suffer from considerably greater CVD burdens in terms of hospitalization for CVD and repeat CAG compared with asymptomatic reference individuals even after adjustment for cardiac risk factors and exclusion of cardiovascular comorbidity as cause. Contrary to common perception, excluding obstructive CAD by CAG in such

  11. Cardiovascular Disease Susceptibility and Resistance in Circumpolar Inuit Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvermosegaard, Maria; Dahl-Petersen, Inger K; Nielsen, Nina Odgaard

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major public health issue in indigenous populations in the Arctic. These diseases have emerged concomitantly with profound social changes over the past 60 years. The aim of this study was to summarize the literature on CVD risk among Arctic Inuit. Literature...... CVD risk include aging of the population, genetic susceptibility, and a rapid increase in obesity, diabetes, and hypertension in parallel with decreasing physical activity and deterioration of the lipid profile. In contrast, and of great importance, there has been a decrease in smoking and alcohol...... intake (at least documented in Greenland), and contaminant levels are declining. Although there have been marked socioeconomic and dietary changes, it remains unsolved and to some extent controversial how this may have influenced cardiovascular risk among Arctic Inuit. The increase in life expectancy...

  12. Transcriptomic Analysis and the Expression of Disease-Resistant Genes in Oryza meyeriana under Native Condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    Full Text Available Oryza meyeriana (O. meyeriana, with a GG genome type (2n = 24, accumulated plentiful excellent characteristics with respect to resistance to many diseases such as rice shade and blast, even immunity to bacterial blight. It is very important to know if the diseases-resistant genes exist and express in this wild rice under native conditions. However, limited genomic or transcriptomic data of O. meyeriana are currently available. In this study, we present the first comprehensive characterization of the O. meyeriana transcriptome using RNA-seq and obtained 185,323 contigs with an average length of 1,692 bp and an N50 of 2,391 bp. Through differential expression analysis, it was found that there were most tissue-specifically expressed genes in roots, and next to stems and leaves. By similarity search against protein databases, 146,450 had at least a significant alignment to existed gene models. Comparison with the Oryza sativa (japonica-type Nipponbare and indica-type 93-11 genomes revealed that 13% of the O. meyeriana contigs had not been detected in O. sativa. Many diseases-resistant genes, such as bacterial blight resistant, blast resistant, rust resistant, fusarium resistant, cyst nematode resistant and downy mildew gene, were mined from the transcriptomic database. There are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes (Xa1 and Xa26 differentially or specifically expressed in O. meyeriana. The 4 Xa1 contigs were all only expressed in root, while three of Xa26 contigs have the highest expression level in leaves, two of Xa26 contigs have the highest expression profile in stems and one of Xa26 contigs was expressed dominantly in roots. The transcriptomic database of O. meyeriana has been constructed and many diseases-resistant genes were found to express under native condition, which provides a foundation for future discovery of a number of novel genes and provides a basis for studying the molecular mechanisms associated with disease

  13. REST and stress resistance in ageing and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Aron, Liviu; Zullo, Joseph; Pan, Ying; Kim, Haeyoung; Chen, Yiwen; Yang, Tun-Hsiang; Kim, Hyun-Min; Drake, Derek; Liu, X. Shirley; Bennett, David A.; Colaiácovo, Monica P.; Yankner, Bruce A.

    2014-03-01

    Human neurons are functional over an entire lifetime, yet the mechanisms that preserve function and protect against neurodegeneration during ageing are unknown. Here we show that induction of the repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST; also known as neuron-restrictive silencer factor, NRSF) is a universal feature of normal ageing in human cortical and hippocampal neurons. REST is lost, however, in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep sequencing and expression analysis show that REST represses genes that promote cell death and Alzheimer's disease pathology, and induces the expression of stress response genes. Moreover, REST potently protects neurons from oxidative stress and amyloid β-protein toxicity, and conditional deletion of REST in the mouse brain leads to age-related neurodegeneration. A functional orthologue of REST, Caenorhabditis elegans SPR-4, also protects against oxidative stress and amyloid β-protein toxicity. During normal ageing, REST is induced in part by cell non-autonomous Wnt signalling. However, in Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, REST is lost from the nucleus and appears in autophagosomes together with pathological misfolded proteins. Finally, REST levels during ageing are closely correlated with cognitive preservation and longevity. Thus, the activation state of REST may distinguish neuroprotection from neurodegeneration in the ageing brain.

  14. Repurposing diabetes drugs for brain insulin resistance in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarchoan, Mark; Arnold, Steven E

    2014-07-01

    A growing body of clinical and epidemiological research suggests that two of the most common diseases of aging, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and Alzheimer disease (AD), are linked. The nature of the association is not known, but this observation has led to the notion that drugs developed for the treatment of T2DM may be beneficial in modifying the pathophysiology of AD and maintaining cognitive function. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of T2DM have resulted in a growing number of therapies that are approved or in clinical development for this disease. This review summarizes the evidence that T2DM and AD are linked, with a focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms in common, and then assesses the various clinical-stage diabetes drugs for their potential activity in AD. At a time when existing therapies for AD offer only limited symptomatic benefit for some patients, additional clinical trials of diabetes drugs are needed to at least advance the care of T2DM patients at risk for or with comorbid AD and also to determine their value for AD in general. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  15. Elastin organization in pig and cardiovascular disease patients' pericardial resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Leurgans, Thomas; Nissen, Inger;

    2015-01-01

    coronary artery bypass grafting or cardiac valve replacement surgeries, can serve as a source of resistance arteries for structural research in cardiovascular disease patients. We applied two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy to study the parietal pericardium and isolated pericardial resistance...... arteries with a focus on the collagen and elastin components of the extracellular matrix. Initial findings in pig tissue were confirmed in patient biopsies. The microarchitecture of the internal elastic lamina in both the pig and patient pericardial resistance arteries (studied at a transmural pressure...

  16. Effect of repeated Waon therapy on exercise tolerance and pulmonary function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a pilot controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hiroshi Kikuchi,1,2 Nobuyoshi Shiozawa,1 Shingo Takata,1 Kozo Ashida,1 Fumihiro Mitsunobu11Division of Medicine, Misasa Medical Center, Okayama University Hospital, Misasa, Tottori, Japan; 2Division of Internal Medicine, Takamatsu Hospital KKR, Takamatsu, JapanPurpose: Controlled clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of repeated Waon therapy for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have yet to be conducted. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated Waon therapy exhibits an adjuvant effect on conventional therapy for COPD patients.Patients and methods: This prospective trial comprised 20 consecutive COPD patients who satisfied the criteria of the Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD guidelines, stages 1–4. They were assigned to either a Waon or control group. The patients in the Waon group received both repeated Waon therapy and conventional therapy, including medications, such as long-acting inhaled β2 agonists, long-acting anticholinergics and xanthine derivatives, and pulmonary rehabilitation. The Waon therapy consisted of sitting in a 60°C sauna room for 15 minutes, followed by 30 minutes of being warmed with blankets once a day, 5 days a week, for a total of 20 times. The patients in the control group received only conventional therapy. Pulmonary function and the 6-minute walk test were assessed before and at 4 weeks after the program.Results: The change in vital capacity (0.30 ± 0.4 L and in peak expiratory flow (0.48 ± 0.79 L/s in the Waon group was larger than the change in the vital capacity (0.02 ± 0.21 L (P=0.077 and peak expiratory flow (−0.11 ± 0.72 L/s (P=0.095 in the control group. The change in forced expiratory flow after 50% of expired forced vital capacity in the Waon group, 0.08 (0.01–0.212 L/s, was larger than that in the control group, −0.01 (−0.075–0.04 L/s (P=0.019. Significant differences were not observed in the change in any

  17. Resistance to Dutch elm disease reduces presence of xylem endophytic fungi in Elms (Ulmus spp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Martín

    Full Text Available Efforts to introduce pathogen resistance into landscape tree species by breeding may have unintended consequences for fungal diversity. To address this issue, we compared the frequency and diversity of endophytic fungi and defensive phenolic metabolites in elm (Ulmus spp. trees with genotypes known to differ in resistance to Dutch elm disease. Our results indicate that resistant U. minor and U. pumila genotypes exhibit a lower frequency and diversity of fungal endophytes in the xylem than susceptible U. minor genotypes. However, resistant and susceptible genotypes showed a similar frequency and diversity of endophytes in the leaves and bark. The resistant and susceptible genotypes could be discriminated on the basis of the phenolic profile of the xylem, but not on basis of phenolics in the leaves or bark. As the Dutch elm disease pathogen develops within xylem tissues, the defensive chemistry of resistant elm genotypes thus appears to be one of the factors that may limit colonization by both the pathogen and endophytes. We discuss a potential trade-off between the benefits of breeding resistance into tree species, versus concomitant losses of fungal endophytes and the ecosystem services they provide.

  18. Transgenic banana expressing Pflp gene confers enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namukwaya, B; Tripathi, L; Tripathi, J N; Arinaitwe, G; Mukasa, S B; Tushemereirwe, W K

    2012-08-01

    Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum, is one of the most important diseases of banana (Musa sp.) and currently considered as the biggest threat to banana production in Great Lakes region of East and Central Africa. The pathogen is highly contagious and its spread has endangered the livelihood of millions of farmers who rely on banana for food and income. The development of disease resistant banana cultivars remains a high priority since farmers are reluctant to employ labor-intensive disease control measures and there is no host plant resistance among banana cultivars. In this study, we demonstrate that BXW can be efficiently controlled using transgenic technology. Transgenic bananas expressing the plant ferredoxin-like protein (Pflp) gene under the regulation of the constitutive CaMV35S promoter were generated using embryogenic cell suspensions of banana. These transgenic lines were characterized by molecular analysis. After challenge with X. campestris pv. musacearum transgenic lines showed high resistance. About 67% of transgenic lines evaluated were completely resistant to BXW. These transgenic lines did not show any disease symptoms after artificial inoculation of in vitro plants under laboratory conditions as well as potted plants in the screen-house, whereas non-transgenic control plants showed severe symptoms resulting in complete wilting. This study confirms that expression of the Pflp gene in banana results in enhanced resistance to BXW. This transgenic technology can provide a timely solution to the BXW pandemic.

  19. Are obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes autoimmune diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sue; Clemente-Casares, Xavier; Revelo, Xavier S; Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    Obesity and associated insulin resistance predispose individuals to develop chronic metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although these disorders affect a significant proportion of the global population, the underlying mechanisms of disease remain poorly understood. The discovery of elevated tumor necrosis factor-α in adipose tissue as an inducer of obesity-associated insulin resistance marked a new era of understanding that a subclinical inflammatory process underlies the insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction that precedes type 2 diabetes. Advances in the field identified components of both the innate and adaptive immune response as key players in regulating such inflammatory processes. As antigen specificity is a hallmark of an adaptive immune response, its role in modulating the chronic inflammation that accompanies obesity and type 2 diabetes begs the question of whether insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes can have autoimmune components. In this Perspective, we summarize current data that pertain to the activation and perpetuation of adaptive immune responses during obesity and discuss key missing links and potential mechanisms for obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes to be considered as potential autoimmune diseases.

  20. Diabetes mellitus, a complex and heterogeneous disease, and the role of insulin resistance as a determinant of diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalliedde, Janaka; Gnudi, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasingly recognized as a heterogeneous condition. The individualization of care and treatment necessitates an understanding of the individual patient's pathophysiology of DM that underpins their DM classification and clinical presentation. Classical type-2 diabetes mellitus is due to a combination of insulin resistance and an insulin secretory defect. Type-1 diabetes is characterized by a near-absolute deficiency of insulin secretion. More recently, advances in genetics and a better appreciation of the atypical features of DM has resulted in more categories of diabetes. In the context of kidney disease, patients with DM and microalbuminuria are more insulin resistant, and insulin resistance may be a pathway that results in accelerated progression of diabetic kidney disease. This review summarizes the updated classification of DM, including more rarer categories and their associated renal manifestations that need to be considered in patients who present with atypical features. The benefits and limitations of the tests utilized to make a diagnosis of DM are discussed. We also review the putative pathways and mechanisms by which insulin resistance drives the progression of diabetic kidney disease.

  1. An 87-year-old patient with repeated oligorecurrences over six years whose disease were treated with radiotherapy alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hyong Geun [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In the clinical state of oligometastases or oligorecurrence, a transitional state between localized and widespread systemic disease, local control of the disease may yield improved systemic control. Radiotherapy may be a good means for controlling oligometastatic tumors, particularly in very old patients for whom surgery may be infeasible. A combination of systemic therapy and local therapy is necessary to prevent systemic progression. Some kinds of cancers found in the elderly are known to be somewhat indolent for systemic progression. So, for very old patients who refuse or cannot tolerate chemotherapy, the use of radical radiotherapy alone to treat oligorecurrences may be very helpful. We successfully treated an 87-year-old patient who had been diagnosed with oligorecurrences three times over six years with radiotherapy alone. The patient is now, about four years after his first radiotherapy for liver metastasis, alive without any evidence of cancer and with fully active performance status.

  2. "Nanoantibiotics": a new paradigm for treating infectious diseases using nanomaterials in the antibiotics resistant era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Ae Jung; Kwon, Young Jik

    2011-12-10

    Despite the fact that we live in an era of advanced and innovative technologies for elucidating underlying mechanisms of diseases and molecularly designing new drugs, infectious diseases continue to be one of the greatest health challenges worldwide. The main drawbacks for conventional antimicrobial agents are the development of multiple drug resistance and adverse side effects. Drug resistance enforces high dose administration of antibiotics, often generating intolerable toxicity, development of new antibiotics, and requests for significant economic, labor, and time investments. Recently, nontraditional antibiotic agents have been of tremendous interest in overcoming resistance that is developed by several pathogenic microorganisms against most of the commonly used antibiotics. Especially, several classes of antimicrobial nanoparticles (NPs) and nanosized carriers for antibiotics delivery have proven their effectiveness for treating infectious diseases, including antibiotics resistant ones, in vitro as well as in animal models. This review summarizes emerging efforts in combating against infectious diseases, particularly using antimicrobial NPs and antibiotics delivery systems as new tools to tackle the current challenges in treating infectious diseases.

  3. Scale-Dependent Assessment of Relative Disease Resistance to Plant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Skelsey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenotyping trials may not take into account sufficient spatial context to infer quantitative disease resistance of recommended varieties in commercial production settings. Recent ecological theory—the dispersal scaling hypothesis—provides evidence that host heterogeneity and scale of host heterogeneity interact in a predictable and straightforward manner to produce a unimodal (“humpbacked” distribution of epidemic outcomes. This suggests that the intrinsic artificiality (scale and design of experimental set-ups may lead to spurious conclusions regarding the resistance of selected elite cultivars, due to the failure of experimental efforts to accurately represent disease pressure in real agricultural situations. In this model-based study we investigate the interaction of host heterogeneity and scale as a confounding factor in the inference from ex-situ assessment of quantitative disease resistance to commercial production settings. We use standard modelling approaches in plant disease epidemiology and a number of different agronomic scenarios. Model results revealed that the interaction of heterogeneity and scale is a determinant of relative varietal performance under epidemic conditions. This is a previously unreported phenomenon that could provide a new basis for informing the design of future phenotyping platforms, and optimising the scale at which quantitative disease resistance is assessed.

  4. Genetic evaluation of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. germplasm for resistance components of spot blotch disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejveer Singh, V. K. Mishra*, L. C. Prasad, Ankitand R. Chand

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Spot blotch caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana is an important fungal disease of Barley in warm humid areas of the world. In present study, 124 genotypes that includes 122 un-adapted germplasm accessions and 2 cultivars of barley were evaluated for three years, to select resistant and susceptible accessions based on five components of spot blotch resistance viz., disease severity, latent period, spore load, number of spots and incubation period. Significant differences were observed among the evaluated accessions for all of the components of resistance. A significant positive correlation was recorded between disease severity, number of spots, and spore load while a significant negative correlation of disease severity was recorded with latent period and incubation period. Multiple regression analysis revealed that number of spots contributed maximum followed by latent period, spore load and incubation period towards the variation in disease severity. Clustering of accessions based on different components identified three groups. Based on the studied components, accessions BCU422, BCU1204 and BCU5092 demonstrated good performance, while BCU711, K603 and RD2506 were the most susceptible to spot blotch pathogen. Identified accessions BCU422, BCU1204 and BCU5092 can be recommended for use in breeding programs that aim to generate barley genotypes resistant to Bipolaris sorokiniana.

  5. Association of Age to Mortality and Repeat Revascularization in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients: Implications for Clinicians and Future Health Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswami, Ashok; Alloggiamento, Thomas; Forman, Daniel E; Leong, Thomas K; Go, Alan S; McCulloch, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Background: The clinical effects of age occur over an age continuum, yet age as a primary predictor is often analyzed using arbitrary age cut-points. Objective: To assess whether transformation of a continuous variable such as age using a spline function can uncover nonlinear associations between age and cardiovascular outcomes. Design: Observational retrospective cohort study in 1015 Kaiser Permanente Northern California patients with end-stage renal disease after index coronary revascularization. Age, the primary predictor, was modeled by 5 different techniques: 1) dichotomized at 65 years or older; 2) at 80 years or older (as a sensitivity analysis); 3) categorized as younger than 55 years (reference), 55 to 64, 65 to 74, and 75 years or older; 4) linear (every 5 years) variable; and 5) nonlinear by transformation into a cubic spline. Age categories were changed in a sensitivity analysis. Main Outcome Measures: Primary and secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality and repeat revascularization, respectively. Results: Graphical assessment demonstrated that age dichotomized at either 65 years and older or 80 years and older led to loss of information. Categorized age underestimated or overestimated risk at the extremes of age. A sensitivity analysis demonstrated that an arbitrary change in the age category led to a different conclusion. Age modeled linearly adequately represented mortality risk but was suboptimal with repeat revascularization. Only the cubic spline demonstrated the nonlinear association between age and repeat revascularization. Conclusion: Employing the continuous variable age as a case study, we have demonstrated that the use of flexible transformations, such as spline functions, can unearth clinically meaningful associations that would not have been possible otherwise. Future research should determine whether incorporation of these methods can improve decision making at a population level. PMID:26934624

  6. Artificially inserting a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of Marek's disease virus (MDV) alters expression of nearby MDV genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taejoong; Mays, Jody; Fadly, Aly; Silva, Robert F

    2011-06-01

    Researchers reported that co-cultivating the JM/102W strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV) with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in an REV long terminal repeat (LTR) being inserted into the internal repeat short (IRS) region of JM/102W. When the resulting recombinant virus was serially passed in cell culture, the initial LTR was duplicated and a second LTR spontaneously appeared in the terminal repeat short (TRS) region of the MDV genome. The virus, designated RM1, was significantly attenuated but still induced severe bursal and thymic atrophy (Isfort et al. PNAS 89:991-995). To determine whether the altered phenotype was due solely to the LTR, we cloned the LTR from the RM1 IRS region and inserted it into the IRS region of a very virulent bacterial artificial clone (BAC) of the Md5 strain of MDV, which we designated rMd5-RM1-LTR. During blind passage in duck embryo fibroblast cultures, the initial LTR in the rMd5-RM1-LTR was also duplicated, with LTRs appearing in both IRS and TRS regions of the MDV genome. The inserted LTR sequences and transcripts associated with the MDV open reading frames MDV085, MDV086, SORF2, US1, and US10 were molecularly characterized. The parental Md5 BAC contains a family of transcripts of 3, 2, and 1 kb that all terminate at the end of the US10 gene. The rMd5-RM1-LTR and RM1 viruses both express an additional 4 kb transcript that originates in the LTR and also terminates after US10. Collectively, the data suggest that our engineered rMd5-RM1-LTR virus very closely resembles the RM1 virus in its structure and transcription patterns.

  7. Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. sprouts germinated under red light irradiation induce disease resistance against bacterial rotting disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Dhakal

    Full Text Available Specific wavelengths of light can exert various physiological changes in plants, including effects on responses to disease incidence. To determine whether specific light wavelength had effects on rotting disease caused by Pseudomonas putida 229, soybean sprouts were germinated under a narrow range of wavelengths from light emitting diodes (LEDs, including red (650-660, far red (720-730 and blue (440-450 nm or broad range of wavelength from daylight fluorescence bulbs. The controls were composed of soybean sprouts germinated in darkness. After germination under different conditions for 5 days, the soybean sprouts were inoculated with P. putida 229 and the disease incidence was observed for 5 days. The sprouts exposed to red light showed increased resistance against P. putida 229 relative to those grown under other conditions. Soybean sprouts germinated under red light accumulated high levels of salicylic acid (SA accompanied with up-regulation of the biosynthetic gene ICS and the pathogenesis- related (PR gene PR-1, indicating that the resistance was induced by the action of SA via de novo synthesis of SA in the soybean sprouts by red light irradiation. Taken together, these data suggest that only the narrow range of red light can induce disease resistance in soybean sprouts, regulated by the SA-dependent pathway via the de novo synthesis of SA and up-regulation of PR genes.

  8. Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) sprouts germinated under red light irradiation induce disease resistance against bacterial rotting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Radhika; Park, Euiho; Lee, Se-Weon; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Specific wavelengths of light can exert various physiological changes in plants, including effects on responses to disease incidence. To determine whether specific light wavelength had effects on rotting disease caused by Pseudomonas putida 229, soybean sprouts were germinated under a narrow range of wavelengths from light emitting diodes (LEDs), including red (650-660), far red (720-730) and blue (440-450 nm) or broad range of wavelength from daylight fluorescence bulbs. The controls were composed of soybean sprouts germinated in darkness. After germination under different conditions for 5 days, the soybean sprouts were inoculated with P. putida 229 and the disease incidence was observed for 5 days. The sprouts exposed to red light showed increased resistance against P. putida 229 relative to those grown under other conditions. Soybean sprouts germinated under red light accumulated high levels of salicylic acid (SA) accompanied with up-regulation of the biosynthetic gene ICS and the pathogenesis- related (PR) gene PR-1, indicating that the resistance was induced by the action of SA via de novo synthesis of SA in the soybean sprouts by red light irradiation. Taken together, these data suggest that only the narrow range of red light can induce disease resistance in soybean sprouts, regulated by the SA-dependent pathway via the de novo synthesis of SA and up-regulation of PR genes.

  9. Development and Comparison of Symptom Indices for Quantifying Grapevine Resistance to Pierce's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, A F; Stevenson, J F; Walker, M A

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT Symptoms of Pierce's disease (PD) were assessed under greenhouse conditions on field-resistant and field-susceptible grapevines in order to characterize the PD resistance phenotype in the genus Vitis. A cane maturation index (CMI) was developed to quantify the green-islands symptom, which was measured at 12 weeks post-bacterial inoculation, along with leaf scorch and percentage of xylem vessels blocked by occlusions. Canes of resistant genotypes matured normally and had a significantly lower CMI score of 0.9 (on a 0-to-6 scale) compared with 5.1 for the susceptible genotypes. The CMI scoring method had a high correlation (R(2) = 0.91) with previously characterized field performance, whereas leaf scorch had only a moderate correlation (R(2) = 0.51) with field performance. Average scorched area on leaves of the susceptible and resistant genotypes was 80 and 48%, respectively, demonstrating that leaf scorch can be extensive in resistant genotypes under the presented screening conditions, and suggesting that systemic infection can occur in all evaluated genotypes. Occlusions within both stem and petiole vessels were composed principally of tyloses and were significantly higher in petioles than in stems of either resistant or susceptible backgrounds. Susceptible genotypes displayed a higher level of stem tylose occlusions relative to resistant genotypes, but correlation to field performance was low (R(2) = 0.13). Ease of use and high correlation to field performance makes CMI scoring a better choice for PD resistance evaluations relative to other phenotypic symptom assessments.

  10. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt to Identify Disease-Resistance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt is one of the most important wild relatives of cultivated rice and exhibits high resistance to many diseases. It has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated rice. However, there are limited genomic resources and little genetic information publicly reported for this species. To better understand the pathways and factors involved in disease resistance and accelerating the process of rice breeding, we carried out a de novo transcriptome sequencing of O. officinalis. In this research, 137,229 contigs were obtained ranging from 200 to 19,214 bp with an N50 of 2331 bp through de novo assembly of leaves, stems and roots in O. officinalis using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Based on sequence similarity searches against a non-redundant protein database, a total of 88,249 contigs were annotated with gene descriptions and 75,589 transcripts were further assigned to GO terms. Candidate genes for plant–pathogen interaction and plant hormones regulation pathways involved in disease-resistance were identified. Further analyses of gene expression profiles showed that the majority of genes related to disease resistance were all expressed in the three tissues. In addition, there are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes in O. officinalis, including two Xa1 genes and three Xa26 genes. All 2 Xa1 genes showed the highest expression level in stem, whereas one of Xa26 was expressed dominantly in leaf and other 2 Xa26 genes displayed low expression level in all three tissues. This transcriptomic database provides an opportunity for identifying the genes involved in disease-resistance and will provide a basis for studying functional genomics of O. officinalis and genetic improvement of cultivated rice in the future.

  11. Nutritional Management of Insulin Resistance in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Wylie-Rosett

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is an emerging global health concern. It is the most common form of chronic liver disease in Western countries, affecting both adults and children. NAFLD encompasses a broad spectrum of fatty liver disease, ranging from simple steatosis (NAFL to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, and is strongly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. First-line therapy for NAFLD includes weight loss achieved through diet and physical activity. However, there is a lack of evidenced-based dietary recommendations. The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA recommendations that aim to reduce the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease may also be applicable to the NAFLD population. The objectives of this review are to: (1 provide an overview of NAFLD in the context of insulin resistance, and (2 provide a rationale for applying relevant aspects of the ADA recommendations to the nutritional management of NAFLD.

  12. Longitudinal behavioral, cross-sectional transcriptional and histopathological characterization of a knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease with 140 CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Aaron C; Xu, Jia; Carlson, Aaron; Napoli, Vincent V; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Mandel, Ronald J

    2011-04-01

    The discovery of the gene mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD), huntingtin, in 1993 allowed for a better understanding of the pathology of and enabled the development of animal models. HD is caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine repeat region in the N-terminal of the huntingtin protein. Here we examine the behavioral, transcriptional, histopathological and anatomical characteristics of a knock-in HD mouse model with a 140 polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein. This CAG 140 model contains a portion of the human exon 1 with 140 CAG repeats knocked into the mouse huntingtin gene. We have longitudinally examined the rearing behavior, accelerating rotarod, constant speed rotarod and gait for age-matched heterozygote, homozygote and non-transgenic mice and have found a significant difference in the afflicted mice. However, while there were significant differences between the non-transgenic and the knock-in mice, these behaviors were not progressive. As in HD, we show that the CAG 140 mice also have a significant decrease in striatally enriched mRNA transcripts. In addition, striatal neuronal intranuclear inclusion density increases with age. Lastly these CAG 140 mice show slight cortical thinning compared to non-transgenic mice, similarly to the cortical thinning recently reported in HD.

  13. Bioavailability of gallic acid and catechins from grape seed polyphenol extract is improved by repeated dosing in rats: implications for treatment in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruzzi, Mario G; Lobo, Jessica K; Janle, Elsa M; Cooper, Bruce; Simon, James E; Wu, Qing-Li; Welch, Cara; Ho, Lap; Weaver, Connie; Pasinetti, Giulio M

    2009-01-01

    The present study explored the bioavailability and brain deposition of a grape seed polyphenolic extract (GSPE) previously found to attenuate cognitive deterioration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Plasma pharmacokinetic response of major GSPE phenolic components was measured following intragastric gavage of 50, 100, and 150 mg GSPE per kg body weight. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis identified gallic acid (GA), catechin (C), and epicatechin (EC) in plasma of rats gavaged acutely with GSPE. Additionally, 4-methylgallic acid (4-OMeGA), 3'-methylcatechin (3'-OMeC), and 3'-methylepicatechin (3'-OMeEC) were identified as circulating metabolites of GSPE phenolic constituents. Cmax for individual GSPE constituents and their metabolites increased in a dose-dependent fashion (with increasing GSPE oral dose). Repeated daily exposure to GSPE was found to significantly increase bioavailability (defined as plasma AUC0-8h) of GA, C, and EC by 198, 253, and 282% relative to animals receiving only a single acute GSPE dose. EC and C were not detectable in brain tissues of rats receiving a single GSPE dose but reached levels of 290.7 +/-45.9 and 576.7 +/- 227.7 pg/g in brain tissues from rats administered GSPE for 10 days. This study suggests that brain deposition of GA, C, and EC is affected by repeated dosing of GSPE.

  14. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 and alpha-synuclein: intersecting pathways in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Civiero Laura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although Parkinson's disease (PD is generally a sporadic neurological disorder, the discovery of monogenic, hereditable forms of the disease has been crucial in delineating the molecular pathways that lead to this pathology. Genes responsible for familial PD can be ascribed to two categories based both on their mode of inheritance and their suggested biological function. Mutations in parkin, PINK1 and DJ-1 cause of recessive Parkinsonism, with a variable pathology often lacking the characteristic Lewy bodies (LBs in the surviving neurons. Intriguingly, recent findings highlight a converging role of all these genes in mitochondria function, suggesting a common molecular pathway for recessive Parkinsonism. Mutations in a second group of genes, encoding alpha-synuclein (α-syn and LRRK2, are transmitted in a dominant fashion and generally lead to LB pathology, with α-syn being the major component of these proteinaceous aggregates. In experimental systems, overexpression of mutant proteins is toxic, as predicted for dominant mutations, but the normal function of both proteins is still elusive. The fact that α-syn is heavily phosphorylated in LBs and that LRRK2 is a protein kinase, suggests that a link, not necessarily direct, exists between the two. What are the experimental data supporting a common molecular pathway for dominant PD genes? Do α-syn and LRRK2 target common molecules? Does LRRK2 act upstream of α-syn? In this review we will try to address these of questions based on the recent findings available in the literature.

  15. Comparisons of protein profiles of beech bark disease resistant and susceptible American beech (Fagus grandifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beech bark disease is an insect-fungus complex that damages and often kills American beech trees and has major ecological and economic impacts on forests of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canadian forests. The disease begins when exotic beech scale insects feed on the bark of trees, and is followed by infection of damaged bark tissues by one of the Neonectria species of fungi. Proteomic analysis was conducted of beech bark proteins from diseased trees and healthy trees in areas heavily infested with beech bark disease. All of the diseased trees had signs of Neonectria infection such as cankers or fruiting bodies. In previous tests reported elsewhere, all of the diseased trees were demonstrated to be susceptible to the scale insect and all of the healthy trees were demonstrated to be resistant to the scale insect. Sixteen trees were sampled from eight geographically isolated stands, the sample consisting of 10 healthy (scale-resistant and 6 diseased/infested (scale-susceptible trees. Results Proteins were extracted from each tree and analysed in triplicate by isoelectric focusing followed by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gels were stained and protein spots identified and intensity quantified, then a statistical model was fit to identify significant differences between trees. A subset of BBD differential proteins were analysed by mass spectrometry and matched to known protein sequences for identification. Identified proteins had homology to stress, insect, and pathogen related proteins in other plant systems. Protein spots significantly different in diseased and healthy trees having no stand or disease-by-stand interaction effects were identified. Conclusions Further study of these proteins should help to understand processes critical to resistance to beech bark disease and to develop biomarkers for use in tree breeding programs and for the selection of resistant trees prior to or in early stages of BBD

  16. Choice of Rational Antibiotic Therapy in Children with Bacterial Respiratory Diseases Under Increased Antibiotic Resistance Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.O. Lezhenko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the problems of the etiology of bacterial respiratory diseases in children, as well as antibiotic resistance of clinical strains of this pathology. It is found that in 52.7 % of cases, the causative agent of bacterial respiratory diseases in children was Haemophilus bacteria genus. The performed analysis of antibiogram showed that at the present stage starting antibacterial drug for empirical treatment of bacterial respiratory tract infections in children are the third generation cephalosporins.

  17. [insulin Resistance/hyperinsulinemia Associated Diseases Not Included In The Metabolic Syndrome].

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalheira, José B. C.; Saad, Mario J. A.

    2015-01-01

    In the past years, in Brazil and in developed countries, obesity has become a major public health problem. It was identified that besides DM2 and metabolic syndrome other clinical entities were associated with insulin resistance. In this review we describe some of these alterations emphasizing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, but also including polycistic ovary disease, hyperuricemia, chronic renal failure, heart failure, cognitive decline and cancer.

  18. Drought tolerance in Arabidopsis is controlled by the OCP3 disease resistance regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Vicente; Coego, Alberto; López, Ana; Agorio, Astrid; Flors, Víctor; Vera, Pablo

    2009-05-01

    Water scarcity and corresponding abiotic drought stress is one of the most important factors limiting plant performance and yield. In addition, plant productivity is severely compromised worldwide by infection with microbial pathogens. Two of the most prominent pathways responsible for drought tolerance and disease resistance to fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis are those controlled by the phytohormones abscisic acid (ABA) and the oxylipin methyl jasmonate (MeJA), respectively. Here, we report on the functional characterization of OCP3, a transcriptional regulator from the homeodomain (HD) family. The Arabidopsis loss-of-function ocp3 mutant exhibits both drought resistance and enhanced disease resistance to necrotrophic fungal pathogens. Double-mutant analysis revealed that these two resistance phenotypes have different genetic requirements. Whereas drought tolerance in ocp3 is ABA-dependent but MeJA-independent, the opposite holds true for the enhanced disease resistance characteristics. These observations lead us to propose a regulatory role of OCP3 in the adaptive responses to these two stresses, functioning as a modulator of independent and specific aspects of the ABA- and MeJA-mediated signal transduction pathways.

  19. Insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse intestinal macrophages is mediated by activation of JNK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y-L; Du, Y-F; Du, H; Shao, P

    2017-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been considered as a metabolic disorder disease, which closely related to insulin signaling impairment. Therefore, identifying the potential mechanism of insulin resistance is important for AD treatment. An APP/PS1 double transgenic AD mouse model was introduced to study insulin resistance in gut. The expressions of AD markers and key elements of insulin signaling were detected in ileum and intestinal macrophages of AD mice by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, mouse intestinal macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was treated by Aβ25-35 or Aβ25-35 + insulin to explore the mechanism of insulin resistance in vitro. The expression of IR-β and the activation of cell signaling related proteins (Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), protein kinase B (AKT) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)) in Aβ25-35-stimulated macrophages were performed via Western blotting. The expressions of IRS1, Aβ and Tuj in AD mice ileum were significantly different from WT mice (pinsulin could reverse these changes (pinsulin addition. Activation of JNK pathway played an important role in insulin resistance of AD mice, suggesting that inhibition of JNK pathway might be a new strategy toward resolving insulin resistance related diseases, such as AD.

  20. Disease Resistance in Maize and the Role of Molecular Breeding in Defending Against Global Threat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farhan Ali; Jianbing Yan

    2012-01-01

    Diseases are a potential threat to global food security but plants have evolved an extensive array of methodologies to cope with the invading pathogens.Non-host resistance and quantitative resistance are broad spectrum forms of resistance,and all kinds of resistances are controlled by extremely diverse genes called “R-genes”.R-genes follow different mechanisms to defend plants and PAMP-induced defenses in susceptible host plants are referred to as basal resistance.Genetic and phenotypic diversity are vital in maize (Zea mays L.); as such,genome wide association study (GWAS)along with certain other methodologies can explore the maximum means of genetic diversity.Exploring the complete genetic architecture to manipulate maize genetically reduces the losses from hazardous diseases.Genomic studies can reveal the interaction between different genes and their pathways.By confirming the specific role of these genes and protein-protein interaction (proteomics) via advanced molecular and bioinformatics tools,we can shed a light on the most complicated and abstruse phenomena of resistance.

  1. Repeated measures of body mass index and C-reactive protein in relation to all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Doherty, Mark G; Jørgensen, Torben; Borglykke, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has been linked with elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), and both have been associated with increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous studies have used a single 'baseline' measurement and such analyses cannot account for possible changes in these which...... body mass index (BMI) and CRP with all-cause mortality and CVD. Being overweight (≥25-obese (≥30-....79-0.94) and 0.80 (0.72-0.89). A similar relationship was found, but only for overweight in Glostrup, HR (95 % CI) 0.88 (0.76-1.02); and moderately obese in Tromsø, HR (95 % CI) 0.79 (0.62-1.01). Associations were not evident between repeated measures of BMI and CVD. Conversely, increasing CRP concentrations...

  2. Hormonal secretion and quality of life in Nelson syndrome and Cushing disease after long acting repeatable octreotide: a short series and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregger, Alejandro L; Cardoso, Estela M L; Sandoval, Olga B; Monardes Tumilasci, Elida G; Sanchez, Rocío; Contreras, Liliana N

    2014-01-01

    Clinical management of persistent adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) excess in Nelson syndrome (NS) and Cushing disease (CD) remains a challenge. Somatostatin and its analogs as octreotide decrease ACTH secretion through somatostatin receptors of pituitary cells. To our knowledge, there are no reports on the effect of long-acting repeatable octreotide (oct-lar) on hormonal secretion and quality of life in patients with NS and CD who failed conventional therapy. Herein, we describe the effects of treatment with oct-lar (20 mg/month intramurally) in 1 woman with NS and 2 women with persistent CD. Oct-lar therapy reduced ACTH secretion and improved the quality of life in NS patient. By contrast, in CD patients, it failed to control ACTH and cortisol secretion, and the quality of life remained unchanged.

  3. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Lipids and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Paul D; Verna, Elizabeth C

    2016-01-01

    Abstract/Synopsis Obesity and its major co-morbidities, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), obesity cardiomyopathy, and certain cancers, are major public health problems worldwide. They are responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality, to a degree that life expectancy in the United States has actually declined in recent years because of it. Obesity is the increased accumulation of fat, i.e. triglycerides (TG), which are synthesized from glycerol and long chain fatty acids (LCFA), throughout the body. Although long believed to enter cells solely by passive diffusion, it has been established over the past 30 years that LCFA enter adipocytes, hepatocytes and cardiomyocytes via specific, facilitated transport processes, and that these processes are hormonally up-regulated in obesity. Metabolism of increased cellular TG content in obesity may lead to cell-specific lipotoxicity, contributing to co-morbidities such as NAFLD and cardiomyopathy. In contrast to the popular perception, dietary control and bariatric surgery can each achieve major initial weight loss in many patients. However several mechanisms, including persistent up-regulation of LCFA transport, contribute to weight regain in the large majority of patients. Better understanding of these transport processes and their regulation may be a key to successful future strategies to treat obesity and NAFLD. PMID:27063267

  4. Overexpression of a Chitinase Gene from Trichoderma asperellum Increases Disease Resistance in Transgenic Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuli; Ruan, Xianle; Wang, Xian; Liu, Zhihua; Hu, Lizong; Li, Chengwei

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, a chi gene from Trichoderma asperellum, designated Tachi, was cloned and functionally characterized in soybean. Firstly, the effects of sodium thiosulfate on soybean Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation with embryonic tip regeneration system were investigated. The transformation frequency was improved by adding sodium thiosulfate in co-culture medium for three soybean genotypes. Transgenic soybean plants with constitutive expression of Tachi showed increased resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum compared to WT plants. Meanwhile, overexpression of Tachi in soybean exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level as well as peroxidase (POD) and catalase (SOD) activities, decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) content, along with diminished electrolytic leakage rate after S. sclerotiorum inoculation. These results suggest that Tachi can improve disease resistance in plants by enhancing ROS accumulation and activities of ROS scavenging enzymes and then diminishing cell death. Therefore, Tachi represents a candidate gene with potential application for increasing disease resistance in plants.

  5. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease : A main driver of insulin resistance or a dangerous liaison?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruben, Nanda; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Koonen, Debby P. Y.; Hofker, Marten H.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance is one of the key components of the metabolic syndrome and it eventually leads to the development of type 2 diabetes, making it one of the biggest medical problems of modern society. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are tightly assoc

  6. Cladosporium Avr2 inhibits tomato Rcr3 protease required for Cf-2-dependent disease resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooney, H.C.E.; Klooster, van t J.W.; Hoorn, van der R.A.L.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.; Jones, J.D.G.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    How plants recognize pathogens and activate defense is still mysterious. Direct interaction between pathogen avirulence (Avr) proteins and plant disease resistance proteins is the exception rather than the rule. During infection, Cladosporium fulvum secretes Avr2 protein into the apoplast of tomato

  7. Genomic tools for developing markers for postharvest disease resistance in Rosaceae fruit crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wealth of new plant genomic information and molecular tools have been developed over the past ten years and now the challenge is to learn how to apply this information to address critical production problems, such as disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. Malus sieversii, an apple speci...

  8. Selection of Arabica coffee types resistant to coffee berry disease in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, van der N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Descriptive part. A review is given of: the importance of Coffea arabica to Ethiopia; coffee research; habitus, origin and cultivation of C. arabica ; theoretical aspects of resistance and its implications for the system C. arabica -parasites; Coffee Berry Disease, symptoms, epidemiology, geographic

  9. Transgenic resistance confers effective field level control of bacterial spot disease in tomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M Horvath

    Full Text Available We investigated whether lines of transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum expressing the Bs2 resistance gene from pepper, a close relative of tomato, demonstrate improved resistance to bacterial spot disease caused by Xanthomonas species in replicated multi-year field trials under commercial type growing conditions. We report that the presence of the Bs2 gene in the highly susceptible VF 36 background reduced disease to extremely low levels, and VF 36-Bs2 plants displayed the lowest disease severity amongst all tomato varieties tested, including commercial and breeding lines with host resistance. Yields of marketable fruit from transgenic lines were typically 2.5 times that of the non-transformed parent line, but varied between 1.5 and 11.5 fold depending on weather conditions and disease pressure. Trials were conducted without application of any copper-based bactericides, presently in wide use despite negative impacts on the environment. This is the first demonstration of effective field resistance in a transgenic genotype based on a plant R gene and provides an opportunity for control of a devastating pathogen while eliminating ineffective copper pesticides.

  10. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease : A main driver of insulin resistance or a dangerous liaison?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruben, Nanda; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Koonen, Debby P. Y.; Hofker, Marten H.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance is one of the key components of the metabolic syndrome and it eventually leads to the development of type 2 diabetes, making it one of the biggest medical problems of modern society. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are tightly assoc

  11. The clinical impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on morbidity, mortality and burden of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, H.S.M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the clinical impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] infections on the total burden of disease. A guideline on empirical antimicrobial eradication of MRSA in carriers was developed based on a systematic review of literature. A distinction w

  12. Prevalence and characteristics of patients with resistant hypertension and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdalles, Úrsula; Goicoechea, Marian; Garcia de Vinuesa, Soledad; Quiroga, Borja; Galan, Isabel; Verde, Eduardo; Perez de Jose, Ana; Luño, José

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is a common problem in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A decline in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and increased albuminuria are associated with RH; however, there are few published studies about the prevalence of this entity in patients with CKD.

  13. Evaluation of fruit rot disease resistance in muscadine grapes (Vitis rotundifolia Michx)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacadine grapes (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) are truly a sustainable fruit for the southeastern United States. Although far more resistant to many fungal and bacterial diseases and pests than most of the bunch grapes (V. vinifera, V. labrusca, or their derivatives), muscadine grape suffers consider...

  14. Activation of proteinase 3 contributes to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toonen, Erik J.M.; Mirea, Andreea Manuela; Tack, Cees J.; Stienstra, Rinke; Ballak, Dov B.; Diepen, van Janna A.; Hijmans, Anneke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Dokter, Wim H.; Pham, Christine Tn; Netea, Mihai G.; Dinarello, Charles A.; Joosten, Leo A.B.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways is known to accompany development of obesity-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition to caspase-1, the neutrophil serine proteases proteinase 3, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are able to proces

  15. Association mapping of fruit, seed and disease resistance traits in Theobroma cacao L

    Science.gov (United States)

    An association mapping approach was employed to find markers for color, size, girth and mass of fruits; seed number and butterfat content; and resistance to black pod and witches’ broom diseases in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.). Ninety-five microsatellites (SSRs) and 775 single nucleotide polymorphisms...

  16. Previous hypertensive disease of pregnancy is associated with alterations of markers of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girouard, Joël; Giguère, Yves; Moutquin, Jean-Marie; Forest, Jean-Claude

    2007-05-01

    Insulin resistance syndrome has been observed in women with hypertensive disease of pregnancy, but few studies evaluated the presence of the syndrome a few years after delivery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of insulin resistance and its metabolic alterations in these women compared with those who had a normal pregnancy. We performed an observational study in 168 women with previous hypertensive disease of pregnancy and 168 control subjects with normal pregnancy contacted, on average, 7.8 years after their first delivery (mean age: 34.8 years). Complete blood lipid profile, insulin, glucose, homocysteine, adipokins, and markers of inflammation were measured. Also, an oral glucose tolerance test was performed in 146 case and 135 control subjects. Case subjects were more overweight compared with control subjects. We found significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and adiponectin levels and higher apolipoprotein (apo) apoB/apoA1 ratio, homocysteine, leptin, and insulin levels among case subjects compared with control subjects (Phypertensive disease of pregnancy show signs of insulin resistance within the first decade after delivery. These findings suggest that insulin resistance may be the link between hypertensive disease of pregnancy and increased cardiovascular risk later in life.

  17. Genotype x environment interaction and growth stability of several elm clones resistant to Dutch elm disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto Santini; Francesco Pecori; Alessia L. Pepori; Luisa Ghelardini

    2012-01-01

    The elm breeding program carried out in Italy at the Institute of Plant Protection - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricercje (CNR) during the last 40 years aimed to develop Dutch elm disease (DED)-resistant elm selections specific to the Mediterranean environment. The need for genotypes adapted to Mediterranean conditions was evident from the poor performance of the Dutch...

  18. Behaviour of the disease resistance gene Asc in protoplasts of Lycopersicon esculentum mill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moussatos, V.; Witsenboer, H.; Hille, J.; Gilchrist, D.

    1993-01-01

    Action of Asc, a single dominant Mendelian gene controlling disease response at the whole plant level, was detected at the level of individual cells. Protoplasts, freshly isolated from resistant (Asc/Asc) and susceptible (asc/asc) tomato isolines, were differentially sensitive to AAL toxin as observ

  19. Developing maize germplasm lines with multiple insect and disease resistance and low aflatoxin contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yield and quality losses caused BY insects, diseases, and mycotoxin contaminations are the critical impediments for maize production under warm climate. In order to develop maize germplasm lines with resistance to multiple insect pests and aflatoxin accumulation, a set of 13 reciprocal breeding cro...

  20. Screening for insect and disease resistance and aflatoxin accumulation in experimental maize hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to develop new maize germplasm lines with resistance to multiple insect pests, disease, and aflatoxin accumulation in temperate region, a set of new experimental hybrids was made using exotic tropical and subtropical maize inbred lines. The evaluation of these breeding crosses for insect a...

  1. Management of diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Vivian A

    2003-08-18

    Patients with diabetes have a greatly increased relative risk of developing cardiovascular disease when compared with patients without diabetes. Much of this risk is related to insulin resistance and is associated with both traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors. Therapy for diabetes must address these risk factors in an attempt to prevent and adequately treat cardiovascular disease. Pharmacologic therapy directed toward dyslipidemia and hypertension has a beneficial effect on risk factors and has been shown to decrease cardiovascular events. The effects of insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents on insulin resistance are variable, and their direct effect on cardiovascular disease is less clear. Metformin is the only oral hypoglycemic agent shown to decrease cardiovascular events independent of glycemia. The thiazolidinediones directly improve insulin resistance, decrease plasma insulin concentration, and have the potential to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. A number of studies have demonstrated that the thiazolidinediones produce changes in several cardiovascular risk factors associated with the insulin resistance syndrome, including lowering blood pressure, correcting diabetic dyslipidemia, improving fibrinolysis, and decreasing carotid artery intima-medial thickness. These agents bind a newly described class of receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, which may have implications for atherosclerosis. Although these drugs increase low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, they induce a favorable change in the LDL particle size and susceptibility to oxidation. Long-term clinical trials are being conducted to determine the effect that thiazolidinediones have on cardiovascular events in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  2. The clinical impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on morbidity, mortality and burden of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, H.S.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815470

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the clinical impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] infections on the total burden of disease. A guideline on empirical antimicrobial eradication of MRSA in carriers was developed based on a systematic review of literature. A distinction

  3. Molecular Diagnostics for Complex Pest and Disease Resistance and Tuber Quality Traits: Concept, Achievements and Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebhardt, C.; Urbany, C.; Li, L.; Stich, B.; Caldas Paulo, M.J.; Draffehn, A.; Ballvora, A.

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the concept of molecular diagnostic of complex traits related to pest and disease resistance and to tuber quality of potato, and describe recent achievements and perspectives. Many potato characteristics are controlled by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Knowing the genes and

  4. Probiotics cultures in animal feed: Effects on ruminal fermentation, immune responses, and resistance to infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the effects of probiotics included in dairy cattle and mice feed on ruminal fermentation, immune responses, and resistance to Johne’s disease. To unveil the underlying mechanisms, dairy cattle were either fed Bovamine (1.04 x 10**9 cfu of Lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 plus 2.04 x 10**...

  5. The metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease: understanding the role of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, David M; Harmel, Anne Peters

    2002-12-01

    The most common and clinically important complication in adults with diabetes is cardiovascular disease (CVD), which includes coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and stroke. Both type 2 diabetes and the insulin resistance syndrome are associated with a marked increase in the risk for CVD. The metabolic syndrome and the closely related insulin resistance syndrome have recently been recognized as important disorders, each being associated with an increase in CVD risk even in the absence of glucose intolerance. Given the significant public health burden of CVD, risk reduction has emerged as a significant clinical challenge for most practitioners. Diabetes and the insulin resistance syndrome are closely related disorders, with insulin resistance being more than a key pathogenic defect in type 2 diabetes. Even in the absence of glucose intolerance, these 2 disorders are both associated with a number of distinct pathologic findings, including hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia, a prothrombotic environment, and significant vascular and hemodynamic abnormalities that result from endothelial cell dysfunction. Insulin resistance is now recognized to be closely associated with the development of each of these risk factors. This article uses a case-based approach to discuss the unique features of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes considered to be key contributors to CVD risk. A systematic approach to both evaluation and management is proposed, with priority given to therapies of demonstrated clinical benefit. Because of its critical and central role in the development of many CVD risk factors, targeted treatment of insulin resistance will also be discussed as such therapy may prove to be a critical component of care in years to come.

  6. Exploitation of Solanum chilense and Solanum peruvianum in tomato breeding for resistance to Tomato yellow leaf curl disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Julián Rodríguez, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Among viral diseases affecting cultivated tomato, Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD) is one of the most devastating. This disease is caused by a complex of viruses of which Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is regarded as the most important species. Current control strategies to fight viral diseases in tomato are mainly based on genetic resistance derived from wild relatives. In the present thesis, resistance derived from S. chilense and S. peruvianum has been exploited in breeding f...

  7. Brain distribution of dipeptide repeat proteins in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and motor neurone disease associated with expansions in C9ORF72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Yvonne S; Barker, Holly; Robinson, Andrew C; Thompson, Jennifer C; Harris, Jenny; Troakes, Claire; Smith, Bradley; Al-Saraj, Safa; Shaw, Chris; Rollinson, Sara; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hasegawa, Masato; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Snowden, Julie S; Mann, David M

    2014-06-20

    A hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) expansion in C9ORF72 gene is the most common genetic change seen in familial Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) and familial Motor Neurone Disease (MND). Pathologically, expansion bearers show characteristic p62 positive, TDP-43 negative inclusion bodies within cerebellar and hippocampal neurons which also contain dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR) formed from sense and antisense RAN (repeat associated non ATG-initiated) translation of the expanded repeat region itself. 'Inappropriate' formation, and aggregation, of DPR might therefore confer neurotoxicity and influence clinical phenotype. Consequently, we compared the topographic brain distribution of DPR in 8 patients with Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), 6 with FTD + MND and 7 with MND alone (all 21 patients bearing expansions in C9ORF72) using a polyclonal antibody to poly-GA, and related this to the extent of TDP-43 pathology in key regions of cerebral cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences in either the pattern or severity of brain distribution of DPR between FTD, FTD + MND and MND groups, nor was there any relationship between the distribution of DPR and TDP-43 pathologies in expansion bearers. Likewise, there were no significant differences in the extent of TDP-43 pathology between FTLD patients bearing an expansion in C9ORF72 and non-bearers of the expansion. There were no association between the extent of DPR pathology and TMEM106B or APOE genotypes. However, there was a negative correlation between the extent of DPR pathology and age at onset. Present findings therefore suggest that although the presence and topographic distribution of DPR may be of diagnostic relevance in patients bearing expansion in C9ORF72 this has no bearing on the determination of clinical phenotype. Because TDP-43 pathologies are similar in bearers and non-bearers of the expansion, the expansion may act as a major genetic risk factor for FTLD and MND by rendering the brain

  8. Characterization of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases in Chinese children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiang; YAO Kai-hu; XIE Gui-lin; ZHENG YUE-jie; WANG Chuan-qing; SHANG Yun-xiao; WANG Hui-yun

    2013-01-01

    Background Erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates that causing invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) in Chinese children remain uncharacterized.This study aims to identify the resistance genes associated with erythromycin resistance and to determine the genetic relationships of IPD isolates in Chinese children.Methods A total of 171 S.pneumoniae strains were isolated from 11 medical centers in China from 2006 to 2008.All the isolates were characterized via serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility determination.The erythromycin-resistant isolates were further characterized via ermB and mefA gene detection,multi-locus sequence typing analysis,and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.Results A total of 164 (95.9%) isolates showed resistance to erythromycin,of which 162 strains with high high-level resistance (MIC ≥ 256 μg/ml).A total of 104 (63.4%) isolates carry the ermB gene alone,whereas 59 (36.0%) harbor both ermB and mefA genes.Of the 59 strains,54 were of serotypes 19A and 19F and were identified as highly clonal and related to the Taiwan19F-14 clone.Conclusions The erythromycin resistance rate in IPD isolates is significantly high and is predominantly mediated by the ermB gene.Isolates that carry both ermB and mefA genes are predominantly of serotypes 19A and 19F.

  9. Emerging Infectious Diseases, Antimicrobial Resistance and Millennium Development Goals: Resolving the Challenges through One Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Asokan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonoses, which could severely hamper reaching the targets of millennium development goals (MDG. Five out of the total eight MDG’s are strongly associated with the Emerging Infectious Diseases (EIDs. Recent emergence and dissemination of drug-resistant pathogens has accelerated and prevent reaching the targets of MDG, with shrinking of therapeutic arsenal, mostly due to antimicrobial resistance (AMR. World Health Organization (WHO has identified AMR as 1 of the 3 greatest threats to global health. Until now, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE have been observed in hospital-acquired infections. In India, within a span of three years, New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase prevalence has risen from three percent in hospitals to twenty- fifty percent and is found to be colistin resistant as well. Routine use of antimicrobials in animal husbandry accounts for more than 50% in tonnage of all antimicrobial production to promote growth and prophylaxis. This has consequences to human health and environmental contamination with a profound impact on the environmental microbiome, resulting in resistance. Antibiotic development is now considered a global health crisis. The average time required to receive regulatory approval is 7.2 years. Moreover, the clinical approval success is only 16%. To overcome resistance in antimicrobials, intersectoral partnerships among medical, veterinary, and environmental disciplines, with specific epidemiological, diagnostic, and therapeutic approaches are needed. Joint efforts under “One Health”, beyond individual professional boundaries are required to stop antimicrobial resistance against zoonoses (EID and reach the MDG.

  10. The Arabidopsis NPR1 gene confers broad-spectrum disease resistance in strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Katchen Julliany P; Brunings, Asha; Peres, Natalia A; Mou, Zhonglin; Folta, Kevin M

    2015-08-01

    Although strawberry is an economically important fruit crop worldwide, production of strawberry is limited by its susceptibility to a wide range of pathogens and the lack of major commercial cultivars with high levels of resistance to multiple pathogens. The objective of this study is to ectopically express the Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene (AtNPR1) in the diploid strawberry Fragaria vesca L. and to test transgenic plants for disease resistance. AtNPR1 is a key positive regulator of the long-lasting broad-spectrum resistance known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and has been shown to confer resistance to a number of pathogens when overexpressed in Arabidopsis or ectopically expressed in several crop species. We show that ectopic expression of AtNPR1 in strawberry increases resistance to anthracnose, powdery mildew, and angular leaf spot, which are caused by different fungal or bacterial pathogens. The increased resistance is related to the relative expression levels of AtNPR1 in the transgenic plants. In contrast to Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtNPR1, which grow normally and do not constitutively express defense genes, the strawberry transgenic plants are shorter than non-transformed controls, and most of them fail to produce runners and fruits. Consistently, most of the transgenic lines constitutively express the defense gene FvPR5, suggesting that the SAR activation mechanisms in strawberry and Arabidopsis are different. Nevertheless, our results indicate that overexpression of AtNPR1 holds the potential for generation of broad-spectrum disease resistance in strawberry.

  11. Bayesian hierarchical joint modeling of repeatedly measured continuous and ordinal markers of disease severity: Application to Ugandan diabetes data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhule, O D; Wahed, A S; Youk, A O

    2017-08-22

    Modeling of correlated biomarkers jointly has been shown to improve the efficiency of parameter estimates, leading to better clinical decisions. In this paper, we employ a joint modeling approach to a unique diabetes dataset, where blood glucose (continuous) and urine glucose (ordinal) measures of disease severity for diabetes are known to be correlated. The postulated joint model assumes that the outcomes are from distributions that are in the exponential family and hence modeled as multivariate generalized linear mixed effects model associated through correlated and/or shared random effects. The Markov chain Monte Carlo Bayesian approach is used to approximate posterior distribution and draw inference on the parameters. This proposed methodology provides a flexible framework to account for the hierarchical structure of the highly unbalanced data as well as the association between the 2 outcomes. The results indicate improved efficiency of parameter estimates when blood glucose and urine glucose are modeled jointly. Moreover, the simulation studies show that estimates obtained from the joint model are consistently less biased and more efficient than those in the separate models. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Overexpression of a modified plant thionin enhances disease resistance to citrus canker and Huanglongbing (HLB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixia Hao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening disease caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las is a great threat to the US citrus industry. There are no proven strategies to eliminate HLB disease and no cultivar has been identified with strong HLB resistance. Citrus canker is also an economically important disease associated with a bacterial pathogen (Xanthomonas citri. In this study, we characterized endogenous citrus thionins and investigated their expression in different citrus tissues. Since no HLB-resistant citrus cultivars have been identified, we attempted to develop citrus resistant to both HLB and citrus canker through overexpression of a modified plant thionin. To improve effectiveness for disease resistance, we modified and synthesized the sequence encoding a plant thionin and cloned into the binary vector pBinPlus/ARS. The construct was then introduced into Agrobacterium strain EHA105 for citrus transformation. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified plant thionin were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Successful transformation and transgene gene expression was confirmed by molecular analysis. Transgenic Carrizo plants expressing the modified thionin gene were challenged with X. citri 3213 at a range of concentrations, and a significant reduction in canker symptoms and a decrease in bacterial growth were demonstrated compared to nontransgenic plants. Furthermore the transgenic citrus plants were challenged with HLB via graft inoculation. Our results showed significant Las titer reduction in roots of transgenic Carrizo compared with control plants and reduced scion Las titer twelve months after graft inoculation. These data provide promise for engineering citrus disease resistance against HLB and canker.

  13. The Impact of Time and Repeated Exposure on Famous Person Knowledge in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Sophie; Rouleau, Isabelle; Langlois, Roxane; Dostie, Valérie; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Joubert, Sven

    2017-06-22

    Famous people knowledge has been shown to be impaired early in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). However, the question of whether recently acquired knowledge is more impaired than remotely acquired knowledge remains a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of semantic memory impairment in aMCI and AD by investigating 2 factors that may influence the retrieval of such knowledge, namely remoteness and frequency of repetition of information over time. Three groups (19 controls, 20 aMCI, and 20 AD patients) were compared on a test assessing general and specific biographical knowledge about famous people, where the period of acquired fame (remote vs. recent) and the type of fame (enduring vs. transient) were controlled for. Global performance of aMCI and AD patients was significantly poorer than that of controls. However, different patterns of recall were observed as a function of time and type of fame. A temporal gradient was found in both patient groups for enduring names but not for transient ones, whereby knowledge about remote enduring famous persons was better recalled. Patients were more impaired at questions assessing specific biographical knowledge (unique to an individual) than more general knowledge. Tests of famous people knowledge offer a unique opportunity to investigate semantic deficits in aMCI and AD, because they make it possible to estimate the time at which memories were acquired, as well as the type of fame. Results are discussed in light of memory consolidation models. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Characterization and selection of location for resistance to sugarcane brown rust disease under cuban conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Montalván Delgado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sugarcane brown rust disease is caused by fungus Puccinia melanocephala Sydow & P. Sydow and it is one of the more importance diseases. The environment where the sugarcane is cultivated is constituted by numerous factors and its combination contributes to the formation of different development and production conditions, what influences in the varietal disease resistance. With the objective of to characterize and to define the resistance tests location to the brown rust disease were carried out experiments in 6 location of the country. Eleven varieties and six patterns were studied. The climatic variables were analyzed during the period in each location and they were carried out evaluations in different ages of the plant and number of the leaves. The quantity of pustules, long of the most frequent pustules, size of the biggest pustules and area per - centage occupied by pustules were evaluated. The data were analyzed statistically. Differential behavior of the locations and the importance of the relative humidity and the temperatures in the manifestation of the disease symptoms were proven. All the locations were important although similarity exists between Matanzas and Villa Clara and between Camagüey and Holguín. Mayabeque and Santiago de Cuba didn’t present similarity with any other one. These 6 locations can be used for the resistance tests and to define the progenitors’ Santiago de Cuba, Holguín, Villa Clara and Mayabeque

  15. Antibiotic resistance as collateral damage: the tragedy of the commons in a two-disease setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daozhou; Lietman, Thomas M; Porco, Travis C

    2015-05-01

    We propose a simple two-disease epidemic model where one disease exhibits only a drug-sensitive strain, while the other exhibits both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains. Treatment for the first disease may select for resistance in the other. We model antibiotic use as a mathematical game through the study of individual incentives and community welfare. The basic reproduction number is derived and the existence and local stability of the model equilibria are analyzed. When the force of infection of each disease is unaffected by the presence of the other, we find that there is a conflict of interest between individual and community, known as a tragedy of the commons, under targeted treatment toward persons infected by the single strain disease, but there is no conflict under mass treatment. However, we numerically show that individual and social incentive to use antibiotics may show disaccord under mass treatment if the restriction on the transmission ability of the dually infected people is removed, or drug resistant infection is worse than drug sensitive infection, or the uninfected state has a comparative disutility over the infected states. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Grapevine rootstock effects on scion sap phenolic levels, resistance to Xylella fastidiosa infection, and progression of Pierce’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The xylem-limited bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) causes Pierce’s disease (PD), an important disease of grapevine, Vitis vinifera L. Grapevine rootstocks were developed to provide increased resistance to root disease, but rootstock effects on cane and vine diseases remain unclear. Grapevines that ...

  17. Organization, expression and evolution of a disease resistance gene cluster in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michelle A; Marek, Laura Fredrick; Shoemaker, Randy C

    2002-01-01

    PCR amplification was previously used to identify a cluster of resistance gene analogues (RGAs) on soybean linkage group J. Resistance to powdery mildew (Rmd-c), Phytophthora stem and root rot (Rps2), and an ineffective nodulation gene (Rj2) map within this cluster. BAC fingerprinting and RGA-specific primers were used to develop a contig of BAC clones spanning this region in cultivar "Williams 82" [rps2, Rmd (adult onset), rj2]. Two cDNAs with homology to the TIR/NBD/LRR family of R-genes have also been mapped to opposite ends of a BAC in the contig Gm_Isb001_091F11 (BAC 91F11). Sequence analyses of BAC 91F11 identified 16 different resistance-like gene (RLG) sequences with homology to the TIR/NBD/LRR family of disease resistance genes. Four of these RLGs represent two potentially novel classes of disease resistance genes: TIR/NBD domains fused inframe to a putative defense-related protein (NtPRp27-like) and TIR domains fused inframe to soybean calmodulin Ca(2+)-binding domains. RT-PCR analyses using gene-specific primers allowed us to monitor the expression of individual genes in different tissues and developmental stages. Three genes appeared to be constitutively expressed, while three were differentially expressed. Analyses of the R-genes within this BAC suggest that R-gene evolution in soybean is a complex and dynamic process. PMID:12524363

  18. Mapping of resistance to spot blotch disease caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana in spring wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Uttam; Joshi, Arun K; Kumar, Sundeep; Chand, Ramesh; Röder, Marion S

    2009-02-01

    Spot blotch caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana is a destructive disease of wheat in warm and humid wheat growing regions of the world. The development of disease resistant cultivars is considered as the most effective control strategy for spot blotch. An intervarietal mapping population in the form of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was developed from a cross 'Yangmai 6' (a Chinese source of resistance) x 'Sonalika' (a spot blotch susceptible cultivar). The 139 single seed descent (SSD) derived F(6), F(7), F(8) lines of 'Yangmai 6' x 'Sonalika' were evaluated for resistance to spot blotch in three blocks in each of the 3 years. Joint and/or single year analysis by composite interval mapping (CIM) and likelihood of odd ratio (LOD) >2.2, identified four quantitative trait loci (QTL) on the chromosomes 2AL, 2BS, 5BL and 6DL. These QTLs were designated as QSb.bhu-2A, QSb.bhu-2B, QSb.bhu-5B and QSb.bhu-6D, respectively. A total of 63.10% of phenotypic variation was explained by these QTLs based on the mean over years. Two QTLs on chromosomes 2B and 5B with major effects were consistent over 3 years. All QTL alleles for resistance were derived from the resistant parent 'Yangmai 6'.

  19. Enhancing disease resistances of Super Hybrid Rice with four antifungal genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A plant expression vector harboring four antifungal genes was delivered into the embryogenic calli of ‘9311’, an indica restorer line of Super Hybrid Rice, via modified biolistic particle bombardment. Southern blot analysis indicated that in the regenerated hygromycin-resistant plants, all the four anti-fungal genes, including RCH10, RAC22, β-Glu and B-RIP, were integrated into the genome of ‘9311’, co-transmitted altogether with the marker gene hpt in a Mendelian pattern. Some transgenic R1 and R2 progenies, with all transgenes displaying a normal expression level in the Northern blot analysis, showed high resistance to Magnaporthe grisea when tested in the typical blast nurseries located in Yanxi and Sanya respectively. Furthermore, transgenic F1 plants, resulting from a cross of R2 homo-zygous lines with high resistance to rice blast with the non-transgenic male sterile line Peiai 64S, showed not only high resistance to M. grisea but also enhanced resistance to rice false smut (a disease caused by Ustilaginoidea virens) and rice kernel smut (another disease caused by Tilletia barclayana).

  20. An antibody that confers plant disease resistance targets a membrane-bound glyoxal oxidase in Fusarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiu-Shi; Xing, Shu; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Qu, Bo; Jiang, Jin-He; Fan, Chao; Yang, Peng; Liu, Jin-Long; Hu, Zu-Quan; Xue, Sheng; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-05-01

    Plant germplasm resources with natural resistance against globally important toxigenic Fusarium are inadequate. CWP2, a Fusarium genus-specific antibody, confers durable resistance to different Fusarium pathogens that infect cereals and other crops, producing mycotoxins. However, the nature of the CWP2 target is not known. Thus, investigation of the gene coding for the CWP2 antibody target will likely provide critical insights into the mechanism underlying the resistance mediated by this disease-resistance antibody. Immunoblots and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional electrophoresis gels containing cell wall proteins from Fusarium graminearum (Fg) revealed that a glyoxal oxidase (GLX) is the CWP2 antigen. Cellular localization studies showed that GLX is localized to the plasma membrane. This GLX efficiently catalyzes hydrogen peroxide production; this enzymatic activity was specifically inhibited by the CWP2 antibody. GLX-deletion strains of Fg, F. verticillioides (Fv) and F. oxysporum had significantly reduced virulence on plants. The GLX-deletion Fg and Fv strains had markedly reduced mycotoxin accumulation, and the expression of key genes in mycotoxin metabolism was downregulated. This study reveals a single gene-encoded and highly conserved cellular surface antigen that is specifically recognized by the disease-resistance antibody CWP2 and regulates both virulence and mycotoxin biosynthesis in Fusarium species. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Towards establishing broad-spectrum disease resistance in plants: silicon leads the way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bockhaven, Jonas; De Vleesschauwer, David; Höfte, Monica

    2013-03-01

    Plants are constantly threatened by a wide array of microbial pathogens. Pathogen invasion can lead to vast yield losses and the demand for sustainable plant-protection strategies has never been greater. Chemical plant activators and selected strains of rhizobacteria can increase resistance against specific types of pathogens but these treatments are often ineffective or even cause susceptibility against others. Silicon application is one of the scarce examples of a treatment that effectively induces broad-spectrum disease resistance. The prophylactic effect of silicon is considered to be the result of both passive and active defences. Although the phenomenon has been known for decades, very little is known about the molecular basis of silicon-afforded disease control. By combining knowledge on how silicon interacts with cell metabolism in diatoms and plants, this review describes silicon-induced regulatory mechanisms that might account for broad-spectrum plant disease resistance. Priming of plant immune responses, alterations in phytohormone homeostasis, regulation of iron homeostasis, silicon-driven photorespiration and interaction with defence signalling components all are potential mechanisms involved in regulating silicon-triggered resistance responses. Further elucidating how