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Sample records for repairs oxidized proteins

  1. Immunohistochemical analysis of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins in normal mammary and breast cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardulli Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the course of normal cellular metabolism, oxygen is consumed and reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced. If not effectively dissipated, ROS can accumulate and damage resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. Enzymes involved in redox regulation and DNA repair dissipate ROS and repair the resulting damage in order to preserve a functional cellular environment. Because increased ROS accumulation and/or unrepaired DNA damage can lead to initiation and progression of cancer and we had identified a number of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins that influence estrogen responsiveness of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it seemed possible that these proteins might be differentially expressed in normal mammary tissue, benign hyperplasia (BH, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and invasive breast cancer (IBC. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of a number of oxidative stress proteins, DNA repair proteins, and damage markers in 60 human mammary tissues which were classified as BH, DCIS or IBC. The relative mean intensity was determined for each tissue section and ANOVA was used to detect statistical differences in the relative expression of BH, DCIS and IBC compared to normal mammary tissue. Results We found that a number of these proteins were overexpressed and that the cellular localization was altered in human breast cancer tissue. Conclusions Our studies suggest that oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins not only protect normal cells from the damaging effects of ROS, but may also promote survival of mammary tumor cells.

  2. Estimating the effect of human base excision repair protein variants on the repair of oxidative DNA base damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed a complex association between human genetic variance and cancer risk. Quantitative biological modeling based on experimental data can play a critical role in interpreting the effect of genetic variation on biochemical pathways relevant to cancer development and progression. Defects in human DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins can reduce cellular tolerance to oxidative DNA base damage caused by endogenous and exogenous sources, such as exposure to toxins and ionizing radiation. If not repaired, DNA base damage leads to cell dysfunction and mutagenesis, consequently leading to cancer, disease, and aging. Population screens have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in many BER proteins and some have been purified and found to exhibit mild kinetic defects. Epidemiologic studies have led to conflicting conclusions on the association between single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in BER proteins and cancer risk. Using experimental data for cellular concentration and the kinetics of normal and variant BER proteins, we apply a previously developed and tested human BER pathway model to (i) estimate the effect of mild variants on BER of abasic sites and 8-oxoguanine, a prominent oxidative DNA base modification, (ii) identify ranges of variation associated with substantial BER capacity loss, and (iii) reveal nonintuitive consequences of multiple simultaneous variants. Our findings support previous work suggesting that mild BER variants have a minimal effect on pathway capacity whereas more severe defects and simultaneous variation in several BER proteins can lead to inefficient repair and potentially deleterious consequences of cellular damage.

  3. The recombination protein RAD52 cooperates with the excision repair protein OGG1 for the repair of oxidative lesions in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Maynard, Scott; Hashiguchi, Kazunari;

    2009-01-01

    activities and RAD52 stimulates OGG1 incision activity, likely increasing its turnover rate. RAD52 colocalizes with OGG1 after oxidative stress to cultured cells, but not after the direct induction of double-strand breaks by ionizing radiation. Human cells depleted of RAD52 via small interfering RNA...... to repair oxidative DNA damage and enhances the cellular resistance to oxidative stress. Our observations suggest a coordinated action between these proteins that may be relevant when oxidative lesions positioned close to strand breaks impose a hindrance to RAD52 catalytic activities....

  4. Choreography of oxidative damage repair in mammalian genomes.

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    Mitra, Sankar; Izumi, Tadahide; Boldogh, Istvan; Bhakat, Kishor K; Hill, Jeff W; Hazra, Tapas K

    2002-07-01

    The lesions induced by reactive oxygen species in both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes include altered bases, abasic (AP) sites, and single-strand breaks, all repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Although the basic BER process (consisting of five sequential steps) could be reconstituted in vitro with only four enzymes, it is now evident that repair of oxidative damage, at least in mammalian cell nuclei, is more complex, and involves a number of additional proteins, including transcription- and replication-associated factors. These proteins may be required in sequential repair steps in concert with other cellular changes, starting with nuclear targeting of the early repair enzymes in response to oxidative stress, facilitation of lesion recognition, and access by chromatin unfolding via histone acetylation, and formation of metastable complexes of repair enzymes and other accessory proteins. Distinct, specific subclasses of protein complexes may be formed for repair of oxidative lesions in the nucleus in transcribed vs. nontranscribed sequences in chromatin, in quiescent vs. cycling cells, and in nascent vs. parental DNA strands in replicating cells. Characterizing the proteins for each repair subpathway, their signaling-dependent modifications and interactions in the nuclear as well as mitochondrial repair complexes, will be a major focus of future research in oxidative damage repair.

  5. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

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    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  6. DNA-Protein Crosslink Proteolysis Repair.

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    Vaz, Bruno; Popovic, Marta; Ramadan, Kristijan

    2017-06-01

    Proteins that are covalently bound to DNA constitute a specific type of DNA lesion known as DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs). DPCs represent physical obstacles to the progression of DNA replication. If not repaired, DPCs cause stalling of DNA replication forks that consequently leads to DNA double-strand breaks, the most cytotoxic DNA lesion. Although DPCs are common DNA lesions, the mechanism of DPC repair was unclear until now. Recent work unveiled that DPC repair is orchestrated by proteolysis performed by two distinct metalloproteases, SPARTAN in metazoans and Wss1 in yeast. This review summarizes recent discoveries on two proteases in DNA replication-coupled DPC repair and establishes DPC proteolysis repair as a separate DNA repair pathway for genome stability and protection from accelerated aging and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultraviolet B retards growth, induces oxidative stress, and modulates DNA repair-related gene and heat shock protein gene expression in the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus sp

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    Kim, Ryeo-Ok [Department of Chemistry, and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Jae-Sung [Department of Molecular and Environmental Bioscience, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Won, Eun-Ji [Department of Environmental Marine Sciences, College of Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyun-Woo [Department of Chemistry, and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang-Mo [Laboratory of Cytogenetics and Tissue Regeneration, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Mi [Department of Green Life Science, College of Convergence, Sangmyung University, Seoul 110-743 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular and Environmental Bioscience, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation causes direct cellular damage by breakage of DNA strands and oxidative stress induction in aquatic organisms. To understand the effect of UV-B radiation on the rotifer, Brachionus sp., several parameters including 24-h survival rate, population growth rate, and ROS level were measured after exposure to a wide range of UV-B doses. To check the expression of other important inducible genes such as replication protein A (RPA), DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), Ku70, Ku80, and heat shock proteins (hsps) after UV-B radiation, we observed dose- and time-dependency at 2 kJ/m{sup 2}. We also examined 13 hsp genes for their roles in the UV-B damaged rotifer. Results showed that UV-B remarkably inhibited the population growth of Brachionus sp. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was high at 2 kJ/m{sup 2}, suggesting that 2 kJ/m{sup 2} would already be toxic. This result was supported by other enzymatic activities, such as GSH levels, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase. For dose dependency, low doses of UV-B radiation (2, 4, and 6 kJ/m{sup 2}) significantly up-regulated the examined genes (e.g. RPA, DNA-PK, Ku70, and Ku80). For the time course study, RPA genes showed immediate up-regulation but returned to basal or lower expression levels compared to the control 3 h after UV-B exposure. The DNA-PK and Ku70/80 genes significantly increased, indicating that they may be involved in repairing processes against a low dose of UV-B exposure (2 kJ/m{sup 2}). At the basal level, the hsp90{alpha}1 gene showed the highest expression, and followed by hsp10, hsp30, hsp60, and hsc70, and hsp90{beta} in adults (w/o egg). In eggs, the hsp10 gene was expressed the highest, and followed by hsp30, hsp27, hsp90{alpha}1, and hsp60 genes. In real-time RT-PCR array on rotifer hsp genes, low doses of UV-B radiation (2 and 4 kJ/m{sup 2}) showed up-regulation of several hsp genes but most of the hsp

  8. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  9. X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 in base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen-Bauer, Audun; Solvang-Garten, Karin; Akbari, Mansour;

    2012-01-01

    X-ray Repair Cross Complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) acts as a scaffolding protein in the converging base excision repair (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR) pathways. XRCC1 also interacts with itself and rapidly accumulates at sites of DNA damage. XRCC1 can thus mediate the assembly of large...

  10. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed...... of this process depends on the extent of oxidation at C-3 compared with other sites. HO*, generated by gamma radiolysis, gave the highest total carbonyl yield, with protein-bound carbonyls predominating over released. In contrast, metal ion/H2O2 systems, gave more released than bound carbonyls, with this ratio...... modulated by EDTA. This is ascribed to metal ion-protein interactions affecting the sites of initial oxidation. Hypochlorous acid gave low concentrations of released carbonyls, but high yields of protein-bound material. The peroxyl radical generator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride...

  11. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function....... Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides...

  12. Production, Purification, and Characterization of 15N-Labeled DNA Repair Proteins as Internal Standards for Mass Spectrometric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaruga, Pawel; Nelson, Bryant C.; Lowenthal, Mark S.; Jemth, Ann-Sofie; Loseva, Olga; Coskun, Erdem; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by a variety of damaging agents, resulting in the formation of a multiplicity of lesions, which are mutagenic and cytotoxic. Unless repaired by DNA repair mechanisms before DNA replication, DNA lesions can lead to genomic instability, which is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Oxidatively induced DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair pathway with the involvement of a plethora of proteins. Cancer tissues develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues by overexpressing DNA repair proteins. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions generated by therapeutic agents before they became toxic is a major mechanism in the development of therapy resistance. Evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker of patient response. Thus, knowledge of DNA–protein expressions in disease-free and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. Our laboratory has developed methodologies that use mass spectrometry with isotope dilution for the measurement of expression of DNA repair proteins in human tissues and cultured cells. For this purpose, full-length 15N-labeled analogs of a number of human DNA repair proteins have been produced and purified to be used as internal standards for positive identification and accurate quantification. This chapter describes in detail the protocols of this work. The use of 15N-labeled proteins as internal standards for the measurement of several DNA repair proteins in vivo is also presented. PMID:26791985

  13. Protein oxidation and ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linton, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    2001-01-01

    of redox-active metal ions that could catalyse oxidant formation. As a result of this decrease in antioxidant defences, and increased rate of ROS formation, it is possible that the impact of ROS increases with age. ROS are known to oxidise biological macromolecules, with proteins an important target....... If the argument that the impact of ROS increases with age is true, then proteins would be expected to accumulate oxidised materials with age, and the rate of such accumulation should increase with time, reflecting impaired inefficiency of homeostasis. Here we review the evidence for the accumulation of oxidised......, or modified, extra- and intra-cellular proteins in vivo....

  14. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...... may not only induce quality losses but may be desirable in some type of foods, such as salted herring....

  15. Biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Steffen; Høgh Danielsen, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Lone

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative-stress-induced damage to DNA includes a multitude of lesions, many of which are mutagenic and have multiple roles in cancer and aging. Many lesions have been characterized by MS-based methods after extraction and digestion of DNA. These preparation steps may cause spurious base oxidation...... DNA glycosylase 1), responsible for repair of 8-oxodG, by genotyping. Products of repair in DNA or the nucleotide pool, such as 8-oxodG, excreted into the urine can be assessed by MS-based methods and generally reflects the rate of damage. Experimental and population-based studies indicate that many...

  16. Double strand break (DSB) repair in heterochromatin and heterochromatin proteins in DSB repair.

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    Lemaître, Charlène; Soutoglou, Evi

    2014-07-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer cells and they represent a major cause of tumorigenesis. To avoid chromosomal translocations, faithful repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) has to be ensured in the context of high ordered chromatin structure. However, chromatin compaction is proposed to represent a barrier for DSB repair. Here we review the different mechanisms cells use to alleviate the heterochromatic barrier for DNA repair. At the same time, we discuss the activating role of heterochromatin-associated proteins in this process, therefore proposing that chromatin structure, more than being a simple barrier, is a key modulator of DNA repair.

  17. Characterization of oxidative guanine damage and repair in mammalian telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilong Wang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG are among the most common oxidative DNA lesions and are substrates for 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1-initiated DNA base excision repair (BER. Mammalian telomeres consist of triple guanine repeats and are subject to oxidative guanine damage. Here, we investigated the impact of oxidative guanine damage and its repair by OGG1 on telomere integrity in mice. The mouse cells were analyzed for telomere integrity by telomere quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (telomere-FISH, by chromosome orientation-FISH (CO-FISH, and by indirect immunofluorescence in combination with telomere-FISH and for oxidative base lesions by Fpg-incision/Southern blot assay. In comparison to the wild type, telomere lengthening was observed in Ogg1 null (Ogg1(-/- mouse tissues and primary embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs cultivated in hypoxia condition (3% oxygen, whereas telomere shortening was detected in Ogg1(-/- mouse hematopoietic cells and primary MEFs cultivated in normoxia condition (20% oxygen or in the presence of an oxidant. In addition, telomere length abnormalities were accompanied by altered telomere sister chromatid exchanges, increased telomere single- and double-strand breaks, and preferential telomere lagging- or G-strand losses in Ogg1(-/- mouse cells. Oxidative guanine lesions were increased in telomeres in Ogg1(-/- mice with aging and primary MEFs cultivated in 20% oxygen. Furthermore, oxidative guanine lesions persisted at high level in Ogg1(-/- MEFs after acute exposure to hydrogen peroxide, while they rapidly returned to basal level in wild-type MEFs. These findings indicate that oxidative guanine damage can arise in telomeres where it affects length homeostasis, recombination, DNA replication, and DNA breakage repair. Our studies demonstrate that BER pathway is required in repairing oxidative guanine damage in telomeres and maintaining telomere integrity

  18. [The correlations between aging of the human body, oxidative stress and reduced efficiency of repair systems].

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    Michalak, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiak, Jakub; Markiewicz-Górka, Iwona

    2014-12-15

    The article presents an current knowledge overview about the importance of oxidative stress and reduced efficiency of repair processes during the aging process of the human body. Oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules (proteins, lipids, nucleic acids), are formed under the influence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). They are the part of important mechanism which is responsible for the process of aging and the development of many diseases. The most important effects result from DNA damage, due to the mutations formation, which can lead to the development of tumors. However, a well-functioning repair systems (i.a. homologous recombination) remove the damage and prevent harmful changes in the cells. Lipid peroxidation products also cause oxidative modification of nucleic acids (and proteins). Proteins and fats also have repair systems, but much simpler than those responsible for the repair of nucleic acids. Unfortunately, with increasing age, they are more weakened, which contributes to increase numbers of cell damage, and consequently development of diseases specific to old age: cancer, neurodegenerative diseases or atherosclerosis.

  19. How Trypanosoma cruzi deals with oxidative stress: Antioxidant defence and DNA repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Silva, Alice; Cerqueira, Paula Gonçalves; Grazielle-Silva, Viviane; Gadelha, Fernanda Ramos; Peloso, Eduardo de Figueiredo; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Machado, Carlos Renato

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is an obligatory intracellular parasite with a digenetic life cycle. Due to the variety of host environments, it faces several sources of oxidative stress. In addition to reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by its own metabolism, T. cruzi must deal with high ROS levels generated as part of the host's immune responses. Hence, the conclusion that T. cruzi has limited ability to deal with ROS (based on the lack of a few enzymes involved with oxidative stress responses) seems somewhat paradoxical. Actually, to withstand such variable sources of oxidative stress, T. cruzi has developed complex defence mechanisms. This includes ROS detoxification pathways that are distinct from the ones in the mammalian host, DNA repair pathways and specialized polymerases, which not only protect its genome from the resulting oxidative damage but also contribute to the generation of genetic diversity within the parasite population. Recent studies on T. cruzi's DNA repair pathways as mismatch repair (MMR) and GO system suggested that, besides a role associated with DNA repair, some proteins of these pathways may also be involved in signalling oxidative damage. Recent data also suggested that an oxidative environment might be beneficial for parasite survival within the host cell as it contributes to iron mobilization from the host's intracellular storages. Besides contributing to the understanding of basic aspects of T. cruzi biology, these studies are highly relevant since oxidative stress pathways are part of the poorly understood mechanisms behind the mode of action of drugs currently used against this parasite. By unveiling new peculiar aspects of T. cruzi biology, emerging data on DNA repair pathways and other antioxidant defences from this parasite have revealed potential new targets for a much needed boost in drug development efforts towards a better treatment for Chagas disease.

  20. Protein found to promote DNA repair, prevent cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ An abundant chromosomal protein that binds to damaged DNA prevents cancer development by enhancing DNA repair, researchers at University of Texas reported on-line in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science.

  1. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  2. Protein oxidation in Huntington disease.

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    Sorolla, M Alba; Rodríguez-Colman, María José; Vall-llaura, Núria; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene, affecting initially the striatum and progressively the cortex. Oxidative stress, and consequent protein oxidation, has been described as important to disease progression. This review focuses on recent advances in the field, with a particular emphasis on the identified target proteins and the role that their oxidation has or might have in the pathophysiology of HD. Oxidation and the resulting inactivation and/or degradation of important proteins can explain the impairment of several metabolic pathways in HD. Oxidation of enzymes involved in ATP synthesis can account for the energy deficiency observed. Impairment of protein folding and degradation can be due to oxidation of several heat shock proteins and Valosin-containing protein. Oxidation of two enzymes involved in the vitamin B6 metabolism could result in decreased availability of pyridoxal phosphate, which is a necessary cofactor in transaminations, the kynurenine pathway and the synthesis of glutathione, GABA, dopamine and serotonin, all of which have a key role in HD pathology. In addition, protein oxidation often contributes to oxidative stress, aggravating the molecular damage inside the cell. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Purification of mammalian DNA repair protein XRCC1

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    Chen, I. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Malfunctioning DNA repair systems lead to cancer mutations, and cell death. XRCC1 (X-ray Repair Cross Complementing) is a human DNA repair gene that has been found to fully correct the x-ray repair defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutant EM9. The corresponding protein (XRCC1) encoded by this gene has been linked to a DNA repair pathway known as base excision repair, and affects the activity of DNA ligase III. Previously, an XRCC1 cDNA minigene (consisting of the uninterrupted coding sequence for XRCC1 protein followed by a decahistidine tag) was constructed and cloned into vector pET-16b for the purpose of: (1) overproduction of XRCC1 in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; and (2) to facilitate rapid purification of XRCC1 from these systems. A vector is basically a DNA carrier that allows recombinant protein to be cloned and overexpressed in host cells. In this study, XRCC1 protein was overexpressed in E. coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Currently, the XRCC1 minigene is being inserted into a new vector [pET-26b(+)] in hopes to increase overexpression and improve purification. Once purified XRCC1 can be crystallized for structural studies, or studied in vitro for its biological function.

  4. Production, Purification, and Characterization of ¹⁵N-Labeled DNA Repair Proteins as Internal Standards for Mass Spectrometric Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Prasad T; Jaruga, Pawel; Nelson, Bryant C; Lowenthal, Mark S; Jemth, Ann-Sofie; Loseva, Olga; Coskun, Erdem; Helleday, Thomas; Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2016-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by a variety of damaging agents, resulting in the formation of a multiplicity of lesions, which are mutagenic and cytotoxic. Unless repaired by DNA repair mechanisms before DNA replication, DNA lesions can lead to genomic instability, which is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Oxidatively induced DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair pathway with the involvement of a plethora of proteins. Cancer tissues develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues by overexpressing DNA repair proteins. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions generated by therapeutic agents before they became toxic is a major mechanism in the development of therapy resistance. Evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker of patient response. Thus, knowledge of DNA-protein expressions in disease-free and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. Our laboratory has developed methodologies that use mass spectrometry with isotope dilution for the measurement of expression of DNA repair proteins in human tissues and cultured cells. For this purpose, full-length (15)N-labeled analogs of a number of human DNA repair proteins have been produced and purified to be used as internal standards for positive identification and accurate quantification. This chapter describes in detail the protocols of this work. The use of (15)N-labeled proteins as internal standards for the measurement of several DNA repair proteins in vivo is also presented.

  5. Protein damage and repair controlling seed vigor and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogé, Laurent; Broyart, Caroline; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Jallet, Denis; Bourdais, Gildas; Job, Dominique; Grappin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The formation of abnormal isoaspartyl residues derived from aspartyl or asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous protein misfolding in cells. The repair enzyme protein L: -isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) counteracts such damage by catalyzing the conversion of abnormal isoaspartyl residues to their normal aspartyl forms. Thus, this enzyme contributes to the survival of many organisms, including plants. Analysis of the accumulation of isoaspartyl-containing proteins and its modulation by the PIMT repair pathway, using germination tests, immunodetection, enzymatic assays, and HPLC analysis, gives new insights in understanding controlling mechanisms of seed longevity and vigor.

  6. The effect of aging on the DNA damage and repair capacity in 2BS cells undergoing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Ling; Wang, Pei-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with a reduction in the DNA repair capacity under oxidative stress. However, whether the DNA damage and repair capacity can be a biomarker of aging remains controversial. In this study, we demonstrated two cause-and-effect relationships, the one is between the DNA damage and repair capacity and the cellular age, another is between DNA damage and repair capacity and the level of oxidative stress in human embryonic lung fibroblasts (2BS) exposed to different doses of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). To clarify the mechanisms of the age-related reduction in DNA damage and repair capacity, we preliminarily evaluated the expressions of six kinds of pivotal enzymes involved in the two classical DNA repair pathways. The DNA repair capacity was observed in human fibroblasts cells using the comet assay; the age-related DNA repair enzymes were selected by RT-PCR and then verified by Western blot in vitro. Results showed that the DNA repair capacity was negatively and linearly correlated with (i) cumulative population doubling (PD) levels only in the group of low concentration of hydrogen peroxide treatment, (ii) with the level of oxidative stress only in the group of young PD cells. The mRNA expression of DNA polymerase δ1 decreased substantially in senescent cells and showed negative linear-correlation with PD levels; the protein expression level was well consistent with the mRNA level. Taken together, DNA damage and repair capacity can be a biomarker of aging. Reduced expression of DNA polymerase δ1 may be responsible for the decrease of DNA repair capacity in senescent cells.

  7. Dietary Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Oxidative DNA Damage and Modulate Expression of DNA Repair Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh C. Gupta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a pre-requisite for the initiation of cancer and agents that reduce this damage are useful in cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated the ability of whole berries and berry phytochemical, ellagic acid to reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage. Ellagic acid was selected based on > 95% inhibition of 8-oxodeoxyguosine (8-oxodG and other unidentified oxidative DNA adducts induced by 4-hydroxy-17B;-estradiol and CuCl2 in vitro. Inhibition of the latter occurred at lower concentrations (10 u(microM than that for 8-oxodG (100 u(microM. In the in vivo study, female CD-1 mice (n=6 were fed either a control diet or diet supplemented with ellagic acid (400 ppm and dehydrated berries (5% w/w with varying ellagic acid contents -- blueberry (low, strawberry (medium and red raspberry (high, for 3 weeks. Blueberry and strawberry diets showed moderate reductions in endogenous DNA adducts (25%. However, both red raspberry and ellagic acid diets showed a significant reduction of 59% (p < 0.001 and 48% (p < 0.01, respectively. Both diets also resulted in a 3-8 fold over-expression of genes involved in DNA repair such as xeroderma pigmentosum group A complementing protein (XPA, DNA excision repair protein (ERCC5 and DNA ligase III (DNL3. These results suggest that red raspberry and ellagic acid reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage by mechanisms which may involve increase in DNA repair.

  8. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxidative modification of proteins: age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Bulbul; Chakravarti, Deb N

    2007-01-01

    Aging is a complex biological phenomenon which involves progressive loss of different physiological functions of various tissues of living organisms. It is the inevitable fate of life and is a major risk factor for death and different pathological disorders. Based on a wide variety of studies performed in humans as well as in various animal models and microbial systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to play a key role in the aging process. The production of ROS is influenced by cellular metabolic activities as well as environmental factors. ROS can react with all major biological macromolecules such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. Since, in general, proteins are the key molecules that play the ultimate role in various structural and functional aspects of living organisms, this review will focus on the age-related oxidative modifications of proteins as well as on mechanism for removal or repair of the oxidized proteins. The topics covered include protein oxidation as a marker of oxidative stress, experimental evidence indicating the role of ROS in protein oxidation, protein carbonyl content, enzymatic degradation of oxidized proteins, and effects of caloric restriction on protein oxidation in the context of aging. Finally, we will discuss different strategies which have been or can be undertaken to slow down the oxidative damage of proteins and the aging process.

  10. The DNA base excision repair protein Ape1/Ref-1 as a therapeutic and chemopreventive target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishel, Melissa L; Kelley, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    With our growing understanding of the pathways involved in cell proliferation and signaling, targeted therapies, in the treatment of cancer are entering the clinical arena. New and emerging targets are proteins involved in DNA repair pathways. Inhibition of various proteins in the DNA repair pathways sensitizes cancer cells to DNA damaging agents such as chemotherapy and/or radiation. We study the apurinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (Ape1/Ref-1) and believe that its crucial function in DNA repair and reduction-oxidation or redox signaling make it an excellent target for sensitizing tumor cells to chemotherapy. Ape1/Ref-1 is an essential enzyme in the base excision repair (BER) pathway which is responsible for the repair of DNA caused by oxidative and alkylation damage. As importantly, Ape1/Ref-1 also functions as a redox factor maintaining transcription factors in an active reduced state. Ape1/Ref-1 stimulates the DNA binding activity of numerous transcription factors that are involved in cancer promotion and progression such as AP-1 (Fos/Jun), NFkappaB, HIF-1alpha, CREB, p53 and others. We will discuss what is known regarding the pharmacological targeting of the DNA repair activity, as well as the redox activity of Ape1/Ref-1, and explore the budding clinical utility of inhibition of either of these functions in cancer treatment. A brief discussion of the effect of polymorphisms in its DNA sequence is included because of Ape1/Ref-1's importance to maintenance and integrity of the genome. Experimental modification of Ape1/Ref-1 activity changes the response of cells and of organisms to DNA damaging agents, suggesting that Ape1/Ref-1 may also be a productive target of chemoprevention. In this review, we will provide an overview of Ape1/Ref-1's activities and explore the potential of this protein as a target in cancer treatment as well as its role in chemoprevention.

  11. DNA Repair-Protein Relocalization After Heavy Ion Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metting, N. F.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is good at making DNA double strand breaks, and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations such as heavy ion particles are particularly efficient. For this reason, the proteins belonging to repair systems that deal with double strand breaks are of particular interest. One such protein is Ku, a component in the non-homologous recombination repair system. The Ku protein is an abundant, heterodimeric DNA end-binding complex, composed of one 70 and one 86 kDa subunit. Ku protein binds to DNA ends, nicks, gaps, and regions of transition between single and double-stranded structure. These binding properties suggest an important role in DNA repair. The Ku antigen is important in this study because it is present in relatively large copy numbers and it is part of a double-strand-break repair system. More importantly, we consistently measure an apparent upregulation in situ that is not verified by whole-cell-lysate immunoblot measurements. This apparent upregulation is triggered by very low doses of radiation, thus showing a potentially useful high sensitivity. However, elucidation of the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is still to be done.

  12. The Psb32 Protein Aids in Repairing Photodamaged Photosystem Ⅱ in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kimberly M. Wegener; Stefan Bennewitz; Ralf Oelmüller; Himadri B. Pakrasi

    2011-01-01

    Photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ),a membrane protein complex,catalyzes the photochemical oxidation of water to molecular oxygen.This enzyme complex consists of approximately 20 stoichiometric protein components.However,due to the highly energetic reactions it catalyzes as part of its normal activity,PSⅡ is continuously damaged and repaired.With advances in protein detection technologies,an increasing number of sub-stoichiometric PSⅡ proteins have been identified,many of which aid in the biogenesis and assembly of this protein complex.Psb32 (SⅡ1390) has previously been identified as a protein associated with highly active purified PSⅡ preparations from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803.To investigate its function,the subcellular localization of Psb32 and the impact of deletion of the psb32 gene on PSⅡ were analyzed.Here,we show that Psb32 is an integral membrane protein,primarily located in the thylakoid membranes.Although not required for cell viability,Psb32 protects cells from oxidative stress and additionally confers a selective fitness advantage in mixed culture experiments.Specifically,Psb32 protects PSⅡ from photodamage and accelerates its repair.Thus,the data suggest that Psb32 plays an important role in minimizing the effect of photoinhibition on PSⅡ.

  13. Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straatsma, TP; McCammon, J A; Miller, John H; Smith, Paul E; Vorpagel, Erich R; Wong, Chung F; Zacharias, Martin W

    2006-03-03

    The goal of the Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling project is to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of human polymerase-β, one of the key enzymes in base excision repair (BER) and the cell-signaling enzymes cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. This work used molecular modeling and simulation studies to specifically focus on the • dynamics of DNA and damaged DNA • dynamics and energetics of base flipping in DNA • mechanism and fidelity of nucleotide insertion by BER enzyme human polymerase-β • mechanism and inhibitor design for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations have been performed using the computer resources at the Molecular Science Computing Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  14. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners...

  15. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required.

  16. Neurons efficiently repair glutamate-induced oxidative DNA damage by a process involving CREB-mediated up-regulation of apurinic endonuclease 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Tadokoro, Takashi; Keijzers, Guido

    2010-01-01

    damage after glutamate treatment, suggesting that APE1 is a key repair protein for glutamate-induced DNA damage. A cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) binding sequence is present in the Ape1 gene (encodes APE1 protein) promoter and treatment of neurons with a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase......-mediated DNA damage that is then rapidly repaired by a mechanism involving Ca(2+)-induced, CREB-mediated APE1 expression. Our findings reveal a previously unknown ability of neurons to efficiently repair oxidative DNA lesions after transient activation of glutamate receptors....

  17. Oxidative stress in normal and impaired wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Matthias; Werner, Sabine

    2008-08-01

    A large percentage of the population suffers from wound healing abnormalities, in particular aged individuals, patients with diabetes, and those treated with immunosuppressive drugs, chemo- or radiotherapy. The mechanisms underlying the impaired healing response are still poorly understood. Recent studies provided strong evidence for a role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of non-healing ulcers. Therefore, it is of major importance to identify and functionally characterize the factors involved in the generation and detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This will provide the basis for the development of new strategies for therapeutic intervention. In this review we summarize the current information about the roles of low molecular weight antioxidants and ROS-detoxifying enzymes in normal and impaired wound repair, and we report on the consequences of their modulation at the wound site.

  18. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 in Wound Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Patrone

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1, a member of highly conserved non-histone DNA binding protein family, has been studied as transcription factor and growth factor. Secreted extracellularly by activated monocytes and macrophages or passively released by necrotic or damaged cells, extracellular HMGB1 is a potent mediator of inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 has apparently contrasting biological actions: it sustains inflammation (with the possible establishment of autoimmunity or of self-maintaining tissue damage, but it also activates and recruits stem cells, boosting tissue repair. Here, we focus on the role of HMGB1 in physiological and pathological responses, the mechanisms by which it contributes to tissue repair and therapeutic strategies base on targeting HMGB1.

  19. Role of Gasotransmitters in Oxidative Stresses, Neuroinflammation, and Neuronal Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulfuara Shefa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, three main gasotransmitters, that is, hydrogen sulfide (H2S, carbon monoxide (CO, and nitric oxide (NO, have been discovered to play major bodily physiological roles. These gasotransmitters have multiple functional roles in the body including physiologic and pathologic functions with respect to the cellular or tissue quantities of these gases. Gasotransmitters were originally known to have only detrimental and noxious effects in the body but that notion has much changed with years; vast studies demonstrated that these gasotransmitters are precisely involved in the normal physiological functioning of the body. From neuromodulation, oxidative stress subjugation, and cardiovascular tone regulation to immunomodulation, these gases perform critical roles, which, should they deviate from the norm, can trigger the genesis of a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease (PD. The purpose of this review is to discuss at great length physical and chemical properties and physiological actions of H2S, NO, and CO as well as shedding light on recently researched molecular targets. We particularly put emphasis on the roles in neuronal inflammation and neurodegeneration and neuronal repair.

  20. Crosslinking of DNA repair and replication proteins to DNA in cells treated with 6-thioguanine and UVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueranger, Quentin; Kia, Azadeh; Frith, David; Karran, Peter

    2011-07-01

    The DNA of patients taking immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory thiopurines contains 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and their skin is hypersensitive to ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. DNA 6-TG absorbs UVA and generates reactive oxygen species that damage DNA and proteins. Here, we show that the DNA damage includes covalent DNA-protein crosslinks. An oligonucleotide containing a single 6-TG is photochemically crosslinked to cysteine-containing oligopeptides by low doses of UVA. Crosslinking is significantly more efficient if guanine sulphonate (G(SO3))--an oxidized 6-TG and a previously identified UVA photoproduct--replaces 6-TG, suggesting that G(SO3) is an important reaction intermediate. Crosslinking occurs via oligopeptide sulphydryl and free amino groups. The oligonucleotide-oligopeptide adducts are heat stable but are partially reversed by reducing treatments. UVA irradiation of human cells containing DNA 6-TG induces extensive heat- and reducing agent-resistant covalent DNA-protein crosslinks and diminishes the recovery of some DNA repair and replication proteins from nuclear extracts. DNA-protein crosslinked material has an altered buoyant density and can be purified by banding in cesium chloride (CsCl) gradients. PCNA, the MSH2 mismatch repair protein and the XPA nucleotide excision repair (NER) factor are among the proteins detectable in the DNA-crosslinked material. These findings suggest that the 6-TG/UVA combination might compromise DNA repair by sequestering essential proteins.

  1. Protein oxidation and degradation caused by particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Huang; Lee, Chun-Nin; Bai, Kuan-Jen; Yang, You-Lan; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Wu, Sheng-Ming; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2016-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) modulates the expression of autophagy; however, the role of selective autophagy by PM remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the underlying mechanisms in protein oxidation and degradation caused by PM. Human epithelial A549 cells were exposed to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), urban dust (UD), and carbon black (CB; control particles). Cell survival and proliferation were significantly reduced by DEPs and UD in A549 cells. First, benzo(a)pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE) protein adduct was caused by DEPs at 150 μg/ml. Methionine oxidation (MetO) of human albumin proteins was induced by DEPs, UD, and CB; however, the protein repair mechanism that converts MetO back to methionine by methionine sulfoxide reductases A (MSRA) and B3 (MSRB3) was activated by DEPs and inhibited by UD, suggesting that oxidized protein was accumulating in cells. As to the degradation of oxidized proteins, proteasome and autophagy activation was induced by CB with ubiquitin accumulation, whereas proteasome and autophagy activation was induced by DEPs without ubiquitin accumulation. The results suggest that CB-induced protein degradation may be via an ubiquitin-dependent autophagy pathway, whereas DEP-induced protein degradation may be via an ubiquitin-independent autophagy pathway. A distinct proteotoxic effect may depend on the physicochemistry of PM.

  2. Identification of novel DNA repair proteins via primary sequence, secondary structure, and homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akutsu Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA repair is the general term for the collection of critical mechanisms which repair many forms of DNA damage such as methylation or ionizing radiation. DNA repair has mainly been studied in experimental and clinical situations, and relatively few information-based approaches to new extracting DNA repair knowledge exist. As a first step, automatic detection of DNA repair proteins in genomes via informatics techniques is desirable; however, there are many forms of DNA repair and it is not a straightforward process to identify and classify repair proteins with a single optimal method. We perform a study of the ability of homology and machine learning-based methods to identify and classify DNA repair proteins, as well as scan vertebrate genomes for the presence of novel repair proteins. Combinations of primary sequence polypeptide frequency, secondary structure, and homology information are used as feature information for input to a Support Vector Machine (SVM. Results We identify that SVM techniques are capable of identifying portions of DNA repair protein datasets without admitting false positives; at low levels of false positive tolerance, homology can also identify and classify proteins with good performance. Secondary structure information provides improved performance compared to using primary structure alone. Furthermore, we observe that machine learning methods incorporating homology information perform best when data is filtered by some clustering technique. Analysis by applying these methodologies to the scanning of multiple vertebrate genomes confirms a positive correlation between the size of a genome and the number of DNA repair protein transcripts it is likely to contain, and simultaneously suggests that all organisms have a non-zero minimum number of repair genes. In addition, the scan result clusters several organisms' repair abilities in an evolutionarily consistent fashion. Analysis also identifies several

  3. Understanding the molecular mechanism of formaldehyde-induced DNA-protein crosslink repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaldehyde induces DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) in several experimental in vitro and in vivo test systems, as well as in exposed human workers. DPCs are repaired by several DNA repair pathways in different species, but the molecular understanding of DPC repair in human tissues...

  4. Association between age and repair of oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesised that positive associations between age and levels of oxidative stress-generated damage to DNA may be related to an age-dependent decline in DNA repair activity. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between age and repair activity of oxidatively...... assay. There was an inverse association between age and DNA repair activity with a 0.65% decline in activity per year from age 18 to 83 (95% confidence interval: 0.16-1.14% per year). Univariate regression analysis also indicated inverse associations between DNA repair activity and waist-hip ratio (P...... indicating that the decline in repair activity was not mediated by metabolic risk factors. In summary...

  5. Chaperones, but not oxidized proteins, are ubiquitinated after oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästle, Marc; Reeg, Sandra; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina;

    2012-01-01

    After oxidative stress proteins which are oxidatively modified are degraded by the 20S proteasome. However, several studies documented an enhanced ubiquitination of yet unknown proteins. Since ubiqutination is a prerequisite for degradation by the 26S proteasome in an ATP-dependent manner......, we were able to confirm an increase of ubiquitinated proteins 16h upon oxidative stress. Therefore, we isolated ubiquitinated proteins from hydrogen peroxide treated cells, as well as from control and lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, treated cells, and identified some......, ubiquitinated proteins confirm the thesis that ubiquitination upon oxidative stress is no random process to degrade the mass of oxidized proteins, but concerns a special group of functional proteins....

  6. Origin and evolution of the protein-repairing enzymes methionine sulphoxide reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Weissbach, Herbert

    2008-08-01

    The majority of extant life forms thrive in an O2-rich environment, which unavoidably induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during cellular activities. ROS readily oxidize methionine (Met) residues in proteins/peptides to form methionine sulphoxide [Met(O)] that can lead to impaired protein function. Two methionine sulphoxide reductases, MsrA and MsrB, catalyse the reduction of the S and R epimers, respectively, of Met(O) in proteins to Met. The Msr system has two known functions in protecting cells against oxidative damage. The first is to repair proteins that have lost activity due to Met oxidation and the second is to function as part of a scavenger system to remove ROS through the reversible oxidation/reduction of Met residues in proteins. Bacterial, plant and animal cells lacking MsrA are known to be more sensitive to oxidative stress. The Msr system is considered an important cellular defence mechanism to protect against oxidative stress and may be involved in ageing/senescence. MsrA is present in all known eukaryotes and eubacteria and a majority of archaea, reflecting its essential role in cellular life. MsrB is found in all eukaryotes and the majority of eubacteria and archaea but is absent in some eubacteria and archaea, which may imply a less important role of MsrB compared to MsrA. MsrA and MsrB share no sequence or structure homology, and therefore probably emerged as a result of independent evolutionary events. The fact that some archaea lack msr genes raises the question of how these archaea cope with oxidative damage to proteins and consequently of the significance of msr evolution in oxic eukaryotes dealing with oxidative stress. Our best hypothesis is that the presence of ROS-destroying enzymes such as peroxiredoxins and a lower dissolved O2 concentration in those msr-lacking organisms grown at high temperatures might account for the successful survival of these organisms under oxidative stress.

  7. Pyridoxamine Protects Protein Backbone from Oxidative Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; McDonald, W. Hayes; Shackelford, Xavier; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins is one of the major pathogenic mechanisms in many chronic diseases. Therefore, inhibition of this oxidative damage can be an important part of therapeutic strategies. Pyridoxamine (PM), a prospective drug for treatment of diabetic nephropathy, has been previously shown to inhibit several oxidative and glycoxidative pathways, thus protecting amino acid side chains of the proteins from oxidative damage. Here, we demonstrated that PM can also protect protein backbone from fragmentation induced via different oxidative mechanisms including autoxidation of glucose. This protection was due to hydroxyl radical scavenging by PM and may contribute to PM therapeutic effects shown in clinical trials. PMID:21763683

  8. Post-Electrophoretic Identification of Oxidized Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad Craig

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative modification of proteins has been shown to play a major role in a number of human diseases. However, the ability to identify specific proteins that are most susceptible to oxidative modifications is difficult. Separation of proteins using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE offers the analytical potential for the recovery, amino acid sequencing, and identification of thousands of individual proteins from cells and tissues. We have developed a method to allow underivatized proteins to be electroblotted onto PVDF membranes before derivatization and staining. Since both the protein and oxidation proteins are quantifiable, the specific oxidation index of each protein can be determined. The optimal sequence and conditions for the staining process are (a electrophoresis, (b electroblotting onto PVDF membranes, (c derivatization of carbonyls with 2,4-DNP, (d immunostaining with anti DNP antibody, and (e protein staining with colloidal gold.

  9. PROTEIN OXIDATION AND ANTIOXIDANT VITAMINS IN LEPROSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Girish

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Methods: Total 30 leprosy cases were studied. Patients were subjected to various tests like, serum protein carbonyl as an index of protein oxidation, while serum Vitamin C and Vitamin E levels as endogenous antioxidants.Aims The presence of carbonyl groups in proteins has been used as a marker of ROS-mediated protein oxidation. The present work was undertaken to study the importance of endogenous antioxidants like Vitamin C and vitamin E in different types of leprosy patients.Results: An increased level of protein carbonyl indicates oxidative stress .The levels of Vitamins C, E decreased significantly in leprosy.Conclusions: Protein carbonyl can be used as sensitive indicator of oxidative stress in leprosy patients. Vitamin C and vitamin E can be supplemented along with anti-leprosy drugs to control the protein oxidation in leprosy patients.

  10. DNA Repair and the Accumulation of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Are Affected by Fruit Intake in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Croteau, Deborah L; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Harboe, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with elevated oxidative stress and DNA damage. To achieve healthy aging, we must begin to understand how diet affects cellular processes. We postulated that fruit-enriched diets might initiate a program of enhanced DNA repair and thereby improve genome integrity. C57Bl/6 J mice...... were fed for 14 weeks a control diet or a diet with 8% peach or nectarine extract. The activities of DNA repair enzymes, the level of DNA damage, and gene expression changes were measured. Our study showed that repair of various oxidative DNA lesions was more efficient in liver extracts derived from......-fed mice. Taken together, these results suggest that an increased intake of fruits might modulate the efficiency of DNA repair, resulting in altered levels of DNA damage....

  11. Mutagenic roles of DNA "repair" proteins in antibody diversity and disease-associated trinucleotide repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slean, Meghan M; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Ranum, Laura P; Pearson, Christopher E

    2008-07-01

    While DNA repair proteins are generally thought to maintain the integrity of the whole genome by correctly repairing mutagenic DNA intermediates, there are cases where DNA "repair" proteins are involved in causing mutations instead. For instance, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) require the contribution of various DNA repair proteins, including UNG, MSH2 and MSH6 to mutate certain regions of immunoglobulin genes in order to generate antibodies of increased antigen affinity and altered effector functions. Another instance where "repair" proteins drive mutations is the instability of gene-specific trinucleotide repeats (TNR), the causative mutations of numerous diseases including Fragile X mental retardation syndrome (FRAXA), Huntington's disease (HD), myotonic dystrophy (DM1) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) all of which arise via various modes of pathogenesis. These healthy and deleterious mutations that are induced by repair proteins are distinct from the genome-wide mutations that arise in the absence of repair proteins: they occur at specific loci, are sensitive to cis-elements (sequence context and/or epigenetic marks) and transcription, occur in specific tissues during distinct developmental windows, and are age-dependent. Here we review and compare the mutagenic role of DNA "repair" proteins in the processes of SHM, CSR and TNR instability.

  12. Oxidative stress, melatonin level, and sleep insufficiency among electronic equipment repairers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Helaly Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF, especially among electronic equipment repairers may induce oxidative stress and affect sleep quality. Aims: This study was carried out to (a investigate the effect of exposure to ELF-EMF on the malondialdehyde (MDA levels among electronic equipment repairers as an indicator of oxidative stress; and melatonin hormone levels; and (b to study the prevalence of sleep insufficiency among electronic equipment repairers exposed to ELF-EMF. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out on 50 electronic equipment repairers at high risk of exposure to ELF-EMF, and a matched control group at lower risk of exposure to ELF-EMF. All the participants completed a self-administered questionnaire about medical and occupational histories; and sleep sufficiency. The plasma melatonin and MDA levels of the study subjects were assessed. Results: The mean level of serum melatonin in the electronic equipment repairers was lower than that of the controls (P < 0.01. Moreover, serum MDA mean level of the electronic equipment repairers was higher than that of the controls (P < 0.01. Sleep insufficiency was more frequent among electronic equipment repairers (18.00% in comparison with the controls (8.70% (P > 0.05. Conclusion: The electronic equipment repairers, exposed to ELF-EMF, are at a risk of oxidative stress and sleep insufficiency, which could be explained by lower plasma melatonin levels and higher MDA levels. Health education about the hazards of ELF-EMF, shortening of exposure time per day, and taking antioxidant vitamins should be done to ameliorate the oxidative effect of EMF on those workers.

  13. Effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor on proteoglycan metabolism in repaired articular cartilage in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙炜; 金大地; 王吉兴; 秦立赟; 刘晓霞

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, S-methyl thiocarbamate (SMT), on proteoglycan metabolism in repaired articular cartilage in rabbits. Methods: Twenty-four male New Zealand white rabbits, aged 8 months and weighing 2.5 kg±0.2 kg, were used in this study. Cartilage defects in full thickness were created on the intercondylar articular surface of bilateral femurs of all the rabbits. Then the rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=8 in each group). The defects in one group were filled with fibrin glue impregnated with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2, BMP group), in one group with fibrin glue impregnated with rhBMP-2 and hypodermic injection with SMT (SMT group) and in the other group with nothing (control group). All the animals were killed at one year postoperatively. The tissue sections were stained with safranine O-fast green and analyzed by Quantiment 500 system to determine the content of glycosaminoglycan through measuring the percentage of safranine O-stained area, the thickness of cartilages and the mean gray scale (average stain intensity). Radiolabelled sodium sulphate (Na235SO4) was used to assess the proteoglycan synthesis. Results: At one year postoperatively, the percentage of safranine O-stained area, the mean gray scale and the cartilage thickness of the repaired tissues in SMT group were significantly higher than those of BMP group (P<0.01) and the control group (P<0.05). Result of incorporation of Na235SO4 showed that the proteoglycan synthesis in SMT group was higher than those of BMP group and the control group (P<0.01). Conclusions: SMT, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, can significantly increase the content of glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan synthesis, and computer-based image analysis is a reliable method for evaluating proteoglycan metabolism.

  14. Oxidation, aggregation and immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torosantucci, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis is to study the chemical mechanisms responsible for protein aggregation induced by metal catalyzed oxidation and to investigate the relationship between protein oxidation, aggregation and immunogenicity. To this end, recombinant human insulin

  15. Altered DNA repair, oxidative stress and antioxidant status in coronary artery disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Supriya Simon; V Chithra; Anoop Vijayan; Roy D Dinesh; T Vijayakumar

    2013-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a multifactorial disease caused by the interplay of environmental risk factors with multiple predisposing genes. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the role of DNA repair efficiency and oxidative stress and antioxidant status in CAD patients. Malonaldehyde (MDA), which is an indicator of oxidative stress, and mean break per cell (b/c) values, which is an indicator of decreased DNA repair efficiency, were found to be significantly increased in patients compared to normal controls ( < 0.05) whereas ascorbic acid and GSH were found to be lower among patients than the control group. It has been found that elevated oxidative stress decreased antioxidant level and decreased DNA repair efficiency can contribute to the development of CAD. This study also showed that high MDA, low ascorbic acid and GSH were significantly associated with high b/c value.

  16. Targeting 14-3-3 adaptor protein-protein interactions to stimulate central nervous system repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Kaplan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of developing treatments for central nervous system (CNS injuries is becoming more attainable with the recent identification of various drugs that can repair damaged axons. These discoveries have stemmed from screening efforts, large expression datasets and an improved understanding of the cellular and molecular biology underlying axon growth. It will be important to continue searching for new compounds that can induce axon repair. Here we describe how a family of adaptor proteins called 14-3-3s can be targeted using small molecule drugs to enhance axon outgrowth and regeneration. 14-3-3s bind to many functionally diverse client proteins to regulate their functions. We highlight the recent discovery of the axon-growth promoting activity of fusicoccin-A, a fungus-derived small molecule that stabilizes 14-3-3 interactions with their client proteins. Here we discuss how fusicoccin-A could serve as a starting point for the development of drugs to induce CNS repair.

  17. Functions and Dynamics of DNA Repair Proteins in Mitosis and Meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Uringa

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMy PhD project encompassed studies on the functions of several different proteins, all involved in DNA repair, in somatic and germ-line cells. Hr6b and Rad18Sc are involved in a DNA repair mechanism called ‘Replicative Damage Bypass’ (RDB), and function as ubiquitin conjugating enzym

  18. JNK Phosphorylates SIRT6 to Stimulate DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Response to Oxidative Stress by Recruiting PARP1 to DNA Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, Michael; Simon, Matthew; Tombline, Gregory; May, Alfred; Morello, Timothy D; Hubbard, Basil P; Bredbenner, Katie; Park, Rosa; Sinclair, David A; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2016-09-06

    The accumulation of damage caused by oxidative stress has been linked to aging and to the etiology of numerous age-related diseases. The longevity gene, sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), promotes genome stability by facilitating DNA repair, especially under oxidative stress conditions. Here we uncover the mechanism by which SIRT6 is activated by oxidative stress to promote DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We show that the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphorylates SIRT6 on serine 10 in response to oxidative stress. This post-translational modification facilitates the mobilization of SIRT6 to DNA damage sites and is required for efficient recruitment of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) to DNA break sites and for efficient repair of DSBs. Our results demonstrate a post-translational mechanism regulating SIRT6, and they provide the link between oxidative stress signaling and DNA repair pathways that may be critical for hormetic response and longevity assurance.

  19. JNK Phosphorylates SIRT6 to Stimulate DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Response to Oxidative Stress by Recruiting PARP1 to DNA Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Van Meter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of damage caused by oxidative stress has been linked to aging and to the etiology of numerous age-related diseases. The longevity gene, sirtuin 6 (SIRT6, promotes genome stability by facilitating DNA repair, especially under oxidative stress conditions. Here we uncover the mechanism by which SIRT6 is activated by oxidative stress to promote DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. We show that the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, phosphorylates SIRT6 on serine 10 in response to oxidative stress. This post-translational modification facilitates the mobilization of SIRT6 to DNA damage sites and is required for efficient recruitment of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 to DNA break sites and for efficient repair of DSBs. Our results demonstrate a post-translational mechanism regulating SIRT6, and they provide the link between oxidative stress signaling and DNA repair pathways that may be critical for hormetic response and longevity assurance.

  20. Protein oxidation in muscle foods: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marianne; Heinonen, Marina; Baron, Caroline P.

    2011-01-01

    insight into the reactions involved in the oxidative modifications undergone by muscle proteins. Moreover, a variety of products derived from oxidized muscle proteins, including cross-links and carbonyls, have been identified. The impact of oxidation on protein functionality and on specific meat quality...... in this topic has led to highlight the influence that Pox may have on meat quality and human nutrition. Recent studies have contributed to solid scientific knowledge regarding basic oxidation mechanisms, and in advanced methodologies to accurately assess Pox in food systems. Some of these studies have provided...... traits has also been addressed. Some other recent studies have shed light on the complex interaction mechanisms between myofibrillar proteins and certain redox-active compounds such as tocopherols and phenolic compounds. This paper is devoted to review the most relevant findings on the occurrence...

  1. A novel method for monitoring functional lesion-specific recruitment of repair proteins in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodrick, Jordan; Gupta, Suhani; Khatkar, Pooja; Dave, Kalpana; Levashova, Darya; Choudhury, Sujata; Elias, Hadi; Saha, Tapas; Mueller, Susette; Roy, Rabindra, E-mail: rr228@georgetown.edu

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A method of monitoring lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo is described. • Recruitment of repair enzymes to abasic sites is monitored by co-localization. • Repair protein recruitment is consistent with known protein–protein relationships. • Cells demonstrated complete repair of abasic sites by 90 min. - Abstract: DNA–protein relationships have been studied by numerous methods, but a particular gap in methodology lies in the study of DNA adduct-specific interactions with proteins in vivo, which particularly affects the field of DNA repair. Using the repair of a well-characterized and ubiquitous adduct, the abasic (AP) site, as a model, we have developed a comprehensive method of monitoring DNA lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo over time. We utilized a surrogate system in which a Cy3-labeled plasmid containing a single AP-site was transfected into cells, and the interaction of the labeled DNA with BER enzymes, including APE1, Polβ, LIG1, and FEN1, was monitored by immunofluorescent staining of the enzymes by Alexafluor-488-conjugated secondary antibody. The recruitment of enzymes was characterized by quantification of Cy3-Alexafluor-488 co-localization. To validate the microscopy-based method, repair of the transfected AP-site DNA was also quantified at various time points post-transfection using a real time PCR-based method. Notably, the recruitment time kinetics for each enzyme were consistent with AP-site repair time kinetics. This microscopy-based methodology is reliable in detecting the recruitment of proteins to specific DNA substrates and can be extended to study other in vivo DNA–protein relationships in any DNA sequence and in the context of any DNA structure in transfectable proliferating or quiescent cells. The method may be applied to a variety of disciplines of nucleic acid transaction pathways, including repair, replication, transcription, and recombination.

  2. Quantification of DNA repair protein kinetics after γ-irradiation using number and brightness analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdisalaam, Salim; Poudel, Milan; Chen, David J.; Alexandrakis, George

    2011-03-01

    The kinetics of most proteins involved in DNA damage sensing, signaling and repair following ionizing radiation exposure cannot be quantified by current live cell fluorescence microscopy methods. This is because most of these proteins, with only few notable exceptions, do not attach in large numbers at DNA damage sites to form easily detectable foci in microscopy images. As a result a high fluorescence background from freely moving and immobile fluorescent proteins in the nucleus masks the aggregation of proteins at sparse DNA damage sites. Currently, the kinetics of these repair proteins are studied by laser-induced damage and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching that rely on the detectability of high fluorescence intensity spots of clustered DNA damage. We report on the use of Number and Brightness (N&B) analysis methods as a means to monitor kinetics of DNA repair proteins during sparse DNA damage created by γ-irradiation, which is more relevant to cancer treatment than laser-induced clustered damage. We use two key double strand break repair proteins, namely Ku 70/80 and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKCS), as specific examples to showcase the feasibility of the proposed methods to quantify dose-dependent kinetics for DNA repair proteins after exposure to γ-rays.

  3. Role of protein and mRNA oxidation in seed dormancy and germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hayat eel-maarouf-bouteau

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are key players in the regulation of seed germination and dormancy. Although their regulated accumulation is a prerequisite for germination, the cellular basis of their action remains unknown, but very challenging to elucidate due to the lack of specificity of these compounds that can potentially react with all biomolecules. Among these, nucleic acids and proteins are very prone to oxidative damage. RNA is highly sensitive to oxidation because of its single-stranded structure and the absence of a repair system. Oxidation of mRNAs induces their decay through processing bodies or results in the synthesis of aberrant proteins through altered translation. Depending on the oxidized amino acid, ROS damage of proteins can be irreversible (i.e. carbonylation thus triggering the degradation of the oxidized proteins by the cytosolic 20S proteasome or can be reversed through the action of thioredoxins, peroxiredoxins or glutaredoxins (cysteine oxidation or by methionine sulfoxide reductase (methionine oxidation. Seed dormancy alleviation in the dry state, referred to as after-ripening, requires both selective mRNA oxidation and protein carbonylation. Similarly, seed imbibition of non-dormant seeds is associated with targeted oxidation of a subset of proteins. Altogether, these specific features testify that such oxidative modifications play important role in commitment of the cellular functioning toward germination completion.

  4. Use of a molecular beacon to track the activity of base excision repair protein OGG1 in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbahai, Leda; Kershaw, Rachael M; Green, Richard M; Hayden, Rachel E; Meldrum, Rosalind A; Hodges, Nikolas J

    2010-02-01

    An abundant form of DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine for which the base excision repair protein 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) is a major repair enzyme. To assess the location and intracellular activity of the OGG1 protein in response to oxidative stress, we have utilised a fluorescence-quench molecular beacon switch containing a 8-oxo-dG:C base pair and a fluorescent and quencher molecule at opposite ends of a hairpin oligonucleotide. Oxidative stress was induced by treatment with potassium bromate. Flow cytometry demonstrated a concentration-dependent increase in the activity of OGG1 that was detected by the fluorescence produced when the oligonucleotide was cleaved in the cells treated with potassium bromate. This signal is highly specific and not detectable in OGG1 knock out cells. Induction of OGG1 activity is not a result of induction of OGG1 gene expression as assessed by qPCR suggesting a role for protein stabilisation or increased OGG1 catalytic activity. High resolution confocal microscopy pinpointed the location of the fluorescent molecular beacon in live cells to perinuclear regions that were identified as mitochondria by co-staining with mitotracker dye. There is no evidence of cut beacon within the nuclear compartment of the cell. Control experiments with a positive control beacon (G:C base pair and lacking the DAB quencher) did not result in mitochondrial localisation of fluorescence signal indicating that the dye does not accumulate in mitochondria independent of OGG1 activity. Furthermore, faint nuclear staining was apparent confirming that the beacon structure is able to enter the nucleus. In conclusion, these data indicate that the mitochondria are the major site for OGG1 repair activity under conditions of oxidative stress.

  5. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  6. Mieap, a p53-Inducible Protein, Controls Mitochondrial Quality by Repairing or Eliminating Unhealthy Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Noriaki; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Miyamoto, Yuji; Miyamoto, Takafumi; Kabu, Koki; Yoshida, Masaki; Futamura, Manabu; Ichinose, Shizuko; Arakawa, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of healthy mitochondria prevents aging, cancer, and a variety of degenerative diseases that are due to the result of defective mitochondrial quality control (MQC). Recently, we discovered a novel mechanism for MQC, in which Mieap induces intramitochondrial lysosome-like organella that plays a critical role in the elimination of oxidized mitochondrial proteins (designated MALM for Mieap-induced accumulation of lysosome-like organelles within mitochondria). However, a large part of the mechanisms for MQC remains unknown. Here, we report additional mechanisms for Mieap-regulated MQC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers completely inhibited MALM. A mitochondrial outer membrane protein NIX interacted with Mieap in a ROS-dependent manner via the BH3 domain of NIX and the coiled-coil domain of Mieap. Deficiency of NIX also completely impaired MALM. When MALM was inhibited, Mieap induced vacuole-like structures (designated as MIV for Mieap-induced vacuole), which engulfed and degraded the unhealthy mitochondria by accumulating lysosomes. The inactivation of p53 severely impaired both MALM and MIV generation, leading to accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria. These results suggest that (1) mitochondrial ROS and NIX are essential factors for MALM, (2) MIV is a novel mechanism for lysosomal degradation of mitochondria, and (3) the p53-Mieap pathway plays a pivotal role in MQC by repairing or eliminating unhealthy mitochondria via MALM or MIV generation, respectively. PMID:21264228

  7. Oxidatively damaged DNA and its repair after experimental exposure to wood smoke in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Barregard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Particulate matter from wood smoke may cause health effects through generation of oxidative stress with resulting damage to DNA. We investigated oxidatively damaged DNA and related repair capacity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and measured the urinary excretion of repair products...... after controlled short-term exposure of human volunteers to wood smoke. Thirteen healthy adults were exposed first to clean air and then to wood smoke in a chamber during 4h sessions, 1 week apart. Blood samples were taken 3h after exposure and on the following morning, and urine was collected after...... chromatography with mass spectrometry. The morning following exposure to wood smoke the PBMC levels of SB were significantly decreased and the mRNA levels of hOGG1 significantly increased. FPG sites, hOGG1 activity, expression of hNUDT1 and hHO1, urinary excretion of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua did not change...

  8. Proteomic profile of reversible protein oxidation using PROP, purification of reversibly oxidized proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken G Victor

    Full Text Available Signal transduction pathways that are modulated by thiol oxidation events are beginning to be uncovered, but these discoveries are limited by the availability of relatively few analytical methods to examine protein oxidation compared to other signaling events such as protein phosphorylation. We report here the coupling of PROP, a method to purify reversibly oxidized proteins, with the proteomic identification of the purified mixture using mass spectrometry. A gene ontology (GO, KEGG enrichment and Wikipathways analysis of the identified proteins indicated a significant enrichment in proteins associated with both translation and mRNA splicing. This methodology also enabled the identification of some of the specific cysteine residue targets within identified proteins that are reversibly oxidized by hydrogen peroxide treatment of intact cells. From these identifications, we determined a potential consensus sequence motif associated with oxidized cysteine residues. Furthermore, because we identified proteins and specific sites of oxidation from both abundant proteins and from far less abundant signaling proteins (e.g. hepatoma derived growth factor, prostaglandin E synthase 3, the results suggest that the PROP procedure was efficient. Thus, this PROP-proteomics methodology offers a sensitive means to identify biologically relevant redox signaling events that occur within intact cells.

  9. Solid protein solder-doped biodegradable polymer membranes for laser-assisted tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Diane E.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Welch, Ashley J.

    2000-05-01

    Solid protein solder-doped polymer membranes have been developed for laser-assisted tissue repair. Biodegradable polymer films of controlled porosity were fabricated with poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) using a solvent-casting and particulate-leaching technique. The films provided a porous scaffold that readily absorbed the traditional protein solder mix composed of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and indocyanine green (ICG) dye. In vitro investigations were conducted to assess the influence of various processing parameters on the strength of tissue repairs formed using the new membranes. These parameters included the PLGA copolymer and PLGA/PEG blend ratio, the salt particle size, the initial bovine serum albumin (BSA) weight fraction, and the laser irradiance used to denature the solder. Altering the PLGA copolymer ratio had little effect on repair strength, however, it influenced the membrane degradation rate. Repair strength increased with increased membrane pore size and BSA concentration. The addition of PEG during the film casting stage increased the flexibility of the membranes but not necessarily the repair strength. The repair strength increased with increasing irradiance from 12 W/cm2 to 15 W/cm2. The new solder-doped polymer membranes provide all of the benefits associated with solid protein solders including high repair strength and improved edge coaptation. In addition, the flexible and moldable nature of the new membranes offer the capability of tailoring the membranes to a wide range of tissue geometries, and consequently, improved clinical applicability of laser- assisted tissue repair.

  10. Principles of protein group SUMO modification substantiated in DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Psakhye, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins by covalent attachment of functional groups (like phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, glycosylation, etc.) are of key importance for the cell as they regulate various aspects of protein behavior after its synthesis, e.g., dictate protein interaction properties, change catalytic activity of enzymes, induce conformational changes, guide subcellular localization and determine protein stability. A special class of protein PTMs is the conju...

  11. Protein cysteine oxidation in redox signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forman, Henry Jay; Davies, Michael J; Krämer, Anna C

    2017-01-01

    . Previous studies have claimed that RSOH can be detected as an adduct (e.g., with 5,5-dimethylcyclohexane-1,3-dione; dimedone). Here, kinetic data are discussed which indicate that few proteins can form RSOH under physiological signaling conditions. We also present experimental evidence that indicates......Oxidation of critical signaling protein cysteines regulated by H2O2 has been considered to involve sulfenic acid (RSOH) formation. RSOH may subsequently form either a sulfenyl amide (RSNHR') with a neighboring amide, or a mixed disulfide (RSSR') with another protein cysteine or glutathione...

  12. An interaction between teh DNA repair factor XPA and replication protein A appears essential for nucleotide excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lei; Lu, Xiaoyan; Peterson, C.A.; Legerski, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is required for simian virus 40-directed DNA replication in vitro and for nucleotide excision repair (NER). Here we report that RPA and the human repair protein XPA specifically interact both in vitro and in vivo. Mapping of the RPA-interactive domains in XPA revealed that both of the largest subunits of RPA, RPA-70 and RPA-34, interact with XPA at distinct sites. A domain involved in mediating the interaction with RPA-70 was located between XPA residues 153 and 176. Deletion of highly conserved motifs within this region identified two mutants that were deficient in binding RPA in vitro and highly defective in NER both in vitro and in vivo. The second domain mediating the interaction with RPA-34 was identified within the first 58 residues in XPA. Deletion of this region, however, only moderately affects the complementing activity of XPA in vivo. Finally, the XPA-RPA complex is shown to have a greater affinity for damaged DNA than XPA alone. Taken together, these results indicate that the interaction between XPA and RPA is required for NER but that only the interaction with RPA-70 is essential. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-11-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  14. Chronic Alcohol Exposure Decreases 53BP1 Protein Levels Leading to a Defective DNA Repair in Cultured Primary Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Ana M; Palanca, Ana; Ruiz-Soto, Maria; Llorca, Javier; Marín, María P; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Berciano, Maria T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption may cause neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Alcohol neurotoxicity is associated with the production of acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species that induce oxidative DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ethanol disturbs the DNA damage response (DDR), resulting in a defective DNA repair, remain unknown. Here, we have used cultured primary cortical neurons exposed to 50 or 100 mM ethanol for 7 days to analyze the ethanol-induced DDR. Ethanol exposure produced a dose-dependent generation of double strand breaks and the formation of DNA damage foci immunoreactive for the histone γH2AX, a DNA damage marker, and for the ubiquitylated H2A, which is involved in chromatin remodeling at DNA damage sites. Importantly, these DNA damage foci failed to recruit the protein 53BP1, a crucial DNA repair factor. This effect was associated with a drop in 53BP1 mRNA and protein levels and with an inhibition of global transcription. Moreover, ethanol-exposed neurons treated with ionizing radiation (2 Gy) also failed to recruit 53BP1 at DNA damage foci and exhibited a greater vulnerability to DNA lesions than irradiated control neurons. Our results support that defective DNA repair, mediated by the deficient expression and recruitment of 53BP1 to DNA damage sites, represents a novel mechanism involved in ethanol neurotoxicity. The design of therapeutic strategies that increase or stabilize 53BP1 levels might potentially promote DNA repair and partially compensate alcohol neurotoxicity.

  15. Protein Oxidation in the Lungs of C57BL/6J Mice Following X-Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshishat-Kupper, Michal; McCart, Elizabeth A.; Freedy, James G.; Tipton, Ashlee J.; Nagy, Vitaly; Kim, Sung-Yop; Landauer, Michael R.; Mueller, Gregory P.; Day, Regina M.

    2015-01-01

    Damage to normal lung tissue is a limiting factor when ionizing radiation is used in clinical applications. In addition, radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis are a major cause of mortality following accidental radiation exposure in humans. Although clinical symptoms may not develop for months after radiation exposure, immediate events induced by radiation are believed to generate molecular and cellular cascades that proceed during a clinical latent period. Oxidative damage to DNA is considered a primary cause of radiation injury to cells. DNA can be repaired by highly efficient mechanisms while repair of oxidized proteins is limited. Oxidized proteins are often destined for degradation. We examined protein oxidation following 17 Gy (0.6 Gy/min) thoracic X-irradiation in C57BL/6J mice. Seventeen Gy thoracic irradiation resulted in 100% mortality of mice within 127–189 days postirradiation. Necropsy findings indicated that pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis were the leading cause of mortality. We investigated the oxidation of lung proteins at 24 h postirradiation following 17 Gy thoracic irradiation using 2-D gel electrophoresis and OxyBlot for the detection of protein carbonylation. Seven carbonylated proteins were identified using mass spectrometry: serum albumin, selenium binding protein-1, alpha antitrypsin, cytoplasmic actin-1, carbonic anhydrase-2, peroxiredoxin-6, and apolipoprotein A1. The carbonylation status of carbonic anhydrase-2, selenium binding protein, and peroxiredoxin-6 was higher in control lung tissue. Apolipoprotein A1 and serum albumin carbonylation were increased following X-irradiation, as confirmed by OxyBlot immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Our findings indicate that the profile of specific protein oxidation in the lung is altered following radiation exposure. PMID:28248270

  16. Protein Oxidation in the Lungs of C57BL/6J Mice Following X-Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Barshishat-Kupper

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Damage to normal lung tissue is a limiting factor when ionizing radiation is used in clinical applications. In addition, radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis are a major cause of mortality following accidental radiation exposure in humans. Although clinical symptoms may not develop for months after radiation exposure, immediate events induced by radiation are believed to generate molecular and cellular cascades that proceed during a clinical latent period. Oxidative damage to DNA is considered a primary cause of radiation injury to cells. DNA can be repaired by highly efficient mechanisms while repair of oxidized proteins is limited. Oxidized proteins are often destined for degradation. We examined protein oxidation following 17 Gy (0.6 Gy/min thoracic X-irradiation in C57BL/6J mice. Seventeen Gy thoracic irradiation resulted in 100% mortality of mice within 127–189 days postirradiation. Necropsy findings indicated that pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis were the leading cause of mortality. We investigated the oxidation of lung proteins at 24 h postirradiation following 17 Gy thoracic irradiation using 2-D gel electrophoresis and OxyBlot for the detection of protein carbonylation. Seven carbonylated proteins were identified using mass spectrometry: serum albumin, selenium binding protein-1, alpha antitrypsin, cytoplasmic actin-1, carbonic anhydrase-2, peroxiredoxin-6, and apolipoprotein A1. The carbonylation status of carbonic anhydrase-2, selenium binding protein, and peroxiredoxin-6 was higher in control lung tissue. Apolipoprotein A1 and serum albumin carbonylation were increased following X-irradiation, as confirmed by OxyBlot immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Our findings indicate that the profile of specific protein oxidation in the lung is altered following radiation exposure.

  17. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2004-08-01

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level, based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker, have led to estimates that vary over three to four orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our findings show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  18. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokhansanj, B A; Wilson, III, D M

    2004-05-13

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker have led to estimates varying over 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our results show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  19. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott

    2014-01-01

    slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I...... by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional......Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial...

  20. Gel-free proteomic methodologies to study reversible cysteine oxidation and irreversible protein carbonyl formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, S; García-Santamarina, S; Hidalgo, E

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative modifications in proteins have been traditionally considered as hallmarks of damage by oxidative stress and aging. However, oxidants can generate a huge variety of reversible and irreversible modifications in amino acid side chains as well as in the protein backbones, and these post-translational modifications can contribute to the activation of signal transduction pathways, and also mediate the toxicity of oxidants. Among the reversible modifications, the most relevant ones are those arising from cysteine oxidation. Thus, formation of sulfenic acid or disulfide bonds is known to occur in many enzymes as part of their catalytic cycles, and it also participates in the activation of signaling cascades. Furthermore, these reversible modifications have been usually attributed with a protective role, since they may prevent the formation of irreversible damage by scavenging reactive oxygen species. Among irreversible modifications, protein carbonyl formation has been linked to damage and death, since it cannot be repaired and can lead to protein loss-of-function and to the formation of protein aggregates. This review is aimed at researchers interested on the biological consequences of oxidative stress, both at the level of signaling and toxicity. Here we are providing a concise overview on current mass-spectrometry-based methodologies to detect reversible cysteine oxidation and irreversible protein carbonyl formation in proteomes. We do not pretend to impose any of the different methodologies, but rather to provide an objective catwalk on published gel-free approaches to detect those two types of modifications, from a biologist's point of view.

  1. Wound repair and anti-oxidative capacity is regulated by ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi; Liu, Hui-jun; Xiang, Yang; Tan, Yu-rong; Zhu, Xiao-lin; Qin, Xiao-qun

    2010-08-01

    Integrin beta 4 (ITGB4) is a structural adhesion molecule which engages in maintaining the integrity of airway epithelial cells. Its specific cytomembrane structural feature strongly indicates that ITGB4 may engage in many signaling pathways and physiologic processes. However, in addition to adhesion, the specific biologic significance of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells is almost unknown. In this article, we investigated the expression and functional properties of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14O-cells) and primary rat tracheal epithelial cells (RTE cells) were used to determine ITGB4 expression under ozone tress or mechanical damage, respectively. An ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged asthma model was used to investigate ITGB4 expression after antigen exposure in vivo. In addition, an ITGB4 overexpression vector and ITGB4 silence virus vector were constructed and transfected into RTE cells. Then, wound repair ability and anti-oxidation capacity was evaluated. Our results demonstrated that, on the edge of mechanically wounded cell areas, ITGB4 expression was increased after mechanical injury. After ozone stress, upregulation expression of ITGB4 was also detected. In the OVA-challenged asthma model, ITGB4 expression was decreased on airway epithelial cells accompanying with structural disruption and damage of anti-oxidation capacity. Besides, our study revealed that upregulation of ITGB4 promotes wound repair ability and anti-oxidative ability, while such abilities were blocked when ITGB4 was silenced. Taken together, these results showed that ITGB4 was a new interesting molecule involved in the regulation of wound repair and anti-oxidation processes for airway epithelial cells.

  2. Protein phosphatase 5 is necessary for ATR-mediated DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yoonsung [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hyang-Min [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Hee [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Peter I. [Department of Dermatology, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, 4301 West Markham, Slot 576, Little Rock, AR 72205 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwang-Ho [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Yong [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Jae Yeoul [Department of Physiology, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); You, Ho Jin, E-mail: hjyou@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) has been shown to participate in ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)- and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related)-mediated checkpoint pathways, which plays an important role in the DNA damage response and maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} However, it is not clear exactly how PP5 participates in this process. {yields} Our results indicate that PP5 is more closely related with ATR-mediated pathway than ATM-mediated pathway in DNA damage repair. -- Abstract: Several recent studies have shown that protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) participates in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage, but its roles in DNA repair have not yet been fully characterized. We investigated the roles of PP5 in the repair of ultraviolet (UV)- and neocarzinostatin (NCS)-induced DNA damage. The results of comet assays revealed different repair patterns in UV- and NCS-exposed U2OS-PS cells. PP5 is only essential for Rad3-related (ATR)-mediated DNA repair. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, important mediators of DNA damage repair, and substrates of ATR and ATM decreased in U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation. In contrast, the cell cycle arrest proteins p53, CHK1, and CHK2 were normally phosphorylated in U2OS and U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation or treated with NCS. In view of these results, we suggest that PP5 plays a crucial role in ATR-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

  3. Localization of checkpoint and repair proteins in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2005-01-01

    of proteins, which are reorganized into a focal assembly at the lesion. Moreover, the composition of these foci is coordinated with cell cycle progression, reflecting the favoring of end-joining in the G1 phase and homologous recombination in S and G2. The assembly of proteins at sites of DNA damage...

  4. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage and repair responses: The activations of NHEJ, BER and NER via ATM-p53 signaling axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hui; Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang, E-mail: songyangwenrong@hotmail.com

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone induced oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. To promote genomic integrity, DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates cell-cycle transitions, DNA repair and apoptosis. PCB quinone-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have been documented, however, whether PCB quinone insult induce DNA repair signaling is still unknown. In this study, we identified the activation of DDR and corresponding signaling events in HepG2 cells upon the exposure to a synthetic PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ. Our data illustrated that PCB29-pQ induces the phosphorylation of p53, which was mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase. The observed phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and the elevation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicated that DDR was stimulated by PCB29-pQ treatment. Additionally, we found PCB29-pQ activates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) signalings. However, these repair pathways are not error-free processes and aberrant repair of DNA damage may cause the potential risk of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. - Highlights: • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. • The elevation of γ-H2AX and 8-OHdG indicates the activation of DNA damage response. • ATM-p53 signaling acts as the DNA damage sensor and effector. • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone activates NHEJ, BER and NER signalings.

  5. Understanding the Molecular Mechanism(s) of Formaldehyde-induced DNA-protein Crosslink Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although formaldehyde has been shown to induce many kinds of DNA damage both in in vitro and in vivo assay systems, initial DNA-protein crosslink (DPC) formation might play a major role in FA-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Several DNA repair pathways, such as base excisi...

  6. Repair of DNA Alkylation Damage by the Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AlkB as Studied by ESI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyu Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA alkylation can cause mutations, epigenetic changes, and even cell death. All living organisms have evolved enzymatic and non-enzymatic strategies for repairing such alkylation damage. AlkB, one of the Escherichia coli adaptive response proteins, uses an α-ketoglutarate/Fe(II-dependent mechanism that, by chemical oxidation, removes a variety of alkyl lesions from DNA, thus affording protection of the genome against alkylation. In an effort to understand the range of acceptable substrates for AlkB, the enzyme was incubated with chemically synthesized oligonucleotides containing alkyl lesions, and the reaction products were analyzed by electrospray ionization time-of-flight (ESI-TOF mass spectrometry. Consistent with the literature, but studied comparatively here for the first time, it was found that 1-methyladenine, 1,N 6-ethenoadenine, 3-methylcytosine, and 3-ethylcytosine were completely transformed by AlkB, while 1-methylguanine and 3-methylthymine were partially repaired. The repair intermediates (epoxide and possibly glycol of 3,N 4-ethenocytosine are reported for the first time. It is also demonstrated that O 6-methylguanine and 5-methylcytosine are refractory to AlkB, lending support to the hypothesis that AlkB repairs only alkyl lesions attached to the nitrogen atoms of the nucleobase. ESI-TOF mass spectrometry is shown to be a sensitive and efficient tool for probing the comparative substrate specificities of DNA repair proteins in vitro.

  7. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  8. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Yang, Zaixing; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  9. Hypochlorous and peracetic acid induced oxidation of dairy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkaert, Barbara; Mestdagh, Frédéric; Cucu, Tatiana; Aedo, Philip Roger; Ling, Shen Yan; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2011-02-09

    Hypochlorous and peracetic acids, both known disinfectants in the food industry, were compared for their oxidative capacity toward dairy proteins. Whey proteins and caseins were oxidized under well controlled conditions at pH 8 as a function of the sanitizing concentration. Different markers for protein oxidation were monitored. The results established that the protein carbonyl content was a rather unspecific marker for protein oxidation, which did not allow one to differentiate the oxidant used especially at the lower concentrations. Cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine were proven to be the most vulnerable amino acids for degradation upon hypochlorous and peracetic acid treatment, while tyrosine was only prone to degradation in the presence of hypochlorous acid. Hypochlorous acid induced oxidation gave rise to protein aggregation, while during peracetic acid induced oxidation, no high molecular weight aggregates were observed. Protein aggregation upon hypochlorous acid oxidation could primarily be linked to tryptophan and tyrosine degradation.

  10. The DNA repair-ubiquitin-associated HR23 proteins are constituents of neuronal inclusions in specific neurodegenerative disorders without hampering DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Steven; Severijnen, Lies-Anne; Wijgers, Nils; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Yousaf, Humaira; Kros, Johan M.; van Swieten, John; Oostra, Ben A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.; Vermeulen, Wim; Willemsen, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Intracellular inclusions play a profound role in many neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we report that HR23B and HR23A, proteins that are involved in both DNA repair and shuttling proteins to the 26S proteasome for degradation, accumulate in neuronal inclusions in brain from a mouse model for FXTAS,

  11. Iron oxide labelling of human mesenchymal stem cells in collagen hydrogels for articular cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymer, Andrea; Haddad, Daniel; Weber, Meike; Gbureck, Uwe; Jakob, Peter M; Eulert, Jochen; Nöth, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    For the development of new therapeutical cell-based strategies for articular cartilage repair, a reliable cell monitoring technique is required to track the cells in vivo non-invasively and repeatedly. We present a systematic and detailed study on the performance and biological impact of a simple and efficient labelling protocol for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Commercially available very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOPs) were used as magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Iron uptake via endocytosis was confirmed histologically with prussian blue staining and quantified by mass spectrometry. Compared with unlabelled cells, VSOP-labelling did neither influence the viability nor the proliferation potential of hMSCs. Furthermore, iron incorporation did not affect hMSCs in undergoing adipogenic, osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation, as demonstrated histologically and by gene expression analyses. The efficiency of the labelling protocol was assessed with high-resolution MR imaging at 11.7T. VSOP-labelled hMSCs were visualised in a collagen type I hydrogel, which is in clinical use for matrix-based articular cartilage repair. The presence of VSOP-labelled hMSCs was indicated by distinct hypointense spots in the MR images, as a result of iron specific loss of signal intensity. In summary, this labelling technique has great potential to visualise hMSCs and track their migration after transplantation for articular cartilage repair with MR imaging.

  12. The green microalga Tetraselmis suecica reduces oxidative stress and induces repairing mechanisms in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Clementina; Galasso, Christian; Orefice, Ida; Nuzzo, Genoveffa; Luongo, Elvira; Cutignano, Adele; Romano, Giovanna; Brunet, Christophe; Fontana, Angelo; Esposito, Francesco; Ianora, Adrianna

    2017-01-01

    Green microalgae contain many active pigments such as carotenoids having antioxidant and protective activity on human cells. Here we investigate the biological activity of an ethanol/water extract of the marine green microalga Tetraselmis suecica containing high levels of carotenoids such as the xanthophylls lutein, violaxanthin, neoxanthin, antheraxanthin and loroxanthin esters. This extract has a strong antioxidant and repairing activity in the human lung cancer cell line (A549) as shown by the increased expression of dehydrocholesterol reductase-24 (DHCR24) and prostaglandin reductase 1 (PTGR1) genes and proteins. The extract also reduces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in cells damaged by H2O2 and has tissue repairing effects on reconstructed human epidermal tissue cells (EpiDermTM) indicating a potential cosmeceutical activity of this microalgal species. PMID:28117410

  13. The green microalga Tetraselmis suecica reduces oxidative stress and induces repairing mechanisms in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Clementina; Galasso, Christian; Orefice, Ida; Nuzzo, Genoveffa; Luongo, Elvira; Cutignano, Adele; Romano, Giovanna; Brunet, Christophe; Fontana, Angelo; Esposito, Francesco; Ianora, Adrianna

    2017-01-24

    Green microalgae contain many active pigments such as carotenoids having antioxidant and protective activity on human cells. Here we investigate the biological activity of an ethanol/water extract of the marine green microalga Tetraselmis suecica containing high levels of carotenoids such as the xanthophylls lutein, violaxanthin, neoxanthin, antheraxanthin and loroxanthin esters. This extract has a strong antioxidant and repairing activity in the human lung cancer cell line (A549) as shown by the increased expression of dehydrocholesterol reductase-24 (DHCR24) and prostaglandin reductase 1 (PTGR1) genes and proteins. The extract also reduces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in cells damaged by H2O2 and has tissue repairing effects on reconstructed human epidermal tissue cells (EpiDerm(TM)) indicating a potential cosmeceutical activity of this microalgal species.

  14. New insights in the removal of the hydantoins, oxidation product of pyrimidines, via the base excision and nucleotide incision repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Couve, Sophie; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Gasparutto, Didier; Saparbaev, Murat

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA, if not repaired, can be both miscoding and blocking. These genetic alterations can lead to mutations and/or cell death, which in turn cause cancer and aging. Oxidized DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: base excision (BER) and nucleotide incision repair (NIR). Hydantoin derivatives such as 5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-Hyd) and 5-methyl-5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-5Me-Hyd), major products of cytosine and thymine oxidative degradation pathways, respectively, have been detected in cancer cells and ancient DNA. Hydantoins are blocking lesions for DNA polymerases and excised by bacterial and yeast DNA glycosylases in the BER pathway. However little is known about repair of pyrimidine-derived hydantoins in human cells. Here, using both denaturing PAGE and MALDI-TOF MS analyses we report that the bacterial, yeast and human AP endonucleases can incise duplex DNA 5' next to 5OH-Hyd and 5OH-5Me-Hyd thus initiating the NIR pathway. We have fully reconstituted the NIR pathway for these lesions in vitro using purified human proteins. Depletion of Nfo in E. coli and APE1 in HeLa cells abolishes the NIR activity in cell-free extracts. Importantly, a number of redundant DNA glycosylase activities can excise hydantoin residues, including human NTH1, NEIL1 and NEIL2 and the former protein being a major DNA glycosylase activity in HeLa cells extracts. This study demonstrates that both BER and NIR pathways can compete and/or back-up each other to remove hydantoin DNA lesions in vivo.

  15. New insights in the removal of the hydantoins, oxidation product of pyrimidines, via the base excision and nucleotide incision repair pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modesto Redrejo-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative damage to DNA, if not repaired, can be both miscoding and blocking. These genetic alterations can lead to mutations and/or cell death, which in turn cause cancer and aging. Oxidized DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: base excision (BER and nucleotide incision repair (NIR. Hydantoin derivatives such as 5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-Hyd and 5-methyl-5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-5Me-Hyd, major products of cytosine and thymine oxidative degradation pathways, respectively, have been detected in cancer cells and ancient DNA. Hydantoins are blocking lesions for DNA polymerases and excised by bacterial and yeast DNA glycosylases in the BER pathway. However little is known about repair of pyrimidine-derived hydantoins in human cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, using both denaturing PAGE and MALDI-TOF MS analyses we report that the bacterial, yeast and human AP endonucleases can incise duplex DNA 5' next to 5OH-Hyd and 5OH-5Me-Hyd thus initiating the NIR pathway. We have fully reconstituted the NIR pathway for these lesions in vitro using purified human proteins. Depletion of Nfo in E. coli and APE1 in HeLa cells abolishes the NIR activity in cell-free extracts. Importantly, a number of redundant DNA glycosylase activities can excise hydantoin residues, including human NTH1, NEIL1 and NEIL2 and the former protein being a major DNA glycosylase activity in HeLa cells extracts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that both BER and NIR pathways can compete and/or back-up each other to remove hydantoin DNA lesions in vivo.

  16. The Polycomb Group Protein EZH2 Impairs DNA Repair in Breast Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zeidler

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The Polycomb group protein EZH2 is a transcriptional repressor involved in controlling cellular memory and has been linked to aggressive and metastatic breast cancer. Here we report that EZH2 decreased the expression of five RAD51 paralog proteins involved in homologous recombination (HR repair of DNA doublestrand breaks (RAD51B/RAD51L1, RAD51C/RAD51L2, RAD51D/RAD51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3, but did not affect the levels of DMC1, a gene that only functions in meiosis. EZH2 overexpression impaired the formation of RAD51 repair foci at sites of DNA breaks. Overexpression of EZH2 resulted in decreased cell survival and clonogenic capacity following DNA damage induced independently by etoposide and ionizing radiation. We suggest that EZH2 may contribute to breast tumorigenesis by specific downregulation of RAD51-like proteins and by impairment of HR repair. We provide mechanistic insights into the function of EZH2 in mammalian cells and uncover a link between EZH2, a regulator of homeotic gene expression, and HR DNA repair. Our study paves the way for exploring the blockade of EZH2 overexpression as a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  17. Protein expression of DNA damage repair proteins dictates response to topoisomerase and PARP inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Boerner

    Full Text Available Patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC have a poor prognosis. New approaches for the treatment of TNBC are needed to improve patient survival. The concept of synthetic lethality, brought about by inactivating complementary DNA repair pathways, has been proposed as a promising therapeutic option for these tumors. The TNBC tumor type has been associated with BRCA mutations, and inhibitors of Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, a family of proteins that facilitates DNA repair, have been shown to effectively kill BRCA defective tumors by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to a loss of cell viability and clonogenic survival. Here we present preclinical efficacy results of combining the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888, with CPT-11, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. CPT-11 binds to topoisomerase I at the replication fork, creating a bulky adduct that is recognized as damaged DNA. When DNA damage was stimulated with CPT-11, protein expression of the nucleotide excision repair enzyme ERCC1 inversely correlated with cell viability, but not clonogenic survival. However, 4 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by cell viability and 5 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by clonogenic survival to the combination of ABT-888 and CPT-11. In vivo, the BRCA mutant cell line MX-1 treated with CPT-11 alone demonstrated significant decreased tumor growth; this decrease was enhanced further with the addition of ABT-888. Decrease in tumor growth correlated with an increase in double strand DNA breaks as measured by γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, inhibiting two arms of the DNA repair pathway simultaneously in TNBC cell lines, independent of BRCA mutation status, resulted in un-repairable DNA damage and subsequent cell death.

  18. Choreography of the DNA damage response: spatiotemporal relationships among checkpoint and repair proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisby, Michael; Barlow, Jacqueline H; Burgess, Rebecca C; Rothstein, Rodney

    2004-09-17

    DNA repair is an essential process for preserving genome integrity in all organisms. In eukaryotes, recombinational repair is choreographed by multiprotein complexes that are organized into centers (foci). Here, we analyze the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and replication stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mre11 nuclease and the ATM-related Tel1 kinase are the first proteins detected at DSBs. Next, the Rfa1 single-strand DNA binding protein relocalizes to the break and recruits other key checkpoint proteins. Later and only in S and G2 phase, the homologous recombination machinery assembles at the site. Unlike the response to DSBs, Mre11 and recombination proteins are not recruited to hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks unless the forks collapse. The cellular response to DSBs and DNA replication stress is likely directed by the Mre11 complex detecting and processing DNA ends in conjunction with Sae2 and by RP-A recognizing single-stranded DNA and recruiting additional checkpoint and repair proteins.

  19. ROLE OF MISMATCH REPAIR PROTEINS IN THE PROCESSING OF CISPLATIN INTERSTRAND CROSS-LINKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Akshada; Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Zhitkovich, Anatoly; Sobol, Robert W.; Patrick, Steve M.

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency gives rise to cisplatin resistance and can lead to poor prognosis in cancers. Various models have been proposed to explain this low level of resistance caused due to loss of MMR proteins. We have shown that MMR proteins are required to maintain cisplatin interstrand cross-links (ICLs) on the DNA leading to increased cellular sensitivity. In our previous studies, we have shown that BER processing of the cisplatin ICLs is mutagenic. Polymerase β (Polβ) can generate mismatches which leads to the activation and the recruitment of mismatch repair proteins. In this paper, we distinguished between the requirement of different downstream MMR proteins for maintaining cisplatin sensitivity. We show that the MutSα (MSH2-MSH6) heterocomplex is required to maintain cisplatin sensitivity, whereas the Mutsβ complex has no effect. These results can be correlated with the increased repair of cisplatin ICLs and ICL induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in the resistant cells. Moreover, we show that MLH1 proficient cells displayed a cisplatin sensitive phenotype when compared with the MLH1 deficient cells and the ATPase activity of MLH1 is essential to mediate this effect. Based on these results, we propose that MutSα as well as the downstream MMR pathway proteins are essential to maintain a cisplatin sensitive phenotype as a consequence of processing Polβ induced mismatches at sites flanking cisplatin ICLs. PMID:26519826

  20. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  1. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in skeletal muscle of humans exposed to high-altitude hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Pilegaard, Henriette; van Hall, Gerrit

    2003-01-01

    ) was unaltered by prolonged hypoxia, in accordance with the notion that HO-1 is an acute stress response protein. In conclusion, our data indicate high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a good model for oxidative stress and that antioxidant genes are not upregulated in muscle tissue by prolonged hypoxia despite......Recent research suggests that high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a model for prolonged oxidative stress in healthy humans. In this study, we investigated the consequences of prolonged high-altitude hypoxia on the basal level of oxidative damage to nuclear DNA in muscle cells, a major oxygen...

  2. Oxidative stress, free radicals and protein peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    Primary free radicals generated under oxidative stress in cells and tissues produce a cascade of reactive secondary radicals, which attack biomolecules with efficiency determined by the reaction rate constants and target concentration. Proteins are prominent targets because they constitute the bulk of the organic content of cells and tissues and react readily with many of the secondary radicals. The reactions commonly lead to the formation of carbon-centered radicals, which generally convert in vivo to peroxyl radicals and finally to semistable hydroperoxides. All of these intermediates can initiate biological damage. This article outlines the advantages of the application of ionizing radiations to studies of radicals, with particular reference to the generation of desired radicals, studies of the kinetics of their reactions and correlating the results with events in biological systems. In one such application, formation of protein hydroperoxides in irradiated cells was inhibited by the intracellular ascorbate and glutathione.

  3. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  4. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80-95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure which is uncoupled from its essential function in DSB repair. This could have implications for the development of therapeutic strategies aiming to radiosensitize tumors by affecting the DNA-PKcs function.

  5. The Slx5-Slx8 complex affects sumoylation of DNA repair proteins and negatively regulates recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Rahman, Sadia; Lisby, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Recombination is important for repairing DNA lesions, yet it can also lead to genomic rearrangements. This process must be regulated, and recently, sumoylation-mediated mechanisms were found to inhibit Rad51-dependent recombination. Here, we report that the absence of the Slx5-Slx8 complex, a newly...... identified player in the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) pathway, led to increased Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent recombination. The increases were most striking during S phase, suggesting an accumulation of DNA lesions during replication. Consistent with this view, Slx8 protein localized...... propose that, during replication, the Slx5-Slx8 complex helps prevent DNA lesions that are acted upon by recombination. In addition, the complex inhibits Rad51-independent recombination via modulating the sumoylation of DNA repair proteins....

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection and expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vahid Mirzaee; Mahsa Molaei; Hamid Mohaghegh Shalmani; Mohammad Reza Zali

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To determine the expression of DNA (MMR)proteins,including hMLH1 and hMSH2,in gastric epithelial cells in the patients with or without Hellcobacter pylori(H pylori)-infected gastritis.METHODS:Fifty H pylori-positive patients and 50 H pylori-negative patients were enrolled in the study.During endoscopy of patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia,two antral and two corpus biopsies were taken for histological examination (Giemsa stain)and for immunohistochemical staining of hMLH1 and hMSH2.RESULTS:The percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMLH1 staining was 84.14±7.32% in Hpylori-negative patients,while it was 73.34±10.10% in Hpylori-positive patients (P <0.0001).No significant difference was seen between the two groups regarding the percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMSH2 staining (81.16±8.32% in H pylori-negative versus 78.24±8.71% in Hpylori-positive patients,P=0.09).CONCLUSION:This study indicates that H pylori might promote development of gastric carcinoma at least in part through its ability to affect the DNA MMR system.

  7. Dietary protein oxidation: A silent threat to human health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, M; Luna, C

    2017-11-22

    Protein oxidation has become a topic of great scientific interest in the field of food science and nutrition. Food proteins are known to be preferential targets of radical species, and protein oxidation has relevant consequences on protein functionality and food quality. Current trends in this field call attention to the nutritional and health dimensions of oxidized foods. Both lipid and protein oxidation products are accumulated in food during processing and storage and also upon food intake during the subsequent digestion phases. The gastrointestinal tract and internal organs are exposed to the cytotoxic and mutagenic potential of these species. While the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of particular dietary lipid oxidation products is well known, the impact of dietary oxidized proteins on human health has been largely ignored. The well-established association between in vivo protein oxidation and aging and age-related diseases urges scientists to investigate the contribution of dietary protein oxidation to particular pathological conditions. Recent reports indicate the involvement of dietary protein oxidation species on particular health disorders, which emphasizes the link between dietary and in vivo protein oxidation.

  8. Cockayne syndrome group B protein stimulates repair of formamidopyrimidines by NEIL1 DNA glycosylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Dogan, Arin

    2009-01-01

    on the role of CSB in repair of oxidatively induced DNA lesions have focused on 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine. This study examines the role of CSB in the repair of formamidopyrimidines 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua) and 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyAde), which are substrates...... for endonuclease VIII-like (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase. Results presented here show that csb(-/-) mice have a higher level of endogenous FapyAde and FapyGua in DNA from brain and kidney than wild type mice as well as higher levels of endogenous FapyAde in genomic DNA and mtDNA from liver. In addition, CSB stimulates...... of formamidopyrimidines, possibly by interacting with and stimulating NEIL1, and that accumulation of such modifications may have a causal role in the pathogenesis of CS....

  9. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M.; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53−/− mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  10. Mutagenicity of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline in colon and liver of Big Blue rats: role of DNA adducts, strand breaks, DNA repair and oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Wallin, H.; Vogel, U.

    2002-01-01

    , indicating a higher rate of protein oxidation in the liver following IQ administration. In plasma and erythrocytes there were unaltered levels of oxidized protein, malondialdehyde, and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, glutathione reductase) indicating....... Investigations of oxidative stress biomarkers produced inconclusive results. Oxidative DNA damage detected by the endonuclease III enzyme and 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine in colon, liver and/or urine was unaltered by IQ. However, there was increased level of gamma-glutamyl semialdehyde in liver proteins......The contribution of oxidative stress, different types of DNA damage and expression of DNA repair enzymes in colon and liver mutagenesis induced by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) was investigated in four groups of six Big Blue rats fed diets with 0, 20, 70, and 200 mg IQ/kg for 3...

  11. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie, E-mail: ann-sofie.gustafsson@bms.uu.se; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We reduced the level of DNA-PKcs with siRNA and examined cells after γ-irradiation. • Low DNA-PKcs levels lead to radiosensitivity but did not affect repair of DSB. • Low DNA-PKcs levels may block progression of mitosis. • DNA-PKcs role in mitotic progression is independent of its role in DSB repair. • We suggest different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs function sensitize cells. - Abstract: Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80–95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure

  12. Tai chi improves oxidative stress response and DNA damage/repair in young sedentary females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xing-Yu; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Silsirivanit, Atit; Nakmareong, Saowanee; Wu, Xiu-Hua

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of Tai Chi (TC) exercise on antioxidant capacity, and DNA damage/repair in young females who did not perform regular physical exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Ten female students from a Chinese university voluntarily participated in this program. All of them practiced the 24-form simplified Tai Chi, 5 times weekly, for 12 weeks. Plasma levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), hydroxyl radical inhibiting capacity (OH·-IC), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) were measured at 0, 8, and 12 weeks. Heart rate (HR) was monitored during the last set of the training session at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. [Results] Plasma SOD and OH·-IC levels were increased at 8 and 12 weeks compared to the baseline (0 weeks). Gpx and GSH levels did not change significantly throughout the study period. The plasma MDA level was decreased significantly at 8 weeks but not at 12 weeks compared to the baseline value. While the plasma 8-OHdG level did not change throughout the study period, the plasma OGG1 level was significantly increased at 8 and 12 weeks compared to the baseline value. [Conclusion] TC practice for 12 weeks efficiently improved the oxidative stress response in young females who did not perform regular physical exercise. The TC exercise also increased the DNA repairing capacity.

  13. The potential of nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide membranes to influence skin wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Leigh G; Giles, Natalie L; Adcroft, Katharine F; Fear, Mark W; Wood, Fiona M; Poinern, Gerard E

    2009-12-01

    Cells respond to changes in the environment by altering their phenotype. The ability to influence cell behavior by modifying their environment provides an opportunity for therapeutic application, for example, to promote faster wound healing in response to skin injury. Here, we have modified the preparation of an aluminium oxide template to generate large uniform membranes with differing nano-pore sizes. Epidermal cells (keratinocytes) and dermal cells (fibroblasts) readily adhere to these nanoporous membranes. The pore size appears to influence the rate of cell proliferation and migration, important aspects of cell behavior during wound healing. The suitability of the membrane to act as a dressing after a burn injury was assessed in vivo; application of the membrane demonstrated adherence and conformability to the skin surface of a pig, with no observed degradation or detrimental effect on the repair. Our results suggest that keratinocytes are sensitive to changes in topography at the nanoscale level and that this property may be exploited to improve wound repair after tissue injury.

  14. Sumoylation influences DNA break repair partly by increasing the solubility of a conserved end resection protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha Sarangi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein modifications regulate both DNA repair levels and pathway choice. How each modification achieves regulatory effects and how different modifications collaborate with each other are important questions to be answered. Here, we show that sumoylation regulates double-strand break repair partly by modifying the end resection factor Sae2. This modification is conserved from yeast to humans, and is induced by DNA damage. We mapped the sumoylation site of Sae2 to a single lysine in its self-association domain. Abolishing Sae2 sumoylation by mutating this lysine to arginine impaired Sae2 function in the processing and repair of multiple types of DNA breaks. We found that Sae2 sumoylation occurs independently of its phosphorylation, and the two modifications act in synergy to increase soluble forms of Sae2. We also provide evidence that sumoylation of the Sae2-binding nuclease, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, further increases end resection. These findings reveal a novel role for sumoylation in DNA repair by regulating the solubility of an end resection factor. They also show that collaboration between different modifications and among multiple substrates leads to a stronger biological effect.

  15. Sumoylation Influences DNA Break Repair Partly by Increasing the Solubility of a Conserved End Resection Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Prabha; Steinacher, Roland; Altmannova, Veronika; Fu, Qiong; Paull, Tanya T.; Krejci, Lumir; Whitby, Matthew C.; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Protein modifications regulate both DNA repair levels and pathway choice. How each modification achieves regulatory effects and how different modifications collaborate with each other are important questions to be answered. Here, we show that sumoylation regulates double-strand break repair partly by modifying the end resection factor Sae2. This modification is conserved from yeast to humans, and is induced by DNA damage. We mapped the sumoylation site of Sae2 to a single lysine in its self-association domain. Abolishing Sae2 sumoylation by mutating this lysine to arginine impaired Sae2 function in the processing and repair of multiple types of DNA breaks. We found that Sae2 sumoylation occurs independently of its phosphorylation, and the two modifications act in synergy to increase soluble forms of Sae2. We also provide evidence that sumoylation of the Sae2-binding nuclease, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, further increases end resection. These findings reveal a novel role for sumoylation in DNA repair by regulating the solubility of an end resection factor. They also show that collaboration between different modifications and among multiple substrates leads to a stronger biological effect. PMID:25569253

  16. No effect of 600 grams fruit and vegetables per day on oxidative DNA damage and repair in healthy nonsmokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Pedersen, A.;

    2003-01-01

    In several epidemiological studies, high intakes of fruits and vegetables have been associated with a lower incidence of cancer. Theoretically, intake of antioxidants by consumption of fruits and vegetables should protect against reactive oxygen species and decrease the formation of oxidative DNA......-oxo-2'-deoxyguanine was measured in urine. The expressions of oxoguanine glycosylase I and excision repair cross complementing I DNA repair genes, determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR of mRNAs, were investigated in leukocytes. Consumption of fruits and vegetables or vitamins and minerals...... had no effect on oxidative DNA damage measured in mononuclear cell DNA or urine. Hydrogen peroxide sensitivity, detected by the comet assay, did not differ between the groups. Expression of excision repair cross complementing I and oxoguanine glycosylase I in leukocytes was not related to the diet...

  17. Reversing and Repairing Microstructure Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    The elevated operating temperature of solid oxide electrochemical cells (SOCs) can lead to long-term degradation of cell components due to instability of materials and microstructures. However, this unique possibility for microstructural changes to occur can also be advantageously exploited...... to counteract performance loss, by careful control of operating parameters and cell design. This paper describes four recently discovered methods of in situ reversal or repair of microstructure degradation: (1) The newest method is the elimination of severe electrolysis-induced degradation at high current...... density by reversible battery-like operation, cycling between electrolysis mode and fuel-cell mode. Also reported are new examples of beneficial effects of (2) redox cycling, (3) exsolution of nano-catalysts, and (4) high cathodic polarization, all of which can be used to maintain or even improve...

  18. Expression of domains for protein-protein interaction of nucleotide excision repair proteins modifies cancer cell sensitivity to platinum derivatives and genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordheim, Lars Petter; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Matera, Eva-Laure; Bouledrak, Karima; Dumontet, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is involved in the repair of DNA damage caused by platinum derivatives and has been shown to decrease the cytotoxic activity of these drugs. Because protein-protein interactions are essential for NER activity, we transfected human cancer cell lines (A549 and HCT116) with plasmids coding the amino acid sequences corresponding to the interacting domains between excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA), as well as ERCC1 and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group F (XPF), all NER proteins. Using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and annexin V staining, we showed that transfected A549 cells were sensitized 1.2-2.2-fold to carboplatin and that transfected HCT116 cells were sensitized 1.4-5.4-fold to oxaliplatin in vitro. In addition, transfected cells exhibited modified in vivo sensitivity to the same drugs. Finally, in particular cell models of the interaction between ERCC1 and XPF, DNA repair was decreased, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of the histone 2AX after exposure to mitomycin C, and genomic instability was increased, as determined by comparative genomic hybridization studies. The results indicate that the interacting peptides act as dominant negatives and decrease NER activity through inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  19. Oxidation of Proteins in Plants-Mechanisms and Consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweetlove, Lee J; Møller, Ian M

    2009-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in plant cells can lead to a variety of modifications of proteins through oxidation of amino acid side groups. The widespread occurrence of such modifications is becoming appreciated as new proteomic approaches allow their systematic...... or postponing oxidation of residues more important for the function of the protein.......The production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in plant cells can lead to a variety of modifications of proteins through oxidation of amino acid side groups. The widespread occurrence of such modifications is becoming appreciated as new proteomic approaches allow their systematic...... of modified proteins by affinity purification. Although there are several technical caveats with such approaches, they have been useful in documenting the extent of oxidative modification of proteins and have highlighted a number of proteins where oxidative modification is critical for protein function...

  20. Photo-oxidation of proteins and its role in cataractogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Truscott, R J

    2001-01-01

    Proteins comprise approximately 68% of the dry weight of cells and tissues and are therefore potentially major targets for photo-oxidation. Two major types of processes can occur with proteins. The first of these involves direct photo-oxidation arising from the absorption of UV radiation by the p......Proteins comprise approximately 68% of the dry weight of cells and tissues and are therefore potentially major targets for photo-oxidation. Two major types of processes can occur with proteins. The first of these involves direct photo-oxidation arising from the absorption of UV radiation...

  1. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene inhibit catalase activity and induce expression of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher H; Catallo, W James; Wilson, Vincent L; Mitchell, James B

    2009-10-01

    1,3-Butadiene, an important petrochemical, is commonly burned off when excess amounts need to be destroyed. This combustion process produces butadiene soot (BDS), which is composed of a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates ranging in size from DNA damage in NHBE cells. Thus, our aims were to determine the effect of butadiene soot ethanol extract (BSEE) on both enzyme activity and the expression of proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Catalase was found to be sensitive to BDS as catalase activity was potently diminished in the presence of BSEE. Using Western analysis, both the alpha isoform of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (alpha-hOGG1) and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) were shown to be significantly overexpressed as compared to untreated controls after exposure of NHBE cells to BSEE. Our results indicate that BSEE is capable of effectively inactivating the antioxidant enzyme catalase, presumably via oxidation of protein amino acids. The presence of oxidized biomolecules may partially explain the extranuclear fluorescence that is detected when NHBE cells are treated with an organic extract of BDS. Overexpression of both alpha-hOGG1 and APE-1 proteins following treatment of NHBE cells with BSEE suggests that this mixture causes oxidative DNA damage.

  2. Brain protein oxidation in age-related neurodegenerative disorders that are associated with aggregated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D A; Kanski, J

    2001-07-15

    Protein oxidation, one of a number of brain biomarkers of oxidative stress, is increased in several age-related neurodegenerative disorders or animal models thereof, including Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, prion disorders, such as Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, and alpha-synuclein disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia. Each of these neurodegenerative disorders is associated with aggregated proteins in brain. However, the relationship among protein oxidation, protein aggregation, and neurodegeneration remain unclear. The current rapid progress in elucidation of mechanisms of protein oxidation in neuronal loss should provide further insight into the importance of free radical oxidative stress in these neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla; Daneshvar, Bahram; Autrup, Herman;

    2003-01-01

    was observed. Intake of lard fat resulted in increased ascorbate synthesis and affected markers of oxidative damage to proteins in liver cytosol, but not in plasma. The effect was observed at all lard doses and was not dose-dependent. However, no evidence of increased oxidative DNA damage was found in liver...... supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver....... The DNA-adduct level measured by 32P-postlabelling decreased in both liver and colon with increased fat intake. In liver, this was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the mRNA level of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC1. In colon, a non-statistically significant increase in the ERCC1 mRNA levels...

  4. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Danesvar, B.; Autrup, H.;

    2003-01-01

    was observed. Intake of lard fat resulted in increased ascorbate synthesis and affected markers of oxidative damage to proteins in liver cytosol, but not in plasma. The effect was observed at all lard doses and was not dose-dependent. However, no evidence of increased oxidative DNA damage was found in liver...... supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver....... The DNA-adduct level measured by P-32-postlabelling decreased in both liver and colon with increased fat intake. In liver, this was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the mRNA level of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC1. In colon, a non-statistically significant increase in the ERCC1 mRNA levels...

  5. Antioxidant and DNA Repair Stimulating Effect of Extracts from Transformed and Normal Roots of Rhaponticum carthamoides against Induced Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in CHO Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skała, Ewa; Sitarek, Przemysław; Różalski, Marek; Krajewska, Urszula; Szemraj, Janusz; Wysokińska, Halina; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Rhaponticum carthamoides has a long tradition of use in Siberian folk medicine. The roots and rhizomes of this species are used in various dietary supplements or nutraceutical preparations to increase energy level or eliminate physical weakness. This is the first report to reveal the protective and DNA repair stimulating abilities of R. carthamoides root extracts in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to an oxidative agent. Both transformed root extract (TR extract) and extract of soil-grown plant roots (NR extract) may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, but CHO cells stimulated with extract from the transformed roots demonstrated significantly stronger properties than cells treated with the soil-grown plant root extract. These differences in biological activity may be attributed to the differences in the content of phenolic compounds in these root extracts. Preincubation of the CHO cells with TR and NR extracts showed an increase in gene expression and protein levels of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2). R. carthamoides may possess antioxidant properties that protect CHO cells against oxidative stress. PMID:27034736

  6. Antioxidant and DNA Repair Stimulating Effect of Extracts from Transformed and Normal Roots of Rhaponticum carthamoides against Induced Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in CHO Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Skała

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhaponticum carthamoides has a long tradition of use in Siberian folk medicine. The roots and rhizomes of this species are used in various dietary supplements or nutraceutical preparations to increase energy level or eliminate physical weakness. This is the first report to reveal the protective and DNA repair stimulating abilities of R. carthamoides root extracts in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells exposed to an oxidative agent. Both transformed root extract (TR extract and extract of soil-grown plant roots (NR extract may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, but CHO cells stimulated with extract from the transformed roots demonstrated significantly stronger properties than cells treated with the soil-grown plant root extract. These differences in biological activity may be attributed to the differences in the content of phenolic compounds in these root extracts. Preincubation of the CHO cells with TR and NR extracts showed an increase in gene expression and protein levels of catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD2. R. carthamoides may possess antioxidant properties that protect CHO cells against oxidative stress.

  7. REGULATION OF MUSCLE GLYCOGEN REPLETION, MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS AND REPAIR FOLLOWING EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Ivy

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Recovery from prolonged strenuous exercise requires that depleted fuel stores be replenished, that damaged tissue be repaired and that training adaptations be initiated. Critical to these processes are the type, amount and timing of nutrient intake. Muscle glycogen is an essential fuel for intense exercise, whether the exercise is of an aerobic or anaerobic nature. Glycogen synthesis is a relatively slow process, and therefore the restoration of muscle glycogen requires special considerations when there is limited time between training sessions or competition. To maximize the rate of muscle glycogen synthesis it is important to consume a carbohydrate supplement immediately post exercise, to continue to supplement at frequent intervals and to consume approximately 1.2 g carbohydrate·kg-1 body wt·h-1. Maximizing glycogen synthesis with less frequent supplementation and less carbohydrate can be achieved with the addition of protein to the carbohydrate supplement. This will also promote protein synthesis and reduce protein degradation, thus having the added benefit of stimulating muscle tissue repair and adaptation. Moreover, recent research suggests that consuming a carbohydrate/protein supplement post exercise will have a more positive influence on subsequent exercise performance than a carbohydrate supplement.

  8. Alternative mechanisms of telomere lengthening: Permissive mutations, DNA repair proteins and tumorigenic progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocha, April Renee Sandy; Harris, Julia [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Groden, Joanna, E-mail: joanna.groden@osumc.edu [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Neoplastic cells maintain telomeres by telomerase or ALT. ► Genetic mutations in p53, ATRX, DAXX or H3F3A may activate ALT. ► Many DNA repair proteins are involved in ALT. ► Tumor progression is favored by telomerase expression. - Abstract: Telomeres protect chromosome termini to maintain genomic stability and regulate cellular lifespan. Maintenance of telomere length is required for neoplastic cells after the acquisition of mutations that deregulate cell cycle control and increase cellular proliferation, and can occur through expression of the enzyme telomerase or in a telomerase-independent manner termed alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). The precise mechanisms that govern the activation of ALT or telomerase in tumor cells are unknown, although cellular origin may favor one or the other mechanisms. ALT pathways are incompletely understood to date; however, recent publications have increasingly broadened our understanding of how ALT is activated, how it proceeds, and how it influences tumor growth. Specific mutational events influence ALT activation, as mutations in genes that suppress recombination and/or alterations in the regulation of telomerase expression are associated with ALT. Once engaged, ALT uses DNA repair proteins to maintain telomeres in the absence of telomerase; experiments that manipulate the expression of specific proteins in cells using ALT are illuminating some of its mechanisms. Furthermore, ALT may influence tumor growth, as experimental and clinical data suggest that telomerase expression may favor tumor progression. This review summarizes recent findings in mammalian cells and models, as well as clinical data, that identify the genetic mutations permissive to ALT, the DNA repair proteins involved in ALT mechanisms and the importance of telomere maintenance mechanisms for tumor progression. A comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms that permit tumor cell immortalization will be important for identifying

  9. Partial loss of the DNA repair scaffolding protein, Xrcc1, results in increased brain damage and reduced recovery from ischemic stroke in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Canugovi, Chandrika; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Wilson, David M; Croteau, Deborah L; Mattson, Mark P; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair (BER). Previously, our laboratory showed that mice lacking the BER glycosylases 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) or nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (Neil1) recover more poorly from focal ischemic stroke than wild-type mice. Here, a mouse model was used to investigate whether loss of 1 of the 2 alleles of X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (Xrcc1), which encodes a nonenzymatic scaffold protein required for BER, alters recovery from stroke. Ischemia and reperfusion caused higher brain damage and lower functional recovery in Xrcc1(+/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Additionally, a greater percentage of Xrcc1(+/-) mice died as a result of the stroke. Brain samples from human individuals who died of stroke and individuals who died of non-neurological causes were assayed for various steps of BER. Significant losses of thymine glycol incision, abasic endonuclease incision, and single nucleotide incorporation activities were identified, as well as lower expression of XRCC1 and NEIL1 proteins in stroke brains compared with controls. Together, these results suggest that impaired BER is a risk factor in ischemic brain injury and contributes to its recovery.

  10. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Desler, Claus; Hickson, Ian D; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription and generate mutations. We carried out BER analysis in highly purified mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines U2OS and HeLa, and mouse brain using a circular DNA substrate containing a lesion at a specific position. We found that DNA ligation is significantly slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy.

  11. Hippocampal Adult Neurogenesis Is Maintained by Neil3-Dependent Repair of Oxidative DNA Lesions in Neural Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Elisabeth Regnell

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage has been proposed as a potential cause of age-related cognitive decline. The major pathway for removal of oxidative DNA base lesions is base excision repair, which is initiated by DNA glycosylases. In mice, Neil3 is the main DNA glycosylase for repair of hydantoin lesions in single-stranded DNA of neural stem/progenitor cells, promoting neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis is crucial for maintenance of hippocampus-dependent functions involved in behavior. Herein, behavioral studies reveal learning and memory deficits and reduced anxiety-like behavior in Neil3−/− mice. Neural stem/progenitor cells from aged Neil3−/− mice show impaired proliferative capacity and reduced DNA repair activity. Furthermore, hippocampal neurons in Neil3−/− mice display synaptic irregularities. It appears that Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA damage in neural stem/progenitor cells is required for maintenance of adult neurogenesis to counteract the age-associated deterioration of cognitive performance.

  12. Modulation of wound healing and scar formation by MG53 protein-mediated cell membrane repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-10-02

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53(-/-) mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Protein carbonylation and metal-catalyzed protein oxidation in a cellular perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rao, R S P

    2011-01-01

    Proteins can become oxidatively modified in many different ways, either by direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and protein backbone or indirectly by conjugation with oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates. While reversible oxidative modifications are thought...... to be relevant in physiological processes, irreversible oxidative modifications are known to contribute to cellular damage and disease. The most well-studied irreversible protein oxidation is carbonylation. In this work we first examine how protein carbonylation occurs via metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) in vivo...... and in vitro with an emphasis on cellular metal ion homeostasis and metal binding. We then review proteomic methods currently used for identifying carbonylated proteins and their sites of modification. Finally, we discuss the identified carbonylated proteins and the pattern of carbonylation sites in relation...

  14. Comparative experiment of four different materials as carriers of Bone morphogenetic protein to repair long bone defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Kuan-hai; PEI Guo-xian; YANG Run-gong

    2001-01-01

    @@ OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of four different materials as carriers of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) to repair long bone defect. METHODS 12 mm radius bone defects were made. They were divided into 4 groups in random and repaired respectively with the vascular muscle flap combined with FS/BMP (group A), vascular muscle flap/BMP (group B), bloodless muscle flap/BMP (group C) and autolyzed antigen-extracted allogeneic bone (AAA)/BMP (group D).Their abilities of bone forming to repair bone defects were observed.

  15. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA Repair Protein Mre11 with an Evolutionarily Conserved Nuclease Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugith Babu Badugu

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic Meiotic Recombination protein 11 (Mre11 plays pivotal roles in the DNA damage response (DDR. Specifically, Mre11 senses and signals DNA double strand breaks (DSB and facilitates their repair through effector proteins belonging to either homologous recombination (HR or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ repair mechanisms. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, HR and alternative-NHEJ have been identified; however, little is known about the upstream factors involved in the DDR of this organism. In this report, we identify a putative ortholog of Mre11 in P. falciparum (PfalMre11 that shares 22% sequence similarity to human Mre11. Homology modeling reveals striking structural resemblance of the predicted PfalMre11 nuclease domain to the nuclease domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11 (ScMre11. Complementation analyses reveal functional conservation of PfalMre11 nuclease activity as demonstrated by the ability of the PfalMre11 nuclease domain, in conjunction with the C-terminal domain of ScMre11, to functionally complement an mre11 deficient yeast strain. Functional complementation was virtually abrogated by an amino acid substitution in the PfalMre11 nuclease domain (D398N. PfalMre11 is abundant in the mitotically active trophozoite and schizont stages of P. falciparum and is up-regulated in response to DNA damage, suggesting a role in the DDR. PfalMre11 exhibits physical interaction with PfalRad50. In addition, yeast 2-hybrid studies show that PfalMre11 interacts with ScRad50 and ScXrs2, two important components of the well characterized Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex which is involved in DDR signaling and repair in S. cerevisiae, further supporting a role for PfalMre11 in the DDR. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that PfalMre11 is an evolutionarily conserved component of the DDR in Plasmodium.

  16. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA Repair Protein Mre11 with an Evolutionarily Conserved Nuclease Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badugu, Sugith Babu; Nabi, Shaik Abdul; Vaidyam, Pratap; Laskar, Shyamasree; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal Kanti

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic Meiotic Recombination protein 11 (Mre11) plays pivotal roles in the DNA damage response (DDR). Specifically, Mre11 senses and signals DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and facilitates their repair through effector proteins belonging to either homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair mechanisms. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, HR and alternative-NHEJ have been identified; however, little is known about the upstream factors involved in the DDR of this organism. In this report, we identify a putative ortholog of Mre11 in P. falciparum (PfalMre11) that shares 22% sequence similarity to human Mre11. Homology modeling reveals striking structural resemblance of the predicted PfalMre11 nuclease domain to the nuclease domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11 (ScMre11). Complementation analyses reveal functional conservation of PfalMre11 nuclease activity as demonstrated by the ability of the PfalMre11 nuclease domain, in conjunction with the C-terminal domain of ScMre11, to functionally complement an mre11 deficient yeast strain. Functional complementation was virtually abrogated by an amino acid substitution in the PfalMre11 nuclease domain (D398N). PfalMre11 is abundant in the mitotically active trophozoite and schizont stages of P. falciparum and is up-regulated in response to DNA damage, suggesting a role in the DDR. PfalMre11 exhibits physical interaction with PfalRad50. In addition, yeast 2-hybrid studies show that PfalMre11 interacts with ScRad50 and ScXrs2, two important components of the well characterized Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex which is involved in DDR signaling and repair in S. cerevisiae, further supporting a role for PfalMre11 in the DDR. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that PfalMre11 is an evolutionarily conserved component of the DDR in Plasmodium.

  17. MOF and H4 K16 Acetylation Play Important Roles in DNA Damage Repair by Modulating Recruitment of DNA Damage Repair Protein Mdc1 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangzhi; Corsa, Callie Ann Sprunger; Pan, Patricia W.; Wu, Lipeng; Ferguson, David; Yu, Xiaochun; Min, Jinrong; Dou, Yali

    2010-01-01

    MOF (MYST1) is the major enzyme to catalyze acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (K16) and is highly conserved through evolution. Using a conditional knockout mouse model and the derived mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines, we showed that loss of Mof led to a global reduction of H4 K16 acetylation, severe G2/M cell cycle arrest, massive chromosome aberration, and defects in ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage repair. We further showed that although early DNA damage sensing and signaling by ATM were normal in Mof-null cells, the recruitment of repair mediator protein Mdc1 and its downstream signaling proteins 53bp1 and Brca1 to DNA damage foci was completely abolished. Mechanistic studies suggested that Mof-mediated H4 K16 acetylation and an intact acidic pocket on H2A.X were essential for the recruitment of Mdc1. Removal of Mof and its associated proteins phenocopied a charge-neutralizing mutant of H2A.X. Given the well-characterized H4-H2A trans interactions in regulating higher-order chromatin structure, our study revealed a novel chromatin-based mechanism that regulates the DNA damage repair process. PMID:20837706

  18. A Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling Protein in Oxidative Stress Tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ow, David W.; Song, Wen

    2003-03-26

    Plants for effective extraction of toxic metals and radionuclides must tolerate oxidative stress. To identify genes that enhance oxidative stress tolerance, an S. pombe cDNA expression plasmid library was screened for the ability to yield hypertolerant colonies. Here, we report on the properties of one gene that confers hypertolerance to cadmium and oxidizing chemicals. This gene appears to be conserved in other organisms as homologous genes are found in human, mouse, fruitfly and Arabidopsis. The fruitfly and Arabidopsis genes likewise enhance oxidative stress tolerance in fission yeast. During oxidative stress, the amount of mRNA does not change, but protein fusions to GFP relocate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The same pattern is observed with the Arabidopsis homologue-GFP fusion protein. This behavior suggests a signaling role in oxidative stress tolerance and these conserved proteins may be targets for engineering stress tolerant plants for phytoremediation.

  19. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  20. SNPs in DNA repair or oxidative stress genes and late subcutaneous fibrosis in patients following single shot partial breast irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential association between single nucleotide polymorphisms related response to radiotherapy injury, such as genes related to DNA repair or enzymes involved in anti-oxidative activities. The paper aims to identify marker genes able to predict an increased risk of late toxicity studying our group of patients who underwent a Single Shot 3D-CRT PBI (SSPBI) after BCS (breast conserving surgery). Methods A total of 57 breast cancer pa...

  1. Mismatch repair protein expression and colorectal cancer in Hispanics from Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus-Monge, Wilfredo E; Gonzalez-Keelan, Carmen; Zhao, Ronghua; Hamilton, Stanley R; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2010-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and alterations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, leading to absent protein (negative) expression, are responsible for approximately 20% of CRC cases. Immunohistochemistry is a tool for prescreening of MMR protein expression in CRC but the literature on its use on Hispanics is scarce. However, Hispanics represent the second leading ethnicity in the United States (US) and CRC is a public health burden in this group. Our objectives were to determine the frequency of MMR protein-negative CRC and to evaluate its association with clinical and pathological characteristics among Hispanics from Puerto Rico, for the first time to our knowledge. A retrospective observational study of unselected CRC patients from the Puerto Rico Medical Center from 2001 to 2005 was done. MLH1 and MSH2, the most commonly altered MMR genes, protein expression was evaluated using immunohistochemistry, with microsatellite instability (MSI) and BRAF gene analyses in the absence of MLH1 protein expression. One-hundred sixty-four CRC patients were evaluated: the overall MMR protein-negative frequency was 4.3%, with 0.6% frequency of co-occurrence of MLH1-protein negative expression, MSI-high, and normal BRAF gene. MMR protein-negative expression was associated with proximal colon location (P = 0.02) and poor histological tumor differentiation (P = 0.001), but not with other characteristics. The frequency of MMR protein-negative CRC in Hispanics from Puerto Rico was lower than reported in other populations. This finding may explain the lower CRC incidence rate among US Hispanics as compared to US non-Hispanic whites and blacks.

  2. Lipid oxidation in omega-3 emulsions prepared with milk proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Andersen, Ulf

    components. In these three studies different parameters that are expected to change the properties and structure of the proteins at the interface were investigated. The first study compares 70% emulsions with either sodium caseinate or whey protein isolate at two pH values with and without iron addition....... The properties of the emulsifier used and the structure at the interface are therefore expected to be of great importance for oxidation in emulsions. This presentation will include results from mainly three different studies of lipid oxidation in omega-3 emulsions prepared with milk proteins and protein....... The second study evaluates the effect of two different high pressure homogenizers on oxidation in 10% emulsions with the same emulsifiers as in the first study. Finally, the third study considers the effect of changing pH on oxidation in emulsions prepared with different whey protein components. Results...

  3. Cell and protein compatible 3D bioprinting of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawkins, M J; Mistry, P; Brown, B N; Shakesheff, K M; Bonassar, L J; Yang, J

    2015-07-02

    Rapid prototyping of bone tissue engineering constructs often utilizes elevated temperatures, organic solvents and/or UV light for materials processing. These harsh conditions may prevent the incorporation of cells and therapeutic proteins in the fabrication processes. Here we developed a method for using bioprinting to produce constructs from a thermoresponsive microparticulate material based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) at ambient conditions. These constructs could be engineered with yield stresses of up to 1.22 MPa and Young's moduli of up to 57.3 MPa which are within the range of properties of human cancellous bone. Further study showed that protein-releasing microspheres could be incorporated into the bioprinted constructs. The release of the model protein lysozyme from bioprinted constructs was sustainted for a period of 15 days and a high degree of protein activity could be measured up to day 9. This work suggests that bioprinting is a viable route to the production of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair under mild conditions which allow the inclusion of viable cells and active proteins.

  4. C-terminal fluorescent labeling impairs functionality of DNA mismatch repair proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brieger

    Full Text Available The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR process is crucial to maintain the integrity of the genome and requires many different proteins which interact perfectly and coordinated. Germline mutations in MMR genes are responsible for the development of the hereditary form of colorectal cancer called Lynch syndrome. Various mutations mainly in two MMR proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, have been identified so far, whereas 55% are detected within MLH1, the essential component of the heterodimer MutLα (MLH1 and PMS2. Most of those MLH1 variants are pathogenic but the relevance of missense mutations often remains unclear. Many different recombinant systems are applied to filter out disease-associated proteins whereby fluorescent tagged proteins are frequently used. However, dye labeling might have deleterious effects on MutLα's functionality. Therefore, we analyzed the consequences of N- and C-terminal fluorescent labeling on expression level, cellular localization and MMR activity of MutLα. Besides significant influence of GFP- or Red-fusion on protein expression we detected incorrect shuttling of single expressed C-terminal GFP-tagged PMS2 into the nucleus and found that C-terminal dye labeling impaired MMR function of MutLα. In contrast, N-terminal tagged MutLαs retained correct functionality and can be recommended both for the analysis of cellular localization and MMR efficiency.

  5. The Molecular Mechanisms and the Role of hnRNP K Protein Post- Translational Modification in DNA Damage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage repair is a kind of cellular self-protection mechanism in which some relevant proteins are activated when DNA damage response occurs in order to maintain the intracellular function stability and structure integrity. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins can rapidly confer to them more complicated structure and sophisticated function by covalently combining different small molecules with target proteins, which in turn plays an important regulatory role in DNA damage repair. It was reported that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) could be involved in DNA damage repair process under the regulation of its many post-translational modifications, including methylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation and phosphorylation. Here, we reviewed molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K protein post-translational modifications and their role in DNA damage repair, which will promote our understanding of how hnRNP K participating in the repair process to maintain the normal operation of biological activities in the cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. 14-3-3 checkpoint regulatory proteins interact specifically with DNA repair protein human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) via a semi-conserved motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Keijzers, Guido; Rampakakis, Emmanouil

    2012-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) acts directly in diverse DNA processing events, including replication, mismatch repair (MMR), and double strand break repair (DSBR), and it was also recently described to function as damage sensor and apoptosis inducer following DNA damage. In contrast, 14-3-3 proteins...... are regulatory phosphorserine/threonine binding proteins involved in the control of diverse cellular events, including cell cycle checkpoint and apoptosis signaling. hEXO1 is regulated by post-translation Ser/Thr phosphorylation in a yet not fully clarified manner, but evidently three phosphorylation sites...... are specifically induced by replication inhibition leading to protein ubiquitination and degradation. We demonstrate direct and robust interaction between hEXO1 and six of the seven 14-3-3 isoforms in vitro, suggestive of a novel protein interaction network between DNA repair and cell cycle control. Binding...

  7. Anti- and pro-oxidant effects of (+)-catechin on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Puqing; Yang, Qin; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme proteins as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Flavonoids have been widely used to ameliorate oxidative damage in vivo and in vitro, where the mechanism of this therapeutic action was usually dependent on their anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the influence of (+)-catechin, a polyphenol identified in tea, cocoa, and red wine, on hemoglobin-induced protein oxidative damage. It was found that (+)-catechin had the capacities to act as a free radical scavenger and reducing agent to remove cytotoxic ferryl hemoglobin, demonstrating apparent anti-oxidant activities. However, the presence of (+)-catechin surprisingly promoted hemoglobin-induced protein oxidation, which was probably due to the ability of this anti-oxidant to rapidly trigger the oxidative degradation of normal hemoglobin. In addition, hemoglobin-H2O2-induced protein carbonyl formation was significantly enhanced by (+)-catechin at lower concentrations, while it was efficiently inhibited when higher concentrations were used. These novel results showed that the dietary intake and therapeutic use of catechins might possess pro-oxidant activity through aggravating hemoglobin-related oxidative damage. The dual effects on hemoglobin redox reactions may provide new insights into the physiological implications of tea extract and wine (catechins) with cellular heme proteins.

  8. Regulation of thrombosis and vascular function by protein methionine oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Sean X.; Stevens, Jeff W.

    2015-01-01

    Redox biology is fundamental to both normal cellular homeostasis and pathological states associated with excessive oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species function not only as signaling molecules but also as redox regulators of protein function. In the vascular system, redox reactions help regulate key physiologic responses such as cell adhesion, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, inflammatory gene expression, and apoptosis. During pathologic states, altered redox balance can cause vascular cell dysfunction and affect the equilibrium between procoagulant and anticoagulant systems, contributing to thrombotic vascular disease. This review focuses on the emerging role of a specific reversible redox reaction, protein methionine oxidation, in vascular disease and thrombosis. A growing number of cardiovascular and hemostatic proteins are recognized to undergo reversible methionine oxidation, in which methionine residues are posttranslationally oxidized to methionine sulfoxide. Protein methionine oxidation can be reversed by the action of stereospecific enzymes known as methionine sulfoxide reductases. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a prototypical methionine redox sensor that responds to changes in the intracellular redox state via reversible oxidation of tandem methionine residues in its regulatory domain. Several other proteins with oxidation-sensitive methionine residues, including apolipoprotein A-I, thrombomodulin, and von Willebrand factor, may contribute to vascular disease and thrombosis. PMID:25900980

  9. APE1, the DNA base excision repair protein, regulates the removal of platinum adducts in sensory neuronal cultures by NER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Suk [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Jiang, Yanlin [Department of Pediatrics and Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Kelley, Mark R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Pediatrics and Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Vasko, Michael R. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Lee, Suk-Hee, E-mail: slee@iu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the major side effects of treatment with the anticancer drug, cisplatin. One proposed mechanism for this neurotoxicity is the formation of platinum adducts in sensory neurons that could contribute to DNA damage. Although this damage is largely repaired by nuclear excision repair (NER), our previous findings suggest that augmenting the base excision repair pathway (BER) by overexpressing the repair protein APE1 protects sensory neurons from cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The question remains whether APE1 contributes to the ability of the NER pathway to repair platinum-damage in neuronal cells. To examine this, we manipulated APE1 expression in sensory neuronal cultures and measured Pt-removal after exposure to cisplatin. When neuronal cultures were treated with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for two or three hours, there was a concentration-dependent increase in Pt-damage that peaked at four hours and returned to near baseline levels after 24 h. In cultures where APE1 expression was reduced by ∼80% using siRNA directed at APE1, there was a significant inhibition of Pt-removal over eight hours which was reversed by overexpressing APE1 using a lentiviral construct for human wtAPE1. Overexpressing a mutant APE1 (C65 APE1), which only has DNA repair activity, but not its other significant redox-signaling function, mimicked the effects of wtAPE1. Overexpressing DNA repair activity mutant APE1 (226 + 177APE1), with only redox activity was ineffective suggesting it is the DNA repair function of APE1 and not its redox-signaling, that restores the Pt-damage removal. Together, these data provide the first evidence that a critical BER enzyme, APE1, helps regulate the NER pathway in the repair of cisplatin damage in sensory neurons.

  10. RadA: A protein involved in DNA damage repair processes of Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qing; ZHANG Xinjue; XU Hong; XU Bujin; HUA Yuejin

    2006-01-01

    RadA is highly conserved in bacteria and belongs to the RecA/RadA/Rad51 protein superfamily found in bacteria, archaea and eukarya. In Archaea, it plays a critical role in homologous recombination process due to its RecA-like function. In Escherichia coli, it takes part in conjugational recombination and DNA repair but is not as important as that of archaea. Using PSI-BLAST searches, we found that Deinococcus radiodurans RadA had a higher similarity to that of bacteria than archaea and eukarya. Disruption of radA gene in D. radiodurans resulted in a modestly decreased resistance to gamma radiation and ultraviolet, but had no effect on the resistance to hydrogen peroxide. Complementation of the radA disruptant by both E. coli radA and D.radiodurans radA could fully restore its resistance to gamma radiation and ultraviolet irradiation. Further domain function analyses of D. radiodurans RadA showed that the absence of the zinc finger domain resulted in a slightly more sensitive phenotype togamma and UV radiation than that of the radA mutant,while the absence of the Lon protease domain exhibited a slightly increased resistance to gamma and UV radiation. These data suggest that D. radiodurans RadA does play an important role in the DNA damage repair processes and its three different domains have different functions.

  11. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Cook

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1 is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ. Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution.

  12. Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 4 Modulates Temozolomide Sensitivity in Glioblastoma by Regulating DNA Repair Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitange, Gaspar J.; Mladek, Ann C.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Pokorny, Jenny C.; Carlson, Brett L.; Zhang, Yuji; Nair, Asha A.; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Yan, Huihuang; Decker, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhiguo; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here we provide evidence that RBBP4 modulates temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity through coordinate regulation of 2 key DNA repair genes critical for recovery from TMZ-induced DNA damage: methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) and RAD51. Disruption of RBBP4 enhanced TMZ sensitivity, induced synthetic lethality to PARP inhibition and increased DNA damage signaling in response to TMZ. Moreover, RBBP4 silencing enhanced TMZ-induced H2AX phosphorylation and apoptosis in GBM cells. Intriguingly, RBBP4 knockdown suppressed the expression of MGMT, RAD51 and other genes in association with decreased promoter H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) and increased H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3). Consistent with these data, RBBP4 interacts with CBP/p300 to form a chromatin modifying complex that binds within the promoter of MGMT, RAD51 and perhaps other genes. Globally, RBBP4 positively and negatively regulates genes involved in critical cellular functions including tumorigenesis. RBBP4/CBP/p300 complex may provide an interesting target for developing therapy sensitizing strategies for GBM and other tumors. PMID:26972001

  13. Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 4 Modulates Temozolomide Sensitivity in Glioblastoma by Regulating DNA Repair Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar J. Kitange

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we provide evidence that RBBP4 modulates temozolomide (TMZ sensitivity through coordinate regulation of two key DNA repair genes critical for recovery from TMZ-induced DNA damage: methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT and RAD51. Disruption of RBBP4 enhanced TMZ sensitivity, induced synthetic lethality to PARP inhibition, and increased DNA damage signaling in response to TMZ. Moreover, RBBP4 silencing enhanced TMZ-induced H2AX phosphorylation and apoptosis in GBM cells. Intriguingly, RBBP4 knockdown suppressed the expression of MGMT, RAD51, and other genes in association with decreased promoter H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac and increased H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3. Consistent with these data, RBBP4 interacts with CBP/p300 to form a chromatin-modifying complex that binds within the promoter of MGMT, RAD51, and perhaps other genes. Globally, RBBP4 positively and negatively regulates genes involved in critical cellular functions including tumorigenesis. The RBBP4/CBP/p300 complex may provide an interesting target for developing therapy-sensitizing strategies for GBM and other tumors.

  14. Assessment of primary, oxidative and excision repaired DNA damage in hospital personnel handling antineoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarini, Milena; Dominici, Luca; Piccinini, Renza; Fatigoni, Cristina; Ambrogi, Maura; Curti, Gianluca; Morucci, Piero; Muzi, Giacomo; Monarca, Silvano; Moretti, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified several antineoplastic drugs in Group 1 (human carcinogens), among which chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide (CP) and tamoxifen, Group 2A (probable human carcinogens), among which cisplatin, etoposide, N-ethyl- and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and Group 2B (possible human carcinogens), among which bleomycins, merphalan and mitomycin C. The widespread use of these mutagenic/carcinogenic drugs in the treatment of cancer has led to anxiety about possible genotoxic hazards to medical personnel handling these drugs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate work environment contamination by antineoplastic drugs in a hospital in Central Italy and to assess the genotoxic risks associated with antineoplastic drug handling. The study group comprised 52 exposed subjects and 52 controls. Environmental contamination was assessed by taking wipe samples from different surfaces in preparation and administration rooms and nonwoven swabs were used as pads for the surrogate evaluation of dermal exposure, 5-fluorouracil and cytarabine were chosen as markers of exposure to antineoplastic drugs in the working environment. The actual exposure to antineoplastic drugs was evaluated by determining the urinary excretion of CP. The extent of primary, oxidative and excision repaired DNA damage was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes with the alkaline comet assay. To evaluate the role, if any, of genetic variants in the extent of genotoxic effects related to antineoplastic drug occupational exposure, the study subjects were genotyped for GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 and TP53 polymorphisms. Primary DNA damage significantly increased in leukocytes of exposed nurses compared to controls. The use of personal protective equipment (i.e. gloves and/mask) was associated with a decrease in the extent of primary DNA damage.

  15. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity.

  16. Evidence for oxidative damage to prion protein in prion diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In prion diseases the irreversible protein structural transformation process is completed in the brains of mammals within a few months, the uniformly generated infectivity displays extraordinary resistance to inactivation, suggesting that a vital energy source is required for the production of infectious particles. Considering the high oxygen-respiration rate in the brains, prion protein oxidative damage can be the crucial factor. Both theoretical consideration of the nature of protein radical reactions and a large body of previously unraveled feature of scrapie and prion diseases have provided multiple distinct lines of compelling evidence which persuasively support a suggestion that the infectious agents may be prion (free) radicals produced from protein oxidative damage. This paper describes that scrapie prions are most likely formed from prion radicals and oxidative species-mediated sequence-specific cross-linking of benign prion proteins.

  17. Bone morphogenetic protein-2-encapsulated grafted-poly-lactic acid-polycaprolactone nanoparticles promote bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jun; Ding, Lifeng; Li, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test the efficacy of a novel tissue-engineered bone in repairing bone defects, using poly-lactic-acid-polycaprolactone (PLA-PCL) scaffolding seeded with PEG-bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-transfected rBMSCs (rabbit bone marrow stromal cells). The rBMSCs were transfected with PEG/BMP-2 or liposome/BMP-2, and then implanted into a PLA-PCL tissue-engineered bone. The protein level of BMP-2 was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. ELISA was used to measure the amount of BMP-2 secreted in the culture media. The mRNA level of BMP-2 and osteocalcin was assayed quantitatively by real-time PCR. The middle portion of the bilateral radius in New Zealand rabbits was excised and implanted with tissue-engineered bone, and the modified areas were monitored by X-ray, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and immunohistochemistry staining of BMP-2. PEG-BMP-2 nanoparticles (NPs) and BMP-2-loaded PEG-PLA-PCL tissue-engineered bones were successfully constructed. The novel PEG-PLA-PCL NPs/DNA complex was a superior option for transfecting BMP-2 in rBMSCs compared to normal liposomes Moreover, the mRNA level of osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase activity was also elevated upon transfection of BMP-2-encapsulated NPs. In vivo implants with BMP-2-carried tissue-engineered bone exhibited dramatic augmentation of BMP-2 and effective bone formation in the rabbit ectopic model. The PEG-PLA-PCL NPs/BMP-2 complex had an advantageous effect on bone repair, which provided an important theoretic basis for potential clinical treatments.

  18. Structural basis of protein oxidation resistance: a lysozyme study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Girod

    Full Text Available Accumulation of oxidative damage in proteins correlates with aging since it can cause irreversible and progressive degeneration of almost all cellular functions. Apparently, native protein structures have evolved intrinsic resistance to oxidation since perfectly folded proteins are, by large most robust. Here we explore the structural basis of protein resistance to radiation-induced oxidation using chicken egg white lysozyme in the native and misfolded form. We study the differential resistance to oxidative damage of six different parts of native and misfolded lysozyme by a targeted tandem/mass spectrometry approach of its tryptic fragments. The decay of the amount of each lysozyme fragment with increasing radiation dose is found to be a two steps process, characterized by a double exponential evolution of their amounts: the first one can be largely attributed to oxidation of specific amino acids, while the second one corresponds to further degradation of the protein. By correlating these results to the structural parameters computed from molecular dynamics (MD simulations, we find the protein parts with increased root-mean-square deviation (RMSD to be more susceptible to modifications. In addition, involvement of amino acid side-chains in hydrogen bonds has a protective effect against oxidation Increased exposure to solvent of individual amino acid side chains correlates with high susceptibility to oxidative and other modifications like side chain fragmentation. Generally, while none of the structural parameters alone can account for the fate of peptides during radiation, together they provide an insight into the relationship between protein structure and susceptibility to oxidation.

  19. Scaffolding protein SPIDR/KIAA0146 connects the Bloom syndrome helicase with homologous recombination repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Han, Jinhua; Liu, Ting; Dong, Shunli; Xie, Feng; Chen, Hongxia; Huang, Jun

    2013-06-25

    The Bloom syndrome gene product, BLM, is a member of the highly conserved RecQ family. An emerging concept is the BLM helicase collaborates with the homologous recombination (HR) machinery to help avoid undesirable HR events and to achieve a high degree of fidelity during the HR reaction. However, exactly how such coordination occurs in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we identified a protein termed SPIDR (scaffolding protein involved in DNA repair) as the link between BLM and the HR machinery. SPIDR independently interacts with BLM and RAD51 and promotes the formation of a BLM/RAD51-containing complex of biological importance. Consistent with its role as a scaffolding protein for the assembly of BLM and RAD51 foci, cells depleted of SPIDR show increased rate of sister chromatid exchange and defects in HR. Moreover, SPIDR depletion leads to genome instability and causes hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents. We propose that, through providing a scaffold for the cooperation of BLM and RAD51 in a multifunctional DNA-processing complex, SPIDR not only regulates the efficiency of HR, but also dictates the specific HR pathway.

  20. [Correlation between mismatch repair proteins status and clinicopathological characteristics in sporadic colorectal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Z T; Zhang, R X; Zhao, Y; Peng, J H; Lu, S X; Zhang, H Z; Ding, P R; Wu, X J; Lu, Z H; Li, L R; Wan, D S; Pan, Z Z; Chen, G

    2017-04-25

    Objective: To explore the expression of mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in sporadic colorectal cancer (SCRC) patients, and its association with clinicopathological characteristics of SCRC. Methods: Patients with histologically confirmed colorectal cancer were consecutively recruited between December 2011 and June 2015 at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. The exclusion criteria included multiple primary colorectal tumors, hereditary colorectal cancer (including Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis), and the patients without the MMR proteins status tested. A total of 2 684 patients were included. Correlations of MMR proteins status and patients' demographics (including gender, age), tumor characteristics (site and differentiation) and TNM staging (excluding 315 SCRC patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy) were investigated. Results: The percentage of deficient MMR (dMMR) in these SCRC patients was 10.2%, and that of proficient MMR (pMMR) was 89.8%. The dMMR was more likely to be detected in younger (≤59 old years) SCRC patients compared to the elderly (>59 years) [12.7%(179/1 406)vs 7.5%(96/1 278), Pcolon cancer was significantly higher than that in left colon cancer and rectal cancer [22.7%(151/664)vs 7.2%(69/956)vs 5.2%(55/1 064), Pcolon mucinous adenocarcinoma among SCRC.

  1. Nuclear localization of human DNA mismatch repair protein exonuclease 1 (hEXO1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Vinther, Lena

    2007-01-01

    localization signals (NLSs) in hEXO1. Using fluorescent fusion proteins, we show that the sequence 418KRPR421, which exhibit strong homology to other monopartite NLS sequences, is responsible for correct nuclear localization of hEXO1. This NLS sequence is located in a region that is also required for hEXO1......Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) is implicated in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and mutations in hEXO1 may be associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Since the subcellular localization of MMR proteins is essential for proper MMR function, we characterized possible nuclear...... interaction with hMLH1 and we show that defective nuclear localization of hEXO1 mutant proteins could be rescued by hMLH1 or hMSH2. Both hEXO1 and hMLH1 form complexes with the nuclear import factors importin beta/alpha1,3,7 whereas hMSH2 specifically recognizes importin beta/alpha3. Taken together, we infer...

  2. No effect of 600 grams fruit and vegetables per day on oxidative DNA damage and repair in healthy nonsmokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Pedersen, A.

    2003-01-01

    . Blood and urine samples were collected before, once a week, and 4 weeks after the intervention period. The level of strand breaks, endonuclease III sites, formamidopyrimidine sites, and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide was assessed in mononuclear blood cells by the comet assay. Excretion of 7-hydro-8......In several epidemiological studies, high intakes of fruits and vegetables have been associated with a lower incidence of cancer. Theoretically, intake of antioxidants by consumption of fruits and vegetables should protect against reactive oxygen species and decrease the formation of oxidative DNA......-oxo-2'-deoxyguanine was measured in urine. The expressions of oxoguanine glycosylase I and excision repair cross complementing I DNA repair genes, determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR of mRNAs, were investigated in leukocytes. Consumption of fruits and vegetables or vitamins and minerals...

  3. Oxidant/antioxidant balance in animal nutrition and health: the role of protein oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eCeli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review examines the role that oxidative stress, and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functional modifications. Protein oxidation seems to be involved in pathological conditions such as respiratory diseases and parasitic infection; however some studies also suggest that protein oxidation plays a crucial role in the regulation of important physiological functions such as reproduction, nutrition, metabolism, lactation, gut health and neonatal physiology. As the characterization of the mechanisms by which oxidative stress may influence metabolism and health is attracting considerable scientific interest, the aim of this review is to present veterinary scientists and clinicians with various aspects of oxidative damage to proteins.

  4. Oxidative stress and pathology in muscular dystrophies: focus on protein thiol oxidation and dysferlinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jessica R; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Lemckert, Frances A; Arthur, Peter G; Grounds, Miranda D

    2013-09-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise more than 30 clinical disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Although the genetic basis for many of these disorders has been identified, the exact mechanism for pathogenesis generally remains unknown. It is considered that disturbed levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the pathology of many muscular dystrophies. Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress may cause cellular damage by directly and irreversibly damaging macromolecules such as proteins, membrane lipids and DNA; another major cellular consequence of reactive oxygen species is the reversible modification of protein thiol side chains that may affect many aspects of molecular function. Irreversible oxidative damage of protein and lipids has been widely studied in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and we have recently identified increased protein thiol oxidation in dystrophic muscles of the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This review evaluates the role of elevated oxidative stress in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other forms of muscular dystrophies, and presents new data that show significantly increased protein thiol oxidation and high levels of lipofuscin (a measure of cumulative oxidative damage) in dysferlin-deficient muscles of A/J mice at various ages. The significance of this elevated oxidative stress and high levels of reversible thiol oxidation, but minimal myofibre necrosis, is discussed in the context of the disease mechanism for dysferlinopathies, and compared with the situation for dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

  5. A novel approach in psoriasis: first usage of known protein oxidation markers to prove oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Cevat; Köse, Kader; Utaş, Serap; Tanrikulu, Esen; Taşlidere, Nazan

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, an inflammatory/hyperproliferative skin disease characterized by the cutaneous accumulation of neutrophils releasing reactive oxygen species, as revealed in a number of studies. This study was performed to demonstrate the presence of oxidative stress in psoriasis, as measured by protein oxidation markers. Twenty-nine psoriasis patients were selected based on disease severity assessment using body surface area as well as the psoriasis area severity index (PASI), and were grouped as mild (PASI ≤ 10) and moderate-to-severe (PASI > 10). The measured parameters in psoriatic patients and fourteen healthy volunteers were as follows: erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, neopterin, total lipid hydroperoxides (LHP), pyrrolized protein (PP), protein carbonyl compounds (PCC), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), thiol levels, along with complete blood count. Except lower thiols, all parameters were found to be higher in total patients as well as in subgroups, compared to controls. There was no significant difference among the subgroups. In conclusion, protein oxidation in psoriatics, not only in moderate-to-severe, but also in mild patients, may be explained by the findings of inflammation, phagocytic cell oxidation, and MPO-hypochlorous acid-oxidation reactions; as reflected by increased total/differential leucocytes counts, CRP, ESR as well as MPO, neopterin, AOPP, PCC, PP, LHP, and decreased thiol levels. Demonstrating the AOPP and PP formation for the first time, oxidants from active neutrophils/monocytes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, leading to oxidative stress, especially by protein oxidation.

  6. Bisdemethoxycurcumin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Su-Tso; Huang, Wen-Wen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, An-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Mei-Due; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-12-01

    Nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a devastating primary lung tumor resistant to conventional therapies. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) is one of curcumin derivate from Turmeric and has been shown to induce NSCLC cell death. Although there is one report to show BDMC induced DNA double strand breaks, however, no available information to show BDMC induced DNA damage action with inhibited DNA repair protein in lung cancer cells in detail. In this study, we tested BDMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively and we found BDMC induced DNA damage and condension. Western blotting was used to examine the effects of BDMC on protein expression associated with DNA damage and repair and results indicated that BDMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DDR), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 but activate phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Confocal laser systems microscopy was used for examining the protein translocation and results show that BDMC increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) from cytosol to nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, BDMC induced DNA damage and condension and affect DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1859-1868, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of amino acids, peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Pattison, D I; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Activated phagocytes generate the potent oxidant hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of the enzyme myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide. HOCl is known to react with a number of biological targets including proteins, DNA, lipids and cholesterol. Proteins are likely to be major targets for reaction...

  8. Biochemistry and pathology of radical-mediated protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, R T; Fu, S; Stocker, R

    1997-01-01

    Radical-mediated damage to proteins may be initiated by electron leakage, metal-ion-dependent reactions and autoxidation of lipids and sugars. The consequent protein oxidation is O2-dependent, and involves several propagating radicals, notably alkoxyl radicals. Its products include several catego...

  9. Effects of protein malnutrition on oxidative status in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feoli, Ana M; Siqueira, Ionara R; Almeida, Lúcia; Tramontina, Ana C; Vanzella, Cláudia; Sbaraini, Sabrina; Schweigert, Ingrid D; Netto, Carlos A; Perry, Marcos L S; Gonçalves, Carlos A

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of protein malnutrition on oxidative status in rat brain areas. We investigated various parameters of oxidative status, free radical content (dichlorofluorescein formation), indexes of damage to lipid (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances assay), and protein damage (tryptophan and tyrosine content) in addition to total antioxidant reactivity levels and antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in different cerebral regions (cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum) from rats subjected to prenatal and postnatal protein malnutrition (control 25% casein and protein malnutrition 7% casein). Protein malnutrition altered various parameters of oxidative stress, especially damage to macromolecules. Free radical content was unchanged by protein malnutrition. There was an increase in levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, the index of lipid peroxidation, in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex (P brain structures (P malnutrition increased oxidative damage to lipids and proteins from the studied brain areas. These results may be an indication of an important mechanism for changes in brain development that are caused by protein malnutrition.

  10. S100B protein in tissue development,repair and regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guglielmo; Sorci; Francesca; Riuzzi; Cataldo; Arcuri; Claudia; Tubaro; Roberta; Bianchi; Ileana; Giambanco; Rosario; Donato

    2013-01-01

    The Ca 2+-binding protein of the EF-hand type,S100B,exerts both intracellular and extracellular regulatory activities.As an intracellular regulator,S100B is involved in the regulation of energy metabolism,transcription,protein phosphorylation,cell proliferation,survival,differentiation and motility,and Ca 2+ homeostasis,by interacting with a wide array of proteins(i.e.,enzymes,enzyme substrates,cytoskeletal subunits,scaffold/adaptor proteins,transcription factors,ubiquitin E3 ligases,ion channels) in a restricted number of cell types.As an extracellular signal,S100B engages the pattern recognition receptor,receptor for advanced glycation end-products(RAGE),on immune cells as well as on neuronal,astrocytic and microglial cells,vascular smooth muscle cells,skeletal myoblasts and cardiomyocytes.However,RAGE may not be the sole receptor activated by S100B,the protein being able to enhance bFGF-FGFR1 signaling by interacting with FGFR1-bound bFGF in particular cell types.Moreover,extracellular effects of S100B vary depending on its local concentration.Increasing evidence suggests that at the concentration found in extracellular fluids in normal physiological conditions and locally upon acute tissue injury,which is up to a few nM levels,S100B exerts trophic effects in the central and peripheral nervous system and in skeletal muscle tissue thus participating in tissue homeostasis.The present commentary summarizes results implicating intracellular and extracellular S100B in tissue development,repair and regeneration.

  11. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of the binding of nucleotide excision repair protein XPC-hHr23B with DNA substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Roche; D. Zhang (Dan); G.M. Segers-Nolten; W. Vermeulen (Wim); C. Wyman (Claire); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C. Otto

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe interaction of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein dimeric complex XPC-hHR23B, which is implicated in the DNA damage recognition step, with three Cy3.5 labeled 90-bp double-stranded DNA substrates (unmodified, with a central unpaired region, and cholesterol modified) and a 9

  12. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of proteins in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    Activated phagocyte cells generate hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of H2O2 and the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Plasma proteins are major targets for HOCl, although little information is available about the mechanism(s) of oxidation. In this study the reaction of HOCl (at least 50 microM) with dil......Activated phagocyte cells generate hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of H2O2 and the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Plasma proteins are major targets for HOCl, although little information is available about the mechanism(s) of oxidation. In this study the reaction of HOCl (at least 50 micro......M) with diluted fresh human plasma has been shown to generate material that oxidizes 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid; these oxidants are believed to be chloramines formed from the reaction of HOCl with protein amine groups. Chloramines have also been detected with isolated plasma proteins treated with HOCl. In both....... These results are consistent with protein-derived chloramines, and the radicals derived from them, as contributing agents in HOCl-induced plasma protein oxidation....

  13. Protein oxidation in plant mitochondria as a stress indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, I.M.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2004-01-01

    Plant mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) as an unavoidable side product of aerobic metabolism, but they have mechanisms for regulating this production such as the alternative oxidase. Once produced, ROS can be removed by several different enzyme systems. Finally, should the first ...... oxidation of cysteine and methionine side chains is an important mechanism for regulating enzyme activity. Mitochondria from both mammalian and plant tissues contain a number of oxidised proteins, but the relative abundance of these post-translationally modified forms is as yet unknown...... shock proteins. Plant mitochondria contain a number of different proteases, but their role in removing oxidatively damaged proteins is, as yet, unclear....

  14. Kaempferol induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lung-Yuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Shih, Yung-Luen; Bau, Da-Tian; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Numerous evidences have shown that plant flavonoids (naturally occurring substances) have been reported to have chemopreventive activities and protect against experimental carcinogenesis. Kaempferol, one of the flavonoids, is widely distributed in fruits and vegetables, and may have cancer chemopreventive properties. However, the precise underlying mechanism regarding induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair system are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether kaempferol induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression in human leukemia HL-60 cells in vitro. Percentages of viable cells were measured via a flow cytometry assay. DNA damage was examined by Comet assay and DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation (ladder) was examined by DNA gel electrophoresis. The changes of protein levels associated with DNA repair were examined by Western blotting. Results showed that kaempferol dose-dependently decreased the viable cells. Comet assay indicated that kaempferol induced DNA damage (Comet tail) in a dose-dependent manner and DAPI staining also showed increased doses of kaempferol which led to increased DNA condensation, these effects are all of dose-dependent manners. Western blotting indicated that kaempferol-decreased protein expression associated with DNA repair system, such as phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (p-ATR), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p53 and MDC1 protein expressions, but increased the protein expression of p-p53 and p-H2AX. Protein translocation was examined by confocal laser microscopy, and we found that kaempferol increased the levels of p-H2AX and p-p53 in HL-60 cells. Taken together, in the present study, we found that kaempferol induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair and inhibited DNA repair associated protein expression in HL-60

  15. Nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location and protein stoichiometry influence base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E.; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, David M.; Merienne, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >fourteen genetic disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights as to how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely due to the lower level of APE1, FEN1 and LIG1. Damage located towards the 5’ end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired accumulating incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the centre or at the 3’ end of the repeats or within a control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5’ end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly under the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome, and suggest that a suboptimal LP-BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability. PMID:22497302

  16. Myeloperoxidase-mediated protein oxidation: its possible biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskalski, Jerzy W; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Drozdz, Ryszard

    2002-05-01

    Oxidation of proteins occurs both as a side-effect of aerobic energy metabolism and as an effect of specific metabolism of phagocytic polymorphonuclear granulocytes producing O2- and H2O2. In contrast to other cells, which control their H2O2 level by degrading it to O2 and H2O, polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMN) use H2O2 as a substrate for oxidizing chloride ions to HOCl which rapidly react with all neighboring thiol, disulfide and amino residues. Chloramines, which are the most abundant HOCl reaction products, react with proteins, modifying only certain exposed methionine and cysteine residues. This may account for selective inactivation of a number of enzymes, carrier proteins and peptide mediators, including the alpha1-proteinase inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin and plasminogen activator inhibitor. Inactivaton of plasma proteinase inhibitors protects PMN elastase, collagenase, cathepsin G and other serine proteases in the inflammatory foci. This promotes proteolytic degradation of damaged tissue, removal of bacterial debris and wound healing, as well as tissue remodeling related to the inflammatory processes. Oxidative control of protease-anti-protease balance affects the development of the inflammatory processes. Moreover, inactivation of plasma proteinase inhibitors facilitates primary antigen processing, upregulates lymphocyte proliferative response and activates the local immune response. Oxidation produces a specific protein tagging which attracts and stimulates immune active cells. Therefore, humoral response against oxidatively modified proteins occurs more effectively than that of the native proteins. The effect is dose-dependent with respect to the amount of oxidant employed. Glycol aldehyde, which is the serine chloramine spontaneous decay product, in mice immunized with glycol aldehyde-modified egg-white albumin, yields specific IgG production manifold higher than that in mice immunized with native albumin. Immunopotentiation is produced

  17. Redox Modulation of Cellular Signaling and Metabolism Through Reversible Oxidation of Methionine Sensors in Calcium Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-01-17

    Adaptive responses associated with environmental stressors are critical to cell survival. These involve the modulation of central signaling protein functions through site-specific and enzymatically reversible oxidative modifications of methionines to coordinate cellular metabolism, energy utilization, and calcium signaling. Under conditions when cellular redox and antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, the selective oxidation of critical methionines within selected protein sensors functions to down-regulate energy metabolism and the further generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically, these functional changes within protein sensors take advantage of the helix-breaking character of methionine sulfoxide. Thus, depending on either the ecological niche of the organism or the cellular milieu of different organ systems, cellular metabolism can be fine-tuned to maintain optimal function in the face of variable amounts of collateral oxidative damage. The sensitivity of several calcium regulatory proteins to oxidative modification provides cellular sensors that link oxidative stress to cellular response and recovery. Calmodulin (CaM) is one such critical calcium regulatory protein, which is functionally sensitive to methionine oxidation. Helix destabilization resulting from the oxidation of either Met{sup 144} or Met{sup 145} results in the nonproductive association between CaM and target proteins. The ability of oxidized CaM to stabilize its target proteins in an inhibited state with an affinity similar to that of native (unoxidized) CaM permits this central regulatory protein to function as a cellular rheostat that down-regulates energy metabolism in response to oxidative stress. Likewise, oxidation of a methionine within a critical switch region of the regulatory protein phospholamban is expected to destabilize the phosphorylationdependent helix formation necessary for the release of enzyme inhibition, resulting in a down-regulation of the Ca-ATPase in

  18. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhou J; Mortimer, Gysell; Minchin, Rodney F [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Schiller, Tara; Musumeci, Anthony; Martin, Darren, E-mail: r.minchin@uq.edu.a [Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2009-11-11

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO{sub 2}, the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO{sub 2} and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  19. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked: considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and ...

  20. Inhibitory function of parathyroid hormone-related protein on chondrocyte hypertrophy: the implication for articular cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jialin; Zhang, Shufang; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2012-08-31

    Cartilage repair tissue is usually accompanied by chondrocyte hypertrophy and osseous overgrowths, and a role for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) in inhibiting chondrocytes from hypertrophic differentiation during the process of endochondral ossification has been demonstrated. However, application of PTHrP in cartilage repair has not been extensively considered. This review systemically summarizes for the first time the inhibitory function of PTHrP on chondrocyte hypertrophy in articular cartilage and during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as the process of mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic differentiation. Based on the literature review, the strategy of using PTHrP for articular cartilage repair is suggested, which is instructive for clinical treatment of cartilage injuries as well as osteoarthritis.

  1. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1.

  2. Neutrophil-generated oxidative stress and protein damage in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, William N; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a ubiquitous, versatile and dangerous pathogen. It colonizes over 30% of the human population, and is one of the leading causes of death by an infectious agent. During S. aureus colonization and invasion, leukocytes are recruited to the site of infection. To combat S. aureus, leukocytes generate an arsenal of reactive species including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and hypohalous acids that modify and inactivate cellular macromolecules, resulting in growth defects or death. When S. aureus colonization cannot be cleared by the immune system, antibiotic treatment is necessary and can be effective. Yet, this organism quickly gains resistance to each new antibiotic it encounters. Therefore, it is in the interest of human health to acquire a deeper understanding of how S. aureus evades killing by the immune system. Advances in this field will have implications for the design of future S. aureus treatments that complement and assist the host immune response. In that regard, this review focuses on how S. aureus avoids host-generated oxidative stress, and discusses the mechanisms used by S. aureus to survive oxidative damage including antioxidants, direct repair of damaged proteins, sensing oxidant stress and transcriptional changes. This review will elucidate areas for studies to identify and validate future antimicrobial targets.

  3. [Glycation of mitochondrial proteins, oxidative stress and aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudí, Alba; Jové, Mariona; Ayala, Victoria; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteins can be modified by glycation reactions from endogenous dicarbonyl compounds such as physiologically generated methylglyoxal and glyoxal. This modification could cause structural and functional changes in the proteins Consequently, dicarbonyl attack of the mitochondrial proteome may be an event leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and thus, to oxidative stress. These protein chemical modifications can play an important role in the physiological aging process and age-associated diseases, where both mitochondrial defects and increased dicarbonyl concentrations have been found. Future research should address the functional changes in mitochondrial proteins that are the targets for dicarbonyl glycation.

  4. Repair of oxidative DNA damage, cell-cycle regulation and neuronal death may influence the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aderbal R T Silva

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by progressive cognitive decline associated with a featured neuropathology (neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Several studies have implicated oxidative damage to DNA, DNA repair, and altered cell-cycle regulation in addition to cell death in AD post-mitotic neurons. However, there is a lack of studies that systematically assess those biological processes in patients with AD neuropathology but with no evidence of cognitive impairment. We evaluated markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG, H2AX, DNA repair (p53, BRCA1, PTEN, and cell-cycle (Cdk1, Cdk4, Cdk5, Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, p27Kip1, phospho-Rb and E2F1 through immunohistochemistry and cell death through TUNEL in autopsy hippocampal tissue samples arrayed in a tissue microarray (TMA composed of three groups: I "clinical-pathological AD" (CP-AD--subjects with neuropathological AD (Braak ≥ IV and CERAD = B or C and clinical dementia (CDR ≥ 2, IQCODE>3.8; II "pathological AD" (P-AD--subjects with neuropathological AD (Braak ≥ IV and CERAD = B or C and without cognitive impairment (CDR 0, IQCODE<3.2; and III "normal aging" (N--subjects without neuropathological AD (Braak ≤ II and CERAD 0 or A and with normal cognitive function (CDR 0, IQCODE<3.2. Our results show that high levels of oxidative DNA damage are present in all groups. However, significant reductions in DNA repair and cell-cycle inhibition markers and increases in cell-cycle progression and cell death markers in subjects with CP-AD were detected when compared to both P-AD and N groups, whereas there were no significant differences in the studied markers between P-AD individuals and N subjects. This study indicates that, even in the setting of pathological AD, healthy cognition may be associated with a preserved repair to DNA damage, cell-cycle regulation, and cell death in post-mitotic neurons.

  5. Bacillus subtilis SbcC protein plays an important role in DNA inter-strand cross-link repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisnamurthy Mahalakshmi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several distinct pathways for the repair of damaged DNA exist in all cells. DNA modifications are repaired by base excision or nucleotide excision repair, while DNA double strand breaks (DSBs can be repaired through direct joining of broken ends (non homologous end joining, NHEJ or through recombination with the non broken sister chromosome (homologous recombination, HR. Rad50 protein plays an important role in repair of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells, and forms a complex with the Mre11 nuclease. The prokaryotic ortholog of Rad50, SbcC, also forms a complex with a nuclease, SbcD, in Escherichia coli, and has been implicated in the removal of hairpin structures that can arise during DNA replication. Ku protein is a component of the NHEJ pathway in pro- and eukaryotic cells. Results A deletion of the sbcC gene rendered Bacillus subtilis cells sensitive to DNA damage caused by Mitomycin C (MMC or by gamma irradiation. The deletion of the sbcC gene in a recN mutant background increased the sensitivity of the single recN mutant strain. SbcC was also non-epistatic with AddAB (analog of Escherichia coli RecBCD, but epistatic with RecA. A deletion of the ykoV gene encoding the B. subtilis Ku protein in a sbcC mutant strain did not resulted in an increase in sensitivity towards MMC and gamma irradiation, but exacerbated the phenotype of a recN or a recA mutant strain. In exponentially growing cells, SbcC-GFP was present throughout the cells, or as a central focus in rare cases. Upon induction of DNA damage, SbcC formed 1, rarely 2, foci on the nucleoids. Different to RecN protein, which forms repair centers at any location on the nucleoids, SbcC foci mostly co-localized with the DNA polymerase complex. In contrast to this, AddA-GFP or AddB-GFP did not form detectable foci upon addition of MMC. Conclusion Our experiments show that SbcC plays an important role in the repair of DNA inter-strand cross-links (induced by MMC, most likely

  6. The Base Excision Repair system of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium counteracts DNA damage by host nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Richardson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens must withstand nitric oxide (NO. generated by host phagocytes. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium interferes with intracellular trafficking of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and possesses multiple systems to detoxify NO.. Consequently, the level of NO. stress encountered by S. Typhimurium during infection in vivo has been unknown. The Base Excision Repair (BER system recognizes and repairs damaged DNA bases including cytosine and guanine residues modified by reactive nitrogen species. Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP sites generated by BER glycosylases require subsequent processing by AP endonucleases. S. Typhimurium xth nfo mutants lacking AP endonuclease activity exhibit increased NO. sensitivity resulting from chromosomal fragmentation at unprocessed AP sites. BER mutant strains were thus used to probe the nature and extent of nitrosative damage sustained by intracellular bacteria during infection. Here we show that an xth nfo S. Typhimurium mutant is attenuated for virulence in C3H/HeN mice, and virulence can be completely restored by the iNOS inhibitor L-NIL. Inactivation of the ung or fpg glycosylase genes partially restores virulence to xth nfo mutant S. Typhimurium, demonstrating that NO. fluxes in vivo are sufficient to modify cytosine and guanine bases, respectively. Mutants lacking ung or fpg exhibit NO.-dependent hypermutability during infection, underscoring the importance of BER in protecting Salmonella from the genotoxic effects of host NO.. These observations demonstrate that host-derived NO. damages Salmonella DNA in vivo, and the BER system is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity.

  7. SNPs in DNA repair or oxidative stress genes and late subcutaneous fibrosis in patients following single shot partial breast irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falvo Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential association between single nucleotide polymorphisms related response to radiotherapy injury, such as genes related to DNA repair or enzymes involved in anti-oxidative activities. The paper aims to identify marker genes able to predict an increased risk of late toxicity studying our group of patients who underwent a Single Shot 3D-CRT PBI (SSPBI after BCS (breast conserving surgery. Methods A total of 57 breast cancer patients who underwent SSPBI were genotyped for SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms in XRCC1, XRCC3, GST and RAD51 by Pyrosequencing technology. Univariate analysis (ORs and 95% CI was performed to correlate SNPs with the risk of developing ≥ G2 fibrosis or fat necrosis. Results A higher significant risk of developing ≥ G2 fibrosis or fat necrosis in patients with: polymorphic variant GSTP1 (Ile105Val (OR = 2.9; 95%CI, 0.88-10.14, p = 0.047. Conclusions The presence of some SNPs involved in DNA repair or response to oxidative stress seem to be able to predict late toxicity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01316328

  8. Intracellular Protein Shuttling: A Mechanism Relevant for Myelin Repair in Multiple Sclerosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Göttle

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A prominent feature of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS is the degeneration and loss of previously established functional myelin sheaths, which results in impaired signal propagation and axonal damage. However, at least in early disease stages, partial replacement of lost oligodendrocytes and thus remyelination occur as a result of resident oligodendroglial precursor cell (OPC activation. These cells represent a widespread cell population within the adult central nervous system (CNS that can differentiate into functional myelinating glial cells to restore axonal functions. Nevertheless, the spontaneous remyelination capacity in the adult CNS is inefficient because OPCs often fail to generate new oligodendrocytes due to the lack of stimulatory cues and the presence of inhibitory factors. Recent studies have provided evidence that regulated intracellular protein shuttling is functionally involved in oligodendroglial differentiation and remyelination activities. In this review we shed light on the role of the subcellular localization of differentiation-associated factors within oligodendroglial cells and show that regulation of intracellular localization of regulatory factors represents a crucial process to modulate oligodendroglial maturation and myelin repair in the CNS.

  9. Intracellular Protein Shuttling: A Mechanism Relevant for Myelin Repair in Multiple Sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttle, Peter; Küry, Patrick

    2015-07-03

    A prominent feature of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) is the degeneration and loss of previously established functional myelin sheaths, which results in impaired signal propagation and axonal damage. However, at least in early disease stages, partial replacement of lost oligodendrocytes and thus remyelination occur as a result of resident oligodendroglial precursor cell (OPC) activation. These cells represent a widespread cell population within the adult central nervous system (CNS) that can differentiate into functional myelinating glial cells to restore axonal functions. Nevertheless, the spontaneous remyelination capacity in the adult CNS is inefficient because OPCs often fail to generate new oligodendrocytes due to the lack of stimulatory cues and the presence of inhibitory factors. Recent studies have provided evidence that regulated intracellular protein shuttling is functionally involved in oligodendroglial differentiation and remyelination activities. In this review we shed light on the role of the subcellular localization of differentiation-associated factors within oligodendroglial cells and show that regulation of intracellular localization of regulatory factors represents a crucial process to modulate oligodendroglial maturation and myelin repair in the CNS.

  10. Modulation of microRNA processing by mismatch repair protein MutLα

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guogen Mao; Sanghee Lee; Janice Ortega; Liya Gu; Guo-Min Li

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical post-transcriptional regulators and are derived from hairpnn-shaped primary transcripts via a series of processing steps.However,how the production of individual miRNAs is regulated remains largely unknown.Similarly,loss or overexpression of the key mismatch repair protein MutLα (MLH1-PMS2 heterodimer) leads to genome instability and tumorigenesis,but the mechanisms controlling MutLαt expression are unknown.Here we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that MLH1 and miR-422a participate in a feedback loop that regulates the level of both molecules.Using a defined in-vitro miRNA processing system,we show that MutLαt stimulates the conversion of pri-miR-422a to pre-miR-422a,as well as the processing of other miRNAs tested,implicating MutLα as a general stimulating factor for miRNA biogenesis.This newly identified MutLαα function requires its ATPase and pri-miRNA binding activities.In contrast,miR-422a downregulates MutLα levels by suppressing MLH1 expression through base pairing with the MLH1 3'-untranslated region.A model depicting this feedback mechanism is discussed.

  11. The HhH domain of the human DNA repair protein XPF forms stable homodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Devashish; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2008-03-01

    The human XPF-ERCC1 protein complex plays an essential role in nucleotide excision repair by catalysing positioned nicking of a DNA strand at the 5' side of the damage. We have recently solved the structure of the heterodimeric complex of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1 (Tripsianes et al., Structure 2005;13:1849-1858). We found that this complex comprises a pseudo twofold symmetry axis and that the helix-hairpin-helix motif of ERCC1 is required for DNA binding, whereas the corresponding domain of XPF is functioning as a scaffold for complex formation with ERCC1. Despite the functional importance of heterodimerization, the C-terminal domain of XPF can also form homodimers in vitro. We here compare the stabilities of homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1. The higher stability of the XPF HhH complexes under various experimental conditions, determined using CD and NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, is well explained by the structural differences that exist between the HhH domains of the two complexes. The XPF HhH homodimer has a larger interaction interface, aromatic stacking interactions, and additional hydrogen bond contacts as compared to the XPF/ERCC1 HhH complex, which accounts for its higher stability.

  12. Stoichiometry of base excision repair proteins correlates with increased somatic CAG instability in striatum over cerebellum in Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vassiliki; Berquist, Brian R; Wilson, David M; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Trottier, Yvon; Merienne, Karine

    2009-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of an unstable CAG repeat in the coding sequence of the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Instability affects both germline and somatic cells. Somatic instability increases with age and is tissue-specific. In particular, the CAG repeat sequence in the striatum, the brain region that preferentially degenerates in HD, is highly unstable, whereas it is rather stable in the disease-spared cerebellum. The mechanisms underlying the age-dependence and tissue-specificity of somatic CAG instability remain obscure. Recent studies have suggested that DNA oxidation and OGG1, a glycosylase involved in the repair of 8-oxoguanine lesions, contribute to this process. We show that in HD mice oxidative DNA damage abnormally accumulates at CAG repeats in a length-dependent, but age- and tissue-independent manner, indicating that oxidative DNA damage alone is not sufficient to trigger somatic instability. Protein levels and activities of major base excision repair (BER) enzymes were compared between striatum and cerebellum of HD mice. Strikingly, 5'-flap endonuclease activity was much lower in the striatum than in the cerebellum of HD mice. Accordingly, Flap Endonuclease-1 (FEN1), the main enzyme responsible for 5'-flap endonuclease activity, and the BER cofactor HMGB1, both of which participate in long-patch BER (LP-BER), were also significantly lower in the striatum compared to the cerebellum. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that POLbeta was specifically enriched at CAG expansions in the striatum, but not in the cerebellum of HD mice. These in vivo data fit a model in which POLbeta strand displacement activity during LP-BER promotes the formation of stable 5'-flap structures at CAG repeats representing pre-expanded intermediate structures, which are not efficiently removed when FEN1 activity is constitutively low. We propose that the stoichiometry of BER enzymes is one critical

  13. Stoichiometry of base excision repair proteins correlates with increased somatic CAG instability in striatum over cerebellum in Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathi-Vassiliki Goula

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of an unstable CAG repeat in the coding sequence of the Huntingtin (HTT gene. Instability affects both germline and somatic cells. Somatic instability increases with age and is tissue-specific. In particular, the CAG repeat sequence in the striatum, the brain region that preferentially degenerates in HD, is highly unstable, whereas it is rather stable in the disease-spared cerebellum. The mechanisms underlying the age-dependence and tissue-specificity of somatic CAG instability remain obscure. Recent studies have suggested that DNA oxidation and OGG1, a glycosylase involved in the repair of 8-oxoguanine lesions, contribute to this process. We show that in HD mice oxidative DNA damage abnormally accumulates at CAG repeats in a length-dependent, but age- and tissue-independent manner, indicating that oxidative DNA damage alone is not sufficient to trigger somatic instability. Protein levels and activities of major base excision repair (BER enzymes were compared between striatum and cerebellum of HD mice. Strikingly, 5'-flap endonuclease activity was much lower in the striatum than in the cerebellum of HD mice. Accordingly, Flap Endonuclease-1 (FEN1, the main enzyme responsible for 5'-flap endonuclease activity, and the BER cofactor HMGB1, both of which participate in long-patch BER (LP-BER, were also significantly lower in the striatum compared to the cerebellum. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that POLbeta was specifically enriched at CAG expansions in the striatum, but not in the cerebellum of HD mice. These in vivo data fit a model in which POLbeta strand displacement activity during LP-BER promotes the formation of stable 5'-flap structures at CAG repeats representing pre-expanded intermediate structures, which are not efficiently removed when FEN1 activity is constitutively low. We propose that the stoichiometry of BER enzymes

  14. Native mass spectrometry provides direct evidence for DNA mismatch-induced regulation of asymmetric nucleotide binding in mismatch repair protein MutS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Monti; S.X. Cohen (Serge); A. Fish (Alexander); H.H.K. Winterwerp (Herrie); A. Barendregt (Arjan); P. Friedhoff (Peter); A. Perrakis (Anastassis); A.J.R. Heck (Albert); T.K. Sixma (Titia); R.H.H. van den Heuvel (Robert); J.H.G. Lebbink (Joyce)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe DNA mismatch repair protein MutS recognizes mispaired bases in DNA and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. Understanding of the allosteric coupling between DNA mismatch recognition and two asymmetric nucleotide binding sites at opposing sides of the MutS dimer requires ident

  15. Ebselen attenuates oxidative DNA damage and enhances its repair activity in the thalamus after focal cortical infarction in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meixia; Xing, Shihui; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Liqun; Hua, Haiying; Liang, Zhijian; Zhou, Wenliang; Zeng, Jinsheng; Pei, Zhong

    2007-11-21

    Oxidative DNA damage has been proposed to be a major contributor to focal cerebral ischemic injury. However, little is known about the role of oxidative DNA damage in remote damage secondary to the primary infarction. In the present study, we investigated oxidative damage within the ventroposterior nucleus (VPN) after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in hypertensive rats. We also examined the possible protective effect of ebselen, one glutathione peroxidase mimic, on delayed degeneration in the VPN after distal MCAO. Neuronal damage in the ipsilateral VPN was examined by Nissl staining. Oxidative DNA damage and base repair enzyme activity were assessed by analyzing immunoreactivity of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-ohdG) and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), respectively. The number of intact neurons in the ipsilateral VPN decreased by 52% compared to the contralateral side in ischemia group 2 weeks after distal cerebral cortical infarction. The immunoreactivity of 8-ohdG significantly increased while OGG1 immunoreactivity significantly decreased in the ipsilateral VPN 2 weeks after distal cortical infarction (all pVPN (all pVPN region following distal MCAO. Furthermore, ebselen protects against the delayed damage in the VPN when given at 24 h following distal MCAO.

  16. FRAGILE HISTIDINE TRIAD GENE EXPRESSION AND ITS CORRALATION WITH MISMATCH REPAIR PROTEIN IN HUMAN SPORADIC COLORECTAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚成才; 林从尧

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene and its correlation with clinicopathological features and correlation with mismatch repair protein (mainly MLH1 and MSH2) in human sporadic colorectal carcinoma (SCC). Methods:Immunohistochemistry SP method was used to determine the expression of FHIT, MLH1 and MSH2 protein in surgically resected specimens of 84 human SCC. Results:The positive rates of FHIT, MLH1 and MSH2 protein expression were 48.81%, 92.86% and 100% respectively.Loss or reduced expression of FHIT protein was not related with tumors clinicopathological features such as age, gender,tumors site and histological type (P>0.05), but was correlated with tumors invade depth, degree of the differentiation, Ducks' stage and metastasis (P<0.05). There was no relationship between FHIT gene expression and MLH1 protein (r=0.0991, P>0.05) and MSH2 protein (r=0.0000, P=l.00) expression in human SCC. Conclusion:Absent or reduction of FHIT gene expression consists of high proportion and is a frequent event in SCC. FHIT gene is involved in the development and progression of human SCC and may be a candidate tumors suppressor gene. The relationship between alteration of FHIT gene expression and mismatch repair protein (mainly MLH1 and MSH2)deserved further study in human SCC.

  17. Human carotid atherosclerotic plaque protein(s) change HDL protein(s) composition and impair HDL anti-oxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elad; Aviram, Michael; Khatib, Soliman; Volkova, Nina; Vaya, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) anti-atherogenic functions are closely associated with cardiovascular disease risk factor, and are dictated by its composition, which is often affected by environmental factors. The present study investigates the effects of the human carotid plaque constituents on HDL composition and biological functions. To this end, human carotid plaques were homogenized and incubated with HDL. Results showed that after incubation, most of the apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) protein was released from the HDL, and HDL diameter increased by an average of approximately 2 nm. In parallel, HDL antioxidant activity was impaired. In response to homogenate treatment HDL could not prevent the accelerated oxidation of LDL caused by the homogenate. Boiling of the homogenate prior to its incubation with HDL abolished its effects on HDL composition changes. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence quenching assay revealed an interaction between plaque component(s) and HDL, an interaction that was reduced by 50% upon using pre-boiled homogenate. These results led to hypothesize that plaque protein(s) interacted with HDL-associated Apo A1 and altered the HDL composition. Immuno-precipitation of Apo A1 that was released from the HDL after its incubation with the homogenate revealed a co-precipitation of three isomers of actin. However, beta-actin alone did not significantly affect the HDL composition, and yet the active protein within the plaque was elusive. In conclusion then, protein(s) in the homogenate interact with HDL protein(s), leading to release of Apo A1 from the HDL particle, a process that was associated with an increase in HDL diameter and with impaired HDL anti-oxidant activity.

  18. Mutagenicity of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline in colon and liver of Big Blue rats: role of DNA adducts, strand breaks, DNA repair and oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, P.; Wallin, H.; Vogel, U.

    2002-01-01

    The contribution of oxidative stress, different types of DNA damage and expression of DNA repair enzymes in colon and liver mutagenesis induced by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) was investigated in four groups of six Big Blue rats fed diets with 0, 20, 70, and 200 mg IQ/kg for 3...... weeks. There were dose-response relationships of DNA adducts (P-32-postlabeling) and DNA strand breaks (comet assay) in colon and liver tissues, with the highest levels of DNA adducts and strand breaks in the colon. There was dose-dependent induction of mutations in both the colon and the liver....... Investigations of oxidative stress biomarkers produced inconclusive results. Oxidative DNA damage detected by the endonuclease III enzyme and 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine in colon, liver and/or urine was unaltered by IQ. However, there was increased level of gamma-glutamyl semialdehyde in liver proteins...

  19. Effect of oxidative stress on homer scaffolding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Nepliouev

    Full Text Available Homer proteins are a family of multifaceted scaffolding proteins that participate in the organization of signaling complexes at the post-synaptic density and in a variety of tissues including striated muscle. Homer isoforms form multimers via their C-terminal coiled coil domains, which allows for the formation of a polymeric network in combination with other scaffolding proteins. We hypothesized that the ability of Homer isoforms to serve as scaffolds would be influenced by oxidative stress. We have found by standard SDS-PAGE of lysates from adult mouse skeletal muscle exposed to air oxidation that Homer migrates as both a dimer and monomer in the absence of reducing agents and solely as a monomer in the presence of a reducing agent, suggesting that Homer dimers exposed to oxidation could be modified by the presence of an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Analysis of the peptide sequence of Homer 1b revealed the presence of only two cysteine residues located adjacent to the C-terminal coiled-coil domain. HEK 293 cells were transfected with wild-type and cysteine mutant forms of Homer 1b and exposed to oxidative stress by addition of menadione, which resulted in the formation of disulfide bonds except in the double mutant (C246G, C365G. Exposure of myofibers from adult mice to oxidative stress resulted in decreased solubility of endogenous Homer isoforms. This change in solubility was dependent on disulfide bond formation. In vitro binding assays revealed that cross-linking of Homer dimers enhanced the ability of Homer 1b to bind Drebrin, a known interacting partner. Our results show that oxidative stress results in disulfide cross-linking of Homer isoforms and loss of solubility of Homer scaffolds. This suggests that disulfide cross-linking of a Homer polymeric network may contribute to the pathophysiology seen in neurodegenerative diseases and myopathies characterized by oxidative stress.

  20. Protein oxidation implicated as the primary determinant of bacterial radioresistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Daly

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In the hierarchy of cellular targets damaged by ionizing radiation (IR, classical models of radiation toxicity place DNA at the top. Yet, many prokaryotes are killed by doses of IR that cause little DNA damage. Here we have probed the nature of Mn-facilitated IR resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, which together with other extremely IR-resistant bacteria have high intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios compared to IR-sensitive bacteria. For in vitro and in vivo irradiation, we demonstrate a mechanistic link between Mn(II ions and protection of proteins from oxidative modifications that introduce carbonyl groups. Conditions that inhibited Mn accumulation or Mn redox cycling rendered D. radiodurans radiation sensitive and highly susceptible to protein oxidation. X-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis showed that Mn is globally distributed in D. radiodurans, but Fe is sequestered in a region between dividing cells. For a group of phylogenetically diverse IR-resistant and IR-sensitive wild-type bacteria, our findings support the idea that the degree of resistance is determined by the level of oxidative protein damage caused during irradiation. We present the case that protein, rather than DNA, is the principal target of the biological action of IR in sensitive bacteria, and extreme resistance in Mn-accumulating bacteria is based on protein protection.

  1. The oxidative protein folding machinery in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Isabel; Meyer, Andreas J

    2013-08-01

    Formation of intra-molecular disulfides and concomitant oxidative protein folding is essential for stability and catalytic function of many soluble and membrane-bound proteins in the endomembrane system, the mitochondrial inter-membrane space and the thylakoid lumen. Disulfide generation from free cysteines in nascent polypeptide chains is generally a catalysed process for which distinct pathways exist in all compartments. A high degree of similarities between highly diverse eukaryotic and bacterial systems for generation of protein disulfides indicates functional conservation of key processes throughout evolution. However, while many aspects about molecular function of enzymatic systems promoting disulfide formation have been demonstrated for bacterial and non-plant eukaryotic organisms, it is now clear that the plant machinery for oxidative protein folding displays distinct details, suggesting that the different pathways have been adapted to plant-specific requirements in terms of compartmentation, molecular function and regulation. Here, we aim to evaluate biological diversity by comparing the plant systems for oxidative protein folding to the respective systems from non-plant eukaryotes.

  2. Protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase 1 is involved in both seed longevity and germination vigor in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogé, Laurent; Bourdais, Gildas; Bove, Jérôme; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Granier, Fabienne; Boutin, Jean-Pierre; Job, Dominique; Jullien, Marc; Grappin, Philippe

    2008-11-01

    The formation of abnormal amino acid residues is a major source of spontaneous age-related protein damage in cells. The protein l-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) combats protein misfolding resulting from l-isoaspartyl formation by catalyzing the conversion of abnormal l-isoaspartyl residues to their normal l-aspartyl forms. In this way, the PIMT repair enzyme system contributes to longevity and survival in bacterial and animal kingdoms. Despite the discovery of PIMT activity in plants two decades ago, the role of this enzyme during plant stress adaptation and in seed longevity remains undefined. In this work, we have isolated Arabidopsis thaliana lines exhibiting altered expression of PIMT1, one of the two genes encoding the PIMT enzyme in Arabidopsis. PIMT1 overaccumulation reduced the accumulation of l-isoaspartyl residues in seed proteins and increased both seed longevity and germination vigor. Conversely, reduced PIMT1 accumulation was associated with an increase in the accumulation of l-isoaspartyl residues in the proteome of freshly harvested dry mature seeds, thus leading to heightened sensitivity to aging treatments and loss of seed vigor under stressful germination conditions. These data implicate PIMT1 as a major endogenous factor that limits abnormal l-isoaspartyl accumulation in seed proteins, thereby improving seed traits such as longevity and vigor. The PIMT repair pathway likely works in concert with other anti-aging pathways to actively eliminate deleterious protein products, thus enabling successful seedling establishment and strengthening plant proliferation in natural environments.

  3. Conservation of Oxidative Protein Stabilization in an Insect Homologue of Parkinsonism-Associated Protein DJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiusheng; Prahlad, Janani; Wilson, Mark A. (UNL)

    2012-08-21

    DJ-1 is a conserved, disease-associated protein that protects against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in multiple organisms. Human DJ-1 contains a functionally essential cysteine residue (Cys106) whose oxidation is important for regulating protein function by an unknown mechanism. This residue is well-conserved in other DJ-1 homologues, including two (DJ-1{alpha} and DJ-1{beta}) in Drosophila melanogaster. Because D. melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying DJ-1 function, we have determined the crystal structure and impact of cysteine oxidation on Drosophila DJ-1{beta}. The structure of D. melanogaster DJ-1{beta} is similar to that of human DJ-1, although two important residues in the human protein, Met26 and His126, are not conserved in DJ-1{beta}. His126 in human DJ-1 is substituted with a tyrosine in DJ-1{beta}, and this residue is not able to compose a putative catalytic dyad with Cys106 that was proposed to be important in the human protein. The reactive cysteine in DJ-1 is oxidized readily to the cysteine-sulfinic acid in both flies and humans, and this may regulate the cytoprotective function of the protein. We show that the oxidation of this conserved cysteine residue to its sulfinate form (Cys-SO{sub 2{sup -}}) results in considerable thermal stabilization of both Drosophila DJ-1{beta} and human DJ-1. Therefore, protein stabilization is one potential mechanism by which cysteine oxidation may regulate DJ-1 function in vivo. More generally, most close DJ-1 homologues are likely stabilized by cysteine-sulfinic acid formation but destabilized by further oxidation, suggesting that they are biphasically regulated by oxidative modification.

  4. Protein Thiols as an Indication of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Rezaei Chianeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thiol is an organic compound that contain sulphhydryl group that have a critical role in preventing any involvement of oxidative stress in the cell. These defensive functions are generally considered to be carried out by the low molecular weight thiol glutathione and by cysteine residues in the active sites of proteins such as thioredoxin and peroxiredoxin. In addition, there are thiols exposed on protein surfaces that are not directly involved with protein function, although they can interact with the intracellular environment.The process of protection of the cell against an oxidative damage occur by thiol and cystein residue that has a low molecular weight. These residue are present in the active sites of a protein like, peroxiredoxin and thioredoxin. Apart from intracellular antioxidant defense mechanism by protein thiol, there are presence of thiol in outer surface of protein that are not involved with the function of protein, even though they can interact with intracellular part of the cell. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 443-456

  5. Plasma protein oxidation and total antioxidant power in premenstrual syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eans Tara Tuladhar; Anjali Rao

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To explore whether oxidative stress has any role inpremenstrual syndrome (PMS). Methods: Female volunteers suffering from PMS , in the age group of 20-24 years were compared to their asymptomatic normomennorhoeic counterparts in follicular phase and late luteal phase for ferric reducing antioxidant power of plasma(FRAP), plasma protein thiols(PPT) and protein carbonyls(PPC) levels.Results:There was no significant change in FRAP and PPC levels in controls andPMS groups but PPT decreased significantly in luteal phase ofPMS (P< 0.05) when compared to follicular phase.Conclusions:Estrogen and progesterone, might be responsible for a healthy antioxidant profile inPMS. However, a marked decrease inPPT in luteal phase of PMS group may be due to pro-oxidant nature of estrogen-active in this phase of PMS leading to consumption of the sacrificial antioxidant-protein thiol.

  6. The Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Pathway, Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain Protein Inhibitors, and Their Roles in Bone Repair and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs are oxygen-dependent transcriptional activators that play crucial roles in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, energy metabolism, and cell fate decisions. The group of enzymes that can catalyse the hydroxylation reaction of HIF-1 is prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs. PHD inhibitors (PHIs activate the HIF pathway by preventing degradation of HIF-α via inhibiting PHDs. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis are tightly coupled during bone repair and regeneration. Numerous studies suggest that HIFs and their target gene, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, are critical regulators of angiogenic-osteogenic coupling. In this brief perspective, we review current studies about the HIF pathway and its role in bone repair and regeneration, as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. Additionally, we briefly discuss the therapeutic manipulation of HIFs and VEGF in bone repair and bone tumours. This review will expand our knowledge of biology of HIFs, PHDs, PHD inhibitors, and bone regeneration, and it may also aid the design of novel therapies for accelerating bone repair and regeneration or inhibiting bone tumours.

  7. Human ribosomal protein S3 interacts with DNA base excision repair proteins hAPE/Ref-1 and hOGG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Vijay; Wang, Mu; Deutsch, Walter A

    2004-11-09

    The human ribosomal protein S3 (hS3) possesses associated activities that suggest alternative roles beyond its participation in protein translation. For example, it is capable of cleaving apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) DNA via a beta-elimination reaction, an activity that is missing in partially purified extracts of xeroderma pigmentosum group-D fibroblasts. In a recent study, we showed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) that hS3 also has a very high apparent binding affinity for 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and AP sites in DNA. Using the same SPR technology, it is shown here that hS3 positively interacts with the human base excision repair (BER) enzymes N-glycosylase/AP lyase OGG1 and APE/Ref-1. Using a DNA substrate that allows for the detection of 8-oxoG repair, we also show that hOGG1 N-glycosylase activity becomes increasingly more robust in the presence of hS3. Human S3 was found to co-immunoprecipitate with both hOGG1 and APE/Ref-1, indicating that these proteins physically interact with one another. These results raise the possibility that hS3 not only functions as a ribosomal protein but, in addition, may influence repair activities at sites of DNA damage.

  8. Oxidative Damage to DNA and Lipids: Correlation with Protein Glycation in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Goodarzi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Diabetic hyperglycemia is associated with increased production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS. ROS reacts with DNA results in products such as 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine that excrete in urine due to DNA repair processes. This study aims to evaluate correlation between oxidative damage of DNA and protein glycation in patients with Type 1 diabetes. We measured urinary 8-OHdG level in diabetic and control group and evaluated its correlation to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c and glycated serum protein (GSP levels. Furthermore plasma malondialdehyde (MDA level was measured as an important indicator of lipid peroxidation in diabetes.Materials & Methods: We studied 32 patients with diabetes mellitus Type 1 and compared them with 48 sex and age-matched non-diabetic controls. GSP and MDA measurement were made by colorimetric assay. Hemoglobin A1c measured by ion-exchange chromatography method and urinary 8-OHdG measurement was made by competitive in vitro enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.Results: In the present study urinary 8-OHdG, blood HbA1c, plasma MDA and GSP levels were significantly higher in diabetics comparing to the control subjects (P<0.05. Furthermore, we found significant correlation between urinary 8-OHdG and HbA1c (P<0.05 in diabetic group. In addition, fasting blood sugar showed significant correlation with GSP and MDA (P<0.05. However the correlation of MDA with HbA1c was not significant in diabetic patients.Conclusion: This case-control study in young diabetic patients showed that increased blood glucose and related metabolic disorders result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. Furthermore oxidative damage to DNA correlated to glycemic control, while there was no significant correlation between lipid peroxidation and the level of HbA1c.

  9. Oxidation as an important factor of protein damage: Implications for Maillard reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Trnková; J Dršata; I Boušová

    2015-06-01

    Protein oxidation, the process caused especially by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, is thought to play a major role in various oxidative processes within cells and is implicated in the development of many human diseases. This review provides a brief overview of the protein oxidation with the emphasis on the types of oxidation (oxidation of protein backbone and amino acid residues side chains, site-specific metal-catalysed protein oxidation), oxidation-dependent generation of protein hydroperoxides, carbonyl derivatives and protein–protein cross-linkages. Non-enzymatic glycoxidation (also known as Maillard reaction) as an important factor of protein damage, consequences of oxidative protein impairment and related diseases as well as means of monitoring and assessment of protein modifications are discussed.

  10. Effects of combined physical exercise training on DNA damage and repair capacity: role of oxidative stress changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Jorge Pinto; Silva, Amélia M; Oliveira, Maria Manuel; Peixoto, Francisco; Gaivão, Isabel; Mota, Maria Paula

    2015-06-01

    Regular physical exercise has been shown to be one of the most important lifestyle influences on improving functional performance, decreasing morbidity and all causes of mortality among older people. However, it is known that acute physical exercise may induce an increase in oxidative stress and oxidative damage in several structures, including DNA. Considering this, the purpose of this study was to identify the effects of 16 weeks of combined physical exercise in DNA damage and repair capacity in lymphocytes. In addition, we aimed to investigate the role of oxidative stress involved in those changes. Fifty-seven healthy men (40 to 74 years) were enrolled in this study. The sample was divided into two groups: the experimental group (EG), composed of 31 individuals, submitted to 16 weeks of combined physical exercise training; and the control group (CG), composed of 26 individuals, who did not undergo any specifically orientated physical activity. We observed an improvement of overall physical performance in the EG, after the physical exercise training. A significant decrease in DNA strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites was found after the physical exercise training, with no significant changes in 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase enzyme activity. An increase was observed in antioxidant activity, and a decrease was found in lipid peroxidation levels after physical exercise training. These results suggest that physical exercise training induces protective effects against DNA damage in lymphocytes possibly related to the increase in antioxidant capacity.

  11. Copper-mediated oxidative degradation of catecholamines and oxidative damage of protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, P.R.; Harria, M.I.N.; Felix, J.M.; Hoffmann, M.E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Degradative oxidation of catecholamines has been a matter of large interest in recent years due to the evidences associating their autoxidation with the etiology of neurotoxic and cardiotoxic processes. In this work we present data on the degradative oxidation of catecholamines of physiological importance: isoproterenol (IP), epinephrine (EP), norepinephrine (NEP), deoxyepinephrine (DEP) and dopamine (DA). The degradative oxidation of the catecholamines was followed by measurement of spectral changes and oxygen consumption by neutral aqueous solutions. The data show that Cu{sup 2+} strongly accelerated the rate of catecholamine oxidation, following the decreasing order; EP>DEP>IP>NEP>DA. The production of superoxide anion radical during catecholamine oxidation was very slow, even in the presence of Cu{sup 2+}. The ability of IP to induce damages on bovine serum albumin (BSA) was determined by measuring the formation of carbonyl-groups in the protein, detected by reduction with tritiated Na BH{sub 4}. The incubation of BSA with IP (50-500{mu}M), in the presence of 100{mu}M Cu{sup 2+} leaded to an increased and dose dependent {sup 3} H-incorporation by the oxidized protein. The production of oxidative damage by IP/Cu{sup 2+} was accompanied by marked BSA fragmentation, detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel dependent (25-400{mu}M IP) des appearance of the original BSA band and appearance of smaller fragments spread in the gel, when incubation has been done in the presence of 100{mu}M Cu{sup 2+}. These results suggest that copper-catalysed oxidative degradation of proteins induced by catecholamines might be critically involved in the toxic action of these molecules

  12. Protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase 1 (PIMT1) in rice improves seed longevity by preserving embryo vigor and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yidong; Xu, Huibin; Diao, Lirong; Zhu, Yongsheng; Xie, Hongguang; Cai, Qiuhua; Wu, Fangxi; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Jianfu; Xie, Huaan

    2015-11-01

    Damaged proteins containing abnormal isoaspartyl (isoAsp) accumulate as seeds age and the abnormality is thought to undermine seed vigor. Protein-L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) is involved in isoAsp-containing protein repair. Two PIMT genes from rice (Oryza sativa L.), designated as OsPIMT1 and OsPIMT2, were isolated and investigated for their roles. The results indicated that OsPIMT2 was mainly present in green tissues, but OsPIMT1 largely accumulated in embryos. Confocal visualization of the transient expression of OsPIMTs showed that OsPIMT2 was localized in the chloroplast and nucleus, whereas OsPIMT1 was predominately found in the cytosol. Artificial aging results highlighted the sensitivity of the seeds of OsPIMT1 mutant line when subjected to accelerated aging. Overexpression of OsPIMT1 in transgenic seeds reduced the accumulation of isoAsp-containing protein in embryos, and increased embryo viability. The germination percentage of transgenic seeds overexpressing OsPIMT1 increased 9-15% compared to the WT seeds after 21-day of artificial aging, whereas seeds from the OsPIMT1 RNAi lines overaccumulated isoAsp in embryos and experienced rapid loss of seed germinability. Taken together, these data strongly indicated that OsPIMT1-related seed longevity improvement is probably due to the repair of detrimental isoAsp-containing proteins that over accumulate in embryos when subjected to accelerated aging.

  13. The C-terminal Domain (CTD) of Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Is Required for Forming BERosome Repair Complex with DNA Replication Proteins at the Replicating Genome: DOMINANT NEGATIVE FUNCTION OF THE CTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Pavana M; Dutta, Arijit; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Joy; Adhikari, Sanjay; Tomkinson, Alan E; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-08-21

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 was recently demonstrated to initiate prereplicative base excision repair (BER) of oxidized bases in the replicating genome, thus preventing mutagenic replication. A significant fraction of NEIL1 in cells is present in large cellular complexes containing DNA replication and other repair proteins, as shown by gel filtration. However, how the interaction of NEIL1 affects its recruitment to the replication site for prereplicative repair was not investigated. Here, we show that NEIL1 binarily interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamp loader replication factor C, DNA polymerase δ, and DNA ligase I in the absence of DNA via its non-conserved C-terminal domain (CTD); replication factor C interaction results in ∼8-fold stimulation of NEIL1 activity. Disruption of NEIL1 interactions within the BERosome complex, as observed for a NEIL1 deletion mutant (N311) lacking the CTD, not only inhibits complete BER in vitro but also prevents its chromatin association and reduced recruitment at replication foci in S phase cells. This suggests that the interaction of NEIL1 with replication and other BER proteins is required for efficient repair of the replicating genome. Consistently, the CTD polypeptide acts as a dominant negative inhibitor during in vitro repair, and its ectopic expression sensitizes human cells to reactive oxygen species. We conclude that multiple interactions among BER proteins lead to large complexes, which are critical for efficient BER in mammalian cells, and the CTD interaction could be targeted for enhancing drug/radiation sensitivity of tumor cells.

  14. Redox proteomics identification of oxidatively modified myocardial proteins in human heart failure: implications for protein function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Brioschi

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress in a failing heart may contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF. The aim of this study was to identify the oxidised proteins in the myocardium of HF patients and analyse the consequences of oxidation on protein function. The carbonylated proteins in left ventricular tissue from failing (n = 14 and non-failing human hearts (n = 13 were measured by immunoassay and identified by proteomics. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were incubated in the presence of stimuli relevant for HF in order to assess the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, the induction of protein carbonylation, and its consequences on protein function. The levels of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher in the HF patients than in the controls (p<0.01. We identified two proteins that mainly underwent carbonylation: M-type creatine kinase (M-CK, whose activity is impaired, and, to a lesser extent, α-cardiac actin. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II and norepinephrine led to ROS generation and M-CK carbonylation with loss of its enzymatic activity. Our findings indicate that protein carbonylation is increased in the myocardium during HF and that these oxidative changes may help to explain the decreased CK activity and consequent defects in energy metabolism observed in HF.

  15. Redox proteomics identification of oxidatively modified myocardial proteins in human heart failure: implications for protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brioschi, Maura; Polvani, Gianluca; Fratto, Pasquale; Parolari, Alessandro; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Tremoli, Elena; Banfi, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress in a failing heart may contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify the oxidised proteins in the myocardium of HF patients and analyse the consequences of oxidation on protein function. The carbonylated proteins in left ventricular tissue from failing (n = 14) and non-failing human hearts (n = 13) were measured by immunoassay and identified by proteomics. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were incubated in the presence of stimuli relevant for HF in order to assess the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of protein carbonylation, and its consequences on protein function. The levels of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher in the HF patients than in the controls (p<0.01). We identified two proteins that mainly underwent carbonylation: M-type creatine kinase (M-CK), whose activity is impaired, and, to a lesser extent, α-cardiac actin. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II and norepinephrine led to ROS generation and M-CK carbonylation with loss of its enzymatic activity. Our findings indicate that protein carbonylation is increased in the myocardium during HF and that these oxidative changes may help to explain the decreased CK activity and consequent defects in energy metabolism observed in HF.

  16. The role of Slr0151, a tetratricopeptide repeat protein from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, during Photosystem II assembly and repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eRast

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The assembly and repair of photosystem II (PSII is facilitated by a variety of assembly factors. Among those, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR protein Slr0151 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis has previously been assigned a repair function under high light conditions (Yang et al., 2014, J. Integr. Plant Biol. 56, 1136-50. Here, we show that inactivation of Slr0151 affects thylakoid membrane ultrastructure even under normal light conditions. Moreover, the level and localization of Slr0151 are affected in a variety of PSII-related mutants. In particular, the data suggest a close functional relationship between Slr0151 and Sll0933, which interacts with Ycf48 during PSII assembly and is homologous to PAM68 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed a punctate distribution of Slr0151 within several different membrane types in Synechocystis cells.

  17. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS...... is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown...... to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...

  18. Controlled oxidative protein refolding using an ion-exchange column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenhof, Marc; Leong, Susanna S J; Pattenden, Leonard K; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2005-04-01

    Column-based refolding of complex and highly disulfide-bonded proteins simplifies protein renaturation at both preparative and process scale by integrating and automating a number of operations commonly used in dilution refolding. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein for refolding and oxido-shuffling on an ion-exchange column to give a refolding yield of 55% after 40 h incubation. Successful on-column refolding was conducted at protein concentrations of up to 10 mg/ml and refolded protein, purified from misfolded forms, was eluted directly from the column at a concentration of 3 mg/ml. This technique integrates the dithiothreitol removal, refolding, concentration and purification steps, achieving a high level of process simplification and automation, and a significant saving in reagent costs when scaled. Importantly, the current result suggests that it is possible to controllably refold disulfide-bonded proteins using common and inexpensive matrices, and that it is not always necessary to control protein-surface interactions using affinity tags and expensive chromatographic matrices. Moreover, it is possible to strictly control the oxidative refolding environment once denatured protein is bound to the ion-exchange column, thus allowing precisely controlled oxido-shuffling.

  19. Oxidatively Modified Proteins in the Serous Subtype of Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifeh Mehrabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serous subtype of ovarian cancer is considered to originate from fallopian epithelium mucosa that has been exposed to physiological changes resulting from ovulation. Ovulation influences an increased in inflammation of epithelial ovarian cells as results of constant exposure of cells to ROS. The imbalance between ROS and antioxidant capacities, as well as a disruption of redox signaling, causes a wide range of damage to DNA, proteins, and lipids. This study applied spectrophotometric, dinitrophenylhydrazone (DNPH assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and Western blot analyses to assess the levels of oxidatively modified proteins in 100 primary serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma and normal/surrounding tissues. These samples were obtained from 56 Caucasian and 44 African-American patients within the age range of 61±10 years. Analyses showed that the levels of reactive protein carbonyl groups increased as stages progressed to malignancy. Additionally, the levels of protein carbonyls in serous ovarian carcinoma among African Americans are 40% (P<0.05 higher relative to Caucasian at similar advanced stages. Results suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the modification of carbonyl protein groups, leading to increased aggressiveness of epithelial ovarian tumors and may contribute to the disease's invasiveness among African Americans.

  20. The virion of Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV) contains a complex suite of proteins for transcription and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Matthias G; Kelly, Isabelle; Foster, Leonard J; Suttle, Curtis A

    2014-10-01

    Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV) is a giant virus of the Mimiviridae family that infects the marine phagotrophic flagellate C. roenbergensis. CroV possesses a DNA genome of ~730 kilobase pairs that is predicted to encode 544 proteins. We analyzed the protein composition of purified CroV particles by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and identified 141 virion-associated CroV proteins and 60 host proteins. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000993. Predicted functions could be assigned to 36% of the virion proteins, which include structural proteins as well as enzymes for transcription, DNA repair, redox reactions and protein modification. Homologs of 36 CroV virion proteins have previously been found in the virion of Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus. The overlapping virion proteome of CroV and Mimivirus reveals a set of conserved virion protein functions that were presumably present in the last common ancestor of the Mimiviridae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Apn1 AP-endonuclease is essential for the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA bases in yeast frataxin-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Sophie; Brossas, Caroline; Auchère, Françoise; Boggetto, Nicole; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-09-15

    Frataxin deficiency results in mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress and it is the cause of the hereditary neurodegenerative disease Friedreich ataxia (FA). Here, we present evidence that one of the pleiotropic effects of oxidative stress in frataxin-deficient yeast cells (Δyfh1 mutant) is damage to nuclear DNA and that repair requires the Apn1 AP-endonuclease of the base excision repair pathway. Major phenotypes of Δyfh1 cells are respiratory deficit, disturbed iron homeostasis and sensitivity to oxidants. These phenotypes are weak or absent under anaerobiosis. We show here that exposure of anaerobically grown Δyfh1 cells to oxygen leads to down-regulation of antioxidant defenses, increase in reactive oxygen species, delay in G1- and S-phases of the cell cycle and damage to mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Nuclear DNA lesions in Δyfh1 cells are primarily caused by oxidized bases and single-strand breaks that can be detected 15-30 min after oxygen exposition. The Apn1 enzyme is essential for the repair of the DNA lesions in Δyfh1 cells. Compared with Δyfh1, the double Δyfh1Δapn1 mutant shows growth impairment, increased mutagenesis and extreme sensitivity to H(2)O(2). On the contrary, overexpression of the APN1 gene in Δyfh1 cells decreases spontaneous and induced mutagenesis. Our results show that frataxin deficiency in yeast cells leads to increased DNA base oxidation and requirement of Apn1 for repair, suggesting that DNA damage and repair could be important features in FA disease progression.

  2. Oxidative stress in mammalian cells impinges on the cysteines redox state of human XRCC3 protein and on its cellular localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Marie Girard

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, XRCC3 is one of the five Rad51 paralogs that plays a central role in homologous recombination (HR, a key pathway for maintaining genomic stability. While investigating the potential role of human XRCC3 (hXRCC3 in the inhibition of DNA replication induced by UVA radiation, we discovered that hXRCC3 cysteine residues are oxidized following photosensitization by UVA. Our in silico prediction of the hXRCC3 structure suggests that 6 out of 8 cysteines are potentially accessible to the solvent and therefore potentially exposed to ROS attack. By non-reducing SDS-PAGE we show that many different oxidants induce hXRCC3 oxidation that is monitored in Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO cells by increased electrophoretic mobility of the protein and in human cells by a slight decrease of its immunodetection. In both cell types, hXRCC3 oxidation was reversed in few minutes by cellular reducing systems. Depletion of intracellular glutathione prevents hXRCC3 oxidation only after UVA exposure though depending on the type of photosensitizer. In addition, we show that hXRCC3 expressed in CHO cells localizes both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Mutating all hXRCC3 cysteines to serines (XR3/S protein does not affect the subcellular localization of the protein even after exposure to camptothecin (CPT, which typically induces DNA damages that require HR to be repaired. However, cells expressing mutated XR3/S protein are sensitive to CPT, thus highlighting a defect of the mutant protein in HR. In marked contrast to CPT treatment, oxidative stress induces relocalization at the chromatin fraction of both wild-type and mutated protein, even though survival is not affected. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the DNA repair protein hXRCC3 is a target of ROS induced by environmental factors and raise the possibility that the redox environment might participate in regulating the HR pathway.

  3. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase α2 in Neutrophils Regulates Vascular Repair via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α and a Network of Proteins Affecting Metabolism and Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Malik, Randa; Zippel, Nina; Frömel, Timo; Heidler, Juliana; Zukunft, Sven; Walzog, Barbara; Ansari, Nariman; Pampaloni, Francesco; Wingert, Susanne; Rieger, Michael A.; Wittig, Ilka; Fisslthaler, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is stimulated by hypoxia, and although the AMPKα1 catalytic subunit has been implicated in angiogenesis, little is known about the role played by the AMPKα2 subunit in vascular repair. Objective: To determine the role of the AMPKα2 subunit in vascular repair. Methods and Results: Recovery of blood flow after femoral artery ligation was impaired (>80%) in AMPKα2−/− versus wild-type mice, a phenotype reproduced in mice lacking AMPKα2 in myeloid cells (AMPKα2ΔMC). Three days after ligation, neutrophil infiltration into ischemic limbs of AMPKα2ΔMC mice was lower than that in wild-type mice despite being higher after 24 hours. Neutrophil survival in ischemic tissue is required to attract monocytes that contribute to the angiogenic response. Indeed, apoptosis was increased in hypoxic neutrophils from AMPKα2ΔMC mice, fewer monocytes were recruited, and gene array analysis revealed attenuated expression of proangiogenic proteins in ischemic AMPKα2ΔMC hindlimbs. Many angiogenic growth factors are regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induction was attenuated in AMPKα2-deficient cells and accompanied by its enhanced hydroxylation. Also, fewer proteins were regulated by hypoxia in neutrophils from AMPKα2ΔMC mice. Mechanistically, isocitrate dehydrogenase expression and the production of α-ketoglutarate, which negatively regulate hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stability, were attenuated in neutrophils from wild-type mice but remained elevated in cells from AMPKα2ΔMC mice. Conclusions: AMPKα2 regulates α-ketoglutarate generation, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stability, and neutrophil survival, which in turn determine further myeloid cell recruitment and repair potential. The activation of AMPKα2 in neutrophils is a decisive event in the initiation of vascular repair after ischemia. PMID:27777247

  4. Expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins in transformed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: relationship to smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandi, S; Yu, J; Reinert, Line

    2006-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that defects in DNA-mismatch repair are associated with smoking in certain types of transformed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We have analyzed biopsy samples from two indolent B-cell lymphomas, follicular lymphoma (FL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic...... leukemia (CLL/SLL), that have transformed to diffuse-large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We correlated the presence or absence of DNA-mismatch repair enzymes by immunostaining as well as the p53 status to smoking history. Of all patients (n = 30), 37% showed negative immunostaining of MLH1, 16% showed negative...

  5. Protein topology determines cysteine oxidation fate: the case of sulfenyl amide formation among protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelipe, Lucas A; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A; Turjanski, Adrián G

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function.

  6. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage and association with cancer and aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Schurman, Shepherd H; Harboe, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Aging has been associated with damage accumulation in the genome and with increased cancer incidence. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced from endogenous sources, most notably the oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, and from exogenous sources, such as ionizing radiation. ROS attack D...

  7. Expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins in transformed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: relationship to smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandi, S; Yu, J; Reinert, Line;

    2006-01-01

    leukemia (CLL/SLL), that have transformed to diffuse-large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We correlated the presence or absence of DNA-mismatch repair enzymes by immunostaining as well as the p53 status to smoking history. Of all patients (n = 30), 37% showed negative immunostaining of MLH1, 16% showed negative...

  8. MET1 is a thylakoid-associated TPR protein involved in photosystem II supercomplex formation and repair in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Nazmul H; Friso, Giulia; Poliakov, Anton; Ponnala, Lalit; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) requires constant disassembly and reassembly to accommodate replacement of the D1 protein. Here, we characterize Arabidopsis thaliana MET1, a PSII assembly factor with PDZ and TPR domains. The maize (Zea mays) MET1 homolog is enriched in mesophyll chloroplasts compared with bundle sheath chloroplasts, and MET1 mRNA and protein levels increase during leaf development concomitant with the thylakoid machinery. MET1 is conserved in C3 and C4 plants and green algae but is not found in prokaryotes. Arabidopsis MET1 is a peripheral thylakoid protein enriched in stroma lamellae and is also present in grana. Split-ubiquitin assays and coimmunoprecipitations showed interaction of MET1 with stromal loops of PSII core components CP43 and CP47. From native gels, we inferred that MET1 associates with PSII subcomplexes formed during the PSII repair cycle. When grown under fluctuating light intensities, the Arabidopsis MET1 null mutant (met1) showed conditional reduced growth, near complete blockage in PSII supercomplex formation, and concomitant increase of unassembled CP43. Growth of met1 in high light resulted in loss of PSII supercomplexes and accelerated D1 degradation. We propose that MET1 functions as a CP43/CP47 chaperone on the stromal side of the membrane during PSII assembly and repair. This function is consistent with the observed differential MET1 accumulation across dimorphic maize chloroplasts.

  9. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  10. Bi-directional routing of DNA mismatch repair protein human exonuclease 1 to replication foci and DNA double strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liberti, Sascha E; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) is implicated in DNA metabolism, including replication, recombination and repair, substantiated by its interactions with PCNA, DNA helicases BLM and WRN, and several DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. We investigated the sub-nuclear localization of hEXO1 during S......-phase progression and in response to laser-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). We show that hEXO1 and PCNA co-localize in replication foci. This apparent interaction is sustained throughout S-phase. We also demonstrate that hEXO1 is rapidly recruited to DNA DSBs. We have identified a PCNA interacting protein...... (PIP-box) region on hEXO1 located in its COOH-terminal ((788)QIKLNELW(795)). This motif is essential for PCNA binding and co-localization during S-phase. Recruitment of hEXO1 to DNA DSB sites is dependent on the MMR protein hMLH1. We show that two distinct hMLH1 interaction regions of hEXO1 (residues...

  11. The yeast recombinational repair protein Rad59 interacts with Rad52 and stimulates single-strand annealing.

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, A P; Symington, L. S.

    2001-01-01

    The yeast RAD52 gene is essential for homology-dependent repair of DNA double-strand breaks. In vitro, Rad52 binds to single- and double-stranded DNA and promotes annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA. Genetic studies indicate that the Rad52 and Rad59 proteins act in the same recombination pathway either as a complex or through overlapping functions. Here we demonstrate physical interaction between Rad52 and Rad59 using the yeast two-hybrid system and co-immunoprecipitation from yeas...

  12. Correlativity study between expression of DNA double-strand break repair protein and radiosensitivity of tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang ZHUANG; Shiying YU; Xiaoyuan HUANG; Yang CAO; Huihua XIONG

    2009-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) is generally regarded as the most lethal of all DNA lesions after radiation. KuS0, DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) proteins are major DSB repair proteins. In this study, survival fraction at 2Gy (SF2) values of eight human tumor cell lines (including four human cervical carcinoma cell lines HeLa, SiHa, C33A, Caski, three human breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-453, and one human lung carcinoma cell line A549) were acquired by clone formation assay, and western blot was applied to detect the expressions of Ku80, DNA-PKcs and ATM protein. The correlativity of protein expression with SF2 value was analyzed by Pearson linear correlation analysis. We found that the expression of the same protein in different cell lines and the expression of three proteins in the same cell line had a significant difference. The SF2 values were also different in eight tumor cell lines and there was a positive correlativity between the expression of DNA-PKcs and SF2 (r=0.723, P =0.043), but Ku80 and ATM expression had no correlation with SF2 (P>0.05). These findings suggest that the expression level of DNA-PKcs protein can be an indicator for predicting the radiosensitivity of tumor cells.

  13. An Efficient and Rapid Method to Monitor the Oxidative Degradation of Protein Pharmaceuticals: Probing Tyrosine Oxidation with Fluorogenic Derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommana, Rupesh; Mozziconacci, Olivier; John Wang, Y; Schöneich, Christian

    2017-07-01

    The loss of potency of protein therapeutics can be linked to the oxidation of specific amino acid residues leading to a great variety of oxidative modifications. The comprehensive identification of these oxidative modifications requires high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis, which requires time and expensive resources. Here, we propose a fluorogenic derivatization method of oxidized Tyr and Phe yielding benzoxazole derivatives, as an orthogonal technique for the rapid screening of protein oxidation. Four model proteins, IgG1, human growth hormone (hGH), insulin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were exposed to oxidation via peroxyl radicals and metal-catalyzed reactions and efficiently screened by fluorogenic derivatization of Tyr and Phe oxidation products. Complementary LC-MS analysis was done to identify the extent of methionine oxidation in oxidized proteins. The Fluorogenic derivatization technique can easily be adapted to a 96-well plate, in which several protein formulations can be screened in short time. Representatively for hGH, we show that the formation of benzoxazole parallels the oxidation of Met to methionine sulfoxide which enables estimation of Met oxidation by just recording the fluorescence. Our rapid fluorescence based screening allows for the fast comparison of the stability of multiple formulations.

  14. Influence of protein type on oxidation and digestibility of fish oil-in-water emulsions: gliadin, caseinate, and whey protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chaoying; Zhao, Mouming; Decker, Eric Andrew; McClements, David Julian

    2015-05-15

    The influence of three surface-active proteins on the oxidative stability and lipase digestibility of emulsified ω-3 oils was examined: deamidated wheat gliadin (gliadin); sodium caseinate (CN); whey protein isolate (WPI). Gliadin and WPI were more effective at inhibiting lipid oxidation (hydroperoxides and TBARS) of fish oil-in-water emulsions than CN. Protein oxidation during storage was determined by measuring the loss of tryptophan fluorescence. The CN-emulsions exhibited the highest loss of tryptophan fluorescence during aging, as well as the highest amount of lipid oxidation. Potential reasons for the differences in oxidative stability of the emulsions with different proteins include differences in interfacial film thickness, protein chelating ability, and antioxidant amino acids profiles. During in vitro digestion, gliadin-stabilized emulsions had the lowest digestion rate of the three proteins. These results have important implications for using proteins to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for ω-3 oils.

  15. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Johnson

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumour (MBT domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  16. Protein Tyrosine Nitration and Thiol Oxidation by Peroxynitrite—Strategies to Prevent These Oxidative Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Daub, Steffen; Bachschmid, Markus; Schildknecht, Stefan; Oelze, Matthias; Steven, Sebastian; Schmidt, Patrick; Megner, Alexandra; Wada, Masayuki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Münzel, Thomas; Bottari, Serge; Ullrich, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The reaction product of nitric oxide and superoxide, peroxynitrite, is a potent biological oxidant. The most important oxidative protein modifications described for peroxynitrite are cysteine-thiol oxidation and tyrosine nitration. We have previously demonstrated that intrinsic heme-thiolate (P450)-dependent enzymatic catalysis increases the nitration of tyrosine 430 in prostacyclin synthase and results in loss of activity which contributes to endothelial dysfunction. We here report the sensitive peroxynitrite-dependent nitration of an over-expressed and partially purified human prostacyclin synthase (3.3 μM) with an EC50 value of 5 μM. Microsomal thiols in these preparations effectively compete for peroxynitrite and block the nitration of other proteins up to 50 μM peroxynitrite. Purified, recombinant PGIS showed a half-maximal nitration by 10 μM 3-morpholino sydnonimine (Sin-1) which increased in the presence of bicarbonate, and was only marginally induced by freely diffusing NO2-radicals generated by a peroxidase/nitrite/hydrogen peroxide system. Based on these observations, we would like to emphasize that prostacyclin synthase is among the most efficiently and sensitively nitrated proteins investigated by us so far. In the second part of the study, we identified two classes of peroxynitrite scavengers, blocking either peroxynitrite anion-mediated thiol oxidations or phenol/tyrosine nitrations by free radical mechanisms. Dithiopurines and dithiopyrimidines were highly effective in inhibiting both reaction types which could make this class of compounds interesting therapeutic tools. In the present work, we highlighted the impact of experimental conditions on the outcome of peroxynitrite-mediated nitrations. The limitations identified in this work need to be considered in the assessment of experimental data involving peroxynitrite. PMID:23567270

  17. Protein tyrosine nitration and thiol oxidation by peroxynitrite-strategies to prevent these oxidative modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Daub, Steffen; Bachschmid, Markus; Schildknecht, Stefan; Oelze, Matthias; Steven, Sebastian; Schmidt, Patrick; Megner, Alexandra; Wada, Masayuki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Münzel, Thomas; Bottari, Serge; Ullrich, Volker

    2013-04-08

    The reaction product of nitric oxide and superoxide, peroxynitrite, is a potent biological oxidant. The most important oxidative protein modifications described for peroxynitrite are cysteine-thiol oxidation and tyrosine nitration. We have previously demonstrated that intrinsic heme-thiolate (P450)-dependent enzymatic catalysis increases the nitration of tyrosine 430 in prostacyclin synthase and results in loss of activity which contributes to endothelial dysfunction. We here report the sensitive peroxynitrite-dependent nitration of an over-expressed and partially purified human prostacyclin synthase (3.3 μM) with an EC50 value of 5 μM. Microsomal thiols in these preparations effectively compete for peroxynitrite and block the nitration of other proteins up to 50 μM peroxynitrite. Purified, recombinant PGIS showed a half-maximal nitration by 10 μM 3-morpholino sydnonimine (Sin-1) which increased in the presence of bicarbonate, and was only marginally induced by freely diffusing NO2-radicals generated by a peroxidase/nitrite/hydrogen peroxide system. Based on these observations, we would like to emphasize that prostacyclin synthase is among the most efficiently and sensitively nitrated proteins investigated by us so far. In the second part of the study, we identified two classes of peroxynitrite scavengers, blocking either peroxynitrite anion-mediated thiol oxidations or phenol/tyrosine nitrations by free radical mechanisms. Dithiopurines and dithiopyrimidines were highly effective in inhibiting both reaction types which could make this class of compounds interesting therapeutic tools. In the present work, we highlighted the impact of experimental conditions on the outcome of peroxynitrite-mediated nitrations. The limitations identified in this work need to be considered in the assessment of experimental data involving peroxynitrite.

  18. The protein oxidation product 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) mediates oxidative DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morin, B; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    1998-01-01

    of other protein-bound oxidation products. The formation of two oxidation products of DNA, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxodG) and 5-hydroxy-2'-deoxycytidine (5OHdC), were studied with a novel HPLC using gradient elution and an electrochemical detection method, which allowed the detection of both...... of the present work was to investigate whether DOPA, and especially PB-DOPA, can mediate oxidative damage to DNA. We chose to generate PB-DOPA using mushroom tyrosinase, which catalyses the hydroxylation of tyrosine residues in protein. This permitted us to study the reactions of PB-DOPA in the virtual absence...... DNA modifications in a single experiment. We found that exposure of calf thymus DNA to DOPA or PB-DOPA resulted in the formation of 8oxodG and 5OHdC, with the former predominating. The formation of these DNA oxidation products by either DOPA or PB-DOPA depended on the presence of oxygen, and also...

  19. Effects of an Antimutagenic 1,4-Dihydropyridine AV-153 on Expression of Nitric Oxide Synthases and DNA Repair-related Enzymes and Genes in Kidneys of Rats with a Streptozotocin Model of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ošiņa, Kristīne; Rostoka, Evita; Isajevs, Sergejs; Sokolovska, Jelizaveta; Sjakste, Tatjana; Sjakste, Nikolajs

    2016-11-01

    Development of complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), including diabetic nephropathy, is a complex multi-stage process, dependent on many factors including the modification of nitric oxide (NO) production and an impaired DNA repair. The goal of this work was to study in vivo effects of 1,4-dihydropyridine AV-153, known as antimutagen and DNA binder, on the expression of several genes and proteins involved in NO metabolism and DNA repair in the kidneys of rats with a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of DM. Transcription intensity was monitored by means of real-time RT-PCR and the expression of proteins by immunohistochemistry. Development of DM significantly induced PARP1 protein expression, while AV-153 (0.5 mg/kg) administration decreased it. AV-153 increased the expression of Parp1 gene in the kidneys of both intact and diabetic animals. Expression of H2afx mRNA and γH2AX histone protein, a marker of DNA breakage, was not changed in diabetic animals, but AV-153 up-regulated the expression of the gene without any impact on the protein expression. Development of DM was followed by a significant increase in iNOS enzyme expression, while AV-153 down-regulated the enzyme expression up to normal levels. iNos gene expression was also found to be increased in diabetic animals, but unlike the protein, the expression of mRNA was found to be enhanced by AV-153 administration. Expression of both eNOS protein and eNos gene in the kidneys was down-regulated, and the administration of AV-153 normalized the expression level. The effects of the compound in the kidneys of diabetic animals appear to be beneficial, as a trend for the normalization of expression of NO synthases is observed. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  20. Comparative, osteochondral defect repair: Stem cells versus chondrocytes versus Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2, solely or in combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Reyes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Full-thickness articular cartilage damage does not resolve spontaneously. Studies with growth factors, implantation of autologous chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells have led to variable, to some extent inconsistent, results. This work compares osteochondral knee-defect repair in rabbits upon implantation of a previously described alginate/(poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA osteochondral scaffold in distinct conditions. Systems were either in vitro pre-cultured with a small number of allogeneic chondrocytes under fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 stimulation or the same amount of allogeneic, marrow derived, mesenchymal stem cells (without any pre-differentiation, or loaded with microsphere-encapsulated bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2 within the alginate layer, or holding combinations of one or the other cell type with BMP-2. The experimental limit was 12 weeks, because a foregoing study with this release system had shown a maintained tissue response for at least 24 weeks post-operation. After only 6 weeks, histological analyses revealed newly formed cartilage-like tissue, which resembled the adjacent, normal cartilage in cell as well as BMP-2 treated defects, but cell therapy gave higher histological scores. This advantage evened out until 12 weeks. Combinations of cells and BMP-2 did not result in any additive or synergistic effect. Equally efficient osteochondral defect repair was achieved with chondrocyte, stem cell, and BMP-2 treatment. Expression of collagen X and collagen I, signs of ongoing ossification, were histologically undetectable, and the presence of aggrecan protein indicated cartilage-like tissue. In conclusion, further work should demonstrate whether spatiotemporally controlled, on-site BMP-2 release alone could become a feasible therapeutic approach to repair large osteochondral defects.

  1. Brh2 and Rad51 promote telomere maintenance in Ustilago maydis, a new model system of DNA repair proteins at telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Eun Young; Kojic, Milorad; Holloman, William K; Lue, Neal F

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies implicate a number of DNA repair proteins in mammalian telomere maintenance. However, because several key repair proteins in mammals are missing from the well-studied budding and fission yeast, their roles at telomeres cannot be modeled in standard fungi. In this report, we explored the dimorphic fungus Ustilago maydis as an alternative model for telomere research. This fungus, which belongs to the phylum Basidiomycota, has a telomere repeat unit that is identical to the mammalian repeat, as well as a constellation of DNA repair proteins that more closely mimic the mammalian collection. We showed that the two core components of homology-directed repair (HDR) in U. maydis, namely Brh2 and Rad51, both promote telomere maintenance in telomerase positive cells, just like in mammals. In addition, we found that Brh2 is localized to telomeres in vivo, suggesting that it acts directly at chromosome ends. We surveyed a series of mutants with DNA repair defects, and found many of them to have short telomeres. Our results indicate that factors involved in DNA repair are probably also needed for optimal telomere maintenance in U. maydis, and that this fungus is a useful alternative model system for telomere research.

  2. Hypochlorous acid-mediated protein oxidation: how important are chloramine transfer reactions and protein tertiary structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, David I; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J

    2007-08-28

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a powerful oxidant generated from H2O2 and Cl- by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase, which is released from activated leukocytes. HOCl possesses potent antibacterial properties, but excessive production can lead to host tissue damage that occurs in numerous human pathologies. As proteins and amino acids are highly abundant in vivo and react rapidly with HOCl, they are likely to be major targets for HOCl. In this study, two small globular proteins, lysozyme and insulin, have been oxidized with increasing excesses of HOCl to determine whether the pattern of HOCl-mediated amino acid consumption is consistent with reported kinetic data for isolated amino acids and model compounds. Identical experiments have been carried out with mixtures of N-acetyl amino acids (to prevent reaction at the alpha-amino groups) that mimic the protein composition to examine the role of protein structure on reactivity. The results indicate that tertiary structure facilitates secondary chlorine transfer reactions of chloramines formed on His and Lys side chains. In light of these data, second-order rate constants for reactions of Lys side chain and Gly chloramines with Trp side chains and disulfide bonds have been determined, together with those for further oxidation of Met sulfoxide by HOCl and His side chain chloramines. Computational kinetic models incorporating these additional rate constants closely predict the experimentally observed amino acid consumption. These studies provide insight into the roles of chloramine formation and three-dimensional structure on the reactions of HOCl with isolated proteins and demonstrate that kinetic models can predict the outcome of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation.

  3. Yes-associated protein in the liver: Regulation of hepatic development, repair, cell fate determination and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quy; Anders, Robert A; Alpini, Gianfranco; Bai, Haibo

    2015-10-01

    The liver is a vital organ that plays a major role in many bodily functions from protein production and blood clotting to cholesterol, glucose and iron metabolism and nutrition storage. Maintenance of liver homeostasis is critical for these essential bodily functions and disruption of liver homeostasis causes various kinds of liver diseases, some of which have high mortality rate. Recent research advances of the Hippo signalling pathway have revealed its nuclear effector, Yes-associated protein, as an important regulator of liver development, repair, cell fate determination and tumorigenesis. Therefore, a precise control of Yes-associated protein activity is critical for the maintenance of liver homeostasis. This review is going to summarize the discoveries on how the manipulation of Yes-associated protein activity affects liver homeostasis and induces liver diseases and the regulatory mechanisms that determine the Yes-associated protein activity in the liver. Finally, we will discuss the potential of targeting Yes-associated protein as therapeutic strategies in liver diseases.

  4. Methylation and protein expression of DNA repair genes: association with chemotherapy exposure and survival in sporadic ovarian and peritoneal carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsh Tom

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA repair genes critically regulate the cellular response to chemotherapy and epigenetic regulation of these genes may be influenced by chemotherapy exposure. Restoration of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mediates resistance to platinum chemotherapy in recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutated hereditary ovarian carcinomas. We evaluated BRCA1, BRCA2, and MLH1 protein expression in 115 sporadic primary ovarian carcinomas, of which 31 had paired recurrent neoplasms collected after chemotherapy. Additionally, we assessed whether promoter methylation of BRCA1, MLH1 or FANCF influenced response to chemotherapy or explained alterations in protein expression after chemotherapy exposure. Results Of 115 primary sporadic ovarian carcinomas, 39 (34% had low BRCA1 protein and 49 (42% had low BRCA2 expression. BRCA1 and BRCA2 protein expression were highly concordant (p Conclusion Low BRCA1 expression in primary sporadic ovarian carcinoma is associated with prolonged survival. Recurrent ovarian carcinomas commonly have increased BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 protein expression post chemotherapy exposure which could mediate resistance to platinum based therapies. However, alterations in expression of these proteins after chemotherapy are not commonly mediated by promoter methylation, and other regulatory mechanisms are likely to contribute to these alterations.

  5. The MCM-binding protein ETG1 aids sister chromatid cohesion required for postreplicative homologous recombination repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Takahashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA replication process represents a source of DNA stress that causes potentially spontaneous genome damage. This effect might be strengthened by mutations in crucial replication factors, requiring the activation of DNA damage checkpoints to enable DNA repair before anaphase onset. Here, we demonstrate that depletion of the evolutionarily conserved minichromosome maintenance helicase-binding protein ETG1 of Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in a stringent late G2 cell cycle arrest. This arrest correlated with a partial loss of sister chromatid cohesion. The lack-of-cohesion phenotype was intensified in plants without functional CTF18, a replication fork factor needed for cohesion establishment. The synergistic effect of the etg1 and ctf18 mutants on sister chromatid cohesion strengthened the impact on plant growth of the replication stress caused by ETG1 deficiency because of inefficient DNA repair. We conclude that the ETG1 replication factor is required for efficient cohesion and that cohesion establishment is essential for proper development of plants suffering from endogenous DNA stress. Cohesion defects observed upon knockdown of its human counterpart suggest an equally important developmental role for the orthologous mammalian ETG1 protein.

  6. Comparative proteomics of oxidative stress response of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM reveals effects on DNA repair and cysteine de novo synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderini, Elia; Celebioglu, Hasan Ufuk; Villarroel, Julia

    2017-01-01

    acidophilus NCFM to H2O2, simulating an oxidative environment. Bacterial growth was monitored by BioScreen and batch cultures were harvested at exponential phase for protein profiling of stress responses by 2D gel-based comparative proteomics. Proteins identified in 19 of 21 spots changing in abundance due...... to H2O2 were typically related to carbohydrate and energy metabolism, cysteine biosynthesis, and stress. In particular, increased cysteine synthase activity may accumulate a cysteine pool relevant for protein stability, enzyme catalysis and the disulfide-reducing pathway. The stress response further...... by refolding. The proteome analysis provides novel insight into resistance mechanisms in lactic acid bacteria against reactive oxygen species and constitutes a valuable starting point for improving industrial processes, food design or strain engineering preserving microorganism viability....

  7. Stable markers of oxidant damage to proteins and their application in the study of human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Fu, S; Wang, H

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms of formation and the nature of the altered amino acid side chains formed on proteins subjected to oxidant attack are reviewed. The use of stable products of protein side chain oxidation as potential markers for assessing oxidative damage in vivo in humans is discussed. The methods...... developed in the authors laboratories are outlined, and the advantages and disadvantages of these techniques compared with other methodologies for assessing oxidative damage to proteins and other macromolecules. Evidence is presented to show that protein oxidation products are sensitive markers of oxidative...... damage, that the pattern of products detected may yield information as to the nature of the original oxidative insult, and that the levels of oxidized side-chains can, in certain circumstances, be much higher than those of other markers of oxidation such as lipid hydroperoxides....

  8. Redox conditions and protein oxidation in plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Kasimova, Marina R.; Krab, Klaas

    2005-01-01

    Redox conditions and protein oxidation in plant mitochondria NAD(P)H has a central position in respiratory metabolism. It is produced by a large number of enzymes, e.g. the Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, in the mitochondrial matrix and is oxidised by, amongst others, the respiratory chain. Most...... of this NAD(P)H appears to be bound to proteins, in fact free NAD(P)H – an important parameter in metabolic regulation - has never been observed in mitochondria. We have estimated free and bound NAD(P)H in isolated plant mitochondria under different metabolic conditions. The fluorescence spectra of free...... and bound NADH was determined and used to deconvolute fluorescence spectra of actively respiring mitochondria. Most of the mitochondrial NADH is bound in states 2 and 4. The amount of free NADH is lower but relatively constant even increasing a little in state 3 where it is about equal to bound NADH...

  9. The 70 kDa heat shock protein assists during the repair of chilling injury in the insect, Pyrrhocoris apterus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Kostál

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Pyrrhocoris apterus (Insecta: Heteroptera adults attain high levels of cold tolerance during their overwintering diapause. Non-diapause reproducing adults, however, lack the capacity to express a whole array of cold-tolerance adaptations and show relatively low survival when exposed to sub-zero temperatures. We assessed the competence of non-diapause males of P. apterus for responding to heat- and cold-stresses by up-regulation of 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsps and the role of Hsps during repair of heat- and cold-induced injury. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The fragments of P. apterus homologues of Hsp70 inducible (PaHsp70 and cognate forms (PaHsc70 were cloned and sequenced. The abundance of mRNA transcripts for the inducible form (qPCR and corresponding protein (Western blotting were significantly up-regulated in response to high and low temperature stimuli. In the cognate form, mRNA was slightly up-regulated in response to both stressors but very low or no up-regulation of protein was apparent after heat- or cold-stress, respectively. Injection of 695 bp-long Pahsp70 dsRNA (RNAi caused drastic suppression of the heat- and cold-stress-induced Pahsp70 mRNA response and the up-regulation of corresponding protein was practically eliminated. Our RNAi predictably prevented recovery from heat shock and, in addition, negatively influenced repair of chilling injuries caused by cold stress. Cold tolerance increased when the insects were first exposed to a mild heat shock, in order to trigger the up-regulation of PaHsp70, and subsequently exposed to cold stress. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that accumulation of PaHsp70 belongs to a complex cold tolerance adaptation in the insect Pyrrhocoris apterus.

  10. Phosphorylation states of cell cycle and DNA repair proteins can be altered by the nsSNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Sevtap

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification that affects the intrinsic properties of proteins, such as structure and function. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs result in the substitution of the encoded amino acids and thus are likely to alter the phosphorylation motifs in the proteins. Methods In this study, we used the web-based NetPhos tool to predict candidate nsSNPs that either introduce or remove putative phosphorylation sites in proteins that act in DNA repair and cell cycle pathways. Results Our results demonstrated that a total of 15 nsSNPs (16.9% were likely to alter the putative phosphorylation patterns of 14 proteins. Three of these SNPs (CDKN1A-S31R, OGG1-S326C, and XRCC3-T241M have already found to be associated with altered cancer risk. We believe that this set of nsSNPs constitutes an excellent resource for further molecular and genetic analyses. Conclusion The novel systematic approach used in this study will accelerate the understanding of how naturally occurring human SNPs may alter protein function through the modification of phosphorylation mechanisms and contribute to disease susceptibility.

  11. Nuclear translocation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} protein prior to its cytosolic degradation by UV enhances DNA repair and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Hee Suk; Kim, Joo Young [Department of Biochemistry, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Jeongwon, E-mail: biojs@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-25

    We previously reported that UV induced rapid proteasomal degradation of p21 protein in an ubiquitination-independent manner. Here, UV-induced p21 proteolysis was found to occur in the cytosol. Before cytosolic degradation, however, p21 protein translocated to and transiently accumulated in the nucleus. Nuclear translocation of p21 was not required for its degradation, but rather promoted DNA repair and cell survival. Overexpression of the wild type p21, but not the one with defective nuclear localization signal (NLS), reduced UV-induced DNA damage and cell death. Some of p21 protein translocated to the nucleus were associated with chromatin-bound PCNA and saved from UV-induced proteolysis. These data together show that p21 translocates to the nucleus to participate in DNA repair, while the rest is rapidly degraded in the cytosol. We propose that our findings reflect a mechanism to facilitate removal of damaged cells, enhancing DNA repair at the same time.

  12. EXPRESSION, PURIFICATION, AND SMALL ANGLE X-RAY SCATTERING OF DNA REPLICATION AND REPAIR PROTEINS FROM THE HYPERTHERMOPHILE SULFOLOBUS SOLFATARICUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, S.M.; Hatherill, J.R.; Hammel, M.; Hura, G.L.; Tainer, J.A.; Yannone, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    Vital molecular processes such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, and maintenance occur through transient protein interactions. Elucidating the mechanisms by which these protein complexes and interactions function could lead to treatments for diseases related to DNA damage and cell division control. In the recent decades since its introduction as a third domain, Archaea have shown to be simpler models for complicated eukaryotic processes such as DNA replication, repair, transcription, and translation. Sulfolobus solfataricus is one such model organism. A hyperthermophile with an optimal growth temperature of 80°C, Sulfolobus protein-protein complexes and transient protein interactions should be more stable at moderate temperatures, providing a means to isolate and study their structure and function. Here we provide the initial steps towards characterizing three DNA-related Sulfolobus proteins with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS): Sso0257, a cell division control and origin recognition complex homolog, Sso0768, the small subunit of the replication factor C, and Sso3167, a Mut-T like protein. SAXS analysis was performed at multiple concentrations for both short and long exposure times. The Sso0257 sample was determined to be either a mixture of monomeric and dimeric states or a population of dynamic monomers in various conformational states in solution, consistent with a fl exible winged helix domain. Sso0768 was found to be a complex mixture of multimeric states in solution. Finally, molecular envelope reconstruction from SAXS data for Sso3167 revealed a novel structural component which may function as a disordered to ordered region in the presence of its substrates and/or protein partners.

  13. Protein and lipid oxidation affect the viscoelasticity of whey protein layers at the oil-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berton-Carabin, Claire C.; Schroder, Anja; Rovalino-Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin; Sagis, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Protein and lipid oxidation are prevailing issues that negatively affect the nutritional and sensory quality of food emulsions. It is probable that such oxidative modifications affect the functional properties of proteins, and in particular their ability to form densely packed, interconnected viscoe

  14. Protein and lipid oxidation affect the viscoelasticity of whey protein layers at the oil-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berton-Carabin, Claire C.; Schroder, Anja; Rovalino-Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin; Sagis, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Protein and lipid oxidation are prevailing issues that negatively affect the nutritional and sensory quality of food emulsions. It is probable that such oxidative modifications affect the functional properties of proteins, and in particular their ability to form densely packed, interconnected viscoe

  15. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yezzi, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, has been compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-sC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the exponentially growing TS mutant and the wild-type cells were treated at 40/sub 0/C for up to 2 hrs prior to graded doses of x rays, the survival curves were identical and were the same as those obtained without heat treatment. If the cultures were incubated at 40/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 40/sup 0/C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage. However, if repair was measured by the alkaline-unwinding technique under the same time and temperature schemes, no difference in the kientics of DNA strand rejoining was observed. Misrepair processes may permit restoration of DNA strand integrity but not allow functional repair. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Treatment of cell populations in the middle of G/sub 1/-phase yielded repair inhibition comparable to that observed with the asynchronous cells. Splitdose experiments were done using pre-incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. WT cells and TS cells were treated with cycloheximide at 35/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval. 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Structure/Function Analysis of DNA-glycosylases That Repair Oxidized Purines and Pyrimidines and the Influence of Surrounding DNA Sequence on Their Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Susan S.

    2005-08-22

    The overall goal of this project was to elucidate the structure/function relationships between oxidized DNA bases and the DNA repair enzymes that recognize and remove them. The NMR solution structure of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) that recognizes oxidized DNA purines was to be determined. Furthermore, the solution structures of DNA molecules containing specific lesions recognized by Fpg was to be determined in sequence contexts that either facilitate or hinder this recognition. These objectives were in keeping with the long-term goals of the Principal Investigator's laboratory, that is, to understand the basic mechanisms that underpin base excision repair processing of oxidative DNA lesions and to elucidate the interactions of unrepaired lesions with DNA polymerases. The results of these two DNA transactions can ultimately determine the fate of the cell. These objectives were also in keeping with the goals of our collaborator, Dr. Michael Kennedy, who is studying the repair and recognition of damaged DNA. Overall the goals of this project were congruent with those of the Department of Energy's Health Effects and Life Sciences Research Program, especially to the Structural Biology, the Human Genome and the Health Effects Programs. The mission of the latter Program includes understanding the biological effects and consequences of DNA damages produced by toxic agents in the many DOE waste sites so that cleanup can be accomplished in a safe, effective and timely manner.

  17. Efficiency of olaparib in colorectal cancer patients with an alteration of the homologous repair protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiringhelli, Francois; Richard, Corentin; Chevrier, Sandy; Végran, Frédérique; Boidot, Romain

    2016-12-28

    Precision medicine is defined by the administration of drugs based on the tumor's particular genetic characteristics. It is developing quickly in the field of cancer therapy. For example, KRAS, NRAS and BRAF genetic testing demonstrates its efficiency for precision medicine in colorectal cancer (CRC). Besides for these well-known mutations, the purpose of performing larger genetic testing in this pathology is unknown. Recent reports have shown that using the poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor olaparib in patients with homologous repair enzyme deficiency gave positive clinical results in breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. We have reported here the cases of 2 patients with multi-treated metastatic CRC who underwent somatic and constitutional exome analyses. The analyses revealed a loss of function mutation in a homologous repair enzyme resulting in the loss of heterozygosity for both patients (Check2 for the first patient and RAD51C for the second one). Both patients were treated with off-label usage of olaparib. While the first patient showed clinical benefit, reduction of carcinoembryonic antigen tumor marker and radiologic response, the second patient quickly presented a progression of the tumor. Additional genetic analyses revealed a frameshift truncating mutation of the TP53BP1 gene in the patient who progressed. Interestingly, deficiency in TP53BP1 was previously described to confer resistance to olaparib in mice breast cancer models. Our findings suggest that exome analysis may be a helpful tool to highlight targetable mutations in CRC and that olaparib may be efficient in patients with a homologous repair deficiency.

  18. Is the Oxidative DNA Damage Level of Human Lymphocyte Correlated with the Antioxidant Capacity of Serum or the Base Excision Repair Activity of Lymphocyte?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chih Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A random screening of human blood samples from 24 individuals of nonsmoker was conducted to examine the correlation between the oxidative DNA damage level of lymphocytes and the antioxidant capacity of serum or the base excision repair (BER activity of lymphocytes. The oxidative DNA damage level was measured with comet assay containing Fpg/Endo III cleavage, and the BER activity was estimated with a modified comet assay including nuclear extract of lymphocytes for enzymatic cleavage. Antioxidant capacity was determined with trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay. We found that though the endogenous DNA oxidation levels varied among the individuals, each individual level appeared to be steady for at least 1 month. Our results indicate that the oxidative DNA damage level is insignificantly or weakly correlated with antioxidant capacity or BER activity, respectively. However, lymphocytes from carriers of Helicobacter pylori (HP or Hepatitis B virus (HBV tend to give higher levels of oxidative DNA damage (P<0.05. Though sera of this group of individuals show no particular tendency with reduced antioxidant capacity, the respective BER activities of lymphocytes are lower in average (P<0.05. Thus, reduction of repair activity may be associated with the genotoxic effect of HP or HBV infection.

  19. 3-Hydroxylysine, a potential marker for studying radical-induced protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morin, B; Bubb, W A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    albumin (BSA) and human low-density lipoprotein (LDL)] and diseased human tissues (atherosclerotic plaques and lens cataractous proteins). This work was aimed at investigating oxidized lysine as a sensitive marker for protein oxidation, as such residues are present on protein surfaces, and are therefore...

  20. TET proteins and 5-methylcytosine oxidation in hematological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Myunggon; An, Jungeun; Pastor, William A; Koralov, Sergei B; Rajewsky, Klaus; Rao, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation has pivotal regulatory roles in mammalian development, retrotransposon silencing, genomic imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. Cancer cells display highly dysregulated DNA methylation profiles characterized by global hypomethylation in conjunction with hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands that presumably lead to genome instability and aberrant expression of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. The recent discovery of ten-eleven-translocation (TET) family dioxygenases that oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in DNA has led to profound progress in understanding the mechanism underlying DNA demethylation. Among the three TET genes, TET2 recurrently undergoes inactivating mutations in a wide range of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. TET2 functions as a bona fide tumor suppressor particularly in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies resembling chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in human. Here we review diverse functions of TET proteins and the novel epigenetic marks that they generate in DNA methylation/demethylation dynamics and normal and malignant hematopoietic differentiation. The impact of TET2 inactivation in hematopoiesis and various mechanisms modulating the expression or activity of TET proteins are also discussed. Furthermore, we also present evidence that TET2 and TET3 collaborate to suppress aberrant hematopoiesis and hematopoietic transformation. A detailed understanding of the normal and pathological functions of TET proteins may provide new avenues to develop novel epigenetic therapies for treating hematological malignancies.

  1. Investigation on oxidative stress of nitric oxide synthase interacting protein from Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Meng; Xu, Qingxia; Xu, Yanquan; Li, Shan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Sheng, Jiahe; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-01-01

    Numerous evidences indicate that excretory-secretory products (ESPs) from liver flukes trigger the generation of free radicals that are associated with the initial pathophysiological responses in host cells. In this study, we first constructed a Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis, Cs)-infected BALB/c mouse model and examined relative results respectively at 3, 5, 7, and 9 weeks postinfection (p.i.). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR indicated that the transcriptional level of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) gradually decreased with lastingness of infection, while the transcriptional level of inducible NOS (iNOS) significantly increased. The level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in sera of infected mouse significantly increased versus the healthy control group. These results showed that the liver of C. sinensis-infected mouse was in a state with elevated levels of oxidation stress. Previously, C. sinensis NOS interacting protein coding gene (named CsNOSIP) has been isolated and recombinant CsNOSIP (rCsNOSIP) has been expressed in Escherichia coli, which has been confirmed to be a component present in CsESPs and confirmed to play important roles in immune regulation of the host. In the present paper, we investigated the effects of rCsNOSIP on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7, a murine macrophage cell line. We found that endotoxin-free rCsNOSIP significantly promoted the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) after pretreated with rCsNOSIP, while the level of SOD decreased. Furthermore, rCsNOSIP could also increase the level of lipid peroxidation MDA. Taken together, these results suggested that CsNOSIP was a key molecule which was involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and its reactive intermediates, and played an important role in oxidative stress during C. sinensis infection.

  2. Identification of defective illegitimate recombinational repair of oxidatively-induced DNA double-strand breaks in ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M. E.; Winters, T. A.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal-recessive lethal human disease. Homozygotes suffer from a number of neurological disorders, as well as very high cancer incidence. Heterozygotes may also have a higher than normal risk of cancer, particularly for the breast. The gene responsible for the disease (ATM) has been cloned, but its role in mechanisms of the disease remain unknown. Cellular A-T phenotypes, such as radiosensitivity and genomic instability, suggest that a deficiency in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may be the primary defect; however, overall levels of DSB rejoining appear normal. We used the shuttle vector, pZ189, containing an oxidatively-induced DSB, to compare the integrity of DSB rejoining in one normal and two A-T fibroblast cells lines. Mutation frequencies were two-fold higher in A-T cells, and the mutational spectrum was different. The majority of the mutations found in all three cell lines were deletions (44-63%). The DNA sequence analysis indicated that 17 of the 17 plasmids with deletion mutations in normal cells occurred between short direct-repeat sequences (removing one of the repeats plus the intervening sequences), implicating illegitimate recombination in DSB rejoining. The combined data from both A-T cell lines showed that 21 of 24 deletions did not involve direct-repeats sequences, implicating a defect in the illegitimate recombination pathway. These findings suggest that the A-T gene product may either directly participate in illegitimate recombination or modulate the pathway. Regardless, this defect is likely to be important to a mechanistic understanding of this lethal disease.

  3. Protein phosphatase Z modulates oxidative stress response in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Éva; González, Asier; Erdei, Éva; Casado, Carlos; Kovács, László; Ádám, Csaba; Oláh, Judit; Miskei, Márton; Molnar, Monika; Farkas, Ilona; Hamari, Zsuzsanna; Ariño, Joaquín; Pócsi, István; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2012-09-01

    The genome of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans harbors the gene ppzA that codes for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase Z (PPZ), and the closely related opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus encompasses a highly similar PPZ gene (phzA). When PpzA and PhzA were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Schizosaccharomyces pombe they partially complemented the deleted phosphatases in the ppz1 or the pzh1 mutants, and they also mimicked the effect of Ppz1 overexpression in slt2 MAP kinase deficient S. cerevisiae cells. Although ppzA acted as the functional equivalent of the known PPZ enzymes its disruption in A. nidulans did not result in the expected phenotypes since it failed to affect salt tolerance or cell wall integrity. However, the inactivation of ppzA resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidizing agents like tert-butylhydroperoxide, menadione, and diamide. To demonstrate the general validity of our observations we showed that the deletion of the orthologous PPZ genes in other model organisms, such as S. cerevisiae (PPZ1) or Candida albicans (CaPPZ1) also caused oxidative stress sensitivity. Thus, our work reveals a novel function of the PPZ enzyme in A. nidulans that is conserved in very distantly related fungi.

  4. In vitro oxidation of fibrinogen promotes functional alterations and formation of advanced oxidation protein products, an inflammation mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; de Carvalho, José Antônio Mainardi; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo; da Silva, José Edson Paz; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2015-01-01

    Fibrinogen (FB) is a soluble blood plasma protein and is a key molecule involved in coagulation. Oxidative modification of proteins, such as the formation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), a heterogeneous family of protein compounds structurally modified and derived from oxidative stress, may be associated with the pathophysiology of a number of chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether the formation of this mediator of inflammation occurs from FB and whether its generation is associated with structural changes. Results of the present study suggest that the oxidation of FB may provoke the formation of AOPP, which in turn, may promote functional alterations in FB, thus causing changes in its structural domains and increasing its procoagulant activity.

  5. Sebaceous neoplasms and the immunoprofile of mismatch-repair proteins as a screening target for syndromic cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boennelycke, Marie; Thomsen, Birthe M; Holck, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    16-negativity in MLH1-deficient cases may denote methylation rather than mutation. The prime aim of this study was to evaluate the mismatch-repair (MMR)-protein deficiency and the p16 status among sebaceous neoplasms. MATERIAL AND METHOD: From January 1990 through October 2012, 26 sebaceous adenomas...... (SAs) and 6 sebaceous carcinomas (SCs) were accrued. The expression of MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 was recorded. MLH1-deficient cases were tested for p16 status. RESULTS: Eighteen (56%) of the 32 specimens with SA or SC displayed MMR-protein deficiency, comprising 17 (65.4%) SAs (MSH2/MSH6 loss in 12......, MLH1/PMS2 loss in 3, MSH6 loss only in 2 cases) and 1 (16.7%) SC (MLH1/PMS2 loss). All 4 MLH1 deficient cases were p16-positive. CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of sebaceous neoplasms were MMR-protein deficient and thus likely MTS candidates. Given the low prevalence of sebaceous neoplasms...

  6. Proximity-based Protein Thiol Oxidation by H2O2-scavenging Peroxidases*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutscher, Marcus; Sobotta, Mirko C.; Wabnitz, Guido H.; Ballikaya, Seda; Meyer, Andreas J.; Samstag, Yvonne; Dick, Tobias P.

    2009-01-01

    H2O2 acts as a signaling molecule by oxidizing critical thiol groups on redox-regulated target proteins. To explain the efficiency and selectivity of H2O2-based signaling, it has been proposed that oxidation of target proteins may be facilitated by H2O2-scavenging peroxidases. Recently, a peroxidase-based protein oxidation relay has been identified in yeast, namely the oxidation of the transcription factor Yap1 by the peroxidase Orp1. It has remained unclear whether the protein oxidase function of Orp1 is a singular adaptation or whether it may represent a more general principle. Here we show that Orp1 is in fact not restricted to oxidizing Yap1 but can also form a highly efficient redox relay with the oxidant target protein roGFP (redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein) in mammalian cells. Orp1 mediates near quantitative oxidation of roGFP2 by H2O2, and the Orp1-roGFP2 redox relay effectively converts physiological H2O2 signals into measurable fluorescent signals in living cells. Furthermore, the oxidant relay phenomenon is not restricted to Orp1 as the mammalian peroxidase Gpx4 also mediates oxidation of proximal roGFP2 in living cells. Together, these findings support the concept that certain peroxidases harbor an intrinsic and powerful capacity to act as H2O2-dependent protein thiol oxidases when they are recruited into proximity of oxidizable target proteins. PMID:19755417

  7. Proximity-based protein thiol oxidation by H2O2-scavenging peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutscher, Marcus; Sobotta, Mirko C; Wabnitz, Guido H; Ballikaya, Seda; Meyer, Andreas J; Samstag, Yvonne; Dick, Tobias P

    2009-11-13

    H(2)O(2) acts as a signaling molecule by oxidizing critical thiol groups on redox-regulated target proteins. To explain the efficiency and selectivity of H(2)O(2)-based signaling, it has been proposed that oxidation of target proteins may be facilitated by H(2)O(2)-scavenging peroxidases. Recently, a peroxidase-based protein oxidation relay has been identified in yeast, namely the oxidation of the transcription factor Yap1 by the peroxidase Orp1. It has remained unclear whether the protein oxidase function of Orp1 is a singular adaptation or whether it may represent a more general principle. Here we show that Orp1 is in fact not restricted to oxidizing Yap1 but can also form a highly efficient redox relay with the oxidant target protein roGFP (redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein) in mammalian cells. Orp1 mediates near quantitative oxidation of roGFP2 by H(2)O(2), and the Orp1-roGFP2 redox relay effectively converts physiological H(2)O(2) signals into measurable fluorescent signals in living cells. Furthermore, the oxidant relay phenomenon is not restricted to Orp1 as the mammalian peroxidase Gpx4 also mediates oxidation of proximal roGFP2 in living cells. Together, these findings support the concept that certain peroxidases harbor an intrinsic and powerful capacity to act as H(2)O(2)-dependent protein thiol oxidases when they are recruited into proximity of oxidizable target proteins.

  8. Expression of DNA Repair Enzyme hMTH1 mRNA and Protein in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hejun; CHENG Bin; LIN Jusheng

    2005-01-01

    To study the expression of DNA repair enzyme hMTH1 mRNA and protein in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, tissues adjacent to the cancers, normal liver cells and hepatoma cell lines, and to investigate their function in the progress of HCC, semi-quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was employed to examine the expression of hMTH1 mRNA in matched HCC tissues (HT)/surrounding tissues (HST) of HCC, normal liver cell L02 and hepatoma cell lines SMMC7721, HepG2. hMTH1 protein was detected in corresponding HT as well as their HST by immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that the expression level of hMTH1 mRNA in HT was higher than that in HST (t=2.424, P <0.05). The expression level of hMTH1 mRNA in two hepatoma cell lines was higher than that in normal liver cell line (F=6.810, P <0.01). The expression of hMTH1 mRNA in SMMC7721 was similar to that in HepG2. hMTH1 protein was 88.2 % (15 of 17) positive in HT and 82.4 % (14 of 17) in HST. The protein level of hMTH1 in HT was correspondingly higher than in their HST (t=2.618,P<0.05). It is concluded that hMTH1 mRNA and protein were over-expressed in HCC and hepatoma cell lines. It may be one of the key events during the carcinogenesis,progression of HCC and may promote the malignant growth. These results suggest that hMTH1 plays a role in HCC and may be a candidate marker for the diagnosis of HCC.

  9. p44 and p34 subunits of the BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor have homologies with SSL1, a yeast protein involved in DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Humbert; H. van Vuuren; Y. Lutz; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc); V. Moncollin

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe human BTF2 (TFIIH) transcription factor is a multisubunit protein involved in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (B) as well as in DNA repair. In addition to the previously characterized p62 and p89/ERCC3 subunits, we have cloned two other subunits of BTF2, p44 and p34. Th

  10. Effect of gene modified mesenchymal stem cells overexpression human receptor activity modified protein 1 on inflammation and cardiac repair in a rabbit model of myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵然尊

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) overexpressing human receptor activity modified protein 1(hRAMP1) by adenovirus vector on infarction related inflammation and cardiac repair in a rabbit model of myocardial infarction(MI)

  11. Protein film photoelectrochemistry of the water oxidation enzyme photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masaru; Zhang, Jenny Z; Paul, Nicholas; Reisner, Erwin

    2014-09-21

    Photosynthesis is responsible for the sunlight-powered conversion of carbon dioxide and water into chemical energy in the form of carbohydrates and the release of O2 as a by-product. Although many proteins are involved in photosynthesis, the fascinating machinery of Photosystem II (PSII) is at the heart of this process. This tutorial review describes an emerging technique named protein film photoelectrochemistry (PF-PEC), which allows for the light-dependent activity of PSII adsorbed onto an electrode surface to be studied. The technique is straightforward to use, does not require highly specialised and/or expensive equipment, is highly selective for the active fractions of the adsorbed enzyme, and requires a small amount of enzyme sample. The use of PF-PEC to study PSII can yield insights into its activity, stability, quantum yields, redox behaviour, and interfacial electron transfer pathways. It can also be used in PSII inhibition studies and chemical screening, which may prove useful in the development of biosensors. PSII PF-PEC cells also serve as proof-of-principle solar water oxidation systems; here, a comparison is made against PSII-inspired synthetic photocatalysts and materials for artificial photosynthesis.

  12. Detection of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation products in the extracellular matrix of human atherosclerotic plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Linton, Stuart M; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    for 83-96% of the total oxidized protein side-chain products detected in these plaques. Oxidation of matrix components extracted from healthy artery tissue, and model proteins, with reagent HOCl is shown to give rise to a similar pattern of products to those detected in advanced human lesions......Oxidation is believed to play a role in atherosclerosis. Oxidized lipids, sterols and proteins have been detected in early, intermediate and advanced human lesions at elevated levels. The spectrum of oxidized side-chain products detected on proteins from homogenates of advanced human lesions has...... by activated monocytes (and possibly macrophages) and is a highly basic protein, it would be expected to associate with polyanions such as the glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix, and might result in damage being localized at such sites. In this study proteins extracted from extracellular matrix...

  13. Functional Analysis of Homologous Recombination Repair Proteins HerA and NurA in the Thermophile Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qihong

    A number of DNA lesions are generated in each cell every day, among which double-stranded breaks (DSBs) constitute one of the most detrimental types of DNA damage. DSBs lead to genome instability, cell death, or even tumorigenesis in human, if not repaired timely. Two main pathways are known...... for DSB repair, homologous recombination repair (HRR) and Non-homologous end joint (NHEJ). HR repairs DSBs using a homologous DNA molecule as a template resulting in error free DNA repair, whereas NHEJ promotes direct re-ligation of the broken DNA ends in an error-prone manner. In eukaryotes DSBs occurred...

  14. In normal human fibroblasts variation in DSB repair capacity cannot be ascribed to radiation-induced changes in the localisation, expression or activity of major NHEJ proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Vronskaja, Svetlana; Overgaard, Jens

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to test whether for normal human fibroblasts the variation in double-strand break (DSB) repair capacity results from radiation-induced differences in localisation, expression or activity of major non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) proteins....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Experiments were performed with 11 normal human fibroblast strains AF01-11. NHEJ proteins were determined by Western blot and DNA-PK activity by pulldown-assay. RESULTS: The four NHEJ proteins tested (Ku70, Ku80, XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs) were found to be localised almost exclusively...... in the activity of the DNA-PK complex induced upon irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: For normal human fibroblasts, the level or activity of NHEJ proteins measured prior to or after irradiation cannot be used to predict the DSB repair capacity or cellular radiosensitivity. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar...

  15. Sir protein-independent repair of dicentric chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, David F; Steakley, David Lee; Rine, Jasper

    2016-09-15

    Sir2 protein has been reported to be recruited to dicentric chromosomes under tension, and such chromosomes are reported to be especially vulnerable to breakage in sir2Δ mutants. We found that the loss of viability in such mutants was an indirect effect of the repression of nonhomologous end joining in Sir(-) mutants and that the apparent recruitment of Sir2 protein to chromosomes under tension was likely due to methodological weakness in early chromatin immunoprecipitation studies.

  16. Repair of Nerve Cell Membrance Damage by Calcium-Dependent, Membrane-Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    signaling and amyloid toxicity in Alzheimer disease, J Biol Chem 285 (2010) 12463-12468. [14] H.A. Lashuel, P.T. Lansbury, Are amyloid diseases caused by...protein aggregates that mimic bacterial pore-forming toxins?, Q Rev Biophys 39 (2006) 167-201. [15] N. Arispe, E. Rojas, H.B. Pollard, Alzheimer ...disease amyloid beta protein forms calcium channels in bilayer membranes: blockade by tromethamine and aluminum , Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 90 (1993) 567

  17. Structural and functional interaction between the human DNA repair proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peï-Yu; Frit, Philippe; Meesala, SriLakshmi; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Modesti, Mauro; Andres, Sara N; Huang, Ying; Sekiguchi, JoAnn; Calsou, Patrick; Salles, Bernard; Junop, Murray S

    2009-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  18. Structural and Functional Interaction Between the Human DNA Repair Proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P.; Meesala, S; Dauvillier, S; Modesti, M; Andres, S; Huang, Y; Sekiguchi, J; Calsou, P; Salles, B; Junop, M

    2009-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  19. Identification of the first small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7 DNA repair protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Marcelo L; Ambaye, Nigus D; Evison, Benjamin J; Shao, Youming; Vanarotti, Murugendra; Inoue, Akira; McDonald, Ezelle T; Kikuchi, Sotaro; Heath, Richard; Hara, Kodai; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2016-09-15

    DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair (ICLR) has been implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to ICL-inducing chemotherapeutic agents. Despite the clinical significance of ICL-inducing chemotherapy, few studies have focused on developing small-molecule inhibitors for ICLR. The mammalian DNA polymerase ζ, which comprises the catalytic subunit REV3L and the non-catalytic subunit REV7, is essential for ICLR. To identify small-molecule compounds that are mechanistically capable of inhibiting ICLR by targeting REV7, high-throughput screening and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis were performed. Compound 1 was identified as an inhibitor of the interaction of REV7 with the REV7-binding sequence of REV3L. Compound 7 (an optimized analog of compound 1) bound directly to REV7 in nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, and inhibited the reactivation of a reporter plasmid containing an ICL in between the promoter and reporter regions. The normalized clonogenic survival of HeLa cells treated with cisplatin and compound 7 was lower than that for cells treated with cisplatin only. These findings indicate that a small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7/REV3L interaction can chemosensitize cells by inhibiting ICLR.

  20. Effects of UVB-induced oxidative stress on protein expression and specific protein oxidation in normal human epithelial keratinocytes: a proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Marco Federico

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UVB component of solar ultraviolet irradiation is one of the major risk factors for the development of skin cancer in humans. UVB exposure elicits an increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are responsible for oxidative damage to proteins, DNA, RNA and lipids. In order to examine the biological impact of UVB irradiation on skin cells, we used a parallel proteomics approach to analyze the protein expression profile and to identify oxidatively modified proteins in normal human epithelial keratinocytes. Results The expression levels of fifteen proteins - involved in maintaining the cytoskeleton integrity, removal of damaged proteins and heat shock response - were differentially regulated in UVB-exposed cells, indicating that an appropriate response is developed in order to counteract/neutralize the toxic effects of UVB-raised ROS. On the other side, the redox proteomics approach revealed that seven proteins - involved in cellular adhesion, cell-cell interaction and protein folding - were selectively oxidized. Conclusions Despite a wide and well orchestrated cellular response, a relevant oxidation of specific proteins concomitantly occurs in UVB-irradiated human epithelial Keratinocytes. These modified (i.e. likely dysfunctional proteins might result in cell homeostasis impairment and therefore eventually promote cellular degeneration, senescence or carcinogenesis.

  1. Intra-axonal protein synthesis - a new target for neural repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery L Twiss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although initially argued to be a feature of immature neurons with incomplete polarization, there is clear evidence that neurons in the peripheral nervous system retain the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthesis well into adulthood. This localized protein synthesis has been shown to contribute to injury signaling and axon regeneration in peripheral nerves. Recent works point to potential for protein synthesis in axons of the vertebrate central nervous system. mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery have now been documented in lamprey, mouse, and rat spinal cord axons. Intra-axonal protein synthesis appears to be activated in adult vertebrate spinal cord axons when they are regeneration-competent. Rat spinal cord axons regenerating into a peripheral nerve graft contain mRNAs and markers of activated translational machinery. Indeed, levels of some growth-associated mRNAs in these spinal cord axons are comparable to the regenerating sciatic nerve. Markers of active translation tend to decrease when these axons stop growing, but can be reactivated by a second axotomy. These emerging observations raise the possibility that mRNA transport into and translation within axons could be targeted to facilitate regeneration in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  2. Intra-axonal protein synthesis - a new target for neural repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twiss, Jeffery L; Kalinski, Ashley L; Sachdeva, Rahul; Houle, John D

    2016-09-01

    Although initially argued to be a feature of immature neurons with incomplete polarization, there is clear evidence that neurons in the peripheral nervous system retain the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthesis well into adulthood. This localized protein synthesis has been shown to contribute to injury signaling and axon regeneration in peripheral nerves. Recent works point to potential for protein synthesis in axons of the vertebrate central nervous system. mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery have now been documented in lamprey, mouse, and rat spinal cord axons. Intra-axonal protein synthesis appears to be activated in adult vertebrate spinal cord axons when they are regeneration-competent. Rat spinal cord axons regenerating into a peripheral nerve graft contain mRNAs and markers of activated translational machinery. Indeed, levels of some growth-associated mRNAs in these spinal cord axons are comparable to the regenerating sciatic nerve. Markers of active translation tend to decrease when these axons stop growing, but can be reactivated by a second axotomy. These emerging observations raise the possibility that mRNA transport into and translation within axons could be targeted to facilitate regeneration in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  3. Intra-axonal protein synthesis - a new target for neural repair?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffery L Twiss; Ashley L Kalinski; Rahul Sachdeva; John D Houle

    2016-01-01

    Although initially argued to be a feature of immature neurons with incomplete polarization, there is clear evidence that neurons in the peripheral nervous system retain the capacity for intra-axonal protein synthe-sis well into adulthood. This localized protein synthesis has been shown to contribute to injury signaling and axon regeneration in peripheral nerves. Recent works point to potential for protein synthesis in axons of the vertebrate central nervous system. mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery have now been docu-mented in lamprey, mouse, and rat spinal cord axons. Intra-axonal protein synthesis appears to be activated in adult vertebrate spinal cord axons when they are regeneration-competent. Rat spinal cord axons regen-erating into a peripheral nerve graft contain mRNAs and markers of activated translational machinery. Indeed, levels of some growth-associated mRNAs in these spinal cord axons are comparable to the regen-erating sciatic nerve. Markers of active translation tend to decrease when these axons stop growing, but can be reactivated by a second axotomy. These emerging observations raise the possibility that mRNA transport into and translation within axons could be targeted to facilitate regeneration in both the peripheral and central nervous systems.

  4. Protein Oxidation in Aging: Does It Play a Role in Aging Progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeg, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A constant accumulation of oxidized proteins takes place during aging. Oxidation of proteins leads to a partial unfolding and, therefore, to aggregation. Protein aggregates impair the activity of cellular proteolytic systems (proteasomes, lysosomes), resulting in further accumulation of oxidized proteins. In addition, the accumulation of highly crosslinked protein aggregates leads to further oxidant formation, damage to macromolecules, and, finally, to apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, protein oxidation seems to play a role in the development of various age-related diseases, for example, neurodegenerative diseases. Recent Advances: The highly oxidized lipofuscin accumulates during aging. Lipofuscin formation might cause impaired lysosomal and proteasomal degradation, metal ion accumulation, increased reactive oxygen species formation, and apoptosis. Critical Issues: It is still unclear to which extent protein oxidation is involved in the progression of aging and in the development of some age-related diseases. Future Directions: An extensive knowledge of the effects of protein oxidation on the aging process and its contribution to the development of age-related diseases could enable further strategies to reduce age-related impairments. Strategies aimed at lowering aggregate formation might be a straightforward intervention to reduce age-related malfunctions of organs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 239–255. PMID:25178482

  5. Mass Spectrometry-Based Methods for Identifying Oxidized Proteins in Disease: Advances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Verrastro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many inflammatory diseases have an oxidative aetiology, which leads to oxidative damage to biomolecules, including proteins. It is now increasingly recognized that oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTMs of proteins affect cell signalling and behaviour, and can contribute to pathology. Moreover, oxidized proteins have potential as biomarkers for inflammatory diseases. Although many assays for generic protein oxidation and breakdown products of protein oxidation are available, only advanced tandem mass spectrometry approaches have the power to localize specific oxPTMs in identified proteins. While much work has been carried out using untargeted or discovery mass spectrometry approaches, identification of oxPTMs in disease has benefitted from the development of sophisticated targeted or semi-targeted scanning routines, combined with chemical labeling and enrichment approaches. Nevertheless, many potential pitfalls exist which can result in incorrect identifications. This review explains the limitations, advantages and challenges of all of these approaches to detecting oxidatively modified proteins, and provides an update on recent literature in which they have been used to detect and quantify protein oxidation in disease.

  6. Mismatch repair protein deficient endometrioid adenocarcinomas, metastasizing to adrenal gland and lymph nodes: Unusual cases with diagnostic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Rekhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, certain endometrial carcinomas have been found to be associated with mismatch repair (MMR protein defects/deficiency. A 39-year-old female presented with cough, decreased appetite and significant weight loss since 2 months. Earlier, she had undergone total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH-BSO for endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Imaging disclosed an 8 cm-sized adrenal mass that was surgically excised. Histopathology of the adrenal tumor, endocervical tumor, and endometrial biopsy revealed Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO Grade II to III endometrioid adenocarcinoma. By immunohistochemistry, tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin 7, epithelial membrane antigen, PAX8, MLH1 and PMS2 while negative for estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, MSH2 and MSH6. She underwent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A 34-year-old lady presented with vaginal bleeding since 9 months. She underwent TAH-BSO, reported as FIGO Grade III endometrioid adenocarcinoma. By immunohistochemistry, tumor cells were negative for ER, PR, MLH1, and PMS2 while positive for MSH2 and MSH6. She underwent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, she developed multiple nodal and pericardial metastases and succumbed to the disease within a year post-diagnosis. Certain high-grade endometrioid adenocarcinomas occurring in younger women are MMR protein deficient and display an aggressive clinical course. Adrenal metastasis in endometrial carcinomas is rare.

  7. Synergistic actions of olomoucine and bone morphogenetic protein-4 in axonal repair after acute spinal cord contusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Chen; Jianjun Li; Liang Wu; Mingliang Yang; Feng Gao; Li Yuan

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether olomoucine acts synergistically with bone morphogenetic protein-4 in the treatment of spinal cord injury, we established a rat model of acute spinal cord contusion by impacting the spinal cord at the T8 vertebra. We injected a suspension of astrocytes derived from glial-restricted precursor cells exposed to bone morphogenetic protein-4 (GDAsBMP) into the spinal cord around the site of the injury, and/or olomoucine intraperitoneally. Olomoucine effectively inhibited astrocyte proliferation and the formation of scar tissue at the injury site, but did not prevent proliferation of GDAsBMP or inhibit their effects in reducing the spinal cord lesion cavity. Furthermore, while GDAsBMP and olomoucine independently resulted in small improve-ments in locomotor function in injured rats, combined administration of both treatments had a signiifcantly greater effect on the restoration of motor function. These data indicate that the combined use of olomoucine and GDAsBMP creates a better environment for nerve regeneration than the use of either treatment alone, and contributes to spinal cord repair after injury.

  8. Repair of radius defect with bone-morphogenetic-protein loaded hydroxyapatite/collagen-poly(L-lactic acid) composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡蕴玉; 张超; 吕荣; 徐建强; 李丹

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the method to repair bone defect with bone-morphogenetic-protein loaded hydroxyapatite/collagen-poly(L-lactic acid) composite. Methods: 18 adult beagle dogs were randomly divided into 3 groups. In Group A, bone-morphogenetic-protein (BMP) loaded hydroxyapatite/collagen-poly(L-lactic acid) (HAC-PLA) scaffold was implanted in a 2 cm diaphyseal defect in the radius. In Group B, unloaded pure HAC-PLA scaffold was implanted in the defects. No material was implanted in Group C (control group). The dogs were sacrificed 6 months postoperatively. Features of biocompatibility, biodegradability and osteoinduction were evaluated with histological, radiological examinations and bone mineral density (BMD) measurements.Results: In Group A, the radius defect healed after the treatment with BMP loaded HAC-PLA. BMD at the site of the defect was higher than that of the contralateral radius. Fibrous union developed in the animals of the control group. Conclusions: BMP not only promotes osteogenesis but also accelerates degradation of the biomaterials. Optimized design parameters of a three-dimensional porous biomaterial would give full scope to the role of BMP as an osteoinductive growth factor.

  9. Dietary protein restriction decreases oxidative protein damage, peroxidizability index, and mitochondrial complex I content in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Victoria; Naudí, Alba; Sanz, Alberto; Caro, Pilar; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Barja, Gustavo; Pamplona, Reinald

    2007-04-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) decreases oxidative damage, which contributes to the slowing of aging rate. It is not known if such decreases are due to calories themselves or specific dietary components. In this work, the ingestion of proteins of Wistar rats was decreased by 40% below that of controls. After 7 weeks, the liver of the protein-restricted (PR) animals showed decreases in oxidative protein damage, degree of membrane unsaturation, and mitochondrial complex I content. The results and previous information suggest that the decrease in the rate of aging induced by PR can be due in part to decreases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and DNA and protein oxidative modification, increases in fatty acid components more resistant to oxidative damage, and decreased expression of complex I, analogously to what occurs during CR. Recent studies suggest that those benefits of PR could be caused, in turn, by the lowered methionine intake of that dietary manipulation.

  10. Photosystem II recovery in the presence and absence of chloroplast protein repair in the symbionts of corals exposed to bleaching conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R.; Takahashi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Increased seawater temperature causes photoinhibition due to accumulation of photodamaged photosystem II (PSII) in symbiotic algae (genus Symbiodinium) within corals, and it is assumed to be associated with coral bleaching. To avoid photoinhibition, photosynthetic organisms repair the photodamaged PSII through replacing the PSII proteins, primarily the D1 protein, with newly synthesised proteins. However, in experiments using cultured Symbiodinium strains, the PSII repair of Symbiodinium has been suggested not to be related to the synthesis of the D1 protein. In this study, we examined the relationship between the recovery of PSII photochemical efficiency ( F V/ F M) and the content of D1 protein after high-light and high-temperature treatments using the bleaching-sensitive coral species, Pocillopora damicornis and Acropora millepora, and the bleaching-tolerant coral species, Montipora digitata and Pavona decussata. When corals were exposed to strong light (600 µmol photons m-2 s-1) at elevated temperature (32 °C) for 8 h, significant bleaching occurred in bleaching-sensitive coral species although an almost similar extent of reduced PSII function was found across all coral species tested. During a subsequent 15-h recovery under low light (10 µmol photons m-2 s-1) at optimal temperature (22 °C), the reduced F V/ F M recovered close to initial levels in all coral species, but the reduced D1 content recovered only in one coral species ( Pavona decussata). D1 content was therefore not strongly linked to chloroplast protein synthesis-dependent PSII repair. These results demonstrate that the recovery of photodamaged PSII does not always correspond with the recovery of D1 protein content in Symbiodinium within corals, suggesting that photodamaged PSII can be repaired by a unique mechanism in Symbiodinium within corals.

  11. Effects of Aminoguanidine on Lipid and Protein Oxidation in Diabetic Rat Kidneys

    OpenAIRE

    Yavuz, Dilek Gogas; Küçükkaya, Belgin; Ersöz, H. önder; Yalçin, A. Süha; Emerk, Kaya; Akalin, Sema

    2002-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of tissue and plasma proteins may stimulate the production of oxidant and carbonyl stress in diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aminoguanidine (AG) on lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and nitric oxide (NO) release in diabetic rat kidneys. After induction of diabetes with streptozotocin, female Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups. Group DAG (n=9) rats were given AG hydrogen carbonate (1 g/L) in drinking water and group D (n=8) was diab...

  12. Protein Cysteines Map to Functional Networks According to Steady-state Level of Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Go, Young-Mi; Duong, Duc M.; Peng, Junmin; Jones, Dean P

    2011-01-01

    The cysteine (Cys) proteome serves critical roles in protein structure, function and regulation, and includes key targets in oxidative mechanisms of disease. Thioredoxins maintain Cys residues in thiol forms, and previous research shows that the redox potential of thioredoxin in mitochondria and nuclei is more reduced than cytoplasm, suggesting that proteins in these compartments may have different steady-state oxidation. This study measured fractional oxidation of 641 peptidyl Cys residues f...

  13. Toona sinensis Leaf Aqueous Extract Improves the Functions of Sperm and Testes via Regulating Testicular Proteins in Rats under Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu-Chin Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Toona sinensis leaf (TSL is commonly used as a vegetable and in spice in Asia. In this study, feeding with aqueous extract of TSL (TSL-A alleviated oxidative stress and recovered the motility and functions of sperm in rats under oxidative stress. Protein expressions in testes identified by proteomic analysis and verified by Western blot demonstrated that TSL-A not only downregulated the level of glutathione transferase mu6 (antioxidant system, heat shock protein 90 kDa-β (protein misfolding repairing system, cofilin 2 (spermatogenesis, and cyclophilin A (apoptosis but also upregulated crease3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 2 (steroidogenesis, heat shock glycoprotein 96, and pancreatic trypsin 1 (sperm-oocyte interaction. These results indicate that TSL-A promotes the functions of sperm and testes via regulating multiple testicular proteins in rats under oxidative stress, suggesting that TSL-A is a valuable functional food supplement to improve functions of sperm and testes for males under oxidative stress.

  14. Repair of Nerve Cell Membrane Damage by Calcium-Dependent, Membrane-Binding Proteins (Revised)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Alzheimer disease amyloid beta protein forms calcium channels in bilayer membranes: blockade by tromethamine and aluminum , Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A...Calcium signaling and amyloid toxicity in Alzheimer disease, J Biol Chem 285 (2010) 12463-12468. [14] H.A. Lashuel, P.T. Lansbury, Are amyloid

  15. A new biomarker of protein oxidation degree and site using angiotensin as the target by MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yanmin; Liu, Rutao; Zong, Wansong; Sun, Feng; Wang, Meijie; Zhang, Pengjun

    2010-02-01

    Hydroxyl radicals generated from Fenton reaction were used to damage the angiotensin. The oxidative damage degree and sites of peptides were measured by HPLC-MS and MS/MS. Experimental results proved that the oxidative damage degree increased with longer reaction time. The results also showed that the side chains of phenylalanine and tyrosine in angiotension can be attacked by hydroxyl radicals to form the oxidative products. A new strategy was established to monitor the oxidative degree and sites of peptides and laid the foundation for protein oxidation. This method can be used to investigate the mechanism of protein oxidative damage caused by oxidative stress which is induced by environmental pollutants and physiological activities. There will also be a wide application in the research of pathogenesis of some disease related to oxidative stress.

  16. On-plate deposition of oxidized proteins to facilitate protein footprinting studies by radical probe mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleknia, Simin D; Downard, Kevin M

    2012-10-15

    The on-plate deposition of oxidized proteins is described to advance footprinting applications by radical probe mass spectrometry (RP-MS). An electrospray ionization (ESI) needle assembly mounted vertically over a 384-target matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) plate enabled the limited oxidation of proteins as they were released in the charged droplets ahead of their deposition on the plate. This method combined with on-plate proteolytic digestion protocols expedites the analysis of proteins oxidized by RP-MS, and avoids the need to collect and reconstitute samples prior to analysis by MALDI mass spectrometry. Oxidation of peptides from solutions in water as well as an ammonium bicarbonate solution was investigated to test the optimal conditions required for on-plate oxidation of proteins. These comprised of peptides with a wide range of reactive amino acids including Phe, Tyr, Pro, His, Leu, Met and Lys that were previously shown to oxidize in both electrospray discharge and synchrotron radiolysis based footprinting experiments. The on-plate deposition of lysozyme oxidized at electrospray needle voltages of 6 and 9 kV were carried out to demonstrate conditions suitable for footprinting experiments as well as those that induce the onset of protein damage.

  17. Delivery Systems for Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) for Repair of Battle Incurred Bone Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    infections, congenital malformations that fail to heal are eligible for BMP treatment. I (my child/my ward) will be one of 50 patients to be treated with...Fusions in Dogs 6. Craniotomy Defects in Sheep t0 7. Craniotomy Defects in Monkeys 10 8. BMP Delivery System of Bone Matrix Non Collagenous 11 Proteins...effects. The most important and indispensptle substitutes for experiments in human beings are adult mongrel dogs, monkeys, and sheep . Experimental .S

  18. Expression of hMSH2 protein of the human DNA mismatch repair system in oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous disease of inflammatory nature and unknown etiology. It is characterized by a cell-mediated immunological response to induced antigenic change in skin and/or mucosa. The possible malignant transformation of lichen planus remains a subject of controversial discussions in the literature. hMSH2 is one of the human DNA mismatch repair (hMMR genes and it plays an important role in reducing mutation and maintaining genomic stability. hMSH2 alterations have been reported in oral squamous cell carcinoma and there are evidences suggesting the association between oral lichen planus and squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, we aim to investigate the immunolocalization of hMSH2 protein in oral lichen planus compared to oral normal mucosa epithelium. We examined the expression of hMSH2 protein by immunohistochemistry in twenty-six cases of oral lichen planus. Clinically, 12 of them were categorized into reticular subtype and 14 were atrophic/erosive. Ten cases of normal mucosa were added to the control group. Results showed that the percentage of positive cells to hMSH2 was smaller in reticular (46.54%; p=0,006 and atrophic/erosive (48.79%; p=0,028 subtypes of oral lichen planus compared to normal mucosa (61.29%. The reduced expression of hMSH2 protein in oral lichen planus suggests that this lesion is more susceptible to mutation and therefore facilitate the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  19. Nitric oxide induces ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein-dependent γH2AX protein formation in pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Bryndon J; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Schreiber, Katherine H; Tarakanova, Vera L; Corbett, John A

    2014-04-18

    In this study, the effects of cytokines on the activation of the DNA double strand break repair factors histone H2AX (H2AX) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) were examined in pancreatic β cells. We show that cytokines stimulate H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX formation) in rat islets and insulinoma cells in a nitric oxide- and ATM-dependent manner. In contrast to the well documented role of ATM in DNA repair, ATM does not appear to participate in the repair of nitric oxide-induced DNA damage. Instead, nitric oxide-induced γH2AX formation correlates temporally with the onset of irreversible DNA damage and the induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, inhibition of ATM attenuates cytokine-induced caspase activation. These findings show that the formation of DNA double strand breaks correlates with ATM activation, irreversible DNA damage, and ATM-dependent induction of apoptosis in cytokine-treated β cells.

  20. Anhydrobiosis vs. aging: comparative genomics of protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferases in the sleeping chironomid. .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Oleg; Kikawada, Takahiro; Shagimardanova, Elena; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Ayupov, Rustam

    Origin of anhydrobiosis in the larvae of the sleeping chironomid Polypedilum vanderplanki represents unique example of set of evolutionary events in a single species, resulted in acquiring new ability allowing survival in extremely changeable environment. Complex comparative analysis of the genome of P. vanderplanki resulted in discovery of a set of features, including existence of the set of unique clusters of genes contributing in desiccation resistance. Surprisingly, in several cases, the genes mainly contributing to the formation of the molecular shield in the larvae are sleeping chironomid-specific and have no homology with genes from other insects, including P. nubifer - a chironomid from the same genus. Protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) acts on proteins that have been non-enzymatically damaged due to age, and partially restores aspartic residues, extending life of the polypeptides. PIMT a highly conserved enzyme present in nearly all eukaryotes, and microorganisms mostly in a single copy (or in a few isoforms in certain plants and some bacteria). While conducting a comparative analysis of the genomes of two chironomid midge species different in their ability to stand complete water loss, we have noticed that structure and number of PIMT-coding genes in the desiccation resistant (anhydrobiotic) midge (Polypedilum vanderplanki, Pv) is different from those of the common desiccation-sensitive midge (Polypedilum nubifer, Pn) and the rest of insects. Both species have a clear orthologous PIMT shared by all insects. At the same time, in contrast to Pn which has only one PIMT gene (PnPimt-1), the Pv genome contains 12 additional genes paralogous to Pimt1 (PvPimt-2-12) presumably coding functional PIMT proteins, which are arranged in a single cluster. Remarkably, PvPimt-1 location in the Pv is different from the rest of Pimt-like genes. PvPimt-1 gene is ubiquitously expressed during the life cycle, but expression of the PvPimt2-12 is limited to the eggs

  1. Investigation of protein-styrene oxide adducts as a molecularbiomarker of human exposed to styrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hemoglobin-styrene oxide adducts in blood has been studied as a molecular biomarker of worker exposed to styrene.Determination of protein-styrene oxide adducts in different biological samples with modified Raney-Ni procedure is described in this paper. The following biological samples have been investigated: fresh rat blood reacted with styrene oxide in vitro; rat blood reacted with styrene or styrene oxide in vivo; vein blood from workers exposed to styrene in two factories. The data showed that there was a good linear dose-response relationship between reacting dose of styrene oxide or styrene and amount of protein-styrene oxide adducts in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. For human samples, a dose-response relationship between protein adducts and styrene exposure can be found in glass fiber factory, but not in piano manufacture plant.

  2. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Hu

    Full Text Available DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  3. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  4. Impact of lipid content and composition on lipid oxidation and protein carbonylation in experimental fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Verónica; Estévez, Mario; Ventanas, Jesús; Ventanas, Sonia

    2014-03-15

    This study aims to investigate the effect of lipid content (∼4%, ∼10% and ∼15%) and composition (different lipid sources; animal fat and sunflower oil) on the oxidative stability of proteins and lipids in experimental fermented sausages. Increasing the lipid content of sausages enhanced the susceptibility of lipids to oxidation whereas the effect on the formation of specific carbonyls from protein oxidation was not so evident. Sausages manufactured with different lipid sources affected the susceptibility of lipids and proteins to oxidation as a likely result of the modifications in the fatty acid profile, as well as to the presence of antioxidant compounds. While the fatty acid profile had a major effect on the occurrence and extent of lipid oxidation, the presence of compounds with potential antioxidant activity may be more influential on the extent of protein carbonylation.

  5. Connection between markers of cholestasis and intensity of oxidative modification of proteins in patients with choledocholithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Damnjanović

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the connection between cholestatic markers and the oxidative protein modification intensity in patients with choledocholithiasis. All the participants were subjected to clinical, laboratory and ultrasonic check-up at the Internal Department of the Military Hospital in Niš, Serbia. The parameters of oxidative stress: carbonyl groups, a measure of oxidative protein modification, and biochemical markers of cholestasis were determined by standard biochemical methods. The concentration of total (r=0.41, p<0.05, direct (r=0.49, p<+0.01 and indirect (r=0.41, p<0.05 bilirubin was in statistically significant positive linear correlation with the intensity of oxidative modification of proteins, while the other biochemical markers of cholestasis did not show such correlation. Total, direct and indirect bilirubins showed a significant positive correlation with oxidative protein modification, assessed through the levels of carbonyl groups in patients with choledocholithiasis.

  6. Oxidation of lipid and protein in horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) mince and washed minces during processing and storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eymard, Sylvie; Baron, Caroline; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    on oxidation. Subsequently the different products were stored for up to 96 h at 5 degrees C and samples were taken out regularly for analysis. Lipid oxidation was investigated by measuring primary oxidation products (lipid hydroperoxides) and secondary oxidation products (volatiles). Protein oxidation...... was followed by determination of protein solubility, protein thiol groups and protein carbonyl groups using colorimetric methods as well as western blotting for protein carbonyl groups. Lipid and protein oxidation markers indicated that both lipid and protein oxidation took place during processing......Protein and lipid oxidation was followed during processing and storage of mince and washed minces prepared from horse mackerel (Trachurus trachunts). Briefly horse mackerel mince (MO) was washed with three volumes of water, mimicking the surimi production and different washed products were obtained...

  7. Association of oxidative DNA damage, protein oxidation and antioxidant function with oxidative stress induced cellular injury in pre-eclamptic/eclamptic mothers during fetal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Reena; Pande, Deepti; Karki, Kanchan; Kumar, Ashok; Khanna, Ranjana S; Khanna, Hari D

    2014-02-05

    Pre-eclampsia is a devastating multi system syndrome and a major cause of maternal, fetal, neonatal morbidity and mortality. Pre-eclampsia is associated with oxidative stress in the maternal circulation. To have an insight on the effect of pre-eclampsia/eclampsia on the neonates, the study was made to explore the oxidative status by quantification of byproducts generated during protein oxidation and oxidative DNA damage and deficient antioxidant activity in umbilical cord blood of pre-eclamptic/eclamptic mothers during fetal circulation. Umbilical cord blood during delivery from neonates born to 19 pre-eclamptic mothers, 14 eclamptic mothers and 18 normotensive mothers (uncomplicated pregnancy) as control cases was collected. 8-OHdG (8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine), protein carbonyl, nitrite, catalase, non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin A, E, C), total antioxidant status and iron status were determined. Significant elevation in the levels of 8-OHdG, protein carbonyl, nitrite and iron along with decreased levels of catalase, vitamin A, E, C, total antioxidant status were observed in the umbilical cord blood of pre-eclamptic and eclamptic pregnancies. These parameters might be influential variables for the risk of free radical damage in infants born to pre-eclamptic/eclamptic pregnancies. Increased oxidative stress causes oxidation of DNA and protein which alters antioxidant function. Excess iron level and decreased unsaturated iron binding capacity may be the important factor associated with oxidative stress and contribute in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia/eclampsia which is reflected in fetal circulation.

  8. A High-Throughput Screening Strategy to Identify Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors That Block the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voter, Andrew F; Manthei, Kelly A; Keck, James L

    2016-07-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for resensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay, and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol.

  9. Protein Mediated Oxidative Stress in Patients with Diabetes and its Associated Neuropathy: Correlation with Protein Carbonylation and Disease Activity Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almogbel, Ebtehal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Free radicals have been implicated as Diabetes Mellitus (DM) contributors in type 2 DM and its associated Diabetes Mellitus Neuropathy (DMN). However, the potential for protein mediated oxidative stress to contribute disease pathogenesis remains largely unexplored. Aim To investigate the status and contribution of protein mediated oxidative stress in patients with DM or DMN and to explore whether oxidative protein modification has a role in DM progression to DM associated neuropathy. Materials and Methods Sera from 42 DM and 37 DMN patients with varying levels of disease activities biomarkers (HbA1C, patients’ age or disease duration) and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated for serum levels of protein mediated oxidative stress. Results Serum analysis showed significantly higher levels of protein carbonyl contents in both DM and DMN patients compared with healthy controls. Importantly, not only was there an increased number of subjects positive for protein carbonylation, but also the levels of protein carbonyl contents were significantly higher among DM and DMN patients, whose HbA1C were ≥8.8 as compared with patients with lower HbA1C (HbA1Cdiabetes to diabetes neuropathy. Conclusion These findings support an association between protein oxidation and DM or DMN progression. The stronger response observed in patients with higher HbA1C or patients’ ages or disease durations suggests, that protein mediated oxidative stress may be useful in evaluating the progression of DM and its associated DMN and in elucidating the mechanisms of these disorders pathogenesis.

  10. Individual whey protein components influence lipid oxidation dependent on pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    amounts of the two. Emulsions were prepared at pH4 and pH7. Emulsions were characterized by their droplet sizes, viscosities, and contents of proteins in the water phase. Lipid oxidation was assessed by PV and secondary volatile oxidation products. Results showed that pH greatly influenced the oxidative......In emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface. The properties of the emulsifier used and the composition at the interface is therefore expected to be of great importance for the resulting oxidation. Previous studies have shown that individual whey protein...... components (α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin) adsorb differently to the interface depending on pH. In addition, differences has been shown to exists between the oxidative stability provided by α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin. The hypothesis is that pH influences the oxidative stability of emulsions...

  11. Protein Radical Formation Resulting from Eosinophil Peroxidase-catalyzed Oxidation of Sulfite*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Ramirez, Dario C.; Summers, Fiona A.; Kadiiska, Maria B.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) is an abundant heme protein in eosinophils that catalyzes the formation of cytotoxic oxidants implicated in asthma, allergic inflammatory disorders, and cancer. It is known that some proteins with peroxidase activity (horseradish peroxidase and prostaglandin hydroperoxidase) can catalyze oxidation of bisulfite (hydrated sulfur dioxide), leading to the formation of sulfur trioxide anion radical (·SO3−). This free radical further reacts with oxygen to form peroxymonosulfate anion radical (−O3SOO·) and the very reactive sulfate anion radical (SO4˙̄), which is nearly as strong an oxidant as the hydroxyl radical. However, the ability of EPO to generate reactive sulfur radicals has not yet been reported. Here we demonstrate that eosinophil peroxidase/H2O2 is able to oxidize bisulfite, ultimately forming the sulfate anion radical (SO4˙̄), and that these reactive intermediates can oxidize target proteins to protein radicals, thereby initiating protein oxidation. We used immuno-spin trapping and confocal microscopy to study protein oxidation by EPO/H2O2 in the presence of bisulfite in a pure enzymatic system and in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 clone 15 cells, maturated to eosinophils. Polyclonal antiserum raised against the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) detected the presence of DMPO covalently attached to the proteins resulting from the DMPO trapping of protein free radicals. We found that sulfite oxidation mediated by EPO/H2O2 induced the formation of radical-derived DMPO spin-trapped human serum albumin and, to a lesser extent, of DMPO-EPO. These studies suggest that EPO-dependent oxidative damage may play a role in tissue injury in bisulfite-exacerbated eosinophilic inflammatory disorders. PMID:20501663

  12. Genetic variants involved in oxidative stress, base excision repair, DNA methylation, and folate metabolism pathways influence myeloid neoplasias susceptibility and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Alves, Raquel; Baldeiras, Inês; Cortesão, Emília; Carda, José Pedro; Branco, Claudia C; Oliveiros, Bárbara; Loureiro, Luísa; Pereira, Amélia; Nascimento Costa, José Manuel; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) share common features: elevated oxidative stress, DNA repair deficiency, and aberrant DNA methylation. We performed a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association in variants of genes involved in oxidative stress, folate metabolism, DNA repair, and DNA methylation with susceptibility and prognosis of these malignancies. To that end, 16 SNPs (one per gene: CAT, CYBA, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, GPX1, KEAP1, MPO, MTRR, NEIL1, NFE2F2, OGG1, SLC19A1, SOD1, SOD2, and XRCC1) were genotyped in 191 patients (101 MDS and 90 AML) and 261 controls. We also measured oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species/total antioxidant status ratio), DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), and DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine) in 50 subjects (40 MDS and 10 controls). Results showed that five genes (GPX1, NEIL1, NFE2L2, OGG1, and SOD2) were associated with MDS, two (DNMT3B and SLC19A1) with AML, and two (CYBA and DNMT1) with both diseases. We observed a correlation of CYBA TT, GPX1 TT, and SOD2 CC genotypes with increased oxidative stress levels, as well as NEIL1 TT and OGG1 GG genotypes with higher DNA damage. The 5-methylcytosine levels were negatively associated with DNMT1 CC, DNMT3A CC, and MTRR AA genotypes, and positively with DNMT3B CC genotype. Furthermore, DNMT3A, MTRR, NEIL1, and OGG1 variants modulated AML transformation in MDS patients. Additionally, DNMT3A, OGG1, GPX1, and KEAP1 variants influenced survival of MDS and AML patients. Altogether, data suggest that genetic variability influence predisposition and prognosis of MDS and AML patients, as well AML transformation rate in MDS patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Minor Changes in Expression of the Mismatch Repair Protein MSH2 Exert a Major Impact on Glioblastoma Response to Temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFaline-Figueroa, José L; Braun, Christian J; Stanciu, Monica; Nagel, Zachary D; Mazzucato, Patrizia; Sangaraju, Dewakar; Cerniauskas, Edvinas; Barford, Kelly; Vargas, Amanda; Chen, Yimin; Tretyakova, Natalia; Lees, Jacqueline A; Hemann, Michael T; White, Forest M; Samson, Leona D

    2015-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is often treated with the cytotoxic drug temozolomide, but the disease inevitably recurs in a drug-resistant form after initial treatment. Here, we report that in GBM cells, even a modest decrease in the mismatch repair (MMR) components MSH2 and MSH6 have profound effects on temozolomide sensitivity. RNAi-mediated attenuation of MSH2 and MSH6 showed that such modest decreases provided an unexpectedly strong mechanism of temozolomide resistance. In a mouse xenograft model of human GBM, small changes in MSH2 were sufficient to suppress temozolomide-induced tumor regression. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas to analyze mRNA expression patterns in tumors from temozolomide-treated GBM patients, we found that MSH2 transcripts in primary GBM could predict patient responses to initial temozolomide therapy. In recurrent disease, the absence of microsatellite instability (the standard marker for MMR deficiency) suggests a lack of involvement of MMR in the resistant phenotype of recurrent disease. However, more recent studies reveal that decreased MMR protein levels occur often in recurrent GBM. In accordance with our findings, these reported decreases may constitute a mechanism by which GBM evades temozolomide sensitivity while maintaining microsatellite stability. Overall, our results highlight the powerful effects of MSH2 attenuation as a potent mediator of temozolomide resistance and argue that MMR activity offers a predictive marker for initial therapeutic response to temozolomide treatment.

  14. Chemoproteomics-Enabled Discovery of a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of the DNA Repair Protein MGMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Abegg, Daniel; Hoch, Dominic G; Adibekian, Alexander

    2016-02-18

    We present a novel chemical scaffold for cysteine-reactive covalent inhibitors. Chloromethyl triazoles (CMTs) are readily accessed in only two chemical steps, thus enabling the rapid optimization of the pharmacological properties of these inhibitors. We demonstrate the tunability of the CMTs towards a specific biological target by synthesizing AA-CW236 as the first potent non-pseudosubstrate inhibitor of the O(6) -alkylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a protein of major clinical significance for the treatment of several severe cancer forms. Using quantitative proteomics profiling techniques, we show that AA-CW236 exhibits a high degree of selectivity towards MGMT. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of our MGMT inhibitor in combination with the DNA alkylating drug temozolomide in breast and colon cancer cells by fluorescence imaging and a cell-viability assay. Our results may open a new avenue towards the development of a clinically approved MGMT inhibitor.

  15. Effects of oxidative modification on gel properties of isolated porcine myofibrillar protein by peroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feibai; Zhao, Mouming; Zhao, Haifeng; Sun, Weizheng; Cui, Chun

    2014-04-01

    AAPH-derived (2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride) peroxyl radicals were selected as representative free radicals of lipid peroxidation to investigate the effects of oxidative modifications on isolated porcine myofibrillar protein structures as well as their rheological and gelling properties. Incubation of myofibrillar protein with increasing concentrations of AAPH resulted in a gradual increase (p3 mM) concentrations of AAPH induced aggregation of myosin and denaturation of myosin, troponin and tropomyosin, respectively. These structural changes resulted in changes on gelation of myofibrillar protein. Low level protein oxidation (AAPH≤0.5 mM) had no remarkable effect (p>0.05) on the viscoelastic pattern of myofibrillar protein gelation. Moderate oxidative modification (AAPH~1mM) enhanced the water-holding capacity (WHC) and texture properties of gels, while further oxidation (AAPH>3mM) significantly reduced the gel quality.

  16. Aberrant expression of proteins involved in signal transduction and DNA repair pathways in lung cancer and their association with clinical parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because cell signaling and cell metabolic pathways are executed through proteins, protein signatures in primary tumors are useful for identifying key nodes in signaling networks whose alteration is associated with malignancy and/or clinical outcomes. This study aimed to determine protein signatures in primary lung cancer tissues. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed 126 proteins and/or protein phosphorylation sites in case-matched normal and tumor samples from 101 lung cancer patients with reverse-phase protein array (RPPA assay. The results showed that 18 molecules were significantly different (p<0.05 by at least 30% between normal and tumor tissues. Most of those molecules play roles in cell proliferation, DNA repair, signal transduction and lipid metabolism, or function as cell surface/matrix proteins. We also validated RPPA results by Western blot and/or immunohistochemical analyses for some of those molecules. Statistical analyses showed that Ku80 levels were significantly higher in tumors of nonsmokers than in those of smokers. Cyclin B1 levels were significantly overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumors while Cox2 levels were significantly overexpressed in neuroendocrinal tumors. A high level of Stat5 is associated with favorable survival outcome for patients treated with surgery. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: Our results revealed that some molecules involved in DNA damage/repair, signal transductions, lipid metabolism, and cell proliferation were drastically aberrant in lung cancer tissues, and Stat5 may serve a molecular marker for prognosis of lung cancers.

  17. Use of bone morphogenetic proteins in mesenchymal stemcell stimulation of cartilage and bone repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix-associated bone morphogeneticproteins (BMPs) govern a plethora of biological processes.The BMPs are members of the transforming growthfactor-β protein superfamily, and they actively participateto kidney development, digit and limb formation,angiogenesis, tissue fibrosis and tumor development.Since their discovery, they have attracted attentionfor their fascinating perspectives in the regenerativemedicine and tissue engineering fields. BMPs havebeen employed in many preclinical and clinical studiesexploring their chondrogenic or osteoinductive potentialin several animal model defects and in human diseases.During years of research in particular two BMPs, BMP2and BMP7 have gained the podium for their use inthe treatment of various cartilage and bone defects.In particular they have been recently approved foremployment in non-union fractures as adjunct therapies.On the other hand, thanks to their potentialities inbiomedical applications, there is a growing interest instudying the biology of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC),the rules underneath their differentiation abilities, andto test their true abilities in tissue engineering. In fact,the specific differentiation of MSCs into targeted celltypelineages for transplantation is a primary goal of theregenerative medicine. This review provides an overviewon the current knowledge of BMP roles and signaling inMSC biology and differentiation capacities. In particularthe article focuses on the potential clinical use of BMPsand MSCs concomitantly, in cartilage and bone tissuerepair.

  18. DNA错配修复蛋白多功能性的研究进展%Progress in the versatilities of DNA mismatch repair proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李正莉; 吴建新

    2010-01-01

    DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR) system is one of DNA damage repair pathways, existing in all organisms from bacteria, yeast to human. This system consists of a group of highly-conserved enzymatic proteins. The well-studied function of MMR proteins is to maintain the stability of the genomes by correcting basebase mismatches and insertion/deletion loops generated during DNA replication and recombination. Increasing numbers of researches have revealed that the MMR proteins have multiple roles, including regulation of DNA damage response, homologous recombination, meiotic chromosome pairing and segregation, diversification of antibody and tri-nucleotide repeat expansion. This review is about the resent progress in the study of the versatilities of DNA mismatch repair proteins.%DNA错配修复(mismatch repair,MMR)系统是DNA损伤修复的多种途径之一,存在于从细菌、酵母到人体的所有生物体,由一组高保守性酶蛋白组成.其通过校正DNA复制及重组中产生的碱基错配与插入/缺失环,维持所有生物基因组稳定性的功能已研究比较清楚.越来越多的研究还揭示了错配修复蛋白的其他功能:参与调控DNA损伤应答,同源重组,减数分裂的染色体配对和分离,抗体多样性产生及三核苷酸重复序列扩增等过程.本文将对错配修复蛋白多功能性的研究进展作一综述.

  19. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  20. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  1. Protein oxidation in processed cheese slices treated with pulsed light technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M; Ganan, M; Guerra, C; Hierro, E

    2014-09-15

    The effect of pulsed light technology on protein oxidation was studied in sliced processed cheese by measuring the protein-bound carbonyls with a spectrophotometric DNPH assay. Bovine serum albumin was also tested as a protein standard. Fluences of 0.7, 2.1, 4.2, 8.4 and 11.9 J/cm(2) were applied to vacuum-packaged cheese slices and to an aqueous solution of the protein. Treatments up to 4.2 J/cm(2) did not promote protein oxidation immediately after flashing either in cheese or in the standard. Samples treated with 8.4 and 11.9 J/cm(2) showed significantly higher carbonyl amounts than non-treated ones. Protein oxidation increased along cheese storage at 4°C, and differences among treatments remained. Further studies on the sensory properties will be needed to clarify the impact of pulsed light on processed cheese quality.

  2. Loss of the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase in DNA double-strand-break-repair mutant mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, S R; Kurimasa, A; Oshimura, M; Dynan, W S; Bradbury, E M; Chen, D J

    1995-04-11

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of three polypeptide components: Ku-70, Ku-80, and an approximately 350-kDa catalytic subunit (p350). The gene encoding the Ku-80 subunit is identical to the x-ray-sensitive group 5 complementing gene XRCC5. Expression of the Ku-80 cDNA rescues both DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and V(D)J recombination in group 5 mutant cells. The involvement of Ku-80 in these processes suggests that the underlying defect in these mutant cells may be disruption of the DNA-PK holoenzyme. In this report we show that the p350 kinase subunit is deleted in cells derived from the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and in the Chinese hamster ovary cell line V-3, both of which are defective in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. A centromeric fragment of human chromosome 8 that complements the scid defect also restores p350 protein expression and rescues in vitro DNA-PK activity. These data suggest the scid gene may encode the p350 protein or regulate its expression and are consistent with a model whereby DNA-PK is a critical component of the DSB-repair pathway.

  3. Loss of the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase in DNA double-strand-break-repair mutant mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan); Kurimasa, Akihiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan); Dynan, W.S. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Bradbury, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Chen, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-04-11

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of three polypeptide components: Ku-70, Ku-80, and an {approx}350-kDa catalytic subunit (p350). The gene encoding the Ku-80 subunit is identical to the x-ray-sensitive group 5 complementing gene XRCC5. Expression of the Ku-80 cDNA rescues both DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and V(D)J recombination in group 5 mutant cells. The involvement of Ku-80 in these processes suggests that the underlying defect in these mutant cells may be disruption of the DNA-PK holoenzyme. In this report we show that the p350 kinase subunit is deleted in cells derived from the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and in the Chinese hamster ovary cell line V-3, both of which are defective in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. A centromeric fragment of human chromosome 8 that complements the scid defect also restores p350 protein expression and rescues in vitro DNA-PK activity. These data suggest the scid gene may encode the p350 protein or regulate its expression and are consistent with a model whereby DNA-PK is a critical component of the DSB-repair pathway. 38 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation as signals and regulators of gene expression in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagna eChmielowska-Bąk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are engaged in several processes essential for normal cell functioning, such as differentiation, anti-microbial defense, stimulus sensing and signaling. Interestingly, recent studies imply that cellular signal transduction and gene regulation are mediated not only directly by ROS but also by the molecules derived from ROS-mediated oxidation. Lipid peroxidation leads to non-enzymatic formation of oxylipins. These molecules were shown to modulate expression of signaling associated genes including genes encoding phosphatases, kinases and transcription factors. Oxidized peptides derived from protein oxidation might be engaged in organelle-specific ROS signaling. In turn, oxidation of particular mRNAs leads to decrease in the level of encoded proteins and thus, contributes to the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Present mini review summarizes latest findings concerning involvement of products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation in signal transduction and gene regulation.

  5. Effect of sodium ascorbate and sodium nitrite on protein and lipid oxidation in dry fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardo, A; De Maere, H; Stavropoulou, D A; Rysman, T; Leroy, F; De Smet, S

    2016-11-01

    The effects of sodium nitrite and ascorbate on lipid and protein oxidation were studied during the ripening process of dry fermented sausages. Samples were taken at day 0, 2, 8, 14, 21 and 28 of ripening to assess lipid (malondialdehyde) and protein (carbonyls and sulfhydryl groups) oxidation. Sodium ascorbate and nitrite were separately able to reduce the formation of malondialdehyde. Their combined addition resulted in higher amounts of carbonyl compounds compared to their separate addition or the treatment without any of both compounds. Moreover, sodium nitrite limited the formation of γ-glutamic semialdehyde whereas sodium ascorbate showed a pro-oxidant effect. A loss of thiol groups was observed during ripening, which was not affected by the use of sodium ascorbate nor sodium nitrite. In conclusion, sodium nitrite and ascorbate affected protein and lipid oxidation in different manners. The possible pro-oxidant effect of their combined addition on carbonyl formation might influence the technological and sensory properties of these products.

  6. Repairing split ends: SIRT6, mono-ADP ribosylation and DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, Michael; Mao, Zhiyong; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    The sirtuin gene family comprises an evolutionarily ancient set of NAD+ dependent protein deacetylase and mono-ADP ribosyltransferase enzymes. Found in all domains of life, sirtuins regulate a diverse array of biological processes, including DNA repair, gene silencing, apoptosis and metabolism. Studies in multiple model organisms have indicated that sirtuins may also function to extend lifespan and attenuate age-related pathologies. To date, most of these studies have focused on the deacetylase activity of sirtuins, and relatively little is known about the other biochemical activity of sirtuins, mono-ADP ribosylation. We recently reported that the mammalian sirtuin, SIRT6, mono-ADP ribosylates PARP1 to promote DNA repair in response to oxidative stress. In this research perspective we review the role of SIRT6 in DNA repair and discuss the emerging implications for sirtuin directed mono-ADP ribosylation in aging and age-related diseases. PMID:21946623

  7. The contributions of protein disulfide isomerase and its homologues to oxidative protein folding in the yeast endoplasmic reticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Ruoyu; Wilkinson, Bonney; Solovyov, Anton

    2004-01-01

    In vitro, protein disulfide isomerase (Pdi1p) introduces disulfides into proteins (oxidase activity) and provides quality control by catalyzing the rearrangement of incorrect disulfides (isomerase activity). Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is an essential protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae......, but the contributions of the catalytic activities of PDI to oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are unclear. Using variants of Pdi1p with impaired oxidase or isomerase activity, we show that isomerase-deficient mutants of PDI support wild-type growth even in a strain in which all of the PDI...... homologues of the yeast ER have been deleted. Although the oxidase activity of PDI is sufficient for wild-type growth, pulse-chase experiments monitoring the maturation of carboxypeptidase Y reveal that oxidative folding is greatly compromised in mutants that are defective in isomerase activity. Pdi1p...

  8. Participation of Low Molecular Weight Electron Carriers in Oxidative Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Mandl

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative protein folding is mediated by a proteinaceous electron relay system, in which the concerted action of protein disulfide isomerase and Ero1 delivers the electrons from thiol groups to the final acceptor. Oxygen appears to be the final oxidant in aerobic living organisms, although the existence of alternative electron acceptors, e.g. fumarate or nitrate, cannot be excluded. Whilst the protein components of the system are well-known, less attention has been turned to the role of low molecular weight electron carriers in the process. The function of ascorbate, tocopherol and vitamin K has been raised recently. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that these redox-active compounds can contribute to the functioning of oxidative folding. This review focuses on the participation of small molecular weight redox compounds in oxidative protein folding.

  9. Replication protein A: single-stranded DNA's first responder: dynamic DNA-interactions allow replication protein A to direct single-strand DNA intermediates into different pathways for synthesis or repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ran; Wold, Marc S

    2014-12-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major single-stranded DNA-binding protein in eukaryotic cells, is required for processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates found in replication, repair, and recombination. Recent studies have shown that RPA binding to ssDNA is highly dynamic and that more than high-affinity binding is needed for function. Analysis of DNA binding mutants identified forms of RPA with reduced affinity for ssDNA that are fully active, and other mutants with higher affinity that are inactive. Single molecule studies showed that while RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, the RPA complex can rapidly diffuse along ssDNA and be displaced by other proteins that act on ssDNA. Finally, dynamic DNA binding allows RPA to prevent error-prone repair of double-stranded breaks and promote error-free repair. Together, these findings suggest a new paradigm where RPA acts as a first responder at sites with ssDNA, thereby actively coordinating DNA repair and DNA synthesis. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Evidence for roles of radicals in protein oxidation in advanced human atherosclerotic plaque

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Stocker, R

    1998-01-01

    ) or oxidation has been obtained by immunochemical methods; the specificities of these antibodies are unclear. Here we present chemical determinations of six protein-bound oxidation products: dopa, o-tyrosine, m-tyrosine, dityrosine, hydroxyleucine and hydroxyvaline, some of which reflect particularly oxy...

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum proteins are major targets of oxidative stress. Application of a novel fluorescent probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlies, Dennis van der

    2003-01-01

    A target for protein oxidation by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is tyrosine, which may form the age- and/or disease-related biomarkers dityrosine, chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine. It was already recognized that immunochemical assays should facilitate studies on the role of oxidative stress in aging

  12. γ-Glutamyl semialdehyde and 2-amino-adipic semialdehyde: biomarkers of oxidative damage to proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daneshvar, B.; Frandsen, H.; Autrup, Herman

    1997-01-01

    or Pro, while AAS is an oxidation product of Lys. When oxidative stress was induced in rats by treatments with t-butyl hydroperoxide or acrolein, rat plasma protein levels of GGS and AAS were found to be significantly higher compared with control rats. The AAS-content in serum albumin or in total plasma...

  13. The yeast peroxiredoxin Tsa1 protects against protein-aggregate-induced oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Peroxiredoxins are ubiquitous thiol-specific proteins that have multiple functions in stress protection, including protection against oxidative stress. Tsa1 is the major yeast peroxiredoxin and we show that it functions as a specific antioxidant to protect the cell against the oxidative stress caused by nascent-protein misfolding and aggregation. Yeast mutants lacking TSA1 are sensitive to misfolding caused by exposure to the proline analogue azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (AZC). AZC pr...

  14. The myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant hypothiocyanous acid inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases via oxidation of key cysteine residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cook, Naomi L.; Moeke, Cassidy H.; Fantoni, Luca I.;

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues is critical to cellular processes, and is regulated by kinases and phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs contain a redox-sensitive active site Cys residue, which is readily oxidized. Myeloperoxidase, released from activated leukocytes, catalyzes thiocyanate ion (S...

  15. Helicobacter pylori protein oxidation influences the colonization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewska, Renata; Dzwonek, Artur; Mikuła, Michał; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Pawłowski, Marcin; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta K

    2006-08-01

    Dsb proteins control the formation and rearrangement of disulfide bonds during the folding of membrane and exported proteins. Here we examined the role of DsbI protein in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis and demonstrated that a dsbI mutant impaired in disulfide bond formation revealed a greatly reduced ability to colonize mice gastric mucosa.

  16. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  17. Volatile profile, lipid oxidation and protein oxidation of irradiated ready-to-eat cured turkey meat products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation had little effects on the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values in ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey meat products, while it increased protein oxidation at 4.5 kGy. The volatile profile analyses indicated that the amount of sulfur compounds increased linearly as doses increased in RTE turkey meat products. By correlation analysis, a positive correlation was found between benzene/ benzene derivatives and alcohols with lipid oxidation, while aldehydes, ketones and alkane, alkenes and alkynes were positively correlated with protein oxidation. Principle component analysis showed that irradiated meat samples can be discriminated by two categories of volatile compounds: Strecker degradation products and radiolytic degradation products. The cluster analysis of volatile data demonstrated that low-dose irradiation had minor effects on the volatile profile of turkey sausages (<1.5 kGy). However, as the doses increased, the differences between the irradiated and non-irradiated cured turkey products became significant.

  18. Reduced expression of DNA repair and redox signaling protein APE1/Ref-1 impairs human pancreatic cancer cell survival, proliferation, and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanlin; Zhou, Shaoyu; Sandusky, George E; Kelley, Mark R; Fishel, Melissa L

    2010-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease that is virtually never cured. Understanding the chemoresistance intrinsic to this cancer will aid in developing new regimens. High expression of APE1/Ref-1, a DNA repair and redox signaling protein, is associated with resistance, poor outcome, and angiogenesis; little is known in pancreatic cancer. Immunostaining of adenocarcinoma shows greater APE1/Ref-1 expression than in normal pancreas tissue. A decrease in APE1/Ref-1 protein levels results in pancreatic cancer cell growth inhibition, increased apoptosis, and altered cell cycle progression. Endogenous cell cycle inhibitors increase when APE1/ Ref-1 is reduced, demonstrating its importance to proliferation and growth of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Alkane oxidation by Pseudomonas oleovorans: genes and proteins

    OpenAIRE

    van Beilen, Jan Berthold

    1994-01-01

    This thesis deals with the molecular genetics and biochemistry of oxidation of medium chainlength alkanes by P. oleovorans, as part of a program to develop biotechnological processes, based on oxygenases.

  20. Alkane oxidation by Pseudomonas oleovorans : genes and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, Jan Berthold

    1994-01-01

    This thesis deals with the molecular genetics and biochemistry of oxidation of medium chainlength alkanes by P. oleovorans, as part of a program to develop biotechnological processes, based on oxygenases.

  1. Oxidation of DNA, proteins and lipids by DOPA, protein-bound DOPA, and related catechol(amine)s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, David I; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    in the presence of molecular O(2) and redox-active metal ions (e.g. Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Cr(6+)), which are known to increase the rate of DOPA oxidation. The majority of oxidative damage appears to be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and HO(.) radicals, though other DOPA oxidation products......, including semiquinone radicals, quinones, and metal ion-DOPA complexes have also been implicated in some cases. Non-radical reactions of DOPA with suitable nucleophiles (e.g. thiol groups) can also result in modification of the target, with this process being particularly prevalent with proteins...

  2. Effect of pasteurization on the protein composition and oxidative stability of beer during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Marianne N; Hoff, Signe; Berner, Torben S; Lametsch, René; Andersen, Mogens L

    2012-12-19

    The impacts of pasteurization of a lager beer on protein composition and the oxidative stability were studied during storage at 22 °C for 426 days in the dark. Pasteurization clearly improved the oxidative stability of beer determined by ESR spectroscopy, whereas it had a minor negative effect on the volatile profile by increasing volatile compounds that is generally associated with heat treatment and a loss of fruity ester aroma. A faster rate of radical formation in unpasteurized beer was consistent with a faster consumption of sulfite. Beer proteins in the unpasteurized beer were more degraded, most likely due to proteolytic enzyme activity of yeast remnants and more precipitation of proteins was also observed. The differences in soluble protein content and composition are suggested to result in differences in the contents of prooxidative metals as a consequence of the proteins ability to bind metals. This also contributes to the differences in oxidative stabilities of the beers.

  3. Tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  4. Methionine sulfoxide profiling of milk proteins to assess the influence of lipids on protein oxidation in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüst, Johannes; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2016-06-15

    Thermal treatment of milk and milk products leads to protein oxidation, mainly the formation of methionine sulfoxide. Reactive oxygen species, responsible for the oxidation, can be generated by Maillard reaction, autoxidation of sugars, or lipid peroxidation. The present study investigated the influence of milk fat on methionine oxidation in milk. For this purpose, quantitative methionine sulfoxide profiling of all ten methionine residues of β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, and αs1-casein was carried out by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry with scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS-sMRM). Analysis of defatted and regular raw milk samples after heating for up to 8 min at 120 °C and analysis of ultrahigh-temperature milk samples with 0.1%, 1.5%, and 3.5% fat revealed that methionine oxidation of the five residues of the whey proteins and of residues M 123, M 135, and M 196 of αs1-casein was not affected or even suppressed in the presence of milk fat. Only the oxidation of residues M 54 and M 60 of αs1-casein was promoted by lipids. In evaporated milk samples, formation of methionine sulfoxide was hardly influenced by the fat content of the samples. Thus, it can be concluded that lipid oxidation products are not the major cause of methionine oxidation in milk.

  5. Nucleation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Mediated by Mms6 Protein in Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashyap, Sanjay [Ames Laboratory; Woehl, Taylor J [Ames Laboratory; Liu, Xunpei [Iowa State University; Mallapragada, Surya K [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, Tanya [Ames Laboratory

    2014-09-23

    Biomineralization proteins are widely used as templating agents in biomimetic synthesis of a variety of organic–inorganic nanostructures. However, the role of the protein in controlling the nucleation and growth of biomimetic particles is not well understood, because the mechanism of the bioinspired reaction is often deduced from ex situ analysis of the resultant nanoscale mineral phase. Here we report the direct visualization of biomimetic iron oxide nanoparticle nucleation mediated by an acidic bacterial recombinant protein, Mms6, during an in situ reaction induced by the controlled addition of sodium hydroxide to solution-phase Mms6 protein micelles incubated with ferric chloride. Using in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy we observe the liquid iron prenucleation phase and nascent amorphous nanoparticles forming preferentially on the surface of protein micelles. Our results provide insight into the early steps of protein-mediated biomimetic nucleation of iron oxide and point to the importance of an extended protein surface during nanoparticle formation.

  6. Combination of two oxidant stressors suppresses the oxidative stress and enhances the heat shock protein 27 response in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brerro-Saby, Christelle; Delliaux, Stephane; Steinberg, Jean Guillaume; Boussuges, Alain; Gole, Yoann; Jammes, Yves

    2010-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the combination of 2 oxidant stressors (hyperoxia and fatiguing exercise) might reduce or suppress the oxidative stress. We concomitantly measured the plasma concentration of heat shock proteins (Hsp) that protect the cells against the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species. Healthy humans breathed pure oxygen under normobaric condition for 50-minute periods during which they stayed at rest or executed maximal static handgrip sustained until exhaustion. They also repeated handgrip bouts in normoxic condition. We performed venous blood measurements of 2 markers of the oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and reduced ascorbic acid) and Hsp27. Under normoxic condition, the handgrip elicited an oxidative stress and a modest increase in plasma Hsp27 level (+7.1 +/- 5.4 ng/mL). Under hyperoxic condition, (1) at rest, compared with the same time schedule in normoxic condition, we measured an oxidative stress (increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and decreased reduced ascorbic acid levels) and the plasma Hsp27 level increased (maximal variation, +12.5 +/- 6.0 ng/mL); and (2) after the handgrip, the oxidative stress rapidly disappeared. The combination of both hyperoxia and handgrip bout doubled the Hsp27 response (maximal variation, +24.8 +/- 9.2 ng/mL). Thus, the combination of 2 hits eliciting an oxidative stress seems to induce an adaptive Hsp27 response that might counterbalance an excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) for monitoring oxidative stress in critically ill patients: a simple, fast and inexpensive automated technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmeci, László; Seres, Leila; Antal, Magda; Lukács, Júlia; Regöly-Mérei, Andrea; Acsády, György

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to be involved in many human pathological processes. Although there are numerous methods available for the assessment of oxidative stress, most of them are still not easily applicable in a routine clinical laboratory due to the complex methodology and/or lack of automation. In research into human oxidative stress, the simplification and automation of techniques represent a key issue from a laboratory point of view at present. In 1996 a novel oxidative stress biomarker, referred to as advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), was detected in the plasma of chronic uremic patients. Here we describe in detail an automated version of the originally published microplate-based technique that we adapted for a Cobas Mira Plus clinical chemistry analyzer. AOPP reference values were measured in plasma samples from 266 apparently healthy volunteers (university students; 81 male and 185 female subjects) with a mean age of 21.3 years (range 18-33). Over a period of 18 months we determined AOPP concentrations in more than 300 patients in our department. Our experiences appear to demonstrate that this technique is especially suitable for monitoring oxidative stress in critically ill patients (sepsis, reperfusion injury, heart failure) even at daily intervals, since AOPP exhibited rapid responses in both directions. We believe that the well-established relationship between AOPP response and induced damage makes this simple, fast and inexpensive automated technique applicable in daily routine laboratory practice for assessing and monitoring oxidative stress in critically ill or other patients.

  8. Repair of rat cranial bone defect by using bone morphogenetic protein-2-related peptide combined with microspheres composed of polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid copolymer and chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingfeng; Jin, Lin; Wang, Mingbo; Zhu, Shaobo; Xu, Shuyun

    2015-07-08

    The effects of the transplanted bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) -related peptide P24 and rhBMP2 combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/chitosan (CS) microspheres were investigated in promoting the repair of rat cranial bone defect. Forty white rats were selected and equally divided into four groups (group A: 1 μg of rhBMP2/PLGA/CS composite; group B: 3 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group C: 0.5 μg of rhBMP2 + 1.5 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group D: blank PLGA/CS material), and rat cranial bone defect models with a diameter of 5 mm were established. The materials were transplanted to the cranial bone defects. The animals were sacrificed on weeks 6 and 12 post-operation. Radiographic examinations (x-ray imaging and 3D CT scanning) and histological evaluations were performed. The repaired areas of cranial bone defects were measured, and the osteogenetic abilities of various materials were compared. Cranial histology, imaging, and repaired area measurements showed that the osteogenetic effects at two time points (weeks 6 and 12) in group C were better than those in groups A and B. The effects in groups A and B were similar. Group D achieved the worst repair effect of cranial bone defects, where a large number of fibrous connective tissues were observed. The PLGA/CS composite microspheres loaded with rhBMP2 and P24 had optimal concrescence and could mutually increase their osteogenesis capability. rhBMP2 + P24/PLGA/CS composite is a novel material for bone defect repair with stable activity to induce bone formation.

  9. The promotion of osteochondral repair by combined intra-articular injection of parathyroid hormone-related protein and implantation of a bi-layer collagen-silk scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jialin; Tao, Jiadong; Hu, Changchang; Chen, Longkun; Zhao, Hongshi; Xu, Guowei; Heng, Boon C; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2013-08-01

    The repair of osteochondral defects can be enhanced with scaffolds but is often accompanied with undesirable terminal differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has been shown to inhibit aberrant differentiation, but administration at inappropriate time points would have adverse effects on chondrogenesis. This study aims to develop an effective tissue engineering strategy by combining PTHrP and collagen-silk scaffold for osteochondral defect repair. The underlying mechanisms of the synergistic effect of combining PTHrP administration with collagen-silk scaffold implantation for rabbit knee joint osteochondral defect repair were investigated. In vitro studies showed that PTHrP treatment significantly reduced Alizarin Red staining and expression of terminal differentiation-related markers. This is achieved in part through blocking activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. For the in vivo repair study, intra-articular injection of PTHrP was carried out at three different time windows (4-6, 7-9 and 10-12 weeks) together with implantation of a bi-layer collagen-silk scaffold. Defects treated with PTHrP at the 4-6 weeks time window exhibited better regeneration (reconstitution of cartilage and subchondral bone) with minimal terminal differentiation (hypertrophy, ossification and matrix degradation), as well as enhanced chondrogenesis (cell shape, Col2 and GAG accumulation) compared with treatment at other time windows. Furthermore, the timing of PTHrP administration also influenced PTHrP receptor expression, thus affecting the treatment outcome. Our results demonstrated that intra-articular injection of PTHrP at 4-6 weeks post-injury together with collagen-silk scaffold implantation is an effective strategy for inhibiting terminal differentiation and enhancing chondrogenesis, thus improving cartilage repair and regeneration in a rabbit model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All

  10. Crystal structure of the TLDc domain of oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaise, Mickael; Alsarraf, Husam Mohammad Ali Baker; Wong, Jaslyn

    2012-01-01

    The oxidation resistance proteins (OXR) help to protect eukaryotes from reactive oxygen species. The sole C-terminal domain of the OXR, named TLDc is sufficient to perform this function. However, the mechanism by which oxidation resistance occurs is poorly understood. We present here the crystal...... structure of the TLDc domain of the oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish. The structure was determined by X-ray crystallography to atomic resolution (0.97Å) and adopts an overall globular shape. Two antiparallel β-sheets form a central β-sandwich, surrounded by two helices and two one-turn helices...

  11. The Effect of Leonurus sibiricus Plant Extracts on Stimulating Repair and Protective Activity against Oxidative DNA Damage in CHO Cells and Content of Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Sitarek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leonurus sibiricus L. has been used as a traditional and medicinal herb for many years in Asia and Europe. This species is known to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activity and has demonstrated a reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. All tested extracts of L. sibiricus showed protective and DNA repair stimulating effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells exposed to H2O2. Preincubation of the CHO cells with 0.5 mg/mL of plant extracts showed increased expression level of antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx. LC-MS/MS and HPLC analyses revealed the presence of nine phenolic compounds in L. sibiricus plant extracts: catechin, verbascoside, two flavonoids (quercetin and rutin, and five phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, and ferulic acid. The roots and aerial parts of in vitro L. sibiricus plant extracts, which had the strongest antioxidant properties, may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, as well as protecting DNA via enhanced activation of the antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx regulating intracellular antioxidant capacity. The content of phenolic compounds in in vitro raised plants was greater than the levels found in plants propagated from seeds.

  12. Porous polymer scaffold for on-site delivery of stem cells--Protects from oxidative stress and potentiates wound tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geesala, Ramasatyaveni; Bar, Nimai; Dhoke, Neha R; Basak, Pratyay; Das, Amitava

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing by cell transplantation techniques often suffer setbacks due to oxidative stress encountered at injury sites. A porous polyethyleneglycol-polyurethane (PEG-PU) scaffold that facilitates cell delivery and boosts tissue repair was developed through semi-interpenetrating polymer network approach. The key physico-chemical properties assessed confirms these polymeric matrices are highly thermostable, barostable, degrade at an acidic pH (5.8), biodegradable, cytocompatible and possess excellent porosity. Mechanism of cellular penetration into porous polymer networks was evident by a ≥6 - fold increase in gene expression of MMP-13 and MMP-2 via activation of Akt and Erk. H2O2-induced apoptosis of mouse bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) was abrogated in presence of polymer networks indicating a protective effect from oxidative stress. Transplantation of BMSC + PEG-PU at murine excisional splint wound site depicted significant increase in fibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition, anti-oxidant enzyme activities of catalase, SOD and GPx. Furthermore it significantly decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, etc) with a concomitant increase in anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-13) at an early healing period of day 7. Finally, immunostaining revealed an enhanced engraftment and vascularity indicating an accelerated wound tissue closure. This pre-clinical study demonstrates the proof-of-concept and further necessitates their clinical evaluation as potential cell delivery vehicle scaffolds.

  13. Increased protein oxidation and loss of protein-bound sialic acid in hepatic tissues of D-galactose induced aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakatay, Ufuk; Aydın, Seval; Atukeren, Pınar; Yanar, Karolin; Sitar, Mustafa E; Dalo, Enis; Uslu, Ezel

    2013-07-01

    A redox basis of the increased oxidative protein damage and free radical-mediated desialylation have not been fully elucidated in aging. It is well known that the incidence of several liver diseases increase with age. This original research focuses on protein oxidation mechanisms and protein-bound sialic acid levels in liver tissue of the mimetic aging rats. Injection of D-galactose (60 mg/kg/day) for six weeks to male Sprague-Dawley rats (20-week-old) used to establish mimetic aging model. We investigated the tissue levels of various protein oxidation markers such as protein carbonyl groups, suitable advanced oxidation protein products and protein thiol groups. Our study also covered protein-bound sialic acid in liver tissue of D-galactose-induced aging rats. PCO (Protein Carbonyl Groups), P-OOH (Protein Hydroperoxides) and AOPP (Advanced Oxidation Protein Products) levels in aging rats were significantly higher compared to young control groups. On the other hand, P-SH (Protein Thiol Groups) levels were not found to be different between two groups. SA (Sialic Acid) levels in D-galactose-induced aging rats were significantly lower compared to control groups. Our results demonstrated greater susceptibility to hepatic oxidative protein damage and desialylation of hepatocellular proteins in Dgalactose- induced aging rats. These molecular mechanisms may be operative in the many age-related liver diseases, which are pertinent to increased oxidative stress and altered redox homeostasis.

  14. Products of DNA, protein and lipid oxidative damage in relation to vitamin C plasma concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Dusinská, M; Valachovicová, M; Blazícek, P; Pauková, V

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous chronic age-related free radical-induced diseases. Improved antioxidant status minimizes oxidative damage to DNA, proteins, lipids and other biomolecules. Diet-derived antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, carotenoids and related plant pigments are important in antioxidative defense and maintaining health. The results of long-term epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that protective vitamin C plasma concentration for minimum risk of free radical disease is higher than 50 micromol/l. Products of oxidative damage to DNA (DNA strand breaks with oxidized purines and pyrimidines), proteins (carbonyls) and lipids (conjugated dienes of fatty acids, malondialdehyde) were estimated in a group of apparently healthy adult non-smoking population in dependence on different vitamin C plasma concentrations. Under conditions of protective plasma vitamin C concentrations (>50 micromol/l) significantly lower values of DNA, protein and lipid oxidative damage were found in comparison with the vitamin C-deficient group (fruit and vegetable consumption (leading to higher vitamin C intake and higher vitamin C plasma concentrations) on oxidation of DNA, proteins and lipids is also expressed by an inverse significant correlation between plasma vitamin C and products of oxidative damage. The results suggest an important role of higher and frequent consumption of protective food (fruit, vegetables, vegetable oils, nuts, seeds and cereal grains) in prevention of free radical disease.

  15. Cross-linking proteins by laccase-catalyzed oxidation: importance relative to other modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Charlotte L; Andersen, Mogens L; Degn, Peter E; Nielsen, Jacob H

    2008-12-24

    Laccase-catalyzed oxidation was able to induce intermolecular cross-links in beta-lactoglobulin, and ferulic acid-mediated laccase-catalyzed oxidation was able to induce intermolecular cross-links in alpha-casein, whereas transglutaminase cross-linked only alpha-casein. In addition, different patterns of laccase-induced oxidative modifications were detected, including dityrosine formation, formation of fluorescent tryptophan oxidation products, and carbonyls derived from histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Laccase-catalyzed oxidation as well as transglutaminase induced only minor changes in surface tension of the proteins, and the changes could not be correlated to protein cross-linking. The presence of ferulic acid was found to influence the effect of laccase, allowing laccase to form irreducible intermolecular cross-links in beta-lactoglobulin and resulting in proteins exercising higher surface tensions due to cross-linking as well as other oxidative modifications. The outcome of using ferulic acid-mediated laccase-catalyzed oxidation to modify the functional properties of proteinaceous food components or other biosystems is expected to be highly dependent on the protein composition, resulting in different changes of the functional properties.

  16. Purification of reversibly oxidized proteins (PROP reveals a redox switch controlling p38 MAP kinase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Templeton

    Full Text Available Oxidation of cysteine residues of proteins is emerging as an important means of regulation of signal transduction, particularly of protein kinase function. Tools to detect and quantify cysteine oxidation of proteins have been a limiting factor in understanding the role of cysteine oxidation in signal transduction. As an example, the p38 MAP kinase is activated by several stress-related stimuli that are often accompanied by in vitro generation of hydrogen peroxide. We noted that hydrogen peroxide inhibited p38 activity despite paradoxically increasing the activating phosphorylation of p38. To address the possibility that cysteine oxidation may provide a negative regulatory effect on p38 activity, we developed a biochemical assay to detect reversible cysteine oxidation in intact cells. This procedure, PROP, demonstrated in vivo oxidation of p38 in response to hydrogen peroxide and also to the natural inflammatory lipid prostaglandin J2. Mutagenesis of the potential target cysteines showed that oxidation occurred preferentially on residues near the surface of the p38 molecule. Cysteine oxidation thus controls a functional redox switch regulating the intensity or duration of p38 activity that would not be revealed by immunodetection of phosphoprotein commonly interpreted as reflective of p38 activity.

  17. Reduced protein oxidation in Wistar rats supplemented with marine ω3 PUFAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Lucía; Pazos, Manuel; Gallardo, José M; Torres, Josep L; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Nogués, Rosa; Romeu, Marta; Medina, Isabel

    2013-02-01

    The potential effects of various dietary eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6) ratios (1:1, 2:1, and 1:2, respectively) on protein redox states from plasma, kidney, skeletal muscle, and liver were investigated in Wistar rats. Dietary fish oil groups were compared with animals fed soybean and linseed oils, vegetable oils enriched in ω6 linoleic acid (LA; 18:2) and ω3 α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3), respectively. Fish oil treatments were effective at reducing the level of total fatty acids in plasma and enriching the plasmatic free fatty acid fraction and erythrocyte membranes in EPA and DHA. A proteomic approach consisting of fluorescein 5-thiosemicarbazide (FTSC) labeling of protein carbonyls, FTSC intensity visualization on 1-DE or 2-DE gels, and protein identification by MS/MS was used for the protein oxidation assessment. Albumin was found to be the most carbonylated protein in plasma for all dietary groups, and its oxidation level was significantly modulated by dietary interventions. Supplementation with an equal EPA:DHA ratio (1:1) showed the lowest oxidation score for plasma albumin, followed in increasing order of carbonylation by 1:2 proteins and cytosolic proteins from kidney and liver also indicated a protective effect on proteins for the fish oil treatments, the 1:1 ratio exhibiting the lowest protein oxidation scores. The effect of fish oil treatments at reducing carbonylation on specific proteins from plasma (albumin), skeletal muscle (actin), and liver (albumin, argininosuccinate synthetase, 3-α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) was remarkable. This investigation highlights the efficiency of dietary fish oil at reducing in vivo oxidative damage of proteins compared to oils enriched in the 18-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids ω3 ALA and ω6 LA, and such antioxidant activity may differ among different fish oil sources because of variations in EPA/DHA content.

  18. A Peroxiredoxin Promotes H2O2 Signaling and Oxidative Stress Resistance by Oxidizing a Thioredoxin Family Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon D. Brown

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available H2O2 can cause oxidative damage associated with age-related diseases such as diabetes and cancer but is also used to initiate diverse responses, including increased antioxidant gene expression. Despite significant interest, H2O2-signaling mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we present a mechanism for the propagation of an H2O2 signal that is vital for the adaptation of the model yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, to oxidative stress. Peroxiredoxins are abundant peroxidases with conserved antiaging and anticancer activities. Remarkably, we find that the only essential function for the thioredoxin peroxidase activity of the Prx Tpx1(hPrx1/2 in resistance to H2O2 is to inhibit a conserved thioredoxin family protein Txl1(hTxnl1/TRP32. Thioredoxins regulate many enzymes and signaling proteins. Thus, our discovery that a Prx amplifies an H2O2 signal by driving the oxidation of a thioredoxin-like protein has important implications, both for Prx function in oxidative stress resistance and for responses to H2O2.

  19. Women have higher protein content of beta-oxidation enzymes in skeletal muscle than men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C Maher

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that compared with men, women have better ultra-endurance capacity, oxidize more fat during endurance exercise, and are more resistant to fat oxidation defects i.e. diet-induced insulin resistance. Several groups have shown that the mRNA and protein transcribed and translated from genes related to transport of fatty acids into the muscle are greater in women than men; however, the mechanism(s for the observed sex differences in fat oxidation remains to be determined. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were obtained from moderately active men (N=12 and women (N=11 at rest to examine mRNA and protein content of genes involved in lipid oxidation. Our results show that women have significantly higher protein content for tri-functional protein alpha (TFPalpha, very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD, and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD (P<0.05. There was no significant sex difference in the expression of short-chain hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCHAD, or peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha, or PPARgamma, genes potentially involved in the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism. In conclusion, women have more protein content of the major enzymes involved in long and medium chain fatty acid oxidation which could account for the observed differences in fat oxidation during exercise.

  20. Oxidative stress and CCN1 protein in human skin connective tissue aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoping Qin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS is an important pathogenic factor involved in human aging. Human skin is a primary target of oxidative stress from ROS generated from both extrinsic and intrinsic sources, like ultraviolet irradiation (UV and endogenous oxidative metabolism. Oxidative stress causes the alterations of collagen-rich extracellular matrix (ECM, the hallmark of skin connective tissue aging. Age-related alteration of dermal collagenous ECM impairs skin structural integrity and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin diseases, such as poor wound healing and skin cancer. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of oxidative stress and CCN1 protein (first member of CCN family proteins, a critical mediator of oxidative stress-induced skin connective tissue aging.

  1. Homogenization Pressure and Temperature Affect Protein Partitioning and Oxidative Stability of Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Barouh, Nathalie; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative stability of 10 % fish oil-in-water emulsions was investigated for emulsions prepared under different homogenization conditions. Homogenization was conducted at two different pressures (5 or 22.5 MPa), and at two different temperatures (22 and 72 °C). Milk proteins were used...... as the emulsifier. Hence, emulsions were prepared with either a combination of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin or with a combination of sodium caseinate and β-lactoglobulin. Results showed that an increase in pressure increased the oxidative stability of emulsions with caseinate and β-lactoglobulin, whereas...... it decreased the oxidative stability of emulsions with α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin. For both types of emulsions the partitioning of proteins between the interface and the aqueous phase appeared to be important for the oxidative stability. The effect of pre-heating the aqueous phase with the milk proteins...

  2. Factors affecting the oxidative stability of omega-3 emulsions prepared with milk proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    Omega-3 fatty acids are prone to lipid oxidation due to their unsaturated nature. In oil-in-water emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface. The properties of the emulsifier used and the structure at the interface are therefore expected to be of great...... importance for the resulting oxidation. This presentation will give an overview of parameters that are expected to change the properties and structure of milk protein components at the interface of 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions. Results from three different studies will be included. The first study...... compared the effect of two different high pressure homogenizers on oxidation in caseinate and whey protein isolate emulsions. The second study evaluated the effect of homogenization pressure and temperature on emulsions prepared either with whey proteins or a combination of caseinate and β...

  3. Serum Advanced Oxidation Protein Products in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Possible Markers of Diagnostic Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh Nayyar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to measure the concentrations (levels ofserum total proteins and advanced oxidation protein products as markers of oxidantmediated protein damage in the sera of patients with oral cancers.Methods: The study consisted of the sera analyses of serum total protein andadvanced oxidation protein products’ levels in 30 age and sex matched controls, 60patients with reported pre-cancerous lesions and/or conditions and 60 patients withhistologically proven oral squamous cell carcinoma. One way analyses of variance wereused to test the difference between groups. To determine which of the two groups’ meanswere significantly different, the post-hoc test of Bonferroni was used. The results wereaveraged as mean ± standard deviation. In the above test, P values less than 0.05 weretaken to be statistically significant. The normality of data was checked before thestatistical analysis was performed.Results: The study revealed statistically significant variations in serum levels ofadvanced oxidation protein products (P<0.001. Serum levels of total protein showedextensive variations; therefore the results were largely inconclusive and statisticallyinsignificant.Conclusion: The results emphasize the need for more studies with larger samplesizes to be conducted before a conclusive role can be determined for sera levels of totalprotein and advanced oxidation protein products as markers both for diagnosticsignificance and the transition from the various oral pre-cancerous lesions and conditionsinto frank oral cancers.

  4. DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID ALTERS EXPRESSION OF OXIDATIVE STRESS AND DNA REPAIR GENES IN A DOSE DEPENDENT MANNER IN THE TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIUM OF THE URINARY BLADDER FROM FEMALE F344 RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose-dependent alteration of oxidative stress and DNA repair gene expression by Dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)] in transitional epithelium of urinary bladder from female F344 rats.Arsenic (As) is a major concern as millions of people are at risk from drinking arsenic contaminat...

  5. INVESTIGATION OF DNA REPAIR BY SISTER CHROMATID EXCHANGE (SCE) ANALYSIS AND THE ALKALINE SINGLE CELL GEL ASSAY (SCG) IN MAMMALIAN GO-LYMPHOCYTES AFTER IN VITRO EXPOSURE TO ETHYLENE OXIDE (EO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigation ofDNA Repair by Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE) Analysis and the Alkaline Single Cell Gel Assay (SCG) in Mammalian Go-Lymphocytes after In Vitro Exposure to Ethylene Oxide (EO). EO is a large volume chemical used primarily as an intermediate in manufacturing...

  6. Mutagenicity of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline in colon and liver of Big Blue Rats: role of DNA adducts, strand breaks, DNA repair and oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla;

    2002-01-01

    The contribution of oxidative stress, different types of DNA damage and expression of DNA repair enzymes in colon and liver mutagenesis induced by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) was investigated in four groups of six Big Blue rats fed diets with 0, 20, 70, and 200 mg IQ/kg for 3...

  7. The effect of oxidant and the non-oxidant alteration of cellular thiol concentration on the formation of protein mixed-disulfides in HEK 293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasen Lee Gilge

    Full Text Available Cellular molecules possess various mechanisms in responding to oxidant stress. In terms of protein responses, protein S-glutathionylation is a unique post-translational modification of protein reactive cysteines forming disulfides with glutathione molecules. This modification has been proposed to play roles in antioxidant, regulatory and signaling in cells under oxidant stress. Recently, the increased level of protein S-glutathionylation has been linked with the development of diseases. In this report, specific S-glutathionylated proteins were demonstrated in human embryonic kidney 293 cells treated with two different oxidative reagents: diamide and hydrogen peroxide. Diamide is a chemical oxidizing agent whereas hydrogen peroxide is a physiological oxidant. Under the experimental conditions, these two oxidants decreased glutathione concentration without toxicity. S-glutathionylated proteins were detected by immunoblotting and glutathione concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. We further show the effect of alteration of the cellular thiol pool on the amount of protein S-glutathionylation in oxidant-treated cells. Cellular thiol concentrations were altered either by a specific way using buthionine sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis or by a non-specific way, incubating cells in cystine-methionine deficient media. Cells only treated with either buthionine sulfoximine or cystine-methionine deficient media did not induce protein S-glutathionylation, even though both conditions decreased 65% of cellular glutathione. Moreover, the amount of protein S-glutathionylation under both conditions in the presence of oxidants was not altered when compared to the amount observed in regular media with oxidants present. Protein S-glutathionylation is a dynamic reaction which depends on the rate of adding and removing glutathione. Phenylarsine oxide, which specifically forms a covalent adduct with

  8. Study on Mechanism of Soy Protein Oxidation Induced by Lipid Peroxidation Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative modification of soy protein by lipid peroxidation products, which was potentially present in a lipoxygenase-catalyzed polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation system, was investigated in this study. 13S-Hydroperoxy-9Z, 11E-Octadecadienoic acid (HPODE, malondialdehyde and acrolein were selected as representative primary product and secondary byproducts of lipid peroxidation and 2, 2’-azobis-(2-amidinopropane dihydrochloride (AAPH -derived peroxyl radical peroxyl radicals were chosen to simulate lipid peroxidation-derived free radical. Incubation of soy protein with increasing concentration of AAPH, HPODE, malondialdehyde and acrolein resulted in gradual generation of protein carbonyl derivatives, loss of free sulphydryl groups, total sulphydryl groups, free amine, available lysine, surface hydrophobicity and formation of oxidation aggregates. The average distribution model of protein accessible groups could explain majority mechanism of lipid peroxidation products-mediated soy protein oxidation. Primary oxidation aggregates further developed into insoluble aggregates by covalent cross-linking also may provide a partial mechanism of lipid peroxidation products-mediated soy protein oxidation.

  9. Dose response and adaptive response of non-homologous end joining repair genes and proteins in resting human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to γ radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelke, Shridevi; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2015-05-01

    Ionising radiation induces single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks (DSB) and base damages in human cell. DSBs are the most deleterious and if not repaired may lead to genomic instability and cell death. DSB can be repaired through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway in resting lymphocytes. In this study, NHEJ genes and proteins were studied in irradiated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at resting stage. Dose-response, time point kinetics and adaptive-response studies were conducted in irradiated PBMC at various end points such as DNA damage quantitation, transcription and protein expression profile. Venous blood samples were collected from 20 random, normal and healthy donors with written informed consent. PBMC was separated and irradiated with various doses between 0.1 and 2.0 Gy ((60)CO-γ source) for dose-response study. Repair kinetics of DNA damage and time point changes in expression of genes and proteins were studied in post-irradiated PBMC at 2.0 Gy at various time points up to 240 min. Adaptive-response study was conducted with a priming dose of 0.1 Gy followed by a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy after 4-h incubation. Our results revealed that Ku70, Ku80, XLF and Ligase IV were significantly upregulated (P Adaptive-response study showed significantly increased expression of the proteins involved in NHEJ, suggesting their role in adaptive response in human PBMC at G0/G1, which has important implications to human health. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Aging induces cardiac diastolic dysfunction, oxidative stress, accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts and protein modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Yan; Du, Min; Dolence, E Kurt; Fang, Cindy X; Mayer, Gabriele E; Ceylan-Isik, Asli F; LaCour, Karissa H; Yang, Xiaoping; Wilbert, Christopher J; Sreejayan, Nair; Ren, Jun

    2005-04-01

    Evidence suggests that aging, per se, is a major risk factor for cardiac dysfunction. Oxidative modification of cardiac proteins by non-enzymatic glycation, i.e. advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), has been implicated as a causal factor in the aging process. This study was designed to examine the role of aging on cardiomyocyte contractile function, cardiac protein oxidation and oxidative modification. Mechanical properties were evaluated in ventricular myocytes from young (2-month) and aged (24-26-month) mice using a MyoCam system. The mechanical indices evaluated were peak shortening (PS), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90) and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (+/- dL/dt). Oxidative stress and protein damage were evaluated by glutathione and glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio and protein carbonyl content, respectively. Activation of NAD(P)H oxidase was determined by immunoblotting. Aged myocytes displayed a larger cell cross-sectional area, prolonged TR90, and normal PS, +/- dL/dt and TPS compared with young myocytes. Aged myocytes were less tolerant of high stimulus frequency (from 0.1 to 5 Hz) compared with young myocytes. Oxidative stress and protein oxidative damage were both elevated in the aging group associated with significantly enhanced p47phox but not gp91phox expression. In addition, level of cardiac AGEs was approximately 2.5-fold higher in aged hearts than young ones determined by AGEs-ELISA. A group of proteins with a molecular range between 50 and 75 kDa with pI of 4-7 was distinctively modified in aged heart using one- or two-dimension SDS gel electrophoresis analysis. These data demonstrate cardiac diastolic dysfunction and reduced stress tolerance in aged cardiac myocytes, which may be associated with enhanced cardiac oxidative damage, level of AGEs and protein modification by AGEs.

  11. Advanced oxidation protein products are generated by bovine neutrophils and inhibit free radical production in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordignon, Milena; Da Dalt, Laura; Marinelli, Lieta; Gabai, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recognised importance of oxidative stress in the health and immune function of dairy cows, protein oxidation markers have been poorly studied in this species. The current study aimed to characterise markers of protein oxidation generated by activated bovine neutrophils and investigate the biological effects of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) on bovine neutrophils. Markers of protein oxidation (AOPP, dityrosines and carbonyls) were measured in culture medium containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) exposed to neutrophils. The effect of AOPP-BSA on generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was assessed by chemiluminescence. Activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 and the presence of DNA laddering were used as apoptosis markers. Greater amounts of AOPP were generated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-activated than non-activated neutrophils (1.46 ± 0.13 vs. 0.75 ± 0.13 nmol/mg protein, respectively; P<0.05). Activated neutrophils and hypochlorous acid generated slightly different patterns of oxidized protein markers. Exposure to AOPP-BSA did not stimulate ROS production. Activated neutrophils generated a lesser amount of ROS when incubated with AOPP-BSA (P<0.001). Activation with PMA induced a loss of viable neutrophils after 3h, which was greater with AOPP-BSA incubation (P<0.05). Detectable amounts of active caspases-3, -8 and -9 were found in nearly all samples but differences in caspase activation or DNA laddering were not observed comparing treatment groups. Apoptosis was unlikely to be responsible for the greater loss of PMA-activated neutrophils cultured in AOPP-BSA and it is possible that primary necrosis occurred. The results suggest that accumulation of oxidized proteins at an inflammatory site might result in a progressive reduction of neutrophil viability.

  12. Methods of repairing a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium boride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  13. Effect of pomegranate peel extract on lipid and protein oxidation in beef meatballs during refrigerated storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Sebahattin Serhat; Soyer, Ayla; Işıkçı, Fatma

    2016-06-01

    Antioxidant effect of pomegranate peel extract (PE) to retard lipid and protein oxidation was investigated in meatballs during refrigerated storage at 4±1°C. Concentrated lyophilised water extract of pomegranate peel was incorporated into freshly minced beef meat at 0.5% and 1% concentrations and compared with 0.01% butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as a reference and control (without any antioxidant). PE showed high phenolic content and antioxidant activity. In PE added samples, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) value, peroxide formation, loss of sulfhydryl groups and formation of protein carbonyls were lower than control (P<0.01) after 8 days of storage. Sensory evaluation with respect to colour and rancid odour revealed that PE incorporation in meatballs prolonged the refrigerated storage up to 8 days. Addition of both 0.5 and 1% PE in meatballs reduced lipid and protein oxidation and improved sensory scores. These results indicated that PE was effective on retarding lipid and protein oxidation.

  14. Does LED phototherapy influence the repair of bone defects grafted with MTA, bone morphogenetic proteins, and guided bone regeneration? A description of the repair process on rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L B; Soares, Luiz G P; Barbosa, Artur F S; Ramalho, Luciana M P; dos Santos, Jean N

    2012-09-01

    This work carried out a histological analysis on bone defects grafted (MTA) treated or not with LED, BMPs, and membrane (GBR). Benefits of their isolated or combined usage on bone repair were reported, but not their association. Ninety rats were divided into ten groups and each subdivided into three. Defects on G II and I were filled with the blood clot. G II was further LED irradiated. G III and IV were filled with MTA; G IV was further LED irradiated. In G V and VI, the defects were filled with MTA and covered with a membrane (GBR). G VI was further LED irradiated. In G VII and VIII, BMPs were added to the MTA and group VIII was further LED irradiated. In G IX and X, the MTA + BMP graft was covered with a membrane (GBR). G X was further LED irradiated. LED was applied over the defect at 48-h intervals and repeated for 15 days. Specimens were processed, cut, and stained with H&E and Sirius red and underwent histological analysis. The use of LED light alone dramatically reduced inflammation. However, its use on MTA associated with BMP and/or GBR increased the severity of the inflammatory reaction. Regarding bone reabsorption, the poorest result was seen when the LED light was associated with the MTA + BMP graft. In the groups Clot and MTA + GBR, no bone reabsorption was detectable. Increased collagen deposition was observed when the LED light was associated with the use of the MTA associated with BMP and/or GBR. Increased new bone formation was observed when the LED light was used alone or associated with the use of MTA + GBR, MTA + BMP, on association of MTA + BMP + GBR and when BMP was added to the MTA. Our results indicate that the use of LED light alone or in association with MTA, MTA + BMP, MTA + GBR, and MTA + BMP + GBR caused less inflammation, and an increase of both collagen deposition and bone deposition as seen on both histological and morphometric analysis.

  15. Nrf1 CNC-bZIP protein promotes cell survival and nucleotide excision repair through maintaining glutathione homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weinong; Ming, Mei; Zhao, Rui; Pi, Jingbo; Wu, Chunli; He, Yu-Ying

    2012-05-25

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Its major environmental risk factor is UVB radiation in sunlight. In response to UVB damage, epidermal keratinocytes activate a specific repair pathway, i.e. nucleotide excision repair, to remove UVB-induced DNA lesions. However, the regulation of UVB response is not fully understood. Here we show that the long isoform of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 1 (Nrf1, also called NFE2L1), a cytoprotective transcription factor critical for the expression of multiple antioxidant response element-dependent genes, plays an important role in the response of keratinocytes to UVB. Nrf1 loss sensitized keratinocytes to UVB-induced apoptosis by up-regulating the expression of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bik through reducing glutathione levels. Knocking down Bik reduced UVB-induced apoptosis in Nrf1-inhibited cells. In UVB-irradiated surviving cells, however, disruption of Nrf1 impaired nucleotide excision repair through suppressing the transcription of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC), a factor essential for initiating the global genome nucleotide excision repair by recognizing the DNA lesion and recruiting downstream factors. Nrf1 enhanced XPC expression by increasing glutathione availability but was independent of the transcription repressor of XPC. Adding XPC or glutathione restored the DNA repair capacity in Nrf1-inhibited cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Nrf1 levels are significantly reduced by UVB radiation in mouse skin and are lower in human skin tumors than in normal skin. These results indicate a novel role of Nrf1 in UVB-induced DNA damage repair and suggest Nrf1 as a tumor suppressor in the skin.

  16. 30 CFR 57.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 57.6801 Section 57.6801 Mineral... and Underground § 57.6801 Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers shall not be taken into a repair garage or shop....

  17. Triage of oxidation-prone proteins by Sqstm1/p62 within the mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minjung [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine and Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Suwon-Si, Kyonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jaekyoon, E-mail: jkshin@med.skku.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine and Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Suwon-Si, Kyonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} The mitochondrion contains its own protein quality control system. {yields} p62 localizes within the mitochondria and forms mega-dalton sized complexes. {yields} p62 interacts with oxidation-prone proteins and the proteins of quality control. {yields} In vitro delivery of p62 improves mitochondrial functions. {yields} p62 is implicated as a participant in mitochondrial protein quality control. -- Abstract: As the mitochondrion is vulnerable to oxidative stress, cells have evolved several strategies to maintain mitochondrial integrity, including mitochondrial protein quality control mechanisms and autophagic removal of damaged mitochondria. Involvement of an autophagy adaptor, Sqstm1/p62, in the latter process has been recently described. In the present study, we provide evidence that a portion of p62 directly localizes within the mitochondria and supports stable electron transport by forming heterogeneous protein complexes. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) of mitochondrial proteins co-purified with p62 revealed that p62 interacts with several oxidation-prone proteins, including a few components of the electron transport chain complexes, as well as multiple chaperone molecules and redox regulatory enzymes. Accordingly, p62-deficient mitochondria exhibited compromised electron transport, and the compromised function was partially restored by in vitro delivery of p62. These results suggest that p62 plays an additional role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity at the vicinity of target machineries through its function in relation to protein quality control.

  18. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Stanley, Jennifer A. [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Yang, Eddy S., E-mail: eyang@uab.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States)

    2013-07-26

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER) pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs), which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB). Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NFκB and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NFκB signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation.

  19. Micropatterning of Proteins and Mammalian Cells on Indium Tin Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sunny S.; Howland, Michael C.; Chen, Li-Jung; Silangcruz, Jaime; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Schweikert, Emile A.; Parikh, Atul N.; Revzin, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a novel surface engineering approach that combines oxygen plasma treatment and electrochemical activation to create micropatterned cocultures on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. In this approach, photoresist was patterned onto an ITO substrate modified with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) silane. The photoresist served as a stencil during exposure of the surface to oxygen plasma. Upon incubation with collagen (I) solution and removal of the photoresist, the ITO substrate co...

  20. Bladder exstrophy repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... Bladder exstrophy repair involves two surgeries. The first surgery is to repair the bladder and the second one is to attach ...

  1. Methionine Oxidation Perturbs the Structural Core of the Prion Protein and Suggests a Generic Misfolding Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Nadine D.; Nadal, Rebecca C.; Davies, Paul; Brown, David R.; Viles, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and misfolding of the prion protein (PrPC) are fundamental to prion diseases. We have therefore probed the effect of oxidation on the structure and stability of PrPC. Urea unfolding studies indicate that H2O2 oxidation reduces the thermodynamic stability of PrPC by as much as 9 kJ/mol. 1H-15N NMR studies indicate methionine oxidation perturbs key hydrophobic residues on one face of helix-C as follows: Met-205, Val-209, and Met-212 together with residues Val-160 and Tyr-156. These hydrophobic residues pack together and form the structured core of the protein, stabilizing its ternary structure. Copper-catalyzed oxidation of PrPC causes a more significant alteration of the structure, generating a monomeric molten globule species that retains its native helical content. Further copper-catalyzed oxidation promotes extended β-strand structures that lack a cooperative fold. This transition from the helical molten globule to β-conformation has striking similarities to a misfolding intermediate generated at low pH. PrP may therefore share a generic misfolding pathway to amyloid fibers, irrespective of the conditions promoting misfolding. Our observations support the hypothesis that oxidation of PrP destabilizes the native fold of PrPC, facilitating the transition to PrPSc. This study gives a structural and thermodynamic explanation for the high levels of oxidized methionine in scrapie isolates. PMID:22654104

  2. In vivo effects of UV radiation on multiple endpoints and expression profiles of DNA repair and heat shock protein (Hsp) genes in the cycloid copepod Paracyclopina nana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Eun-Ji; Han, Jeonghoon; Lee, Yeonjung; Kumar, K Suresh; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Su-Jae; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on energy acquisition and consumption, the copepod Paracyclopina nana was irradiated with several doses (0-3kJ/m(2)) of UV. After UV radiation, we measured the re-brooding success, growth pattern of newly hatched nauplii, ingestion rate, and assimilation of diet. In addition, we checked the modulated patterns of DNA repair and heat shock protein (hsp) chaperoning genes of P. nana. UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction (7-87%) of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females, indicating that UV-induced egg sac damage is closely correlated with a reduction in the hatching rate of UV-irradiated ovigerous female offspring. Using chlorophyll a and stable carbon isotope incubation experiments, we found a dose-dependent decrease (Pnana has an underlying ability to shift its balanced-energy status from growth and reproduction to DNA repair and adaptation. Also, expression of P. nana base excision repair (BER)-associated genes and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased in response to UV radiation in P. nana. These findings indicate that even 1kJ/m(2) of UV radiation induces a reduction in reproduction and growth patterns, alters the physiological balance and inhibits the ability to cope with UV-induced damage in P. nana.

  3. The ERCC2/DNA repair protein is associated with the class II BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Schaeffer; V. Moncollin; R. Roy (Richard); A. Staub; M. Mezzina; A. Sarasin; G. Weeda (Geert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractERCC2 is involved in the DNA repair syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group D and was found to copurify with the RNA polymerase II (B) transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH that possesses a bidirectional helicase activity. Antibodies directed towards the 89 kDa (ERCC3) or the p62 subunit of

  4. Affinity purification of human DNA repair/transcription factor TFIIH using epitope-tagged xeroderma pigmentosum B protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); F. Coin (Frédéric); G. Weeda (Geert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractTFIIH is a high molecular weight complex with a remarkable dual function in nucleotide excision repair and initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription. Mutations in the largest subunits, the XPB and XPD helicases, are associated with three inherited disorders: xeroder

  5. The human RAD54 recombinational DNA repair protein is a double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Essers (Jeroen); J. de Wit (Jan); R. Kanaar (Roland); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractDNA double-strand break repair through the RAD52 homologous recombination pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires, among others, the RAD51, RAD52, and RAD54 genes. The biological importance of homologous recombination is underscored by the conservation of

  6. Translocation of Cockayne syndrome group A protein to the nuclear matrix: possible relevance to transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kamiuchi (Shinya); M. Saijo (Masafumi); E. Citterio (Elisabetta); M. de Jager (Martijn); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Tanaka (Kiyoji)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTranscription-coupled repair (TCR) efficiently removes a variety of lesions from the transcribed strand of active genes. By allowing rapid resumption of RNA synthesis, the process is of major importance for cellular resistance to transcription-blocking genotoxic damage. Mutations in the

  7. Influence of XPB helicase on recruitment and redistribution of nucleotide excision repair proteins at sites of UV-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kyu-Seon; Imoto, Kyoko; Boyle, Jennifer; Khan, Sikandar G; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2007-09-01

    The XPB DNA helicase, a subunit of the basal transcription factor TFIIH, is also involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). We examined recruitment of NER proteins in XP-B cells from patients with mild or severe xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) having different XPB mutations using local UV-irradiation through filters with 5 microm pores combined with fluorescent antibody labeling. XPC was rapidly recruited to UV damage sites containing DNA photoproducts (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, CPD) in all the XP-B and normal cells, thus reflecting its role in damage recognition prior to the function of XPB. Cells from the mild XP-B patients, with a missense mutation, showed delayed recruitment of all NER proteins except XPC to UV damage sites, demonstrating that this mutation impaired localization of these proteins. Surprisingly, in cells from severely affected patients, with a C-terminal XPB mutation, XPG and XPA proteins were normally recruited to UV damage sites demonstrating that this mutation permits recruitment of XPG and XPA. In marked contrast, in all the XP-B cells recruitment of XPF was absent immediately after UV and was delayed by 0.5 and 3 h in cells from the mild and severely affected XP patients, respectively. Redistribution of NER proteins was nearly complete in normal cells by 3 h but by 24 h redistribution was only partially present in cells from mild patients and virtually absent in cells from the severely affected patients. Ineffectual repair of UV-induced photoproducts resulting from delayed recruitment and impaired redistribution of NER proteins may contribute to the markedly increased frequency of skin cancer in XP patients.

  8. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Resistant Biology, School of Life Sciences, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Zhang, Qunye, E-mail: wz.zhangqy@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Li, Guorong, E-mail: grli@sdnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Resistant Biology, School of Life Sciences, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2015-03-13

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation.

  9. Radio-adaptive response of base excision repair genes and proteins in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprani, Sneh M; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2015-09-01

    Radio-adaptive response is a mechanism whereby a low-dose exposure (priming dose) induces resistance to a higher dose (challenging dose) thus significantly reducing its detrimental effects. Radiation-induced DNA damage gets repaired through various DNA repair pathways in human cells depending upon the type of lesion. The base excision repair (BER) pathway repairs radiation-induced base damage, abasic sites and single-strand breaks in cellular DNA. In the present study, an attempt has been made to investigate the involvement of BER genes and proteins in the radio-adaptive response in human resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Venous blood samples were collected from 20 randomly selected healthy male individuals with written informed consent. PBMC were isolated and irradiated at a priming dose of 0.1 Gy followed 4h later with a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy (primed cells). Quantitation of DNA damage was done using the alkaline comet assay immediately and expression profile of BER genes and proteins were studied 30 min after the challenging dose using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively. The overall result showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) reduction of DNA damage in terms of percentage of DNA in tail (%T) with a priming dose of 0.1 Gy followed by a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy after 4 h. Twelve individuals showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) reduction in %T whereas eight individuals showed marginal reduction in DNA damage that was not statistically significant. However, at the transcriptional level, BER genes such as APE1, FEN1 and LIGASE1 showed significant (P ≤ 0.05) up-regulation in both groups. Significant (P ≤ 0.05) up-regulation was also observed at the protein level for OGG1, APE1, MBD4, FEN1 and LIGASE1 in primed cells. Up-regulation of some BER genes and proteins such as APE1, FEN1 and LIGASE1 in primed cells of resting PBMC is suggestive of active involvement of the BER pathway in radio-adaptive response.

  10. Whey protein inhibits iron overload-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungmi; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Yoon, Yoh-Chang; Park, Eunju

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of whey protein on oxidative stress in rats that were subjected to oxidative stress induced by iron overload. Thirty male rats were assigned to 3 groups: the control group (regular [50 mg/kg diet] dose of iron+20% casein), iron overload group (high [2,000 mg/kg] dose of iron+20% casein, IO), and whey protein group (high dose of iron+10% casein+10% whey protein, IO+whey). After 6 wk, the IO group showed a reduction in the plasma total radical trapping antioxidant parameter and the activity of erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and an increase in lipid peroxidation (determined from the proportion of conjugated dienes). However, whey protein ameliorated the oxidative changes induced by iron overload. The concentration of erythrocyte glutathione was significantly higher in the IO+whey group than in the IO group. In addition, whey protein supplementation fully inhibited iron overload-induced DNA damage in leukocytes and colonocytes. A highly significant positive correlation was observed between plasma iron levels and DNA damage in leukocytes and colonocytes. These results show the antioxidative and antigenotoxic effects of whey protein in an in vivo model of iron overload-induced oxidative stress.

  11. In vivo effects of UV radiation on multiple endpoints and expression profiles of DNA repair and heat shock protein (Hsp) genes in the cycloid copepod Paracyclopina nana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Eun-Ji; Han, Jeonghoon [Department of Biological Science, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yeonjung; Kumar, K. Suresh; Shin, Kyung-Hoon [Department of Marine Sciences and Convergent Technology, College of Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae [Department of Life Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heum Gi, E-mail: hgpark@gwnu.ac.kr [Department of Marine Resource Development, College of Life Sciences, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung 210-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females. • A dose-dependent decrease in food ingestion and the rate of assimilation to the body upon UV radiation. • Expression of base excision repair-associated and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased upon UV radiation in P. nana. - Abstract: To evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on energy acquisition and consumption, the copepod Paracyclopina nana was irradiated with several doses (0–3 kJ/m{sup 2}) of UV. After UV radiation, we measured the re-brooding success, growth pattern of newly hatched nauplii, ingestion rate, and assimilation of diet. In addition, we checked the modulated patterns of DNA repair and heat shock protein (hsp) chaperoning genes of P. nana. UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction (7–87%) of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females, indicating that UV-induced egg sac damage is closely correlated with a reduction in the hatching rate of UV-irradiated ovigerous female offspring. Using chlorophyll a and stable carbon isotope incubation experiments, we found a dose-dependent decrease (P < 0.05) in food ingestion and the rate of assimilation to the body in response to UV radiation, implying that P. nana has an underlying ability to shift its balanced-energy status from growth and reproduction to DNA repair and adaptation. Also, expression of P. nana base excision repair (BER)-associated genes and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased in response to UV radiation in P. nana. These findings indicate that even 1 kJ/m{sup 2} of UV radiation induces a reduction in reproduction and growth patterns, alters the physiological balance and inhibits the ability to cope with UV-induced damage in P. nana.

  12. Vitamin C deficiency in weanling guinea pigs: differential expression of oxidative stress and DNA repair in liver and brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Trueba, Gilberto Perez; Poulsen, Henrik E;

    2007-01-01

    Neonates are particularly susceptible to malnutrition due to their limited reserves of micronutrients and their rapid growth. In the present study, we examined the effect of vitamin C deficiency on markers of oxidative stress in plasma, liver and brain of weanling guinea pigs. Vitamin C deficiency...

  13. Purification and Characterization of the Manganese(II) Oxidizing Protein from Erythrobacter sp. SD-21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakama, K. R.; Lien, A.; Johnson, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    The manganese(II) oxidizing protein (Mop) found in the alpha-proteobacterium Erythrobacter sp. SD-21 catalyzes the formation of insoluble Mn(III/IV) oxides from soluble Mn(II). These Mn(III/IV) oxides formed are one of the strongest naturally occurring oxides, next to oxygen, and can be used to adsorb and oxidize toxic chemicals from the surrounding environment. Because of the beneficial use in the treatment of contaminated sources, the mechanism and biochemical properties of this novel enzyme are being studied. Due to low expression levels in the native host strain, purification of Mop has been problematic. To overcome this problem the gene encoding Mop, mopA, was cloned from the native host into a C-terminal histidine tag vector and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions have been applied in attempts to purify an active Mop. Western blots have confirmed that the protein is being expressed and is at the expected size of 250 kDa. Preliminary characterization on crude extract containing Mop has shown a Km and vmax value of 2453 uM and 0.025 uM min-1, respectively. Heme and pyrroloquinoline quinone can stimulate Mn(II) oxidizing activity, but hydrogen peroxide does not affect activity, despite the sequence similarity to animal heme peroxidase proteins. Research has been shown that calcium is essential for Mop activity. Purifying an active Mn(II) oxidizing protein will allow for a better understanding behind the enigmatic process of Mn(II) oxidation.

  14. Structural and functional characteristics of cGMP-dependent methionine oxidation in Arabidopsis thaliana proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2013-01-05

    Background: Increasing structural and biochemical evidence suggests that post-translational methionine oxidation of proteins is not just a result of cellular damage but may provide the cell with information on the cellular oxidative status. In addition, oxidation of methionine residues in key regulatory proteins, such as calmodulin, does influence cellular homeostasis. Previous findings also indicate that oxidation of methionine residues in signaling molecules may have a role in stress responses since these specific structural modifications can in turn change biological activities of proteins. Findings. Here we use tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics to show that treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana cells with a non-oxidative signaling molecule, the cell-permeant second messenger analogue, 8-bromo-3,5-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), results in a time-dependent increase in the content of oxidised methionine residues. Interestingly, the group of proteins affected by cGMP-dependent methionine oxidation is functionally enriched for stress response proteins. Furthermore, we also noted distinct signatures in the frequency of amino acids flanking oxidised and un-oxidised methionine residues on both the C- and N-terminus. Conclusions: Given both a structural and functional bias in methionine oxidation events in response to a signaling molecule, we propose that these are indicative of a specific role of such post-translational modifications in the direct or indirect regulation of cellular responses. The mechanisms that determine the specificity of the modifications remain to be elucidated. 2013 Marondedze et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  15. Characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and its application in protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoli, Chuka; Fornara, Andrea; Qin, Jian; Toprak, Muhammet S; Dalhammar, Gunnel; Muhammed, Mamoun; Rajarao, Gunaratna K

    2011-11-01

    The application of surface modified magnetic adsorbent particles in combination with magnetic separation techniques has received considerable awareness in recent years. There is a particular need in protein purification and analysis for specific, functional and generic methods of protein binding on solid supports. Nanoscale superparamagnetic iron oxide particles have been used to purify a natural coagulant protein extracted from Moringa oleifera seeds. Spectrophotometric analysis of the coagulant protein was performed using synthetic clay solution as substrate. Protein binding with carboxyl and silica surface modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) were compared with the known carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) beads of approximately 1 microm. SPION modified with carboxyl surface showed higher binding capacity towards the coagulant protein compared to the CMC beads. The high surface area to volume ratio of the carboxyl-coated SPION resulted in high binding capacity and rapid adsorption kinetics of the crude protein extract. The purification and molecular weight of coagulant protein is analyzed by SDS-PAGE. This approach utilizes the most efficient, feasible and economical method of coagulant protein purification and it can also be applicable to other proteins that possess similar properties.

  16. Increased oxidation, glycoxidation, and lipoxidation of brain proteins in prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Reinald; Naudí, Alba; Gavín, Rosalina; Pastrana, Miguel A; Sajnani, Gustavo; Ilieva, Ekaterina V; Del Río, José Antonio; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Ferrer, Isidre; Requena, Jesús R

    2008-10-15

    The basic molecular underpinnings of the pathological changes that unfold in prion disease remain elusive. A key role of increased oxidative stress has been hypothesized. Given the transient nature of most intermediate molecules implicated, increased oxidative stress is better assessed by quantitating the damage it causes to macromolecules. We used mass spectrometry-based methods to measure specific products of protein oxidation, glycoxidation, and lipoxidation in brains from patients suffering from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Syrian hamsters affected by scrapie. In both cases, increased amounts of glutamic and aminoadipic semialdehydes, products of metal-catalyzed oxidation, malondialdehydelysine (a product of lipoxidation), N-epsilon-carboxyethyllysine (a product of glycoxidation), and N-epsilon-carboxymethyllysine (generated by lipoxidation and glycoxidation) were measured. PrP(Sc), the infectious isoform of the prion protein that accumulates in prion disease, was itself shown to be a target of increased oxidative modification. These changes were accompanied by alterations in fatty acid composition and increased phosphorylation of ERK(1/2) and p38, protein kinases known to respond to increased flows of ROS. These data support an important role of oxidative damage in the pathology of prion disease.

  17. Characterization of the Bat proteins in the oxidative stress response of Leptospira biflexa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Philip E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leptospires lack many of the homologs for oxidative defense present in other bacteria, but do encode homologs of the Bacteriodes aerotolerance (Bat proteins, which have been proposed to fulfill this function. Bat homologs have been identified in all families of the phylum Spirochaetes, yet a specific function for these proteins has not been experimentally demonstrated. Results We investigated the contribution of the Bat proteins in the model organism Leptospira biflexa for their potential contributions to growth rate, morphology and protection against oxidative challenges. A genetically engineered mutant strain in which all bat ORFs were deleted did not exhibit altered growth rate or morphology, relative to the wild-type strain. Nor could we demonstrate a protective role for the Bat proteins in coping with various oxidative stresses. Further, pre-exposing L. biflexa to sublethal levels of reactive oxygen species did not appear to induce a general oxidative stress response, in contrast to what has been shown in other bacterial species. Differential proteomic analysis of the wild-type and mutant strains detected changes in the abundance of a single protein only – HtpG, which is encoded by the gene immediately downstream of the bat loci. Conclusion The data presented here do not support a protective role for the Leptospira Bat proteins in directly coping with oxidative stress as previously proposed. L. biflexa is relatively sensitive to reactive oxygen species such as superoxide and H2O2, suggesting that this spirochete lacks a strong, protective defense against oxidative damage despite being a strict aerobe.

  18. Erythropoietin, Forkhead Proteins, and Oxidative Injury: Biomarkers and Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Maiese

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress significantly impacts multiple cellular pathways that can lead to the initiation and progression of varied disorders throughout the body. It therefore becomes imperative to elucidate the components and function of novel therapeutic strategies against oxidative stress to further clinical diagnosis and care. In particular, both the growth factor and cytokine erythropoietin (EPO, and members of the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs, may offer the greatest promise for new treatment regimens, since these agents and the cellular pathways they oversee cover a range of critical functions that directly influence progenitor cell development, cell survival and degeneration, metabolism, immune function, and cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, both EPO and FoxOs function not only as therapeutic targets, but also as biomarkers of disease onset and progression, since their cellular pathways are closely linked and overlap with several unique signal transduction pathways. Yet, EPO and FoxOs may sometimes have unexpected and undesirable effects that can raise caution for these agents and warrant further investigations. Here we present the exciting as well as the complex role that EPO and FoxOs possess to uncover the benefits as well as the risks of these agents for cell biology and clinical care in processes that range from stem cell development to uncontrolled cellular proliferation.

  19. Erythropoietin, forkhead proteins, and oxidative injury: biomarkers and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Hou, Jinling; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen

    2009-10-02

    Oxidative stress significantly impacts multiple cellular pathways that can lead to the initiation and progression of varied disorders throughout the body. It therefore becomes imperative to elucidate the components and function of novel therapeutic strategies against oxidative stress to further clinical diagnosis and care. In particular, both the growth factor and cytokine erythropoietin (EPO), and members of the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs), may offer the greatest promise for new treatment regimens, since these agents and the cellular pathways they oversee cover a range of critical functions that directly influence progenitor cell development, cell survival and degeneration, metabolism, immune function, and cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, both EPO and FoxOs function not only as therapeutic targets, but also as biomarkers of disease onset and progression, since their cellular pathways are closely linked and overlap with several unique signal transduction pathways. Yet, EPO and FoxOs may sometimes have unexpected and undesirable effects that can raise caution for these agents and warrant further investigations. Here we present the exciting as well as the complex role that EPO and FoxOs possess to uncover the benefits as well as the risks of these agents for cell biology and clinical care in processes that range from stem cell development to uncontrolled cellular proliferation.

  20. Physicochemical Property and Oxidative Stability of Whey Protein Concentrate Multiple Nanoemulsion Containing Fish Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae-Young; Ha, Ho-Kyung; Lee, Mee-Ryung; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Won-Jae

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this research were to produce whey protein concentrate (WPC) multiple nanoemulsion (MNE) and to study how whey protein concentration level and antioxidant type affected the physicochemical properties and oxidative stability of fish oil in MNE. The morphological and physicochemical characteristics of MNE were investigated by using transmission electron microscopy and particle size analyzer, respectively. The oxidative stability of fish oil in MNEs was assessed by measuring peroxide value (PV), p-anisidine value, and volatile compounds. The spherical forms of emulsions with size ranging from 190 to 210 nm were observed indicating the successful production of MNE. Compared with free fish oil, fish oil in MNE exhibited lower PV, p-anisidine value, and formation of maker of oxidation of fish oil indicating the oxidative stability of fish oil in MNE was enhanced. PV, p-anisidine value, and makers of oxidation of fish oil were decreased with increased WPC concentration level. The combined use of Vitamin C and E in MNE resulted in a reduction in PV and p-anisidine value, and development of maker of oxidation. In conclusion, WPC concentration level and antioxidant type are key factors affecting the droplet size of MNE and oxidative stability of fish oil.

  1. Two-component magnetic structure of iron oxide nanoparticles mineralized in Listeria innocua protein cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Klem, Michael T.; Russek, Stephen E.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor; Goldfarb, Ron B.

    2010-06-01

    Magnetometry was used to determine the magnetic properties of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles formed within Listeria innocua protein cage. The electron magnetic resonance spectrum shows the presence of at least two magnetization components. The magnetization curves are explained by a sum of two Langevin functions in which each filled protein cage contains both a large magnetic iron oxide core plus an amorphous surface consisting of small noncoupled iron oxide spin clusters. This model qualitatively explains the observed decrease in the temperature dependent saturation moment and removes an unrealistic temperature dependent increase in the particle moment often observed in nanoparticle magnetization measurements.

  2. Gelation properties of myofibrillar protein under malondialdehyde-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Zhang, Min; Fang, Zhongxiang; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2017-01-01

    The structure of myofibrillar protein (MP) can be readily altered by oxidation, leading to the unfolding of MP structure, which further promotes protein-protein interactions, and thus influences the MP gelling properties. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of malondialdehyde-induced oxidative stress on the gelation properties of myofibrillar protein (MP). Structural changes of the oxidised MPs were evaluated by the contents of carbonyl and total sulfhydryls, surface hydrophobicity, SDS-PAGE and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The oxidative stability of the MP gels as indicated by lipid hydroperoxide was also determined. With the addition of an MDA concentration less than 10 mmol L(-1) , the MP gels showed an improved elasticity, gel strength, water holding capacity, and oxidative stability. Nevertheless, higher MDA concentration (25-50 mmol L(-1) ) significantly reduced the gel quality, probably due to the formation of excessive covalent bonds in the system. Results suggested that protein aggregation occurred in the oxidised system. Myosin was involved in gel formation through non-disulfide covalent bond. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Synergistic cooperation of PDI family members in peroxiredoxin 4-driven oxidative protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoshimi; Kojima, Rieko; Okumura, Masaki; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Masui, Shoji; Maegawa, Ken-ichi; Saiki, Masatoshi; Horibe, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Mamoru; Inaba, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER) harbors disulfide bond-generating enzymes, including Ero1α and peroxiredoxin 4 (Prx4), and nearly 20 members of the protein disulfide isomerase family (PDIs), which together constitute a suitable environment for oxidative protein folding. Here, we clarified the Prx4 preferential recognition of two PDI family proteins, P5 and ERp46, and the mode of interaction between Prx4 and P5 thioredoxin domain. Detailed analyses of oxidative folding catalyzed by the reconstituted Prx4-PDIs pathways demonstrated that, while P5 and ERp46 are dedicated to rapid, but promiscuous, disulfide introduction, PDI is an efficient proofreader of non-native disulfides. Remarkably, the Prx4-dependent formation of native disulfide bonds was accelerated when PDI was combined with ERp46 or P5, suggesting that PDIs work synergistically to increase the rate and fidelity of oxidative protein folding. Thus, the mammalian ER seems to contain highly systematized oxidative networks for the efficient production of large quantities of secretory proteins.

  4. Electrochemical oxidation and cleavage of proteins with on-line mass spectrometric detection : Development of an instrumental alternative to enzymatic protein digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Permentier, HP; Bruins, AP

    2004-01-01

    An electrochemical flow cell coupled on-line to a mass spectrometer is used to oxidize a range of proteins. Oxidation of tyrosine and tryptophan can give rise to peptide bond cleavage at their C-terminal side. This suggests the possible use of electrochemistry as an alternative protein digestion

  5. Ferrous iron oxidation by sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and analysis of the process at the levels of transcription and protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Jiri; Bouchal, Pavel; Lochman, Jan; Potesil, David; Janiczek, Oldrich; Zdrahal, Zbynek; Mandl, Martin

    2013-04-01

    In contrast to iron-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, A. ferrooxidans from a stationary phase elemental sulfur-oxidizing culture exhibited a lag phase in pyrite oxidation, which is similar to its behaviour during ferrous iron oxidation. The ability of elemental sulfur-oxidizing A. ferrooxidans to immediately oxidize ferrous iron or pyrite without a lag phase was only observed in bacteria obtained from growing cultures with elemental sulfur. However, these cultures that shifted to ferrous iron oxidation showed a low rate of ferrous iron oxidation while no growth was observed. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used for a quantitative proteomic analysis of the adaptation process when bacteria were switched from elemental sulfur to ferrous iron. A comparison of total cell lysates revealed 39 proteins whose increase or decrease in abundance was related to this phenotypic switching. However, only a few proteins were closely related to iron and sulfur metabolism. Reverse-transcription quantitative PCR was used to further characterize the bacterial adaptation process. The expression profiles of selected genes primarily involved in the ferrous iron oxidation indicated that phenotypic switching is a complex process that includes the activation of genes encoding a membrane protein, maturation proteins, electron transport proteins and their regulators.

  6. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Petra [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Vijg, Jan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Michael F. Price Center, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Nussenzweig, André [Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, 37 Convent Drive, Room 1106, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Digweed, Martin, E-mail: martin.digweed@charite.de [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin.

  7. Lin28 enhances tissue repair by reprogramming cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyh-Chang, Ng; Zhu, Hao; Yvanka de Soysa, T; Shinoda, Gen; Seligson, Marc T; Tsanov, Kaloyan M; Nguyen, Liem; Asara, John M; Cantley, Lewis C; Daley, George Q

    2013-11-07

    Regeneration capacity declines with age, but why juvenile organisms show enhanced tissue repair remains unexplained. Lin28a, a highly conserved RNA-binding protein expressed during embryogenesis, plays roles in development, pluripotency, and metabolism. To determine whether Lin28a might influence tissue repair in adults, we engineered the reactivation of Lin28a expression in several models of tissue injury. Lin28a reactivation improved hair regrowth by promoting anagen in hair follicles and accelerated regrowth of cartilage, bone, and mesenchyme after ear and digit injuries. Lin28a inhibits let-7 microRNA biogenesis; however, let-7 repression was necessary but insufficient to enhance repair. Lin28a bound to and enhanced the translation of mRNAs for several metabolic enzymes, thereby increasing glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). Lin28a-mediated enhancement of tissue repair was negated by OxPhos inhibition, whereas a pharmacologically induced increase in OxPhos enhanced repair. Thus, Lin28a enhances tissue repair in some adult tissues by reprogramming cellular bioenergetics. PAPERCLIP: Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pre-freezing raw hams affects quality traits in cooked hams: potential influence of protein oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utrera, M; Armenteros, M; Ventanas, S; Solano, F; Estévez, M

    2012-12-01

    The influence of protein carbonylation and lipid oxidation on colour and texture changes in cooked hams from fresh and pre-frozen (frozen/thawed) raw material was studied. Samples from three muscles, biceps femoris (BF) quadriceps femoris (QF) and semimembranosus (SM) were analysed for the gain of specific protein carbonyls, α-aminoadipic and γ-glutamic semialdehydes, the gain of TBA-RS and their colour and texture properties by instrumental and sensory techniques. The formation of protein carbonyls occurred concomitantly with an intense loss of redness and increase of hardness. Both phenomena were found to be more intense in QF and SM muscles in cooked hams elaborated from frozen material. Lipid oxidation played a negligible role on the impaired quality traits observed in cooked hams as a result of pre-freezing. Plausible mechanisms by which protein carbonylation may be implicated in the loss of quality in cooked hams produced from pre-frozen material are discussed.

  9. Physical and Oxidative Stability of Fish Oil-In-Water Emulsions Stabilized with Fish Protein Hydrolysates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Moreno, Pedro Jesús; Guadix, Antonio; Guadix, Emilia M.

    2016-01-01

    The emulsifying and antioxidant properties of fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) for the physical and oxidative stabilization of 5% (by weight) fish oil-in-water emulsions were investigated. Muscle proteins from sardine (Sardina pilchardus) and small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) were......% yielded a physically stable emulsion with low concentration of unsaturated aldehydes. These results show the potential of FPH as alternative protein emulsifiers for the production of oxidatively stable fish oil-in-water emulsions....... hydrolyzed to degrees of hydrolysis (DH) of 3-4-5-6% with subtilisin. Sardine hydrolysates with low DH, 3% and 4%, presented the most effective peptides to physically stabilize emulsions with smaller droplet size. This implied more protein adsorbed at the interface to act as physical barrier against...

  10. Plasma levels of oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP) in rats subjected to physicochemical oxidative stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Takako; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Murayama, Kimie; Seko, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of various disorders including atherosclerosis, aging and especially ischaemia/reperfusion injury. It causes cell damage that leads to apoptosis. However, the precise mechanism has been uncertain. Recently, we identified an apoptosis-inducing humoral factor in a hypoxia/reoxygenated medium of cardiac myocytes. We named this novel post-translationally modified secreted form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) as oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP). We developed a sandwich ELISA and confirmed that myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion markedly increased plasma levels of ORAIP. To investigate whether the role of ORAIP is common to various types of oxidative stress, we measured plasma ORAIP levels in rats subjected to three physicochemical models of oxidative stress including N2/O2 inhalation, cold/warm-stress (heat shock) and blood acidification. In all three models, plasma ORAIP levels significantly increased and reached a peak level at 10-30 min after stimulation, then decreased within 60 min. The (mean±S.E.M.) plasma ORAIP levels before and after (peak) stimulation were (16.4±9.6) and (55.2±34.2) ng/ml in N2/O2 inhalation, (14.1±12.4) and (34.3±14.6) ng/ml in cold/warm-stress, and (18.9±14.3) and (134.0±67.2) ng/ml in blood acidification study. These data strongly suggest that secretion of ORAIP in response to oxidative stress is universal mechanism and plays an essential role. ORAIP will be an important novel biomarker as well as a specific therapeutic target of these oxidative stress-induced cell injuries. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Hypochlorite-induced damage to plasma and proteins: formation of nitrogen-centred radicals and their role in protein oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, C.L.; Davies, M.J. [Heart Research Institute, Camperdown, NSW (Australia)

    1998-12-31

    The respiratory burst of activated phagocyte cells results in the generation of hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of the hydrogen peroxide and the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Little information is available about the mechanisms and intermediates involved in these reactions. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with spin trapping has been employed to identify radicals formed in fresh human plasma and isolated proteins and peptides on treatment with HOCI. Reaction of plasma with HOCI in the presence of a spin trap gives broad, anisotropic radical adducts consistent with the formation of large, slowly-tumbling, protein-derived radicals. The identity of the plasma-derived radical adducts was investigated further by the incubation of the pre-formed adducts with the non-specific proteolytic enzyme pronase. This treatment gave sharper, signals consistent with the release of more mobile, low-molecular-weight spin adducts from the initial protein-derived adducts. The hyperfine couplings of these sharper signals are characteristic of the formation of nitrogen-centred radical adducts. Similar or identical species are observed on treatment with isolated human serum albumin, suggesting that this is a major site of HOCI-induced oxidation. Reaction of HOCI-treated plasma or isolated proteins/peptides with excess methionine eliminates radical formation, consistent with lysine-derived chloramines (via homolysis or heterolysis of N-CI bonds) being the radical source. The effect of HOCI on the structural integrity of the plasma proteins was investigated by SDS-PAGE. It was demonstrated that incubation of HOCI-treated plasma or proteins, after removal of excess oxidant, resulted in a time- and HOCI-dependent fragmentation of the proteins. No evidence was obtained for the presence of either discrete fragments or aggregated material. This suggests that the reaction of HOCI with plasma proteins results in the formation of a large number of random fragments. Treatment with

  12. Compound soft regenerated skull material for repairing dog skull defects using bone morphogenetic protein as an inductor and nanohydroxyapatite as a scaffold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhidong Shi; Mingwang Liu; Zhongzong Qin; Qinmei Wang; Ying Guo; Haiyong He; Zhonghe Yu

    2008-01-01

    broken ends of the fractured bone and grew towards the defect regions. Two months after surgery, many disordered bone islands had formed. Three months after surgery, mature bone, medullary cavities and a large number of new bones were detected in the defect regions. Six months after surgery, the left defect was mostly repaired, with a high bone density compared with the right side in Groups A and B. The right detect was mostly repaired in Group A, but only a small fraction of the right defects was repaired in Group B.CONCLUSION: A composite of calcium alginate gel, osteoblasts, nanometer bone meal and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 can metabolize by itself, gradually ossify and form new bone.

  13. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Lihua [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Center of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Hubei University of Arts and Sciences, Xiangyang 441053 (China); Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine [Ingénierie Moléculaire et Physiopathologie Articulaire (IMoPA), UMR 7365 CNRS – Université de Lorraine, Biopôle, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Chen, Yun, E-mail: yunchen@whu.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2015-02-20

    conduits in the field of nerve tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel nerve conduit was constructed and applied to repair nerve defect in rats. • Transparent hollow cellulose/soy protein isolate tube was used as conduit matrix. • Pyrroloquinoline quinine was adsorbed into the hollow tube as nerve growth factor. • Schwann cells were cultured into the hollow tube as seed cells. • The new nerve conduit could repair and reconstruct the peripheral nerve defects.

  14. Protein glutathionylation protects wheat (Triticum aestivum Var. Sonalika) against Fusarium induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Subhalaxmi; Mittra, Bhabatosh

    2016-12-01

    Fusarium induced oxidative stress could be recovered by reversible protein oxidative modification through the process of glutathionylation in co-stressed (low-dose (50 μM) Cd(2+) pre-treatment followed by Fusarium inoculation) wheat seedlings. Co-stressed seedlings showed low disease severity index as compared to Fusarium infected seedlings. A reduced level of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and carbonyl contents due to irreversible protein oxidation were observed in co-stressed seedlings as compared to Fusarium infected seedlings. Further, a comparative biochemical assay showed an enhanced glutathione content in co-stressed tissues as compared to Fusarium infected tissues. In an investigation, reduced glutathione pre-coated agarose gel beads were used to pull down proteins having affinity with GSH. Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase and 3-Phosphoglycerate kinase were observed to be co-existed in co-stressed seedlings when analysed by LC-MS/MS after being processed through protein-pull assay. Co-stressed tissues showed an enhanced free protein thiol content as compared to Fusarium infected tissues. The ratio of free thiol to thiol disulfides was also observed to be increased in co-stressed tissues as compared to Fusarium infected tissues. In contrast, the quantitative assay by Ellman's reagent and qualitative analysis by diagonal gel electrophoresis showed enhanced protein thiol disulfides in Fusarium infected tissues as compared to co-stressed tissues. Further, glutaredoxin, responsible for the reverse reduction of proteins was observed to be enhanced in co-stressed tissues as compared to Fusarium infected tissues. Thus, a low dose Cd(2+) triggered glutathionylation is suggestive of offering tolerance against Fusarium induced oxidative stress and protects target proteins from irreversible modification and permanent damage in wheat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Redox regulation of heat shock protein expression in aging and neurodegenerative disorders associated with oxidative stress: a nutritional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, V; Scapagnini, G; Colombrita, C; Ravagna, A; Pennisi, G; Giuffrida Stella, A M; Galli, F; Butterfield, D A

    2003-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in mechanisms leading to neuronal cell injury in various pathological states of the brain. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive disorder with cognitive and memory decline, speech loss, personality changes and synapse loss. Many approaches have been undertaken to understand AD, but the heterogeneity of the etiologic factors makes it difficult to define the clinically most important factor determining the onset and progression of the disease. However, increasing evidence indicates that factors such as oxidative stress and disturbed protein metabolism and their interaction in a vicious cycle are central to AD pathogenesis. Brains of AD patients undergo many changes, such as disruption of protein synthesis and degradation, classically associated with the heat shock response, which is one form of stress response. Heat shock proteins are proteins serving as molecular chaperones involved in the protection of cells from various forms of stress.Recently, the involvement of the heme oxygenase (HO) pathway in anti-degenerative mechanisms operating in AD has received considerable attention, as it has been demonstrated that the expression of HO is closely related to that of amyloid precursor protein (APP). HO induction occurs together with the induction of other HSPs during various physiopathological conditions. The vasoactive molecule carbon monoxide and the potent antioxidant bilirubin, products of HO-catalyzed reaction, represent a protective system potentially active against brain oxidative injury. Given the broad cytoprotective properties of the heat shock response there is now strong interest in discovering and developing pharmacological agents capable of inducing the heat shock response. Increasing interest has been focused on identifying dietary compounds that can inhibit, retard or reverse the multi-stage pathophysiological events underlying AD pathology. Alzheimer's disease, in fact, involves a chronic inflammatory response

  16. Advanced oxidation protein product levels as a marker of oxidative stress in paediatric patients with chronic tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, I; Kucur, C; Koçak, F E; Savran, B; Oghan, F

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to determine whether advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) levels can serve as a marker of oxidative stress in paediatric patients with chronic tonsillitis. Thirty children with chronic tonsillitis and 30 healthy children (control group) were recruited from the Otorhinolaryngology (ORL) and Paediatric Surgery departments, respectively, of Dumlupinar University Hospital. In the patient group, blood samples were collected before tonsillectomy, and tonsil tissue was sampled during the operation. Blood samples were also obtained from the control subjects. AOPP levels in the serum and tonsil tissue were measured by the spectrophotometric method. Serum AOPP levels were significantly higher in the patient group (13.1 ± 3.3 ng/ml) than in the control group (11.6 ± 2.3 ng/ml; P tonsil tissue in the patient group was significantly higher than the mean serum AOPP levels in the control and patient groups (P tonsil tissue and serum of patients with chronic tonsillitis compared to the serum AOPP levels in healthy controls. AOPPs may represent a novel class of pro-inflammatory molecules that are involved in oxidative stress in chronic tonsillitis. AOPPs may be used as a marker of oxidative stress in paediatric patients with chronic tonsillitis. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  17. Taurine chloramine-induced inactivation of cofilin protein through methionine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shen; Uehara, Hiroshi; Shacter, Emily

    2014-10-01

    Cofilin regulates reorganization of actin filaments (F-actin) in eukaryotes. A recent finding has demonstrated that oxidation of cofilin by taurine chloramine (TnCl), a physiological oxidant derived from neutrophils, causes cofilin to translocate to the mitochondria inducing apoptosis (F. Klamt et al. Nat. Cell Biol.11:1241-1246; 2009). Here we investigated the effect of TnCl on biological activities of cofilin in vitro. Our data show that TnCl-induced oxidation of recombinant human cofilin-1 inhibits its F-actin-binding and depolymerization activities. Native cofilin contains four free Cys and three Met residues. Incubation of oxidized cofilin with DTT does not lead to its reactivation. A double Cys to Ala mutation on the two C-terminal Cys shows similar biological activities as the wild type, but does not prevent the TnCl-induced inactivation. In contrast, incubation of oxidized cofilin with methionine sulfoxide reductases results in its reactivation. Phosphorylation is known to inhibit cofilin activities. We found that Met oxidation also prevents phosphorylation of cofilin, which is reversed by incubating oxidized cofilin with methionine sulfoxide reductases. Interestingly, intact protein mass spectrometry of the oxidized mutant indicated one major oxidation product with an additional mass of 16 Da, consistent with oxidation of one specific Met residue. This residue was identified as Met-115 by peptide mapping and tandem mass spectrometry. It is adjacent to Lys-114, a known residue on globular-actin-binding site, implying that oxidation of Met-115 disrupts the globular-actin-binding site of cofilin, which causes TnCl-induced inactivation. The findings identify Met-115 as a redox switch on cofilin that regulates its biological activity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Release of free amino acids upon oxidation of peptides and proteins by hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fobang; Lai, Senchao; Tong, Haijie; Lakey, Pascale S J; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Weller, Michael G; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kampf, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxyl radical-induced oxidation of proteins and peptides can lead to the cleavage of the peptide, leading to a release of fragments. Here, we used high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and pre-column online ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) derivatization-based amino acid analysis by HPLC with diode array detection and fluorescence detection to identify and quantify free amino acids released upon oxidation of proteins and peptides by hydroxyl radicals. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin (OVA) as model proteins, and synthetic tripeptides (comprised of varying compositions of the amino acids Gly, Ala, Ser, and Met) were used for reactions with hydroxyl radicals, which were generated by the Fenton reaction of iron ions and hydrogen peroxide. The molar yields of free glycine, aspartic acid, asparagine, and alanine per peptide or protein varied between 4 and 55%. For protein oxidation reactions, the molar yields of Gly (∼32-55% for BSA, ∼10-21% for OVA) were substantially higher than those for the other identified amino acids (∼5-12% for BSA, ∼4-6% for OVA). Upon oxidation of tripeptides with Gly in C-terminal, mid-chain, or N-terminal positions, Gly was preferentially released when it was located at the C-terminal site. Overall, we observe evidence for a site-selective formation of free amino acids in the OH radical-induced oxidation of peptides and proteins, which may be due to a reaction pathway involving nitrogen-centered radicals.

  19. Erythropoietin and a nonerythropoietic peptide analog promote aortic endothelial cell repair under hypoxic conditions: role of nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikal L

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamia Heikal,1 Pietro Ghezzi,1 Manuela Mengozzi,1 Blanka Stelmaszczuk,2 Martin Feelisch,2 Gordon AA Ferns1 1Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, 2Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital and Institute for Life Sciences, Southampton, UK Abstract: The cytoprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO and an EPO-related nonerythropoietic analog, pyroglutamate helix B surface peptide (pHBSP, were investigated in an in vitro model of bovine aortic endothelial cell injury under normoxic (21% O2 and hypoxic (1% O2 conditions. The potential molecular mechanisms of these effects were also explored. Using a model of endothelial injury (the scratch assay, we found that, under hypoxic conditions, EPO and pHBSP enhanced scratch closure by promoting cell migration and proliferation, but did not show any effect under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, EPO protected bovine aortic endothelial cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. The priming effect of hypoxia was associated with stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1α, EPO receptor upregulation, and decreased Ser-1177 phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS; the effect of hypoxia on the latter was rescued by EPO. Hypoxia was associated with a reduction in nitric oxide (NO production as assessed by its oxidation products, nitrite and nitrate, consistent with the oxygen requirement for endogenous production of NO by endothelial NOS. However, while EPO did not affect NO formation in normoxia, it markedly increased NO production, in a manner sensitive to NOS inhibition, under hypoxic conditions. These data are consistent with the notion that the tissue-protective actions of EPO-related cytokines in pathophysiological settings associated with poor oxygenation are mediated by NO. These findings may be particularly relevant to atherogenesis and postangioplasty restenosis. Keywords

  20. Serum levels of nitric oxide and protein oxidation in goats seropositive for Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonin, A A; Weber, A; Ribeiro, A; Camillo, G; Vogel, F F; Moura, A B; Bochi, G V; Moresco, R N; Da Silva, A S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and analyze the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) in serum of goats naturally infected by Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, or concomitantly infected by these two parasites. Thus, it was measured NOx and AOPP levels in twenty (n=20) sera samples of goats seronegative for T. gondii and N. caninum [negative control group (A)]; while the positive groups were composed by sera of infected animals, twelve (n=12) seropositive for N. caninum [group B]; eighteen (n=18) positive for T. gondii [group C]; and thirteen (n=13) seropositive for N. caninum and T. gondii [group D]. As results, it was observed that animals seropositive for N. caninum and T. gondii (Groups B to D) showed higher serum levels of NOx (P0.05). Interestingly, group B did not show increase in AOPP, what led us to hypothesize that the major protein damage is linked to T. gondii infection. Therefore, our results showed an increased in NOx levels, which was probably related to the immune response, since it is an important inflammatory mediator; and AOPP were increased in groups where there was seropositivity for T. gondii, but not for the group composed only by animals seropositive for N. caninum, allowing us to suggest higher protein damage in toxoplasmosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Capsid protein oxidation in feline calicivirus using an electrochemical inactivation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shionoiri, Nozomi; Nogariya, Osamu; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tsuyo@cc.tuat.ac.jp

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Feline calicivirus was inactivated electrochemically by a factor of >5 log. • The electrochemical treatment was performed at 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 15 min. • Electrochemical treatment caused oxidation of viral proteins. • Oxidation of viral proteins can lead to loss of viral structural integrity. - Abstract: Pathogenic viral infections are an international public health concern, and viral disinfection has received increasing attention. Electrochemical treatment has been used for treatment of water contaminated by bacteria for several decades, and although in recent years several reports have investigated viral inactivation kinetics, the mode of action of viral inactivation by electrochemical treatment remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated the inactivation of feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for human noroviruses, by electrochemical treatment in a developed flow-cell equipped with a screen-printed electrode. The viral infectivity titer was reduced by over 5 orders of magnitude after 15 min of treatment at 0.9 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Proteomic study of electrochemically inactivated virus revealed oxidation of peptides located in the viral particles; oxidation was not observed in the non-treated sample. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed that viral particles in the treated sample had irregular structures. These results suggest that electrochemical treatment inactivates FCV via oxidation of peptides in the structural region, causing structural deformation of virus particles. This first report of viral protein damage through electrochemical treatment will contribute to broadening the understanding of viral inactivation mechanisms.

  2. The Role of Expression of Mismatch Repair Proteins hMSH2 and hMLH1 in Gastric Carcinogenesis and Its Clinical Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the expression of the mismatch repair proteins hUSH2 and hMLH1, and to examine the clinical significance of the intracellular expression site (ICES) in gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS Specimens from 172 cases of gastric cancer, 151 tissues from paraneoplastic gastric mucosa and 34 from noncancerous gastric mucosa were collected in Dalain, China. An immunohistochemical method was used to determine the expression of the hMSH2, hMLH1 proteins and their ICES in the gastric mucosas.RESULTS The rate of hMSH2 expression in gastric cancers, paraneoplastic gastric mucosas and noncancerous gastric mucosas were respectively 69.8%, 49.7% and 32.4%. The rate was significantly higher in gastric cancer compared to the latter two groups (P=0.000), but there was no obvious difference in the expression between the two latter groups (P=0.067).The hMLH1 protein expression rates were respectively 73.3%, 57.6% and 41.2% in the above three groups. The expression was significantly higher in the gastric cancer group compared to the two latter groups (P=0.000), while there was no significant difference between the latter groups (P=0.082).There was no obvious correlation between the hMSH2 and hMLH1 protein expression rates and related factors, such as gender, age and differentiated level of gastric cancer etc. The cell-nuclear expression of the hMSH2 protein was respectively 70.0%, 58.7% and 36.4% in the gastric cancer, paraneoplastic gastric mucosa and noncancerous gastric mucosa groups. The cytoplasmic expression rates were 30.0%, 41.3% and 63.6% in the three groups.The cell-nuclear expression rate of the hMSH2 protein gradually decreased in the gastric mucosas in the following order: cancer, paraneoplastic and noncancerous but cytoplasmic expression only increased slightly in these groups (r=0.161, P=0.020). There was no significant difference in the ICES of the hMLH1 protein among the three different gastric mucosas (P=0.659).CONCLUSION Simultaneous determination

  3. Evidence by EIS of the interaction between proteins and tin oxide electrode surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachet, Hubert [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques, UPR 15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Case courrier no133-4 place Jussieu 75005 Paris (France); Debiemme-Chouvy, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.debiemme-chouvy@upmc.f [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques, UPR 15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Case courrier no133-4 place Jussieu 75005 Paris (France)

    2010-08-30

    Macromolecules like proteins are able to adhere to tin oxide electrodes at open circuit potential as proved by electrogravimetry experiments. In this work, electrochemical impedance studies were performed at aqueous electrolyte/F- or Sb-doped semiconducting tin oxide interfaces, including natural seawater. By this way, it was possible to characterize the potential dependence of the interfacial capacitance in various physicochemical conditions, without or in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). In the potential range where tin oxide is in the depletion regime (blocking interface), a capacitance excess is evidenced which can be attributed to the formation of surface states which are the signature of chemical bonding. By simulating the so-called surface state capacitance, three states have been pointed out. They are centred at 0.7, 0.9 and 1.1 eV in the tin oxide bandgap. On the basis of experimental arguments, the state at 1.1 eV was ascribed to the OH-terminated tin oxide surface, the two other states were found to be specific of the interaction of organic matter with the oxide surface. In the presence of BSA, the density of surface atoms (about 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) involved in bonding is of the order of magnitude of the surface concentration of one BSA monolayer. The lasting character of these bonds was also shown. This finding shows the definitive protein immobilisation at the SnO{sub 2} surface.

  4. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with increased mutation frequency due to inactivation of the DNA oxidative repair system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandsberg, Lotte F; Ciofu, Oana; Kirkby, N

    2009-01-01

    and antibiotic resistance. We have constructed and characterized mutT, mutY, and mutM mutants in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The mutT and mutY mutants showed 28- and 7.5-fold increases in mutation frequencies, respectively, over that for PAO1. These mutators had more oxidative DNA damage (higher levels of 7......,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased β-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found...... in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent...

  5. Protein oxidation in Huntington disease affects energy production and vitamin B6 metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorolla, Ma Alba; Rodríguez-Colman, Ma José; Tamarit, Jordi; Ortega, Zaira; Lucas, José J; Ferrer, Isidre; Ros, Joaquim; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2010-08-15

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder that initially affects the striatum and progressively the cortex. Oxidative stress in HD has been described as important to disease progression. In this study, protein carbonylation, used as a marker of protein oxidation, was analyzed in human brain striatum. A comparison of HD samples to matched controls identified 13 carbonylated proteins, including enzymes involved in the glycolytic pathway and mitochondrial proteins related to ATP production. Oxidation of the mitochondrial enzymes resulted in decreased catalytic activity, in good agreement with the energy deficiency observed in HD. We also found carbonylation of pyridoxal kinase and antiquitin 1, both involved in the metabolism of pyridoxal 5-phosphate, the active form of vitamin B6. The Tet/HD94 conditional mouse model allowed us to demonstrate that increased carbonylation in striatum is dependent on mutant huntingtin expression. As in humans, pyridoxal kinase showed decreased levels and was highly carbonylated in the gene-on mice; these modifications were reverted in the gene-off mice. We hypothesize that both pyridoxal kinase and antiquitin 1 oxidation could result in decreased pyridoxal 5-phosphate availability necessary as a cofactor in transaminations, synthesis of glutathione, and synthesis of GABA and dopamine, two neurotransmitters that play a key role in HD pathology.

  6. Mitochondrial oxidative stress, aging and caloric restriction: the protein and methionine connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Reinald; Barja, Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) decreases aging rate and mitochondrial ROS (MitROS) production and oxidative stress in rat postmitotic tissues. Low levels of these parameters are also typical traits of long-lived mammals and birds. However, it is not known what dietary components are responsible for these changes during CR. It was recently observed that 40% protein restriction without strong CR also decreases MitROS generation and oxidative stress. This is interesting because protein restriction also increases maximum longevity (although to a lower extent than CR) and is a much more practicable intervention for humans than CR. Moreover, it was recently found that 80% methionine restriction substituting it for l-glutamate in the diet also decreases MitROS generation in rat liver. Thus, methionine restriction seems to be responsible for the decrease in ROS production observed in caloric restriction. This is interesting because it is known that exactly that procedure of methionine restriction also increases maximum longevity. Moreover, recent data show that methionine levels in tissue proteins negatively correlate with maximum longevity in mammals and birds. All these suggest that lowering of methionine levels is involved in the control of mitochondrial oxidative stress and vertebrate longevity by at least two different mechanisms: decreasing the sensitivity of proteins to oxidative damage, and lowering of the rate of ROS generation at mitochondria.

  7. Micropatterning of proteins and mammalian cells on indium tin oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sunny S; Howland, Michael C; Chen, Li-Jung; Silangcruz, Jaime; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Schweikert, Emile A; Parikh, Atul N; Revzin, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    This paper describes a novel surface engineering approach that combines oxygen plasma treatment and electrochemical activation to create micropatterned cocultures on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. In this approach, photoresist was patterned onto an ITO substrate modified with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) silane. The photoresist served as a stencil during exposure of the surface to oxygen plasma. Upon incubation with collagen (I) solution and removal of the photoresist, the ITO substrate contained collagen regions surrounded by nonfouling PEG silane. Chemical analysis carried out with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) at different stages in micropatterned construction verified removal of PEG-silane during oxygen plasma and presence of collagen and PEG molecules on the same surface. Imaging ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to further investigate micropatterned ITO surfaces. Biological application of this micropatterning strategy was demonstrated through selective attachment of mammalian cells on the ITO substrate. Importantly, after seeding the first cell type, the ITO surfaces could be activated by applying negative voltage (-1.4 V vs Ag/AgCl). This resulted in removal of nonfouling PEG layer and allowed to attach another cell type onto the same surface and to create micropatterned cocultures. Micropatterned cocultures of primary hepatocytes and fibroblasts created by this strategy remained functional after 9 days as verified by analysis of hepatic albumin. The novel surface engineering strategy described here may be used to pattern multiple cell types on an optically transparent and conductive substrate and is envisioned to have applications in tissue engineering and biosensing.

  8. How to Relate Complex DNA Repair Genotypes to Pathway Function and, Ultimately, Health Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, IM

    2002-01-09

    Exposure to ionizing radiation increases the incidence of cancer. However, predicting which individuals are at most risk from radiation exposure is a distant goal. Predictive ability is needed to guide policies that regulate radiation exposure and ensure that medical treatments have maximum benefit and minimum risk. Differences between people in susceptibility to radiation are largely based on their genotype, the genes inherited from their parents. Among the important genes are those that produce proteins that repair DNA damaged by radiation. Base Excision Repair (BER) proteins repair single strand breaks and oxidized bases in DNA. Double Strand Break Repair proteins repair broken chromosomes. Using technologies and information from the Human Genome Project, we have previously determined that the DNA sequence of DNA repair genes varies within the human population. An average of 3-4 different variants were found that affect the protein for each of 37 genes studied. The average frequency of these variants is 5%. Given the many genes in each DNA repair pathway and their many variants, technical ability to determine an individual's repair genotype greatly exceeds ability to interpret the information. A long-term goal is to relate DNA repair genotypes to health risk from radiation. This study focused on the BER pathway. The BER genes are known, variants of the genes have been identified at LLNL, and LLNL had recently developed an assay for BER function using white blood cells. The goal of this initial effort was to begin developing data that could be used to test the hypothesis that many different genotypes have similar DNA repair capacity phenotypes (function). Relationships between genotype and phenotype could then be used to group genotypes with similar function and ultimately test the association of groups of genotypes with health risk from radiation. Genotypes with reduced repair function are expected to increase risk of radiation-induced health effects. The

  9. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter protein MCU is involved in oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yajin; Hao, Yumin; Chen, Hong; He, Qing; Yuan, Zengqiang; Cheng, Jinbo

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is a conserved Ca(2+) transporter at mitochondrial in eukaryotic cells. However, the role of MCU protein in oxidative stress-induced cell death remains unclear. Here, we showed that ectopically expressed MCU is mitochondrial localized in both HeLa and primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Knockdown of endogenous MCU decreases mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake following histamine stimulation and attenuates cell death induced by oxidative stress in both HeLa cells and CGNs. We also found MCU interacts with VDAC1 and mediates VDAC1 overexpression-induced cell death in CGNs. This finding demonstrates that MCU-VDAC1 complex regulates mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, which might represent therapeutic targets for oxidative stress related diseases.

  10. Thioredoxin-related protein 32 (TRP32) specifically reduces oxidized phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tasuku; Funato, Yosuke; Miki, Hiroaki

    2013-03-08

    PRL family constitutes a unique class of phosphatases associated with metastasis. The phosphatase activity of PRL has been reported to be important for promoting metastasis, and it is inactivated by reversible oxidation of its catalytic cysteine. Here, we show that TRP32 specifically reduces PRL. Reduction of oxidized PRL in cells is inhibited by 2,4-dinitro-1-chlorobenzene, an inhibitor of TRX reductase. In vitro assays for the reduction of PRL show that only TRP32 can potently reduce oxidized PRL, whereas other TRX-related proteins linked to TRX reductase show little or no reducing activity. Indeed, TRP32 knockdown significantly prolongs the H2O2-induced oxidation of PRL. Binding analyses reveal that the unique C-terminal domain of TRP32 is required and sufficient for its direct interaction with PRL. These results suggest that TRP32 maintains the reduced state of PRL and thus regulates the biological function of PRL.

  11. Ability of silybin and its derivatives to prevent protein oxidation in different model systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purchartová, K.; Baron, C.P.; Křen, V.

    2013-01-01

    to prevent activation of hemoglobin (Hb) to highly reactive hypervalent heme protein species (ferrylHb and perferrylHb) was examined. Indeed, Hb cytotoxicity has been associated with the generation of protein radicals, which are formed when the ferric iron of Hb (Fe3+) is oxidised by H2O2 to (Fe4+) to form...... perferrylHb and ferrylHb, with the later also bearing a radical on its protein. The relationship between the structural properties of silybin and its derivatives and their ability to prevent oxidation of Hb was investigated in model system in the presence or the absence of lipids. The antioxidant activities...

  12. Protein oxidation: an overview of metabolism of sulphur containing amino acid, cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saheem; Khan, Hamda; Shahab, Uzma; Rehman, Shahnawaz; Rafi, Zeeshan; Khan, Mohd Yasir; Ansari, Ahsanullah; Siddiqui, Zeba; Ashraf, Jalaluddin Mohammad; Abdullah, Saleh M S; Habib, Safia; Uddin, Moin

    2017-01-01

    The available data suggest that among cellular constituents, proteins are the major target for oxidation primarily because of their quantity and high rate of interactions with ROS. Proteins are susceptible to ROS modifications of amino acid side chains which alter protein structure. Among the amino acids, Cysteine (Cys) is more prone to oxidation by ROS because of its high nucleophilic property. The reactivity of Cys with ROS is due to the presence of thiol group. In the oxidised form, Cys forms disulfide bond, which are primary covalent cross-link found in proteins, and which stabilize the native conformation of a protein. Indirect evidence suggests that thiol modifications by ROS may be involved in neurodegenerative disorders, but the significance and precise extent of the contributions are poorly understood. Here, we review the role of oxidized Cys in different pathological consequences and its biochemistry may increase the research in the discovery of new therapies. The purpose of this review is to re-examine the role and biochemistry of oxidised Cys residues.

  13. Oxidative stress affects processing of amyloid precursor protein in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muche, Abebe; Arendt, Thomas; Schliebs, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be a key player in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been assumed that oxidative stress contributes to the ß-amyloid deposition in cerebral blood vessels. In order to prove this hypothesis, we examined the effect of oxidative stress on the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in primary endothelial cells (EC) derived from cerebral cortical tissue of transgenic Tg2576 mice. Following exposure of EC by 1 μM hydrogen peroxide for up to 48 hours, formation and secretion of APP cleavage products sAPPα and sAPPß into the culture medium as well as the expression of endothelial APP were assessed. Oxidative stress resulted in enhanced secretion of sAPPß into the culture medium as compared to controls (absence of hydrogen peroxide), which was accompanied by an increased APP expression, induction of VEGF synthesis, nitric oxide and oxygen free radicals productions, and differential changes of endothelial phospo-p42/44 MAPK expression. The data suggest that oxidative stress may represent a major risk factor in causing Aß deposition in the brain vascular system by initiating the amyloidogenic route of endothelial APP processing. The enhanced β-secretase activity following oxidative stress exposure, possibly promoted by phosphorylation of p42/44 MAPK.

  14. Evaluation of the Protein Requirement in Chinese Young Adults Using the Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Min; ZHANG Yu Hui; WANG Zhi Ling; GOU Ling Yan; LI Wei Dong; TIAN Yuan; HU Yi Chun; WANG Rui; PIAO Jian Hua; YANG Xiao Guang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To accurately calculate the protein requirements in Chinese young adults using the indicator amino acid oxidation technique. Methods Nine women and ten men received a restricted daily level of protein intake (0.75, 0.82, 0.89, 0.97, and 1.05 g/kg), along with L-[1-13C]-leucine. Subjects’ protein requirement was determined by a biphasic linear regression crossover analysis of F13CO2 data. In doing so, a breakpoint at the minimal rate of appearance of 13CO2 expiration specific to each level of dietary protein was identified. This trial was registered with the Chinese clinical trial registry as ChiCTR-ONC-11001407. Results The Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) and the Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI) of protein for healthy Chinese young adults were determined to be 0.87 and 0.98 g/(kg·d), respectively, based on the indicator amino acid oxidation technique. Conclusion The EAR and RNI of mixed protein are 5% and 16% that are lower than the current proposed EAR and RNI (0.92 and 1.16 g/(kg·d), respectively), as determined by the nitrogen balance method. The respective EAR and RNI recommendations of 0.87 and 0.98 g/(kg·d) of mixed protein are estimated to be reasonable and suitable for Chinese young adults.

  15. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    : homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage......Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...

  16. The actin-bundling protein Fascin is overexpressed in inflammatory bowel disease and may be important in tissue repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littlejohns David

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fascin is associated with increased cell motility in colorectal tumours but is absent from the normal colonic epithelium. We examined the expression of fascin in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and its location at regions undergoing restitution and regeneration. Tissue repair is essential for disease remission and we sought to determine the effects of therapeutic modalities on fascin expression and function using an in vitro model. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on colonic tissue from IBD patients to determine changes in fascin expression and distribution. A human colorectal epithelial cell line was treated with 5-aminosalicylate (a common treatment for IBD, or sodium butyrate to determine the effect on fascin expression and cell motility. Results Fascin overexpression was observed in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's colitis and expression correlated with disease severity. Immunoreactivity was more intense and widespread in Crohn's compared to ulcerative colitis. Interestingly, highly expressing foci were consistently observed at the edges of ulcers where flattened, motile epithelial cells are actively involved in restitution, and also in areas of mucosal regeneration. 5-aminosalicylate reduced fascin expression in colorectal epithelial cells and inhibited their motility. Conversely, sodium butyrate increased fascin expression and stimulated cell motility in the same cells. Conclusions Our data shows that fascin is overexpressed in inflammatory bowel disease and its location is indicative of a role in tissue repair. Our in vitro studies show that different therapeutic modalities may have converse effects on fascin expression and may have significant consequences for disease remission and the clinical management of IBD.

  17. Modifications and oxidation of lipids and proteins in human serum detected by thermochemiluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnizer, Sergei; Kagan, Tamara; Lanir, Amos; Maor, Irit; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2003-01-01

    Detection of electronically excited species (EES) in body fluids may constitute an important diagnostic tool in various pathologies. Examples of such products are triplet excited carbonyls (TEC), which can be a source for photon emission in the 400-550 nm range. The aim of the present study was to determine the actual contribution of lipid and protein components (protein carbonyls) to photon emission generated by thermochemiluminescence (TCL) during the heating of biological fluids. In this study, a new TCL Photometer device, designed by Lumitest Ltd, Israel, was used. Samples were heated to a constant temperature of 80 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 280 s and photon emission was measured at several time points. In order to compare the results of TCL measurements to conventional methods of detecting lipid and protein oxidation, each examined sample was also heated in a waterbath at 80 degrees C for 10-280 s. Lipid and protein oxidation were subsequently measured using conventional methods. The TCL of four polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with three to six double bonds was measured. The elevation of the PUFA TCL amplitude correlated with the increase in the number of double bonds of PUFA. A correlation between the increase in TCL intensity and protein carbonyl generation in bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also observed. In the venous blood serum, our study showed that an increase of TCL intensity during heating reflected the cleavage of TEC of lipid origin. Our study suggests that biological molecules such as proteins, lipids and other molecules, which may become unstable during heating, are capable of generating EES. We demonstrated that a TCL curve can be used as a kinetic model for measuring oxidative processes, which reflects modifications of different molecules involved in the oxidative stress phenomena.

  18. Hypospadias repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the problem. If the repair is not done, problems may occur later on such as: Difficulty controlling and directing urine stream A curve in the penis during erection Decreased fertility Embarrassment about appearance of penis Surgery ...

  19. Search for novel remedies to augment radiation resistance of inhabitants of Fukushima and Chernobyl disasters: identifying DNA repair protein XRCC4 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mao-Feng; Chen, Hsin-Yi; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Lui, Shu-Hui; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2011-10-01

    Two nuclear plant disasters occurring within a span of 25 years threaten health and genome integrity both in Fukushima and Chernobyl. Search for remedies capable of enhancing DNA repair efficiency and radiation resistance in humans appears to be a urgent problem for now. XRCC4 is an important enhancer in promoting repair pathway triggered by DNA double-strand break (DSB). In the context of radiation therapy, active XRCC4 could reduce DSB-mediated apoptotic effect on cancer cells. Hence, developing XRCC4 inhibitors could possibly enhance radiotherapy outcomes. In this study, we screened traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) database, TCM Database@Taiwan, and have identified three potent inhibitor agents against XRCC4. Through molecular dynamics simulation, we have determined that the protein-ligand interactions were focused at Lys188 on chain A and Lys187 on chain B. Intriguingly, the hydrogen bonds for all three ligands fluctuated frequently but were held at close approximation. The pi-cation interactions and ionic interactions mediated by o-hydroxyphenyl and carboxyl functional groups respectively have been demonstrated to play critical roles in stabilizing binding conformations. Based on these results, we reported the identification of potential radiotherapy enhancers from TCM. We further characterized the key binding elements for inhibiting the XRCC4 activities.

  20. Small RNA-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA lesions by the DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 2 and ARGONAUTE 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Catherine; Cognat, Valérie; Graindorge, Stéfanie; Vincent, Timothée; Voinnet, Olivier; Molinier, Jean

    2017-04-04

    As photosynthetic organisms, plants need to prevent irreversible UV-induced DNA lesions. Through an unbiased, genome-wide approach, we have uncovered a previously unrecognized interplay between Global Genome Repair and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in the recognition of DNA photoproducts, prevalently in intergenic regions. Genetic and biochemical approaches indicate that, upon UV irradiation, the DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 2 (DDB2) and ARGONAUTE 1 (AGO1) of Arabidopsis thaliana form a chromatin-bound complex together with 21-nt siRNAs, which likely facilitates recognition of DNA damages in an RNA/DNA complementary strand-specific manner. The biogenesis of photoproduct-associated siRNAs involves the noncanonical, concerted action of RNA POLYMERASE IV, RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE-2, and DICER-LIKE-4. Furthermore, the chromatin association/dissociation of the DDB2-AGO1 complex is under the control of siRNA abundance and DNA damage signaling. These findings reveal unexpected nuclear functions for DCL4 and AGO1, and shed light on the interplay between small RNAs and DNA repair recognition factors at damaged sites.

  1. C. elegans ring finger protein RNF-113 is involved in interstrand DNA crosslink repair and interacts with a RAD51C homolog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyojin Lee

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA pathway recognizes interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs and contributes to their conversion into double-strand DNA breaks, which can be repaired by homologous recombination. Seven orthologs of the 15 proteins associated with Fanconi anemia are functionally conserved in the model organism C. elegans. Here we report that RNF-113, a ubiquitin ligase, is required for RAD-51 focus formation after inducing ICLs in C. elegans. However, the formation of foci of RPA-1 or FCD-2/FANCD2 in the FA pathway was not affected by depletion of RNF-113. Nevertheless, the RPA-1 foci formed did not disappear with time in the depleted worms, implying serious defects in ICL repair. As a result, RNF-113 depletion increased embryonic lethality after ICL treatment in wild-type worms, but it did not increase the ICL-induced lethality of rfs-1/rad51C mutants. In addition, the persistence of RPA-1 foci was suppressed in doubly-deficient rnf-113;rfs-1 worms, suggesting that there is an epistatic interaction between the two genes. These results lead us to suggest that RNF-113 and RFS-1 interact to promote the displacement of RPA-1 by RAD-51 on single-stranded DNA derived from ICLs.

  2. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in children exposed to low levels of arsenic in utero and during early childhood: Application of salivary and urinary biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinhumpatch, Pantip; Navasumrit, Panida [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Environmental Health and Toxicology, CHE, Ministry of Education (Thailand); Chaisatra, Krittinee; Promvijit, Jeerawan [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Mahidol, Chulabhorn [Laboratory of Chemical Carcinogenesis, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Ruchirawat, Mathuros, E-mail: mathuros@cri.or.th [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Laksi, Bangkok (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Environmental Health and Toxicology, CHE, Ministry of Education (Thailand); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Phayathai, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-12-15

    The present study aimed to assess arsenic exposure and its effect on oxidative DNA damage and repair in young children exposed in utero and continued to live in arsenic-contaminated areas. To address the need for biological specimens that can be acquired with minimal discomfort to children, we used non-invasive urinary and salivary-based assays for assessing arsenic exposure and early biological effects that have potentially serious health implications. Levels of arsenic in nails showed the greatest magnitude of difference between exposed and control groups, followed by arsenic concentrations in saliva and urine. Arsenic levels in saliva showed significant positive correlations with other biomarkers of arsenic exposure, including arsenic accumulation in nails (r = 0.56, P < 0.001) and arsenic concentration in urine (r = 0.50, P < 0.05). Exposed children had a significant reduction in arsenic methylation capacity indicated by decreased primary methylation index and secondary methylation index in both urine and saliva samples. Levels of salivary 8-OHdG in exposed children were significantly higher (∼ 4-fold, P < 0.01), whereas levels of urinary 8-OHdG excretion and salivary hOGG1 expression were significantly lower in exposed children (∼ 3-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting a defect in hOGG1 that resulted in ineffective cleavage of 8-OHdG. Multiple regression analysis results showed that levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in saliva and urine had a significant positive association with salivary 8-OHdG and a significant negative association with salivary hOGG1 expression. - Highlights: • The effects of arsenic exposure in utero and through early childhood were studied. • Arsenic-exposed children had a reduction in arsenic methylation capacity. • Exposed children had more DNA damage, observed as elevated salivary 8-OHdG. • Lower salivary hOGG1 in exposed children indicated impairment of 8-OHdG repair. • Salivary and urinary 8-OHdG levels were discordant.

  3. Advanced oxidation protein products and their relationship with cardiovascular risk factors in young apparently healthy people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando Sánchez, Diana Carolina; Alvarez Aguilar, Cleto; Gómez García, Anel

    2017-06-12

    Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) are used as a marker to estimate oxidative stress in plasma proteins. Oxidative stress is considered a factor of cardiovascular risk (CVRF) related to increased blood pressure, and dyslipidaemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between plasma AOPPs and CVRF in apparently healthy young adults. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on 120 students of the Faculty of Chemical-Pharmacobiology of the UMSNH. Body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure were determined. A blood specimen was also collected to quantify AOPPs, glucose, total cholesterol, lipoproteins (high, low, and very low density), and triglycerides. Differences were observed in the groups with and without CVRF, with significant differences in BMI, waist, body fat (Pfactor, because their deposition in the atherosclerotic plaque favours the atherogenic process, and thus the development of cardiovascular disease. Quantification of AOPPs contributes to the indirect determination of oxidative status in the body. The study of metabolic and oxidative state of apparently healthy young adults is important in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in later life. More longitudinal studies are required to study its evolution. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurotoxicity induced by arsenic in Gallus Gallus: Regulation of oxidative stress and heat shock protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Houjuan; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic, a naturally occurring heavy metal pollutant, is one of the functioning risk factors for neurological toxicity in humans. However, little is known about the effects of arsenic on the nervous system of Gallus Gallus. To investigate whether arsenic induce neurotoxicity and influence the oxidative stress and heat shock proteins (Hsps) response in chickens, seventy-two 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were treated with different doses of arsenic trioxide (As2O3). The histological changes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and the expressions of Hsps were detected. Results showed slightly histology changes were obvious in the brain tissues exposure to arsenic. The activities of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) were decreased compared to the control, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was increased gradually along with increase in diet-arsenic. The mRNA levels of Hsps and protein expressions of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were up-regulated. These results suggested that sub-chronic exposure to arsenic induced neurotoxicity in chickens. Arsenic exposure disturbed the balance of oxidants and antioxidants. Increased heat shock response tried to protect chicken brain tissues from tissues damage caused by oxidative stress. The mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by arsenic include oxidative stress and heat shock protein response in chicken brain tissues.

  5. Identifying initial molecular targets of PDT: protein and lipid oxidation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; Kim, Junhwan; Rodriguez, Myriam E.; Xue, Liang-yan; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Anderson, Vernon E.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) generates singlet oxygen (1O2) which oxidizes biomolecules in the immediate vicinity of its formation. The phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4 localizes to mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and the primary targets of Pc 4-PDT are expected to be lipids and proteins of those membranes. The initial damage then causes apoptosis in cancer cells via the release of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) from mitochondria into the cytosol, followed by the activation of caspases. That damage also triggers the induction of autophagy, an attempt by the cells to eliminate damaged organelles, or when damage is too extensive, to promote cell death. Cyt-c is bound to the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial inner membrane through association with cardiolipin (CL), a phospholipid containing four unsaturated fatty acids and thus easily oxidized by 1O2 or by other oxidizing agents. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidation of CL loosens its association with Cyt-c, and that the peroxidase activity of Cyt-c can oxidize CL. In earlier studies of Cyt-c in homogeneous medium by MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS, we showed that 1O2 generated by Pc 4-PDT oxidized histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and unexpectedly phenylalanine but not tyrosine. Most of the oxidation products were known to be formed by other oxidizing agents, such as hydroxyl radical, superoxide radical anion, and peroxynitrite. However, two products of histidine were unique to 1O2 and may be useful for reporting the action of 1O2 in cells and tissues. These products, as well as CL oxidation products, have now been identified in liposomes and mitochondria after Pc 4-PDT. In mitochondria, the PDT dose-dependent oxidations can be related to specific changes in mitochondrial function, Bcl-2 photodamage, and Cyt-c release. Thus, the role of PDT-generated 1O2 in oxidizing Cyt-c and CL and the interplay between protein and lipid targets may be highly relevant to understanding one mechanism for cell killing by PDT.

  6. Demineralized bone matrix combined bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, bone morphogenetic protein-2 and transforming growth factor-β3 gene promoted pig cartilage defect repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether a combination of demineralized bone matrix (DBM and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs infected with adenovirus-mediated- bone morphogenetic protein (Ad-BMP-2 and transforming growth factor-β3 (Ad-TGF-β3 promotes the repair of the full-thickness cartilage lesions in pig model. METHODS: BMSCs isolated from pig were cultured and infected with Ad-BMP-2(B group, Ad-TGF-β3 (T group, Ad-BMP-2 + Ad-TGF-β3(BT group, cells infected with empty Ad served as a negative group(N group, the expression of the BMP-2 and TGF-β3 were confirmed by immunofluorescence, PCR, and ELISA, the expression of SOX-9, type II collagen(COL-2A, aggrecan (ACAN in each group were evaluated by real-time PCR at 1w, 2w, 3w, respectively. The chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs was evaluated by type II collagen at 21d with immunohistochemical staining. The third-passage BMSCs infected with Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 were suspended and cultured with DBM for 6 days to construct a new type of tissue engineering scaffold to repair full-thickness cartilage lesions in the femur condyles of pig knee, the regenerated tissue was evaluated at 1,2 and 3 months after surgery by gross appearance, H&E, safranin O staining and O'driscoll score. RESULTS: Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 (BT group infected cells acquired strong type II collagen staining compared with Ad-BMP-2 (B group and Ad-TGF-β3 (T group along. The Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 infected BMSCs adhered and propagated well in DBM and the new type of tissue engineering scaffold produced hyaline cartilage morphology containing a stronger type II collagen and safranin O staining, the O'driscoll score was higher than other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The DBM compound with Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 infected BMSCs scaffold has a good biocompatibility and could well induce cartilage regeneration to repair the defects of joint cartilage. This technology may be efficiently employed for cartilage lesions repair in vivo.

  7. The long N-terminus of the C. elegans DNA repair enzyme APN-1 targets the protein to the nucleus of a heterologous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Xiaoming; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Ramotar, Dindial

    2014-12-15

    We previously isolated from a Caenorhabditis elegans cDNA library, designed for two-hybrid screening, a gene encoding the DNA repair enzyme APN-1 using cross-specie complementation analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae apn1∆ apn2∆ tpp1∆ triple mutant deficient in the ability to repair several types of DNA lesions including apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites. We subsequently purified the APN-1 from this yeast mutant and demonstrated that it possesses four distinct DNA repair activities. However, following the re-annotation of the C. elegans genome we discovered that the functionally active APN-1 encoded by the cDNA from the library might lack 108 amino acid residues from the N-terminus. We therefore synthesized the entire C. elegans apn-1 gene encoding the putative full-length APN-1 and created several N-terminal deletion mutants lacking either 63, 83 or 118 amino acid residues. The full-length APN-1, APN-1 (1-63Δ) and APN-1 (1-83Δ), but not APN-1 (1-118Δ) were stably expressed in the yeast triple mutant and cleaved the AP site substrate. However, only the full-length APN-1 rescued the yeast mutant from the genotoxicity caused by methyl methane sulfonate, a DNA damaging agent that creates AP sites in the genome. The full-length APN-1 was localized to the yeast nucleus, while APN-1 (1-63Δ) and APN-1 (1-83Δ) retained a cytoplasmic distribution. Our data suggest that the N-terminal region has no direct role in the DNA repair functions of APN-1 other than to target the protein to the nucleus and possibly to maintain its stability. Thus, the truncated APN-1, previously isolated from the two-hybrid library, ability to complement the yeast triple mutant depends on the engineered SV40 nuclear localization signal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has provided exciting insights into a novel class of central (small) RNA molecules intimately involved in gene regulation. Only a small percentage of our DNA is translated into proteins by mRNA, yet 80% or more of the DNA is transcribed into RNA, and this RNA has been found...... to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...

  9. MSH3 mismatch repair protein regulates sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs and a histone deacetylase inhibitor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Myung Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MSH3 is a DNA mismatch repair (MMR gene that undergoes frequent somatic mutation in colorectal cancers (CRCs with MMR deficiency. MSH3, together with MSH2, forms the MutSβ heteroduplex that interacts with interstrand cross-links induced by drugs such as cisplatin. To date, the impact of MSH3 on chemosensitivity is unknown. METHODS: We utilized isogenic HCT116 (MLH1-/MSH3- cells where MLH1 is restored by transfer of chromosome 3 (HCT116+ch3 and also MSH3 by chromosome 5 (HCT116+3+5. We generated HCT116+3+5, SW480 (MLH1+/MSH3+ and SW48 (MLH1-/MSH3+ cells with shRNA knockdown of MSH3. Cells were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, SN-38, oxaliplatin, or the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor PCI-24781 and cell viability, clonogenic survival, DNA damage and apoptosis were analyzed. RESULTS: MSH3-deficient vs proficient CRC cells showed increased sensitivity to the irinotecan metabolite SN-38 and to oxaliplatin, but not 5-FU, as shown in assays for apoptosis and clonogenic survival. In contrast, suppression of MLH1 attenuated the cytotoxic effect of 5-FU, but did not alter sensitivity to SN-38 or oxaliplatin. The impact of MSH3 knockdown on chemosensitivity to SN-38 and oxaliplatin was maintained independent of MLH1 status. In MSH3-deficient vs proficient cells, SN-38 and oxaliplatin induced higher levels of phosphorylated histone H2AX and Chk2, and similar results were found in MLH1-proficient SW480 cells. MSH3-deficient vs proficient cells showed increased 53BP1 nuclear foci after irradiation, suggesting that MSH3 can regulate DNA double strand break (DSB repair. We then utilized PCI-24781 that interferes with homologous recombination (HR indicated by a reduction in Rad51 expression. The addition of PCI-24781 to oxaliplatin enhanced cytotoxicity to a greater extent compared to either drug alone. CONCLUSION: MSH3 status can regulate the DNA damage response and extent of apoptosis induced by chemotherapy. The ability of MSH3 to regulate

  10. Oxidative stress induces macroautophagy of amyloid beta-protein and ensuing apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Lin; Kågedal, Katarina; Dehvari, Nodi;

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the toxicity of intracellular amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) to neurons and the involvement of lysosomes in this process in Alzheimer disease (AD). We have recently shown that oxidative stress, a recognized determinant of AD, enhances macroautophagy and leads...... to intralysosomal accumulation of Abeta in cultured neuroblastoma cells. We hypothesized that oxidative stress promotes AD by stimulating macroautophagy of Abeta that further may induce cell death by destabilizing lysosomal membranes. To investigate such possibility, we compared the effects of hyperoxia (40...

  11. Lipoxidation products as biomarkers of oxidative damage to proteins during lipid peroxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, J R; Fu, M X; Ahmed, M U; Jenkins, A J; Lyons, T J; Thorpe, S R

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous disease processes including diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, ischaemia reperfusion injury and rheumatoid arthritis. Chemical modification of amino acids in protein during lipid peroxidation results in the formation of lipoxidation products which may serve as indicators of oxidative stress in vivo. The focus of the studies described here was initially to identify chemical modifications of protein derived exclusively from lipids in order to assess the role of lipid peroxidative damage in the pathogenesis of disease. Malondialdehye (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) are well characterized oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and adducts of these compounds have been detected by immunological means in atherosclerotic plaque. Thus, we first developed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assays for the Schiff base adduct of MDA to lysine, the lysine-MDA-lysine diimine cross-link and the Michael addition product of HNE to lysine. Using these assays, we showed that the concentrations of all three compounds increased significantly in LDL during metal-catalysed oxidation in vitro. The concentration of the advanced glycation end-product N epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) also increased during LDL oxidation, while that of its putative carbohydrate precursor the Amadori compound N epsilon-(1-deoxyfructose-1-yl)lysine did not change, demonstrating that CML is a marker of both glycoxidation and lipoxidation reactions. These results suggest that MDA and HNE adducts to lysine residues should serve as biomarkers of lipid modification resulting from lipid peroxidation reactions, while CML may serve as a biomarker of general oxidative stress resulting from both carbohydrate and lipid oxidation reactions.

  12. Validation of membrane protein topology models by oxidative labeling and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yan; Ruan, Xiang; Valvano, Miguel A; Konermann, Lars

    2012-05-01

    Computer-assisted topology predictions are widely used to build low-resolution structural models of integral membrane proteins (IMPs). Experimental validation of these models by traditional methods is labor intensive and requires modifications that might alter the IMP native conformation. This work employs oxidative labeling coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) as a validation tool for computer-generated topology models. ·OH exposure introduces oxidative modifications in solvent-accessible regions, whereas buried segments (e.g., transmembrane helices) are non-oxidizable. The Escherichia coli protein WaaL (O-antigen ligase) is predicted to have 12 transmembrane helices and a large extramembrane domain (Pérez et al., Mol. Microbiol. 2008, 70, 1424). Tryptic digestion and LC-MS/MS were used to map the oxidative labeling behavior of WaaL. Met and Cys exhibit high intrinsic reactivities with ·OH, making them sensitive probes for solvent accessibility assays. Overall, the oxidation pattern of these residues is consistent with the originally proposed WaaL topology. One residue (M151), however, undergoes partial oxidation despite being predicted to reside within a transmembrane helix. Using an improved computer algorithm, a slightly modified topology model was generated that places M151 closer to the membrane interface. On the basis of the labeling data, it is concluded that the refined model more accurately reflects the actual topology of WaaL. We propose that the combination of oxidative labeling and MS represents a useful strategy for assessing the accuracy of IMP topology predictions, supplementing data obtained in traditional biochemical assays. In the future, it might be possible to incorporate oxidative labeling data directly as constraints in topology prediction algorithms.

  13. Resting energy expenditure and glucose, protein and fat oxidation in severe chronic virus hepatitis B patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study and determine the resting energy ex- penditure (REE) and oxidation rates of glucose, fat and protein in severe chronic hepatitis B patients. METHODS: A total of 100 patients with liver diseases were categorized into three groups: 16 in the acute hepatitis group, 56 in the severe chronic hepatitis group, and 28 in the cirrhosis group. The REE and the oxidation rates of glucose, fat and protein were as- sessed by indirect heat measurement using the CCM-D nutritive metabolic investigation system. RESULTS: The REE of the severe chronic hepatitis group (20.7 ± 6.1 kcal/d per kg) was significantly lower than that of the acute hepatitis group (P = 0.014). The respiratory quotient (RQ) of the severe chronic hepatitis group (0.84 ± 0.06) was significantly lower than that of the acute hepatitis and cirrhosis groups (P = 0.001). The glucose oxidation rate of the severe hepatitis group (39.2%) was significantly lower than that of the acute hepatitis group and the cirrhosis group (P < 0.05), while the fat oxidation rate (39.8%) in the severe hepatitis group was markedly higher than that of the other two groups (P < 0.05). With improve- ment of liver function, the glucose oxidation rate in- creased from 41.7% to 60.1%, while the fat oxidation rate decreased from 26.3% to 7.6%. CONCLUSION: The glucose oxidation rate is signifi- cantly decreased, and a high proportion of energy is provided by fat in severe chronic hepatitis. These re- sues warrant a large clinical trail to assess the optimal nutritive support therapy for patients with severe liver disease.

  14. Myocardial Oxidative Metabolism and Protein Synthesis during Mechanical Circulatory Support by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priddy, MD, Colleen M.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena; Bouchard, Bertrand; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support essential for survival in infants and children with acute cardiac decompensation. However, ECMO also causes metabolic disturbances, which contribute to total body wasting and protein loss. Cardiac stunning can also occur which prevents ECMO weaning, and contributes to high mortality. The heart may specifically undergo metabolic impairments, which influence functional recovery. We tested the hypothesis that ECMO alters oxidative. We focused on the amino acid leucine, and integration with myocardial protein synthesis. We used a translational immature swine model in which we assessed in heart (i) the fractional contribution of leucine (FcLeucine) and pyruvate (FCpyruvate) to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and (ii) global protein fractional synthesis (FSR) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Immature mixed breed Yorkshire male piglets (n = 22) were divided into four groups based on loading status (8 hours of normal circulation or ECMO) and intracoronary infusion [13C6,15N]-L-leucine (3.7 mM) alone or with [2-13C]-pyruvate (7.4 mM). ECMO decreased pulse pressure and correspondingly lowered myocardial oxygen consumption (~ 40%, n = 5), indicating decreased overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, FcLeucine was maintained and myocardial protein FSR was marginally increased. Pyruvate addition decreased tissue leucine enrichment, FcLeucine, and Fc for endogenous substrates as well as protein FSR. Conclusion: The heart under ECMO shows reduced oxidative metabolism of substrates, including amino acids, while maintaining (i) metabolic flexibility indicated by ability to respond to pyruvate, and (ii) a normal or increased capacity for global protein synthesis, suggesting an improved protein balance.

  15. Inhibition of nitric oxide mediated protein nitration: therapeutic implications in experimental radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Jae; Kim, Tae Uk; Park, Jeong-Soo; Ra, Jong Yun

    2013-09-15

    Experimental animal study. This study investigated whether nitric oxide (NO) mediated protein nitration is involved in the pathogenesis of radiculopathy and whether the symptoms can be relieved by its suppression. It has been reported that nitration of protein mediated by NO is involved in the degenerative neurological disorders, but its involvement is not clear in the radiculopathy. Two kinds of rat models of radiculopathy were used. Radiculopathy was induced either by ligation of spinal nerve roots or transplantation of autologous nucleus pulposus. In separate groups of rats, aminoguanidine, a potent nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor, was administered just before induction of radiculopathy, to suppress NO production and resultant nitration of protein. Sensation of the hind limb was evaluated by plantar stimulation test, and motor weakness was assessed by observation of gait pattern. Nitrotyrosine, product of protein nitration, was assayed quantitatively by Western immunoblotting. Mechanical allodynia was observed in both compression and nucleus pulposus groups, but motor weakness was observed only in the compression group. Preoperative administration of aminoguanidine attenuated mechanical allodynia and motor weakness. Optical densities of nitrotyrosine bands increased significantly in radiculopathy groups, but they were lowered by administration of aminoguanidine. NO mediated protein nitration contributes to the development of both types of radiculopathies. Suppression of NO production can decrease protein nitration and relieve neural dysfunctions of radiculopathy. N/A.

  16. Synthesis of magnetite/graphene oxide/chitosan composite and its application for protein adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Nengsheng, E-mail: yensh@cnu.edu.cn; Xie, Yali; Shi, Pengzhi; Gao, Ting; Ma, Jichao

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a facile and novel strategy was developed to fabricate magnetite/graphene oxide/chitosan (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/GO/CS) composite, and the composite was used as a magnetic adsorbent for the enrichment of protein, and followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. The phase composition, chemical structure and morphology of the composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Protein cytochrome c was chosen as model target to evaluate the adsorptive property of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/GO/CS. After enrichment procedure and magnetic separation, protein bounded with the material was analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS without desorption. The results indicated that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/GO/CS composite exhibited a good adsorptive capacity for protein, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/GO/CS composite had a promising potential in magnetic separation research. - Highlights: • Magnetite/graphene oxide/chitosan composite was synthesized by novel route. • The composite was used as magnetic absorbent for protein enrichment. • The composite had excellent adsorption performance for protein enrichment.

  17. In vitro targeted magnetic delivery and tracking of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles labeled stem cells for articular cartilage defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yong; Jin, Xuhong; Dai, Gang; Liu, Jun; Chen, Jiarong; Yang, Liu

    2011-04-01

    To assess a novel cell manipulation technique of tissue engineering with respect to its ability to augment superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) density at a localized cartilage defect site in an in vitro phantom by applying magnetic force. Meanwhile, non-invasive imaging techniques were use to track SPIO-labeled MSCs by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human bone marrow MSCs were cultured and labeled with SPIO. Fresh degenerated human osteochondral fragments were obtained during total knee arthroplasty and a cartilage defect was created at the center. Then, the osteochondral fragments were attached to the sidewalls of culture flasks filled with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) to mimic the human joint cavity. The SPIO-labeled MSCs were injected into the culture flasks in the presence of a 0.57 Tesla (T) magnetic force. Before and 90 min after cell targeting, the specimens underwent T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (SET2WI) sequence of 3.0 T MRI. MRI results were compared with histological findings. Macroscopic observation showed that SPIO-labeled MSCs were steered to the target region of cartilage defect. MRI revealed significant changes in signal intensity (P<0.01). HE staining exibited that a great number of MSCs formed a three-dimensional (3D) cell "sheet" structure at the chondral defect site. It was concluded that 0.57 T magnetic force permits spatial delivery of magnetically labeled MSCs to the target region in vitro. High-field MRI can serve as an very sensitive non-invasive technique for the visualization of SPIO-labeled MSCs.

  18. Different organization of base excision repair of uracil in DNA in nuclei and mitochondria and selective upregulation of mitochondrial uracil-DNA glycosylase after oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, M; Otterlei, M; Pena Diaz, Javier

    2007-01-01

    , indicating regulatory effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial BER. To examine the overall organization of uracil-BER in nuclei and mitochondria, we constructed cell lines expressing EYFP (enhanced yellow fluorescent protein) fused to UNG1 or UNG2. These were used to investigate the possible presence...... of multi-protein BER complexes in nuclei and mitochondria. Extracts from nuclei and mitochondria were both proficient in complete uracil-BER in vitro. BER assays with immunoprecipitates demonstrated that UNG2-EYFP, but not UNG1-EYFP, formed complexes that carried out complete BER. Although apurinic....../apyrimidinic site endonuclease 1 (APE1) is highly enriched in nuclei relative to mitochondria, it was apparently the major AP-endonuclease required for BER in both organelles. APE2 is enriched in mitochondria, but its possible role in BER remains uncertain. These results demonstrate that nuclear and mitochondrial...

  19. Cytotoxicity of protein corona-graphene oxide nanoribbons on human epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbeh, Doris A. [Laboratory for Innovation and Analysis of Bio-Performance, École Polytechnique, C.P. 6079, Succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada); Akhavan, Omid, E-mail: oakhavan@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Javanbakht, Taraneh [Laboratory for Innovation and Analysis of Bio-Performance, École Polytechnique, C.P. 6079, Succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada); Mahmoudi, Morteza [Department of Nanotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yahia, L’Hocine [Laboratory for Innovation and Analysis of Bio-Performance, École Polytechnique, C.P. 6079, Succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Graphene oxide nanoribons (GONRs) were synthesized by unzipping of multi-walled carbon nanotubes. • GONRs were functionalized by the albumin originated from the two different protein sources. • Concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of the functionalized GONRs was investigated on human epithelial cells. - Abstract: Graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs) were synthesized using an oxidative unzipping of multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The interactions of the GONRs with various concentrations of fetal bovine serum or human plasma serum indicated that the GONRs were functionalized substantially by the albumin originated from the two different protein sources. Then, concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of the protein-functionalized GONRs on human epithelial cells was studied. Although the GONRs with concentrations ≤50 μg/mL did not exhibit significant cytotoxicity on the cells (with the cell viability >85%), the concentration of 100 μg/mL exhibited significant cytotoxicity including prevention of cell proliferation and induction of cell apoptosis. These results can provide more in-depth understanding about cytotoxic effects of graphene nanostructures which can be functionalized by the proteins of media.

  20. HCV Core Protein Uses Multiple Mechanisms to Induce Oxidative Stress in Human Hepatoma Huh7 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexander V.; Smirnova, Olga A.; Petrushanko, Irina Y.; Ivanova, Olga N.; Karpenko, Inna L.; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A.; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N.; Isaguliants, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGFβ1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37–191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1α. The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein. PMID:26035647

  1. Evidence that the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein, an early sensor of double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), is involved in HIV-1 post-integration repair by recruiting the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase in a process similar to, but distinct from, cellular DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Johanna A; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Kou-Juey; Williams, Kevin Jon; Daniel, René

    2008-01-22

    Retroviral transduction involves integrase-dependent linkage of viral and host DNA that leaves an intermediate that requires post-integration repair (PIR). We and others proposed that PIR hijacks the host cell double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair pathways. Nevertheless, the geometry of retroviral DNA integration differs considerably from that of DSB repair and so the precise role of host-cell mechanisms in PIR remains unclear. In the current study, we found that the Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 protein (NBS1), an early sensor of DSBs, associates with HIV-1 DNA, recruits the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, promotes stable retroviral transduction, mediates efficient integration of viral DNA and blocks integrase-dependent apoptosis that can arise from unrepaired viral-host DNA linkages. Moreover, we demonstrate that the ATM kinase, recruited by NBS1, is itself required for efficient retroviral transduction. Surprisingly, recruitment of the ATR kinase, which in the context of DSB requires both NBS1 and ATM, proceeds independently of these two proteins. A model is proposed emphasizing similarities and differences between PIR and DSB repair. Differences between the pathways may eventually allow strategies to block PIR while still allowing DSB repair.

  2. Moonlight-like proteins of the cell wall protect sessile cells of Candida from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Fujarte, Isela; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms of Candida species are associated with high morbidity and hospital mortality. Candida forms biofilms by adhering to human host epithelium through cell wall proteins (CWP) and simultaneously neutralizing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during the respiratory burst by phagocytic cells. The purpose of this paper is to identify the CWP of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei and Candida parapsilosis expressed after exposure to different concentrations of H2O2 using a proteomic approach. CWP obtained from sessile cells, both treated and untreated with the oxidizing agent, were resolved by one and two-dimensional (2D-PAGE) gels and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Some of these proteins were identified and found to correspond to moonlighting CWP such as: (i) glycolytic enzymes, (ii) heat shock, (iii) OSR proteins, (iv) general metabolic enzymes and (v) highly conserved proteins, which are up- or down-regulated in the presence or absence of ROS. We also found that the expression of these CWP is different for each Candida species. Moreover, RT-PCR assays allowed us to demonstrate that transcription of the gene coding for Eno1, one of the moonlight-like CWP identified in response to the oxidant agent, is differentially regulated. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration that, in response to oxidative stress, each species of Candida, differentially regulates the expression of moonlighting CWP, which may protect the organism from the ROS generated during phagocytosis. Presumptively, these proteins allow the pathogen to adhere and form a biofilm, and eventually cause invasive candidiasis in the human host. We propose that, in addition to the antioxidant mechanisms present in Candida, the moonlighting CWP also confer protection to these pathogens from oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of lipid and protein membrane components of erythrocytes oxidized with hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendanha, S.A.; Anjos, J.L.V.; Silva, A.H.M.; Alonso, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2012-04-05

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of spin labels was used to monitor membrane dynamic changes in erythrocytes subjected to oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The lipid spin label, 5-doxyl stearic acid, responded to dramatic reductions in membrane fluidity, which was correlated with increases in the protein content of the membrane. Membrane rigidity, associated with the binding of hemoglobin (Hb) to the erythrocyte membrane, was also indicated by a spin-labeled maleimide, 5-MSL, covalently bound to the sulfhydryl groups of membrane proteins. At 2% hematocrit, these alterations in membrane occurred at very low concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 µM) after only 5 min of incubation at 37°C in azide phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. Lipid peroxidation, suggested by oxidative hemolysis and malondialdehyde formation, started at 300 µM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (for incubation of 3 h), which is a concentration about six times higher than those detected with the probes. Ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol protected the membrane against lipoperoxidation, but did not prevent the binding of proteins to the erythrocyte membrane. Moreover, the antioxidant (+)-catechin, which also failed to prevent the cross-linking of cytoskeletal proteins with Hb, was very effective in protecting erythrocyte ghosts from lipid peroxidation induced by the Fenton reaction. This study also showed that EPR spectroscopy can be useful to assess the molecular dynamics of red blood cell membranes in both the lipid and protein domains and examine oxidation processes in a system that is so vulnerable to oxidation.

  4. Bisecting GlcNAc modification stabilizes BACE1 protein under oxidative stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Nakano, Miyako; Kitazume, Shinobu; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi C; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1) is a protease essential for amyloid-β (Aβ) production in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 protein is known to be up-regulated by oxidative stress-inducing stimuli but the mechanism for this up-regulation still needs to be clarified. We have recently found that BACE1 is modified with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-III (GnT-III, encoded by the Mgat3 gene) and that GnT-III deficiency reduces Aβ-plaque formation in the brain by accelerating lysosomal degradation of BACE1. Therefore, we hypothesize