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Sample records for repairing rna transcripts

  1. Transcript-RNA-templated DNA recombination and repair.

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    Keskin, Havva; Shen, Ying; Huang, Fei; Patel, Mikir; Yang, Taehwan; Ashley, Katie; Mazin, Alexander V; Storici, Francesca

    2014-11-20

    Homologous recombination is a molecular process that has multiple important roles in DNA metabolism, both for DNA repair and genetic variation in all forms of life. Generally, homologous recombination involves the exchange of genetic information between two identical or nearly identical DNA molecules; however, homologous recombination can also occur between RNA molecules, as shown for RNA viruses. Previous research showed that synthetic RNA oligonucleotides can act as templates for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in yeast and human cells, and artificial long RNA templates injected in ciliate cells can guide genomic rearrangements. Here we report that endogenous transcript RNA mediates homologous recombination with chromosomal DNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We developed a system to detect the events of homologous recombination initiated by transcript RNA following the repair of a chromosomal DSB occurring either in a homologous but remote locus, or in the same transcript-generating locus in reverse-transcription-defective yeast strains. We found that RNA-DNA recombination is blocked by ribonucleases H1 and H2. In the presence of H-type ribonucleases, DSB repair proceeds through a complementary DNA intermediate, whereas in their absence, it proceeds directly through RNA. The proximity of the transcript to its chromosomal DNA partner in the same locus facilitates Rad52-driven homologous recombination during DSB repair. We demonstrate that yeast and human Rad52 proteins efficiently catalyse annealing of RNA to a DSB-like DNA end in vitro. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of homologous recombination and DNA repair in which transcript RNA is used as a template for DSB repair. Thus, considering the abundance of RNA transcripts in cells, RNA may have a marked impact on genomic stability and plasticity.

  2. Transcript RNA supports precise repair of its own DNA gene.

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    Keskin, Havva; Meers, Chance; Storici, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is considered an extraordinary process in molecular biology. Despite the fact that cells transcribe abundant amount of RNA with a wide range of functions, it has been difficult to uncover whether RNA can serve as a template for DNA repair and recombination. An increasing number of experimental evidences suggest a direct role of RNA in DNA modification. Recently, we demonstrated that endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a template to repair a DNA double-strand break (DSB), the most harmful DNA lesion, not only indirectly via formation of a DNA copy (cDNA) intermediate, but also directly in a homology driven mechanism in budding yeast. These results point out that the transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is more general than previously thought. We found that transcript RNA is more efficient in repairing a DSB in its own DNA (in cis) than in a homologous but ectopic locus (in trans). Here, we summarize current knowledge about the process of RNA-driven DNA repair and recombination, and provide further data in support of our model of DSB repair by transcript RNA in cis. We show that a DSB is precisely repaired predominately by transcript RNA and not by residual cDNA in conditions in which formation of cDNA by reverse transcription is inhibited. Additionally, we demonstrate that defects in ribonuclease (RNase) H stimulate precise DSB repair by homologous RNA or cDNA sequence, and not by homologous DNA sequence carried on a plasmid. These results highlight an antagonistic role of RNase H in RNA-DNA recombination. Ultimately, we discuss several questions that should be addressed to better understand mechanisms and implications of RNA-templated DNA repair and recombination.

  3. RNA interference against transcription elongation factor SII does not support its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair.

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    Mackinnon-Roy, Christine; Stubbert, Lawton J; McKay, Bruce C

    2011-01-10

    RNA polymerase II is unable to bypass bulky DNA lesions induced by agents like ultraviolet light (UV light) and cisplatin that are located in the template strand of active genes. Arrested polymerases form a stable ternary complex at the site of DNA damage that is thought to pose an impediment to the repair of these lesions. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) preferentially repairs these DNA lesions through an incompletely defined mechanism. Based on elegant in vitro experiments, it was hypothesized that the transcription elongation factor IIS (TFIIS) may be required to couple transcription to repair by catalyzing the reverse translocation of the arrested polymerase, allowing access of repair proteins to the site of DNA damage. However the role of TFIIS in this repair process has not been tested in vivo. Here, silencing TFIIS using an RNA interference strategy did not affect the ability of cells to recover nascent RNA synthesis following UV exposure or the ability of cells to repair a UV-damaged reporter gene while a similar strategy to decrease the expression Cockayne syndrome group B protein (CSB) resulted in the expected repair defect. Furthermore, RNA interference against TFIIS did not increase the sensitivity of cells to UV light or cisplatin while decreased expression of CSB did. Taken together, these results indicate that TFIIS is not limiting for the repair of transcription-blocking DNA lesions and thus the present work does not support a role for TFIIS in TC-NER.

  4. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

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    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcription-coupled DNA repair in prokaryotes.

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    Ganesan, Ann; Spivak, Graciela; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2012-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) that acts specifically on lesions in the transcribed strand of expressed genes. First reported in mammalian cells, TCR was then documented in Escherichia coli. In this organism, an RNA polymerase arrested at a lesion is displaced by the transcription repair coupling factor, Mfd. This protein recruits the NER lesion-recognition factor UvrA, and then dissociates from the DNA. UvrA binds UvrB, and the assembled UvrAB* complex initiates repair. In mutants lacking active Mfd, TCR is absent. A gene transcribed by the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase in E. coli also requires Mfd for TCR. The CSB protein (missing or defective in cells of patients with Cockayne syndrome, complementation group B) is essential for TCR in humans. CSB and its homologs in higher eukaryotes are likely functional equivalents of Mfd. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcription-coupled repair: an update.

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    Spivak, Graciela

    2016-11-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a versatile pathway that removes helix-distorting DNA lesions from the genomes of organisms across the evolutionary scale, from bacteria to humans. The serial steps in NER involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER dedicated to the repair of lesions that, by virtue of their location on the transcribed strands of active genes, encumber elongation by RNA polymerases. In this review, I report on recent findings that contribute to the elucidation of TCR mechanisms in the bacterium Escherichia coli, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human cells. I review general models for the biochemical pathways and how and when cells might choose to utilize TCR or other pathways for repair or bypass of transcription-blocking DNA alterations.

  7. Some aspects of RNA repair and editing

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    Kovalchuk M. V.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available All cellular RNA molecules are damaged at the scale of DNA molecules, or even more. In the present review the RNA damaging agents, some mechanisms of RNA repair and editing, their difference from DNA repair mechanisms have been discussed.

  8. The complex choreography of transcription-coupled repair.

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    Spivak, Graciela; Ganesan, Ann K

    2014-07-01

    A quarter of a century has elapsed since the discovery of transcription-coupled repair (TCR), and yet our fascination with this process has not diminished. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a versatile pathway that removes helix-distorting DNA lesions from the genomes of organisms across the evolutionary scale, from bacteria to humans. TCR, defined as a subpathway of NER, is dedicated to the repair of lesions that, by virtue of their location on the transcribed strands of active genes, encumber elongation by RNA polymerases. In this review, we will report on newly identified proteins, protein modifications, and protein complexes that participate in TCR in Escherichia coli and in human cells. We will discuss general models for the biochemical pathways and how and when cells might choose to utilize TCR or other pathways for repair or bypass of transcription-blocking DNA alterations.

  9. miRNA control of tissue repair and regeneration.

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    Sen, Chandan K; Ghatak, Subhadip

    2015-10-01

    Tissue repair and regeneration rely on the function of miRNA, molecular silencers that enact post-transcriptional gene silencing of coding genes. Disruption of miRNA homeostasis is developmentally lethal, indicating that fetal tissue development is tightly controlled by miRNAs. Multiple critical facets of adult tissue repair are subject to control by miRNAs, as well. Sources of cell pool for tissue repair and regeneration are diverse and provided by processes including cellular dedifferentiation, transdifferentiation, and reprogramming. Each of these processes is regulated by miRNAs. Furthermore, induced pluripotency may be achieved by miRNA-based strategies independent of transcription factor manipulation. The observation that miRNA does not integrate into the genome makes miRNA-based therapeutic strategies translationally valuable. Tools to manipulate cellular and tissue miRNA levels include mimics and inhibitors that may be specifically targeted to cells of interest at the injury site. Here, we discuss the extraordinary importance of miRNAs in tissue repair and regeneration based on emergent reports and rapid advances in miRNA-based therapeutics.

  10. Structural basis for bacterial transcription-coupled DNA repair.

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    Deaconescu, Alexandra M; Chambers, Anna L; Smith, Abigail J; Nickels, Bryce E; Hochschild, Ann; Savery, Nigel J; Darst, Seth A

    2006-02-10

    Coupling of transcription and DNA repair in bacteria is mediated by transcription-repair coupling factor (TRCF, the product of the mfd gene), which removes transcription elongation complexes stalled at DNA lesions and recruits the nucleotide excision repair machinery to the site. Here we describe the 3.2 A-resolution X-ray crystal structure of Escherichia coli TRCF. The structure consists of a compact arrangement of eight domains, including a translocation module similar to the SF2 ATPase RecG, and a region of structural similarity to UvrB. Biochemical and genetic experiments establish that another domain with structural similarity to the Tudor-like domain of the transcription elongation factor NusG plays a critical role in TRCF/RNA polymerase interactions. Comparison with the translocation module of RecG as well as other structural features indicate that TRCF function involves large-scale conformational changes. These data, along with a structural model for the interaction of TRCF with the transcription elongation complex, provide mechanistic insights into TRCF function.

  11. New discoveries linking transcription to DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways.

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    Cohen, Susan E; Walker, Graham C

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the transcription elongation factor NusA is associated with all elongating RNA polymerases where it functions in transcription termination and antitermination. Here, we review our recent results implicating NusA in the recruitment of DNA repair and damage tolerance mechanisms to sites of stalled transcription complexes.

  12. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  13. Exon exchange approach to repair Duchenne dystrophin transcripts.

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    Stéphanie Lorain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trans-splicing strategies for mRNA repair involve engineered transcripts designed to anneal target mRNAs in order to interfere with their natural splicing, giving rise to mRNA chimeras where endogenous mutated exons have been replaced by exogenous replacement sequences. A number of trans-splicing molecules have already been proposed for replacing either the 5' or the 3' part of transcripts to be repaired. Here, we show the feasibility of RNA surgery by using a double trans-splicing approach allowing the specific substitution of a given mutated exon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a target we used a minigene encoding a fragment of the mdx dystrophin gene enclosing the mutated exon (exon 23. This minigene was cotransfected with a variety of exon exchange constructions, differing in their annealing domains. We obtained accurate and efficient replacement of exon 23 in the mRNA target. Adding up a downstream intronic splice enhancer DISE in the exon exchange molecule enhanced drastically its efficiency up to 25-45% of repair depending on the construction in use. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate the possibility to fix up mutated exons, refurbish deleted exons and introduce protein motifs, while keeping natural untranslated sequences, which are essential for mRNA stability and translation regulation. Conversely to the well-known exon skipping, exon exchange has the advantage to be compatible with almost any type of mutations and more generally to a wide range of genetic conditions. In particular, it allows addressing disorders caused by dominant mutations.

  14. True Lies: The Double Life of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Factors in Transcription and DNA Repair

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    Nicolas Le May

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER is a major DNA repair pathway in eukaryotic cells. NER removes structurally diverse lesions such as pyrimidine dimers, arising upon UV irradiation or bulky chemical adducts, arising upon exposure to carcinogens and some chemotherapeutic drugs. NER defects lead to three genetic disorders that result in predisposition to cancers, accelerated aging, neurological and developmental defects. During NER, more than 30 polypeptides cooperate to recognize, incise, and excise a damaged oligonucleotide from the genomic DNA. Recent papers reveal an additional and unexpected role for the NER factors. In the absence of a genotoxic attack, the promoters of RNA polymerases I- and II-dependent genes recruit XPA, XPC, XPG, and XPF to initiate gene expression. A model that includes the growth arrest and DNA damage 45α protein (Gadd45α and the NER factors, in order to maintain the promoter of active genes under a hypomethylated state, has been proposed but remains controversial. This paper focuses on the double life of the NER factors in DNA repair and transcription and describes the possible roles of these factors in the RNA synthesis process.

  15. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

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    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  16. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...

  17. When transcription goes on Holliday: Double Holliday junctions block RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro.

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    Pipathsouk, Anne; Belotserkovskii, Boris P; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2017-02-01

    Non-canonical DNA structures can obstruct transcription. This transcription blockage could have various biological consequences, including genomic instability and gratuitous transcription-coupled repair. Among potential structures causing transcription blockage are Holliday junctions (HJs), which can be generated as intermediates in homologous recombination or during processing of stalled replication forks. Of particular interest is the double Holliday junction (DHJ), which contains two HJs. Topological considerations impose the constraint that the total number of helical turns in the DNA duplexes between the junctions cannot be altered as long as the flanking DNA duplexes are intact. Thus, the DHJ structure should strongly resist transient unwinding during transcription; consequently, it is predicted to cause significantly stronger blockage than single HJ structures. The patterns of transcription blockage obtained for RNA polymerase II transcription in HeLa cell nuclear extracts were in accordance with this prediction. However, we did not detect transcription blockage with purified T7 phage RNA polymerase; we discuss a possible explanation for this difference. In general, our findings implicate naturally occurring Holliday junctions in transcription arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The RNA polymerase I transcription machinery.

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    Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C B M

    2006-01-01

    The rRNAs constitute the catalytic and structural components of the ribosome, the protein synthesis machinery of cells. The level of rRNA synthesis, mediated by Pol I (RNA polymerase I), therefore has a major impact on the life and destiny of a cell. In order to elucidate how cells achieve the stringent control of Pol I transcription, matching the supply of rRNA to demand under different cellular growth conditions, it is essential to understand the components and mechanics of the Pol I transcription machinery. In this review, we discuss: (i) the molecular composition and functions of the Pol I enzyme complex and the two main Pol I transcription factors, SL1 (selectivity factor 1) and UBF (upstream binding factor); (ii) the interplay between these factors during pre-initiation complex formation at the rDNA promoter in mammalian cells; and (iii) the cellular control of the Pol I transcription machinery.

  19. Mfd as a central partner of transcription coupled repair.

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    Monnet, Jordan; Grange, Wilfried; Strick, Terence R; Joly, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is one of the key of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways required to preserve genome integrity. Although understanding TCR is still a major challenge, recent single-molecule experiments have brought new insights into the initial steps of TCR leading to new perspectives.

  20. Translocation of Cockayne syndrome group A protein to the nuclear matrix: possible relevance to transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kamiuchi (Shinya); M. Saijo (Masafumi); E. Citterio (Elisabetta); M. de Jager (Martijn); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Tanaka (Kiyoji)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTranscription-coupled repair (TCR) efficiently removes a variety of lesions from the transcribed strand of active genes. By allowing rapid resumption of RNA synthesis, the process is of major importance for cellular resistance to transcription-blocking genotoxic damage. Mutations in the

  1. The RNA polymerase I transcription machinery

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The rRNAs constitute the catalytic and structural components of the ribosome, the protein synthesis machinery of cells. The level of rRNA synthesis, mediated by Pol I (RNA polymerase I), therefore has a major impact on the life and destiny of a cell. In order to elucidate how cells achieve the stringent control of Pol I transcription, matching the supply of rRNA to demand under different cellular growth conditions, it is essential to understand the components and mechanics of the Pol I transc...

  2. Cockayne syndrome: defective repair of transcription?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Gool (Alain); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); E. Citterio (Elisabetta); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn the past years, it has become increasingly evident that basal metabolic processes within the cell are intimately linked and influenced by one another. One such link that recently has attracted much attention is the close interplay between nucleotide excision DNA repair and transcripti

  3. Designing Efficient Double RNA trans-Splicing Molecules for Targeted RNA Repair

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    Hüttner, Clemens; Murauer, Eva M.; Hainzl, Stefan; Kocher, Thomas; Neumayer, Anna; Reichelt, Julia; Bauer, Johann W.; Koller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    RNA trans-splicing is a promising tool for mRNA modification in a diversity of genetic disorders. In particular, the substitution of internal exons of a gene by combining 3′ and 5′ RNA trans-splicing seems to be an elegant way to modify especially large pre-mRNAs. Here we discuss a robust method for designing double RNA trans-splicing molecules (dRTM). We demonstrate how the technique can be implemented in an endogenous setting, using COL7A1, the gene encoding type VII collagen, as a target. An RTM screening system was developed with the aim of testing the replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons, harbouring a homozygous mutation, with the wild-type version. The most efficient RTMs from a pool of randomly generated variants were selected via our fluorescence-based screening system and adapted for use in an in vitro disease model system. Transduction of type VII collagen-deficient keratinocytes with the selected dRTM led to accurate replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons resulting in a restored wild-type RNA sequence. This is the first study demonstrating specific exon replacement by double RNA trans-splicing within an endogenous transcript in cultured cells, corroborating the utility of this technology for mRNA repair in a variety of genetic disorders. PMID:27669223

  4. Transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The ambiguous role of Rad26.

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    Li, Shisheng

    2015-12-01

    Transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) is believed to be triggered by an RNA polymerase stalled at a lesion in the transcribed strand of actively transcribed genes. Rad26, a DNA-dependent ATPase in the family of SWI2/SNF2 chromatin remodeling proteins, plays an important role in TC-NER in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, Rad26 is not solely responsible for TC-NER and Rpb9, a nonessential subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II), is largely responsible for Rad26-independent TC-NER. The Rad26-dependent and Rpb9-dependent TC-NER have different efficiencies in genes with different transcription levels and in different regions of a gene. Rad26 becomes entirely or partially dispensable for TC-NER in the absence of Rpb4, another nonessential subunit of RNAP II, or a number of transcription elongation factors (Spt4, Spt5 and the RNAP II associated factor complex). Rad26 may not be a true transcription-repair coupling factor that recruits the repair machinery to the damaged sites where RNAP II stalls. Rather, Rad26 may facilitate TC-NER indirectly, by antagonizing the action of TC-NER repressors that normally promote transcription elongation. The underlying mechanism of how Rad26 functions in TC-NER remains to be elucidated.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of human global and transcription-coupled excision repair of UV damage at single-nucleotide resolution.

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    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera; Selby, Christopher P; Lieb, Jason D; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-05-01

    We developed a method for genome-wide mapping of DNA excision repair named XR-seq (excision repair sequencing). Human nucleotide excision repair generates two incisions surrounding the site of damage, creating an ∼30-mer. In XR-seq, this fragment is isolated and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. We used XR-seq to produce stranded, nucleotide-resolution maps of repair of two UV-induced DNA damages in human cells: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts [(6-4)PPs]. In wild-type cells, CPD repair was highly associated with transcription, specifically with the template strand. Experiments in cells defective in either transcription-coupled excision repair or general excision repair isolated the contribution of each pathway to the overall repair pattern and showed that transcription-coupled repair of both photoproducts occurs exclusively on the template strand. XR-seq maps capture transcription-coupled repair at sites of divergent gene promoters and bidirectional enhancer RNA (eRNA) production at enhancers. XR-seq data also uncovered the repair characteristics and novel sequence preferences of CPDs and (6-4)PPs. XR-seq and the resulting repair maps will facilitate studies of the effects of genomic location, chromatin context, transcription, and replication on DNA repair in human cells.

  6. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription.

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    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Scicchitano, David A

    2016-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER.

  7. RNA polymerase: the vehicle of transcription.

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    Borukhov, Sergei; Nudler, Evgeny

    2008-03-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the principal enzyme of gene expression and regulation for all three divisions of life: Eukaryota, Archaea and Bacteria. Recent progress in the structural and biochemical characterization of RNAP illuminates this enzyme as a flexible, multifunctional molecular machine. During each step of the transcription cycle, RNAP undergoes elaborate conformational changes. As many fundamental and previously mysterious aspects of how RNAP works begin to be understood, this enzyme reveals intriguing similarities to man-made engineered devices. These resemblances can be found in the mechanics of RNAP-DNA complex formation, in RNA chain initiation and in the elongation processes. Here we highlight recent advances in understanding RNAP function and regulation.

  8. Transcription-induced CAG repeat contraction in human cells is mediated in part by transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair.

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    Lin, Yunfu; Wilson, John H

    2007-09-01

    Expansions of CAG repeat tracts in the germ line underlie several neurological diseases. In human patients and mouse models, CAG repeat tracts display an ongoing instability in neurons, which may exacerbate disease symptoms. It is unclear how repeats are destabilized in nondividing cells, but it cannot involve DNA replication. We showed previously that transcription through CAG repeats induces their instability (Y. Lin, V. Dion, and J. H. Wilson, Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 13:179-180). Here, we present a genetic analysis of the link between transcription-induced repeat instability and nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. We show that short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CSB, a component specifically required for transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER), and knockdowns of ERCC1 and XPG, which incise DNA adjacent to damage, stabilize CAG repeat tracts. These results suggest that TC-NER is involved in the pathway for transcription-induced CAG repeat instability. In contrast, knockdowns of OGG1 and APEX1, key components involved in base excision repair, did not affect repeat instability. In addition, repeats are stabilized by knockdown of transcription factor IIS, consistent with a requirement for RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) to backtrack from a transcription block. Repeats also are stabilized by knockdown of either BRCA1 or BARD1, which together function as an E3 ligase that can ubiquitinate arrested RNAPII. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, which stabilizes repeats, confirms proteasome involvement. We integrate these observations into a tentative pathway for transcription-induced CAG repeat instability that can account for the contractions observed here and potentially for the contractions and expansions seen with human diseases.

  9. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription-coupling factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Citterio (Elisabetta); V. van den Boom (Vincent); G. Schnitzler; R. Kanaar (Roland); E. Bonte (Edgar); R.E. Kingston; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a

  10. Transcriptional profiling differences for articular cartilage and repair tissue in equine joint surface lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Arnold J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Full-thickness articular cartilage lesions that reach to the subchondral bone yet are restricted to the chondral compartment usually fill with a fibrocartilage-like repair tissue which is structurally and biomechanically compromised relative to normal articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to evaluate transcriptional differences between chondrocytes of normal articular cartilage and repair tissue cells four months post-microfracture. Methods Bilateral one-cm2 full-thickness defects were made in the articular surface of both distal femurs of four adult horses followed by subchondral microfracture. Four months postoperatively, repair tissue from the lesion site and grossly normal articular cartilage from within the same femorotibial joint were collected. Total RNA was isolated from the tissue samples, linearly amplified, and applied to a 9,413-probe set equine-specific cDNA microarray. Eight paired comparisons matched by limb and horse were made with a dye-swap experimental design with validation by histological analyses and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Results Statistical analyses revealed 3,327 (35.3% differentially expressed probe sets. Expression of biomarkers typically associated with normal articular cartilage and fibrocartilage repair tissue corroborate earlier studies. Other changes in gene expression previously unassociated with cartilage repair were also revealed and validated by RT-qPCR. Conclusion The magnitude of divergence in transcriptional profiles between normal chondrocytes and the cells that populate repair tissue reveal substantial functional differences between these two cell populations. At the four-month postoperative time point, the relative deficiency within repair tissue of gene transcripts which typically define articular cartilage indicate that while cells occupying the lesion might be of mesenchymal origin, they have not recapitulated differentiation to

  11. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  12. At the intersection of non-coding transcription, DNA repair, chromatin structure, and cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke eOhsawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that non-coding RNAs play a critical role in regulating gene expression. Recent paradigm-setting studies are now revealing that non-coding RNAs, other than microRNAs, also play intriguing roles in the maintenance of chromatin structure, in the DNA damage response, and in adult human stem cell aging. In this review, we will discuss the complex inter-dependent relationships among non-coding RNA transcription, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and adult stem cell senescence. DNA damage-induced non-coding RNAs transcribed in the vicinity of the DNA break regulate recruitment of the DNA damage machinery and DNA repair efficiency. We will discuss the correlation between non-coding RNAs and DNA damage repair efficiency and the potential role of changing chromatin structures around double-strand break sites. On the other hand, induction of non-coding RNA transcription from the repetitive Alu elements occurs during human stem cell aging and hinders efficient DNA repair causing entry into senescence. We will discuss how this fine balance between transcription and genomic instability may be regulated by the dramatic changes to chromatin structure that accompany cellular senescence.

  13. ppGpp couples transcription to DNA repair in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Epshtein, Vitaly; Benjamin, Bradley; Proshkin, Sergey; Mironov, Alexander; Cashel, Michael; Nudler, Evgeny

    2016-05-20

    The small molecule alarmone (p)ppGpp mediates bacterial adaptation to nutrient deprivation by altering the initiation properties of RNA polymerase (RNAP). ppGpp is generated in Escherichia coli by two related enzymes, RelA and SpoT. We show that ppGpp is robustly, but transiently, induced in response to DNA damage and is required for efficient nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER). This explains why relA-spoT-deficient cells are sensitive to diverse genotoxic agents and ultraviolet radiation, whereas ppGpp induction renders them more resistant to such challenges. The mechanism of DNA protection by ppGpp involves promotion of UvrD-mediated RNAP backtracking. By rendering RNAP backtracking-prone, ppGpp couples transcription to DNA repair and prompts transitions between repair and recovery states.

  14. DNA repair by RNA: Templated, or not templated, that is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meers, Chance; Keskin, Havva; Storici, Francesca

    2016-08-01

    Cells are continuously exposed to both endogenous and exogenous sources of genomic stress. To maintain chromosome stability, a variety of mechanisms have evolved to cope with the multitude of genetic abnormalities that can arise over the life of a cell. Still, failures to repair these lesions are the driving force of cancers and other degenerative disorders. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most toxic genetic lesions, inhibiting cell ability to replicate, and are sites of mutations and chromosomal rearrangements. DSB repair is known to proceed via two major mechanisms: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). HR reliance on the exchange of genetic information between two identical or nearly identical DNA molecules offers increased accuracy. While the preferred substrate for HR in mitotic cells is the sister chromatid, this is limited to the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. However, abundant amounts of homologous genetic substrate may exist throughout the cell cycle in the form of RNA. Considered an uncommon occurrence, the direct transfer of information from RNA to DNA is thought to be limited to special circumstances. Studies have shown that RNA molecules reverse transcribed into cDNA can be incorporated into DNA at DSB sites via a non-templated mechanism by NHEJ or a templated mechanism by HR. In addition, synthetic RNA molecules can directly template the repair of DSBs in yeast and human cells via an HR mechanism. New work suggests that even endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a homologous template to repair a DSB in chromosomal DNA. In this perspective, we will review and discuss the recent advancements in DSB repair by RNA via non-templated and templated mechanisms. We will provide current findings, models and future challenges investigating RNA and its role in DSB repair.

  15. The ERCC2/DNA repair protein is associated with the class II BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Schaeffer; V. Moncollin; R. Roy (Richard); A. Staub; M. Mezzina; A. Sarasin; G. Weeda (Geert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractERCC2 is involved in the DNA repair syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group D and was found to copurify with the RNA polymerase II (B) transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH that possesses a bidirectional helicase activity. Antibodies directed towards the 89 kDa (ERCC3) or the p62 subunit of

  16. Affinity purification of human DNA repair/transcription factor TFIIH using epitope-tagged xeroderma pigmentosum B protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); F. Coin (Frédéric); G. Weeda (Geert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractTFIIH is a high molecular weight complex with a remarkable dual function in nucleotide excision repair and initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription. Mutations in the largest subunits, the XPB and XPD helicases, are associated with three inherited disorders: xeroder

  17. Optical tweezers studies of transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisica, Ana; Grill, Stephan W

    2017-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in the expression of genetic information and it is carried out by large macromolecular enzymes called RNA polymerases. Transcription has been studied for many years and with a myriad of experimental techniques, ranging from bulk studies to high-resolution transcript sequencing. In this review, we emphasise the advantages of using single-molecule techniques, particularly optical tweezers, to study transcription dynamics. We give an overview of the latest results in the single-molecule transcription field, focusing on transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases. Finally, we evaluate recent quantitative models that describe the biophysics of RNA polymerase translocation and backtracking dynamics.

  18. Nucleolin Is Required for RNA Polymerase I Transcription In Vivo▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickards, Brenden; Flint, S. J.; Cole, Michael D.; LeRoy, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged with histones and accessory proteins in the form of chromatin. RNA polymerases and their accessory proteins are sufficient for transcription of naked DNA, but not of chromatin, templates in vitro. In this study, we purified and identified nucleolin as a protein that allows RNA polymerase II to transcribe nucleosomal templates in vitro. As immunofluorescence confirmed that nucleolin localizes primarily to nucleoli with RNA polymerase I, we demonstrated that nucleolin allows RNA polymerase I transcription of chromatin templates in vitro. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments established that nucleolin is associated with chromatin containing rRNA genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I but not with genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II or III. Knockdown of nucleolin by RNA interference resulted in specific inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription. We therefore propose that an important function of nucleolin is to permit RNA polymerase I to transcribe nucleolar chromatin. PMID:17130237

  19. Co-transcriptional folding is encoded within RNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós István

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the existing RNA structure prediction programs fold a completely synthesized RNA molecule. However, within the cell, RNA molecules emerge sequentially during the directed process of transcription. Dedicated experiments with individual RNA molecules have shown that RNA folds while it is being transcribed and that its correct folding can also depend on the proper speed of transcription. Methods The main aim of this work is to study if and how co-transcriptional folding is encoded within the primary and secondary structure of RNA genes. In order to achieve this, we study the known primary and secondary structures of a comprehensive data set of 361 RNA genes as well as a set of 48 RNA sequences that are known to differ from the originally transcribed sequence units. We detect co-transcriptional folding by defining two measures of directedness which quantify the extend of asymmetry between alternative helices that lie 5' and those that lie 3' of the known helices with which they compete. Results We show with statistical significance that co-transcriptional folding strongly influences RNA sequences in two ways: (1 alternative helices that would compete with the formation of the functional structure during co-transcriptional folding are suppressed and (2 the formation of transient structures which may serve as guidelines for the co-transcriptional folding pathway is encouraged. Conclusions These findings have a number of implications for RNA secondary structure prediction methods and the detection of RNA genes.

  20. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase pausing and dislodgement of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Adam C; Egan, J Barry; Shearwin, Keith E

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional interference is the in cis suppression of one transcriptional process by another. Mathematical modeling shows that promoter occlusion by elongating RNA polymerases cannot produce strong interference. Interference may instead be generated by (1) dislodgement of slow-to-assemble pre-initiation complexes and transcription factors and (2) prolonged occlusion by paused RNA polymerases.

  1. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair in mammalian cells: molecular mechanisms and biological effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mafia Fousteri; Leon HF Mullenders

    2008-01-01

    The encounter of elongating RNA polymerase Ⅱ (RNAPIIo) with DNA lesions has severe consequences for the cell as this event provides a strong signal for P53-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. To counteract prolonged blockage of transcription, the cell removes the RNAPllo-hlocking DNA lesions by transcription-coupled repair (TC-NER), a specialized subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). Exposure of mice to UVB light or chemicals has elucidated that TC-NER is a critical survival pathway protecting against acute toxic and long-term effects (cancer) of genotoxic exposure. Deficiency in TC-NER is associated with mutations in the CSA and CSB genes giving rise to the rare hu-man disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS). Recent data suggest that CSA and CSB play differential roles in mammalian TC-NER: CSB as a repair coupling factor to attract NER proteins, chromatin remodellers and the CSA- E3-ubiquitin iigase complex to the stalled RNAPI io. CSA is dispensable for attraction of NER proteins, yet in cooperation with CSB is required to recruit XAB2, the nucleosomal binding protein HMGNl and TFIIS. The emerging picture of TC-NER is complex: repair of transcription-blocking lesions occurs without displacement of the DNA damage-stalled RNAPIIo, and requires at least two essential assembly factors (CSA and CSB), the core NER factors (except for XPC-RAD23B), and TC-NER specific factors. These and yet unidentified proteins will accomplish not only efficient repair of transcrip-tion-blocking lesions, but are also likely to contribute to DNA damage signalling events.

  2. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair factors promote R-loop-induced genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollier, Julie; Stork, Caroline Townsend; García-Rubio, María L; Paulsen, Renee D; Aguilera, Andrés; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-12-18

    R-loops, consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA, are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. Intriguingly, changes in R-loop dynamics have also been associated with DNA damage accumulation and genome instability; however, the mechanisms underlying R-loop-induced DNA damage remain unknown. Here we demonstrate in human cells that R-loops induced by the absence of diverse RNA processing factors, including the RNA/DNA helicases Aquarius (AQR) and Senataxin (SETX), or by the inhibition of topoisomerase I, are actively processed into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG. Surprisingly, DSB formation requires the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) factor Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), but not the global genome repair protein XPC. These findings reveal an unexpected and potentially deleterious role for TC-NER factors in driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability.

  3. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair factors promote R-loop-induced genome instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollier, Julie; Stork, Caroline Townsend; García-Rubio, María L.; Paulsen, Renee D.; Aguilera, Andrés; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary R-loops, consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA, are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. Intriguingly, changes in R-loop dynamics have also been associated with DNA damage accumulation and genome instability, however the mechanisms underlying R-loop induced DNA damage remain unknown. Here we demonstrate in human cells that R-loops induced by the absence of diverse RNA processing factors, including the RNA/DNA helicases Aquarius (AQR) and Senataxin (SETX), or by the inhibition of topoisomerase I, are actively processed into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG. Surprisingly, DSB formation requires the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) factor Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), but not the global genome repair protein XPC. These findings reveal an unexpected and potentially deleterious role for TC-NER factors in driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability. PMID:25435140

  4. Cockayne syndrome protein A is a transcription factor of RNA polymerase I and stimulates ribosomal biogenesis and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sylvia; Garcia Gonzalez, Omar; Assfalg, Robin; Schelling, Adrian; Schäfer, Patrick; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Iben, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) protein account for 20% of Cockayne syndrome (CS) cases, a childhood disorder of premature aging and early death. Hitherto, CSA has exclusively been described as DNA repair factor of the transcription-coupled branch of nucleotide excision repair. Here we show a novel function of CSA as transcription factor of RNA polymerase I in the nucleolus. Knockdown of CSA reduces pre-rRNA synthesis by RNA polymerase I. CSA associates with RNA polymerase I and the active fraction of the rDNA and stimulates re-initiation of rDNA transcription by recruiting the Cockayne syndrome proteins TFIIH and CSB. Moreover, compared with CSA deficient parental CS cells, CSA transfected CS cells reveal significantly more rRNA with induced growth and enhanced global translation. A previously unknown global dysregulation of ribosomal biogenesis most likely contributes to the reduced growth and premature aging of CS patients. PMID:24781187

  5. Mutual Interference between Genomic RNA Replication and Subgenomic mRNA Transcription in Brome Mosaic Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.; Garcia-Ruiz, Hernan; Watanabe, Tokiko; Ahlquist, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Replication by many positive-strand RNA viruses includes genomic RNA amplification and subgenomic mRNA (sgRNA) transcription. For brome mosaic virus (BMV), both processes occur in virus-induced, membrane-associated compartments, require BMV replication factors 1a and 2a, and use negative-strand RNA3 as a template for genomic RNA3 and sgRNA syntheses. To begin elucidating their relations, we examined the interaction of RNA3 replication and sgRNA transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae expres...

  6. GTF2E2 Mutations Destabilize the General Transcription Factor Complex TFIIE in Individuals with DNA Repair-Proficient Trichothiodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschal, Christiane; Botta, Elena; Orioli, Donata; Digiovanna, John J; Seneca, Sara; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Tamura, Deborah; Heller, Elizabeth; Khan, Sikandar G; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Lanzafame, Manuela; Nardo, Tiziana; Ricotti, Roberta; Peverali, Fiorenzo A; Stephens, Robert; Zhao, Yongmei; Lehmann, Alan R; Baranello, Laura; Levens, David; Kraemer, Kenneth H; Stefanini, Miria

    2016-04-01

    The general transcription factor IIE (TFIIE) is essential for transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) via direct interaction with the basal transcription/DNA repair factor IIH (TFIIH). TFIIH harbors mutations in two rare genetic disorders, the cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and the cancer-free, multisystem developmental disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The phenotypic complexity resulting from mutations affecting TFIIH has been attributed to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect as well as to impaired transcription. Here, we report two unrelated children showing clinical features typical of TTD who harbor different homozygous missense mutations in GTF2E2 (c.448G>C [p.Ala150Pro] and c.559G>T [p.Asp187Tyr]) encoding the beta subunit of transcription factor IIE (TFIIEβ). Repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage was normal in the GTF2E2 mutated cells, indicating that TFIIE was not involved in NER. We found decreased protein levels of the two TFIIE subunits (TFIIEα and TFIIEβ) as well as decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα in cells from both children. Interestingly, decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα was also seen in TTD cells with mutations in ERCC2, which encodes the XPD subunit of TFIIH, but not in XP cells with ERCC2 mutations. Our findings support the theory that TTD is caused by transcriptional impairments that are distinct from the NER disorder XP.

  7. GTF2E2 Mutations Destabilize the General Transcription Factor Complex TFIIE in Individuals with DNA Repair-Proficient Trichothiodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschal, Christiane; Botta, Elena; Orioli, Donata; Digiovanna, John J.; Seneca, Sara; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Tamura, Deborah; Heller, Elizabeth; Khan, Sikandar G.; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Lanzafame, Manuela; Nardo, Tiziana; Ricotti, Roberta; Peverali, Fiorenzo A.; Stephens, Robert; Zhao, Yongmei; Lehmann, Alan R.; Baranello, Laura; Levens, David; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Stefanini, Miria

    2016-01-01

    The general transcription factor IIE (TFIIE) is essential for transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) via direct interaction with the basal transcription/DNA repair factor IIH (TFIIH). TFIIH harbors mutations in two rare genetic disorders, the cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and the cancer-free, multisystem developmental disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The phenotypic complexity resulting from mutations affecting TFIIH has been attributed to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect as well as to impaired transcription. Here, we report two unrelated children showing clinical features typical of TTD who harbor different homozygous missense mutations in GTF2E2 (c.448G>C [p.Ala150Pro] and c.559G>T [p.Asp187Tyr]) encoding the beta subunit of transcription factor IIE (TFIIEβ). Repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage was normal in the GTF2E2 mutated cells, indicating that TFIIE was not involved in NER. We found decreased protein levels of the two TFIIE subunits (TFIIEα and TFIIEβ) as well as decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα in cells from both children. Interestingly, decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα was also seen in TTD cells with mutations in ERCC2, which encodes the XPD subunit of TFIIH, but not in XP cells with ERCC2 mutations. Our findings support the theory that TTD is caused by transcriptional impairments that are distinct from the NER disorder XP. PMID:26996949

  8. p44 and p34 subunits of the BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor have homologies with SSL1, a yeast protein involved in DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Humbert; H. van Vuuren; Y. Lutz; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc); V. Moncollin

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe human BTF2 (TFIIH) transcription factor is a multisubunit protein involved in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (B) as well as in DNA repair. In addition to the previously characterized p62 and p89/ERCC3 subunits, we have cloned two other subunits of BTF2, p44 and p34. Th

  9. Recognition of prokaryotic transcription terminators by spinach chloroplast RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen,L.J.; Orozco, E M

    1988-01-01

    To determine whether chloroplast RNA polymerase will accurately terminate transcription in vitro, we have fused the spinach chloroplast rbcL promoter to the 3' end of the rbcL gene as well as to various factor independent transcription terminators from E. coli. Transcription of the rbcL minigene did not result in production of the expected 265 nucleotide RNA. However, the spinach chloroplast RNA polymerase did terminate transcription with varying efficiency at the thra, rrnB, rrnC and gene 32...

  10. Single molecule studies of RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Abigail E; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is the first step in gene expression and a key determinant of cellular regulation. Elucidating the mechanism by which RNAP II synthesizes RNA is therefore vital to determining how genes are controlled under diverse biological conditions. Significant advances in understanding RNAP II transcription have been achieved using classical biochemical and structural techniques; however, aspects of the transcription mechanism cannot be assessed using these approaches. The application of single-molecule techniques to study RNAP II transcription has provided new insight only obtainable by studying molecules in this complex system one at a time.

  11. Coupling of RNA Polymerase II Transcription Elongation with Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldi, Tassa; Cortazar, Michael A; Sheridan, Ryan M; Bentley, David L

    2016-06-19

    Pre-mRNA maturation frequently occurs at the same time and place as transcription by RNA polymerase II. The co-transcriptionality of mRNA processing has permitted the evolution of mechanisms that functionally couple transcription elongation with diverse events that occur on the nascent RNA. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between transcriptional elongation through a chromatin template and co-transcriptional splicing including alternative splicing decisions that affect the expression of most human genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural basis of transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Sarah; Bernecky, Carrie; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes commences with the assembly of a conserved initiation complex, which consists of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription factors, at promoter DNA. After two decades of research, the structural basis of transcription initiation is emerging. Crystal structures of many components of the initiation complex have been resolved, and structural information on Pol II complexes with general transcription factors has recently been obtained. Although mechanistic details await elucidation, available data outline how Pol II cooperates with the general transcription factors to bind to and open promoter DNA, and how Pol II directs RNA synthesis and escapes from the promoter.

  13. Transcription arrest caused by long nascent RNA chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, Thomas; Cherny, Dmitry; Larsen, H Jakob

    2004-01-01

    the number of active elongation complexes. Thus transcription behaved as an all-or-none process. The mechanism of transcription inhibition was explored using electron microscopy and further biochemical experiments. The data suggest that multiple mechanisms may contribute to the observed effects. Part......The transcription process is highly processive. However, specific sequence elements encoded in the nascent RNA may signal transcription pausing and/or termination. We find that under certain conditions nascent RNA chains can have a strong and apparently sequence-independent inhibitory effect...... on transcription. Using phage T3 RNA polymerase (T3 RNAP) and covalently closed circular (cccDNA) DNA templates that did not contain any strong termination signal, transcription was severely inhibited after a short period of time. Less than approximately 10% residual transcriptional activity remained after 10 min...

  14. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen...

  15. Kub5-Hera, the human Rtt103 homolog, plays dual functional roles in transcription termination and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Julio C; Richard, Patricia; Rommel, Amy; Fattah, Farjana J; Motea, Edward A; Patidar, Praveen L; Xiao, Ling; Leskov, Konstantin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Hittelman, Walter N; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Manley, James L; Boothman, David A

    2014-04-01

    Functions of Kub5-Hera (In Greek Mythology Hera controlled Artemis) (K-H), the human homolog of the yeast transcription termination factor Rtt103, remain undefined. Here, we show that K-H has functions in both transcription termination and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. K-H forms distinct protein complexes with factors that repair DSBs (e.g. Ku70, Ku86, Artemis) and terminate transcription (e.g. RNA polymerase II). K-H loss resulted in increased basal R-loop levels, DSBs, activated DNA-damage responses and enhanced genomic instability. Significantly lowered Artemis protein levels were detected in K-H knockdown cells, which were restored with specific K-H cDNA re-expression. K-H deficient cells were hypersensitive to cytotoxic agents that induce DSBs, unable to reseal complex DSB ends, and showed significantly delayed γ-H2AX and 53BP1 repair-related foci regression. Artemis re-expression in K-H-deficient cells restored DNA-repair function and resistance to DSB-inducing agents. However, R loops persisted consistent with dual roles of K-H in transcription termination and DSB repair.

  16. Structural basis of transcription initiation by bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ritwika S; Warner, Brittany A; Molodtsov, Vadim; Pupov, Danil; Esyunina, Daria; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey; Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2014-08-29

    The bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing σ factor initiates transcription at specific promoter sites by de novo RNA priming, the first step of RNA synthesis where RNAP accepts two initiating ribonucleoside triphosphates (iNTPs) and performs the first phosphodiester bond formation. We present the structure of de novo transcription initiation complex that reveals unique contacts of the iNTPs bound at the transcription start site with the template DNA and also with RNAP and demonstrate the importance of these contacts for transcription initiation. To get further insight into the mechanism of RNA priming, we determined the structure of initially transcribing complex of RNAP holoenzyme with 6-mer RNA, obtained by in crystallo transcription approach. The structure highlights RNAP-RNA contacts that stabilize the short RNA transcript in the active site and demonstrates that the RNA 5'-end displaces σ region 3.2 from its position near the active site, which likely plays a key role in σ ejection during the initiation-to-elongation transition. Given the structural conservation of the RNAP active site, the mechanism of de novo RNA priming appears to be conserved in all cellular RNAPs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. 2-Selenouridine triphosphate synthesis and Se-RNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huiyan; Jiang, Sibo; Caton-Williams, Julianne; Liu, Hehua; Huang, Zhen

    2013-09-01

    2-Selenouridine ((Se)U) is one of the naturally occurring modifications of Se-tRNAs ((Se)U-RNA) at the wobble position of the anticodon loop. Its role in the RNA-RNA interaction, especially during the mRNA decoding, is elusive. To assist the research exploration, herein we report the enzymatic synthesis of the (Se)U-RNA via 2-selenouridine triphosphate ((Se)UTP) synthesis and RNA transcription. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the synthesized (Se)UTP is stable and recognizable by T7 RNA polymerase. Under the optimized conditions, the transcription yield of (Se)U-RNA can reach up to 85% of the corresponding native RNA. Furthermore, the transcribed (Se)U-hammerhead ribozyme has the similar activity as the corresponding native, which suggests usefulness of (Se)U-RNAs in function and structure studies of noncoding RNAs, including the Se-tRNAs.

  18. Structural basis of transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II.

    OpenAIRE

    Sainsbury, S.; Bernecky, C.; Cramer, P

    2015-01-01

    Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes commences with the assembly of a conserved initiation complex, which consists of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription factors, at promoter DNA. After two decades of research, the structural basis of transcription initiation is emerging. Crystal structures of many components of the initiation complex have been resolved, and structural information on Pol II complexes with general transcription factors has recently been obtaine...

  19. Diversity of Endonuclease V: From DNA Repair to RNA Editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Kuraoka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Deamination of adenine occurs in DNA, RNA, and their precursors via a hydrolytic reaction and a nitrosative reaction. The generated deaminated products are potentially mutagenic because of their structural similarity to natural bases, which in turn leads to erroneous nucleotide pairing and subsequent disruption of cellular metabolism. Incorporation of deaminated precursors into the nucleic acid strand occurs during nucleotide synthesis by DNA and RNA polymerases or base modification by DNA- and/or RNA-editing enzymes during cellular functions. In such cases, removal of deaminated products from DNA and RNA by a nuclease might be required depending on the cellular function. One such enzyme, endonuclease V, recognizes deoxyinosine and cleaves 3' end of the damaged base in double-stranded DNA through an alternative excision repair mechanism in Escherichia coli, whereas in Homo sapiens, it recognizes and cleaves inosine in single-stranded RNA. However, to explore the role of endonuclease V in vivo, a detailed analysis of cell biology is required. Based on recent reports and developments on endonuclease V, we discuss the potential functions of endonuclease V in DNA repair and RNA metabolism.

  20. Versatile RNA-sensing transcriptional regulators for engineering genetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucks, Julius B; Qi, Lei; Mutalik, Vivek K; Wang, Denise; Arkin, Adam P

    2011-05-24

    The widespread natural ability of RNA to sense small molecules and regulate genes has become an important tool for synthetic biology in applications as diverse as environmental sensing and metabolic engineering. Previous work in RNA synthetic biology has engineered RNA mechanisms that independently regulate multiple targets and integrate regulatory signals. However, intracellular regulatory networks built with these systems have required proteins to propagate regulatory signals. In this work, we remove this requirement and expand the RNA synthetic biology toolkit by engineering three unique features of the plasmid pT181 antisense-RNA-mediated transcription attenuation mechanism. First, because the antisense RNA mechanism relies on RNA-RNA interactions, we show how the specificity of the natural system can be engineered to create variants that independently regulate multiple targets in the same cell. Second, because the pT181 mechanism controls transcription, we show how independently acting variants can be configured in tandem to integrate regulatory signals and perform genetic logic. Finally, because both the input and output of the attenuator is RNA, we show how these variants can be configured to directly propagate RNA regulatory signals by constructing an RNA-meditated transcriptional cascade. The combination of these three features within a single RNA-based regulatory mechanism has the potential to simplify the design and construction of genetic networks by directly propagating signals as RNA molecules.

  1. Transcriptional activators enhance polyadenylation of mRNA precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Nagaike, Takashi; Manley, James L.

    2011-01-01

    3′ processing of mRNA precursors is frequently coupled to transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). This coupling is well known to involve the C-terminal domain of the RNAP II largest subunit, but a variety of other transcription-associated factors have also been suggested to mediate coupling. Our recent studies have provided direct evidence that transcriptional activators can enhance the efficiency of transcription-coupled 3′ processing. In this point-of-view, we discuss the mechanisms t...

  2. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription-coupling factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Citterio (Elisabetta); V. van den Boom (Vincent); G. Schnitzler; R. Kanaar (Roland); E. Bonte (Edgar); R.E. Kingston; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a DNA-d

  3. Basic mechanism of transcription by RNA polymerase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlov, Vladimir; Nudler, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase II-like enzymes carry out transcription of genomes in Eukaryota, Archaea, and some viruses. They also exhibit fundamental similarity to RNA polymerases from bacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. In this review we take an inventory of recent studiesilluminating different steps of basic transcription mechanism, likely common for most multi-subunit RNA polymerases. Through the amalgamation of structural and computational chemistry data we attempt to highlight the most feasible reaction pathway for the two-metal nucleotidyl transfer mechanism, and to evaluate the way catalysis can be linked to translocation in the mechano-chemical cycle catalyzed by RNA polymerase II. PMID:22982365

  4. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle....... The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results...

  5. Reconstitution and structure of a bacterial Pnkp1RnlHen1 RNA repair complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pei; Selvadurai, Kiruthika; Huang , Raven H. (UIUC)

    2016-01-22

    Ribotoxins cleave essential RNAs for cell killing, and RNA repair neutralizes the damage inflicted by ribotoxins for cell survival. We report a new bacterial RNA repair complex that performs RNA repair linked to immunity. This new RNA repair complex is a 270-kDa heterohexamer composed of three proteins—Pnkp1, Rnl and Hen1—that are required to repair ribotoxin-cleaved RNA in vitro. The crystal structure of the complex reveals the molecular architecture of the heterohexamer as two rhomboid-shaped ring structures of Pnkp1–Rnl–Hen1 heterotrimer fused at the Pnkp1 dimer interface. The four active sites required for RNA repair are located on the inner rim of each ring. Furthermore, the architecture and the locations of the active sites of the Pnkp1–Rnl–Hen1 heterohexamer suggest an ordered series of repair reactions at the broken RNA ends that confer immunity to recurrent damage.

  6. Intracellular Detection of Viral Transcription and Replication Using RNA FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Chapter 14. Intracellular detection of viral transcription and replication using RNA FISH i. Summary/Abstract Many hemorrhagic fever viruses...examine the mechanisms in which viruses replicate, assemble, and traffic through the cell. An additional benefit of this method is that the robust...Visualization of single RNA transcripts in situ. Science, 1998. 280(5363): p. 585-90. 4. Jambo, K.C., et al., Small alveolar macrophages are infected

  7. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  8. Divergent RNA transcription: a role in promoter unwinding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Catherine; Corless, Samuel; Gilbert, Nick

    2013-01-01

    New approaches using biotinylated-psoralen as a probe for investigating DNA structure have revealed new insights into the relationship between DNA supercoiling, transcription and chromatin compaction. We explore a hypothesis that divergent RNA transcription generates negative supercoiling at promoters facilitating initiation complex formation and subsequent promoter clearance.

  9. Transcription rate of RNA polymerase under rotary torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiryu, H.

    2004-04-01

    We investigated the transcription rates of RNA polymerases that were subjected to rotational drag. By combining chemical kinetics with mechanical equations, we derived formulas for the transcription rate in the case where the torque was caused by the hydrodynamic drag to DNA rotation.

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 links RNA polymerase II transcription to processing of ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Rohrmoser, Michaela; Coordes, Britta; Heidemann, Martin; Kellner, Markus; Gruber-Eber, Anita; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Strässer, Katja; Eick, Dirk

    2013-07-19

    Ribosome biogenesis is a process required for cellular growth and proliferation. Processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is highly sensitive to flavopiridol, a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9). Cdk9 has been characterized as the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here we studied the connection between RNAPII transcription and rRNA processing. We show that inhibition of RNAPII activity by α-amanitin specifically blocks processing of rRNA. The block is characterized by accumulation of 3' extended unprocessed 47 S rRNAs and the entire inhibition of other 47 S rRNA-specific processing steps. The transcription rate of rRNA is moderately reduced after inhibition of Cdk9, suggesting that defective 3' processing of rRNA negatively feeds back on RNAPI transcription. Knockdown of Cdk9 caused a strong reduction of the levels of RNAPII-transcribed U8 small nucleolar RNA, which is essential for 3' rRNA processing in mammalian cells. Our data demonstrate a pivotal role of Cdk9 activity for coupling of RNAPII transcription with small nucleolar RNA production and rRNA processing.

  11. DNAPKcs-dependent arrest of RNA polymerase II transcription in the presence of DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankotai, Tibor; Bonhomme, Céline; Chen, David; Soutoglou, Evi

    2012-02-12

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair interferes with ongoing cellular processes, including replication and transcription. Although the process of replication stalling upon collision of replication forks with damaged DNA has been extensively studied, the fate of elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) that encounters a DSB is not well understood. We show that the occurrence of a single DSB at a human RNAPII-transcribed gene leads to inhibition of transcription elongation and reinitiation. Upon inhibition of DNA protein kinase (DNAPK), RNAPII bypasses the break and continues transcription elongation, suggesting that it is not the break per se that inhibits the processivity of RNAPII, but the activity of DNAPK. We also show that the mechanism of DNAPK-mediated transcription inhibition involves the proteasome-dependent pathway. The results point to the pivotal role of DNAPK activity in the eviction of RNAPII from DNA upon encountering a DNA lesion.

  12. Uncovering layers of human RNA polymerase II transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    In recent years DNA microarray and high-throughput sequencing technologies have challenged the “gene-centric” view that pre-mRNA is the only RNA species transcribed off protein-coding genes. Instead unorthodox transcription from within genic- and intergenic regions has been demonstrated to occur...

  13. Direct analysis of RNA transcripts in electroporated carrot protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, E E; Buchholz, W G; Bowen, B

    1990-07-01

    We describe a method for direct analysis of RNA transcribed from DNA introduced into carrot cells by electroporation. Octopine synthase RNA transcribed from the plasmid p35SOcs was detected in total and poly A(+) RNA on Northern blots and in RNA protection assays. The highest level of octopine synthase transcript was detected at approximately 8 hrs post-electroporation, although RNA could still be detected after 48 hrs. This method allows detection of foreign gene expression in a plant system and bypasses the need for reporter genes.

  14. The chemical structure of DNA sequence signals for RNA transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. G.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed recognition sites for RNA transcription for E. coli NRA polymerase, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, and eukaryotic RNA polymerase Pol II are evaluated in the light of the requirements for efficient recognition. It is shown that although there is good experimental evidence that specific nucleic acid sequence patterns are involved in transcriptional regulation in bacteria and bacterial viruses, among the sequences now available, only in the case of the promoters recognized by bacteriophage T7 polymerase does it seem likely that the pattern is sufficient. It is concluded that the eukaryotic pattern that is investigated is not restrictive enough to serve as a recognition site.

  15. An RNA polymerase II-coupled function for histone H3K36 methylation in checkpoint activation and DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Deepak Kumar; Strahl, Brian D

    2014-06-09

    Histone modifications are major determinants of DNA double-strand break (DSB) response and repair. Here we elucidate a DSB repair function for transcription-coupled Set2 methylation at H3 lysine 36 (H3K36me). Cells devoid of Set2/H3K36me are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents and site-specific DSBs, fail to properly activate the DNA-damage checkpoint, and show genetic interactions with DSB-sensing and repair machinery. Set2/H3K36me3 is enriched at DSBs, and loss of Set2 results in altered chromatin architecture and inappropriate resection during G1 near break sites. Surprisingly, Set2 and RNA polymerase II are programmed for destruction after DSBs in a temporal manner--resulting in H3K36me3 to H3K36me2 transition that may be linked to DSB repair. Finally, we show a requirement of Set2 in DSB repair in transcription units--thus underscoring the importance of transcription-dependent H3K36me in DSB repair.

  16. Structural basis of transcription by bacterial and eukaryotic RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Shun-ichi; Tagami, Shunsuke; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2012-02-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) is responsible for cellular gene transcription. Although crystallographic studies on prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNAPs have elucidated the basic RNAP architectures, the structural details of many essential events during transcription initiation, elongation, and termination are still largely unknown. Recent crystallographic studies on a bacterial RNAP and yeast RNAP II have revealed different RNAP structural states from that of the normal transcribing complex, as well as the basis of transcription factor functions, advancing our understanding of transcription. These studies have highlighted unexpected similarities in many fundamental aspects of transcription mechanisms between the bacterial and eukaryotic transcription machineries. Remarkable differences also exist between the bacterial and eukaryotic transcription systems, suggesting directions for future studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Microprocessor mediates transcriptional termination of long noncoding RNA transcripts hosting microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Ashish; Dhir, Somdutta; Proudfoot, Nick J; Jopling, Catherine L

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a major part in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Mammalian miRNA biogenesis begins with cotranscriptional cleavage of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcripts by the Microprocessor complex. Although most miRNAs are located within introns of protein-coding transcripts, a substantial minority of miRNAs originate from long noncoding (lnc) RNAs, for which transcript processing is largely uncharacterized. We show, by detailed characterization of liver-specific lnc-pri-miR-122 and genome-wide analysis in human cell lines, that most lncRNA transcripts containing miRNAs (lnc-pri-miRNAs) do not use the canonical cleavage-and-polyadenylation pathway but instead use Microprocessor cleavage to terminate transcription. Microprocessor inactivation leads to extensive transcriptional readthrough of lnc-pri-miRNA and transcriptional interference with downstream genes. Consequently we define a new RNase III-mediated, polyadenylation-independent mechanism of Pol II transcription termination in mammalian cells.

  18. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance.

  19. Dynamic phosphorylation patterns of RNA polymerase II CTD during transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Martin; Hintermair, Corinna; Voß, Kirsten; Eick, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) catalyzes the transcription of all protein encoding genes and is also responsible for the generation of small regulatory RNAs. RNAPII has evolved a unique domain composed of heptapeptide repeats with the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 at the C-terminus (CTD) of its largest subunit (Rpb1). Dynamic phosphorylation patterns of serine residues in CTD during gene transcription coordinate the recruitment of factors to the elongating RNAPII and to the nascent transcript. Recent studies identified threonine 4 and tyrosine 1 as new CTD modifications and thereby expanded the "CTD code". In this review, we focus on CTD phosphorylation and its function in the RNAPII transcription cycle. We also discuss in detail the limitations of the phosphospecific CTD antibodies, which are used in all studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation.

  20. Elucidating MicroRNA Regulatory Networks Using Transcriptional, Post-transcriptional, and Histone Modification Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J.C. Gosline

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate diverse biological processes by repressing mRNAs, but their modest effects on direct targets, together with their participation in larger regulatory networks, make it challenging to delineate miRNA-mediated effects. Here, we describe an approach to characterizing miRNA-regulatory networks by systematically profiling transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic activity in a pair of isogenic murine fibroblast cell lines with and without Dicer expression. By RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and CLIP (crosslinking followed by immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq, we found that most of the changes induced by global miRNA loss occur at the level of transcription. We then introduced a network modeling approach that integrated these data with epigenetic data to identify specific miRNA-regulated transcription factors that explain the impact of miRNA perturbation on gene expression. In total, we demonstrate that combining multiple genome-wide datasets spanning diverse regulatory modes enables accurate delineation of the downstream miRNA-regulated transcriptional network and establishes a model for studying similar networks in other systems.

  1. Elucidating MicroRNA Regulatory Networks Using Transcriptional, Post-transcriptional, and Histone Modification Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosline, Sara J C; Gurtan, Allan M; JnBaptiste, Courtney K; Bosson, Andrew; Milani, Pamela; Dalin, Simona; Matthews, Bryan J; Yap, Yoon S; Sharp, Phillip A; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-01-12

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate diverse biological processes by repressing mRNAs, but their modest effects on direct targets, together with their participation in larger regulatory networks, make it challenging to delineate miRNA-mediated effects. Here, we describe an approach to characterizing miRNA-regulatory networks by systematically profiling transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic activity in a pair of isogenic murine fibroblast cell lines with and without Dicer expression. By RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and CLIP (crosslinking followed by immunoprecipitation) sequencing (CLIP-seq), we found that most of the changes induced by global miRNA loss occur at the level of transcription. We then introduced a network modeling approach that integrated these data with epigenetic data to identify specific miRNA-regulated transcription factors that explain the impact of miRNA perturbation on gene expression. In total, we demonstrate that combining multiple genome-wide datasets spanning diverse regulatory modes enables accurate delineation of the downstream miRNA-regulated transcriptional network and establishes a model for studying similar networks in other systems.

  2. Transcription reactions of yeast RNA polymerase II in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宇; 敖世洲

    1995-01-01

    The transcription reactions in vitro of yeast ADHl and PHO5 gene promoters are investigated by means of a yeast crude nuclear extract. Using specific RNA probes, the transcription products of these 2 promoters have been first obtained. A low concentration of α-amanitin is highly inhibitory. The transcription of the PHO5 gene was initiated in vitro at or near the sites used in vim. The transcription products increase with the amount of the template and reach the maximum at certain concentrations of the template. The deletion of the yeast promoter sequences abolishes the reaction.

  3. Swinger RNA self-hybridization and mitochondrial non-canonical swinger transcription, transcription systematically exchanging nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-06-21

    Stem-loop hairpins punctuate mitochondrial post-transcriptional processing. Regulation of mitochondrial swinger transcription, transcription producing RNAs matching the mitogenome only assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides (23 bijective transformations along 9 symmetric exchanges XY, e.g. AG, and 14 asymmetric exchanges X>Y>Z>X, e.g. A>G>C>A) remains unknown. Does swinger RNA self-hybridization regulate swinger, as regular, transcription? Groups of 8 swinger transformations share canonical self-hybridization properties within each group, group 0 includes identity (regular) transcription. The human mitogenome has more stem-loop hairpins than randomized sequences for all groups. Group 2 transformations reveal complementarity of the light strand replication origin (OL) loop and a neighboring tRNA gene, detecting the longtime presumed OL/tRNA homology. Non-canonical G=U pairings in hairpins increases with swinger RNA detection. These results confirm biological relevancy of swinger-transformed DNA/RNA, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected swinger DNA/RNA and swinger peptides. Swinger-transformed mitogenomes include unsuspected multilayered information.

  4. Patterns and regulation of ribosomal RNA transcription in Borrelia burgdorferi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz Ira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Borrelia burgdorferi contains one 16S and two tandem sets of 23S-5S ribosomal (r RNA genes whose patterns of transcription and regulation are unknown but are likely to be critical for survival and persistence in its hosts. Results RT-PCR of B. burgdorferi N40 and B31 revealed three rRNA region transcripts: 16S rRNA-alanine transfer RNA (tRNAAla; tRNAIle; and both sets of 23S-5S rRNA. At 34°C, there were no differences in growth rate or in accumulation of total protein, DNA and RNA in B31 cultured in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly (BSK-H whether rabbit serum was present or not. At 23°C, B31 grew more slowly in serum-containing BSK-H than at 34°C. DNA per cell was higher in cells in exponential as compared to stationary phase at either temperature; protein per cell was similar at both temperatures in both phases. Similar amounts of rRNA were produced in exponential phase at both temperatures, and rRNA was down-regulated in stationary phase at either temperature. Interestingly, a relBbu deletion mutant unable to generate (pppGpp did not down-regulate rRNA at transition to stationary phase in serum-containing BSK-H at 34°C, similar to the relaxed phenotype of E. coli relA mutants. Conclusions We conclude that rRNA transcription in B. burgdorferi is complex and regulated both by growth phase and by the stringent response but not by temperature-modulated growth rate.

  5. Defective transcription-coupled repair in Cockayne syndrome B mice is associated with skin cancer predisposition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); H. van Steeg (Harry); R.J.W. Berg (Rob); A.J. van Gool (Alain); J. de Wit (Jan); G. Weeda (Geert); H. Morreau (Hans); R.B. Beems (Rudolf); C.F. van Kreijl (Coen); F.R. de Gruijl (Frank); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA mouse model for the nucleotide excision repair disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS) was generated by mimicking a truncation in the CSB(ERCC6) gene of a CS-B patient. CSB-deficient mice exhibit all of the CS repair characteristics: ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity, inactivation of transcription-

  6. Uncovering layers of human RNA polymerase II transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    In recent years DNA microarray and high-throughput sequencing technologies have challenged the “gene-centric” view that pre-mRNA is the only RNA species transcribed off protein-coding genes. Instead unorthodox transcription from within genic- and intergenic regions has been demonstrated to occur...... and unstable RNAs emitted from within, and immediately upstream human protein-coding genes. Mechanisms of their production and turn-over as well as their possible functions will be discussed...

  7. Modulation of microRNA processing by mismatch repair protein MutLα

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guogen Mao; Sanghee Lee; Janice Ortega; Liya Gu; Guo-Min Li

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical post-transcriptional regulators and are derived from hairpnn-shaped primary transcripts via a series of processing steps.However,how the production of individual miRNAs is regulated remains largely unknown.Similarly,loss or overexpression of the key mismatch repair protein MutLα (MLH1-PMS2 heterodimer) leads to genome instability and tumorigenesis,but the mechanisms controlling MutLαt expression are unknown.Here we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that MLH1 and miR-422a participate in a feedback loop that regulates the level of both molecules.Using a defined in-vitro miRNA processing system,we show that MutLαt stimulates the conversion of pri-miR-422a to pre-miR-422a,as well as the processing of other miRNAs tested,implicating MutLα as a general stimulating factor for miRNA biogenesis.This newly identified MutLαα function requires its ATPase and pri-miRNA binding activities.In contrast,miR-422a downregulates MutLα levels by suppressing MLH1 expression through base pairing with the MLH1 3'-untranslated region.A model depicting this feedback mechanism is discussed.

  8. A 3' --> 5' XPB helicase defect in repair/transcription factor TFIIH of xeroderma pigmentosum group B affects both DNA repair and transcription.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Hwang; V. Moncollin; W. Vermeulen (Wim); T. Seroz; H. van Vuuren; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractXPB is a subunit of the basal transcription factor TFIIH, which is also involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and potentially in cell cycle regulation. A frameshift mutation in the 3'-end of the XPB gene is responsible for a concurrence of two disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  9. Bijective transformation circular codes and nucleotide exchanging RNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Christian J; Seligmann, Hervé

    2014-04-01

    The C(3) self-complementary circular code X identified in genes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes is a set of 20 trinucleotides enabling reading frame retrieval and maintenance, i.e. a framing code (Arquès and Michel, 1996; Michel, 2012, 2013). Some mitochondrial RNAs correspond to DNA sequences when RNA transcription systematically exchanges between nucleotides (Seligmann, 2013a,b). We study here the 23 bijective transformation codes ΠX of X which may code nucleotide exchanging RNA transcription as suggested by this mitochondrial observation. The 23 bijective transformation codes ΠX are C(3) trinucleotide circular codes, seven of them are also self-complementary. Furthermore, several correlations are observed between the Reading Frame Retrieval (RFR) probability of bijective transformation codes ΠX and the different biological properties of ΠX related to their numbers of RNAs in GenBank's EST database, their polymerization rate, their number of amino acids and the chirality of amino acids they code. Results suggest that the circular code X with the functions of reading frame retrieval and maintenance in regular RNA transcription, may also have, through its bijective transformation codes ΠX, the same functions in nucleotide exchanging RNA transcription. Associations with properties such as amino acid chirality suggest that the RFR of X and its bijective transformations molded the origins of the genetic code's machinery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Basic Mechanisms in RNA Polymerase I Transcription of the Ribosomal RNA Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Sarah J.; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2013-01-01

    RNA Polymerase (Pol) I produces ribosomal (r)RNA, an essential component of the cellular protein synthetic machinery that drives cell growth, underlying many fundamental cellular processes. Extensive research into the mechanisms governing transcription by Pol I has revealed an intricate set of control mechanisms impinging upon rRNA production. Pol I-specific transcription factors guide Pol I to the rDNA promoter and contribute to multiple rounds of transcription initiation, promoter escape, elongation and termination. In addition, many accessory factors are now known to assist at each stage of this transcription cycle, some of which allow the integration of transcriptional activity with metabolic demands. The organisation and accessibility of rDNA chromatin also impinge upon Pol I output, and complex mechanisms ensure the appropriate maintenance of the epigenetic state of the nucleolar genome and its effective transcription by Pol I. The following review presents our current understanding of the components of the Pol I transcription machinery, their functions and regulation by associated factors, and the mechanisms operating to ensure the proper transcription of rDNA chromatin. The importance of such stringent control is demonstrated by the fact that deregulated Pol I transcription is a feature of cancer and other disorders characterised by abnormal translational capacity. PMID:23150253

  11. Structural basis for transcription-coupled repair: the N terminus of Mfd resembles UvrB with degenerate ATPase motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenmacher, Nora; Wenig, Katja; Lammens, Alfred; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2006-01-27

    The transcription repair coupling factor Mfd removes stalled RNA polymerase from DNA lesions and links transcription to UvrABC-dependent nucleotide excision repair in prokaryotes. We report the 2.1A crystal structure of the UvrA-binding N terminus (residues 1-333) of Escherichia coli Mfd (Mfd-N). Remarkably, Mfd-N reveals a fold that resembles the three N-terminal domains of the repair enzyme UvrB. Domain 1A of Mfd adopts a typical RecA fold, domain 1B matches the damage-binding domain of the UvrB, and domain 2 highly resembles the implicated UvrA-binding domain of UvrB. However, Mfd apparently lacks a functional ATP-binding site and does not contain the DNA damage-binding motifs of UvrB. Thus, our results suggest that Mfd might form a UvrA recruitment factor at stalled transcription complexes that architecturally but not catalytically resembles UvrB.

  12. The mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in mitochondrial base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Maynard, Scott; Bayne, Anne-Cécile V

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is an essential component of mitochondrial nucleoids. TFAM plays an important role in mitochondrial transcription and replication. TFAM has been previously reported to inhibit nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vitro but NER has not yet been detected i...

  13. DBIRD complex integrates alternative mRNA splicing with RNA polymerase II transcript elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Close, Pierre; East, Philip; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara;

    2012-01-01

    Alternative messenger RNA splicing is the main reason that vast mammalian proteomic complexity can be achieved with a limited number of genes. Splicing is physically and functionally coupled to transcription, and is greatly affected by the rate of transcript elongation. As the nascent pre...... and help to integrate transcript elongation with mRNA splicing remain unclear. Here we characterize the human interactome of chromatin-associated mRNP particles. This led us to identify deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) and ZNF326 (which we call ZNF-protein interacting with nuclear mRNPs and DBC1 (ZIRD......)) as subunits of a novel protein complex--named DBIRD--that binds directly to RNAPII. DBIRD regulates alternative splicing of a large set of exons embedded in (A + T)-rich DNA, and is present at the affected exons. RNA-interference-mediated DBIRD depletion results in region-specific decreases in transcript...

  14. Deciphering Transcriptional Dynamics In Vivo by Counting Nascent RNA Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandeep; Kondev, Jane; Sanchez, Alvaro

    2015-11-01

    Deciphering how the regulatory DNA sequence of a gene dictates its expression in response to intra and extracellular cues is one of the leading challenges in modern genomics. The development of novel single-cell sequencing and imaging techniques, as well as a better exploitation of currently available single-molecule imaging techniques, provides an avenue to interrogate the process of transcription and its dynamics in cells by quantifying the number of RNA polymerases engaged in the transcription of a gene (or equivalently the number of nascent RNAs) at a given moment in time. In this paper, we propose that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability in the number of nascent RNAs provide a mostly unexplored method for deciphering mechanisms of transcription initiation in cells. We propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which we calculate nascent RNA copy-number fluctuations. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we test our theory against published nascent RNA data for twelve constitutively expressed yeast genes. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate limiting step, as it had been previously proposed, our single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Surprisingly, half of the genes analyzed have nearly identical rates of transcription initiation, suggesting a common mechanism. Our analytical framework can be used to extract quantitative information about dynamics of transcription from single-cell sequencing data, as well as from single-molecule imaging and electron micrographs of fixed cells, and provides the mathematical means to exploit the quantitative power of these technologies.

  15. Deciphering Transcriptional Dynamics In Vivo by Counting Nascent RNA Molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Choubey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering how the regulatory DNA sequence of a gene dictates its expression in response to intra and extracellular cues is one of the leading challenges in modern genomics. The development of novel single-cell sequencing and imaging techniques, as well as a better exploitation of currently available single-molecule imaging techniques, provides an avenue to interrogate the process of transcription and its dynamics in cells by quantifying the number of RNA polymerases engaged in the transcription of a gene (or equivalently the number of nascent RNAs at a given moment in time. In this paper, we propose that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability in the number of nascent RNAs provide a mostly unexplored method for deciphering mechanisms of transcription initiation in cells. We propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which we calculate nascent RNA copy-number fluctuations. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we test our theory against published nascent RNA data for twelve constitutively expressed yeast genes. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate limiting step, as it had been previously proposed, our single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Surprisingly, half of the genes analyzed have nearly identical rates of transcription initiation, suggesting a common mechanism. Our analytical framework can be used to extract quantitative information about dynamics of transcription from single-cell sequencing data, as well as from single-molecule imaging and electron micrographs of fixed cells, and provides the mathematical means to exploit the quantitative power of these technologies.

  16. RNA exosome-regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N; Bradner, James E; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-05-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function.

  17. Mediator MED23 Links Pigmentation and DNA Repair through the Transcription Factor MITF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair is related to many physiological and pathological processes, including pigmentation. Little is known about the role of the transcriptional cofactor Mediator complex in DNA repair and pigmentation. Here, we demonstrate that Mediator MED23 plays an important role in coupling UV-induced DNA repair to pigmentation. The loss of Med23 specifically impairs the pigmentation process in melanocyte-lineage cells and in zebrafish. Med23 deficiency leads to enhanced nucleotide excision repair (NER and less DNA damage following UV radiation because of the enhanced expression and recruitment of NER factors to chromatin for genomic stability. Integrative analyses of melanoma cells reveal that MED23 controls the expression of a melanocyte master regulator, Mitf, by modulating its distal enhancer activity, leading to opposing effects on pigmentation and DNA repair. Collectively, the Mediator MED23/MITF axis connects DNA repair to pigmentation, thus providing molecular insights into the DNA damage response and skin-related diseases.

  18. Mechanism of histone survival during transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaeva, Olga I; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2010-01-01

    This work is related to and stems from our recent NSMB paper, "Mechanism of chromatin remodeling and recovery during passage of RNA polymerase II" (December 2009). Synopsis. Recent genomic studies from many laboratories have suggested that nucleosomes are not displaced from moderately transcribed genes. Furthermore, histones H3/H4 carrying the primary epigenetic marks are not displaced or exchanged (in contrast to H2A/H2B histones) during moderate transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in vivo. These exciting observations suggest that the large molecule of Pol II passes through chromatin structure without even transient displacement of H3/H4 histones. The most recent analysis of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-type mechanism of chromatin remodeling in vitro (described in our NSMB 2009 paper) suggests that nucleosome survival is tightly coupled with formation of a novel intermediate: a very small intranucleosomal DNA loop (Ø-loop) containing transcribing Pol II. In the submitted manuscript we critically evaluate one of the key predictions of this model: the lack of even transient displacement of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription in vitro. The data suggest that, indeed, histones H3/H4 are not displaced during Pol II transcription in vitro. These studies are directly connected with the observation in vivo on the lack of exchange of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription.

  19. Molecular basis for coordinating transcription termination with noncoding RNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudek, Agnieszka; Porrua, Odil; Kabzinski, Tomasz; Lidschreiber, Michael; Kubicek, Karel; Fortova, Andrea; Lacroute, François; Vanacova, Stepanka; Cramer, Patrick; Stefl, Richard; Libri, Domenico

    2014-08-07

    The Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1 (NNS) complex is essential for controlling pervasive transcription and generating sn/snoRNAs in S. cerevisiae. The NNS complex terminates transcription of noncoding RNA genes and promotes exosome-dependent processing/degradation of the released transcripts. The Trf4-Air2-Mtr4 (TRAMP) complex polyadenylates NNS target RNAs and favors their degradation. NNS-dependent termination and degradation are coupled, but the mechanism underlying this coupling remains enigmatic. Here we provide structural and functional evidence demonstrating that the same domain of Nrd1p interacts with RNA polymerase II and Trf4p in a mutually exclusive manner, thus defining two alternative forms of the NNS complex, one involved in termination and the other in degradation. We show that the Nrd1-Trf4 interaction is required for optimal exosome activity in vivo and for the stimulation of polyadenylation of NNS targets by TRAMP in vitro. We propose that transcription termination and RNA degradation are coordinated by switching between two alternative partners of the NNS complex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro transcription of Sonchus yellow net virus RNA by a virus-associated RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flore, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the investigation presented in this thesis was to elucidate the nature of the RNA- dependent RNA polymerase, thought to be associated with Sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV), a rhabdovirus infecting plants. This research was initiated to shed light on the transcription activity in rhabdoviru

  1. RNA-eXpress annotates novel transcript features in RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Samuel C; Finkel, Alexander M; Gould, Jodee A; Hertzog, Paul J

    2013-03-15

    Next-generation sequencing is rapidly becoming the approach of choice for transcriptional analysis experiments. Substantial advances have been achieved in computational approaches to support these technologies. These approaches typically rely on existing transcript annotations, introducing a bias towards known genes, require specific experimental design and computational resources, or focus only on identification of splice variants (ignoring other biologically relevant transcribed features contained within the data that may be important for downstream analysis). Biologically relevant transcribed features also include large and small non-coding RNA, new transcription start sites, alternative promoters, RNA editing and processing of coding transcripts. Also, many existing solutions lack accessible interfaces required for wide scale adoption. We present a user-friendly, rapid and computation-efficient feature annotation framework (RNA-eXpress) that enables identification of transcripts and other genomic and transcriptional features independently of current annotations. RNA-eXpress accepts mapped reads in the standard binary alignment (BAM) format and produces a study-specific feature annotation in GTF format, comparison statistics, sequence extraction and feature counts. The framework is designed to be easily accessible while allowing advanced users to integrate new feature-identification algorithms through simple class extension, thus facilitating expansion to novel feature types or identification of study-specific feature types.

  2. Complexity on Acute Myeloid Leukemia mRNA Transcript Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sequence analysis of acute myeloid leukemia mRNA. Six transcript variants of mlf1 mRNA, with more than 2000 bps, are analyzed by focusing on the autocorrelation of each distribution. Through the correlation matrix, some patches and similarities are singled out and commented, with respect to similar distributions. The comparison of Kolmogorov fractal dimension will be also given in order to classify the six variants. The existence of a fractal shape, patterns, and symmetries are discussed as well.

  3. Translation with frameshifting of ribosome along mRNA transcript

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Translation is an important process for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to produce necessary proteins for cell growth. Numerious experiments have been performed to explore the translational properties. Diverse models have also been developed to determine the biochemical mechanism of translation. However, to simplify the majority of the existing models, the frameshifting of ribosome along the mRNA transcript is neglected, which actually occurs in real cells and has been extensively experimentally studied. The frameshifting of ribosome evidently influences the efficiency and speed of translation, considering that the peptide chains synthesized by shifted ribosomes will not fold into functional proteins and will degrade rapidly. In this study, a theoretical model is presented to describe the translational process based on the model for totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. In this model, the frameshifting of the ribosome along the mRNA transcript and the attachment/detachment of the ribosome to/from the ...

  4. RNA Pol II Dynamics Modulate Co-transcriptional Chromatin Modification, CTD Phosphorylation, and Transcriptional Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Nova; Saldi, Tassa; Sheridan, Ryan M; Cortazar, Michael A; Bentley, David L

    2017-05-18

    Eukaryotic genes are marked by conserved post-translational modifications on the RNA pol II C-terminal domain (CTD) and the chromatin template. How the 5'-3' profiles of these marks are established is poorly understood. Using pol II mutants in human cells, we found that slow transcription repositioned specific co-transcriptionally deposited chromatin modifications; histone H3 lysine 36 trimethyl (H3K36me3) shifted within genes toward 5' ends, and histone H3 lysine 4 dimethyl (H3K4me2) extended farther upstream of start sites. Slow transcription also evoked a hyperphosphorylation of CTD Ser2 residues at 5' ends of genes that is conserved in yeast. We propose a "dwell time in the target zone" model to explain the effects of transcriptional dynamics on the establishment of co-transcriptionally deposited protein modifications. Promoter-proximal Ser2 phosphorylation is associated with a longer pol II dwell time at start sites and reduced transcriptional polarity because of strongly enhanced divergent antisense transcription at promoters. These results demonstrate that pol II dynamics help govern the decision between sense and divergent antisense transcription. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Age-related neuronal degeneration: complementary roles of nucleotide excision repair and transcription-coupled repair in preventing neuropathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick Jaarsma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal degeneration is a hallmark of many DNA repair syndromes. Yet, how DNA damage causes neuronal degeneration and whether defects in different repair systems affect the brain differently is largely unknown. Here, we performed a systematic detailed analysis of neurodegenerative changes in mouse models deficient in nucleotide excision repair (NER and transcription-coupled repair (TCR, two partially overlapping DNA repair systems that remove helix-distorting and transcription-blocking lesions, respectively, and that are associated with the UV-sensitive syndromes xeroderma pigmentosum (XP and Cockayne syndrome (CS. TCR-deficient Csa(-/- and Csb(-/- CS mice showed activated microglia cells surrounding oligodendrocytes in regions with myelinated axons throughout the nervous system. This white matter microglia activation was not observed in NER-deficient Xpa(-/- and Xpc(-/- XP mice, but also occurred in Xpd(XPCS mice carrying a point mutation (G602D in the Xpd gene that is associated with a combined XPCS disorder and causes a partial NER and TCR defect. The white matter abnormalities in TCR-deficient mice are compatible with focal dysmyelination in CS patients. Both TCR-deficient and NER-deficient mice showed no evidence for neuronal degeneration apart from p53 activation in sporadic (Csa(-/-, Csb(-/- or highly sporadic (Xpa(-/-, Xpc(-/- neurons and astrocytes. To examine to what extent overlap occurs between both repair systems, we generated TCR-deficient mice with selective inactivation of NER in postnatal neurons. These mice develop dramatic age-related cumulative neuronal loss indicating DNA damage substrate overlap and synergism between TCR and NER pathways in neurons, and they uncover the occurrence of spontaneous DNA injury that may trigger neuronal degeneration. We propose that, while Csa(-/- and Csb(-/- TCR-deficient mice represent powerful animal models to study the mechanisms underlying myelin abnormalities in CS, neuron

  6. Transcription-coupled repair and apoptosis provide specific protection against transcription-associated mutagenesis by ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Giel; Jansen, Jacob G; Mullenders, Leon H F; de Wind, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Recent data reveal that gene transcription affects genome stability in mammalian cells. For example, transcription of DNA that is damaged by the most prevalent exogenous genotoxin, UV light, induces nucleotide substitutions and chromosomal instability, collectively called UV-induced transcription-associated mutations (UV-TAM). An important class of UV-TAM consists of nucleotide transitions that are caused by deamination of cytosine-containing photolesions to uracil, presumably occurring at stalled transcription complexes. Transcription-associated deletions and recombinational events after UV exposure may be triggered by collisions of replication forks with stalled transcription complexes. In this Point-of-View we propose that mammalian cells possess two tailored mechanisms to prevent UV-TAM in dermal stem cells. First, the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TCR) pathway removes lesions at transcribed DNA strands, forming the primary barrier against the mutagenic consequences of transcription at a damaged template. Second, when TCR is absent or when the capacity of TCR is exceeded, persistently stalled transcription complexes induce apoptosis, averting the generation of mutant cells following replication. We hypothesize that TCR and the apoptotic response in conjunction reduce the risk of skin carcinogenesis.

  7. Repairing RNA Transcripts that Mediate Breast Cancer Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    has been shown to be a critical nucleophile (the G-addition reaction), whereas TES reactions component of the exon- ligation reaction (9-15). For the TES...different introns. For example, the contribution of ligation reaction (second step). To test this, we used the tertiary interactions by the 5’ splice site...Mending the message. Nat. Biotechnol. 21: 4°C. Following ligation, a 3-j1L aliquot of the ligation reaction 1448-1449. was used to transform E. coli

  8. The transcriptional histone acetyltransferase cofactor TRRAP associates with the MRN repair complex and plays a role in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Flavie; Hardy, Sara; Nagy, Zita; Baldeyron, Céline; Murr, Rabih; Déry, Ugo; Masson, Jean-Yves; Papadopoulo, Dora; Herceg, Zdenko; Tora, Làszlò

    2006-01-01

    Transactivation-transformation domain-associated protein (TRRAP) is a component of several multiprotein histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes implicated in transcriptional regulation. TRRAP was shown to be required for the mitotic checkpoint and normal cell cycle progression. MRE11, RAD50, and NBS1 (product of the Nijmegan breakage syndrome gene) form the MRN complex that is involved in the detection, signaling, and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By using double immunopurification, mass spectrometry, and gel filtration, we describe the stable association of TRRAP with the MRN complex. The TRRAP-MRN complex is not associated with any detectable HAT activity, while the isolated other TRRAP complexes, containing either GCN5 or TIP60, are. TRRAP-depleted extracts show a reduced nonhomologous DNA end-joining activity in vitro. Importantly, small interfering RNA knockdown of TRRAP in HeLa cells or TRRAP knockout in mouse embryonic stem cells inhibit the DSB end-joining efficiency and the precise nonhomologous end-joining process, further suggesting a functional involvement of TRRAP in the DSB repair processes. Thus, TRRAP may function as a molecular link between DSB signaling, repair, and chromatin remodeling.

  9. Transcription, reverse transcription, and analysis of RNA containing artificial genetic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Nicole A; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Hoshika, Shuichi; Kim, Myong-Jung; Carrigan, Matthew A; Benner, Steven A

    2015-04-17

    Expanding the synthetic biology of artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS) requires tools to make and analyze RNA molecules having added nucleotide "letters". We report here the development of T7 RNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase to catalyze transcription and reverse transcription of xNA (DNA or RNA) having two complementary AEGIS nucleobases, 6-amino-5-nitropyridin-2-one (trivially, Z) and 2-aminoimidazo[1,2a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)-one (trivially, P). We also report MALDI mass spectrometry and HPLC-based analyses for oligomeric GACUZP six-letter RNA and the use of ribonuclease (RNase) A and T1 RNase as enzymatic tools for the sequence-specific degradation of GACUZP RNA. We then applied these tools to analyze the GACUZP and GACTZP products of polymerases and reverse transcriptases (respectively) made from DNA and RNA templates. In addition to advancing this 6-letter AEGIS toward the biosynthesis of proteins containing additional amino acids, these experiments provided new insights into the biophysics of DNA.

  10. Structural Basis of RNA Polymerase I Transcription Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Christoph; Gubbey, Tobias; Neyer, Simon; Sainsbury, Sarah; Oberthuer, Christiane; Baejen, Carlo; Bernecky, Carrie; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-03-23

    Transcription initiation at the ribosomal RNA promoter requires RNA polymerase (Pol) I and the initiation factors Rrn3 and core factor (CF). Here, we combine X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to obtain a molecular model for basal Pol I initiation. The three-subunit CF binds upstream promoter DNA, docks to the Pol I-Rrn3 complex, and loads DNA into the expanded active center cleft of the polymerase. DNA unwinding between the Pol I protrusion and clamp domains enables cleft contraction, resulting in an active Pol I conformation and RNA synthesis. Comparison with the Pol II system suggests that promoter specificity relies on a distinct "bendability" and "meltability" of the promoter sequence that enables contacts between initiation factors, DNA, and polymerase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fast transcription rates of RNA polymerase II in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Paolo; Knezevich, Anna; De Marco, Alex; Mazza, Davide; Kula, Anna; McNally, Jim G; Marcello, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Averaged estimates of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) elongation rates in mammalian cells have been shown to range between 1.3 and 4.3 kb min−1. In this work, nascent RNAs from an integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1-derived vector were detectable at the single living cell level by fluorescent RNA tagging. At steady state, a constant number of RNAs was measured corresponding to a minimal density of polymerases with negligible fluctuations over time. Recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching was complete within seconds, indicating a high rate of RNA biogenesis. The calculated transcription rate above 50 kb min−1 points towards a wide dynamic range of RNAPII velocities in living cells. PMID:22015688

  12. DNA double strand break repair, chromosome synapsis and transcriptional silencing in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Akiko; Schoenmakers, Sam; Baarends, Willy M

    2010-05-16

    Chromosome pairing and synapsis during meiotic prophase requires the formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the topoisomerase-like enzyme SPO11. Chromosomes, or chromosomal regions, that lack a pairing partner, such as the largely heterologous X and Y chromosomes, show delayed meiotic DSB repair and are transcriptionally silenced. Herein, we review meiosis-specific aspects of DSB repair in relation to homology recognition and meiotic silencing of heterologous regions. We propose a dynamic interplay between progression of synapsis and persistent meiotic DSBs. Signaling from these persistent breaks could inhibit heterologous synapsis and stimulate meiotic silencing of the X and Y chromosomes.

  13. Direct Regulation of tRNA and 5S rRNA Gene Transcription by Polo-like Kinase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairley, Jennifer A.; Mitchell, Louise E.; Berg, Tracy; Kenneth, Niall S.; von Schubert, Conrad; Sillje, Herman H. W.; Medema, Rene H.; Nigg, Erich A.; White, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Polo-like kinase Plk1 controls numerous aspects of cell-cycle progression. We show that it associates with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes and regulates their transcription by RNA polymerase Ill (pol Ill) through direct binding and phosphorylation of transcription factor Brit During interphase, Plk1 promotes

  14. Direct Regulation of tRNA and 5S rRNA Gene Transcription by Polo-like Kinase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairley, Jennifer A.; Mitchell, Louise E.; Berg, Tracy; Kenneth, Niall S.; von Schubert, Conrad; Sillje, Herman H. W.; Medema, Rene H.; Nigg, Erich A.; White, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Polo-like kinase Plk1 controls numerous aspects of cell-cycle progression. We show that it associates with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes and regulates their transcription by RNA polymerase Ill (pol Ill) through direct binding and phosphorylation of transcription factor Brit During interphase, Plk1 promotes

  15. E2F1 and p53 Transcription Factors as Accessory Factors for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the biochemical details of nucleotide excision repair (NER have been established using purified proteins and DNA substrates. In cells however, DNA is tightly packaged around histones and other chromatin-associated proteins, which can be an obstacle to efficient repair. Several cooperating mechanisms enhance the efficiency of NER by altering chromatin structure. Interestingly, many of the players involved in modifying chromatin at sites of DNA damage were originally identified as regulators of transcription. These include ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, histone modifying enzymes and several transcription factors. The p53 and E2F1 transcription factors are well known for their abilities to regulate gene expression in response to DNA damage. This review will highlight the underappreciated, transcription-independent functions of p53 and E2F1 in modifying chromatin structure in response to DNA damage to promote global NER.

  16. Architecture of the Human and Yeast General Transcription and DNA Repair Factor TFIIH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Cimermancic, Peter; Viswanath, Shruthi; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Kim, Bong; Dehecq, Marine; Raman, Vishnu; Greenberg, Charles H; Pellarin, Riccardo; Sali, Andrej; Taatjes, Dylan J; Hahn, Steven; Ranish, Jeff

    2015-09-03

    TFIIH is essential for both RNA polymerase II transcription and DNA repair, and mutations in TFIIH can result in human disease. Here, we determine the molecular architecture of human and yeast TFIIH by an integrative approach using chemical crosslinking/mass spectrometry (CXMS) data, biochemical analyses, and previously published electron microscopy maps. We identified four new conserved "topological regions" that function as hubs for TFIIH assembly and more than 35 conserved topological features within TFIIH, illuminating a network of interactions involved in TFIIH assembly and regulation of its activities. We show that one of these conserved regions, the p62/Tfb1 Anchor region, directly interacts with the DNA helicase subunit XPD/Rad3 in native TFIIH and is required for the integrity and function of TFIIH. We also reveal the structural basis for defects in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and trichothiodystrophy, with mutations found at the interface between the p62 Anchor region and the XPD subunit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A mutation in the XPB/ERCC3 DNA repair transcription gene, associated with trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeda, G.; Donker, I.; Vermeulen, W. [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sulfur-deficient brittle hair and nails, mental retardation, impaired sexual development, and ichthyosis. Photosensitivity has been reported in {approximately}50% of the cases, but no skin cancer is associated with TTD. Virtually all photosensitive TTD patients have a deficiency in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced DNA damage that is indistinguishable from that of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group D (XP-D) patients. DNA repair defects in XP-D are associated with two additional, quite different diseases; XP, a sun-sensitive and cancer-prone repair disorder, and Cockayne syndrome (CS), a photosensitive condition characterized by physical and mental retardation and wizened facial appearance. One photosensitive TTD case constitutes a new repair-deficient complementation group, TTD-A. Remarkably, both TTD-A and XP-D defects are associated with subunits of TFIIH, a basal transcription factor with a second function in DNA repair. Thus, mutations in TFIIH components may, on top of a repair defect, also cause transcriptional insufficiency, which may explain part of the non-XP clinical features of TTD. To date, three patients with the remarkable conjunction of XP and CS but not TM have been assigned to XP complementation group B (XP-B). Here we present the characterization of the NER defect in two mild TTD patients (TTD6VI and TTD4VI) and confirm the assignment to X-PB. The causative mutation was found to be a single base substitution resulting in a missense mutation (T119P) in a region of the XPB protein. These findings define a third TTD complementation group, extend the clinical heterogeneity associated with XP-B, stress the exclusive relationship between TTD and mutations in subunits of repair/transcription factor TFIIH, and strongly support the concept of {open_quotes}transcription syndromes.{close_quotes} 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Loss of transcription factor early growth response gene 1 results in impaired endochondral bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumann, Marie K; Strachna, Olga; Yagerman, Sarah; Torrecilla, Daniel; Kim, Jihye; Doty, Stephen B; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-10-01

    Transcription factors that play a role in ossification during development are expected to participate in postnatal fracture repair since the endochondral bone formation that occurs in embryos is recapitulated during fracture repair. However, inherent differences exist between bone development and fracture repair, including a sudden disruption of tissue integrity followed by an inflammatory response. This raises the possibility that repair-specific transcription factors participate in bone healing. Here, we assessed the consequence of loss of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) on endochondral bone healing because this transcription factor has been shown to modulate repair in vascularized tissues. Model fractures were created in ribs of wild type (wt) and EGR-1(-/-) mice. Differences in tissue morphology and composition between these two animal groups were followed over 28 post fracture days (PFDs). In wt mice, bone healing occurred in healing phases characteristic of endochondral bone repair. A similar healing sequence was observed in EGR-1(-/-) mice but was impaired by alterations. A persistent accumulation of fibrin between the disconnected bones was observed on PFD7 and remained pronounced in the callus on PFD14. Additionally, the PFD14 callus was abnormally enlarged and showed increased deposition of mineralized tissue. Cartilage ossification in the callus was associated with hyper-vascularity and -proliferation. Moreover, cell deposits located in proximity to the callus within skeletal muscle were detected on PFD14. Despite these impairments, repair in EGR-1(-/-) callus advanced on PFD28, suggesting EGR-1 is not essential for healing. Together, this study provides genetic evidence that EGR-1 is a pleiotropic regulator of endochondral fracture repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and histone binding by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription coupling factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Citterio (Elisabetta); V. van den Boom (Vincent); G. Schnitzler; R. Kanaar (Roland); E. Bonte (Edgar); R.E. Kingston; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a DNA-dependent ATPase of the

  20. RNA polymerase II transcriptional fidelity control and its functional interplay with DNA modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Chong, Jenny; Shin, Ji Hyun; Xu, Jun; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate genetic information transfer is essential for life. As a key enzyme involved in the first step of gene expression, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) must maintain high transcriptional fidelity while it reads along DNA template and synthesizes RNA transcript in a stepwise manner during transcription elongation. DNA lesions or modifications may lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity or transcription elongation dynamics. In this review, we will summarize recent progress towards understanding the molecular basis of RNA Pol II transcriptional fidelity control and impacts of DNA lesions and modifications on Pol II transcription elongation. PMID:26392149

  1. Correction of xeroderma pigmentosum repair defect by basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Vuuren (Hanneke); W. Vermeulen (Wim); L. Ma (Libin); G. Weeda (Geert); E. Appeldoorn (Esther); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); A.J. van der Eb; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S. Humbert; L. Schaeffer; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractERCC3 was initially identified as a gene correcting the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B (XP-B). The recent finding that its gene product is identical to the p89 subunit of basal transcription factor BTF2(TFIIH), opened the possibil

  2. Transcription Restores DNA Repair to Heterochromatin, Determining Regional Mutation Rates in Cancer Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L. Zheng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in cancer are more frequent in heterochromatic and late-replicating regions of the genome. We report that regional disparities in mutation density are virtually abolished within transcriptionally silent genomic regions of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCCs arising in an XPC−/− background. XPC−/− cells lack global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER, thus establishing differential access of DNA repair machinery within chromatin-rich regions of the genome as the primary cause for the regional disparity. Strikingly, we find that increasing levels of transcription reduce mutation prevalence on both strands of gene bodies embedded within H3K9me3-dense regions, and only to those levels observed in H3K9me3-sparse regions, also in an XPC-dependent manner. Therefore, transcription appears to reduce mutation prevalence specifically by relieving the constraints imposed by chromatin structure on DNA repair. We model this relationship among transcription, chromatin state, and DNA repair, revealing a new, personalized determinant of cancer risk.

  3. Split End Family RNA Binding Proteins: Novel Tumor Suppressors Coupling Transcriptional Regulation with RNA Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairui Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Split End (SPEN family proteins have three members: SPEN, RBM15, and RBM15B. SPEN family proteins contain three conserved RNA recognition motifs on the N-terminal region and an SPOC domain on the C-terminal region. RBM15 is fused to MKL1 in chromosome translocation t (1;22, which causes childhood acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL. Haploinsufficiency of RBM15 in AMKL indicates that RBM15 is a tumor suppressor. Both SPEN and RBM15 are mutated in a variety of cancer types, implying that they are tumor suppressors. SPEN and RBM15are required for the development of multiple organs including hematopoiesis partly via regulating the NOTCH signaling pathway, as well as the WNT signaling pathway in species ranging from Drosophila to mammals. Besides transcriptional regulation, RBM15 regulates RNA export and RNA splicing. In this review, we summarized data in the literature on how the members in SPEN family regulate gene expression at transcription and RNA processing steps. The crosstalk between epigenetic regulation and RNA metabolism is increasingly appreciated in understanding tumorigenesis. Studying the SPEN family of RNA binding proteins will create new perspectives for cancer therapy.

  4. Extragenic accumulation of RNA polymerase II enhances transcription by RNA polymerase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Listerman

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent genomic data indicate that RNA polymerase II (Pol II function extends beyond conventional transcription of primarily protein-coding genes. Among the five snRNAs required for pre-mRNA splicing, only the U6 snRNA is synthesized by RNA polymerase III (Pol III. Here we address the question of how Pol II coordinates the expression of spliceosome components, including U6. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and high-resolution mapping by PCR to localize both Pol II and Pol III to snRNA gene regions. We report the surprising finding that Pol II is highly concentrated approximately 300 bp upstream of all five active human U6 genes in vivo. The U6 snRNA, an essential component of the spliceosome, is synthesized by Pol III, whereas all other spliceosomal snRNAs are Pol II transcripts. Accordingly, U6 transcripts were terminated in a Pol III-specific manner, and Pol III localized to the transcribed gene regions. However, synthesis of both U6 and U2 snRNAs was alpha-amanitin-sensitive, indicating a requirement for Pol II activity in the expression of both snRNAs. Moreover, both Pol II and histone tail acetylation marks were lost from U6 promoters upon alpha-amanitin treatment. The results indicate that Pol II is concentrated at specific genomic regions from which it can regulate Pol III activity by a general mechanism. Consequently, Pol II coordinates expression of all RNA and protein components of the spliceosome.

  5. Structural basis of transcription: Mismatch-specific fidelity mechanisms and paused RNA polymerase II with frayed RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Sydow, J.; Brueckner, F.; Cheung, A; Damsma, G.; Dengl, S.; Lehmann, E.; Vassylyev, D.; Cramer, P

    2009-01-01

    We show that RNA polymerase (Pol) II prevents erroneous transcription in vitro with different strategies that depend on the type of DNA,RNA base mismatch. Certain mismatches are efficiently formed but impair RNA extension. Other mismatches allow for RNA extension but are inefficiently formed and efficiently proofread by RNA cleavage. X-ray analysis reveals that a T,U mismatch impairs RNA extension by forming a wobble base pair at the Pol II active center that dissociates the catalytic metal i...

  6. Finding noncoding RNA transcripts from low abundance expressed sequence tags

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenghai Xue; Fei Li; Fei Li

    2008-01-01

    It has been proved that noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes are much more numerous than expected.However,it remains a difficult task to identify ncRNAs with either computational algorithms or biological experiments.Recent reports have suggested that ncRNAs may also appear in the expressed sequence tags (EST's) database.Nevertheless,intergenic ESTs have received little attention and are poorly annotated owing to their low abundance.Here,we have developed a computational strategy for discovering ncRNA genes from human ESTs.We first collected ESTs that are located in the intergenic regions and do not have detailed annotations.The intergenic regions were divided into non-overlapping 50-nt windows and PhastCons scores obtained from the UCSC database were assigned to these windows.We kept conserved windows that had PhastCons scores of over 0.8 and that had at least three supporting ESTs to act as seeds.Each cluster of ESTs corresponding to the seeds was assembled into a long contig.We used two criteria to screen for ncRNA transcripts from these contigs:the first was that the longest predicted open reading frame was less than 300 nt and the second was that the likely Pol-Ⅱ promoters exist within 2 000 nt upstream or downstream of the contigs.As a result,118 novel ncRNA genes were identified from human low abundance ESTs.Of seven randomly selected candidates,six were transcribed in human 2BS cells as shown by RT-PCR.Our work proves that the EST is a 'hidden treasure' for detecting novel ncRNA genes.

  7. A Long Noncoding RNA lincRNA-EPS Acts as a Transcriptional Brake to Restrain Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atianand, Maninjay K; Hu, Wenqian; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Shen, Ying; Ricci, Emiliano P; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Bhatta, Ankit; Schattgen, Stefan A; McGowan, Jason D; Blin, Juliana; Braun, Joerg E; Gandhi, Pallavi; Moore, Melissa J; Chang, Howard Y; Lodish, Harvey F; Caffrey, Daniel R; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2016-06-16

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. Although lincRNAs are expressed in immune cells, their functions in immunity are largely unexplored. Here, we identify an immunoregulatory lincRNA, lincRNA-EPS, that is precisely regulated in macrophages to control the expression of immune response genes (IRGs). Transcriptome analysis of macrophages from lincRNA-EPS-deficient mice, combined with gain-of-function and rescue experiments, revealed a specific role for this lincRNA in restraining IRG expression. Consistently, lincRNA-EPS-deficient mice manifest enhanced inflammation and lethality following endotoxin challenge in vivo. lincRNA-EPS localizes at regulatory regions of IRGs to control nucleosome positioning and repress transcription. Further, lincRNA-EPS mediates these effects by interacting with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L via a CANACA motif located in its 3' end. Together, these findings identify lincRNA-EPS as a repressor of inflammatory responses, highlighting the importance of lincRNAs in the immune system.

  8. Transcription inhibition by DRB potentiates recombinational repair of UV lesions in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Stoimenov

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is intricately associated with replication, transcription and DNA repair in all organisms studied. However, the interplay between all these processes occurring simultaneously on the same DNA molecule is still poorly understood. Here, we study the interplay between transcription and HR during ultraviolet light (UV-induced DNA damage in mammalian cells. Our results show that inhibition of transcription with 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB increases the number of UV-induced DNA lesions (γH2AX, 53BP1 foci formation, which correlates with a decrease in the survival of wild type or nucleotide excision repair defective cells. Furthermore, we observe an increase in RAD51 foci formation, suggesting HR is triggered in response to an increase in UV-induced DSBs, while inhibiting transcription. Unexpectedly, we observe that DRB fails to sensitise HR defective cells to UV treatment. Thus, increased RAD51 foci formation correlates with increased cell death, suggesting the existence of a futile HR repair of UV-induced DSBs which is linked to transcription inhibition.

  9. RNA polymerase II induced transcription of tRNA genes and processing of the mRNAs in yeast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Only 5'-halves were produced when the terminator sequence for RNA polymerase (pol) 1II transcrip-tion was inserted into the intron of yeast tRNATyr gene. If a promoter and a terminator for pol II transcription flanked it,the tRNA gene could be transcribed by pol II, but the transcripts could not be processed into mature tRNAs. In con-trast, tRNA gene could also be transcribed by pol III and the transcripts could be processed into mature tRNAs even if a promoter and a terminator for pol II transcription flanked it. Pol II transcripts, modified with a self-cleaved hannner-head structure at 3'-end, were processed into mature tRNAs in the medium containing 100 mmol/L Mg2+ , indicating that the 3'-long trailer sequence blocks the maturation of tRNA gene transcripts by pol II.

  10. RNA-seq analysis of the transcriptional response to blue and red light in the extremophilic red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardu, Mehmet; Dikbas, Ugur Meric; Baris, Ibrahim; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil

    2016-11-01

    Light is one of the main environmental cues that affects the physiology and behavior of many organisms. The effect of light on genome-wide transcriptional regulation has been well-studied in green algae and plants, but not in red algae. Cyanidioschyzon merolae is used as a model red algae, and is suitable for studies on transcriptomics because of its compact genome with a relatively small number of genes. In addition, complete genome sequences of the nucleus, mitochondrion, and chloroplast of this organism have been determined. Together, these attributes make C. merolae an ideal model organism to study the response to light stimuli at the transcriptional and the systems biology levels. Previous studies have shown that light significantly affects cell signaling in this organism, but there are no reports on its blue light- and red light-mediated transcriptional responses. We investigated the direct effects of blue and red light at the transcriptional level using RNA-seq. Blue and red lights were found to regulate 35 % of the total genes in C. merolae. Blue light affected the transcription of genes involved in protein synthesis while red light specifically regulated the transcription of genes involved in photosynthesis and DNA repair. Blue or red light regulated genes involved in carbon metabolism and pigment biosynthesis. Overall, our data showed that red and blue light regulate the majority of the cellular, cell division, and repair processes in C. merolae.

  11. Noncoding RNA. piRNA-guided slicing specifies transcripts for Zucchini-dependent, phased piRNA biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Fabio; Handler, Dominik; Brennecke, Julius

    2015-05-15

    In animal gonads, PIWI-clade Argonaute proteins repress transposons sequence-specifically via bound Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These are processed from single-stranded precursor RNAs by largely unknown mechanisms. Here we show that primary piRNA biogenesis is a 3'-directed and phased process that, in the Drosophila germ line, is initiated by secondary piRNA-guided transcript cleavage. Phasing results from consecutive endonucleolytic cleavages catalyzed by Zucchini, implying coupled formation of 3' and 5' ends of flanking piRNAs. Unexpectedly, Zucchini also participates in 3' end formation of secondary piRNAs. Its function can, however, be bypassed by downstream piRNA-guided precursor cleavages coupled to exonucleolytic trimming. Our data uncover an evolutionarily conserved piRNA biogenesis mechanism in which Zucchini plays a central role in defining piRNA 5' and 3' ends. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Transcriptional elongation factor ENL phosphorylated by ATM recruits polycomb and switches off transcription for DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Ayako; Nagaura, Yuko; Yasui, Akira

    2015-05-07

    Transcription is repressed if a DNA double-strand break (DSB) is introduced in close proximity to a transcriptional activation site at least in part by H2A-ubiquitination. While ATM signaling is involved, how it controls H2A-ubiquitination remains unclear. Here, we identify that, in response to DSBs, a transcriptional elongation factor, ENL (MLLT1), is phosphorylated by ATM at conserved SQ sites. This phosphorylation increases the interaction between ENL and the E3-ubiquitin-ligase complex of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) via BMI1. This interaction promotes enrichment of PRC1 at transcription elongation sites near DSBs to ubiquitinate H2A leading to transcriptional repression. ENL SQ sites and BMI1 are necessary for KU70 accumulation at DSBs near active transcription sites and cellular resistance to DSBs. Our data suggest that ATM-dependent phosphorylation of ENL functions as switch from elongation to Polycomb-mediated repression to preserve genome integrity.

  13. Quantification of co-transcriptional splicing from RNA-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzel, Lydia; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2015-09-01

    During gene expression, protein-coding transcripts are shaped by multiple processing events: 5' end capping, pre-mRNA splicing, RNA editing, and 3' end cleavage and polyadenylation. These events are required to produce mature mRNA, which can be subsequently translated. Nearly all of these RNA processing steps occur during transcription, while the nascent RNA is still attached to the DNA template by RNA polymerase II (i.e. co-transcriptionally). Polyadenylation occurs after 3' end cleavage or post-transcriptionally. Pre-mRNA splicing - the removal of introns and ligation of exons - can be initiated and concluded co-transcriptionally, although this is not strictly required. Recently, a number of studies using global methods have shown that the majority of splicing is co-transcriptional, yet not all published studies agree in their conclusions. Short read sequencing of RNA (RNA-Seq) is the prevailing approach to measuring splicing levels in nascent RNA, mRNA or total RNA. Here, we compare four different strategies for analyzing and quantifying co-transcriptional splicing. To do so, we reanalyze two nascent RNA-Seq datasets of the same species, but different cell type and RNA isolation procedure. Average co-transcriptional splicing values calculated on a per intron basis are similar, independent of the strategy used. We emphasize the technical requirements for identifying co-transcriptional splicing events with high confidence, e.g. how to calculate co-transcriptional splicing from nascent RNA- versus mRNA-Seq data, the number of biological replicates needed, depletion of polyA+RNA, and appropriate normalization. Finally, we present guidelines for planning a nascent RNA-Seq experiment.

  14. SELECTIVE-INHIBITION OF REPAIR OF ACTIVE GENES BY HYPERTHERMIA IS DUE TO INHIBITION OF GLOBAL AND TRANSCRIPTION COUPLED REPAIR PATHWAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SAKKERS, RJ; FILON, AR; BRUNSTING, JF; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT; MULLENDERS, LHF

    1995-01-01

    Hyperthermia specifically inhibits the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions in transcriptionally active genes, To define more precisely which mechanisms underlie the heat-induced inhibition of repair of active genes, removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) was studied in human fibroblasts w

  15. Gearing up chromatin: A role for chromatin remodeling during the transcriptional restart upon DNA damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.K. Mandemaker (Imke); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractDuring transcription, RNA polymerase may encounter DNA lesions, which causes stalling of transcription. To overcome the RNA polymerase blocking lesions, the transcribed strand is repaired by a dedicated repair mechanism, called transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER). A

  16. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on the transcriptional landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O'Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-04-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA cofactors short interfering RNAs are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) that are antisense to germline transcripts. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here we used genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts and found that the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway promoted sense-oriented RNA polymerase II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway helps maintain the directionality of active transcription, thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions.

  17. Modeling microRNA-transcription factor networks in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguda, Baltazar D

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) is known to form feedback loops (FBLs) of interactions where a TF positively or negatively regulates the expression of a miRNA, and the miRNA suppresses the translation of the TF messenger RNA. FBLs are potential sources of instability in a gene regulatory network. Positive FBLs can give rise to switching behaviors while negative FBLs can generate periodic oscillations. This chapter presents documented examples of FBLs and their relevance to stem cell renewal and differentiation in gliomas. Feed-forward loops (FFLs) are only discussed briefly because they do not affect network stability unless they are members of cycles. A primer on qualitative network stability analysis is given and then used to demonstrate the network destabilizing role of FBLs. Steps in model formulation and computer simulations are illustrated using the miR-17-92/Myc/E2F network as an example. This example possesses both negative and positive FBLs.

  18. Transcript levels of the Saccharomyes cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD23 increase in response to UV light and in meiosis but remain constant in the mitotic cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, K; Prakash, S

    1990-08-25

    The RAD23 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for excision-repair of UV damaged DNA. In this paper, we determine the location of the RAD23 gene in a cloned DNA fragment, identify the 1.6 kb RAD23 transcript, and examine RAD23 transcript levels in UV damaged cells, during the mitotic cell cycle, and in meiosis. The RAD23 mRNA levels are elevated 5-fold between 30 to 60 min after 37 J/m2 of UV light. RAD23 mRNA levels rise over 6-fold during meiosis at a stage coincident with high levels of genetic recombination. This response is specific to sporulation competent MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, and is not observed in asporogenous MATa/MATa diploids. RAD23 mRNA levels, however, remain constant during the mitotic cell cycle.

  19. Inositol pyrophosphates regulate RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Swarna Gowri; Unnikannan, C P; Thampatty, Sitalakshmi R; Manorama, R; Bhandari, Rashna

    2015-02-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is an essential cellular process regulated by the metabolic state of a cell. We examined whether inositol pyrophosphates, energy-rich derivatives of inositol that act as metabolic messengers, play a role in ribosome synthesis in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast strains lacking the inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) kinase Kcs1, which is required for the synthesis of inositol pyrophosphates, display increased sensitivity to translation inhibitors and decreased protein synthesis. These phenotypes are reversed on expression of enzymatically active Kcs1, but not on expression of the inactive form. The kcs1Δ yeast cells exhibit reduced levels of ribosome subunits, suggesting that they are defective in ribosome biogenesis. The rate of rRNA synthesis, the first step of ribosome biogenesis, is decreased in kcs1Δ yeast strains, suggesting that RNA polymerase I (Pol I) activity may be reduced in these cells. We determined that the Pol I subunits, A190, A43 and A34.5, can accept a β-phosphate moiety from inositol pyrophosphates to undergo serine pyrophosphorylation. Although there is impaired rRNA synthesis in kcs1Δ yeast cells, we did not find any defect in recruitment of Pol I on rDNA, but observed that the rate of transcription elongation was compromised. Taken together, our findings highlight inositol pyrophosphates as novel regulators of rRNA transcription.

  20. Oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1 mRNA and protein expression in organotypic rat brain slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Cui; Lijun Yang; Dezhuang Huang; Wandong Zhang; Weijuan Han; Yanqing Yao; Wenxing Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have confirmed that oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1 (Olig-1) is vital for myelin repair. However, the effects of hypoxia and ischemia on Olig-1 expression remain unknown.In this study, Olig-1 mRNA and protein expressions were analyzed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, to determine the expression profile of Olig-1 in rat brain slices exposed to hypoxia and ischemia. Brains were obtained from 2-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats, and sections were randomly assigned to control and hypoxia/ischemia groups. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed karyorrhexis and karyopyknosis in cells from the hypoxia/ischemia group. Under electron microscopy, mitochondria swelling and neuropil edema were observed in the hypoxia/ischemia group. Olig-1 mRNA and protein expressions were increased at 1 day after hypoxia and ischemia treatment. These results suggest that in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry could be used simultaneously to detect mRNA and protein expression in brain slices.

  1. The XPB subunit of repair/transcription factor TFIIH directly interacts with SUG1, a subunit of the 26S proteasome and putative transcription factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Weeda (Geert); M. Rossignol; R.A. Fraser; G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); L. Ma (Libin); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractMutations in the basal transcription initiation/DNA repair factor TFIIH are responsible for three human disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), cockayne syndrome (CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The non-repair features of CS and TTD are thought to be due to a partial inactivation of th

  2. Structural basis of transcription: mismatch-specific fidelity mechanisms and paused RNA polymerase II with frayed RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydow, Jasmin F; Brueckner, Florian; Cheung, Alan C M; Damsma, Gerke E; Dengl, Stefan; Lehmann, Elisabeth; Vassylyev, Dmitry; Cramer, Patrick

    2009-06-26

    We show that RNA polymerase (Pol) II prevents erroneous transcription in vitro with different strategies that depend on the type of DNARNA base mismatch. Certain mismatches are efficiently formed but impair RNA extension. Other mismatches allow for RNA extension but are inefficiently formed and efficiently proofread by RNA cleavage. X-ray analysis reveals that a TU mismatch impairs RNA extension by forming a wobble base pair at the Pol II active center that dissociates the catalytic metal ion and misaligns the RNA 3' end. The mismatch can also stabilize a paused state of Pol II with a frayed RNA 3' nucleotide. The frayed nucleotide binds in the Pol II pore either parallel or perpendicular to the DNA-RNA hybrid axis (fraying sites I and II, respectively) and overlaps the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) site, explaining how it halts transcription during proofreading, before backtracking and RNA cleavage.

  3. Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 stimulates DNA end joining and activates DSB repair activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, Kiran; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio; Kundu, Tapas K

    2009-01-23

    Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 is a highly abundant nuclear protein that is involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from transcription to chromatin organization. Earlier, we have shown that PC4, a positive activator of p53, overexpresses upon genotoxic insult in a p53-dependent manner. In the present study, we show that PC4 stimulates ligase-mediated DNA end joining irrespective of the source of DNA ligase. Pull-down assays reveal that PC4 helps in the association of DNA ends through its C-terminal domain. In vitro nonhomologous end-joining assays with cell-free extracts show that PC4 enhances the joining of noncomplementary DNA ends. Interestingly, we found that PC4 activates double-strand break (DSB) repair activity through stimulation of DSB rejoining in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate PC4 as an activator of nonhomologous end joining and DSB repair activity.

  4. Distinct properties of hexameric but functionally conserved Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcription-repair coupling factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swayam Prabha

    Full Text Available Transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER is involved in correcting UV-induced damage and other road-blocks encountered in the transcribed strand. Mutation frequency decline (Mfd is a transcription repair coupling factor, involved in repair of template strand during transcription. Mfd from M. tuberculosis (MtbMfd is 1234 amino-acids long harboring characteristic modules for different activities. Mtbmfd complemented Escherichia coli mfd (Ecomfd deficient strain, enhanced survival of UV irradiated cells and increased the road-block repression in vivo. The protein exhibited ATPase activity, which was stimulated ∼1.5-fold in the presence of DNA. While the C-terminal domain (CTD comprising amino acids 630 to 1234 showed ∼2-fold elevated ATPase activity than MtbMfd, the N-terminal domain (NTD containing the first 433 amino acid residues was able to bind ATP but deficient in hydrolysis. Overexpression of NTD of MtbMfd led to growth defect and hypersensitivity to UV light. Deletion of 184 amino acids from the C-terminal end of MtbMfd (MfdΔC increased the ATPase activity by ∼10-fold and correspondingly exhibited efficient translocation along DNA as compared to the MtbMfd and CTD. Surprisingly, MtbMfd was found to be distributed in monomer and hexamer forms both in vivo and in vitro and the monomer showed increased susceptibility to proteases compared to the hexamer. MfdΔC, on the other hand, was predominantly monomeric in solution implicating the extreme C-terminal region in oligomerization of the protein. Thus, although the MtbMfd resembles EcoMfd in many of its reaction characteristics, some of its hitherto unknown distinct properties hint at its species specific role in mycobacteria during transcription-coupled repair.

  5. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E.; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen. Here, we investigated the function of the zinc finger transcription factor EGR1 in tendon formation, healing, and repair using rodent animal models and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adult tendons of Egr1–/– mice displayed a deficiency in the expression of tendon genes, including Scx, Col1a1, and Col1a2, and were mechanically weaker compared with their WT littermates. EGR1 was recruited to the Col1a1 and Col2a1 promoters in postnatal mouse tendons in vivo. Egr1 was required for the normal gene response following tendon injury in a mouse model of Achilles tendon healing. Forced Egr1 expression programmed MSCs toward the tendon lineage and promoted the formation of in vitro–engineered tendons from MSCs. The application of EGR1-producing MSCs increased the formation of tendon-like tissues in a rat model of Achilles tendon injury. We provide evidence that the ability of EGR1 to promote tendon differentiation is partially mediated by TGF-β2. This study demonstrates EGR1 involvement in adult tendon formation, healing, and repair and identifies Egr1 as a putative target in tendon repair strategies. PMID:23863709

  6. MicroRNA-101 regulated transcriptional modulator SUB1 plays a role in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, B V S K; Goswami, M T; Pathi, S S; Robinson, A D; Cieślik, M; Chandrashekar, D S; Agarwal, S; Siddiqui, J; Daignault, S; Carskadon, S L; Jing, X; Chinnaiyan, A M; Kunju, L P; Palanisamy, N; Varambally, S

    2016-12-08

    MicroRNA-101, a tumor suppressor microRNA (miR), is often downregulated in cancer and is known to target multiple oncogenes. Some of the genes that are negatively regulated by miR-101 expression include histone methyltransferase EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2), COX2 (cyclooxygenase-2), POMP (proteasome maturation protein), CERS6, STMN1, MCL-1 and ROCK2, among others. In the present study, we show that miR-101 targets transcriptional coactivator SUB1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)/PC4 (positive cofactor 4) and regulates its expression. SUB1 is known to have diverse role in vital cell processes such as DNA replication, repair and heterochromatinization. SUB1 is known to modulate transcription and acts as a mediator between the upstream activators and general transcription machinery. Expression profiling in several cancers revealed SUB1 overexpression, suggesting a potential role in tumorigenesis. However, detailed regulation and function of SUB1 has not been elucidated. In this study, we show elevated expression of SUB1 in aggressive prostate cancer. Knockdown of SUB1 in prostate cancer cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro, and tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Gene expression analyses coupled with chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that SUB1 binds to the promoter regions of several oncogenes such as PLK1 (Polo-like kinase 1), C-MYC, serine-threonine kinase BUB1B and regulates their expression. Additionally, we observed SUB1 downregulated CDKN1B expression. PLK1 knockdown or use of PLK1 inhibitor can mitigate oncogenic function of SUB1 in benign prostate cancer cells. Thus, our study suggests that miR-101 loss results in increased SUB1 expression and subsequent activation of known oncogenes driving prostate cancer progression and metastasis. This study therefore demonstrates functional role of SUB1 in prostate cancer, and identifies its regulation and potential downstream therapeutic targets of SUB1 in prostate

  7. Transcription inactivation through local refolding of the RNA polymerase structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Vassylyeva, Marina N.; Sevostyanova, Anastasiya; Appleman, James R.; Xiang, Alan X.; Lira, Ricardo; Webber, Stephen E.; Klyuyev, Sergiy; Nudler, Evgeny; Artsimovitch, Irina; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; (OSU); (UAB); (Anadys); (NYUSM)

    2009-02-12

    Structural studies of antibiotics not only provide a shortcut to medicine allowing for rational structure-based drug design, but may also capture snapshots of dynamic intermediates that become 'frozen' after inhibitor binding. Myxopyronin inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) by an unknown mechanism. Here we report the structure of dMyx - a desmethyl derivative of myxopyronin B - complexed with a Thermus thermophilus RNAP holoenzyme. The antibiotic binds to a pocket deep inside the RNAP clamp head domain, which interacts with the DNA template in the transcription bubble. Notably, binding of dMyx stabilizes refolding of the {beta}'-subunit switch-2 segment, resulting in a configuration that might indirectly compromise binding to, or directly clash with, the melted template DNA strand. Consistently, footprinting data show that the antibiotic binding does not prevent nucleation of the promoter DNA melting but instead blocks its propagation towards the active site. Myxopyronins are thus, to our knowledge, a first structurally characterized class of antibiotics that target formation of the pre-catalytic transcription initiation complex - the decisive step in gene expression control. Notably, mutations designed in switch-2 mimic the dMyx effects on promoter complexes in the absence of antibiotic. Overall, our results indicate a plausible mechanism of the dMyx action and a stepwise pathway of open complex formation in which core enzyme mediates the final stage of DNA melting near the transcription start site, and that switch-2 might act as a molecular checkpoint for DNA loading in response to regulatory signals or antibiotics. The universally conserved switch-2 may have the same role in all multisubunit RNAPs.

  8. Repair of Mybpc3 mRNA by 5'-trans-splicing in a Mouse Model of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearini, Giulia; Stimpel, Doreen; Krämer, Elisabeth; Geertz, Birgit; Braren, Ingke; Gedicke-Hornung, Christina; Précigout, Guillaume; Müller, Oliver J; Katus, Hugo A; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Lorain, Stéphanie; Carrier, Lucie

    2013-07-02

    RNA trans-splicing has been explored as a therapeutic option for a variety of genetic diseases, but not for cardiac genetic disease. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal-dominant disease, characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and diastolic dysfunction. MYBPC3, encoding cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is frequently mutated. We evaluated the 5'-trans-splicing strategy in a mouse model of HCM carrying a Mybpc3 mutation. 5'-trans-splicing was induced between two independently transcribed molecules, the mutant endogenous Mypbc3 pre-mRNA and an engineered pre-trans-splicing molecule (PTM) carrying a FLAG-tagged wild-type (WT) Mybpc3 cDNA sequence. PTMs were packaged into adeno-associated virus (AAV) for transduction of cultured cardiac myocytes and the heart in vivo. Full-length repaired Mybpc3 mRNA represented up to 66% of total Mybpc3 transcripts in cardiac myocytes and 0.14% in the heart. Repaired cMyBP-C protein was detected by immunoprecipitation in cells and in vivo and exhibited correct incorporation into the sarcomere in cardiac myocytes. This study provides (i) the first evidence of successful 5'-trans-splicing in vivo and (ii) proof-of-concept of mRNA repair in the most prevalent cardiac genetic disease. Since current therapeutic options for HCM only alleviate symptoms, these findings open new horizons for causal therapy of the severe forms of the disease.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e102; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.31; published online 2 July 2013.

  9. Repair of Mybpc3 mRNA by 5′-trans-splicing in a Mouse Model of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearini, Giulia; Stimpel, Doreen; Krämer, Elisabeth; Geertz, Birgit; Braren, Ingke; Gedicke-Hornung, Christina; Précigout, Guillaume; Müller, Oliver J; Katus, Hugo A; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Lorain, Stéphanie; Carrier, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    RNA trans-splicing has been explored as a therapeutic option for a variety of genetic diseases, but not for cardiac genetic disease. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal-dominant disease, characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and diastolic dysfunction. MYBPC3, encoding cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is frequently mutated. We evaluated the 5′-trans-splicing strategy in a mouse model of HCM carrying a Mybpc3 mutation. 5′-trans-splicing was induced between two independently transcribed molecules, the mutant endogenous Mypbc3 pre-mRNA and an engineered pre-trans-splicing molecule (PTM) carrying a FLAG-tagged wild-type (WT) Mybpc3 cDNA sequence. PTMs were packaged into adeno-associated virus (AAV) for transduction of cultured cardiac myocytes and the heart in vivo. Full-length repaired Mybpc3 mRNA represented up to 66% of total Mybpc3 transcripts in cardiac myocytes and 0.14% in the heart. Repaired cMyBP-C protein was detected by immunoprecipitation in cells and in vivo and exhibited correct incorporation into the sarcomere in cardiac myocytes. This study provides (i) the first evidence of successful 5′-trans-splicing in vivo and (ii) proof-of-concept of mRNA repair in the most prevalent cardiac genetic disease. Since current therapeutic options for HCM only alleviate symptoms, these findings open new horizons for causal therapy of the severe forms of the disease. PMID:23820890

  10. Structural basis of initial RNA polymerase II transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alan C M; Sainsbury, Sarah; Cramer, Patrick

    2011-11-04

    During transcription initiation by RNA polymerase (Pol) II, a transient open promoter complex (OC) is converted to an initially transcribing complex (ITC) containing short RNAs, and to a stable elongation complex (EC). We report structures of a Pol II-DNA complex mimicking part of the OC, and of complexes representing minimal ITCs with 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 nucleotide (nt) RNAs, with and without a non-hydrolyzable nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) in the insertion site +1. The partial OC structure reveals that Pol II positions the melted template strand opposite the active site. The ITC-mimicking structures show that two invariant lysine residues anchor the 3'-proximal phosphate of short RNAs. Short DNA-RNA hybrids adopt a tilted conformation that excludes the +1 template nt from the active site. NTP binding induces complete DNA translocation and the standard hybrid conformation. Conserved NTP contacts indicate a universal mechanism of NTP selection. The essential residue Q1078 in the closed trigger loop binds the NTP 2'-OH group, explaining how the trigger loop couples catalysis to NTP selection, suppressing dNTP binding and DNA synthesis.

  11. Differential RNA-seq (dRNA-seq) for annotation of transcriptional start sites and small RNAs in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischler, Thorsten; Tan, Hock Siew; Nieselt, Kay; Sharma, Cynthia M

    2015-09-15

    The global mapping of transcription boundaries is a key step in the elucidation of the full complement of transcriptional features of an organism. It facilitates the annotation of operons and untranslated regions as well as novel transcripts, including cis- and trans-encoded small RNAs (sRNAs). So called RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) based on deep sequencing of cDNAs has greatly facilitated transcript mapping with single nucleotide resolution. However, conventional RNA-seq approaches typically cannot distinguish between primary and processed transcripts. Here we describe the recently developed differential RNA-seq (dRNA-seq) approach, which facilitates the annotation of transcriptional start sites (TSS) based on deep sequencing of two differentially treated cDNA library pairs, with one library being enriched for primary transcripts. Using the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori as a model organism, we describe the application of dRNA-seq together with an automated TSS annotation approach for generation of a genome-wide TSS map in bacteria. Besides a description of transcriptome and regulatory features that can be identified by this approach, we discuss the impact of different library preparation protocols and sequencing platforms as well as manual and automated TSS annotation. Moreover, we have set up an easily accessible online browser for visualization of the H. pylori transcriptome data from this and our previous H. pylori dRNA-seq study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Low abundant spacer 5S rRNA transcripts are frequently polyadenylated in Nicotiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulnecek, Jaroslav; Kovarik, Ales

    2007-11-01

    In plants, 5S rRNA genes (5S rDNA) encoding 120-nt structural RNA molecules of ribosomes are organized in tandem arrays comprising thousands of units. Failure to correctly terminate transcription would generate longer inaccurately processed transcripts interfering with ribosome biogenesis. Hence multiple termination signals occur immediately after the 5S rRNA coding sequence. To obtain information about the efficiency of termination of 5S rDNA transcription in plants we analyzed 5S rRNA pools in three Nicotiana species, N. sylvestris, N. tomentosiformis and N. tabacum. In addition to highly abundant 120-nt 5S rRNA transcripts, we also detected RNA species composed of a genic region and variable lengths of intergenic sequences. These genic-intergenic RNA molecules occur at a frequency severalfold lower than the mature 120-nt transcripts, and are posttranscriptionally modified by polyadenylation at their 3' end in contrast to 120-nt transcripts. An absence of 5S small RNAs (smRNA) argue against a dominant role for the smRNA biosynthesis pathway in the degradation of aberrant 5S rRNA in Nicotiana. This work is the first description of polyadenylated 5S rRNA species in higher eukaryotes originating from a read-through transcription into the intergenic spacer. We propose that polyadenylation may function in a "quality control" pathway ensuring that only correctly processed molecules enter the ribosome biogenesis.

  13. Functionally distinct regulatory RNAs generated by bidirectional transcription and processing of microRNA loci.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyler, D.M.; Okamura, K.; Chung, W.J.; Hagen, J.W.; Berezikov, E.; Hannon, G.J.; Lai, E.C

    2008-01-01

    Many microRNA (miRNA) loci exhibit compelling hairpin structures on both sense and antisense strands; however, the possibility that a miRNA gene might produce functional species from its antisense strand has not been examined. We report here that antisense transcription of the Hox miRNA locus mir-ia

  14. Chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precede the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yea Woon; Lee, Sungkung; Yun, Jangmi; Kim, AeRi

    2015-03-18

    Enhancers are closely positioned with actively transcribed target genes by chromatin looping. Non-coding RNAs are often transcribed on active enhancers, referred to as eRNAs (enhancer RNAs). To explore the kinetics of enhancer-promoter looping and eRNA transcription during transcriptional activation, we induced the β-globin locus by chemical treatment and analysed cross-linking frequency between the β-globin gene and locus control region (LCR) and the amount of eRNAs transcribed on the LCR in a time course manner. The cross-linking frequency was increased after chemical induction but before the transcriptional activation of gene in the β-globin locus. Transcription of eRNAs was increased in concomitant with the increase in cross-linking frequency. These results show that chromatin looping and eRNA transcription precedes the transcriptional activation of gene. Concomitant occurrence of the two events suggests functional relationship between them.

  15. Transcriptional bursting is intrinsically caused by interplay between RNA polymerases on DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Keisuke; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Yanagida, Toshio

    2016-12-01

    Cell-to-cell variability plays a critical role in cellular responses and decision-making in a population, and transcriptional bursting has been broadly studied by experimental and theoretical approaches as the potential source of cell-to-cell variability. Although molecular mechanisms of transcriptional bursting have been proposed, there is little consensus. An unsolved key question is whether transcriptional bursting is intertwined with many transcriptional regulatory factors or is an intrinsic characteristic of RNA polymerase on DNA. Here we design an in vitro single-molecule measurement system to analyse the kinetics of transcriptional bursting. The results indicate that transcriptional bursting is caused by interplay between RNA polymerases on DNA. The kinetics of in vitro transcriptional bursting is quantitatively consistent with the gene-nonspecific kinetics previously observed in noisy gene expression in vivo. Our kinetic analysis based on a cellular automaton model confirms that arrest and rescue by trailing RNA polymerase intrinsically causes transcriptional bursting.

  16. Transcription of the major neurospora crassa microRNA-like small RNAs relies on RNA polymerase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuying Yang

    Full Text Available Most plant and animal microRNAs (miRNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. We previously discovered miRNA-like small RNAs (milRNAs in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa and uncovered at least four different pathways for milRNA production. To understand the evolutionary origin of milRNAs, we determined the roles of polymerases II and III (Pol II and Pol III in milRNA transcription. Our results show that Pol III is responsible for the transcription of the major milRNAs produced in this organism. The inhibition of Pol III activity by an inhibitor or by gene silencing abolishes the production of most abundant milRNAs and pri-milRNAs. In addition, Pol III associates with these milRNA producing loci. Even though silencing of Pol II does not affect the synthesis of the most abundant milRNAs, Pol II or both Pol II and Pol III are associated with some milRNA-producing loci, suggesting a regulatory interaction between the two polymerases for some milRNA transcription. Furthermore, we show that one of the Pol III-transcribed milRNAs is derived from a tRNA precursor, and its biogenesis requires RNase Z, which cleaves the tRNA moiety to generate pre-milRNA. Our study identifies the transcriptional machinery responsible for the synthesis of fungal milRNAs and sheds light on the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic small RNAs.

  17. DNA-PK triggers histone ubiquitination and signaling in response to DNA double-strand breaks produced during the repair of transcription-blocking topoisomerase I lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristini, Agnese; Park, Joon-Hyung; Capranico, Giovanni; Legube, Gaëlle; Favre, Gilles; Sordet, Olivier

    2016-02-18

    Although defective repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leads to neurodegenerative diseases, the processes underlying their production and signaling in non-replicating cells are largely unknown. Stabilized topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (Top1cc) by natural compounds or common DNA alterations are transcription-blocking lesions whose repair depends primarily on Top1 proteolysis and excision by tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase-1 (TDP1). We previously reported that stabilized Top1cc produce transcription-dependent DSBs that activate ATM in neurons. Here, we use camptothecin (CPT)-treated serum-starved quiescent cells to induce transcription-blocking Top1cc and show that those DSBs are generated during Top1cc repair from Top1 peptide-linked DNA single-strand breaks generated after Top1 proteolysis and before excision by TDP1. Following DSB induction, ATM activates DNA-PK whose inhibition suppresses H2AX and H2A ubiquitination and the later assembly of activated ATM into nuclear foci. Inhibition of DNA-PK also reduces Top1 ubiquitination and proteolysis as well as resumption of RNA synthesis suggesting that DSB signaling further enhances Top1cc repair. Finally, we show that co-transcriptional DSBs kill quiescent cells. Together, these new findings reveal that DSB production and signaling by transcription-blocking Top1 lesions impact on non-replicating cell fate and provide insights on the molecular pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as SCAN1 and AT syndromes, which are caused by TDP1 and ATM deficiency, respectively.

  18. Double strand break repair by capture of retrotransposon sequences and reverse-transcribed spliced mRNA sequences in mouse zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryuichi; Ishii, Masayuki; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Kitazawa, Moe; Usami, Takako; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Kanno, Jun; Ikawa, Masahito; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2015-07-28

    The CRISPR/Cas system efficiently introduces double strand breaks (DSBs) at a genomic locus specified by a single guide RNA (sgRNA). The DSBs are subsequently repaired through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Here, we demonstrate that DSBs introduced into mouse zygotes by the CRISPR/Cas system are repaired by the capture of DNA sequences deriving from retrotransposons, genomic DNA, mRNA and sgRNA. Among 93 mice analysed, 57 carried mutant alleles and 22 of them had long de novo insertion(s) at DSB-introduced sites; two were spliced mRNAs of Pcnt and Inadl without introns, indicating the involvement of reverse transcription (RT). Fifteen alleles included retrotransposons, mRNAs, and other sequences without evidence of RT. Two others were sgRNAs with one containing T7 promoter-derived sequence suggestive of a PCR product as its origin. In conclusion, RT-product-mediated DSB repair (RMDR) and non-RMDR repair were identified in the mouse zygote. We also confirmed that both RMDR and non-RMDR take place in CRISPR/Cas transfected NIH-3T3 cells. Finally, as two de novo MuERV-L insertions in C57BL/6 mice were shown to have characteristic features of RMDR in natural conditions, we hypothesize that RMDR contributes to the emergence of novel DNA sequences in the course of evolution.

  19. Fully functional global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts and compromised transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in condensed mitotic chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komura, Jun-ichiro, E-mail: junkom@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Ikehata, Hironobu [Department of Cell Biology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Mori, Toshio [Radioisotope Research Center, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Department of Cell Biology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2012-03-10

    During mitosis, chromatin is highly condensed, and activities such as transcription and semiconservative replication do not occur. Consequently, the condensed condition of mitotic chromatin is assumed to inhibit DNA metabolism by impeding the access of DNA-transacting proteins. However, about 40 years ago, several researchers observed unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated mitotic chromosomes, suggesting the presence of excision repair. We re-examined this subject by directly measuring the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions by an ELISA and by a Southern-based technique in HeLa cells arrested at mitosis. We observed that the removal of (6-4) photoproducts from the overall genome in mitotic cells was as efficient as in interphase cells. This suggests that global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully functional during mitosis, and that the DNA in mitotic chromatin is accessible to proteins involved in this mode of DNA repair. Nevertheless, not all modes of DNA repair seem fully functional during mitosis. We also observed that the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the dihydrofolate reductase and c-MYC genes in mitotic cells was very slow. This suggests that transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is compromised or non-functional during mitosis, which is probably the consequence of mitotic transcriptional repression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully active in mitotic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA in condensed mitotic chromatin does not seem inaccessible or inert. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitotic transcriptional repression may impair transcription-coupled repair.

  20. High SINE RNA Expression Correlates with Post-Transcriptional Downregulation of BRCA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bosco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs are non-autonomous retrotransposons that comprise a large fraction of the human genome. SINEs are demethylated in human disease, but whether SINEs become transcriptionally induced and how the resulting transcripts may affect the expression of protein coding genes is unknown. Here, we show that downregulation of the mRNA of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 is associated with increased transcription of SINEs and production of sense and antisense SINE small RNAs. We find that BRCA1 mRNA is post-transcriptionally down-regulated in a Dicer and Drosha dependent manner and that expression of a SINE inverted repeat with sequence identity to a BRCA1 intron is sufficient for downregulation of BRCA1 mRNA. These observations suggest that transcriptional activation of SINEs could contribute to a novel mechanism of RNA mediated post-transcriptional silencing of human genes.

  1. The thumb subdomain of yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase is involved in processivity, transcript fidelity and mitochondrial transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Gilberto; Sousa, Rui; Brieba, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    Single subunit RNA polymerases have evolved 2 mechanisms to synthesize long transcripts without falling off a DNA template: binding of nascent RNA and interactions with an RNA:DNA hybrid. Mitochondrial RNA polymerases share a common ancestor with T-odd bacteriophage single subunit RNA polymerases. Herein we characterized the role of the thumb subdomain of the yeast mtRNA polymerase gene (RPO41) in complex stability, processivity, and fidelity. We found that deletion and point mutants of the thumb subdomain of yeast mtRNA polymerase increase the synthesis of abortive transcripts and the probability that the polymerase will disengage from the template during the formation of the late initial transcription and elongation complexes. Mutations in the thumb subdomain increase the amount of slippage products from a homopolymeric template and, unexpectedly, thumb subdomain deletions decrease the binding affinity for mitochondrial transcription factor (Mtf1). The latter suggests that the thumb subdomain is part of an extended binding surface area involved in binding Mtf1.

  2. Control of gene expression during T cell activation: alternate regulation of mRNA transcription and mRNA stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorospe Myriam

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has become highly valuable for identifying complex global changes in gene expression patterns. The effective correlation of observed changes in gene expression with shared transcription regulatory elements remains difficult to demonstrate convincingly. One reason for this difficulty may result from the intricate convergence of both transcriptional and mRNA turnover events which, together, directly influence steady-state mRNA levels. Results In order to investigate the relative contribution of gene transcription and changes in mRNA stability regulation to standard analyses of gene expression, we used two distinct microarray methods which individually measure nuclear gene transcription and changes in polyA mRNA gene expression. Gene expression profiles were obtained from both polyA mRNA (whole-cell and nuclear run-on (newly transcribed RNA across a time course of one hour following the activation of human Jurkat T cells with PMA plus ionomycin. Comparative analysis revealed that regulation of mRNA stability may account for as much as 50% of all measurements of changes in polyA mRNA in this system, as inferred by the absence of any corresponding regulation of nuclear gene transcription activity for these groups of genes. Genes which displayed dramatic elevations in both mRNA and nuclear run-on RNA were shown to be inhibited by Actinomycin D (ActD pre-treatment of cells while large numbers of genes regulated only through altered mRNA turnover (both up and down were ActD-resistant. Consistent patterns across the time course were observed for both transcribed and stability-regulated genes. Conclusion We propose that regulation of mRNA stability contributes significantly to the observed changes in gene expression in response to external stimuli, as measured by high throughput systems.

  3. A role for RNA post-transcriptional regulation in satellite cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina Nicholas H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Satellite cells are resident skeletal muscle stem cells responsible for muscle maintenance and repair. In resting muscle, satellite cells are maintained in a quiescent state. Satellite cell activation induces the myogenic commitment factor, MyoD, and cell cycle entry to facilitate transition to a population of proliferating myoblasts that eventually exit the cycle and regenerate muscle tissue. The molecular mechanism involved in the transition of a quiescent satellite cell to a transit-amplifying myoblast is poorly understood. Methods Satellite cells isolated by FACS from uninjured skeletal muscle and 12 h post-muscle injury from wild type and Syndecan-4 null mice were probed using Affymetrix 430v2 gene chips and analyzed by Spotfiretm and Ingenuity Pathway analysis to identify gene expression changes and networks associated with satellite cell activation, respectively. Additional analyses of target genes identify miRNAs exhibiting dynamic changes in expression during satellite cell activation. The function of the miRNAs was assessed using miRIDIAN hairpin inhibitors. Results An unbiased gene expression screen identified over 4,000 genes differentially expressed in satellite cells in vivo within 12 h following muscle damage and more than 50% of these decrease dramatically. RNA binding proteins and genes involved in post-transcriptional regulation were significantly over-represented whereas splicing factors were preferentially downregulated and mRNA stability genes preferentially upregulated. Furthermore, six computationally identified miRNAs demonstrated novel expression through muscle regeneration and in satellite cells. Three of the six miRNAs were found to regulate satellite cell fate. Conclusions The quiescent satellite cell is actively maintained in a state poised to activate in response to external signals. Satellite cell activation appears to be regulated by post-transcriptional gene regulation.

  4. A new way to start: nanoRNA-mediated priming of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Bryce E

    2012-01-01

    A recent study provides evidence that RNA polymerase uses 2- to ~4-nt RNAs, species termed "nanoRNAs," to prime transcription initiation in Escherichia coli. Priming of transcription initiation with nanoRNAs represents a previously undocumented component of transcription start site selection and gene expression.

  5. Effects of downregulating TEAD4 transcripts by RNA interference on early development of bovine embryos

    OpenAIRE

    SAKURAI, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Kazuki; EMURA, Natsuko; HASHIZUME, Tsutomu; SAWAI, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor TEA domain family transcription factor 4 (Tead4) is one of the key factors involved in the differentiation of the trophectoderm (TE) in murine embryos. However, knowledge on the roles of TEAD4 in preimplantation development during bovine embryos is currently limited. This study examined the transcript and protein expression patterns of TEAD4 and attempted to elucidate the functions of TEAD4 during bovine preimplantation development using RNA interference. TEAD4 mRNA was f...

  6. Alkylation damage in DNA and RNA--repair mechanisms and medical significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabløs, Finn; Feyzi, Emadoldin; Aas, Per Arne

    2004-01-01

    Alkylation lesions in DNA and RNA result from endogenous compounds, environmental agents and alkylating drugs. Simple methylating agents, e.g. methylnitrosourea, tobacco-specific nitrosamines and drugs like temozolomide or streptozotocin, form adducts at N- and O-atoms in DNA bases. These lesions...... are mainly repaired by direct base repair, base excision repair, and to some extent by nucleotide excision repair (NER). The identified carcinogenicity of O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-meG) is largely caused by its miscoding properties. Mutations from this lesion are prevented by O(6)-alkylG-DNA alkyltransferase......, inactivation of the MMR system in an AGT-defective background causes resistance to the killing effects of O(6)-alkylating agents, but not to the mutagenic effect. Bifunctional alkylating agents, such as chlorambucil or carmustine (BCNU), are commonly used anti-cancer drugs. DNA lesions caused by these agents...

  7. Conserved pattern of antisense overlapping transcription in the homologous ERCC-1 and yeast RAD10 DNA repair gene regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J. van den Tol; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk); I.P. Rupp; P. Reynolds (Paul); L. Prakash; S. Prakash

    1989-01-01

    textabstractWe report that the genes for the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD10 and human ERCC-1 DNA excision repair proteins harbor overlapping antisense transcription units in their 3' regions. Since naturally occurring antisense transcription is rare in S. cerevisiae and humans (this is

  8. Repair of rhodopsin mRNA by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing: a new approach for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission.

  9. Bacillus subtilis 6S-2 RNA serves as a template for short transcripts in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Philipp G; Schlereth, Julia; Lechner, Marcus; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-04-01

    The global transcriptional regulator 6S RNA is abundant in a broad range of bacteria. The RNA competes with DNA promoters for binding to the housekeeping RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme. When bound to RNAP, 6S RNA serves as a transcription template for RNAP in an RNA-dependent RNA polymerization reaction. The resulting short RNA transcripts (so-called product RNAs = pRNAs) can induce a stable structural rearrangement of 6S RNA when reaching a certain length. This rearrangement leads to the release of RNAP and thus the recovery of transcription at DNA promoters. While most bacteria express a single 6S RNA, some harbor a second 6S RNA homolog (termed 6S-2 RNA in Bacillus subtilis). Bacillus subtilis 6S-2 RNA was recently shown to exhibit essentially all hallmark features of a bona fide 6S RNA in vitro, but evidence for the synthesis of 6S-2 RNA-derived pRNAs in vivo has been lacking so far. This raised the question of whether the block of RNAP by 6S-2 RNA might be lifted by a mechanism other than pRNA synthesis. However, here we demonstrate that 6S-2 RNA is able to serve as a template for pRNA synthesis in vivo. We verify this finding by using three independent approaches including a novel primer extension assay. Thus, we demonstrate the first example of an organism that expresses two distinct 6S RNAs that both exhibit all mechanistic features defined for this type of regulatory RNA.

  10. Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends for RNA Transcript Sequencing in Staphylococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) is a technique that was developed to swiftly and efficiently amplify full-length RNA molecules in which the terminal ends have not been characterized. Current usage of this procedure has been more focused on sequencing and characterizing RNA 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Herein is described an adapted RACE protocol to amplify bacterial RNA transcripts.

  11. Requirement for PBAF in transcriptional repression and repair at DNA breaks in actively transcribed regions of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Kakarougkas, Andreas; Ismail, Amani; Chambers, Anna; Riballo, Queti; Herbert, Alex; Kunzel, Julia; Lobrich, Markus; Jeggo, Penny; Downs, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Summary Actively transcribed regions of the genome are vulnerable to genomic instability. Recently, it was discovered that transcription is repressed in response to neighboring DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is not known whether a failure to silence transcription flanking DSBs has any impact on DNA repair efficiency or whether chromatin remodelers contribute to the process. Here, we show that the PBAF remodeling complex is important for DSB-induced transcriptional silencing and promotes ...

  12. The ribosomal RNA transcription unit of Entamoeba invadens: accumulation of unprocessed pre-rRNA and a long non coding RNA during encystation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Sandeep; Singh, Nishant; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2013-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA genes in Entamoeba spp. are located on extrachromosomal circular molecules. Unlike model organisms where rRNA transcription stops during growth stress, Entamoeba histolytica continues transcription; but unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during stress, along with a novel class of circular transcripts from the 5'-external transcribed spacer (ETS). To determine the fate of rRNA transcription during stage conversion between trophozoite to cyst we analyzed Entamoeba invadens, a model system for differentiation studies in Entamoeba. We characterized the complete rDNA transcription unit by mapping the ends of pre-rRNA and mature rRNAs. The 3' end of mature 28S rRNA was located 321 nt downstream of the end predicted by sequence homology with E. histolytica. The major processing sites were mapped in external and internal transcribed spacers. The promoter located within 146 nt upstream of 5' ETS was used to transcribe the pre-rRNA. On the other hand, a second promoter located at the 3' end of 28S rDNA was used to transcribe almost the entire intergenic spacer into a long non coding (nc) RNA (>10 kb). Interestingly we found that the levels of pre-rRNA and long ncRNA, measured by northern hybridization, decreased initially in cells shifted to encystation medium, after which they began to increase and reached high levels by 72 h when mature cysts were formed. Unlike E. histolytica, no circular transcripts were found in E. invadens. E. histolytica and E. invadens express fundamentally different ncRNAs from the rDNA locus, which may reflect their adaptation to different hosts (human and reptiles, respectively). This is the first description of rDNA organization and transcription in E. invadens, and provides the framework for further studies on regulation of rRNA synthesis during cyst formation.

  13. FARNA: knowledgebase of inferred functions of non-coding RNA transcripts

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2016-10-12

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes play a major role in control of heterogeneous cellular behavior. Yet, their functions are largely uncharacterized. Current available databases lack in-depth information of ncRNA functions across spectrum of various cells/tissues. Here, we present FARNA, a knowledgebase of inferred functions of 10,289 human ncRNA transcripts (2,734 microRNA and 7,555 long ncRNA) in 119 tissues and 177 primary cells of human. Since transcription factors (TFs) and TF co-factors (TcoFs) are crucial components of regulatory machinery for activation of gene transcription, cellular processes and diseases in which TFs and TcoFs are involved suggest functions of the transcripts they regulate. In FARNA, functions of a transcript are inferred from TFs and TcoFs whose genes co-express with the transcript controlled by these TFs and TcoFs in a considered cell/tissue. Transcripts were annotated using statistically enriched GO terms, pathways and diseases across cells/tissues based on guilt-by-association principle. Expression profiles across cells/tissues based on Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) are provided. FARNA, having the most comprehensive function annotation of considered ncRNAs across widest spectrum of human cells/tissues, has a potential to greatly contribute to our understanding of ncRNA roles and their regulatory mechanisms in human. FARNA can be accessed at: http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/farna

  14. Enhancement of single guide RNA transcription for efficient CRISPR/Cas-based genomic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui-Tei, Kumiko; Maruyama, Shohei; Nakano, Yuko

    2017-06-01

    Genomic engineering using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein is a promising approach for targeting the genomic DNA of virtually any organism in a sequence-specific manner. Recent remarkable advances in CRISPR/Cas technology have made it a feasible system for use in therapeutic applications and biotechnology. In the CRISPR/Cas system, a guide RNA (gRNA), interacting with the Cas protein, recognizes a genomic region with sequence complementarity, and the double-stranded DNA at the target site is cleaved by the Cas protein. A widely used gRNA is an RNA polymerase III (pol III)-driven single gRNA (sgRNA), which is produced by artificial fusion of CRISPR RNA (crRNA) and trans-activation crRNA (tracrRNA). However, we identified a TTTT stretch, known as a termination signal of RNA pol III, in the scaffold region of the sgRNA. Here, we revealed that sgRNA carrying a TTTT stretch reduces the efficiency of sgRNA transcription due to premature transcriptional termination, and decreases the efficiency of genome editing. Unexpectedly, it was also shown that the premature terminated sgRNA may have an adverse effect of inducing RNA interference. Such disadvantageous effects were avoided by substituting one base in the TTTT stretch.

  15. Preparation of long templates for RNA in vitro transcription by recursive PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Jessica C; Azizi, Bahareh; Lenz, Timothy K; Roy, Poorna; Williams, Loren Dean

    2012-01-01

    Preparing conventional DNA templates for in vitro RNA transcription involves PCR amplification of the DNA gene coding for the RNA of interest from plasmid or genomic DNA, subsequent amplification with primers containing a 5' T7 promoter region, and confirmation of the amplified DNA sequence. Complications arise in applications where long, nonnative sequences are desired in the final RNA transcript. Here we describe a ligase-independent method for the preparation of long synthetic DNA templates for in vitro RNA transcription. In Recursive PCR, partially complementary DNA oligonucleotides coding for the RNA sequence of interest are annealed, extended into the full-length double-stranded DNA, and amplified in a single PCR. Long insertions, mutations, or deletions are accommodated prior to in vitro transcription by simple substitution of oligonucleotides.

  16. Selectivity and proofreading both contribute significantly to the fidelity of RNA polymerase III transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alic, Nazif; Ayoub, Nayla; Landrieux, Emilie; Favry, Emmanuel; Baudouin-Cornu, Peggy; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    We examine here the mechanisms ensuring the fidelity of RNA synthesis by RNA polymerase III (Pol III). Misincorporation could only be observed by using variants of Pol III deficient in the intrinsic RNA cleavage activity. Determination of relative rates of the reactions producing correct and erroneous transcripts at a specific position on a tRNA gene, combined with computational methods, demonstrated that Pol III has a highly efficient proofreading activity increasing its transcriptional fidelity by a factor of 103 over the error rate determined solely by selectivity (1.8 × 10−4). We show that Pol III slows down synthesis past a misincorporation to achieve efficient proofreading. We discuss our findings in the context of transcriptional fidelity studies performed on RNA Pols, proposing that the fidelity of transcription is more crucial for Pol III than Pol II. PMID:17553959

  17. Analysis of Single-cell Gene Transcription by RNA Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Joergensen, Louise;

    2012-01-01

    and the consequence of differential binding on the clinical outcome of P. falciparum infections. Recently, the mutually exclusive transcription paradigm has been called into doubt by transcription assays based on individual P. falciparum transcript identification in single infected erythrocytic cells using RNA...... fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of var gene transcription by the parasite in individual nuclei of P. falciparum IE(1). Here, we present a detailed protocol for carrying out the RNA-FISH methodology for analysis of var gene transcription in single-nuclei of P. falciparum infected human...... erythrocytes. The method is based on the use of digoxigenin- and biotin- labeled antisense RNA probes using the TSA Plus Fluorescence Palette System(2) (Perkin Elmer), microscopic analyses and freshly selected P. falciparum IE. The in situ hybridization method can be used to monitor transcription...

  18. Heat shock response in yeast involves changes in both transcription rates and mRNA stabilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Castells-Roca

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the heat stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by determining mRNA levels and transcription rates for the whole transcriptome after a shift from 25 °C to 37 °C. Using an established mathematical algorithm, theoretical mRNA decay rates have also been calculated from the experimental data. We have verified the mathematical predictions for selected genes by determining their mRNA decay rates at different times during heat stress response using the regulatable tetO promoter. This study indicates that the yeast response to heat shock is not only due to changes in transcription rates, but also to changes in the mRNA stabilities. mRNA stability is affected in 62% of the yeast genes and it is particularly important in shaping the mRNA profile of the genes belonging to the environmental stress response. In most cases, changes in transcription rates and mRNA stabilities are homodirectional for both parameters, although some interesting cases of antagonist behavior are found. The statistical analysis of gene targets and sequence motifs within the clusters of genes with similar behaviors shows that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulons apparently contribute to the general heat stress response by means of transcriptional factors and RNA binding proteins.

  19. Single-molecule RNA observation in vivo reveals dynamics of co-transcriptional splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, M. L.; Coulon, A.; de Turris, V.; Palangat, M.; Chow, C. C.; Singer, R. H.; Larson, D. R.

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of pre-mRNA and the splicing of that pre-mRNA to form completed transcripts requires coordination between two large multi-subunit complexes (the transcription elongation complex and the spliceosome). How this coordination occurs in vivo is unknown. Here we report the first experimental observation of transcription and splicing occurring at the same gene in living cells. By utilizing the PP7/MS2 fluorescent RNA reporter system, we can directly observe two distinct regions of the nascent RNA, allowing us to measure the rise and fall time of the intron and exon of a reporter gene stably integrated into a human cell line. The reporter gene consists of a beta globin gene where we have inserted a 24 RNA hairpin cassette into the intron/exon. Upon synthesis, the RNA hairpins are tightly bound by fluorescently-labeled PP7/MS2 bacteriophage coat proteins. After gene induction, a single locus of active transcription in the nucleus shows fluorescence intensity changes characteristic of the synthesis and excision of the intron/exon. Using fluctuation analysis, we determine the elongation rate to be 1.5 kb/min. From the temporal cross correlation function, we determine that splicing of this gene must be co-transcriptional with a splicing time of ~100 seconds before termination and a ~200 second pause at termination. We propose that dual-color RNA imaging may be extended to investigate other mechanisms of transcription, gene regulation, and RNA processing.

  20. Transcription factor binding sites are highly enriched within microRNA precursor sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piriyapongsa Jittima

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors are thought to regulate the transcription of microRNA genes in a manner similar to that of protein-coding genes; that is, by binding to conventional transcription factor binding site DNA sequences located in or near promoter regions that lie upstream of the microRNA genes. However, in the course of analyzing the genomics of human microRNA genes, we noticed that annotated transcription factor binding sites commonly lie within 70- to 110-nt long microRNA small hairpin precursor sequences. Results We report that about 45% of all human small hairpin microRNA (pre-miR sequences contain at least one predicted transcription factor binding site motif that is conserved across human, mouse and rat, and this rises to over 75% if one excludes primate-specific pre-miRs. The association is robust and has extremely strong statistical significance; it affects both intergenic and intronic pre-miRs and both isolated and clustered microRNA genes. We also confirmed and extended this finding using a separate analysis that examined all human pre-miR sequences regardless of conservation across species. Conclusions The transcription factor binding sites localized within small hairpin microRNA precursor sequences may possibly regulate their transcription. Transcription factors may also possibly bind directly to nascent primary microRNA gene transcripts or small hairpin microRNA precursors and regulate their processing. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Guillaume Bourque (nominated by Jerzy Jurka, Dmitri Pervouchine (nominated by Mikhail Gelfand, and Yuriy Gusev.

  1. Counterselection of prokaryotic ribosomal RNA during reverse transcription using non-random hexameric oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, J M; Robb, F T

    2007-12-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is the major component in total RNA extracts, interfering with the synthesis of cDNA corresponding to messenger RNA (mRNA). In this study, we present a novel strategy for selectively discriminating against rRNA and favoring mRNA from prokaryotes during synthesis of cDNA by reverse transcriptase. Our technique is based on the fact that rRNA sequences, in many species, are G+C rich relative to the genome at large, and highly conserved among prokaryotes. The sequence TTTT is therefore rarely found in rRNA sequences. However, TTTT priming sites are found at a much higher frequency in protein-encoding gene sequences. We designed specific hexamers (HD/DHTTTT) to prime reverse transcription reactions resulting in a selective synthesis of cDNA corresponding to mRNA from prokaryotic total RNA extractions.

  2. Understanding the Molecular Basis of RNA Polymerase II Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Su; Wang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic nucleic acid analogues have profoundly advanced our knowledge of DNA and RNA, as well as the complex biological processes that involve nucleic acids. As a pivotal enzyme, eukaryotic RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is responsible for transcribing DNA into messenger RNA, which serves as a template to direct protein synthesis. Chemically modified nucleic acid analogues have greatly facilitated the structural elucidation of RNA Pol II elongation complex and understanding the key chemical int...

  3. Expression of DNA Repair Enzyme hMTH1 mRNA and Protein in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hejun; CHENG Bin; LIN Jusheng

    2005-01-01

    To study the expression of DNA repair enzyme hMTH1 mRNA and protein in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, tissues adjacent to the cancers, normal liver cells and hepatoma cell lines, and to investigate their function in the progress of HCC, semi-quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was employed to examine the expression of hMTH1 mRNA in matched HCC tissues (HT)/surrounding tissues (HST) of HCC, normal liver cell L02 and hepatoma cell lines SMMC7721, HepG2. hMTH1 protein was detected in corresponding HT as well as their HST by immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that the expression level of hMTH1 mRNA in HT was higher than that in HST (t=2.424, P <0.05). The expression level of hMTH1 mRNA in two hepatoma cell lines was higher than that in normal liver cell line (F=6.810, P <0.01). The expression of hMTH1 mRNA in SMMC7721 was similar to that in HepG2. hMTH1 protein was 88.2 % (15 of 17) positive in HT and 82.4 % (14 of 17) in HST. The protein level of hMTH1 in HT was correspondingly higher than in their HST (t=2.618,P<0.05). It is concluded that hMTH1 mRNA and protein were over-expressed in HCC and hepatoma cell lines. It may be one of the key events during the carcinogenesis,progression of HCC and may promote the malignant growth. These results suggest that hMTH1 plays a role in HCC and may be a candidate marker for the diagnosis of HCC.

  4. Effects of single-base substitutions within the acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA promoter on transcription and on binding of transcription initiation factor and RNA polymerase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kownin, P.; Bateman, E.; Paule, M.R.

    1988-02-01

    Single-point mutations were introduced into the promoter region of the Acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA gene by chemical mutagen treatment of a single-stranded clone in vitro, followed by reverse transcription and cloning of the altered fragment. The promoter mutants were tested for transcription initiation factor (TIF) binding by a template commitment assay plus DNase I footprinting and for transcription by an in vitro runoff assay. Point mutations within the previously identified TIF interaction region (between -20 and -47, motifs A and B) indicated that TIF interacts most strongly with a sequence centered at -29 and less tightly with sequences upstream and downstream. Some alterations of the base sequence closer to the transcription start site (and outside the TIF-protected site) also significantly decrease specific RNA synthesis in vitro. These were within the region which is protected from DNAse I digestion by polymerase I, but these mutations did not detectably affect the binding of polymerase to the promoter.

  5. Transcription and Maturation of mRNA in Dinoflagellates

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are of great importance to the marine ecosystem, yet scant details of how gene expression is regulated at the transcriptional level are available. Transcription is of interest in the context of the chromatin structure in the dinoflagellates as it shows many differences from more typical eukaryotic cells. Here we canvas recent transcriptome profiles to identify the molecular building blocks available for the construction of the transcriptional machinery and contrast these with ...

  6. Mutations in the CRE pocket of bacterial RNA polymerase affect multiple steps of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petushkov, Ivan; Pupov, Danil; Bass, Irina; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2015-07-13

    During transcription, the catalytic core of RNA polymerase (RNAP) must interact with the DNA template with low-sequence specificity to ensure efficient enzyme translocation and RNA extension. Unexpectedly, recent structural studies of bacterial promoter complexes revealed specific interactions between the nontemplate DNA strand at the downstream edge of the transcription bubble (CRE, core recognition element) and a protein pocket formed by core RNAP (CRE pocket). We investigated the roles of these interactions in transcription by analyzing point amino acid substitutions and deletions in Escherichia coli RNAP. The mutations affected multiple steps of transcription, including promoter recognition, RNA elongation and termination. In particular, we showed that interactions of the CRE pocket with a nontemplate guanine immediately downstream of the active center stimulate RNA-hairpin-dependent transcription pausing but not other types of pausing. Thus, conformational changes of the elongation complex induced by nascent RNA can modulate CRE effects on transcription. The results highlight the roles of specific core RNAP-DNA interactions at different steps of RNA synthesis and suggest their importance for transcription regulation in various organisms.

  7. Transcription inhibition by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) causes DNA damage and triggers homologous recombination repair in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoimenov, Ivaylo [Department of Genetics Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Gottipati, Ponnari [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Schultz, Niklas [Department of Genetics Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Helleday, Thomas, E-mail: helleday@gmt.su.se [Department of Genetics Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-10

    Transcription, replication and homologous recombination are intrinsically connected and it is well established that an increase of transcription is associated with an increase in homologous recombination. Here, we have studied how homologous recombination is affected during transcription inhibition by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB), a compound that prevents activating phosphorylations of the RNA Pol II C-terminal domain. We identify that DRB triggers an increase in homologous recombination within the hprt gene as well as increasing RAD51 foci formation in mammalian cells. Furthermore, we find that DRB-induced transcriptional stress is associated with formation of the nuclear foci of the phosphorylated form of H2AX ({gamma}H2AX). We accounted that about 72% of RAD51 foci co-localized with the observed {gamma}H2AX foci. Interestingly, we find that XRCC3 mutated, homologous recombination defective cells are hypersensitive to the toxic effect of DRB and fail to form RAD51 foci. In conclusion, we show that DRB-induced transcription inhibition is associated with the formation of a lesion that triggers RAD51-dependent homologous recombination repair, required for survival under transcriptional stress.

  8. Importance of steric effects on the efficiency and fidelity of transcription by T7 RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Sébastien; Kool, Eric T

    2011-11-29

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerases such as T7 RNA polymerase (T7 RNAP) perform the transcription of DNA into mRNA with high efficiency and high fidelity. Although structural studies have provided a detailed account of the molecular basis of transcription, the relative importance of factors like hydrogen bonds and steric effects remains poorly understood. We report herein the first study aimed at systematically probing the importance of steric and electrostatic effects on the efficiency and fidelity of DNA transcription by T7 RNAP. We used synthetic nonpolar analogues of thymine with sizes varying in subangstrom increments to probe the steric requirements of T7 RNAP during the elongation mode of transcription. Enzymatic assays with internal radiolabeling were performed to compare the efficiency of transcription of modified DNA templates with a natural template containing thymine as a reference. Furthermore, we analyzed effects on the fidelity by measuring the composition of RNA transcripts by enzymatic digestion followed by two-dimensional thin layer chromatography separation. Our results demonstrate that hydrogen bonds play an important role in the efficiency of transcription but, interestingly, do not appear to be required for faithful transcription. Steric effects (size and shape variations) are found to be significant both in insertion of a new RNA base and in extension beyond it.

  9. A Comparative Study of RNA Polymerase II Transcription Machinery in Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nimisha; Mehta, Surbhi

    The control of gene expression, predominantly at the level of transcription, plays a fundamental role in biological processes determining the phenotypic changes in cells and organisms. The eukaryotes have evolved a complex and sophisticated transcription machinery to transcribe DNA into RNA. RNA polymerase II enzyme lies at the centre of the transcription apparatus that comprises nearly 60 polypeptides and is responsible for the expression and regulation of proteinencoding genes. Much of our present understanding and knowledge of the RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus in eukaryotes has been derived from studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. More recently, Schizosaccharomyces pombe has emerged as a better model system to study transcription because the transcription mechanism in this yeast is closer to that in higher eukaryotes. Also, studies on components of the basal transcription machinery have revealed a number of properties that are common with other eukaryotes, but have also highlighted some features unique to S. pombe. In fact, the fungal transcription associated protein families show greater species specificity and only 15% of these proteins contain homologues shared between both S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. In this chapter, we compare the RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus in different yeasts.

  10. Heterologous replicase driven 3' end repair of Cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanandam, Venkatesh; Varady, Erika; Rao, A L N

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the extent of the 3' end repair in a satellite RNA of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) strain Q (Q(sat)) by a heterologous Tomato aspermy virus (TAV), a set of biologically active agrotransformants corresponding to the three genomic RNAs of TAV was developed. Analysis of Nicotiana benthamiana plants agroinfiltrated with TAV and either wild type or each of the six 3' deletion mutants of Q(sat) revealed that (i) heterologous replicase failed to generate Q(sat) multimers, a hallmark feature of homologous replicase dependent replication of Qsat; (ii) manifestation of severe symptom phenotypes and progeny analysis suggested that heterologous replicase was competent to repair Q(sat) deletion mutants lacking up to 3'13 nucleotides (nt) but not beyond and (iii) comparative in silico analysis indicated that the 3' secondary structural features of the repaired Q(sat) progeny from heterologous vs homologous driven replicases are remarkably very similar. The significance of these observations is discussed.

  11. Transcriptional properties and splicing of the flamenco piRNA cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriaux, Coline; Desset, Sophie; Renaud, Yoan; Vaury, Chantal; Brasset, Emilie

    2014-04-01

    In Drosophila, the piRNA cluster, flamenco, produces most of the piRNAs (PIWI-interacting RNAs) that silence transposable elements in the somatic follicle cells during oogenesis. These piRNAs are thought to be processed from a long single-stranded precursor transcript. Here, we demonstrate that flamenco transcription is initiated from an RNA polymerase II promoter containing an initiator motif (Inr) and downstream promoter element (DPE) and requires the transcription factor, Cubitus interruptus. We show that the flamenco precursor transcript undergoes differential alternative splicing to generate diverse RNA precursors that are processed to piRNAs. Our data reveal dynamic processing steps giving rise to piRNA cluster precursors.

  12. Characterization of Transcriptional Complexity during Berry Development in Vitis vinifera Using RNA-Seq

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sara Zenoni; Alberto Ferrarini; Enrico Giacomelli; Luciano Xumerle; Marianna Fasoli; Giovanni Malerba; Diana Bellin; Mario Pezzotti; Massimo Delledonne

    2010-01-01

    ... of transcriptomes can be studied. Here we report on the first use of RNA-Seq to gain insight into the wide range of transcriptional responses that are associated with berry development in Vitis vinifera 'Corvina...

  13. Properties of the reverse transcription reaction in mRNA quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Håkansson, Joakim; Xian, Xiaojie;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In most measurements of gene expression, mRNA is first reverse-transcribed into cDNA. We studied the reverse transcription reaction and its consequences for quantitative measurements of gene expression. METHODS: We used SYBR green I-based quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) to measure......-QPCR) was mainly attributable to the reverse transcription step. Reverse transcription efficiency depended on priming strategy, and the dependence was different for the five genes studied. Reverse transcription yields also depended on total RNA concentration. CONCLUSIONS: RT-QPCR gene expression measurements...... are comparable only when the same priming strategy and reaction conditions are used in all experiments and the samples contain the same total amount of RNA. Experimental accuracy is improved by running samples in (at least) duplicate starting with the reverse transcription reaction....

  14. Direct regulation of tRNA and 5S rRNA gene transcription by Polo-like kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairley, Jennifer A; Mitchell, Louise E; Berg, Tracy; Kenneth, Niall S; von Schubert, Conrad; Silljé, Herman H W; Medema, René H; Nigg, Erich A; White, Robert J

    2012-02-24

    Polo-like kinase Plk1 controls numerous aspects of cell-cycle progression. We show that it associates with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes and regulates their transcription by RNA polymerase III (pol III) through direct binding and phosphorylation of transcription factor Brf1. During interphase, Plk1 promotes tRNA and 5S rRNA expression by phosphorylating Brf1 directly on serine 450. However, this stimulatory modification is overridden at mitosis, when elevated Plk1 activity causes Brf1 phosphorylation on threonine 270 (T270), which prevents pol III recruitment. Thus, although Plk1 enhances net tRNA and 5S rRNA production, consistent with its proliferation-stimulating function, it also suppresses untimely transcription when cells divide. Genomic instability is apparent in cells with Brf1 T270 mutated to alanine to resist Plk1-directed inactivation, suggesting that chromosome segregation is vulnerable to inappropriate pol III activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. RNA secondary structures regulate three steps of Rho-dependent transcription termination within a bacterial mRNA leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriner, Michelle A; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2017-01-25

    Transcription termination events in bacteria often require the RNA helicase Rho. Typically, Rho promotes termination at the end of coding sequences, but it can also terminate transcription within leader regions to implement regulatory decisions. Rho-dependent termination requires initial recognition of a Rho utilization (rut) site on a nascent RNA by Rho's primary binding surface. However, it is presently unclear what factors determine the location of transcription termination, how RNA secondary structures influence this process and whether mechanistic differences distinguish constitutive from regulated Rho-dependent terminators. We previously demonstrated that the 5' leader mRNA of the Salmonella corA gene can adopt two mutually exclusive conformations that dictate accessibility of a rut site to Rho. We now report that the corA leader also controls two subsequent steps of Rho-dependent termination. First, the RNA conformation that presents an accessible rut site promotes pausing of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at a single Rho-dependent termination site over 100 nt downstream. Second, an additional RNA stem-loop promotes Rho activity and controls the location at which Rho-dependent termination occurs, despite having no effect on initial Rho binding to the corA leader. Thus, the multi-step nature of Rho-dependent termination may facilitate regulation of a given coding region by multiple cytoplasmic signals.

  16. Intergenic and repeat transcription in human, chimpanzee and macaque brains measured by RNA-Seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augix Guohua Xu

    Full Text Available Transcription is the first step connecting genetic information with an organism's phenotype. While expression of annotated genes in the human brain has been characterized extensively, our knowledge about the scope and the conservation of transcripts located outside of the known genes' boundaries is limited. Here, we use high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq to characterize the total non-ribosomal transcriptome of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque brain. In all species, only 20-28% of non-ribosomal transcripts correspond to annotated exons and 20-23% to introns. By contrast, transcripts originating within intronic and intergenic repetitive sequences constitute 40-48% of the total brain transcriptome. Notably, some repeat families show elevated transcription. In non-repetitive intergenic regions, we identify and characterize 1,093 distinct regions highly expressed in the human brain. These regions are conserved at the RNA expression level across primates studied and at the DNA sequence level across mammals. A large proportion of these transcripts (20% represents 3'UTR extensions of known genes and may play roles in alternative microRNA-directed regulation. Finally, we show that while transcriptome divergence between species increases with evolutionary time, intergenic transcripts show more expression differences among species and exons show less. Our results show that many yet uncharacterized evolutionary conserved transcripts exist in the human brain. Some of these transcripts may play roles in transcriptional regulation and contribute to evolution of human-specific phenotypic traits.

  17. Polyadenylation Linked to Transcription Termination Directs the Processing of snoRNA Precursors in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Grzechnik, Pawel; Kufel, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Summary Transcription termination by RNA polymerase II is coupled to transcript 3′ end formation. A large cleavage and polyadenylation complex containing the major poly(A) polymerase Pap1 produces mRNA 3′ ends, whereas those of nonpolyadenylated snoRNAs in yeast are formed either by endonucleolytic cleavage or by termination, followed by trimming by the nuclear exosome. We show that synthesis of independently transcribed snoRNAs involves default polyadenylation of two classes of precursors de...

  18. Assembly of transcription factor IIB at a promoter in vivo requires contact with RNA polymerase II

    OpenAIRE

    Elsby, Laura M.; O'Donnell, Amanda J M; Green, Laura M.; Sharrocks, Andrew D.; Roberts, Stefan G. E.

    2006-01-01

    The general transcription factor TFIIB has a central role in the assembly of the preinitiation complex at the promoter, providing a platform for the entry of RNA polymerase II/TFIIF. We used an RNA interference (RNAi)-based system in which TFIIB expression is ablated in vivo and replaced with a TFIIB derivative that contains a silent mutation and is refractory to the RNAi. Using this approach, we found that transcriptionally defective TFIIB amino-terminal mutants showed distinct effects on th...

  19. A novel cis-acting element from the 3′UTR of DNA damage-binding protein 2 mRNA links transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Brian D.; Cabrita, Miguel A.; Bose, Reetesh; Hamill, Jeffrey D.; Pan, Elysia; Brochu, Christian; Marcellus, Kristen A.; Zhao, Tong T.; Holcik, Martin; McKay, Bruce C.

    2013-01-01

    The DNA damage-binding protein 2 (DDB2) is an adapter protein that can direct a modular Cul4-DDB1-RING E3 Ligase complex to sites of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage to ubiquitinate substrates during nucleotide excision repair. The DDB2 transcript is ultraviolet-inducible; therefore, its regulation is likely important for its function. Curiously, the DDB2 mRNA is reportedly short-lived, but the transcript does not contain any previously characterized cis-acting determinants of mRNA stability in its 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR). Here, we used a tetracycline regulated d2EGFP reporter construct containing specific 3′UTR sequences from DDB2 to identify novel cis-acting elements that regulate mRNA stability. Synthetic 3′UTRs corresponding to sequences as short as 25 nucleotides from the central region of the 3′UTR of DDB2 were sufficient to accelerate decay of the heterologous reporter mRNA. Conversely, these same 3′UTRs led to more rapid induction of the reporter mRNA, export of the message to the cytoplasm and the subsequent accumulation of the encoded reporter protein, indicating that this newly identified cis-acting element affects transcriptional and post-transciptional processes. These results provide clear evidence that nuclear and cytoplasmic processing of the DDB2 mRNA is inextricably linked. PMID:23605047

  20. A novel cis-acting element from the 3'UTR of DNA damage-binding protein 2 mRNA links transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Brian D; Cabrita, Miguel A; Bose, Reetesh; Hamill, Jeffrey D; Pan, Elysia; Brochu, Christian; Marcellus, Kristen A; Zhao, Tong T; Holcik, Martin; McKay, Bruce C

    2013-06-01

    The DNA damage-binding protein 2 (DDB2) is an adapter protein that can direct a modular Cul4-DDB1-RING E3 Ligase complex to sites of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage to ubiquitinate substrates during nucleotide excision repair. The DDB2 transcript is ultraviolet-inducible; therefore, its regulation is likely important for its function. Curiously, the DDB2 mRNA is reportedly short-lived, but the transcript does not contain any previously characterized cis-acting determinants of mRNA stability in its 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). Here, we used a tetracycline regulated d2EGFP reporter construct containing specific 3'UTR sequences from DDB2 to identify novel cis-acting elements that regulate mRNA stability. Synthetic 3'UTRs corresponding to sequences as short as 25 nucleotides from the central region of the 3'UTR of DDB2 were sufficient to accelerate decay of the heterologous reporter mRNA. Conversely, these same 3'UTRs led to more rapid induction of the reporter mRNA, export of the message to the cytoplasm and the subsequent accumulation of the encoded reporter protein, indicating that this newly identified cis-acting element affects transcriptional and post-transciptional processes. These results provide clear evidence that nuclear and cytoplasmic processing of the DDB2 mRNA is inextricably linked.

  1. Detecting Pyronin Y labeled RNA transcripts in live cell microenvironments by phasor-FLIM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Laura M.; Jones, Mark R.; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-03-01

    Pyronin Y is an environment-sensitive probe which labels all double-stranded RNA in live cells. Methods to determine which RNA species Pyronin Y may be labeling are limited due to the lack of studies aimed at determining whether this probe has different spectroscopic properties when bound to specific transcripts. A major issue is that transcripts are difficult to isolate and study individually. We detected transcripts directly in their biological environment allowing us to identify RNA species on the basis of their location in the cell. We show that the phasor approach to lifetime analysis has the sensitivity to determine at least six different RNA species in live fibroblast cells. The detected lifetime differences were consistent among cells. To our knowledge this is the first application of a spectroscopic technique aimed at identifying Pyronin Y labeled RNA subtypes in living cells.

  2. Noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Federico; Jegu, Teddy; Latrasse, David; Romero-Barrios, Natali; Christ, Aurélie; Benhamed, Moussa; Crespi, Martin

    2014-08-07

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes.

  3. piRNA-directed cleavage of meiotic transcripts regulates spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Wee Siong Sho; Falciatori, Ilaria; Tam, Oliver H; Burgess, Ralph; Meikar, Oliver; Kotaja, Noora; Hammell, Molly; Hannon, Gregory J

    2015-05-15

    MIWI catalytic activity is required for spermatogenesis, indicating that piRNA-guided cleavage is critical for germ cell development. To identify meiotic piRNA targets, we augmented the mouse piRNA repertoire by introducing a human meiotic piRNA cluster. This triggered a spermatogenesis defect by inappropriately targeting the piRNA machinery to mouse mRNAs essential for germ cell development. Analysis of such de novo targets revealed a signature for pachytene piRNA target recognition. This enabled identification of both transposable elements and meiotically expressed protein-coding genes as targets of native piRNAs. Cleavage of genic targets began at the pachytene stage and resulted in progressive repression through meiosis, driven at least in part via the ping-pong cycle. Our data support the idea that meiotic piRNA populations must be strongly selected to enable successful spermatogenesis, both driving the response away from essential genes and directing the pathway toward mRNA targets that are regulated by small RNAs in meiotic cells.

  4. New insights into the promoterless transcription of DNA coligo templates by RNA polymerase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Lodoe; Seidl, Christine I; Ryan, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Chemically synthesized DNA can carry small RNA sequence information but converting that information into small RNA is generally thought to require large double-stranded promoters in the context of plasmids, viruses and genes. We previously found evidence that circularized oligodeoxynucleotides (coligos) containing certain sequences and secondary structures can template the synthesis of small RNA by RNA polymerase III in vitro and in human cells. By using immunoprecipitated RNA polymerase III we now report corroborating evidence that this enzyme is the sole polymerase responsible for coligo transcription. The immobilized polymerase enabled experiments showing that coligo transcripts can be formed through transcription termination without subsequent 3' end trimming. To better define the determinants of productive transcription, a structure-activity relationship study was performed using over 20 new coligos. The results show that unpaired nucleotides in the coligo stem facilitate circumtranscription, but also that internal loops and bulges should be kept small to avoid secondary transcription initiation sites. A polymerase termination sequence embedded in the double-stranded region of a hairpin-encoding coligo stem can antagonize transcription. Using lessons learned from new and old coligos, we demonstrate how to convert poorly transcribed coligos into productive templates. Our findings support the possibility that coligos may prove useful as chemically synthesized vectors for the ectopic expression of small RNA in human cells.

  5. Control of Transcriptional Fidelity by Active Center Tuning as Derived from RNA Polymerase Endonuclease Reaction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosunova, Ekaterina; Sosunov, Vasily; Epshtein, Vitaly; Nikiforov, Vadim; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Precise transcription by cellular RNA polymerase requires the efficient removal of noncognate nucleotide residues that are occasionally incorporated. Mis-incorporation causes the transcription elongation complex to backtrack, releasing a single strand 3′-RNA segment bearing a noncognate residue, which is hydrolyzed by the active center that carries two Mg2+ ions. However, in most x-ray structures only one Mg2+ is present. This Mg2+ is tightly bound to the active center aspartates, creating an inactive stable state. The first residue of the single strand RNA segment in the backtracked transcription elongation complex strongly promotes transcript hydrolytic cleavage by establishing a network of interactions that force a shift of stably bound Mg2+ to release some of its aspartate coordination valences for binding to the second Mg2+ thus enabling catalysis. Such a rearrangement that we call active center tuning (ACT) occurs when all recognition contacts of the active center-bound RNA segment are established and verified by tolerance to stress. Transcription factor Gre builds on the ACT mechanism in the same reaction by increasing the retention of the second Mg2+ and by activating the attacking water, causing 3000–4000-fold reaction acceleration and strongly reinforcing proofreading. The unified mechanism for RNA synthesis and degradation by RNA polymerase predicts that ACT also executes NTP selection thereby contributing to high transcription fidelity. PMID:23283976

  6. Dissecting the nascent human transcriptome by analysing the RNA content of transcription factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Cook, Peter R.; Rippe, Karsten; Papantonis, Argyris

    2015-01-01

    While mapping total and poly-adenylated human transcriptomes has now become routine, characterizing nascent transcripts remains challenging, largely because nascent RNAs have such short half-lives. Here, we describe a simple, fast and cost-effective method to isolate RNA associated with transcription factories, the sites responsible for the majority of nuclear transcription. Following stimulation of human endothelial cells with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα, we isolate and analyse the RNA content of factories by sequencing. Comparison with total, poly(A)+ and chromatin RNA fractions reveals that sequencing of purified factory RNA maps the complete nascent transcriptome; it is rich in intronic unprocessed transcript, as well as long intergenic non-coding (lincRNAs) and enhancer-associated RNAs (eRNAs), micro-RNA precursors and repeat-derived RNAs. Hence, we verify that transcription factories produce most nascent RNA and confer a regulatory role via their association with a set of specifically-retained non-coding transcripts. PMID:25897132

  7. A Molecular Titration System Coordinates Ribosomal Protein Gene Transcription with Ribosomal RNA Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Benjamin; Knight, Britta; Merwin, Jason; Martin, Victoria; Ottoz, Diana; Gloor, Yvonne; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Rudner, Adam; Shore, David

    2016-11-17

    Cell growth potential is determined by the rate of ribosome biogenesis, a complex process that requires massive and coordinated transcriptional output. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ribosome biogenesis is highly regulated at the transcriptional level. Although evidence for a system that coordinates ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein gene (RPG) transcription has been described, the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that an interaction between the RPG transcriptional activator Ifh1 and the rRNA processing factor Utp22 serves to coordinate RPG transcription with that of rRNA. We demonstrate that Ifh1 is rapidly released from RPG promoters by a Utp22-independent mechanism following growth inhibition, but that its long-term dissociation requires Utp22. We present evidence that RNA polymerase I activity inhibits the ability of Utp22 to titrate Ifh1 from RPG promoters and propose that a dynamic Ifh1-Utp22 interaction fine-tunes RPG expression to coordinate RPG and rRNA transcription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Analyses of in vivo interactions between transcription factors and the archaeal RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Julie E; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2015-09-15

    Transcription factors regulate the activities of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at each stage of the transcription cycle. Many basal transcription factors with common ancestry are employed in eukaryotic and archaeal systems that directly bind to RNAP and influence intramolecular movements of RNAP and modulate DNA or RNA interactions. We describe and employ a flexible methodology to directly probe and quantify the binding of transcription factors to RNAP in vivo. We demonstrate that binding of the conserved and essential archaeal transcription factor TFE to the archaeal RNAP is directed, in part, by interactions with the RpoE subunit of RNAP. As the surfaces involved are conserved in many eukaryotic and archaeal systems, the identified TFE-RNAP interactions are likely conserved in archaeal-eukaryal systems and represent an important point of contact that can influence the efficiency of transcription initiation.

  9. Viral miRNA targeting of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Huang, Yufei; Jung, Jae U; Lu, Chun; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2014-08-01

    Successful viral infection entails a choreographic regulation of viral gene expression program. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes numerous miRNAs that regulate viral life cycle. However, few viral targets have been identified due to the lack of information on KSHV 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). Recent genome-wide mapping of KSHV transcripts and 3'UTRs has revealed abundant bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts. The extended 3'UTRs of the 5' proximal genes of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts offer additional regulatory targets. Indeed, a genome-wide screening of KSHV 3'UTRs has identified several bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts as the novel targets of viral miRNAs. Together, these works have expanded our knowledge of the unique features of KSHV gene regulation program and provided valuable resources for the research community.

  10. Nuclear stability and transcriptional directionality separate functionally distinct RNA species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Robin; Andersen, Peter Refsing; Valen, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed, yielding a complex transcriptome with high variability in composition and cellular abundance. Although recent efforts have identified thousands of new long non-coding (lnc) RNAs and demonstrated a complex transcriptional repertoire produced by protei...

  11. Comparative overview of RNA polymerase II and III transcription cycles, with focus on RNA polymerase III termination and reinitiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G; Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase (RNAP) III transcribes hundreds of genes for tRNAs and 5S rRNA, among others, which share similar promoters and stable transcription initiation complexes (TIC), which support rapid RNAP III recycling. In contrast, RNAP II transcribes a large number of genes with highly variable promoters and interacting factors, which exert fine regulatory control over TIC lability and modifications of RNAP II at different transitional points in the transcription cycle. We review data that illustrate a relatively smooth continuity of RNAP III initiation-elongation-termination and reinitiation toward its function to produce high levels of tRNAs and other RNAs that support growth and development.

  12. Global transcriptional start site mapping using differential RNA sequencing reveals novel antisense RNAs in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Maureen K; Bischler, Thorsten; Eisenbart, Sara K; Förstner, Konrad U; Zhang, Aixia; Herbig, Alexander; Nieselt, Kay; Sharma, Cynthia M; Storz, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    While the model organism Escherichia coli has been the subject of intense study for decades, the full complement of its RNAs is only now being examined. Here we describe a survey of the E. coli transcriptome carried out using a differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) approach, which can distinguish between primary and processed transcripts, and an automated prediction algorithm for transcriptional start sites (TSS). With the criterion of expression under at least one of three growth conditions examined, we predicted 14,868 TSS candidates, including 5,574 internal to annotated genes (iTSS) and 5,495 TSS corresponding to potential antisense RNAs (asRNAs). We examined expression of 14 candidate asRNAs by Northern analysis using RNA from wild-type E. coli and from strains defective for RNases III and E, two RNases reported to be involved in asRNA processing. Interestingly, nine asRNAs detected as distinct bands by Northern analysis were differentially affected by the rnc and rne mutations. We also compared our asRNA candidates with previously published asRNA annotations from RNA-seq data and discuss the challenges associated with these cross-comparisons. Our global transcriptional start site map represents a valuable resource for identification of transcription start sites, promoters, and novel transcripts in E. coli and is easily accessible, together with the cDNA coverage plots, in an online genome browser.

  13. Genome-wide location analysis reveals a role for Sub1 in RNA polymerase III transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavenet, Arounie; Suleau, Audrey; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Ferrari, Roberto; Ducrot, Cécile; Michaut, Magali; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Dieci, Giorgio; Lefebvre, Olivier; Conesa, Christine; Acker, Joël

    2009-01-01

    Human PC4 and the yeast ortholog Sub1 have multiple functions in RNA polymerase II transcription. Genome-wide mapping revealed that Sub1 is present on Pol III-transcribed genes. Sub1 was found to interact with components of the Pol III transcription system and to stimulate the initiation and reinitiation steps in a system reconstituted with all recombinant factors. Sub1 was required for optimal Pol III gene transcription in exponentially growing cells. PMID:19706510

  14. Structural basis for transcription elongation by bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassylyev, Dmitry G; Vassylyeva, Marina N; Perederina, Anna; Tahirov, Tahir H; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2007-07-12

    The RNA polymerase elongation complex (EC) is both highly stable and processive, rapidly extending RNA chains for thousands of nucleotides. Understanding the mechanisms of elongation and its regulation requires detailed information about the structural organization of the EC. Here we report the 2.5-A resolution structure of the Thermus thermophilus EC; the structure reveals the post-translocated intermediate with the DNA template in the active site available for pairing with the substrate. DNA strand separation occurs one position downstream of the active site, implying that only one substrate at a time can specifically bind to the EC. The upstream edge of the RNA/DNA hybrid stacks on the beta'-subunit 'lid' loop, whereas the first displaced RNA base is trapped within a protein pocket, suggesting a mechanism for RNA displacement. The RNA is threaded through the RNA exit channel, where it adopts a conformation mimicking that of a single strand within a double helix, providing insight into a mechanism for hairpin-dependent pausing and termination.

  15. Structural basis of transcription: an RNA polymerase II elongation complex at 3.3 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatt, A L; Cramer, P; Fu, J; Bushnell, D A; Kornberg, R D

    2001-06-08

    The crystal structure of RNA polymerase II in the act of transcription was determined at 3.3 A resolution. Duplex DNA is seen entering the main cleft of the enzyme and unwinding before the active site. Nine base pairs of DNA-RNA hybrid extend from the active center at nearly right angles to the entering DNA, with the 3' end of the RNA in the nucleotide addition site. The 3' end is positioned above a pore, through which nucleotides may enter and through which RNA may be extruded during back-tracking. The 5'-most residue of the RNA is close to the point of entry to an exit groove. Changes in protein structure between the transcribing complex and free enzyme include closure of a clamp over the DNA and RNA and ordering of a series of "switches" at the base of the clamp to create a binding site complementary to the DNA-RNA hybrid. Protein-nucleic acid contacts help explain DNA and RNA strand separation, the specificity of RNA synthesis, "abortive cycling" during transcription initiation, and RNA and DNA translocation during transcription elongation.

  16. Infectious in vitro transcripts from cloned cDNA of beet necrotic yellow vein virus RNA3 and RNA4and their functional study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李毅; 魏春红; 田波; 潘乃穟; 陈章良

    1995-01-01

    The full-length double-stranded cDNAs of beet necrotie yellow vein virus RNA3 and RNA 4were synthesized by using oligo(dT) 15 as well as RNA3 and RNA4 specific primers, and cloned downstream of the bacteriophage Sp6 RNA polymerase promoter of the transcription vector pGEM3Zf(+). The in vitro "run-off" transcription products obtained in the presence of Sp6 RNA polymerase and template DNA have high biological activities. In the 2 transcription systems, the transcription and capping in 2 separate reactions are more efficient. The simultaneous transcription and capping are not so efficient, but the transcripts are more infectious. Although there are a number of nonviral nucleotide sequences at the 5- and 3’-ends of RNA3 and RNA4 transcripts, the biological activities of both transcripts were not affected. The mechanical coinoculation of sugarbeet roots with the infectious transcripts of the prepared RNA3 and RNA4 and BNYW Rgl isolate has confirmed that RNA3 is the main cause of sugarbeet rhizomania.

  17. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in trans signalling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient...

  18. Transcription of ribosomal RNA genes is initiated in the third cell cycle of bovine embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anne Sørig; Avery, Birthe; Dieleman, Steph J.

    2006-01-01

    of the embryonic genome. In the present study, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription was investigated by visualization of the rRNA by fluorescent in situ hybridization, and subsequent visualization of the argyrophilic nucleolar proteins by silver staining. A total of 145 in vivo developed and 200 in vitro produced...... bovine embryos were investigated to allow comparison of transcription initiation. Signs of active transcription of rRNA were observed in the third cell cycle in 29% of the in vitro produced embryos (n=35) and in 58% of the in vivo developed embryos (n=11). Signs of active transcription of rRNA were...... not apparent in the early phase of the fourth cell cycle but restarted later on. All embryos in the fifth or later cell cycles were all transcribing rRNA. The signs of rRNA synthesis during the third and fourth embryonic cell cycles could be blocked by actinomycin D, which is a strong inhibitor of RNA...

  19. The major transcripts of the kinetoplast Trypanosoma brucei are very small ribosomal RNA's.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.C. Eperon; J.W.G. Janssen; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Borst (Piet)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractThe nucleotide sequence has been determined of a 2.2 kb segment of kinetoplast DNA, which encodes the major mitochondrial transcripts (12S and 9S) of Trypanosoma brucei. The sequence shows that the 12S RNA is a large subunit rRNA, although sufficiently unusual for resistance to chloramph

  20. Transcriptional and Posttranslational Regulation of Nucleotide Excision Repair: The Guardian of the Genome against Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Min Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV radiation from sunlight represents a constant threat to genome stability by generating modified DNA bases such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP. If unrepaired, these lesions can have deleterious effects, including skin cancer. Mammalian cells are able to neutralize UV-induced photolesions through nucleotide excision repair (NER. The NER pathway has multiple components including seven xeroderma pigmentosum (XP proteins (XPA to XPG and numerous auxiliary factors, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR protein kinase and RCC1 like domain (RLD and homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus (HECT domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2 (HERC2. In this review we highlight recent data on the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of NER activity.

  1. Integrated genome-wide analysis of transcription factor occupancy, RNA polymerase II binding and steady-state RNA levels identify differentially regulated functional gene classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokry, M.; Hatzis, P.; Schuijers, J.; Lansu, N.; Ruzius, F.P.; Clevers, H.; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Routine methods for assaying steady-state mRNA levels such as RNA-seq and micro-arrays are commonly used as readouts to study the role of transcription factors (TFs) in gene expression regulation. However, cellular RNA levels do not solely depend on activity of TFs and subsequent transcription by

  2. Integrated genome-wide analysis of transcription factor occupancy, RNA polymerase II binding and steady-state RNA levels identify differentially regulated functional gene classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokry, Michal; Hatzis, Pantelis; Schuijers, Jurian; Lansu, Nico; Ruzius, Frans-Paul; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Routine methods for assaying steady-state mRNA levels such as RNA-seq and micro-arrays are commonly used as readouts to study the role of transcription factors (TFs) in gene expression regulation. However, cellular RNA levels do not solely depend on activity of TFs and subsequent transcription by RN

  3. RNA-templated DNA ligation for transcript analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Mats; Antson, Dan-Oscar; Barbany, Gisela; Landegren, Ulf

    2001-01-01

    Ligase-mediated gene detection has proven valuable for detection and precise distinction of DNA sequence variants. We have recently shown that T4 DNA ligase can also be used to distinguish single nucleotide variants of RNA sequences. Here we describe parameters that influence RNA-templated DNA ligation by T4 DNA ligase. The reaction proceeds much more slowly, requiring more enzyme, compared to ligation of the same oligonucleotides hybridized to the corresponding DNA se...

  4. Strategies for psbA gene expression in cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants: from transcription to PSII repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulo, Paula; Sakurai, Isamu; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-01-01

    The Photosystem (PS) II of cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants is prone to light-induced inactivation, the D1 protein being the primary target of such damage. As a consequence, the D1 protein, encoded by the psbA gene, is degraded and re-synthesized in a multistep process called PSII repair cycle. In cyanobacteria, a small gene family codes for the various, functionally distinct D1 isoforms. In these organisms, the regulation of the psbA gene expression occurs mainly at the level of transcription, but the expression is fine-tuned by regulation of translation elongation. In plants and green algae, the D1 protein is encoded by a single psbA gene located in the chloroplast genome. In chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the psbA gene expression is strongly regulated by mRNA processing, and particularly at the level of translation initiation. In chloroplasts of higher plants, translation elongation is the prevalent mechanism for regulation of the psbA gene expression. The pre-existing pool of psbA transcripts forms translation initiation complexes in plant chloroplasts even in darkness, while the D1 synthesis can be completed only in the light. Replacement of damaged D1 protein requires also the assistance by a number of auxiliary proteins, which are encoded by the nuclear genome in green algae and higher plants. Nevertheless, many of these chaperones are conserved between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we describe the specific features and fundamental differences of the psbA gene expression and the regeneration of the PSII reaction center protein D1 in cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Photosystem II.

  5. INTEGRATIVE COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF ANTISENSE TRANSCRIPTS AND miRNA TARGETS IN PLANT GENOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Y.L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNA, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are important components of gene expression in eukaryotes, forming a regulatory network. miRNAs are expressed through nucleolytic maturation of hairpin precursors transcribed by RNA Polymerase II or III. Such transcripts are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation in plants, fungi and animals. miRNAs bind to target RNA transcripts and guide their cleavage (mostly for plants or act to prevent translation. siRNAs act via a similar mechanism of cleavage of their target genes, but they also can direct genomic DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling. It is estimated that large fraction, up to 30% of all human genes also may be post-transcriptionally regulated by miRNAs. For plant genomes numbers could be higher depending on quality of sequencing and genome annotation. Due to availability of genome and mRNA sequences genome-wide searches for sense-antisense transcripts have been reported, but few plant sense-antisense transcript pairs have been studied. Integration of these data in specialized databases is challenging problem of computer genomics. We have developed set of computer programs to define antisense transcripts and miRNA genes based on available sequencing data. We have analyzed data from PlantNATsDB (Plant Natural Antisense Transcripts DataBase which is a platform for annotating and discovering Natural Antisense Transcripts (NAT by integrating various data sources [1]. NATs can be grouped into two categories, cis-NATs and trans-NATs. Cis-NAT pairs are transcribed from opposing DNA strands at the same genomic locus and have a variety of orientations and differing lengths of overlap between the perfect sequence complementary regions, whereas trans-NAT pairs are transcribed from different loci and form partial complementarily. The database contains at the moment 69 plant species. The database provides an integrative, interactive and information-rich web graphical interface to

  6. Pulsed low-level infrared laser alters mRNA levels from muscle repair genes dependent on power output in Wistar rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Trajano, E. T. L.; Thomé, A. M. C.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    Satellite cells are present in skeletal muscle functioning in the repair and regeneration of muscle injury. Activation of these cells depends on the expression of myogenic factor 5 (Myf5), myogenic determination factor 1(MyoD), myogenic regulatory factor 4 (MRF4), myogenin (MyoG), paired box transcription factors 3 (Pax3), and 7 (Pax7). Low-level laser irradiation accelerates the repair of muscle injuries. However, data from the expression of myogenic factors have been controversial. Furthermore, the effects of different laser beam powers on the repair of muscle injuries have been not evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-level infrared laser at different powers and in pulsed emission mode on the expression of myogenic regulatory factors and on Pax3 and Pax7 in injured skeletal muscle from Wistar rats. Animals that underwent cryoinjury were divided into three groups: injury, injury laser 25 Mw, and injury laser 75 mW. Low-level infrared laser irradiation (904 nm, 3 J cm‑2, 5 kHz) was carried out at 25 and 75 mW. After euthanasia, skeletal muscle samples were withdrawn and the total RNA was extracted for the evaluation of mRNA levels from the MyoD, MyoG, MRF4, Myf5, Pax3, and Pax7 gene. Pax 7 mRNA levels did not alter, but Pax3 mRNA levels increased in the injured and laser-irradiated group at 25 mW. MyoD, MyoG, and MYf5 mRNA levels increased in the injured and laser-irradiated animals at both powers, and MRF4 mRNA levels decreased in the injured and laser-irradiated group at 75 mW. In conclusion, exposure to pulsed low-level infrared laser, by power-dependent effect, could accelerate the muscle repair process altering mRNA levels from paired box transcription factors and myogenic regulatory factors.

  7. MicroRNA-Dependent Transcriptional Silencing of Transposable Elements in Drosophila Follicle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugat, Bruno; Akkouche, Abdou; Serrano, Vincent; Armenise, Claudia; Li, Blaise; Brun, Christine; Fulga, Tudor A; Van Vactor, David; Pélisson, Alain; Chambeyron, Séverine

    2015-05-01

    RNA interference-related silencing mechanisms concern very diverse and distinct biological processes, from gene regulation (via the microRNA pathway) to defense against molecular parasites (through the small interfering RNA and the Piwi-interacting RNA pathways). Small non-coding RNAs serve as specificity factors that guide effector proteins to ribonucleic acid targets via base-pairing interactions, to achieve transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Because of the small sequence complementarity required for microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional regulation, thousands of microRNA (miRNA) putative targets have been annotated in Drosophila. In Drosophila somatic ovarian cells, genomic parasites, such as transposable elements (TEs), are transcriptionally repressed by chromatin changes induced by Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that prevent them from invading the germinal genome. Here we show, for the first time, that a functional miRNA pathway is required for the piRNA-mediated transcriptional silencing of TEs in this tissue. Global miRNA depletion, caused by tissue- and stage-specific knock down of drosha (involved in miRNA biogenesis), AGO1 or gawky (both responsible for miRNA activity), resulted in loss of TE-derived piRNAs and chromatin-mediated transcriptional de-silencing of TEs. This specific TE de-repression was also observed upon individual titration (by expression of the complementary miRNA sponge) of two miRNAs (miR-14 and miR-34) as well as in a miR-14 loss-of-function mutant background. Interestingly, the miRNA defects differentially affected TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first indication of possible differences in the biogenesis or stability of TE- and 3' UTR-derived piRNAs. This work is one of the examples of detectable phenotypes caused by loss of individual miRNAs in Drosophila and the first genetic evidence that miRNAs have a role in the maintenance of genome stability via piRNA-mediated TE repression.

  8. Deep sequencing analysis of small noncoding RNA and mRNA targets of the global post-transcriptional regulator, Hfq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sittka, A; Lucchini, S; Papenfort, K

    2008-01-01

    explained aspects of the pleiotropic effects of Hfq loss-of-function. Specifically, we found that the mRNAs of hilD (master regulator of the SPI-1 invasion genes) and flhDC (flagellar master regulator) were bound by Hfq. We predicted that defective SPI-1 secretion and flagellar phenotypes of the hfq mutant......-density microarrays that have impeded expression-based sRNA discovery in microorganisms. We present a generic strategy that is ideal for the systems-level analysis of the post-transcriptional regulons of RNA-binding proteins and for sRNA discovery in a wide range of bacteria....

  9. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-06-25

    Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  10. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Zenkin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  11. Optimized rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) for mapping bacterial mRNA transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, D; Burns, B P; Neilan, B A

    2000-03-01

    A simple, efficient and sensitive RACE-based procedure was developed for the determination of unknown 5' regions from bacterial cDNA. A number of critical modifications were made to the standard RACE method, including the optimization of the RNA extraction, reverse transcription and PCR conditions. This procedure was used to accurately determine the site of transcript initiation and structure of the promoter region of the Helicobacter pylori aspartate carbamoyltransferase gene (pyrB). The technique avoids many of the difficulties associated with established bacterial transcript mapping protocols and can be performed in two days starting with less than 1 microgram of total RNA. The modifications described here have significant potential for the identification of transcript start sites of bacterial genes and non-polyadenylated eukaryotic RNA.

  12. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshab Rijal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC; they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  13. Alternative splicing of anciently exonized 5S rRNA regulates plant transcription factor TFIIIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yan; Bannach, Oliver; Chen, Hao; Teune, Jan-Hendrik; Schmitz, Axel; Steger, Gerhard; Xiong, Liming; Barbazuk, W Brad

    2009-05-01

    Identifying conserved alternative splicing (AS) events among evolutionarily distant species can prioritize AS events for functional characterization and help uncover relevant cis- and trans-regulatory factors. A genome-wide search for conserved cassette exon AS events in higher plants revealed the exonization of 5S ribosomal RNA (5S rRNA) within the gene of its own transcription regulator, TFIIIA (transcription factor for polymerase III A). The 5S rRNA-derived exon in TFIIIA gene exists in all representative land plant species but not in green algae and nonplant species, suggesting it is specific to land plants. TFIIIA is essential for RNA polymerase III-based transcription of 5S rRNA in eukaryotes. Integrating comparative genomics and molecular biology revealed that the conserved cassette exon derived from 5S rRNA is coupled with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Utilizing multiple independent Arabidopsis overexpressing TFIIIA transgenic lines under osmotic and salt stress, strong accordance between phenotypic and molecular evidence reveals the biological relevance of AS of the exonized 5S rRNA in quantitative autoregulation of TFIIIA homeostasis. Most significantly, this study provides the first evidence of ancient exaptation of 5S rRNA in plants, suggesting a novel gene regulation model mediated by the AS of an anciently exonized noncoding element.

  14. Expression of an RNA glycosidase inhibits HIV-1 transactivation of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutky, Meherzad; Hudak, Katalin A

    2017-09-01

    HIV-1 transcription is primarily controlled by the virally encoded Tat protein and its interaction with the viral TAR RNA element. Specifically, binding of a Tat-containing complex to TAR recruits cellular factors that promote elongation of the host RNA polymerase engaging the viral DNA template. Disruption of this interaction halts viral RNA transcription. In this study, we investigated the effect of pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), an RNA glycosidase (EC#: 3.2.2.22) synthesized by the pokeweed plant ( Phytolacca americana ), on transcription of HIV-1 mRNA. We show that co-expression of PAP with a proviral clone in culture cells resulted in a Tat-dependent decrease in viral mRNA levels. PAP reduced HIV-1 transcriptional activity by inhibiting Tat protein synthesis. The effects of PAP expression on host factors AP-1, NF-κB and SP-1, which modulate HIV-1 transcription by binding to the viral LTR, were also investigated. Only AP-1 showed a modest JNK pathway-dependent increase in activity in the presence of PAP; however, this activation was not sufficient to significantly enhance transcription from a partial viral LTR containing AP-1 binding sites. Therefore, the primary effect of PAP on HIV-1 transcription is to reduce viral RNA synthesis by decreasing the abundance of Tat. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed decrease in viral RNAs in cells expressing PAP and contribute to our understanding of the antiviral effects of this plant protein. ©2017 The Author(s).

  15. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Hijacks RNA Polymerase II To Create a Viral Transcriptional Factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christopher Phillip; Lyu, Yuanzhi; Chuang, Frank; Nakano, Kazushi; Izumiya, Chie; Jin, Di; Campbell, Mel; Izumiya, Yoshihiro

    2017-06-01

    Locally concentrated nuclear factors ensure efficient binding to DNA templates, facilitating RNA polymerase II recruitment and frequent reutilization of stable preinitiation complexes. We have uncovered a mechanism for effective viral transcription by focal assembly of RNA polymerase II around Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genomes in the host cell nucleus. Using immunofluorescence labeling of latent nuclear antigen (LANA) protein, together with fluorescence in situ RNA hybridization (RNA-FISH) of the intron region of immediate early transcripts, we visualized active transcription of viral genomes in naturally infected cells. At the single-cell level, we found that not all episomes were uniformly transcribed following reactivation stimuli. However, those episomes that were being transcribed would spontaneously aggregate to form transcriptional "factories," which recruited a significant fraction of cellular RNA polymerase II. Focal assembly of "viral transcriptional factories" decreased the pool of cellular RNA polymerase II available for cellular gene transcription, which consequently impaired cellular gene expression globally, with the exception of selected ones. The viral transcriptional factories localized with replicating viral genomic DNAs. The observed colocalization of viral transcriptional factories with replicating viral genomic DNA suggests that KSHV assembles an "all-in-one" factory for both gene transcription and DNA replication. We propose that the assembly of RNA polymerase II around viral episomes in the nucleus may be a previously unexplored aspect of KSHV gene regulation by confiscation of a limited supply of RNA polymerase II in infected cells.IMPORTANCE B cells infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) harbor multiple copies of the KSHV genome in the form of episomes. Three-dimensional imaging of viral gene expression in the nucleus allows us to study interactions and changes in the physical distribution of

  16. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  17. The use of Molecular Beacons to Directly Measure Bacterial mRNA Abundances and Transcript Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuechenmeister, Lisa J.; Anderson, Kelsi L.; Morrison, John M.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of mRNA turnover is a dynamic means by which bacteria regulate gene expression. Although current methodologies allow characterization of the stability of individual transcripts, procedures designed to measure alterations in transcript abundance/turnover on a high throughput scale are lacking. In the current report, we describe the development of a rapid and simplified molecular beacon-based procedure to directly measure the mRNA abundances and mRNA degradation properties of well-characterized Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity factors. This method does not require any PCR-based amplification, can monitor the abundances of multiple transcripts within a single RNA sample, and was successfully implemented into a high throughput screen of transposon mutant library members to detect isolates with altered mRNA turnover properties. It is expected that the described methodology will provide great utility in characterizing components of bacterial RNA degradation processes and can be used to directly measure the mRNA levels of virtually any bacterial transcript. PMID:18992285

  18. Histone H3 Variant Regulates RNA Polymerase II Transcription Termination and Dual Strand Transcription of siRNA Loci in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Reynolds

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Base J, β-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil, is a chromatin modification of thymine in the nuclear DNA of flagellated protozoa of the order Kinetoplastida. In Trypanosoma brucei, J is enriched, along with histone H3 variant (H3.V, at sites involved in RNA Polymerase (RNAP II termination and telomeric sites involved in regulating variant surface glycoprotein gene (VSG transcription by RNAP I. Reduction of J in T. brucei indicated a role of J in the regulation of RNAP II termination, where the loss of J at specific sites within polycistronic gene clusters led to read-through transcription and increased expression of downstream genes. We now demonstrate that the loss of H3.V leads to similar defects in RNAP II termination within gene clusters and increased expression of downstream genes. Gene derepression is intensified upon the subsequent loss of J in the H3.V knockout. mRNA-seq indicates gene derepression includes VSG genes within the silent RNAP I transcribed telomeric gene clusters, suggesting an important role for H3.V in telomeric gene repression and antigenic variation. Furthermore, the loss of H3.V at regions of overlapping transcription at the end of convergent gene clusters leads to increased nascent RNA and siRNA production. Our results suggest base J and H3.V can act independently as well as synergistically to regulate transcription termination and expression of coding and non-coding RNAs in T. brucei, depending on chromatin context (and transcribing polymerase. As such these studies provide the first direct evidence for histone H3.V negatively influencing transcription elongation to promote termination.

  19. RNA Polymerase II Elongation at the Crossroads of Transcription and Alternative Splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel de la Mata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The elongation phase of transcription lies at the core of several simultaneous and coupled events leading to alternative splicing regulation. Although underestimated in the past, it is at this phase of the transcription cycle where complexes affecting the transcription machinery itself, chromatin structure, posttranscriptional gene regulation and pre-mRNA processing converge to regulate each other or simply to consolidate higher-order complexes and functions. This paper focuses on the multiple processes that take place during transcription elongation which ultimately regulate the outcome of alternative splicing decisions.

  20. Varying Rate of RNA Chain Elongation during rrn Transcription in Escherichia coli▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, P. P.; Ehrenberg, M.; Fange, D.; Bremer, H.

    2009-01-01

    The value of the rRNA chain elongation rate in bacteria is an important physiological parameter, as it affects not only the rRNA promoter activity but also the free-RNA polymerase concentration and thereby the transcription of all genes. On average, rRNA chains elongate at a rate of 80 to 90 nucleotides (nt) per s, and the transcription of an entire rrn operon takes about 60 s (at 37°C). Here we have analyzed a reported distribution obtained from electron micrographs of RNA polymerase molecules along rrn operons in E. coli growing at 2.5 doublings per hour (S. Quan, N. Zhang, S. French, and C. L. Squires, J. Bacteriol. 187:1632-1638, 2005). The distribution exhibits two peaks of higher polymerase density centered within the 16S and 23S rRNA genes. An evaluation of this distribution indicates that RNA polymerase transcribes the 5′ leader region at speeds up to or greater than 250 nt/s. Once past the leader, transcription slows down to about 65 nt/s within the 16S gene, speeds up in the spacer region between the 16S and 23S genes, slows again to about 65 nt/s in the 23S region, and finally speeds up to a rate greater than 400 nt/s near the end of the operon. We suggest that the slowing of transcript elongation in the 16S and 23S sections is the result of transcriptional pauses, possibly caused by temporary interactions of the RNA polymerase with secondary structures in the nascent rRNA. PMID:19329648

  1. Structural basis of transcription: RNA polymerase II at 2.8 angstrom resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, P; Bushnell, D A; Kornberg, R D

    2001-06-08

    Structures of a 10-subunit yeast RNA polymerase II have been derived from two crystal forms at 2.8 and 3.1 angstrom resolution. Comparison of the structures reveals a division of the polymerase into four mobile modules, including a clamp, shown previously to swing over the active center. In the 2.8 angstrom structure, the clamp is in an open state, allowing entry of straight promoter DNA for the initiation of transcription. Three loops extending from the clamp may play roles in RNA unwinding and DNA rewinding during transcription. A 2.8 angstrom difference Fourier map reveals two metal ions at the active site, one persistently bound and the other possibly exchangeable during RNA synthesis. The results also provide evidence for RNA exit in the vicinity of the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain, coupling synthesis to RNA processing by enzymes bound to this domain.

  2. RNA Pol II promotes transcription of centromeric satellite DNA in beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeljka Pezer

    Full Text Available Transcripts of centromeric satellite DNAs are known to play a role in heterochromatin formation as well as in establishment of the kinetochore. However, little is known about basic mechanisms of satellite DNA expression within constitutive heterochromatin and its regulation. Here we present comprehensive analysis of transcription of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, PRAT from beetle Palorus ratzeburgii (Coleoptera. This satellite is characterized by preservation and extreme sequence conservation among evolutionarily distant insect species. PRAT is expressed in all three developmental stages: larvae, pupae and adults at similar level. Transcripts are abundant comprising 0.033% of total RNA and are heterogeneous in size ranging from 0.5 kb up to more than 5 kb. Transcription proceeds from both strands but with 10 fold different expression intensity and transcripts are not processed into siRNAs. Most of the transcripts (80% are not polyadenylated and remain in the nucleus while a small portion is exported to the cytoplasm. Multiple, irregularly distributed transcription initiation sites as well as termination sites have been mapped within the PRAT sequence using primer extension and RLM-RACE. The presence of cap structure as well as poly(A tails in a portion of the transcripts indicate RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription and a putative polymerase II promoter site overlaps the most conserved part of the PRAT sequence. The treatment of larvae with alpha-amanitin decreases the level of PRAT transcripts at concentrations that selectively inhibit pol II activity. In conclusion, stable, RNA polymerase II dependant transcripts of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, not regulated by RNAi, have been identified and characterized. This study offers a basic understanding of expression of highly abundant heterochromatic DNA which in beetle species constitutes up to 50% of the genome.

  3. Selective inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription as a potential approach to treat African trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Louise E.; Pegg, Elaine E.; Cameron, Donald P.; Budzak, James; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M.; Hannan, Ross D.

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei relies on an essential Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat for survival in the mammalian bloodstream. High VSG expression within an expression site body (ESB) is mediated by RNA polymerase I (Pol I), which in other eukaryotes exclusively transcribes ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). As T. brucei is reliant on Pol I for VSG transcription, we investigated Pol I transcription inhibitors for selective anti-trypanosomal activity. The Pol I inhibitors quarfloxin (CX-3543), CX-5461, and BMH-21 are currently under investigation for treating cancer, as rapidly dividing cancer cells are particularly dependent on high levels of Pol I transcription compared with nontransformed cells. In T. brucei all three Pol I inhibitors have IC50 concentrations for cell proliferation in the nanomolar range: quarfloxin (155 nM), CX-5461 (279 nM) or BMH-21 (134 nM) compared with IC50 concentrations in the MCF10A human breast epithelial cell line (4.44 μM, 6.89 μM or 460 nM, respectively). T. brucei was therefore 29-fold more sensitive to quarfloxin, 25-fold more sensitive to CX-5461 and 3.4-fold more sensitive to BMH-21. Cell death in T. brucei was due to rapid inhibition of Pol I transcription, as within 15 minutes treatment with the inhibitors rRNA precursor transcript was reduced 97-98% and VSG precursor transcript 91-94%. Incubation with Pol I transcription inhibitors also resulted in disintegration of the ESB as well as the nucleolus subnuclear structures, within one hour. Rapid ESB loss following the block in Pol I transcription argues that the ESB is a Pol I transcription nucleated structure, similar to the nucleolus. In addition to providing insight into Pol I transcription and ES control, Pol I transcription inhibitors potentially also provide new approaches to treat trypanosomiasis. PMID:28263991

  4. E. coli 6S RNA: a universal transcriptional regulator within the centre of growth adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissen, René; Steuten, Benedikt; Polen, Tino; Wagner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial 6S RNA has been shown to bind with high affinity to σ(70)-containing RNA polymerase, suppressing σ(70)-dependent transcription during stationary phase, when 6S RNA concentrations are highest. We recently reported a genome-wide transcriptional comparison of wild-type and 6S RNA deficient E. coli strains. Contrary to the expected σ(70)- and stationary phase-specific regulatory effect of 6S RNA it turned out that mRNA levels derived from many alternative sigma factors, including σ(38) or σ(32), were affected during exponential and stationary growth. Among the most noticeably down-regulated genes at stationary growth are ribosomal proteins and factors involved in translation. In addition, a striking number of mRNA levels coding for enzymes involved in the purine metabolism, for transporters and stress regulators are altered both during log- and stationary phase. During the study we discovered a link between 6S RNA and the general stress alarmone ppGpp, which has a higher basal level in cells deficient in 6S RNA. This finding points to a functional interrelation of 6S RNA and the global network of stress and growth adaptation.

  5. DMPD: Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15733829 Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. Sen GC, Sa... signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. PubmedID 15733829 Title Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role

  6. Cartilage hair hypoplasia mutations that lead to RMRP promoter inefficiency or RNA transcript instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Eiji; Tran, Joseph R; Welting, Tim J M; Pruijn, Ger J M; Hirose, Yuichiro; Nishimura, Gen; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Schurman, Shepherd H; Cheng, Jun; Candotti, Fabio; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Ikegawa, Shiro; Schlessinger, David

    2007-11-15

    Cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH; MIM 250250) is an autosomal recessive disease with diverse clinical manifestations. It is caused by mutations in RMRP gene, the RNA component of the ribonucleoprotein complex RNase MRP. Mutations in RMRP have been found in patients in the core promoter region or in the transcribed region, but the pathogenetic effect of the mutations is unclear. Real-time PCR assays confirmed that both promoter (c.-16_-1 dup and c.-15_+2 dup) and transcribed mutations (c.168G > A and c.218A > G) lower the expression level of RMRP. Experiments with 5'RACE, showed that the reduced transcription in the promoter mutants was accompanied by shifting of the transcription initiation sites to nucleotides 5'-upstream of the authentic site. Low levels of RMRP expression levels with transcript mutations were also seen when constructs encoding the wild-type and mutant genes were transfected into cultured cells. The reduced transcription was correlated with greater instability of mutant RMRP transcripts compared to controls. A comparable reduction was seen when a mouse gene containing the c.70A > G mutation (the major mutation in humans with CHH) was introduced into ES cells in place of one of the wild-type alleles. The low expression level of the c.70A > G Rmrp RNA was confirmed by expression assays into cultured cells, and was again correlated with RNA instability. Our results indicate that a loss of mutant RNA transcripts is a critical feature of pathogenesis. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Transcripts with in silico predicted RNA structure are enriched everywhere in the mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seemann Stefan E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-transcriptional control of gene expression is mostly conducted by specific elements in untranslated regions (UTRs of mRNAs, in collaboration with specific binding proteins and RNAs. In several well characterized cases, these RNA elements are known to form stable secondary structures. RNA secondary structures also may have major functional implications for long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs. Recent transcriptional data has indicated the importance of lncRNAs in brain development and function. However, no methodical efforts to investigate this have been undertaken. Here, we aim to systematically analyze the potential for RNA structure in brain-expressed transcripts. Results By comprehensive spatial expression analysis of the adult mouse in situ hybridization data of the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, we show that transcripts (coding as well as non-coding associated with in silico predicted structured probes are highly and significantly enriched in almost all analyzed brain regions. Functional implications of these RNA structures and their role in the brain are discussed in detail along with specific examples. We observe that mRNAs with a structure prediction in their UTRs are enriched for binding, transport and localization gene ontology categories. In addition, after manual examination we observe agreement between RNA binding protein interaction sites near the 3’ UTR structures and correlated expression patterns. Conclusions Our results show a potential use for RNA structures in expressed coding as well as noncoding transcripts in the adult mouse brain, and describe the role of structured RNAs in the context of intracellular signaling pathways and regulatory networks. Based on this data we hypothesize that RNA structure is widely involved in transcriptional and translational regulatory mechanisms in the brain and ultimately plays a role in brain function.

  8. Construction and validation of an RNA trans-splicing molecule suitable to repair a large number of COL7A1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tockner, B; Kocher, T; Hainzl, S; Reichelt, J; Bauer, J W; Koller, U; Murauer, E M

    2016-11-01

    RNA trans-splicing has become a versatile tool in the gene therapy of monogenetic diseases. This technique is especially valuable for the correction of mutations in large genes such as COL7A1, which underlie the dystrophic subtype of the skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa. Over 800 mutations spanning the entire length of the COL7A1 gene have been associated with defects in type VII collagen, leading to excessive fragility of epithelial tissues, the hallmark of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB). In the present study, we designed an RNA trans-splicing molecule (RTM) that is capable of repairing any given mutation within a 4200 nucleotide region spanning the 3' half of COL7A1. The selected RTM, RTM28, was able to induce accurate trans-splicing into endogenous COL7A1 pre-mRNA transcripts in a type VII collagen-deficient DEB patient-derived cell line. Correct trans-splicing was detected at the RNA level by semiquantitative RT-PCR and correction of full-length type VII collagen was confirmed at the protein level by immunofluorescence and western blot analyses. Our results demonstrate that RTM28, which covers >60% of all mutations reported in DEB and is thus the longest RTM described so far for the repair of COL7A1, represents a promising candidate for therapeutic applications.

  9. Direct regulation of rRNA transcription by fibroblast growth factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zhi; Liang, Yanping; Lin, Chih-Yin; Comai, Lucio; Chirico, William J

    2005-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), which is highly expressed in developing tissues and malignant cells, regulates cell growth, differentiation, and migration. Five isoforms (18 to approximately 34 kDa) of FGF-2 are derived from alternative initiation codons of a single mRNA. The 18-kDa FGF-2 isoform is released from cells by a nonclassical secretory pathway and regulates gene expression by binding to cell surface receptors. This isoform also localizes to the nucleolus, raising the possibility that it may directly regulate ribosome biogenesis, a rate-limiting process in cell growth. Although several growth factors have been shown to accumulate in the nucleolus, their function and mechanism of action remain unclear. Here we show that 18-kDa FGF-2 interacts with upstream binding factor (UBF), an architectural transcription factor essential for rRNA transcription. The maximal activation of rRNA transcription in vitro by 18-kDa FGF-2 requires UBF. The 18-kDa FGF-2 localizes to rRNA genes and is necessary for the full activation of pre-rRNA synthesis in vivo. Our results demonstrate that 18-kDa FGF-2 directly regulates rRNA transcription.

  10. Structural basis of transcription: An RNA polymerase II elongation complex at 3.3 Å resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Gnatt, A; Cramer, P; Fu, J.; Bushnell, D; Kornberg, R

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structure of RNA polymerase II in the act of transcription was determined at 3.3  resolution. Duplex DNA is seen entering the main cleft of the enzyme and unwinding before the active site. Nine base pairs of DNA-RNA hybrid extend from the active center at nearly right angles to the entering DNA, with the 39 end of the RNA in the nucleotide addition site. The 39 end is positioned above a pore, through which nucleotides may enter and through which RNA may be extruded during back-tr...

  11. Differential intragraft cytokine messenger RNA profiles during rejection and repair of clinical heart transplants. A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A; Mol, Wendy M; Niesters, Hubert G M; Maat, Alex P W; van Gelder, Teun; Balk, Aggie H M M; Weimar, Willem; Baan, Carla C

    2003-01-01

    After clinical heart transplantation, ischemia, acute rejection, and repair mechanisms can trigger the up-regulation of cytokines. To investigate the cytokine profile early after transplantation, we monitored messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), monocyte

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation study of conformational changes of transcription factor TFIIS during RNA polymerase II transcriptional arrest and reactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsun Eun

    Full Text Available Transcription factor IIS (TFIIS is a protein known for catalyzing the cleavage reaction of the 3'-end of backtracked RNA transcript, allowing RNA polymerase II (Pol II to reactivate the transcription process from the arrested state. Recent structural studies have provided a molecular basis of protein-protein interaction between TFIIS and Pol II. However, the detailed dynamic conformational changes of TFIIS upon binding to Pol II and the related thermodynamic information are largely unknown. Here we use computational approaches to investigate the conformational space of TFIIS in the Pol II-bound and Pol II-free (unbound states. Our results reveal two distinct conformations of TFIIS: the closed and the open forms. The closed form is dominant in the Pol II-free (unbound state of TFIIS, whereas the open form is favorable in the Pol II-bound state. Furthermore, we discuss the free energy difference involved in the conformational changes between the two forms in the presence or absence of Pol II. Additionally, our analysis indicates that hydrophobic interactions and the protein-protein interactions between TFIIS and Pol II are crucial for inducing the conformational changes of TFIIS. Our results provide novel insights into the functional interplay between Pol II and TFIIS as well as mechanism of reactivation of Pol II transcription by TFIIS.

  13. Getting up to speed with transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, Iris; Lis, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing techniques that measure nascent transcripts and that reveal the positioning of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) have shown that the pausing of Pol II in promoter-proximal regions and its release to initiate a phase of productive elongation are key steps in transcription regulation. Moreover, after the release of Pol II from the promoter-proximal region, elongation rates are highly dynamic throughout the transcription of a gene, and vary on a gene-by-gene basis. Interestingly, Pol II elongation rates affect co-transcriptional processes such as splicing, termination and genome stability. Increasing numbers of factors and regulatory mechanisms have been associated with the steps of transcription elongation by Pol II, revealing that elongation is a highly complex process. Elongation is thus now recognized as a key phase in the regulation of transcription by Pol II. PMID:25693130

  14. Comet-FISH with strand-specific probes reveals transcription-coupled repair of 8-oxoGuanine in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Hanawalt, Philip C; Spivak, Graciela

    2013-09-01

    Oxidized bases in DNA have been implicated in cancer, aging and neurodegenerative disease. We have developed an approach combining single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) that enables the comparative quantification of low, physiologically relevant levels of DNA lesions in the respective strands of defined nucleotide sequences and in the genome overall. We have synthesized single-stranded probes targeting the termini of DNA segments of interest using a polymerase chain reaction-based method. These probes facilitate detection of damage at the single-molecule level, as the lesions are converted to DNA strand breaks by lesion-specific endonucleases or glycosylases. To validate our method, we have documented transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) gene in human fibroblasts irradiated with 254 nm ultraviolet at 0.1 J/m2, a dose ∼100-fold lower than those typically used. The high specificity and sensitivity of our approach revealed that 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) at an incidence of approximately three lesions per megabase is preferentially repaired in the transcribed strand of the ATM gene. We have also demonstrated that the hOGG1, XPA, CSB and UVSSA proteins, as well as actively elongating RNA polymerase II, are required for this process, suggesting cross-talk between DNA repair pathways.

  15. The spliceosome U2 snRNP factors promote genome stability through distinct mechanisms; transcription of repair factors and R-loop processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, M; Sanjiv, K; Helleday, T; Herr, P; Mortusewicz, O

    2016-12-19

    Recent whole-exome sequencing of malignancies have detected recurrent somatic mutations in U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex (snRNP) components of the spliceosome. These factors have also been identified as novel players in the DNA-damage response (DDR) in several genome-wide screens and proteomic analysis. Although accumulating evidence implies that the spliceosome has an important role in genome stability and is an emerging hallmark of cancer, its precise role in DNA repair still remains elusive. Here we identify two distinct mechanisms of how spliceosome U2 snRNP factors contribute to genome stability. We show that the spliceosome maintains protein levels of essential repair factors, thus contributing to homologous recombination repair. In addition, real-time laser microirradiation analysis identified rapid recruitment of the U2 snRNP factor SNRPA1 to DNA-damage sites. Functional analysis of SNRPA1 revealed a more immediate and direct role in preventing R-loop-induced DNA damage. Our present study implies a complex interrelation between transcription, mRNA splicing and the DDR. Cells require rapid spatio-temporal coordination of these chromatin transactions to cope with various forms of genotoxic stress.

  16. Molecular characterization of 5S ribosomal RNA genes and transcripts in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Campos, Rodrigo; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E; Nepomuceno-Mejía, Tomás; Rojas-Sánchez, Saúl; Vélez-Ramírez, Daniel E; Padilla-Mejía, Norma E; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa; Manning-Cela, Rebeca; Martínez-Calvillo, Santiago

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic 5S rRNA, synthesized by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit. Most organisms contain hundreds of 5S rRNA genes organized into tandem arrays. However, the genome of the protozoan parasite Leishmania major contains only 11 copies of the 5S rRNA gene, which are interspersed and associated with other Pol III-transcribed genes. Here we report that, in general, the number and order of the 5S rRNA genes is conserved between different species of Leishmania. While in most organisms 5S rRNA genes are normally associated with the nucleolus, combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and indirect immunofluorescence experiments showed that 5S rRNA genes are mainly located at the nuclear periphery in L. major. Similarly, the tandemly repeated 5S rRNA genes in Trypanosoma cruzi are dispersed throughout the nucleus. In contrast, 5S rRNA transcripts in L. major were localized within the nucleolus, and scattered throughout the cytoplasm, where mature ribosomes are located. Unlike other rRNA species, stable antisense RNA complementary to 5S rRNA is not detected in L. major.

  17. Expression Silence of DNA Repair Gene hMGMT Induced by RNA Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiu-ying; LAI Yan-dong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: MGMT protein expression has been associated with tumor resistance to alkylating agents. The objective of this paper is to construct the RNA interference vector which can specifically induce the expression silence of human DNA repair gene hMGMT. Methods: The hMGMT specific siRNA expression cassette was made by two steps PCR, linked with pUC19 to get pU6-MGMTi, co-transfected with pEGFP-C1 into 16HBE and screened by G418. The MGMT mRNA and protein levels were detected by RT-PCR and Western Blot respectively. Results: hMGMT specific RNA interfere vector pU6-MGMTi was constructed successfully. In transfected 16HBE cells MGMT mRNA level could hardly be detected and the protein level was only 10% of control. Conclusion: MGMT specific RNAi expression cassette can effectively inhibit MGMT expression. MGMT silence cell line was built by co-transfection technology, which offered condition for studying the gene function of MGMT.

  18. Cellular and molecular phenotypes depending upon the RNA repair system RtcAB of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engl, Christoph; Schaefer, Jorrit; Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Buck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    RNA ligases function pervasively across the three kingdoms of life for RNA repair, splicing and can be stress induced. The RtcB protein (also HSPC117, C22orf28, FAAP and D10Wsu52e) is one such conserved ligase, involved in tRNA and mRNA splicing. However, its physiological role is poorly described, especially in bacteria. We now show in Escherichia coli bacteria that the RtcR activated rtcAB genes function for ribosome homeostasis involving rRNA stability. Expression of rtcAB is activated by agents and genetic lesions which impair the translation apparatus or may cause oxidative damage in the cell. Rtc helps the cell to survive challenges to the translation apparatus, including ribosome targeting antibiotics. Further, loss of Rtc causes profound changes in chemotaxis and motility. Together, our data suggest that the Rtc system is part of a previously unrecognized adaptive response linking ribosome homeostasis with basic cell physiology and behaviour. PMID:27402162

  19. Cellular and molecular phenotypes depending upon the RNA repair system RtcAB of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engl, Christoph; Schaefer, Jorrit; Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Buck, Martin

    2016-11-16

    RNA ligases function pervasively across the three kingdoms of life for RNA repair, splicing and can be stress induced. The RtcB protein (also HSPC117, C22orf28, FAAP and D10Wsu52e) is one such conserved ligase, involved in tRNA and mRNA splicing. However, its physiological role is poorly described, especially in bacteria. We now show in Escherichia coli bacteria that the RtcR activated rtcAB genes function for ribosome homeostasis involving rRNA stability. Expression of rtcAB is activated by agents and genetic lesions which impair the translation apparatus or may cause oxidative damage in the cell. Rtc helps the cell to survive challenges to the translation apparatus, including ribosome targeting antibiotics. Further, loss of Rtc causes profound changes in chemotaxis and motility. Together, our data suggest that the Rtc system is part of a previously unrecognized adaptive response linking ribosome homeostasis with basic cell physiology and behaviour. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. A growth-dependent transcription initiation factor (TIF-IA) interacting with RNA polymerase I regulates mouse ribosomal RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapp, A; Pfleiderer, C; Rosenbauer, H; Grummt, I

    1990-09-01

    Control of mouse ribosomal RNA synthesis in response to extracellular signals is mediated by TIF-IA, a regulatory factor whose amount or activity correlates with cell proliferation. Factor TIF-IA interacts with RNA polymerase I (pol I), thus converting it into a transcriptionally active holoenzyme, which is able to initiate specifically at the rDNA promoter in the presence of the other auxiliary transcription initiation factors, designated TIF-IB, TIF-IC and UBF. With regard to several criteria, the growth-dependent factor TIF-IA behaves like a bacterial sigma factor: (i) it associates physically with pol I, (ii) it is required for initiation of transcription, (iii) it is present in limiting amounts and (iv) under certain salt conditions, it is chromatographically separable from the polymerase. In addition, evidence is presented that dephosphorylation of pol I abolishes in vitro transcription initiation from the ribosomal gene promoter without significantly affecting the polymerizing activity of the enzyme at nonspecific templates. The involvement of both a regulatory factor and post-translational modification of the transcribing enzyme provides an efficient and versatile mechanism of rDNA transcription regulation which enables the cell to adapt ribosome synthesis rapidly to a variety of extracellular signals.

  1. Identification of the transcriptional promoters in the proximal regions of human microRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yue-Sheng; Deng, Guang-Fei; Sun, Xun-Sha; Yi, Yong-Hong; Su, Tao; Zhao, Qi-Hua; Liao, Wei-Ping

    2011-08-01

    To identify the transcriptional promoters in the proximal regions of human microRNA (miRNA) genes, we analyzed the 5' flanking regions of intergenic miRNAs and intronic miRNAs. With the TSSG program prediction, we found that the ratio of intronic-s miRNA genes with a least one promoter was significantly lower than those of intergenic miRNA genes and intronic-a miRNA genes. More than half of the miRNA genes have only one promoter and less than 20% of the miRNA genes have more than three promoters in the 5-kb upstream regions. All potential promoters are randomly distributed within these regions. Approximately 60% of the miRNA promoters have a TATA-like box, being significantly higher than that of all human promoters. Luciferase reporter assays showed that 22 of the 30 promoters drove gene expression in HEK-293 cells, indicating a high accuracy of the promoter prediction. This study lays a foundation for future investigation into the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of human miRNA genes.

  2. The structure of an RNAi polymerase links RNA silencing and transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula S Salgado

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing refers to a group of RNA-induced gene-silencing mechanisms that developed early in the eukaryotic lineage, probably for defence against pathogens and regulation of gene expression. In plants, protozoa, fungi, and nematodes, but apparently not insects and vertebrates, it involves a cell-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (cRdRP that produces double-stranded RNA triggers from aberrant single-stranded RNA. We report the 2.3-A resolution crystal structure of QDE-1, a cRdRP from Neurospora crassa, and find that it forms a relatively compact dimeric molecule, each subunit of which comprises several domains with, at its core, a catalytic apparatus and protein fold strikingly similar to the catalytic core of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerases responsible for transcription. This evolutionary link between the two enzyme types suggests that aspects of RNA silencing in some organisms may recapitulate transcription/replication pathways functioning in the ancient RNA-based world.

  3. The Transcription Bubble of the RNA Polymerase-Promoter Open Complex Exhibits Conformational Heterogeneity and Millisecond-Scale Dynamics : Implications for Transcription Start-Site Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robb, Nicole C.; Cordes, Thorben; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Duchi, Diego; Craggs, Timothy D.; Santoso, Yusdi; Weiss, Shimon; Ebright, Richard H.; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial transcription is initiated after RNA polymerase (RNAP) binds to promoter DNA, melts similar to 14 bp around the transcription start site and forms a single-stranded "transcription bubble" within a catalytically active RNAP-DNA open complex (RPo). There is significant flexibility in the tra

  4. Short hairpin RNA targeting NP mRNA inhibiting Newcastle disease virus production and other viral structural mRNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hua; Deng, Shu; Yang, Fa-Long; Li, Ding-Fei; Fu, An-Jing; Yang, Fan; Tang, Cheng

    2009-02-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), formally recognized as avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1), is the etiological agent of Newcastle disease (ND), an affliction which can cause severe losses in the poultry industry. Better understanding of the molecular basis of viral structural genes involved with production should contribute significantly toward the development of improved prophylactic and therapeutic reagents to control the infection. Here we show that a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) eukaryotic expression vector targeting nucleocapsid (NP) gene of NDV can potently inhibit NDV production in both primary cells and embryonated chicken eggs. Moreover, shRNA specific for NP abolished the accumulation of not only the corresponding mRNA but also P, HN, F, M gene mRNA. The findings reveal that newly synthesized NP mRNA is essential for NDV transcription and replication, and provide a basis for the development of shRNAs as a prophylaxis and therapy for NDV infection in poultry.

  5. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2014-11-14

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  6. RNA-binding proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke eVan Assche

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional regulation is a very important mechanism to control gene expression in changing environments. In the past decade, a lot of interest has been directed towards the role of small RNAs in bacterial post-transcriptional regulation. However, small RNAs are not the only molecules controlling gene expression at this level, RNA-binding proteins play an important role as well. CsrA and Hfq are the two best studied bacterial proteins of this type, but recently, additional proteins involved in post-transcriptional control have been identified. This review focuses on the general working mechanisms of post-transcriptionally active RNA-binding proteins, which include (i adaptation of the susceptibility of mRNAs and sRNAs to RNases, (ii modulating the accessibility of the ribosome binding site of mRNAs, (iii recruiting and assisting in the interaction of mRNAs with other molecules and (iv regulating transcription terminator / antiterminator formation, and gives an overview of both the well-studied and the newly identified proteins that are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory processes. Additionally, the post-transcriptional mechanisms by which the expression or the activity of these proteins is regulated, are described. For many of the newly identified proteins, however, mechanistic questions remain. Most likely, more post-transcriptionally active proteins will be identified in the future.

  7. SINE transcription by RNA polymerase III is suppressed by histone methylation but not by DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Dhaval; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; Oler, Andrew J.; Cowling, Victoria H.; Cairns, Bradley R.; White, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs), such as Alu, spread by retrotransposition, which requires their transcripts to be copied into DNA and then inserted into new chromosomal sites. This can lead to genetic damage through insertional mutagenesis and chromosomal rearrangements between non-allelic SINEs at distinct loci. SINE DNA is heavily methylated and this was thought to suppress its accessibility and transcription, thereby protecting against retrotransposition. Here we provide several lines of evidence that methylated SINE DNA is occupied by RNA polymerase III, including the use of high-throughput bisulphite sequencing of ChIP DNA. We find that loss of DNA methylation has little effect on accessibility of SINEs to transcription machinery or their expression in vivo. In contrast, a histone methyltransferase inhibitor selectively promotes SINE expression and occupancy by RNA polymerase III. The data suggest that methylation of histones rather than DNA plays a dominant role in suppressing SINE transcription. PMID:25798578

  8. Making ends meet: Coordination between RNA 3'end processing and transcription initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Jensen, Torben Heick; Lykke-Andersen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)-mediated gene transcription initiates at promoters and ends at terminators. Transcription termination is intimately connected to 3'-end processing of the produced RNA and already when loaded at the promoter, RNAPII starts to become configured for this downstream event....... Conversely, RNAPII is 'reset' as part of the 3'-end processing/termination event, thus preparing the enzyme for its next round of transcription--possibly on the same gene. There is both direct and circumstantial evidence for preferential recycling of RNAPII from the gene terminator back to its own promoter......, which supposedly increases the efficiency of the transcription process under conditions where RNAPII levels are rate limiting. Here, we review differences and commonalities between initiation and 3'-end processing/termination processes on various types of RNAPII transcribed genes. In doing so, we...

  9. Complementary RNA amplification methods enhance microarray identification of transcripts expressed in the C. elegans nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Shawn

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarrays provide a powerful method for global analysis of gene expression. The application of this technology to specific cell types and tissues, however, is typically limited by small amounts of available mRNA, thereby necessitating amplification. Here we compare microarray results obtained with two different methods of RNA amplification to profile gene expression in the C. elegans larval nervous system. Results We used the mRNA-tagging strategy to isolate transcripts specifically from C. elegans larval neurons. The WT-Ovation Pico System (WT-Pico was used to amplify 2 ng of pan-neural RNA to produce labeled cDNA for microarray analysis. These WT-Pico-derived data were compared to microarray results obtained with a labeled aRNA target generated by two rounds of In Vitro Transcription (IVT of 25 ng of pan-neural RNA. WT-Pico results in a higher fraction of present calls than IVT, a finding consistent with the proposal that DNA-DNA hybridization results in lower mismatch signals than the RNA-DNA heteroduplexes produced by IVT amplification. Microarray data sets from these samples were compared to a reference profile of all larval cells to identify transcripts with elevated expression in neurons. These results were validated by the high proportion of known neuron-expressed genes detected in these profiles and by promoter-GFP constructs for previously uncharacterized genes in these data sets. Together, the IVT and WT-Pico methods identified 2,173 unique neuron-enriched transcripts. Only about half of these transcripts (1,044, however, are detected as enriched by both IVT and WT-Pico amplification. Conclusion We show that two different methods of RNA amplification, IVT and WT-Pico, produce valid microarray profiles of gene expression in the C. elegans larval nervous system with a low rate of false positives. However, our results also show that each method of RNA amplification detects a unique subset of bona fide neural

  10. Transcriptator: An Automated Computational Pipeline to Annotate Assembled Reads and Identify Non Coding RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Parijat Tripathi

    Full Text Available RNA-seq is a new tool to measure RNA transcript counts, using high-throughput sequencing at an extraordinary accuracy. It provides quantitative means to explore the transcriptome of an organism of interest. However, interpreting this extremely large data into biological knowledge is a problem, and biologist-friendly tools are lacking. In our lab, we developed Transcriptator, a web application based on a computational Python pipeline with a user-friendly Java interface. This pipeline uses the web services available for BLAST (Basis Local Search Alignment Tool, QuickGO and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery tools. It offers a report on statistical analysis of functional and Gene Ontology (GO annotation's enrichment. It helps users to identify enriched biological themes, particularly GO terms, pathways, domains, gene/proteins features and protein-protein interactions related informations. It clusters the transcripts based on functional annotations and generates a tabular report for functional and gene ontology annotations for each submitted transcript to the web server. The implementation of QuickGo web-services in our pipeline enable the users to carry out GO-Slim analysis, whereas the integration of PORTRAIT (Prediction of transcriptomic non coding RNA (ncRNA by ab initio methods helps to identify the non coding RNAs and their regulatory role in transcriptome. In summary, Transcriptator is a useful software for both NGS and array data. It helps the users to characterize the de-novo assembled reads, obtained from NGS experiments for non-referenced organisms, while it also performs the functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed transcripts/genes for both RNA-seq and micro-array experiments. It generates easy to read tables and interactive charts for better understanding of the data. The pipeline is modular in nature, and provides an opportunity to add new plugins in the future. Web application is

  11. Transcriptator: An Automated Computational Pipeline to Annotate Assembled Reads and Identify Non Coding RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, Antonio; Guarracino, Mario Rosario

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq is a new tool to measure RNA transcript counts, using high-throughput sequencing at an extraordinary accuracy. It provides quantitative means to explore the transcriptome of an organism of interest. However, interpreting this extremely large data into biological knowledge is a problem, and biologist-friendly tools are lacking. In our lab, we developed Transcriptator, a web application based on a computational Python pipeline with a user-friendly Java interface. This pipeline uses the web services available for BLAST (Basis Local Search Alignment Tool), QuickGO and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery) tools. It offers a report on statistical analysis of functional and Gene Ontology (GO) annotation’s enrichment. It helps users to identify enriched biological themes, particularly GO terms, pathways, domains, gene/proteins features and protein—protein interactions related informations. It clusters the transcripts based on functional annotations and generates a tabular report for functional and gene ontology annotations for each submitted transcript to the web server. The implementation of QuickGo web-services in our pipeline enable the users to carry out GO-Slim analysis, whereas the integration of PORTRAIT (Prediction of transcriptomic non coding RNA (ncRNA) by ab initio methods) helps to identify the non coding RNAs and their regulatory role in transcriptome. In summary, Transcriptator is a useful software for both NGS and array data. It helps the users to characterize the de-novo assembled reads, obtained from NGS experiments for non-referenced organisms, while it also performs the functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed transcripts/genes for both RNA-seq and micro-array experiments. It generates easy to read tables and interactive charts for better understanding of the data. The pipeline is modular in nature, and provides an opportunity to add new plugins in the future. Web application is freely

  12. Translational control by the DEAD Box RNA helicase belle regulates ecdysone-triggered transcriptional cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Ihry

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones act, through their respective nuclear receptors, to regulate target gene expression. Despite their critical role in development, physiology, and disease, however, it is still unclear how these systemic cues are refined into tissue-specific responses. We identified a mutation in the evolutionarily conserved DEAD box RNA helicase belle/DDX3 that disrupts a subset of responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. We demonstrate that belle directly regulates translation of E74A, an ets transcription factor and critical component of the ecdysone-induced transcriptional cascade. Although E74A mRNA accumulates to abnormally high levels in belle mutant tissues, no E74A protein is detectable, resulting in misregulation of E74A-dependent ecdysone response genes. The accumulation of E74A mRNA in belle mutant salivary glands is a result of auto-regulation, fulfilling a prediction made by Ashburner nearly 40 years ago. In this model, Ashburner postulates that, in addition to regulating secondary response genes, protein products of primary response genes like E74A also inhibit their own ecdysone-induced transcription. Moreover, although ecdysone-triggered transcription of E74A appears to be ubiquitous during metamorphosis, belle-dependent translation of E74A mRNA is spatially restricted. These results demonstrate that translational control plays a critical, and previously unknown, role in refining transcriptional responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone.

  13. Structural basis of transcription: an RNA polymerase II-TFIIB cocrystal at 4.5 Angstroms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, David A; Westover, Kenneth D; Davis, Ralph E; Kornberg, Roger D

    2004-02-13

    The structure of the general transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) in a complex with RNA polymerase II reveals three features crucial for transcription initiation: an N-terminal zinc ribbon domain of TFIIB that contacts the "dock" domain of the polymerase, near the path of RNA exit from a transcribing enzyme; a "finger" domain of TFIIB that is inserted into the polymerase active center; and a C-terminal domain, whose interaction with both the polymerase and with a TATA box-binding protein (TBP)-promoter DNA complex orients the DNA for unwinding and transcription. TFIIB stabilizes an early initiation complex, containing an incomplete RNA-DNA hybrid region. It may interact with the template strand, which sets the location of the transcription start site, and may interfere with RNA exit, which leads to abortive initiation or promoter escape. The trajectory of promoter DNA determined by the C-terminal domain of TFIIB traverses sites of interaction with TFIIE, TFIIF, and TFIIH, serving to define their roles in the transcription initiation process.

  14. Translational control by the DEAD Box RNA helicase belle regulates ecdysone-triggered transcriptional cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Ihry

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones act, through their respective nuclear receptors, to regulate target gene expression. Despite their critical role in development, physiology, and disease, however, it is still unclear how these systemic cues are refined into tissue-specific responses. We identified a mutation in the evolutionarily conserved DEAD box RNA helicase belle/DDX3 that disrupts a subset of responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. We demonstrate that belle directly regulates translation of E74A, an ets transcription factor and critical component of the ecdysone-induced transcriptional cascade. Although E74A mRNA accumulates to abnormally high levels in belle mutant tissues, no E74A protein is detectable, resulting in misregulation of E74A-dependent ecdysone response genes. The accumulation of E74A mRNA in belle mutant salivary glands is a result of auto-regulation, fulfilling a prediction made by Ashburner nearly 40 years ago. In this model, Ashburner postulates that, in addition to regulating secondary response genes, protein products of primary response genes like E74A also inhibit their own ecdysone-induced transcription. Moreover, although ecdysone-triggered transcription of E74A appears to be ubiquitous during metamorphosis, belle-dependent translation of E74A mRNA is spatially restricted. These results demonstrate that translational control plays a critical, and previously unknown, role in refining transcriptional responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone.

  15. Structures of nucleolus and transcription sites of rRNA genes in rat liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶伟; 焦明大; 赫杰; 何孟元; 郝水

    2000-01-01

    We observed the ultrastructure of nucleolus in rat liver cells by conventional electron microscopy, and employed cytochemistry NAMA-Ur DNA specific stain method to analyze the distribution and position of nucleolar DNA in situ. The results showed that nucleolar DNA of rat liver cells comes from nucleolus-associated chromatin, and continuously extends in the dense fibrillar component (DFC) of nucleolus, localizes at the periphery of fibrillar center (FC) and in DFC. Furthermore, by employing anti-DNA/RNA hybrid antibodies, we directly and selectively labeled transcription sites of rRNA genes and testified that localization of transcription sites not only to DFC but also to the periphery of FC.

  16. Regulation of nucleolus assembly by non-coding RNA polymerase II transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Pankert, Teresa; Rippe, Karsten

    2016-05-01

    The nucleolus is a nuclear subcompartment for tightly regulated rRNA production and ribosome subunit biogenesis. It also acts as a cellular stress sensor and can release enriched factors in response to cellular stimuli. Accordingly, the content and structure of the nucleolus change dynamically, which is particularly evident during cell cycle progression: the nucleolus completely disassembles during mitosis and reassembles in interphase. Although the mechanisms that drive nucleolar (re)organization have been the subject of a number of studies, they are only partly understood. Recently, we identified Alu element-containing RNA polymerase II transcripts (aluRNAs) as important for nucleolar structure and rRNA synthesis. Integrating these findings with studies on the liquid droplet-like nature of the nucleolus leads us to propose a model on how RNA polymerase II transcripts could regulate the assembly of the nucleolus in response to external stimuli and during cell cycle progression.

  17. Having it both ways: transcription factors that bind DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiday, Laura A; Maher, L James

    2002-10-01

    Multifunctional proteins challenge the conventional 'one protein-one function' paradigm. Here we note apparent multifunctional proteins with nucleic acid partners, tabulating eight examples. We then focus on eight additional cases of transcription factors that bind double-stranded DNA with sequence specificity, but that also appear to lead alternative lives as RNA-binding proteins. Exemplified by the prototypic Xenopus TFIIIA protein, and more recently by mammalian p53, this list of transcription factors includes WT-1, TRA-1, bicoid, the bacterial sigma(70) subunit, STAT1 and TLS/FUS. The existence of transcription factors that bind both DNA and RNA provides an interesting puzzle. Little is known concerning the biological roles of these alternative protein-nucleic acid interactions, and even less is known concerning the structural basis for dual nucleic acid specificity. We discuss how these natural examples have motivated us to identify artificial RNA sequences that competitively inhibit a DNA-binding transcription factor not known to have a natural RNA partner. The identification of such RNAs raises the possibility that RNA binding by DNA-binding proteins is more common than currently appreciated.

  18. Role of Ser7 phosphorylation of the CTD during transcription of snRNA genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egloff, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    The largest subunit of RNA polymerase (pol) II, Rpb1, contains an unusual carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) composed of consecutive repeats of the sequence Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7). During transcription, Ser2, Ser5 and Ser7 are subjected to dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by CTD kinases and phosphatases, creating a characteristic CTD phosphorylation pattern along genes. This CTD “code” allows the coupling of transcription with co-transcriptional RNA processing, through the timely recruitment of the appropriate factors at the right point of the transcription cycle. In mammals, phosphorylation of Ser7 (Ser7P) is detected on all pol II-transcribed genes, but is only essential for expression of a sub-class of genes encoding small nuclear (sn)RNAs. The molecular mechanisms by which Ser7P influences expression of these particular genes are becoming clearer. Here, I discuss our recent findings clarifying how Ser7P facilitates transcription of these genes and 3′end processing of the transcripts, through recruitment of the RPAP2 phosphatase and the snRNA gene-specific Integrator complex. PMID:22858677

  19. Transcription pattern of UL131A-128 mRNA in clinical strains of human cytomegalovirus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhengrong Sun; Gaowei Ren; Yanping Ma; Ning Wang; Yaohua Ji; Ying Qi; Mali Li; Rong He; Qiang Ruan

    2010-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) mRNA was obtained from human embryonic lung fibroblast cells infected by HCMV clinical strains from urine samples of infants at different kinetic periods. The cDNA of UL131A-128 mRNAs was amplified using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and analysed by sequencing. Mean while, clones containing UL131A-128 transcripts in an HCMV cDNA library of a clinical strain were selected and sequenced. It was demonstrated that UL131A-128 mRNA was expressed with immediately early, early and late kinetics. Sequences obtained by RT-PCR showed that the UL131A gene consisted of two exons and the coding region of the UL130 gene was not interrupted by any intron in the region as reported earlier. However, the transcript of the UL128 gene showed two patterns: one pattern consisted of three exons as reported earlier; the other contained the three exons and also the first intron. Moreover, the above characteristics of UL131A-128 spliced transcripts were confirmed by the sequences of clones selected from the HCMV cDNA library. Our results demonstrated that the UL131A, UL130 and UL128 genes were transcribed with the 3′-coterminal, although the initiation points of their mRNA may be different. The variation in the transcripts found in our study indicated the complex nature of transcription of UL131A-128 genes in clinical strains of HCMV.

  20. A Regulatory miRNA–mRNA Network Is Associated with Tissue Repair Induced by Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Bassi, Ênio Jose; Azevedo, Hatylas; Anderson, Letícia; Origassa, Clarice Silvia Taemi; Cenedeze, Marcos Antônio; de Andrade-Oliveira, Vinicius; Felizardo, Raphael José Ferreira; da Silva, Reinaldo Correia; Hiyane, Meire Ioshie; Semedo, Patricia; dos Reis, Marlene Antônia; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Pacheco-Silva, Álvaro; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) orchestrate tissue repair by releasing cell-derived microvesicles (MVs), which, presumably by small RNA species, modulate global gene expression. The knowledge of miRNA/mRNA signatures linked to a reparative status may elucidate some of the molecular events associated with MSC protection. Here, we used a model of cisplatin-induced kidney injury (acute kidney injury) to assess how MSCs or MVs could restore tissue function. MSCs and MVs presented similar protective effects, which were evidenced in vivo and in vitro by modulating apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and a set of prosurvival molecules. In addition, we observed that miRNAs (i.e., miR-880, miR-141, miR-377, and miR-21) were modulated, thereby showing active participation on regenerative process. Subsequently, we identified that MSC regulates a particular miRNA subset which mRNA targets are associated with Wnt/TGF-β, fibrosis, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition signaling pathways. Our results suggest that MSCs release MVs that transcriptionally reprogram injured cells, thereby modulating a specific miRNA–mRNA network. PMID:28096802

  1. BayFish: Bayesian inference of transcription dynamics from population snapshots of single-molecule RNA FISH in single cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mariana Gomez-Schiavon; Liang-Fu Chen; Anne E West; Nicolas E Buchler

    2017-01-01

    Single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) provides unparalleled resolution in the measurement of the abundance and localization of nascent and mature RNA transcripts in fixed, single cells...

  2. Transcriptional profiling of bovine milk using RNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wickramasinghe Saumya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cow milk is a complex bioactive fluid consumed by humans beyond infancy. Even though the chemical and physical properties of cow milk are well characterized, very limited research has been done on characterizing the milk transcriptome. This study performs a comprehensive expression profiling of genes expressed in milk somatic cells of transition (day 15, peak (day 90 and late (day 250 lactation Holstein cows by RNA sequencing. Milk samples were collected from Holstein cows at 15, 90 and 250 days of lactation, and RNA was extracted from the pelleted milk cells. Gene expression analysis was conducted by Illumina RNA sequencing. Sequence reads were assembled and analyzed in CLC Genomics Workbench. Gene Ontology (GO and pathway analysis were performed using the Blast2GO program and GeneGo application of MetaCore program. Results A total of 16,892 genes were expressed in transition lactation, 19,094 genes were expressed in peak lactation and 18,070 genes were expressed in late lactation. Regardless of the lactation stage approximately 9,000 genes showed ubiquitous expression. Genes encoding caseins, whey proteins and enzymes in lactose synthesis pathway showed higher expression in early lactation. The majority of genes in the fat metabolism pathway had high expression in transition and peak lactation milk. Most of the genes encoding for endogenous proteases and enzymes in ubiquitin-proteasome pathway showed higher expression along the course of lactation. Conclusions This is the first study to describe the comprehensive bovine milk transcriptome in Holstein cows. The results revealed that 69% of NCBI Btau 4.0 annotated genes are expressed in bovine milk somatic cells. Most of the genes were ubiquitously expressed in all three stages of lactation. However, a fraction of the milk transcriptome has genes devoted to specific functions unique to the lactation stage. This indicates the ability of milk somatic cells to adapt to different

  3. Detection of Babesia microti parasites by highly sensitive 18S rRNA reverse transcription PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanron, Amelia E; Billman, Zachary P; Seilie, Annette M; Chang, Ming; Murphy, Sean C

    2017-03-01

    Babesia are increasingly appreciated as a cause of transfusion-transmitted infection. Sensitive methods are needed to screen blood products. We report herein that B. microti 18S rRNA is over 1,000-fold more abundant than its coding genes, making reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) much more sensitive than PCR. Babesia 18S rRNA may be useful for screening the blood supply.

  4. Control of microRNA biogenesis and transcription by cell signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A limited set of cell-cell signaling pathways presides over the vast majority of animal developmental events. The typical raison d'etre for signal transduction is to control the transcription of protein-coding genes. However, with the recent appreciation of microRNAs, growing attention has been paid towards understanding how signaling pathways intertwine with microRNA-mediated regulation. This review highlights recent studies that uncover unexpected modes of microRNA regulation by cell signal...

  5. An RNA Polymerase II-coupled function for histone H3K36 methylation in checkpoint activation and DSB repair

    OpenAIRE

    Jha, Deepak Kumar; Brian D Strahl

    2014-01-01

    Histone modifications are major determinants of DNA double-strand break (DSB) response and repair. Here we elucidate a DSB repair function for transcription-coupled Set2 methylation at H3 lysine 36 (H3K36me). Cells devoid of Set2/H3K36me are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents and site-specific DSBs, fail to properly activate the DNA-damage checkpoint, and show genetic interactions with DSB-sensing and repair machinery. Set2/H3K36me3 is enriched at DSBs, and loss of Set2 results in altered ...

  6. Proteomic Validation of Transcript Isoforms, Including Those Assembled from RNA-Seq Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tay, Aidan P; Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Twine, Natalie a;

    2015-01-01

    data, and proteomic analysis of the same sample, can identify protein isoforms. RNA-seq data from human mesenchymal (hMSC) stem cells were analyzed with our new TranscriptCoder tool to generate a database of protein isoform sequences. MS/MS data from matching hMSC samples were then matched against...... the TranscriptCoder-derived database, along with Ensembl and the neXtProt database. Querying the TranscriptCoder-derived or Ensembl database could unambiguously identify ∼450 protein isoforms, with isoform-specific proteotypic peptides, including candidate hMSC-specific isoforms for the genes DPYSL2 and FXR1...

  7. The control of HIV transcription: keeping RNA polymerase II on track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Melanie; Geyer, Matthias; Zhou, Qiang

    2011-11-17

    Thirteen years ago, human cyclin T1 was identified as part of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) and the long-sought host cofactor for the HIV-1 transactivator Tat. Recent years have brought new insights into the intricate regulation of P-TEFb function and its relationship with Tat, revealing novel mechanisms for controlling HIV transcription and fueling new efforts to overcome the barrier of transcriptional latency in eradicating HIV. Moreover, the improved understanding of HIV and Tat forms a basis for studying transcription elongation control in general. Here, we review advances in HIV transcription research with a focus on the growing family of cellular P-TEFb complexes, structural insights into the interactions between Tat, P-TEFb, and TAR RNA, and the multifaceted regulation of these interactions by posttranscriptional modifications of Tat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Critical evaluation of the FANTOM3 non-coding RNA transcripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Karl J V; Mirza, Majd A I; Almén, Markus Sällman

    2009-01-01

    We studied the genomic positions of 38,129 putative ncRNAs from the RIKEN dataset in relation to protein-coding genes. We found that the dataset has 41% sense, 6% antisense, 24% intronic and 29% intergenic transcripts. Interestingly, 17,678 (47%) of the FANTOM3 transcripts were found to potentially......-coding genes, did not contain ORFs longer than 100 residues and were not internally primed. This dataset contains 53% of the FANTOM3 transcripts associated to known ncRNA in RNAdb and expands previous similar efforts with 6523 novel transcripts. This bioinformatic filtering of the FANTOM3 non-coding dataset...... has generated a lead dataset of transcripts without signs of being artefacts, providing a suitable dataset for investigation with hybridization-based techniques....

  9. Cooperative RNA polymerase molecules behavior on a stochastic sequence-dependent model for transcription elongation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Rafael Costa

    Full Text Available The transcription process is crucial to life and the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP is the major component of the transcription machinery. The development of single-molecule techniques, such as magnetic and optical tweezers, atomic-force microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence, increased our understanding of the transcription process and complements traditional biochemical studies. Based on these studies, theoretical models have been proposed to explain and predict the kinetics of the RNAP during the polymerization, highlighting the results achieved by models based on the thermodynamic stability of the transcription elongation complex. However, experiments showed that if more than one RNAP initiates from the same promoter, the transcription behavior slightly changes and new phenomenona are observed. We proposed and implemented a theoretical model that considers collisions between RNAPs and predicts their cooperative behavior during multi-round transcription generalizing the Bai et al. stochastic sequence-dependent model. In our approach, collisions between elongating enzymes modify their transcription rate values. We performed the simulations in Mathematica® and compared the results of the single and the multiple-molecule transcription with experimental results and other theoretical models. Our multi-round approach can recover several expected behaviors, showing that the transcription process for the studied sequences can be accelerated up to 48% when collisions are allowed: the dwell times on pause sites are reduced as well as the distance that the RNAPs backtracked from backtracking sites.

  10. Environmental Contaminants and microRNA Regulation: Transcription Factors as Regulators of Toxicant-Altered microRNA Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollome, James; Martin, Elizabeth; Sethupathy, Praveen; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding mRNA transcripts and inhibiting translation and/or inducing degradation of the associated transcripts. Expression levels of miRNAs have been shown to be altered in response to environmental toxicants, thus impacting cellular function and influencing disease risk. Transcription factors (TFs) are known to be altered in response to environmental toxicants and play a critical role in the regulation of miRNA expression. To date, environmentally-responsive TFs that are important for regulating miRNAs remain understudied. In a state-of-the-art analysis, we utilized in silico bioinformatic analysis to characterize potential transcriptional regulators of environmentally-responsive miRNAs. Using the miRStart database, genomic sequences of promoter regions for all available human miRNAs (n=847) were identified and promoter regions were defined as −1000/+500 base pairs from the transcription start site. Subsequently, the promoter region sequences of environmentally-responsive miRNAs (n=128) were analyzed using enrichment analysis to determine overrepresented TF binding sites (TFBS). While most (56/73) TFs differed across environmental contaminants, a set of 17 TFs was enriched for promoter binding among miRNAs responsive to numerous environmental contaminants. Of these, one TF was common to miRNAs altered by the majority of environmental contaminants, namely SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily A, member 3 (SMARCA3). These identified TFs represent candidate common transcriptional regulators of miRNAs perturbed by environmental toxicants. PMID:27292125

  11. Synthesis of RNA probes by the direct in vitro transcription of PCR-generated DNA templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, R; McNiven, M A; Kachar, B

    1993-05-01

    We describe a novel method for the generation of RNA probes based on the direct in vitro transcription of DNA templates amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers with sequence hybrids between the target gene and those of the T7 and T3 RNA polymerases promoters. This method circumvents the need for cloning and allows rapid generation of strand-specific RNA molecules that can be used for the identification of genes in hybridization experiments. We have successfully applied this method to the identification of DNA sequences by Southern blot analysis and library screening.

  12. Transcriptional reprogramming in yeast using dCas9 and combinatorial gRNA strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Emil D; Ferreira, Raphael; Jakočiūnas, Tadas; Arsovska, Dushica; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Ling; Smith, Justin D; David, Florian; Nielsen, Jens; Jensen, Michael K; Keasling, Jay D

    2017-03-15

    Transcriptional reprogramming is a fundamental process of living cells in order to adapt to environmental and endogenous cues. In order to allow flexible and timely control over gene expression without the interference of native gene expression machinery, a large number of studies have focused on developing synthetic biology tools for orthogonal control of transcription. Most recently, the nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) has emerged as a flexible tool for controlling activation and repression of target genes, by the simple RNA-guided positioning of dCas9 in the vicinity of the target gene transcription start site. In this study we compared two different systems of dCas9-mediated transcriptional reprogramming, and applied them to genes controlling two biosynthetic pathways for biobased production of isoprenoids and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By testing 101 guide-RNA (gRNA) structures on a total of 14 different yeast promoters, we identified the best-performing combinations based on reporter assays. Though a larger number of gRNA-promoter combinations do not perturb gene expression, some gRNAs support expression perturbations up to ~threefold. The best-performing gRNAs were used for single and multiplex reprogramming strategies for redirecting flux related to isoprenoid production and optimization of TAG profiles. From these studies, we identified both constitutive and inducible multiplex reprogramming strategies enabling significant changes in isoprenoid production and increases in TAG. Taken together, we show similar performance for a constitutive and an inducible dCas9 approach, and identify multiplex gRNA designs that can significantly perturb isoprenoid production and TAG profiles in yeast without editing the genomic context of the target genes. We also identify a large number of gRNA positions in 14 native yeast target pomoters that do not affect expression, suggesting the need for further optimization of gRNA design

  13. lncRNA-Induced Nucleosome Repositioning Reinforces Transcriptional Repression of rRNA Genes upon Hypotonic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongliang Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The activity of rRNA genes (rDNA is regulated by pathways that target the transcription machinery or alter the epigenetic state of rDNA. Previous work has established that downregulation of rRNA synthesis in quiescent cells is accompanied by upregulation of PAPAS, a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA that recruits the histone methyltransferase Suv4-20h2 to rDNA, thus triggering trimethylation of H4K20 (H4K20me3 and chromatin compaction. Here, we show that upregulation of PAPAS in response to hypoosmotic stress does not increase H4K20me3 because of Nedd4-dependent ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation of Suv4-20h2. Loss of Suv4-20h2 enables PAPAS to interact with CHD4, a subunit of the chromatin remodeling complex NuRD, which shifts the promoter-bound nucleosome into the transcriptional “off” position. Thus, PAPAS exerts a “stress-tailored” dual function in rDNA silencing, facilitating either Suv4-20h2-dependent chromatin compaction or NuRD-dependent changes in nucleosome positioning.

  14. Hnf-1β transcription factor is an early hif-1α-independent marker of epithelial hypoxia and controls renal repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislas Faguer

    Full Text Available Epithelial repair following acute kidney injury (AKI requires epithelial-mesenchyme-epithelial cycling associated with transient re-expression of genes normally expressed during kidney development as well as activation of growth factors and cytokine-induced signaling. In normal kidney, the Hnf-1β transcription factor drives nephrogenesis, tubulogenesis and epithelial homeostasis through the regulation of epithelial planar cell polarity and expression of developmental or tubular segment-specific genes. In a mouse model of ischemic AKI induced by a 2-hours hemorrhagic shock, we show that expression of this factor is tightly regulated in the early phase of renal repair with a biphasic expression profile (early down-regulation followed by transient over-expression. These changes are associated to tubular epithelial differentiation as assessed by KSP-cadherin and megalin-cubilin endocytic complex expression analysis. In addition, early decrease in Hnf1b expression is associated with the transient over-expression of one of its main target genes, the suppressor of cytokine signaling Socs3, which has been shown essential for renal repair. In vitro, hypoxia induced early up-regulation of Hnf-1β from 1 to 24 hours, independently of the hypoxia-inducible factor Hif-1α. When prolonged, hypoxia induced Hnf-1β down-regulation while normoxia led to Hnf-1β normalization. Last, Hnf-1β down-regulation using RNA interference in HK-2 cells led to phenotype switch from an epithelial to a mesenchyme state. Taken together, we showed that Hnf-1β may drive recovery from ischemic AKI by regulating both the expression of genes important for homeostasis control during organ repair and the state of epithelial cell differentiation.

  15. Structural basis of transcription: separation of RNA from DNA by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westover, Kenneth D; Bushnell, David A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2004-02-13

    The structure of an RNA polymerase II-transcribing complex has been determined in the posttranslocation state, with a vacancy at the growing end of the RNA-DNA hybrid helix. At the opposite end of the hybrid helix, the RNA separates from the template DNA. This separation of nucleic acid strands is brought about by interaction with a set of proteins loops in a strand/loop network. Formation of the network must occur in the transition from abortive initiation to promoter escape.

  16. In vivo live imaging of RNA polymerase II transcription factories in primary cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ghamari (Alireza); M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); S. Thongjuea (Supat); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); J.A.J. van Haren (Jeffrey); E. Soler (Eric); D. Eick (Dirk); B. Lenhard (Boris); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTranscription steps are marked by different modifications of the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Phosphorylation of Ser5 and Ser7 by cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) as part of TFIIH marks initiation, whereas phosphorylation of Ser2 by CDK9 marks elongation. These proces

  17. Ribosomal RNA and protein transcripts persist in the cysts of Entamoeba invadens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Sandeep; Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2014-06-01

    In most organisms rDNA transcription ceases under conditions of growth stress. However, we have earlier shown that pre-rRNA accumulates during encystation in Entamoeba invadens. We labeled newly-synthesized rRNA during encystation, with [methyl-(3)H] methionine in the presence of chitinase to enable uptake of isotope. Incorporation rate reduced after 24h, and then increased to reach levels comparable with normal cells. The label was rapidly chased to the ribosomal pellet in dividing cells, while at late stages of encystation the ratio of counts going to the pellet dropped 3-fold. The transcript levels of selected ribosomal protein genes also went down initially but went up again at later stages of encystation. This suggested that rRNA and ribosomal protein transcription may be coordinately regulated. Our data shows that encysting E. invadens cells accumulate transcripts of both the RNA and protein components of the ribosome, which may ensure rapid synthesis of new ribosomes when growth resumes.

  18. Site-Specific Incorporation of Functional Components into RNA by an Unnatural Base Pair Transcription System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Kawai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Toward the expansion of the genetic alphabet, an unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds and pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (Pa functions as a third base pair in replication and transcription, and provides a useful tool for the site-specific, enzymatic incorporation of functional components into nucleic acids. We have synthesized several modified-Pa substrates, such as alkylamino-, biotin-, TAMRA-, FAM-, and digoxigenin-linked PaTPs, and examined their transcription by T7 RNA polymerase using Ds-containing DNA templates with various sequences. The Pa substrates modified with relatively small functional groups, such as alkylamino and biotin, were efficiently incorporated into RNA transcripts at the internal positions, except for those less than 10 bases from the 3′-terminus. We found that the efficient incorporation into a position close to the 3′-terminus of a transcript depended on the natural base contexts neighboring the unnatural base, and that pyrimidine-Ds-pyrimidine sequences in templates were generally favorable, relative to purine-Ds-purine sequences. The unnatural base pair transcription system provides a method for the site-specific functionalization of large RNA molecules.

  19. mRNA quality control is bypassed for immediate export of stress-responsive transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Gesa; Hackmann, Alexandra; Bender, Lysann; Becker, Daniel; Lingner, Thomas; Salinas, Gabriela; Krebber, Heike

    2016-12-12

    Cells grow well only in a narrow range of physiological conditions. Surviving extreme conditions requires the instantaneous expression of chaperones that help to overcome stressful situations. To ensure the preferential synthesis of these heat-shock proteins, cells inhibit transcription, pre-mRNA processing and nuclear export of non-heat-shock transcripts, while stress-specific mRNAs are exclusively exported and translated. How cells manage the selective retention of regular transcripts and the simultaneous rapid export of heat-shock mRNAs is largely unknown. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the shuttling RNA adaptor proteins Npl3, Gbp2, Hrb1 and Nab2 are loaded co-transcriptionally onto growing pre-mRNAs. For nuclear export, they recruit the export-receptor heterodimer Mex67-Mtr2 (TAP-p15 in humans). Here we show that cellular stress induces the dissociation of Mex67 and its adaptor proteins from regular mRNAs to prevent general mRNA export. At the same time, heat-shock mRNAs are rapidly exported in association with Mex67, without the need for adapters. The immediate co-transcriptional loading of Mex67 onto heat-shock mRNAs involves Hsf1, a heat-shock transcription factor that binds to heat-shock-promoter elements in stress-responsive genes. An important difference between the export modes is that adaptor-protein-bound mRNAs undergo quality control, whereas stress-specific transcripts do not. In fact, regular mRNAs are converted into uncontrolled stress-responsive transcripts if expressed under the control of a heat-shock promoter, suggesting that whether an mRNA undergoes quality control is encrypted therein. Under normal conditions, Mex67 adaptor proteins are recruited for RNA surveillance, with only quality-controlled mRNAs allowed to associate with Mex67 and leave the nucleus. Thus, at the cost of error-free mRNA formation, heat-shock mRNAs are exported and translated without delay, allowing cells to survive extreme situations.

  20. LncRNA profiling of human lymphoid progenitors reveals transcriptional divergence of B and T lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casero, David; Sandoval, Salemiz; Seet, Christopher S.; Scholes, Jessica; Zhu, Yuhua; Ha, Vi Luan; Luong, Annie; Parekh, Chintan; Crooks, Gay M.

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the transcriptional landscape that regulates human lymphoid commitment during postnatal life, we used RNA sequencing to assemble the long non-coding transcriptome across human bone marrow and thymic progenitors spanning the earliest stages of B and T lymphoid specification. Over 3000 novel long non-coding RNA genes (lncRNAs) were revealed through the analysis of these rare populations. Lymphoid commitment was characterized by lncRNA expression patterns that were highly stage-specific and more lineage-specific than protein coding patterns. Protein-coding genes co-expressed with neighboring lncRNA genes were enriched for ontologies related to lymphoid differentiation. The exquisite cell-type specificity of global lncRNA expression patterns independently revealed new developmental relationships between the earliest progenitors in the human bone marrow and thymus. PMID:26502406

  1. c-Myc directly regulates the transcription of the NBS1 gene involved in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yu-Chi; Teng, Shu-Chun; Su, Yi-Ning; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Wu, Kou-Juey

    2003-05-23

    The c-myc proto-oncogene encodes a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in the control of cell growth and implicated in inducing tumorigenesis. Understanding the function of c-Myc and its role in cancer depends upon the identification of c-Myc target genes. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a chromosomal-instability syndrome associated with cancer predisposition, radiosensitivity, and chromosomal instability. The NBS gene product, NBS1 (p95 or nibrin), is a part of the hMre11 complex, a central player associated with double-strand break (DSB) repair. NBS1 contains domains characteristic for proteins involved in DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Here we show that c-Myc directly activates NBS1. c-Myc-mediated induction of NBS1 gene transcription occurs in different tissues, is independent of cell proliferation, and is mediated by a c-Myc binding site in the intron 1 region of NBS1 gene. Overexpression of NBS1 in Rat1a cells increased cell proliferation. These results indicate that NBS1 is a direct transcriptional target of c-Myc and links the function of c-Myc to the regulation of DNA DSB repair pathway operating during DNA replication.

  2. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Kwasniewska

    Full Text Available In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley by maleic hydrazide (MH cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment.

  3. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.

    2014-08-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Systematic identification of spontaneous preterm birth-associated RNA transcripts in maternal plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen S C Chim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous preterm birth (SPB, before 37 gestational weeks is a major cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity, but its pathogenesis remains unclear. Studies on SPB have been hampered by the limited availability of markers for SPB in predelivery clinical samples that can be easily compared with gestational age-matched normal controls. We hypothesize that SPB involves aberrant placental RNA expression, and that such RNA transcripts can be detected in predelivery maternal plasma samples, which can be compared with gestational age-matched controls. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using gene expression microarray to profile essentially all human genes, we observed that 426 probe signals were changed by >2.9-fold in the SPB placentas, compared with the spontaneous term birth (STB placentas. Among the genes represented by those probes, we observed an over-representation of functions in RNA stabilization, extracellular matrix binding, and acute inflammatory response. Using RT-quantitative PCR, we observed differences in the RNA concentrations of certain genes only between the SPB and STB placentas, but not between the STB and term elective cesarean delivery placentas. Notably, 36 RNA transcripts were observed at placental microarray signals higher than a threshold, which indicated the possibility of their detection in maternal plasma. Among them, the IL1RL1 mRNA was tested in plasma samples taken from 37 women. It was detected in 6 of 10 (60% plasma samples collected during the presentation of preterm labor (≤32.9 weeks in women eventually giving SPB, but was detected in only 1 of 27 (4% samples collected during matched gestational weeks from women with no preterm labor (Fisher exact test, p = 0.00056. CONCLUSION: We have identified 36 SPB-associated RNA transcripts, which are possibly detectable in maternal plasma. We have illustrated that the IL1RL1 mRNA was more frequently detected in predelivery maternal plasma samples collected from women

  5. An aromatic residue switch in enhancer-dependent bacterial RNA polymerase controls transcription intermediate complex activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesler, Simone C.; Weinzierl, Robert O. J.; Buck, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the open promoter complex (RPo) in which the melted DNA containing the transcription start site is located at the RNA polymerase (RNAP) catalytic centre is an obligatory step in the transcription of DNA into RNA catalyzed by RNAP. In the RPo, an extensive network of interactions is established between DNA, RNAP and the σ-factor and the formation of functional RPo occurs via a series of transcriptional intermediates (collectively ‘RPi’). A single tryptophan is ideally positioned to directly engage with the flipped out base of the non-template strand at the +1 site. Evidence suggests that this tryptophan (i) is involved in either forward translocation or DNA scrunching and (ii) in σ54-regulated promoters limits the transcription activity of at least one intermediate complex (RPi) before the formation of a fully functional RPo. Limiting RPi activity may be important in preventing the premature synthesis of abortive transcripts, suggesting its involvement in a general mechanism driving the RPi to RPo transition for transcription initiation. PMID:23609536

  6. Transcriptional reprogramming in yeast using dCas9 and combinatorial gRNA strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard Jensen, Emil; Ferreira, Raphael; Jakociunas, Tadas

    2017-01-01

    on developing synthetic biology tools for orthogonal control of transcription. Most recently, the nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) has emerged as a flexible tool for controlling activation and repression of target genes, by the simple RNA-guided positioning of dCas9 in the vicinity of the target gene...... identify a large number of gRNA positions in 14 native yeast target pomoters that do not affect expression, suggesting the need for further optimization of gRNA design tools and dCas9 engineering.......Transcriptional reprogramming is a fundamental process of living cells in order to adapt to environmental and endogenous cues. In order to allow flexible and timely control over gene expression without the interference of native gene expression machinery, a large number of studies have focused...

  7. Effect of chronic uremia on the transcriptional profile of the calcified aorta analyzed by RNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Gravesen, Eva; Mace, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of vascular calcification (VC) in chronic uremia (CU) is a tightly regulated process controlled by factors promoting and inhibiting mineralization. Next-generation high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a powerful and sensitive tool for quantitative gene expression profiling...... and the detection of differentially expressed genes. In the present study, we, for the first time, used RNA-seq to examine rat aorta transcriptomes from CU rats compared with control rats. Severe VC was induced in CU rats, which lead to extensive changes in the transcriptional profile. Among the 10,153 genes...... with an expression level of >1 reads/kilobase transcript/million mapped reads, 2,663 genes were differentially expressed with 47% upregulated genes and 53% downregulated genes in uremic rats. Significantly deregulated genes were enriched for ontologies related to the extracellular matrix, response to wounding...

  8. Defective transcription initiation causes postnatal growth failure in a mouse model of nucleotide excision repair (NER) progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamileri, Irene; Karakasilioti, Ismene; Sideri, Aria; Kosteas, Theodoros; Tatarakis, Antonis; Talianidis, Iannis; Garinis, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) defects are associated with cancer, developmental disorders and neurodegeneration. However, with the exception of cancer, the links between defects in NER and developmental abnormalities are not well understood. Here, we show that the ERCC1-XPF NER endonuclease assembles on active promoters in vivo and facilitates chromatin modifications for transcription during mammalian development. We find that Ercc1−/− mice demonstrate striking physiological, metabolic and gene expression parallels with Taf10−/− animals carrying a liver-specific transcription factor II D (TFIID) defect in transcription initiation. Promoter occupancy studies combined with expression profiling in the liver and in vitro differentiation cell assays reveal that ERCC1-XPF interacts with TFIID and assembles with POL II and the basal transcription machinery on promoters in vivo. Whereas ERCC1-XPF is required for the initial activation of genes associated with growth, it is dispensable for ongoing transcription. Recruitment of ERCC1-XPF on promoters is accompanied by promoter-proximal DNA demethylation and histone marks associated with active hepatic transcription. Collectively, the data unveil a role of ERCC1/XPF endonuclease in transcription initiation establishing its causal contribution to NER developmental disorders. PMID:22323595

  9. A kinetic framework for tRNA ligase and enforcement of a 2'-phosphate requirement for ligation highlights the design logic of an RNA repair machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Barbara S; Shuman, Stewart

    2013-05-01

    tRNA ligases are essential components of informational and stress-response pathways entailing repair of RNA breaks with 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-OH ends. Plant and fungal tRNA ligases comprise three catalytic domains. Phosphodiesterase and kinase modules heal the broken ends to generate the 3'-OH, 2'-PO₄, and 5'-PO₄ required for sealing by the ligase. We exploit RNA substrates with different termini to define rates of individual steps or subsets of steps along the repair pathway of plant ligase AtRNL. The results highlight rate-limiting transactions, how repair is affected by active-site mutations, and how mutations are bypassed by RNA alterations. We gain insights to 2'-PO₄ specificity by showing that AtRNL is deficient in transferring AMP to pRNAOH to form AppRNAOH but proficient at sealing pre-adenylylated AppRNAOH. This strategy for discriminating 2'-PO₄ versus 2'-OH ends provides a quality-control checkpoint to ensure that only purposeful RNA breaks are sealed and to avoid nonspecific "capping" of 5'-PO₄ ends.

  10. Computational design of RNA parts, devices, and transcripts with kinetic folding algorithms implemented on multiprocessor clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmaiah, Tim; Voje, William E; Carothers, James M

    2015-01-01

    With progress toward inexpensive, large-scale DNA assembly, the demand for simulation tools that allow the rapid construction of synthetic biological devices with predictable behaviors continues to increase. By combining engineered transcript components, such as ribosome binding sites, transcriptional terminators, ligand-binding aptamers, catalytic ribozymes, and aptamer-controlled ribozymes (aptazymes), gene expression in bacteria can be fine-tuned, with many corollaries and applications in yeast and mammalian cells. The successful design of genetic constructs that implement these kinds of RNA-based control mechanisms requires modeling and analyzing kinetically determined co-transcriptional folding pathways. Transcript design methods using stochastic kinetic folding simulations to search spacer sequence libraries for motifs enabling the assembly of RNA component parts into static ribozyme- and dynamic aptazyme-regulated expression devices with quantitatively predictable functions (rREDs and aREDs, respectively) have been described (Carothers et al., Science 334:1716-1719, 2011). Here, we provide a detailed practical procedure for computational transcript design by illustrating a high throughput, multiprocessor approach for evaluating spacer sequences and generating functional rREDs. This chapter is written as a tutorial, complete with pseudo-code and step-by-step instructions for setting up a computational cluster with an Amazon, Inc. web server and performing the large numbers of kinefold-based stochastic kinetic co-transcriptional folding simulations needed to design functional rREDs and aREDs. The method described here should be broadly applicable for designing and analyzing a variety of synthetic RNA parts, devices and transcripts.

  11. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  12. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  13. The H4 subunit of vaccinia virus RNA polymerase is not required for transcription initiation at a viral late promoter.

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, C F; Coroneos, A M

    1995-01-01

    Chromatography of RNA polymerase purified from vaccinia virions and from vaccinia virus-infected HeLa cells resulted in the separation of populations active for early and late transcription. An RNA polymerase population immunodepleted for the vaccinia virus H4 gene peptide could support late transcription.

  14. RNA editing of hepatitis B virus transcripts by activation-induced cytidine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guoxin; Kitamura, Kouichi; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Guangyan; Chowdhury, Sajeda; Fu, Weixin; Koura, Miki; Wakae, Kousho; Honjo, Tasuku; Muramatsu, Masamichi

    2013-02-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes. The mechanism by which AID triggers SHM and CSR has been explained by two distinct models. In the DNA deamination model, AID converts cytidine bases in DNA into uridine. The uridine is recognized by the DNA repair system, which produces DNA strand breakages and point mutations. In the alternative model, RNA edited by AID is responsible for triggering CSR and SHM. However, RNA deamination by AID has not been demonstrated. Here we found that C-to-T and G-to-A mutations accumulated in hepatitis B virus (HBV) nucleocapsid DNA when AID was expressed in HBV-replicating hepatic cell lines. AID expression caused C-to-T mutations in the nucleocapsid DNA of RNase H-defective HBV, which does not produce plus-strand viral DNA. Furthermore, the RT-PCR products of nucleocapsid viral RNA from AID-expressing cells exhibited significant C-to-T mutations, whereas viral RNAs outside the nucleocapsid did not accumulate C-to-U mutations. Moreover, AID was packaged within the nucleocapsid by forming a ribonucleoprotein complex with HBV RNA and the HBV polymerase protein. The encapsidation of the AID protein with viral RNA and DNA provides an efficient environment for evaluating AID's RNA and DNA deamination activities. A bona fide RNA-editing enzyme, apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide 1, induced a similar level of C-to-U mutations in nucleocapsid RNA as AID. Taken together, the results indicate that AID can deaminate the nucleocapsid RNA of HBV.

  15. The interaction between bacterial transcription factors and RNA polymerase during the transition from initiation to elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    There are three stages of transcription: initiation, elongation and termination, and traditionally there has been a clear distinction between the stages. The specificity factor sigma is completely released from bacterial RNA polymerase after initiation, and then recycled for another round of transcription. Elongation factors then associate with the polymerase followed by termination factors (where necessary). These factors dissociate prior to initiation of a new round of transcription. However, there is growing evidence suggesting that sigma factors can be retained in the elongation complex. The structure of bacterial RNAP in complex with an essential elongation factor NusA has recently been published, which suggested rather than competing for the major σ binding site, NusA binds to a discrete region on RNAP. A model was proposed to help explain the way in which both factors could be associated with RNAP during the transition from transcription initiation to elongation.

  16. Localization of RNA transcription sites in insect oocytes using microinjections of 5-bromouridine 5'-triphosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Bogolyubov

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we used 5-bromouridine 5'-triphosphate (BrUTP microinjections to localize the transcription sites in oocytes of insects with different types of the ovarium structure: panoistic, meroistic polytrophic, and meroistic telotrophic. We found that in an insect with panoistic ovaries (Acheta domesticus, oocyte nuclei maintain their transcription activity during the long period of oocyte growth. In insects with meroistic ovaries (Tenebrio molitor and Panorpa communis, early oocyte chromosomes were found to be transcriptionally active, and some transcription activity still persist while the karyosphere, a compact structure formed by all condensed oocyte chromosomes, begins to develop. At the latest stages of karyosphere development, no anti-Br-RNA signal was registered in the karyosphere.

  17. Detection of HSP mRNA Transcription in Transport Stressed Pigs by Fluorescence Quantitative RT-PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-bao; BAO En-dong; WANG Zhi-liang; ZHAO Ru-qian

    2007-01-01

    The RNA transcripted in vitro was used as the standard quantitative template to make the standard curve and establish the fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR (FQ-PCR) method. By means of FQ-PCR, the transcription changes of HSP70 and HSPg0 mRNA in the livers and hearts of transport stressed pigs were studied. The level of HSP70 mRNA transcription increased continuously from the beginning of transportation. The inductions of HSP70 mRNA transcription in the livers and hearts of 10 h transport stressed pigs were 2.5 and 4.1 times higher than that of the un-transport stressed pigs (P<0.01).However, the transcription levels of HSPg0 mRNA in the livers and hearts decreased with the transport stress.

  18. DIANA-LncBase v2: indexing microRNA targets on non-coding transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Kanellos, Ilias; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Zagganas, Konstantinos; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Floros, Evangelos; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2016-01-04

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that act as post-transcriptional regulators of coding gene expression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently reported to interact with miRNAs. The sponge-like function of lncRNAs introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA interactome. DIANA-LncBase v1 provided a database of experimentally supported and in silico predicted miRNA Recognition Elements (MREs) on lncRNAs. The second version of LncBase (www.microrna.gr/LncBase) presents an extensive collection of miRNA:lncRNA interactions. The significantly enhanced database includes more than 70 000 low and high-throughput, (in)direct miRNA:lncRNA experimentally supported interactions, derived from manually curated publications and the analysis of 153 AGO CLIP-Seq libraries. The new experimental module presents a 14-fold increase compared to the previous release. LncBase v2 hosts in silico predicted miRNA targets on lncRNAs, identified with the DIANA-microT algorithm. The relevant module provides millions of predicted miRNA binding sites, accompanied with detailed metadata and MRE conservation metrics. LncBase v2 caters information regarding cell type specific miRNA:lncRNA regulation and enables users to easily identify interactions in 66 different cell types, spanning 36 tissues for human and mouse. Database entries are also supported by accurate lncRNA expression information, derived from the analysis of more than 6 billion RNA-Seq reads.

  19. Minor Contribution of Chimeric Host-HIV Readthrough Transcripts to the Level of HIV Cell-Associated gag RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Alexander O; DeMaster, Laura K; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Reiss, Peter; O'Doherty, Una; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-11-11

    Cell-associated HIV unspliced RNA is an important marker of the viral reservoir. HIV gag RNA-specific assays are frequently used to monitor reservoir activation. Because HIV preferentially integrates into actively transcribed genes, some of the transcripts detected by these assays may not represent genuine HIV RNA but rather chimeric host-HIV readthrough transcripts. Here, we demonstrate that in HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy, such host-derived transcripts do not significantly contribute to the HIV gag RNA level.

  20. Transcript levels, alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage of TFIIIA control 5S rRNA accumulation during Arabidopsis thaliana development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layat, Elodie; Cotterell, Sylviane; Vaillant, Isabelle; Yukawa, Yasushi; Tutois, Sylvie; Tourmente, Sylvette

    2012-07-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is critical for eukaryotic cells and requires coordinated synthesis of the protein and rRNA moieties of the ribosome, which are therefore highly regulated. 5S ribosomal RNA, an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and specifically requires transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA). To obtain insight into the regulation of 5S rRNA transcription, we have investigated the expression of 5S rRNA and the exon-skipped (ES) and exon-including (EI) TFIIIA transcripts, two transcript isoforms that result from alternative splicing of the TFIIIA gene, and TFIIIA protein amounts with respect to requirements for 5S rRNA during development. We show that 5S rRNA quantities are regulated through distinct but complementary mechanisms operating through transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of TFIIIA transcripts as well as at the post-translational level through proteolytic cleavage of the TFIIIA protein. During the reproductive phase, high expression of the TFIIIA gene together with low proteolytic cleavage contributes to accumulation of functional, full-length TFIIIA protein, and results in 5S rRNA accumulation in the seed. In contrast, just after germination, the levels of TFIIIA-encoding transcripts are low and stable. Full-length TFIIIA protein is undetectable, and the level of 5S rRNA stored in the embryo progressively decreases. After day 4, in correlation with the reorganization of 5S rDNA chromatin to a mature state, full-length TFIIIA protein with transcriptional activity accumulates and permits de novo transcription of 5S rRNA. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. A Protein Complex Required for Polymerase V Transcripts and RNA- Directed DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Julie A.

    2010-05-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene silencing. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation is established by DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE 2 (DRM2), which is targeted by small interfering RNAs through a pathway termed RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) [1, 2]. Recently, RdDM was shown to require intergenic noncoding (IGN) transcripts that are dependent on the Pol V polymerase. These transcripts are proposed to function as scaffolds for the recruitment of downstream RdDM proteins, including DRM2, to loci that produce both siRNAs and IGN transcripts [3]. However, the mechanism(s) through which Pol V is targeted to specific genomic loci remains largely unknown. Through affinity purification of two known RdDM components, DEFECTIVE IN RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DRD1) [4] and DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING 3 (DMS3) [5, 6], we found that they copurify with each other and with a novel protein, RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (RDM1), forming a complex we term DDR. We also found that DRD1 copurified with Pol V subunits and that RDM1, like DRD1 [3] and DMS3 [7], is required for the production of Pol V-dependent transcripts. These results suggest that the DDR complex acts in RdDM at a step upstream of the recruitment or activation of Pol V. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving fold activation of small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) with rational RNA engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sarai; Chappell, James; Sankar, Sitara; Chew, Rebecca; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory RNAs have become integral components of the synthetic biology and bioengineering toolbox for controlling gene expression. We recently expanded this toolbox by creating small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) that act by disrupting the formation of a target transcriptional terminator hairpin placed upstream of a gene. While STARs are a promising addition to the repertoire of RNA regulators, much work remains to be done to optimize the fold activation of these systems. Here we apply rational RNA engineering strategies to improve the fold activation of two STAR regulators. We demonstrate that a combination of promoter strength tuning and multiple RNA engineering strategies can improve fold activation from 5.4-fold to 13.4-fold for a STAR regulator derived from the pbuE riboswitch terminator. We then validate the generality of our approach and show that these same strategies improve fold activation from 2.1-fold to 14.6-fold for an unrelated STAR regulator, opening the door to creating a range of additional STARs to use in a broad array of biotechnologies. We also establish that the optimizations preserve the orthogonality of these STARs between themselves and a set of RNA transcriptional repressors, enabling these optimized STARs to be used in sophisticated circuits.

  3. Stimulation of Pol III-dependent 5S rRNA and U6 snRNA gene expression by AP-1 transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Richa; Kumar, Vijay

    2017-07-01

    RNA polymerase III transcribes structurally diverse group of essential noncoding RNAs including 5S ribosomal RNA (5SrRNA) and U6 snRNA. These noncoding RNAs are involved in RNA processing and ribosome biogenesis, thus, coupling Pol III activity to the rate of protein synthesis, cell growth, and proliferation. Even though a few Pol II-associated transcription factors have been reported to participate in Pol III-dependent transcription, its activation by activator protein 1 (AP-1) factors, c-Fos and c-Jun, has remained unexplored. Here, we show that c-Fos and c-Jun bind to specific sites in the regulatory regions of 5S rRNA (type I) and U6 snRNA (type III) gene promoters and stimulate their transcription. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation studies suggested that endogenous AP-1 factors bind to their cognate promoter elements during the G1/S transition of cell cycle apparently synchronous with Pol III transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the interaction of c-Jun with histone acetyltransferase p300 promoted the recruitment of p300/CBP complex on the promoters and facilitated the occupancy of Pol III transcriptional machinery via histone acetylation and chromatin remodeling. The findings of our study, together, suggest that AP-1 factors are novel regulators of Pol III-driven 5S rRNA and U6 snRNA expression with a potential role in cell proliferation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Transcription of the non-coding RNA upperhand controls Hand2 expression and heart development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kelly M.; Anderson, Douglas M.; McAnally, John R.; Shelton, John M.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2017-01-01

    HAND2 is an ancestral regulator of heart development and one of four transcription factors that control the reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes1–4. Deletion of Hand2 in mice results in right ventricle hypoplasia and embryonic lethality1,5. Hand2 expression is tightly regulated by upstream enhancers6,7 that reside within a super-enhancer delineated by histone H3 acetyl Lys27 (H3K27ac) modifications8. Here we show that transcription of a Hand2-associated long non-coding RNA, which we named upperhand (Uph), is required to maintain the super-enhancer signature and elongation of RNA polymerase II through the Hand2 enhancer locus. Blockade of Uph transcription, but not knockdown of the mature transcript, abolished Hand2 expression, causing right ventricular hypoplasia and embryonic lethality in mice. Given the substantial number of uncharacterized promoter-associated long non-coding RNAs encoded by the mammalian genome9, the Uph–Hand2 regulatory partnership offers a mechanism by which divergent non-coding transcription can establish a permissive chromatin environment. PMID:27783597

  5. The elongation factor Spt4/5 regulates RNA polymerase II transcription through the nucleosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickard, John B.; Lee, Jaehyoun; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Abstract RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) passes through the nucleosome in a coordinated manner, generating several intermediate nucleosomal states as it breaks and then reforms histone–DNA contacts ahead of and behind it, respectively. Several studies have defined transcription-induced nucleosome intermediates using only RNA Polymerase. However, RNAPII is decorated with elongation factors as it transcribes the genome. One such factor, Spt4/5, becomes an integral component of the elongation complex, making direct contact with the ‘jaws’ of RNAPII and nucleic acids in the transcription scaffold. We have characterized the effect of incorporating Spt4/5 into the elongation complex on transcription through the 601R nucleosome. Spt4/5 suppressed RNAPII pausing at the major H3/H4-induced arrest point, resulting in downstream re-positioning of RNAPII further into the nucleosome. Using a novel single molecule FRET system, we found that Spt4/5 affected the kinetics of DNA re-wrapping and stabilized a nucleosomal intermediate with partially unwrapped DNA behind RNAPII. Comparison of nucleosomes of different sequence polarities suggest that the strength of the DNA–histone interactions behind RNAPII specifies the Spt4/5 requirement. We propose that Spt4/5 may be important to coordinate the mechanical movement of RNAPII through the nucleosome with co-transcriptional chromatin modifications during transcription, which is affected by the strength of histone–DNA interactions. PMID:28379497

  6. Transcription of the non-coding RNA upperhand controls Hand2 expression and heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kelly M; Anderson, Douglas M; McAnally, John R; Shelton, John M; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2016-11-17

    HAND2 is an ancestral regulator of heart development and one of four transcription factors that control the reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes. Deletion of Hand2 in mice results in right ventricle hypoplasia and embryonic lethality. Hand2 expression is tightly regulated by upstream enhancers that reside within a super-enhancer delineated by histone H3 acetyl Lys27 (H3K27ac) modifications. Here we show that transcription of a Hand2-associated long non-coding RNA, which we named upperhand (Uph), is required to maintain the super-enhancer signature and elongation of RNA polymerase II through the Hand2 enhancer locus. Blockade of Uph transcription, but not knockdown of the mature transcript, abolished Hand2 expression, causing right ventricular hypoplasia and embryonic lethality in mice. Given the substantial number of uncharacterized promoter-associated long non-coding RNAs encoded by the mammalian genome, the Uph-Hand2 regulatory partnership offers a mechanism by which divergent non-coding transcription can establish a permissive chromatin environment.

  7. Dissecting the expression relationships between RNA-binding proteins and their cognate targets in eukaryotic post-transcriptional regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtala, Sneha; Neelamraju, Yaseswini; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are pivotal in orchestrating several steps in the metabolism of RNA in eukaryotes thereby controlling an extensive network of RBP-RNA interactions. Here, we employed CLIP (cross-linking immunoprecipitation)-seq datasets for 60 human RBPs and RIP-ChIP (RNP immunoprecipitation-microarray) data for 69 yeast RBPs to construct a network of genome-wide RBP- target RNA interactions for each RBP. We show in humans that majority (~78%) of the RBPs are strongly associated with their target transcripts at transcript level while ~95% of the studied RBPs were also found to be strongly associated with expression levels of target transcripts when protein expression levels of RBPs were employed. At transcript level, RBP - RNA interaction data for the yeast genome, exhibited a strong association for 63% of the RBPs, confirming the association to be conserved across large phylogenetic distances. Analysis to uncover the features contributing to these associations revealed the number of target transcripts and length of the selected protein-coding transcript of an RBP at the transcript level while intensity of the CLIP signal, number of RNA-Binding domains, location of the binding site on the transcript, to be significant at the protein level. Our analysis will contribute to improved modelling and prediction of post-transcriptional networks.

  8. T rypanosoma brucei histone H1 inhibits RNA polymerase I transcription and is important for parasite fitness in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Pena, Ana C.; Pimentel, Mafalda R; Manso, Helena; Vaz-Drago, Rita; Pinto-Neves, Daniel; Aresta-Branco, Francisco; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Guegan, Fabien; Pedro Coelho, Luis; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L.; Figueiredo, Luisa M.

    2014-01-01

    T rypanosoma brucei is a unicellular parasite that causes sleeping sickness in humans. Most of its transcription is constitutive and driven by RNA polymerase II. RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcribes not only ribosomal RNA genes, but also protein-encoding genes, including variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs) and procyclins. In T . brucei, histone H1 (H1) is required for VSG silencing and chromatin condensation. However, whether H1 has a genome-wide role in transcription is unknown. Here, using...

  9. Preparation of mononucleosomal templates for analysis of transcription with RNA polymerase using spFRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashova, Kseniya S; Chertkov, Oleg V; Nikitin, Dmitry V; Pestov, Nikolai A; Kulaeva, Olga I; Efremenko, Anastasija V; Solonin, Alexander S; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Studitsky, Vasily M; Feofanov, Alexey V

    2015-01-01

    Single positioned nucleosomes have been extensively employed as simple model experimental systems for analysis of various intranuclear processes. Here we describe an experimental system containing positioned mononucleosomes allowing transcription by various RNA polymerases. Each DNA template contains a pair of fluorescent labels (Cy3 and Cy5) allowing measuring relative distances between the neighboring coils of nucleosomal DNA using Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The single-particle FRET (spFRET) approach for analysis of DNA uncoiling from the histone octamer during transcription through chromatin is described in detail.

  10. RNA-seq detects pharmacological inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus late transcription during spontaneous reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An T. Phan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The stepwise and sequential expression of viral genes underlies progression of the infectious life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is both a tractable model for elucidating principles of transcription as well as a global health threat. We describe an experimental protocol and bioinformatics pipeline for functional identification of EBV true late genes, the last step of transcription prior to virion packaging and egress. All data have been uploaded to the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession code GSE96689. The key improvement over previous approaches is leveraging the sensitivity of RNA-seq to detect gene expression changes during spontaneous reactivation.

  11. RSEM: accurate transcript quantification from RNA-Seq data with or without a reference genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewey Colin N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-Seq is revolutionizing the way transcript abundances are measured. A key challenge in transcript quantification from RNA-Seq data is the handling of reads that map to multiple genes or isoforms. This issue is particularly important for quantification with de novo transcriptome assemblies in the absence of sequenced genomes, as it is difficult to determine which transcripts are isoforms of the same gene. A second significant issue is the design of RNA-Seq experiments, in terms of the number of reads, read length, and whether reads come from one or both ends of cDNA fragments. Results We present RSEM, an user-friendly software package for quantifying gene and isoform abundances from single-end or paired-end RNA-Seq data. RSEM outputs abundance estimates, 95% credibility intervals, and visualization files and can also simulate RNA-Seq data. In contrast to other existing tools, the software does not require a reference genome. Thus, in combination with a de novo transcriptome assembler, RSEM enables accurate transcript quantification for species without sequenced genomes. On simulated and real data sets, RSEM has superior or comparable performance to quantification methods that rely on a reference genome. Taking advantage of RSEM's ability to effectively use ambiguously-mapping reads, we show that accurate gene-level abundance estimates are best obtained with large numbers of short single-end reads. On the other hand, estimates of the relative frequencies of isoforms within single genes may be improved through the use of paired-end reads, depending on the number of possible splice forms for each gene. Conclusions RSEM is an accurate and user-friendly software tool for quantifying transcript abundances from RNA-Seq data. As it does not rely on the existence of a reference genome, it is particularly useful for quantification with de novo transcriptome assemblies. In addition, RSEM has enabled valuable guidance for cost

  12. Oestradiol reduces Liver Receptor Homolog-1 mRNA transcript stability in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, Kyren A. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Environmental and Biotechnology Centre, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Zhao, Zhe; Knower, Kevin C. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); To, Sarah Q. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Chand, Ashwini L. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Clyne, Colin D., E-mail: Colin.clyne@princehenrys.org [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •LRH-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates tumor proliferation. •In breast cancer, high mRNA expression is associated with ER+ status. •In ER−ve cells, despite very low mRNA, we found abundant LRH-1 protein. •Our data show distinctly different LRH-1 protein isoforms in ER− and ER+ breast cancer cells. •This is due to differences in LRH-1 mRNA and protein stability rates. -- Abstract: The expression of orphan nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1) is elevated in breast cancer and promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. LRH-1 expression is regulated by oestrogen (E{sub 2}), with LRH-1 mRNA transcript levels higher in oestrogen receptor α (ERα) positive (ER+) breast cancer cells compared to ER− cells. However, the presence of LRH-1 protein in ER− cells suggests discordance between mRNA transcript levels and protein expression. To understand this, we investigated the impact of mRNA and protein stability in determining LRH-1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. LRH-1 transcript levels were significantly higher in ER+ versus ER− breast cancer cells lines; however LRH-1 protein was expressed at similar levels. We found LRH-1 mRNA and protein was more stable in ER− compared to ER+ cell lines. The tumor-specific LRH-1 variant isoform, LRH-1v4, which is highly responsive to E{sub 2}, showed increased mRNA stability in ER− versus ER+ cells. In addition, in MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines, LRH-1 total mRNA stability was reduced with E{sub 2} treatment, this effect mediated by ERα. Our data demonstrates that in ER− cells, increased mRNA and protein stability contribute to the abundant protein expression levels. Expression and immunolocalisation of LRH-1 in ER− cells as well as ER− tumors suggests a possible role in the development of ER− tumors. The modulation of LRH-1 bioactivity may therefore be beneficial as a treatment option in both ER− and ER+ breast cancer.

  13. lncScore: alignment-free identification of long noncoding RNA from assembled novel transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Song, Xiaofeng; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    RNA-Seq based transcriptome assembly has been widely used to identify novel lncRNAs. However, the best-performing transcript reconstruction methods merely identified 21% of full-length protein-coding transcripts from H. sapiens. Those partial-length protein-coding transcripts are more likely to be classified as lncRNAs due to their incomplete CDS, leading to higher false positive rate for lncRNA identification. Furthermore, potential sequencing or assembly error that gain or abolish stop codons also complicates ORF-based prediction of lncRNAs. Therefore, it remains a challenge to identify lncRNAs from the assembled transcripts, particularly the partial-length ones. Here, we present a novel alignment-free tool, lncScore, which uses a logistic regression model with 11 carefully selected features. Compared to other state-of-the-art alignment-free tools (e.g. CPAT, CNCI, and PLEK), lncScore outperforms them on accurately distinguishing lncRNAs from mRNAs, especially partial-length mRNAs in the human and mouse datasets. In addition, lncScore also performed well on transcripts from five other species (Zebrafish, Fly, C. elegans, Rat, and Sheep). To speed up the prediction, multithreading is implemented within lncScore, and it only took 2 minute to classify 64,756 transcripts and 54 seconds to train a new model with 21,000 transcripts with 12 threads, which is much faster than other tools. lncScore is available at https://github.com/WGLab/lncScore. PMID:27708423

  14. Karyopherin alpha2 is essential for rRNA transcription and protein synthesis in proliferative keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Umegaki-Arao

    Full Text Available Karyopherin proteins mediate nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and are critical for protein and RNA subcellular localization. Recent studies suggest KPNA2 expression is induced in tumor cells and is strongly associated with prognosis, although the precise roles and mechanisms of KPNA2 overexpression in proliferative disorders have not been defined. We found that KPNA2 expression is induced in various proliferative disorders of the skin such as psoriasis, Bowen's disease, actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma, Paget's disease, Merkel cell carcinoma, and mycosis fungoides. siRNA-mediated KPNA suppression revealed that KPNA2 is essential for significant suppression of HaCaT proliferation under starvation conditions. Ribosomal RNA transcription and protein synthesis were suppressed by starvation combined with knockdown of KPNA (including KPNA2 expression. KPNA2 localized to the nucleolus and interacted with proteins associated with mRNA processing, ribonucleoprotein complex biogenesis, chromatin modification, and transcription, as demonstrated by tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry. KPNA2 may be an important promoter of ribosomal RNA and protein synthesis in tumor cells.

  15. Structure of the initiation-competent RNA polymerase I and its implication for transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilsl, Michael; Crucifix, Corinne; Papai, Gabor; Krupp, Ferdinand; Steinbauer, Robert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert; Schultz, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is specialized in rRNA gene transcription synthesizing up to 60% of cellular RNA. High level rRNA production relies on efficient binding of initiation factors to the rRNA gene promoter and recruitment of Pol I complexes containing initiation factor Rrn3. Here, we determine the cryo-EM structure of the Pol I-Rrn3 complex at 7.5 Å resolution, and compare it with Rrn3-free monomeric and dimeric Pol I. We observe that Rrn3 contacts the Pol I A43/A14 stalk and subunits A190 and AC40, that association re-organizes the Rrn3 interaction interface, thereby preventing Pol I dimerization; and Rrn3-bound and monomeric Pol I differ from the dimeric enzyme in cleft opening, and localization of the A12.2 C-terminus in the active centre. Our findings thus support a dual role for Rrn3 in transcription initiation to stabilize a monomeric initiation competent Pol I and to drive pre-initiation complex formation.

  16. piRNA-mediated nuclear accumulation of retrotransposon transcripts in the Drosophila female germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambeyron, Séverine; Popkova, Anna; Payen-Groschêne, Geneviève; Brun, Christine; Laouini, Dorsaf; Pelisson, Alain; Bucheton, Alain

    2008-09-30

    Germline silencing of transposable elements is essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. Recent results indicate that this repression is largely achieved through a RNA silencing pathway that involves Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). However the repressive mechanisms are not well understood. To address this question, we used the possibility to disrupt the repression of the Drosophila I element retrotransposon by hybrid dysgenesis. We show here that the repression of the functional I elements that are located in euchromatin requires proteins of the piRNA pathway, and that the amount of ovarian I element piRNAs correlates with the strength of the repression in the female germline. Antisense RNAs, which are likely used to produce antisense piRNAs, are transcribed by heterochromatic defective I elements, but efficient production of these antisense small RNAs requires the presence in the genome of euchromatic functional I elements. Finally, we demonstrate that the piRNA-induced silencing of the functional I elements is at least partially posttranscriptional. In a repressive background, these elements are still transcribed, but some of their sense transcripts are kept in nurse cell nuclear foci together with those of the Doc retrotransposon. In the absence of I element piRNAs, either in dysgenic females or in mutants of the piRNA silencing pathway, sense I element transcripts are transported toward the oocyte where retrotransposition occurs. Our results indicate that piRNAs are involved in a posttranscriptional gene-silencing mechanism resulting in RNA nuclear accumulation.

  17. Crystal structure of bacterial RNA polymerase bound with a transcription inhibitor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Shunsuke; Sekine, Shun-Ichi; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Hino, Nobumasa; Murayama, Yuko; Kamegamori, Syunsuke; Yamamoto, Masaki; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-12-16

    The multi-subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the principal enzyme of transcription for gene expression. Transcription is regulated by various transcription factors. Gre factor homologue 1 (Gfh1), found in the Thermus genus, is a close homologue of the well-conserved bacterial transcription factor GreA, and inhibits transcription initiation and elongation by binding directly to RNAP. The structural basis of transcription inhibition by Gfh1 has remained elusive, although the crystal structures of RNAP and Gfh1 have been determined separately. Here we report the crystal structure of Thermus thermophilus RNAP complexed with Gfh1. The amino-terminal coiled-coil domain of Gfh1 fully occludes the channel formed between the two central modules of RNAP; this channel would normally be used for nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) entry into the catalytic site. Furthermore, the tip of the coiled-coil domain occupies the NTP β-γ phosphate-binding site. The NTP-entry channel is expanded, because the central modules are 'ratcheted' relative to each other by ∼7°, as compared with the previously reported elongation complexes. This 'ratcheted state' is an alternative structural state, defined by a newly acquired contact between the central modules. Therefore, the shape of Gfh1 is appropriate to maintain RNAP in the ratcheted state. Simultaneously, the ratcheting expands the nucleic-acid-binding channel, and kinks the bridge helix, which connects the central modules. Taken together, the present results reveal that Gfh1 inhibits transcription by preventing NTP binding and freezing RNAP in the alternative structural state. The ratcheted state might also be associated with other aspects of transcription, such as RNAP translocation and transcription termination.

  18. Integrative miRNA-mRNA profiling of adipose tissue unravels transcriptional circuits induced by sleep fragmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina A Gharib

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a prevalent condition and strongly associated with metabolic disorders. Sleep fragmentation (SF is a major consequence of OSA, but its contribution to OSA-related morbidities is not known. We hypothesized that SF causes specific perturbations in transcriptional networks of visceral fat cells, leading to systemic metabolic disturbances. We simultaneously profiled visceral adipose tissue mRNA and miRNA expression in mice exposed to 6 hours of SF during sleep, and developed a new computational framework based on gene set enrichment and network analyses to merge these data. This approach leverages known gene product interactions and biologic pathways to interrogate large-scale gene expression profiling data. We found that SF induced the activation of several distinct pathways, including those involved in insulin regulation and diabetes. Our integrative methodology identified putative controllers and regulators of the metabolic response during SF. We functionally validated our findings by demonstrating altered glucose and lipid homeostasis in sleep-fragmented mice. This is the first study to link sleep fragmentation with widespread disruptions in visceral adipose tissue transcriptome, and presents a generalizable approach to integrate mRNA-miRNA information for systematic mapping of regulatory networks.

  19. Structural basis of transcription: RNA polymerase II at 2.8 Ångstrom resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, P; Bushnell, D; Kornberg, R

    2001-01-01

    Structures of a 10-subunit yeast RNA polymerase II have been derived from two crystal forms at 2.8 and 3.1 angstrom resolution. Comparison of the structures reveals a division of the polymerase into four mobile modules, including a clamp, shown previously to swing over the active center. In the 2.8 angstrom structure, the clamp is in an open state, allowing entry of straight promoter DNA for the initiation of transcription. Three loops extending from the clamp may play roles in RNA unwinding ...

  20. Structures of nucleolus and transcription sites of rRNA genes in rat liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We observed the ultrastructure of nucleolus in rat liver cells by conventional electronmicroscopy, and employed cytochemistry NAMA-Ur DNA specific stain method to analyze the distributionand position of nucleolar DNA in situ. The results showed that nucleolar DNA of rat livercells comes from nucleolus-associated chromatin, and continuously extends in the dense fibrillarcomponent (DFC) of nucleolus, localizes at the periphery of fibrillar center (FC) and in DFC. Furthermore,by employing anti-DNA/RNA hybrid antibodies, we directly and selectively labeled transcriptionsites of rRNA genes and testified that localization of transcription sites not only to DFC butalso to the periphery of FC.

  1. ERK-dependent phosphorylation of the transcription initiation factor TIF-IA is required for RNA polymerase I transcription and cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jian; Yuan, Xuejun; Frödin, Morten;

    2003-01-01

    Phosphorylation of transcription factors by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades links cell signaling with the control of gene expression. Here we show that growth factors induce rRNA synthesis by activating MAPK-dependent signaling cascades that target the RNA polymerase I-specific t...

  2. Virus and dsRNA-triggered transcriptional responses reveal key components of honey bee antiviral defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutscher, Laura M; Daughenbaugh, Katie F; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2017-07-25

    Recent high annual losses of honey bee colonies are associated with many factors, including RNA virus infections. Honey bee antiviral responses include RNA interference and immune pathway activation, but their relative roles in antiviral defense are not well understood. To better characterize the mechanism(s) of honey bee antiviral defense, bees were infected with a model virus in the presence or absence of dsRNA, a virus associated molecular pattern. Regardless of sequence specificity, dsRNA reduced virus abundance. We utilized next generation sequencing to examine transcriptional responses triggered by virus and dsRNA at three time-points post-infection. Hundreds of genes exhibited differential expression in response to co-treatment of dsRNA and virus. Virus-infected bees had greater expression of genes involved in RNAi, Toll, Imd, and JAK-STAT pathways, but the majority of differentially expressed genes are not well characterized. To confirm the virus limiting role of two genes, including the well-characterized gene, dicer, and a probable uncharacterized cyclin dependent kinase in honey bees, we utilized RNAi to reduce their expression in vivo and determined that virus abundance increased, supporting their involvement in antiviral defense. Together, these results further our understanding of honey bee antiviral defense, particularly the role of a non-sequence specific dsRNA-mediated antiviral pathway.

  3. Critical analysis of rhinovirus RNA load quantification by real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibler, Manuel; Yerly, Sabine; Vieille, Gaël; Docquier, Mylène; Turin, Lara; Kaiser, Laurent; Tapparel, Caroline

    2012-09-01

    Rhinoviruses are the most frequent cause of human respiratory infections, and quantitative rhinovirus diagnostic tools are needed for clinical investigations. Although results obtained by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) assays are frequently converted to viral RNA loads, this presents several limitations regarding accurate virus RNA quantification, particularly given the need to reliably quantify all known rhinovirus genotypes with a single assay. Using an internal extraction control and serial dilutions of an in vitro-transcribed rhinovirus RNA reference standard, we validated a quantitative one-step real-time PCR assay. We then used chimeric rhinovirus genomes with 5'-untranslated regions (5'UTRs) originating from the three rhinovirus species and from one enterovirus to estimate the impact of the 5'UTR diversity. Respiratory specimens from infected patients were then also analyzed. The assay quantification ability ranged from 4.10 to 9.10 log RNA copies/ml, with an estimated error margin of ±10%. This variation was mainly linked to target variability and interassay variability. Taken together, our results indicate that our assay can reliably estimate rhinovirus RNA load, provided that the appropriate error margin is used. In contrast, due to the lack of a universal rhinovirus RNA standard and the variability related to sample collection procedures, accurate absolute rhinovirus RNA quantification in respiratory specimens is currently hardly feasible.

  4. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong H Ahn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3' end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation.

  5. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong H.; Rechsteiner, Andreas; Strome, Susan; Kelly, William G.

    2016-01-01

    The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3’ end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation. PMID:27541139

  6. Deciphering the transcriptional circuitry of microRNA genes expressed during human monocytic differentiation

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2009-12-10

    Background: Macrophages are immune cells involved in various biological processes including host defence, homeostasis, differentiation, and organogenesis. Disruption of macrophage biology has been linked to increased pathogen infection, inflammation and malignant diseases. Differential gene expression observed in monocytic differentiation is primarily regulated by interacting transcription factors (TFs). Current research suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) degrade and repress translation of mRNA, but also may target genes involved in differentiation. We focus on getting insights into the transcriptional circuitry regulating miRNA genes expressed during monocytic differentiation. Results: We computationally analysed the transcriptional circuitry of miRNA genes during monocytic differentiation using in vitro time-course expression data for TFs and miRNAs. A set of TF?miRNA associations was derived from predicted TF binding sites in promoter regions of miRNA genes. Time-lagged expression correlation analysis was utilised to evaluate the TF?miRNA associations. Our analysis identified 12 TFs that potentially play a central role in regulating miRNAs throughout the differentiation process. Six of these 12 TFs (ATF2, E2F3, HOXA4, NFE2L1, SP3, and YY1) have not previously been described to be important for monocytic differentiation. The remaining six TFs are CEBPB, CREB1, ELK1, NFE2L2, RUNX1, and USF2. For several miRNAs (miR-21, miR-155, miR-424, and miR-17-92), we show how their inferred transcriptional regulation impacts monocytic differentiation. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that miRNAs and their transcriptional regulatory control are integral molecular mechanisms during differentiation. Furthermore, it is the first study to decipher on a large-scale, how miRNAs are controlled by TFs during human monocytic differentiation. Subsequently, we have identified 12 candidate key controllers of miRNAs during this differentiation process. 2009 Schmeier et al; licensee Bio

  7. Transcription elongation. Heterogeneous tracking of RNA polymerase and its biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Oshima, Taku; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of transcription elongation via pausing of RNA polymerase has multiple physiological roles. The pausing mechanism depends on the sequence heterogeneity of the DNA being transcribed, as well as on certain interactions of polymerase with specific DNA sequences. In order to describe the mechanism of regulation, we introduce the concept of heterogeneity into the previously proposed alternative models of elongation, power stroke and Brownian ratchet. We also discuss molecular origins and physiological significances of the heterogeneity.

  8. Bending the Rules of Transcriptional Repression: Tightly Looped DNA Directly Represses T7 RNA Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Lionberger, Troy A.; Meyhöfer, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    From supercoiled DNA to the tight loops of DNA formed by some gene repressors, DNA in cells is often highly bent. Despite evidence that transcription by RNA polymerase (RNAP) is affected in systems where DNA is deformed significantly, the mechanistic details underlying the relationship between polymerase function and mechanically stressed DNA remain unclear. Seeking to gain additional insight into the regulatory consequences of highly bent DNA, we hypothesize that tightly looping DNA is alone...

  9. Principles for RNA metabolism and alternative transcription initiation within closely spaced promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun; Pai, Athma A.; Herudek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    sites, promoters often cluster so that the divergent activity of one might impact another. Here we found that the distance between promoters strongly correlates with the expression, stability and length of their associated PROMPTs. Adjacent promoters driving divergent mRNA transcription support PROMPT...... suggest that basic building blocks of divergently transcribed core promoter pairs, in combination with the wealth of TSSs in mammalian genomes, provide a framework with which evolution shapes transcriptomes....

  10. Principles for RNA metabolism and alternative transcription initiation within closely spaced promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun; Pai, Athma A.; Herudek, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    sites, promoters often cluster so that the divergent activity of one might impact another. Here we found that the distance between promoters strongly correlates with the expression, stability and length of their associated PROMPTs. Adjacent promoters driving divergent mRNA transcription support PROMPT...... suggest that basic building blocks of divergently transcribed core promoter pairs, in combination with the wealth of TSSs in mammalian genomes, provide a framework with which evolution shapes transcriptomes....

  11. A small interfering RNA screen of genes involved in DNA repair identifies tumor-specific radiosensitization by POLQ knockdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Higgins, Geoff S; Prevo, Remko; Lee, Yin-Fai

    2010-01-01

    radiosensitivity are largely unknown. We have conducted a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen of 200 genes involved in DNA damage repair aimed at identifying genes whose knockdown increased tumor radiosensitivity. Parallel siRNA screens were conducted in irradiated and unirradiated tumor cells (SQ20B...... polymerase ) as a potential tumor-specific target. Subsequent investigations showed that POLQ knockdown resulted in radiosensitization of a panel of tumor cell lines from different primary sites while having little or no effect on normal tissue cell lines. These findings raise the possibility that POLQ...

  12. Double-stranded RNA transcribed from vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide acts as transcription factor decoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiao [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Gang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Department of Infectious Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710038, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Honghong [No. 518 Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Xi’an 710043, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Jiayin [The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63108 (United States); Zhao, Lina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Xu, Li, E-mail: lxuhelen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Liu, Zhiguo, E-mail: liuzhiguo@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • A shRNA vector based transcription factor decoy, VB-ODN, was designed. • VB-ODN for NF-κB inhibited cell viability in HEK293 cells. • VB-ODN inhibited expression of downstream genes of target transcription factors. • VB-ODN may enhance nuclear entry ratio for its feasibility of virus production. - Abstract: In this study, we designed a short hairpin RNA vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide (VB-ODN) carrying transcription factor (TF) consensus sequence which could function as a decoy to block TF activity. Specifically, VB-ODN for Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) could inhibit cell viability and decrease downstream gene expression in HEK293 cells without affecting expression of NF-κB itself. The specific binding between VB-ODN produced double-stranded RNA and NF-κB was evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, similar VB-ODNs designed for three other TFs also inhibit their downstream gene expression but not that of themselves. Our study provides a new design of decoy for blocking TF activity.

  13. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by RNA-binding proteins in vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, HongBo; Deng, KeYu; Fu, MinGui

    2014-08-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is a term which implies the dysregulation of normal endothelial cell functions, including impairment of the barrier functions, control of vascular tone, disturbance of proliferative and migratory capacity of endothelial cells, as well as control of leukocyte trafficking. Endothelial dysfunction is an early step in vascular inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetic vascular complications, sepsis-induced or severe virus infection-induced organ injuries. The expressions of inflammatory cytokines and vascular adhesion molecules induced by various stimuli, such as modified lipids, smoking, advanced glycation end products and bacteria toxin, significantly contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. The transcriptional regulation of inflammatory cytokines and vascular adhesion molecules has been well-studied. However, the regulation of those gene expressions at post-transcriptional level is emerging. RNA-binding proteins have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression acting predominantly at the post-transcriptional level in microRNA-dependent or independent manners. This review summarizes the latest insights into the roles of RNA-binding proteins in controlling vascular endothelial cell functions and their contribution to the pathogenesis of vascular inflammatory diseases.

  14. Expression and Purification of Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase and Transcription Factor A from Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, John P; Arnold, Jamie J; Salminen, Tiina S; Kaguni, Laurie S; Cameron, Craig E

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial gene expression is essential in all organisms. Our understanding of mitochondrial transcription on a biochemical level has been limited by the inability to purify the individual protein components involved in mitochondrial gene expression. Recently, new systems have been identified that permit purification of these proteins from bacteria. However, the generalizability of these systems is not clear. Here, we have applied the technology from the Cameron lab to express and purify mitochondrial RNA polymerase and transcription factor A from Drosophila melanogaster. We show that the use of SUMO system to produce SUMO fusion proteins in bacteria is effective not only for the human and mouse proteins, but also for the fly proteins. The application of this system to produce the mitochondrial proteins from other organisms should permit detailed understanding of mitochondrial transcription from any organism.

  15. Functional and mechanistic studies of XPC DNA-repair complex as transcriptional coactivator in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattoglio, Claudia; Zhang, Elisa T; Grubisic, Ivan; Chiba, Kunitoshi; Fong, Yick W; Tjian, Robert

    2015-05-01

    The embryonic stem cell (ESC) state is transcriptionally controlled by OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG with cofactors, chromatin regulators, noncoding RNAs, and other effectors of signaling pathways. Uncovering components of these regulatory circuits and their interplay provides the knowledge base to deploy ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells. We recently identified the DNA-repair complex xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC)-RAD23B-CETN2 as a stem cell coactivator (SCC) required for OCT4/SOX2 transcriptional activation. Here we investigate the role of SCC genome-wide in murine ESCs by mapping regions bound by RAD23B and analyzing transcriptional profiles of SCC-depleted ESCs. We establish OCT4 and SOX2 as the primary transcription factors recruiting SCC to regulatory regions of pluripotency genes and identify the XPC subunit as essential for interaction with the two proteins. The present study reveals new mechanistic and functional aspects of SCC transcriptional activity, and thus underscores the diversified functions of this regulatory complex.

  16. Mouse model for the DNA repair/basal transcription disorder trichothiodystrophy reveals cancer predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Boer (Jan); C.F. van Kreijl (Coen); G. Weeda (Geert); F.R. de Gruijl (Frank); D. Bootsma (Dirk); H. van Steeg (Harry); R.J.W. Berg (Rob); J. Garssen (Johan); J. de Wit (Jan); C.T. van Oostrum; R.B. Beems (Rudolf); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPatients with the nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are highly predisposed to develop sunlight-induced skin cancer, in remarkable contrast to photosensitive NER-deficient trichothiodystrophy (TTD) patients carrying mutations in the sam

  17. A subcomplex of RNA polymerase III subunits involved in transcription termination and reinitiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrieux, Emilie; Alic, Nazif; Ducrot, Cécile; Acker, Joël; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    While initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase III (Pol III) has been thoroughly investigated, molecular mechanisms driving transcription termination remain poorly understood. Here we describe how the characterization of the in vitro transcriptional properties of a Pol III variant (Pol IIIΔ), lacking the C11, C37, and C53 subunits, revealed crucial information about the mechanisms of Pol III termination and reinitiation. The specific requirement for the C37–C53 complex in terminator recognition was determined. This complex was demonstrated to slow down elongation by the enzyme, adding to the evidence implicating the elongation rate as a critical determinant of correct terminator recognition. In addition, the presence of the C37–C53 complex required the simultaneous addition of C11 to Pol IIIΔ for the enzyme to reinitiate after the first round of transcription, thus uncovering a role for polymerase subunits in the facilitated recycling process. Interestingly, we demonstrated that the role of C11 in recycling was independent of its role in RNA cleavage. The data presented allowed us to propose a model of Pol III termination and its links to reinitiation. PMID:16362040

  18. RNA-seq for comparative transcript profiling of kenaf under salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Li, Defang; Chen, Anguo; Tang, Huijuan; Li, Jianjun; Huang, Siqi

    2017-03-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) is an economically important global natural fiber crop. As a consequence of the increased demand for food crops and the reduction of available arable land, kenaf cultivation has increasingly shifted to saline and alkaline land. To investigate the molecular mechanism of salinity tolerance in kenaf, we performed Illumina high-throughput RNA sequencing on shoot tips of kenaf and identified 71,318 unigenes, which were annotated using four different protein databases. In total, 2,384 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between the salt-stressed and the control plants, 1,702 of these transcripts were up-regulated and 683 transcripts were down-regulated. Thirty-seven transcripts belonging to 15 transcription-factor families that respond to salt stress were identified. Gene ontology function enrichment analysis revealed that the genes encoding antioxidant enzymes were up-regulated. The amino acid metabolism and carbohydrate metabolism pathways were highly enriched among these DEGs under salt stress conditions. In order to confirm the RNA-seq data, we randomly selected 20 unigenes for analysis using a quntitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Our study not only provided the large-scale assessment of transcriptome resources of kenaf but also guidelines for understanding the mechanism underlying salt stress responses in kenaf.

  19. Toxaphene affects the levels of mRNA transcripts that encode antioxidant enzymes in Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seonock; Lee, Aekyung; Won, Hyokyoung; Ryu, Jae-Chun; Yum, Seungshic

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated toxaphene-induced acute toxicity in Hydra magnipapillata. The median lethal concentrations of the animals (LC(50)) were determined to be 34.5 mg/L, 25.0 mg/L and 12.0 mg/L after exposure to toxaphene for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h, respectively. Morphological responses of hydra polyps to a range of toxaphene concentrations suggested that toxaphene negatively affects the nervous system of H. magnipapillata. We used real-time quantitative PCR of RNA extracted from polyps exposed to two concentrations of toxaphene (0.3 mg/L and 3 mg/L) for 24 h to evaluate the differential regulation of levels of transcripts that encode six antioxidant enzymes (CAT, G6PD, GPx, GR, GST and SOD), two proteins involved in detoxification and molecular stress responses (CYP1A and UB), and two proteins involved in neurotransmission and nerve cell differentiation (AChE and Hym-355). Of the genes involved in antioxidant responses, the most striking changes were observed for transcripts that encode GPx, G6PD, SOD, CAT and GST, with no evident change in levels of transcripts encoding GR. Levels of UB and CYP1A transcripts increased in a dose-dependent manner following exposure to toxaphene. Given that toxaphene-induced neurotoxicity was not reflected in the level of AChE transcripts and only slight accumulation of Hym-355 transcript was observed only at the higher of the two doses of toxaphene tested, there remains a need to identify transcriptional biomarkers for toxaphene-mediated neurotoxicity in H. magnipapillata. Transcripts that respond to toxaphene exposure could be valuable biomarkers for stress levels in H. magnipapillata and may be useful for monitoring the pollution of aquatic environments.

  20. RNA processing factors Swd2.2 and Sen1 antagonize RNA Pol III-dependent transcription and the localization of condensin at Pol III genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pénélope Legros

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Condensin-mediated chromosome condensation is essential for genome stability upon cell division. Genetic studies have indicated that the association of condensin with chromatin is intimately linked to gene transcription, but what transcription-associated feature(s direct(s the accumulation of condensin remains unclear. Here we show in fission yeast that condensin becomes strikingly enriched at RNA Pol III-transcribed genes when Swd2.2 and Sen1, two factors involved in the transcription process, are simultaneously deleted. Sen1 is an ATP-dependent helicase whose orthologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contributes both to terminate transcription of some RNA Pol II transcripts and to antagonize the formation of DNA:RNA hybrids in the genome. Using two independent mapping techniques, we show that DNA:RNA hybrids form in abundance at Pol III-transcribed genes in fission yeast but we demonstrate that they are unlikely to faciliate the recruitment of condensin. Instead, we show that Sen1 forms a stable and abundant complex with RNA Pol III and that Swd2.2 and Sen1 antagonize both the interaction of RNA Pol III with chromatin and RNA Pol III-dependent transcription. When Swd2.2 and Sen1 are lacking, the increased concentration of RNA Pol III and condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes is accompanied by the accumulation of topoisomerase I and II and by local nucleosome depletion, suggesting that Pol III-transcribed genes suffer topological stress. We provide evidence that this topological stress contributes to recruit and/or stabilize condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes in the absence of Swd2.2 and Sen1. Our data challenge the idea that a processive RNA polymerase hinders the binding of condensin and suggest that transcription-associated topological stress could in some circumstances facilitate the association of condensin.

  1. RNA polymerase II pausing downstream of core histone genes is different from genes producing polyadenylated transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishanpal Anamika

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq analyses performed in various eukaryotic organisms, analysed RNA Polymerase II (Pol II pausing around the transcription start sites of genes. In this study we have further investigated genome-wide binding of Pol II downstream of the 3' end of the annotated genes (EAGs by ChIP-seq in human cells. At almost all expressed genes we observed Pol II occupancy downstream of the EAGs suggesting that Pol II pausing 3' from the transcription units is a rather common phenomenon. Downstream of EAGs Pol II transcripts can also be detected by global run-on and sequencing, suggesting the presence of functionally active Pol II. Based on Pol II occupancy downstream of EAGs we could distinguish distinct clusters of Pol II pause patterns. On core histone genes, coding for non-polyadenylated transcripts, Pol II occupancy is quickly dropping after the EAG. In contrast, on genes, whose transcripts undergo polyA tail addition [poly(A(+], Pol II occupancy downstream of the EAGs can be detected up to 4-6 kb. Inhibition of polyadenylation significantly increased Pol II occupancy downstream of EAGs at poly(A(+ genes, but not at the EAGs of core histone genes. The differential genome-wide Pol II occupancy profiles 3' of the EAGs have also been confirmed in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, indicating that Pol II pauses genome-wide downstream of the EAGs in mammalian cells. Moreover, in mES cells the sharp drop of Pol II signal at the EAG of core histone genes seems to be independent of the phosphorylation status of the C-terminal domain of the large subunit of Pol II. Thus, our study uncovers a potential link between different mRNA 3' end processing mechanisms and consequent Pol II transcription termination processes.

  2. Blockage of Src by Specific siRNA as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy to Prevent Destructive Repair in Steroid-Associated Osteonecrosis in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-zhen; Cao, Hui-juan; Chen, Shi-hui; Tang, Tao; Fu, Wei-min; Huang, Le; Chow, Dick Ho Kiu; Wang, Yi-xiang; Griffith, James Francis; He, Wei; Zhou, Hong; Zhao, De-wei; Zhang, Ge; Wang, Xin-luan; Qin, Ling

    2015-11-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability and highly upregulated bone resorption in the destructive repair progress of steroid-associated osteonecrosis (SAON) are associated with a high expression of VEGF and high Src activity (Src is encoded by the cellular sarcoma [c-src] gene). This study was designed to prove our hypothesis that blocking the VEGF-Src signaling pathway by specific Src siRNA is able to prevent destructive repair in a SAON rabbit model. Destructive repair in SAON was induced in rabbits. At 2, 4, and 6 weeks after SAON induction, VEGF, anti-VEGF, Src siRNA, Src siRNA+VEGF, control siRNA, and saline were introduced via intramedullary injection into proximal femora for each group, respectively. Vascularization and permeability were quantified by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. At week 6 after SAON induction, proximal femurs were dissected for micro-computed tomography (μCT)-based trabecular architecture with finite element analysis (FEA), μCT-based angiography, and histological analysis. Histological evaluation revealed that VEGF enhanced destructive repair, whereas anti-VEGF prevented destructive repair and Src siRNA and Src siRNA+VEGF prevented destructive repair and enhanced reparative osteogenesis. Findings of angiography and histomorphometry were consistent with those determined by DCE MRI. Src siRNA inhibited VEGF-mediated vascular hyperpermeability but preserved VEGF-induced neovascularization. Bone resorption was enhanced in the VEGF group and inhibited in the anti-VEGF, Src siRNA, Src siRNA+VEGF groups as determined by both 3D μCT and 2D histomorphometry. FEA showed higher estimated failure load in the Src siRNA and Src siRNA+VEGF groups when compared to the vehicle control group. Blockage of VEGF-Src signaling pathway by specific Src siRNA was able to prevent steroid-associated destructive repair while improving reconstructive repair in SAON, which might become a novel therapeutic strategy.

  3. Mapping the RNA-Seq trash bin: unusual transcripts in prokaryotic transcriptome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Gero; Alexis, Maria; Kirsch, Rebecca; Findeiß, Sven; Langenberger, David; Machné, Rainer; Mörl, Mario; Hoffmann, Steve; Stadler, Peter F

    2013-07-01

    Prokaryotic transcripts constitute almost always uninterrupted intervals when mapped back to the genome. Split reads, i.e., RNA-seq reads consisting of parts that only map to discontiguous loci, are thus disregarded in most analysis pipelines. There are, however, some well-known exceptions, in particular, tRNA splicing and circularized small RNAs in Archaea as well as self-splicing introns. Here, we reanalyze a series of published RNA-seq data sets, screening them specifically for non-contiguously mapping reads. We recover most of the known cases together with several novel archaeal ncRNAs associated with circularized products. In Eubacteria, only a handful of interesting candidates were obtained beyond a few previously described group I and group II introns. Most of the atypically mapping reads do not appear to correspond to well-defined, specifically processed products. Whether this diffuse background is, at least in part, an incidental by-product of prokaryotic RNA processing or whether it consists entirely of technical artifacts of reverse transcription or amplification remains unknown.

  4. RNA sequence and transcriptional properties of the 3' end of the Newcastle disease virus genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurilla, M.G.; Stone, H.O.; Keene, J.D.

    1985-09-01

    The 3' end of the genomic RNA of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been sequenced and the leader RNA defined. Using hybridization to a 3'-end-labeled genome, leader RNA species from in vitro transcription reactions and from infected cell extracts were found to be 47 and 53 nucleotides long. In addition, the start site of the 3'-proximal mRNA was determined by sequence analysis of in vitro (beta-32P)GTP-labeled transcription products. The genomic sequence extending beyond the leader region demonstrated an open reading frame for at least 42 amino acids and probably represents the amino terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (NP). The terminal 8 nucleotides of the NDV genome were identical to those of measles virus and Sendai virus while the sequence of the distal half of the leader region was more similar to that of vesicular stomatitis virus. These data argue for strong evolutionary relatedness between the paramyxovirus and rhabdovirus groups.

  5. Transcriptional landscape of ncRNA and Repeat elements in somatic cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosheh, Yanal

    2016-12-01

    The advancement of Nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) sequencing technology has enabled many projects targeted towards the identification of genome structure and transcriptome complexity of organisms. The first conclusions of the human and mouse projects have underscored two important, yet unexpected, findings. First, while almost the entire genome is transcribed, only 5% of it encodes for proteins. Thereby, most transcripts are noncoding RNA. This includes both short RNA (<200 nucleotides (nt)) comprising piRNAs; microRNAs (miRNAs); endogenous Short Interfering RNAs (siRNAs) among others, and includes lncRNA (>200nt). Second, a significant portion of the mammalian genome (45%) is composed of Repeat Elements (REs). RE are mostly relics of ancestral viruses that during evolution have invaded the host genome by producing thousands of copies. Their roles within their host genomes have yet to be fully explored considering that they sometimes produce lncRNA, and have been shown to influence expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Moreover, because some REs can still mobilize within host genomes, host genomes have evolved mechanisms, mainly epigenetic, to maintain REs under tight control. Recent reports indicate that REs activity is regulated in somatic cells, particularily in the brain, suggesting a physiological role of RE mobilization during normal development. In this thesis, I focus on the analysis of ncRNAs, specifically REs; piRNAs; lncRNAs in human and mouse post-mitotic somatic cells. The main aspects of this analysis are: Using sRNA-Seq, I show that piRNAs, a class of ncRNAs responsible for the silencing of Transposable elements (TEs) in testes, are present also in adult mouse brain. Furthermore, their regulation shows only a subset of testes piRNAs are expressed in the brain and may be controlled by known neurogenesis factors. To investigate the dynamics of the transcriptome during cellular differentiation, I examined deep RNA-Seq and Cap

  6. Translation by polysome: theory of ribosome profile on a single mRNA transcript

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Ajeet K

    2011-01-01

    The process of polymerizing a protein by a ribosome, using a messenger RNA (mRNA) as the corresponding template, is called {\\it translation}. Ribosome may be regarded as a molecular motor for which the mRNA template serves also as the track. Often several ribosomes may translate the same (mRNA) simultaneously. The ribosomes bound simultaneously to a single mRNA transcript are the members of a polyribosome (or, simply, {\\it polysome}). Experimentally measured {\\it polysome profile} gives the distribution of polysome {\\it sizes}. Recently a breakthrough in determining the instantaneous {\\it positions} of the ribosomes on a given mRNA track has been achieved and the technique is called {\\it ribosome profiling} \\cite{ingolia10,guo10}. Motivated by the success of these techniques, we have studied the spatio-temporal organization of ribosomes by extending a theoretical model that we have reported elsewhere \\cite{sharma11}. This extended version of our model incorporates not only (i) mechano-chemical cycle of indivi...

  7. Long noncoding RNA BCAR4 promotes osteosarcoma progression through activating GLI2-dependent gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fenyong; Mo, Jiadong; Zhang, Li

    2016-10-01

    Despite great advances have been made in the understanding of biology of osteosarcoma, the molecular mechanisms involved in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis and progression are still largely unknown. Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is a new type of RNA molecule, which plays pivotal roles in many tumors. lncRNA BCAR4 has been identified as an oncogenetic lncRNA involved in the progression of breast cancer. However, the functions and clinical significances of BCAR4 in osteosarcoma are unknown now. In this study, we found that BCAR4 was significantly upregulated in osteosarcoma tissues. Increased expression of BCAR4 was significantly correlated with large tumor size, advanced Enneking stage, lung metastasis, and poor prognosis. Functional experiments demonstrated that knockdown of BCAR4 inhibits the proliferation and migration of osteosarcoma cell in vitro. Consistently, knockdown of BCAR4 inhibits osteosarcoma tumorigenesis and lung metastasis in vivo. Chromatin isolation by RNA purification assay showed that BCAR4 physically associates with the promoters of GLI2 target genes. The depletion of BCAR4 inhibits the expression of GLI2 target genes and GLI2 reporter luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of BCAR4 and GLI2 target genes is significantly correlated in osteosarcoma tissues. Depletion of DLI2 abolished the effects of BCAR4 on osteosarcoma. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that BCAR4 promotes osteosarcoma progression via activating GLI2-dependent gene transcription and serves as a potential prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target of osteosarcoma.

  8. Long Noncoding RNA Identification: Comparing Machine Learning Based Tools for Long Noncoding Transcripts Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Siyu; Liang, Yanchun; Li, Ying; Du, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is a kind of noncoding RNA with length more than 200 nucleotides, which aroused interest of people in recent years. Lots of studies have confirmed that human genome contains many thousands of lncRNAs which exert great influence over some critical regulators of cellular process. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies, a great quantity of sequences is waiting for exploitation. Thus, many programs are developed to distinguish differences between coding and long noncoding transcripts. Different programs are generally designed to be utilised under different circumstances and it is sensible and practical to select an appropriate method according to a certain situation. In this review, several popular methods and their advantages, disadvantages, and application scopes are summarised to assist people in employing a suitable method and obtaining a more reliable result.

  9. TODRA, a lncRNA at the RAD51 Locus, Is Oppositely Regulated to RAD51, and Enhances RAD51-Dependent DSB (Double Strand Break) Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazy, Inbal; Zeevi, David A; Renbaum, Paul; Zeligson, Sharon; Eini, Lital; Bashari, Dana; Smith, Yoav; Lahad, Amnon; Goldberg, Michal; Ginsberg, Doron; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2015-01-01

    Expression of RAD51, a crucial player in homologous recombination (HR) and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is dysregulated in human tumors, and can contribute to genomic instability and tumor progression. To further understand RAD51 regulation we functionally characterized a long non-coding (lnc) RNA, dubbed TODRA (Transcribed in the Opposite Direction of RAD51), transcribed 69bp upstream to RAD51, in the opposite direction. We demonstrate that TODRA is an expressed transcript and that the RAD51 promoter region is bidirectional, supporting TODRA expression (7-fold higher than RAD51 in this assay, p = 0.003). TODRA overexpression in HeLa cells induced expression of TPIP, a member of the TPTE family which includes PTEN. Similar to PTEN, we found that TPIP co-activates E2F1 induction of RAD51. Analysis of E2F1's effect on the bidirectional promoter showed that E2F1 binding to the same site that promotes RAD51 expression, results in downregulation of TODRA. Moreover, TODRA overexpression induces HR in a RAD51-dependent DSB repair assay, and increases formation of DNA damage-induced RAD51-positive foci. Importantly, gene expression in breast tumors supports our finding that E2F1 oppositely regulates RAD51 and TODRA: increased RAD51 expression, which is associated with an aggressive tumor phenotype (e.g. negative correlation with positive ER (r = -0.22, p = 0.02) and positive PR status (r = -0.27, pDSB repair in malignancy. Importantly, gene expression in breast tumors supports our finding that E2F1 oppositely regulates RAD51 and TODRA: increased RAD51 expression, which is associated with an aggressive tumor phenotype (e.g. negative correlation with positive ER (r = -0.22, p = 0.02) and positive PR status (r = -0.27, pDSB repair in malignancy.

  10. MicroRNA-dependent regulation of transcription in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Molina-Pinelo

    Full Text Available Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC and adenocarcinoma are the most common histological subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, and have been traditionally managed in the clinic as a single entity. Increasing evidence, however, illustrates the biological diversity of these two histological subgroups of lung cancer, and supports the need to improve our understanding of the molecular basis beyond the different phenotypes if we aim to develop more specific and individualized targeted therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify microRNA (miRNA-dependent transcriptional regulation differences between SCC and adenocarcinoma histological lung cancer subtypes. In this work, paired miRNA (667 miRNAs by TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA and mRNA profiling (Whole Genome 44 K array G112A, Agilent was performed in tumor samples of 44 NSCLC patients. Nine miRNAs and 56 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in SCC versus adenocarcinoma samples. Eleven of these 56 mRNA were predicted as targets of the miRNAs identified to be differently expressed in these two histological conditions. Of them, 6 miRNAs (miR-149, miR-205, miR-375, miR-378, miR-422a and miR-708 and 9 target genes (CEACAM6, CGN, CLDN3, ABCC3, MLPH, ACSL5, TMEM45B, MUC1 were validated by quantitative PCR in an independent cohort of 41 lung cancer patients. Furthermore, the inverse correlation between mRNAs and microRNAs expression was also validated. These results suggest miRNA-dependent transcriptional regulation differences play an important role in determining key hallmarks of NSCLC, and may provide new biomarkers for personalized treatment strategies.

  11. Differences of RNA Expression in the Tendon According to Anatomic Outcomes in Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Ok; Chung, Jin-Young; Kim, Do Hoon; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2017-06-01

    Despite increased understanding of the pathophysiology of rotator cuff tears and the evolution of rotator cuff repair, healing failure remains a substantial problem. The critical roles played by biological factors have been emphasized, but little is known of the implications of gene expression profile differences at the time of repair. To document the relationship between the perioperative gene expression of healed and unhealed rotator cuffs by RNA microarray analysis. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Superior (supraspinatus involvement) and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus involvement) tears were included in the study. Samples of rotator cuff tendons were prospectively collected during rotator cuff surgery. Three samples were harvested at the tendon ends of tears from the anterior, middle (apex), and posterior parts using an arthroscopic punch. Seven patients with an unhealed rotator cuff were matched one-to-one with patients with a healed rotator cuff by sex, age, tear size, and fatty degeneration of rotator cuff muscles. mRNA microarray analysis was used to identify genetic differences between healed and unhealed rotator cuff tendons. Gene ontology and gene association files were obtained from the Gene Ontology Consortium, and the Gene Ontology system in DAVID was used to identify enhanced biological processes. Microarray analyses identified 262 genes that were differentially expressed by at least 1.5-fold between the healed and unhealed groups. Overall, in the healed group, 103 genes were significantly downregulated, and 159 were significantly upregulated. DAVID Functional Annotation Cluster analysis showed that in the healed group, the genes most upregulated were related to the G protein-coupled receptor protein signaling pathway and to the neurological system. On the other hand, the genes most downregulated were related to immune and inflammatory responses. BMP5 was the gene most upregulated in the healed group, and the majority of

  12. Widespread Polycistronic Transcripts in Fungi Revealed by Single-Molecule mRNA Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Gordon

    Full Text Available Genes in prokaryotic genomes are often arranged into clusters and co-transcribed into polycistronic RNAs. Isolated examples of polycistronic RNAs were also reported in some higher eukaryotes but their presence was generally considered rare. Here we developed a long-read sequencing strategy to identify polycistronic transcripts in several mushroom forming fungal species including Plicaturopsis crispa, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Trametes versicolor, and Gloeophyllum trabeum. We found genome-wide prevalence of polycistronic transcription in these Agaricomycetes, involving up to 8% of the transcribed genes. Unlike polycistronic mRNAs in prokaryotes, these co-transcribed genes are also independently transcribed. We show that polycistronic transcription may interfere with expression of the downstream tandem gene. Further comparative genomic analysis indicates that polycistronic transcription is conserved among a wide range of mushroom forming fungi. In summary, our study revealed, for the first time, the genome prevalence of polycistronic transcription in a phylogenetic range of higher fungi. Furthermore, we systematically show that our long-read sequencing approach and combined bioinformatics pipeline is a generic powerful tool for precise characterization of complex transcriptomes that enables identification of mRNA isoforms not recovered via short-read assembly.

  13. Reconstitution of the yeast RNA polymerase III transcription system with all recombinant factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, Cécile; Lefebvre, Olivier; Landrieux, Emilie; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Sentenac, André; Acker, Joel

    2006-04-28

    Transcription factor TFIIIC is a multisubunit complex required for promoter recognition and transcriptional activation of class III genes. We describe here the reconstitution of complete recombinant yeast TFIIIC and the molecular characterization of its two DNA-binding domains, tauA and tauB, using the baculovirus expression system. The B block-binding module, rtauB, was reconstituted with rtau138, rtau91, and rtau60 subunits. rtau131, rtau95, and rtau55 formed also a stable complex, rtauA, that displayed nonspecific DNA binding activity. Recombinant rTFIIIC was functionally equivalent to purified yeast TFIIIC, suggesting that the six recombinant subunits are necessary and sufficient to reconstitute a transcriptionally active TFIIIC complex. The formation and the properties of rTFIIIC-DNA complexes were affected by dephosphorylation treatments. The combination of complete recombinant rTFIIIC and rTFIIIB directed a low level of basal transcription, much weaker than with the crude B'' fraction, suggesting the existence of auxiliary factors that could modulate the yeast RNA polymerase III transcription system.

  14. A novel intermediate in transcription initiation by human mitochondrial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Yaroslav I; Agaronyan, Karen; Cheung, Alan C M; Anikin, Michael; Cramer, Patrick; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2014-04-01

    The mitochondrial genome is transcribed by a single-subunit T7 phage-like RNA polymerase (mtRNAP), structurally unrelated to cellular RNAPs. In higher eukaryotes, mtRNAP requires two transcription factors for efficient initiation-TFAM, a major nucleoid protein, and TFB2M, a transient component of mtRNAP catalytic site. The mechanisms behind assembly of the mitochondrial transcription machinery and its regulation are poorly understood. We isolated and identified a previously unknown human mitochondrial transcription intermediate-a pre-initiation complex that includes mtRNAP, TFAM and promoter DNA. Using protein-protein cross-linking, we demonstrate that human TFAM binds to the N-terminal domain of mtRNAP, which results in bending of the promoter DNA around mtRNAP. The subsequent recruitment of TFB2M induces promoter melting and formation of an open initiation complex. Our data indicate that the pre-initiation complex is likely to be an important target for transcription regulation and provide basis for further structural, biochemical and biophysical studies of mitochondrial transcription.

  15. Transcription factor KLF4 regulates microRNA-544 that targets YWHAZ in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Langyong; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Xiaolong; Mo, Wenjuan; Yu, Yao; Lu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The deregulation of microRNAs has been demonstrated in various tumor processes. Here, we report that microRNA-544 (miR-544) is decreased in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervical tissues. To identify the mechanisms involved in miR-544 deregulation, we studied the regulation of miR-544 expression at the transcriptional level. We first identified the transcriptional start site of miR-544 by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends and subsequently determined the miR-544 promoter. We discovered that the transcription factor Krueppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is involved in the transcriptional regulation of miR-544 through interaction with the miR-544 promoter. In addition, we found that miR-544 directly targets the YWHAZ oncogene and functions as a tumor suppressor in cervical cancer cells. miR-544 is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in a manner associated with YWHAZ downregulation. In summary, our findings demonstrate that KLF4 upregulates miR-544 transcription by activating the miR-544 promoter and that miR-544 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting YWHAZ. Therefore, miR-544 may be a potential novel therapeutic target and prognostic marker for cervical cancer.

  16. Downregulation of homologous recombination DNA repair genes by HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer is mediated through the E2F1 transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant K Kachhap

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis re-express silenced tumor suppressor genes and are currently undergoing clinical trials. Although HDACis have been known to induce gene expression, an equal number of genes are downregulated upon HDAC inhibition. The mechanism behind this downregulation remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that several DNA repair genes are downregulated by HDAC inhibition and provide a mechanism involving the E2F1 transcription factor in the process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Applying Analysis of Functional Annotation (AFA on microarray data of prostate cancer cells treated with HDACis, we found a number of genes of the DNA damage response and repair pathways are downregulated by HDACis. AFA revealed enrichment of homologous recombination (HR DNA repair genes of the BRCA1 pathway, as well as genes regulated by the E2F1 transcription factor. Prostate cancer cells demonstrated a decreased DNA repair capacity and an increased sensitization to chemical- and radio-DNA damaging agents upon HDAC inhibition. Recruitment of key HR repair proteins to the site of DNA damage, as well as HR repair capacity was compromised upon HDACi treatment. Based on our AFA data, we hypothesized that the E2F transcription factors may play a role in the downregulation of key repair genes upon HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer cells. ChIP analysis and luciferase assays reveal that the downregulation of key repair genes is mediated through decreased recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor and not through active repression by repressive E2Fs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study indicates that several genes in the DNA repair pathway are affected upon HDAC inhibition. Downregulation of the repair genes is on account of a decrease in amount and promoter recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor. Since HDAC inhibition affects several pathways that could potentially have an impact on DNA repair, compromised DNA repair upon HDAC

  17. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-04-26

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation.

  18. Inference of RNA polymerase II transcription dynamics from chromatin immunoprecipitation time course data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciira wa Maina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II (pol-II is a key step in gene expression. The dynamics of pol-II moving along the transcribed region influence the rate and timing of gene expression. In this work, we present a probabilistic model of transcription dynamics which is fitted to pol-II occupancy time course data measured using ChIP-Seq. The model can be used to estimate transcription speed and to infer the temporal pol-II activity profile at the gene promoter. Model parameters are estimated using either maximum likelihood estimation or via Bayesian inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The Bayesian approach provides confidence intervals for parameter estimates and allows the use of priors that capture domain knowledge, e.g. the expected range of transcription speeds, based on previous experiments. The model describes the movement of pol-II down the gene body and can be used to identify the time of induction for transcriptionally engaged genes. By clustering the inferred promoter activity time profiles, we are able to determine which genes respond quickly to stimuli and group genes that share activity profiles and may therefore be co-regulated. We apply our methodology to biological data obtained using ChIP-seq to measure pol-II occupancy genome-wide when MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are treated with estradiol (E2. The transcription speeds we obtain agree with those obtained previously for smaller numbers of genes with the advantage that our approach can be applied genome-wide. We validate the biological significance of the pol-II promoter activity clusters by investigating cluster-specific transcription factor binding patterns and determining canonical pathway enrichment. We find that rapidly induced genes are enriched for both estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and FOXA1 binding in their proximal promoter regions.

  19. Cdc15 Phosphorylates the C-terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II for Transcription during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Rastogi, Shivangi; Shukla, Harish; Asalam, Mohd; Rath, Srikanta Kumar; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2017-03-31

    In eukaryotes, the basal transcription in interphase is orchestrated through the regulation by kinases (Kin28, Bur1, and Ctk1) and phosphatases (Ssu72, Rtr1, and Fcp1), which act through the post-translational modification of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The CTD comprises the repeated Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser motif with potential epigenetic modification sites. Despite the observation of transcription and periodic expression of genes during mitosis with entailing CTD phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, the associated CTD specific kinase(s) and its role in transcription remains unknown. Here we have identified Cdc15 as a potential kinase phosphorylating Ser-2 and Ser-5 of CTD for transcription during mitosis in the budding yeast. The phosphorylation of CTD by Cdc15 is independent of any prior Ser phosphorylation(s). The inactivation of Cdc15 causes reduction of global CTD phosphorylation during mitosis and affects the expression of genes whose transcript levels peak during mitosis. Cdc15 also influences the complete transcription of clb2 gene and phosphorylates Ser-5 at the promoter and Ser-2 toward the 3' end of the gene. The observation that Cdc15 could phosphorylate Ser-5, as well as Ser-2, during transcription in mitosis is in contrast to the phosphorylation marks put by the kinases in interphase (G1, S, and G2), where Cdck7/Kin28 phosphorylates Ser-5 at promoter and Bur1/Ctk1 phosphorylates Ser-2 at the 3' end of the genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Inference of RNA polymerase II transcription dynamics from chromatin immunoprecipitation time course data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciira wa Maina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II (pol-II is a key step in gene expression. The dynamics of pol-II moving along the transcribed region influence the rate and timing of gene expression. In this work, we present a probabilistic model of transcription dynamics which is fitted to pol-II occupancy time course data measured using ChIP-Seq. The model can be used to estimate transcription speed and to infer the temporal pol-II activity profile at the gene promoter. Model parameters are estimated using either maximum likelihood estimation or via Bayesian inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The Bayesian approach provides confidence intervals for parameter estimates and allows the use of priors that capture domain knowledge, e.g. the expected range of transcription speeds, based on previous experiments. The model describes the movement of pol-II down the gene body and can be used to identify the time of induction for transcriptionally engaged genes. By clustering the inferred promoter activity time profiles, we are able to determine which genes respond quickly to stimuli and group genes that share activity profiles and may therefore be co-regulated. We apply our methodology to biological data obtained using ChIP-seq to measure pol-II occupancy genome-wide when MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are treated with estradiol (E2. The transcription speeds we obtain agree with those obtained previously for smaller numbers of genes with the advantage that our approach can be applied genome-wide. We validate the biological significance of the pol-II promoter activity clusters by investigating cluster-specific transcription factor binding patterns and determining canonical pathway enrichment. We find that rapidly induced genes are enriched for both estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and FOXA1 binding in their proximal promoter regions.

  1. RNA-Seq for gene identification and transcript profiling of three Stevia rebaudiana genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junwen; Hou, Kai; Qin, Peng; Liu, Hongchang; Yi, Bin; Yang, Wenting; Wu, Wei

    2014-07-07

    Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) is an important medicinal plant that yields diterpenoid steviol glycosides (SGs). SGs are currently used in the preparation of medicines, food products and neutraceuticals because of its sweetening property (zero calories and about 300 times sweeter than sugar). Recently, some progress has been made in understanding the biosynthesis of SGs in Stevia, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this process. Additionally, the genomics of Stevia, a non-model species, remains uncharacterized. The recent advent of RNA-Seq, a next generation sequencing technology, provides an opportunity to expand the identification of Stevia genes through in-depth transcript profiling. We present a comprehensive landscape of the transcriptome profiles of three genotypes of Stevia with divergent SG compositions characterized using RNA-seq. 191,590,282 high-quality reads were generated and then assembled into 171,837 transcripts with an average sequence length of 969 base pairs. A total of 80,160 unigenes were annotated, and 14,211 of the unique sequences were assigned to specific metabolic pathways by the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Gene sequences of all enzymes known to be involved in SG synthesis were examined. A total of 143 UDP-glucosyltransferase (UGT) unigenes were identified, some of which might be involved in SG biosynthesis. The expression patterns of eight of these genes were further confirmed by RT-QPCR. RNA-seq analysis identified candidate genes encoding enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of SGs in Stevia, a non-model plant without a reference genome. The transcriptome data from this study yielded new insights into the process of SG accumulation in Stevia. Our results demonstrate that RNA-Seq can be successfully used for gene identification and transcript profiling in a non-model species.

  2. Effect of chronic uremia on the transcriptional profile of the calcified aorta analyzed by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukov, Jakob L; Gravesen, Eva; Mace, Maria L; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Vinther, Jeppe; Andersen, Claus B; Lewin, Ewa; Olgaard, Klaus

    2016-03-15

    The development of vascular calcification (VC) in chronic uremia (CU) is a tightly regulated process controlled by factors promoting and inhibiting mineralization. Next-generation high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a powerful and sensitive tool for quantitative gene expression profiling and the detection of differentially expressed genes. In the present study, we, for the first time, used RNA-seq to examine rat aorta transcriptomes from CU rats compared with control rats. Severe VC was induced in CU rats, which lead to extensive changes in the transcriptional profile. Among the 10,153 genes with an expression level of >1 reads/kilobase transcript/million mapped reads, 2,663 genes were differentially expressed with 47% upregulated genes and 53% downregulated genes in uremic rats. Significantly deregulated genes were enriched for ontologies related to the extracellular matrix, response to wounding, organic substance, and ossification. The individually affected genes were of relevance to osteogenic transformation, tissue calcification, and Wnt modulation. Downregulation of the Klotho gene in uremia is believed to be involved in the development of VC, but it is debated whether the effect is caused by circulating Klotho only or if Klotho is produced locally in the vasculature. We found that Klotho was neither expressed in the normal aorta nor calcified aorta by RNA-seq. In conclusion, we demonstrated extensive changes in the transcriptional profile of the uremic calcified aorta, which were consistent with a shift in phenotype from vascular tissue toward an osteochondrocytic transcriptome profile. Moreover, neither the normal vasculature nor calcified vasculature in CU expresses Klotho.

  3. A novel min-cost flow method for estimating transcript expression with RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomescu, Alexandru I; Kuosmanen, Anna; Rizzi, Romeo; Mäkinen, Veli

    2013-01-01

    Through transcription and alternative splicing, a gene can be transcribed into different RNA sequences (isoforms), depending on the individual, on the tissue the cell is in, or in response to some stimuli. Recent RNA-Seq technology allows for new high-throughput ways for isoform identification and quantification based on short reads, and various methods have been put forward for this non-trivial problem. In this paper we propose a novel radically different method based on minimum-cost network flows. This has a two-fold advantage: on the one hand, it translates the problem as an established one in the field of network flows, which can be solved in polynomial time, with different existing solvers; on the other hand, it is general enough to encompass many of the previous proposals under the least sum of squares model. Our method works as follows: in order to find the transcripts which best explain, under a given fitness model, a splicing graph resulting from an RNA-Seq experiment, we find a min-cost flow in an offset flow network, under an equivalent cost model. Under very weak assumptions on the fitness model, the optimal flow can be computed in polynomial time. Parsimoniously splitting the flow back into few path transcripts can be done with any of the heuristics and approximations available from the theory of network flows. In the present implementation, we choose the simple strategy of repeatedly removing the heaviest path. We proposed a new very general method based on network flows for a multiassembly problem arising from isoform identification and quantification with RNA-Seq. Experimental results on prediction accuracy show that our method is very competitive with popular tools such as Cufflinks and IsoLasso. Our tool, called Traph (Transcrips in gRAPHs), is available at: http://www.cs.helsinki.fi/gsa/traph/.

  4. Regulatory coordination of clustered microRNAs based on microRNA-transcription factor regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA (miRNA is a class of small RNAs of ~22nt which play essential roles in many crucial biological processes and numerous human diseases at post-transcriptional level of gene expression. It has been revealed that miRNA genes tend to be clustered, and the miRNAs organized into one cluster are usually transcribed coordinately. This implies a coordinated regulation mode exerted by clustered miRNAs. However, how the clustered miRNAs coordinate their regulations on large scale gene expression is still unclear. Results We constructed the miRNA-transcription factor regulatory network that contains the interactions between transcription factors (TFs, miRNAs and non-TF protein-coding genes, and made a genome-wide study on the regulatory coordination of clustered miRNAs. We found that there are two types of miRNA clusters, i.e. homo-clusters that contain miRNAs of the same family and hetero-clusters that contain miRNAs of various families. In general, the homo-clustered as well as the hetero-clustered miRNAs both exhibit coordinated regulation since the miRNAs belonging to one cluster tend to be involved in the same network module, which performs a relatively isolated biological function. However, the homo-clustered miRNAs show a direct regulatory coordination that is realized by one-step regulation (i.e. the direct regulation of the coordinated targets, whereas the hetero-clustered miRNAs show an indirect regulatory coordination that is realized by a regulation comprising at least three steps (e.g. the regulation on the coordinated targets by a miRNA through a sequential action of two TFs. The direct and indirect regulation target different categories of genes, the former predominantly regulating genes involved in emergent responses, the latter targeting genes that imply long-term effects. Conclusion The genomic clustering of miRNAs is closely related to the coordinated regulation in the gene regulatory network. The pattern of

  5. The Maize Imprinted Gene Floury3 Encodes a PLATZ Protein Required for tRNA and 5S rRNA Transcription Through Interaction with RNA Polymerase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Wang, Jiechen; Ye, Jianwei; Zheng, Xixi; Xiang, Xiaoli; Li, Changsheng; Fu, Miaomiao; Wang, Qiong; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Yongrui

    2017-09-05

    Maize (Zea mays) floury3 (fl3) is a classic semi-dominant negative mutant that exhibits severe defects in the endosperm but fl3 plants otherwise appear normal. We cloned the fl3 gene and determined that it encodes a PLATZ (plant AT-rich sequence- and zinc-binding) protein. The mutation in fl3 resulted in an Asn to His replacement in the conserved PLATZ domain, creating a dominant allele. Fl3 is specifically expressed in starchy endosperm cells and regulated by genomic imprinting, which leads to the suppressed expression of fl3 when transmitted through the male, perhaps as a consequence the semi-dominant behavior. Yeast two-hybrid screening and bimolecular luciferase complementation (BiLC) experiments revealed that FL3 interacts with the RNA polymerase III subunit 53 (RPC53) and transcription factor class C 1 (TFC1), two critical factors of the RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) transcription complex. In the fl3 endosperm, the levels of many tRNAs and 5S rRNA that are transcribed by RNAPIII are significantly reduced, suggesting that the incorrectly folded fl3 protein may impair the function of RNAPIII. The transcriptome is dramatically altered in fl3 mutants, in which the down-regulated genes are primarily enriched in pathways related to translation, ribosome, misfolded protein responses and nutrient reservoir activity. Collectively, these changes may lead to defects in endosperm development and storage reserve filling in fl3 seeds. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural Model of RNA Polymerase II Elongation Complex with Complete Transcription Bubble Reveals NTP Entry Routes.

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    Lu Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The RNA polymerase II (Pol II is a eukaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the messenger RNA using a DNA template. Despite numerous biochemical and biophysical studies, it remains elusive whether the "secondary channel" is the only route for NTP to reach the active site of the enzyme or if the "main channel" could be an alternative. On this regard, crystallographic structures of Pol II have been extremely useful to understand the structural basis of transcription, however, the conformation of the unpaired non-template DNA part of the full transcription bubble (TB is still unknown. Since diffusion routes of the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP substrate through the main channel might overlap with the TB region, gaining structural information of the full TB is critical for a complete understanding of Pol II transcription process. In this study, we have built a structural model of Pol II with a complete transcription bubble based on multiple sources of existing structural data and used Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations together with structural analysis to shed light on NTP entry pathways. Interestingly, we found that although both channels have enough space to allow NTP loading, the percentage of MD conformations containing enough space for NTP loading through the secondary channel is twice higher than that of the main channel. Further energetic study based on MD simulations with NTP loaded in the channels has revealed that the diffusion of the NTP through the main channel is greatly disfavored by electrostatic repulsion between the NTP and the highly negatively charged backbones of nucleotides in the non-template DNA strand. Taken together, our results suggest that the secondary channel is the major route for NTP entry during Pol II transcription.

  7. Structural Model of RNA Polymerase II Elongation Complex with Complete Transcription Bubble Reveals NTP Entry Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Pardo-Avila, Fátima; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-07-01

    The RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a eukaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the messenger RNA using a DNA template. Despite numerous biochemical and biophysical studies, it remains elusive whether the "secondary channel" is the only route for NTP to reach the active site of the enzyme or if the "main channel" could be an alternative. On this regard, crystallographic structures of Pol II have been extremely useful to understand the structural basis of transcription, however, the conformation of the unpaired non-template DNA part of the full transcription bubble (TB) is still unknown. Since diffusion routes of the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate through the main channel might overlap with the TB region, gaining structural information of the full TB is critical for a complete understanding of Pol II transcription process. In this study, we have built a structural model of Pol II with a complete transcription bubble based on multiple sources of existing structural data and used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations together with structural analysis to shed light on NTP entry pathways. Interestingly, we found that although both channels have enough space to allow NTP loading, the percentage of MD conformations containing enough space for NTP loading through the secondary channel is twice higher than that of the main channel. Further energetic study based on MD simulations with NTP loaded in the channels has revealed that the diffusion of the NTP through the main channel is greatly disfavored by electrostatic repulsion between the NTP and the highly negatively charged backbones of nucleotides in the non-template DNA strand. Taken together, our results suggest that the secondary channel is the major route for NTP entry during Pol II transcription.

  8. PRC2 regulates RNA polymerase III transcribed non-translated RNA gene transcription through EZH2 and SUZ12 interaction with TFIIIC complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chang; Li Shuai; Dai Xiaoyan; Ma Ji; Wan Junhu; Jiang Hao; Wang Peng; Liu Zhaoli; Zhang Hongquan

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb repression complex 2 ( PRC2 ) component EZH2 tri-methylates H3 K27 and exerts ep-igenetic repression on target gene expression. EZH2-mediated epigenetic control of RNA polymerase II(Pol II) transcribed coding gene transcription has been well established. However, little is known about EZH2-mediated epigenetic regulation of RNA polymerase III( Pol III) transcription. Here we present a paradigm that EZH2 is in-volved in the repression of Pol III transcription via interaction with transcriptional factor complex IIIC ( TFIIIC ) . EZH2 and H3K27 me3 cooccupy the promoter of tRNATyr, 5S rRNA and 7SL RNA genes. Depletion of EZH2 or inhibition of EZH2 methyl transferase activity led to upregulation of Pol III target gene transcription. EZH2-media-ted repression of Pol III transcribed gene expression requires presence of SUZ12 . SUZ12 was able to interact with TFIIIC complex and knockdown of SUZ12 decreased occupancy of EZH2 and H3 K27 me3 at the promoter of Pol III target genes. Our findings pointed out a previously unidentified role of PRC2 complex in suppressing transcription of Pol III transcribed non-translated RNA genes, putting Pol III on a new layer of epigenetic regulation.

  9. DNA repair helicase: a component of BTF2 (TFIIH) basic transcription factor. (research article)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Schaeffer; R. Roy (Richard); S. Humbert; V. Moncollin; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Chambon; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe human BTF2 basic transcription factor (also called TFIIH), which is similar to the delta factor in rat and factor b in yeast, is required for class II gene transcription. A strand displacement assay was used to show that highly purified preparation of BTF2 had an adenosine triphospha

  10. Quantification of mRNA Levels by Fluorescently Labelled Reverse Transcription Competitive PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A reproducible,quantitative,non-radioactive method for the analysis of mRNA expression is described.After RNA preparation and cDNA synthesi s,the cDNA was co-amplified with an internal standard in the same PCR system.Th e PCR products containing both targen and internal standard amplificates were el ectrophoresed and detected on an ABI 377 DNA Sequencer.For each sample,β-actin was also quantified by an identical procedure to compensate for relative differ ences between samples in the integrity of the individual RNA samples and for var iations in reverse transcription.Due to the linear relationship between cDNA con tent and PCR product ratio of target cDNA template and competitive standard,a si ngle PCR reaction was sufficient for quantification of a sample.The experimental results showed that the method is a mRNA quantitative RT-PCR method with high sensitivity and good reproducibility.It can be used in large-scale accurate qu antitative analyses of mRNA expression of any gene.

  11. Detecting sequence dependent transcriptional pauses from RNA and protein number time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmert-Streib Frank

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that in prokaryotes sequence-dependent transcriptional pauses affect the dynamics of transcription and translation, as well as of small genetic circuits. So far, a few pause-prone sequences have been identified from in vitro measurements of transcription elongation kinetics. Results Using a stochastic model of gene expression at the nucleotide and codon levels with realistic parameter values, we investigate three different but related questions and present statistical methods for their analysis. First, we show that information from in vivo RNA and protein temporal numbers is sufficient to discriminate between models with and without a pause site in their coding sequence. Second, we demonstrate that it is possible to separate a large variety of models from each other with pauses of various durations and locations in the template by means of a hierarchical clustering and a random forest classifier. Third, we introduce an approximate likelihood function that allows to estimate the location of a pause site. Conclusions This method can aid in detecting unknown pause-prone sequences from temporal measurements of RNA and protein numbers at a genome-wide scale and thus elucidate possible roles that these sequences play in the dynamics of genetic networks and phenotype.

  12. Detecting sequence dependent transcriptional pauses from RNA and protein number time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; Häkkinen, Antti; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2012-06-28

    Evidence suggests that in prokaryotes sequence-dependent transcriptional pauses affect the dynamics of transcription and translation, as well as of small genetic circuits. So far, a few pause-prone sequences have been identified from in vitro measurements of transcription elongation kinetics. Using a stochastic model of gene expression at the nucleotide and codon levels with realistic parameter values, we investigate three different but related questions and present statistical methods for their analysis. First, we show that information from in vivo RNA and protein temporal numbers is sufficient to discriminate between models with and without a pause site in their coding sequence. Second, we demonstrate that it is possible to separate a large variety of models from each other with pauses of various durations and locations in the template by means of a hierarchical clustering and a random forest classifier. Third, we introduce an approximate likelihood function that allows to estimate the location of a pause site. This method can aid in detecting unknown pause-prone sequences from temporal measurements of RNA and protein numbers at a genome-wide scale and thus elucidate possible roles that these sequences play in the dynamics of genetic networks and phenotype.

  13. The actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA binds to the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Liu, Bing; Doughty, Philip; Lewis, Richard A; Ghosh, Somadri; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Simpson, Peter J; O'Dwyer, Kathleen; Matthews, Steve J; Paget, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    RbpA is a small non-DNA-binding transcription factor that associates with RNA polymerase holoenzyme and stimulates transcription in actinobacteria, including Streptomyces coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. RbpA seems to show specificity for the vegetative form of RNA polymerase as opposed to alternative forms of the enzyme. Here, we explain the basis of this specificity by showing that RbpA binds directly to the principal σ subunit in these organisms, but not to more diverged alternative σ factors. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that, although differing in their requirement for structural zinc, the RbpA orthologues from S. coelicolor and M. tuberculosis share a common structural core domain, with extensive, apparently disordered, N- and C-terminal regions. The RbpA-σ interaction is mediated by the C-terminal region of RbpA and σ domain 2, and S. coelicolor RbpA mutants that are defective in binding σ are unable to stimulate transcription in vitro and are inactive in vivo. Given that RbpA is essential in M. tuberculosis and critical for growth in S. coelicolor, these data support a model in which RbpA plays a key role in the σ cycle in actinobacteria.

  14. An essential nuclear protein in trypanosomes is a component of mRNA transcription/export pathway.

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    Mariana Serpeloni

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, different RNA species are exported from the nucleus via specialized pathways. The mRNA export machinery is highly integrated with mRNA processing, and includes a different set of nuclear transport adaptors as well as other mRNA binding proteins, RNA helicases, and NPC-associated proteins. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, a widespread and neglected human disease which is endemic to Latin America. Gene expression in Trypanosoma has unique characteristics, such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-encoding genes and mRNA processing by trans-splicing. In general, post-transcriptional events are the major points for regulation of gene expression in these parasites. However, the export pathway of mRNA from the nucleus is poorly understood. The present study investigated the function of TcSub2, which is a highly conserved protein ortholog to Sub2/ UAP56, a component of the Transcription/Export (TREX multiprotein complex connecting transcription with mRNA export in yeast/human. Similar to its orthologs, TcSub2 is a nuclear protein, localized in dispersed foci all over the nuclei -except the fibrillar center of nucleolus- and at the interface between dense and non-dense chromatin areas, proposing the association of TcSub2 with transcription/processing sites. These findings were analyzed further by BrUTP incorporation assays and confirmed that TcSub2 is physically associated with active RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II, but not RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I or Spliced Leader (SL transcription, demonstrating participation particularly in nuclear mRNA metabolism in T. cruzi. The double knockout of the TcSub2 gene is lethal in T. cruzi, suggesting it has an essential function. Alternatively, RNA interference assays were performed in Trypanosoma brucei. It allowed demonstrating that besides being an essential protein, its knockdown causes mRNA accumulation in the nucleus and

  15. The N-terminal domain of the arenavirus L protein is an RNA endonuclease essential in mRNA transcription.

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    Benjamin Morin

    Full Text Available Arenaviridae synthesize viral mRNAs using short capped primers presumably acquired from cellular transcripts by a 'cap-snatching' mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure and functional characterization of the N-terminal 196 residues (NL1 of the L protein from the prototypic arenavirus: lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. The NL1 domain is able to bind and cleave RNA. The 2.13 Å resolution crystal structure of NL1 reveals a type II endonuclease α/β architecture similar to the N-terminal end of the influenza virus PA protein. Superimposition of both structures, mutagenesis and reverse genetics studies reveal a unique spatial arrangement of key active site residues related to the PD…(D/EXK type II endonuclease signature sequence. We show that this endonuclease domain is conserved and active across the virus families Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae and Orthomyxoviridae and propose that the arenavirus NL1 domain is the Arenaviridae cap-snatching endonuclease.

  16. Regulation of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination: choreography of noncoding transcription, targeted DNA deamination, and long-range DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Allysia J; Zheng, Simin; DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    Upon encountering antigens, mature IgM-positive B lymphocytes undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) wherein exons encoding the default Cμ constant coding gene segment of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (Igh) locus are excised and replaced with a new constant gene segment (referred to as "Ch genes", e.g., Cγ, Cɛ, or Cα). The B cell thereby changes from expressing IgM to one producing IgG, IgE, or IgA, with each antibody isotype having a different effector function during an immune reaction. CSR is a DNA deletional-recombination reaction that proceeds through the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in repetitive switch (S) sequences preceding each Ch gene and is completed by end-joining between donor Sμ and acceptor S regions. CSR is a multistep reaction requiring transcription through S regions, the DNA cytidine deaminase AID, and the participation of several general DNA repair pathways including base excision repair, mismatch repair, and classical nonhomologous end-joining. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how transcription through S regions generates substrates for AID-mediated deamination and how AID participates not only in the initiation of CSR but also in the conversion of deaminated residues into DSBs. Additionally, we review the multiple processes that regulate AID expression and facilitate its recruitment specifically to the Ig loci, and how deregulation of AID specificity leads to oncogenic translocations. Finally, we summarize recent data on the potential role of AID in the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell state during epigenetic reprogramming.

  17. Reprogramming of human fibroblasts to pluripotent stem cells using mRNA of four transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakubov, Eduard [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Rechavi, Gidi [Cancer Research Center, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Rozenblatt, Shmuel [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Givol, David, E-mail: david.givol@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel)

    2010-03-26

    Reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent cells (iPS) was accomplished in 2006 by expressing four, or less, embryonic stem cell (ESC)-specific transcription factors. Due to the possible danger of DNA damage and the potential tumorigenicity associated with such DNA damage, attempts were made to minimize DNA integration by the vectors involved in this process without complete success. Here we present a method of using RNA transfection as a tool for reprogramming human fibroblasts to iPS. We used RNA synthesized in vitro from cDNA of the same reprogramming four transcription factors. After transfection of the RNA, we show intracellular expression and nuclear localization of the respective proteins in at least 70% of the cells. We used five consecutive transfections to support continuous protein expression resulting in the formation of iPS colonies that express alkaline phosphatase and several ESC markers and that can be expanded. This method completely avoids DNA integration and may be developed to replace the use of DNA vectors in the formation of iPS.

  18. Potential RNA polymerase II-induced interactions of transcription factor TFIIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, S; Lee, D K; Roeder, R G

    1993-10-01

    The ubiquitous transcription factor TFIIB is required for initiation by RNA polymerase II and serves as a target of some regulatory factors. The carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB contains a large imperfect direct repeat reminiscent of the structural organization of the TATA-binding component (TBP) of TFIID, as well as sequence homology to conserved regions of bacterial sigma factors. The present study shows that the carboxy-terminal portion of TFIIB, like that of TBP, is folded into a compact protease-resistant core. The TFIIB core, unlike the TBP core, is inactive in transcription but retains structural features that enable it to form a complex with promoter-bound TFIID. The protease-susceptible amino terminus appears to contain components responsible for direct interaction with RNA polymerase II (in association with TFIIF) either on the promoter (in association with TFIID) or independently. In addition, core TFIIB (but not intact TFIIB) extends the footprint of TBP on promoter DNA, suggesting that TFIIB has a cryptic DNA-binding potential. These results are consistent with a model in which TFIIB, in a manner functionally analogous to that of bacterial sigma factors, undergoes an RNA polymerase II-dependent conformational change with resultant DNA interactions during the pathway leading to a functional preinitiation complex.

  19. Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 is Regulated Post-Transcriptionally by miRNA-29a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Lau, Pierre; Hudson, Lynn; Murashov, Alexander K.; Renne, Rolf; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a dose-sensitive, disease-associated protein primarily expressed in myelinating Schwann cells. Either reduction or overproduction of PMP22 can result in hereditary neuropathy, suggesting a requirement for correct protein expression for peripheral nerve biology. PMP22 is post-transcriptionally regulated and the 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) of the gene exerts a negative effect on translation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory molecules that function at a post-transcriptional level by targeting the 3′UTR in a reverse complementary manner. We used cultured Schwann cells to demonstrate that alterations in the miRNA biogenesis pathway affect PMP22 levels, and endogenous PMP22 is subjected to miRNA regulation. GW-body formation, the proposed cytoplasmic site for miRNA-mediated repression, and Dicer expression, an RNase III family ribonuclease involved in miRNA biogenesis, are co-regulated with the differentiation state of Schwann cells. Furthermore, the levels of Dicer inversely correlate with PMP22, while the inhibition of Dicer leads to elevated PMP22. Microarray analysis of actively-proliferating and differentiated Schwann cells, in conjunction with bioinformatics programs, identified several candidate PMP22-targeting miRNAs. Here we demonstrate that miR-29a binds and inhibits PMP22 reporter expression through a specific miRNA seed binding region. Over-expression of miR-29a enhances the association of PMP22 RNA with Argonaute 2, a protein involved in miRNA function, and reduces the steady-state levels of PMP22. In contrast, inhibition of endogenous miR-29a relieves the miRNA-mediated repression of PMP22. Correlation analyses of miR-29 and PMP22 in sciatic nerves reveal an inverse relationship, both developmentally and in post-crush injury. These results identify PMP22 as a target of miRNAs and suggest that myelin gene expression by Schwann cells is regulated by miRNAs. PMID:19170179

  20. Cytoplasmic and nuclear quality control and turnover of single-stranded RNA modulate post-transcriptional gene silencing in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Bardou, Florian; Crespi, Martin D.; Vaucheret, Hervé; Maizel, Alexis; Mallory, Allison C.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA quality control (RQC) uses both endonucleolytic and exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional RNAs. In addition, endogenous and exogenous RNAs are degraded through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), which is triggered by the production of double-stranded (ds)RNAs and proceeds through short-interfering (si)RNA-directed ARGONAUTE-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage. Compromising cytoplasmic or nuclear 5′–3′ exoribonuclease function enhances sense-transgene (S)-PTGS in Arabidopsis, suggesting that these pathways compete for similar RNA substrates. Here, we show that impairing nonsense-mediated decay, deadenylation or exosome activity enhanced S-PTGS, which requires host RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6/SGS2/SDE1) and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING 3 (SGS3) for the transformation of single-stranded RNA into dsRNA to trigger PTGS. However, these RQC mutations had no effect on inverted-repeat–PTGS, which directly produces hairpin dsRNA through transcription. Moreover, we show that these RQC factors are nuclear and cytoplasmic and are found in two RNA degradation foci in the cytoplasm: siRNA-bodies and processing-bodies. We propose a model of single-stranded RNA tug-of-war between RQC and S-PTGS that ensures the correct partitioning of RNA substrates among these RNA degradation pathways. PMID:23482394

  1. Mouse model for the DNA repair/basal transcription disorder Trichothiodystrophy reveals cancer predisposition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Boer (Jan); H. van Steeg (Harry); R.J.W. Berg (Rob); J. Garssen (Johan); J. de Wit (Jan); C.T.M. van Oostrom (Conny); R.B. Beems (Rudolf); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); C.F. van Kreijl (Coen); F.R. de Gruijl (Frank); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); G. Weeda (Geert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPatients with the nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are highly predisposed to develop sunlight-induced skin cancer, in remarkable contrast to photosensitive NER-deficient trichothiodystrophy (TTD) patients carrying mutations in the same XPD gene. XPD en

  2. Mycobacterial RNA isolation optimized for non-coding RNA: high fidelity isolation of 5S rRNA from Mycobacterium bovis BCG reveals novel post-transcriptional processing and a complete spectrum of modified ribonucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hia, Fabian; Chionh, Yok Hian; Pang, Yan Ling Joy; DeMott, Michael S; McBee, Megan E; Dedon, Peter C

    2015-03-11

    A major challenge in the study of mycobacterial RNA biology is the lack of a comprehensive RNA isolation method that overcomes the unusual cell wall to faithfully yield the full spectrum of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) species. Here, we describe a simple and robust procedure optimized for the isolation of total ncRNA, including 5S, 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and tRNA, from mycobacteria, using Mycobacterium bovis BCG to illustrate the method. Based on a combination of mechanical disruption and liquid and solid-phase technologies, the method produces all major species of ncRNA in high yield and with high integrity, enabling direct chemical and sequence analysis of the ncRNA species. The reproducibility of the method with BCG was evident in bioanalyzer electrophoretic analysis of isolated RNA, which revealed quantitatively significant differences in the ncRNA profiles of exponentially growing and non-replicating hypoxic bacilli. The method also overcame an historical inconsistency in 5S rRNA isolation, with direct sequencing revealing a novel post-transcriptional processing of 5S rRNA to its functional form and with chemical analysis revealing seven post-transcriptional ribonucleoside modifications in the 5S rRNA. This optimized RNA isolation procedure thus provides a means to more rigorously explore the biology of ncRNA species in mycobacteria. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Transcription Profiling of Bacillus subtilis Cells Infected with AR9, a Giant Phage Encoding Two Multisubunit RNA Polymerases

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    Daria Lavysh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage AR9 is a recently sequenced jumbo phage that encodes two multisubunit RNA polymerases. Here we investigated the AR9 transcription strategy and the effect of AR9 infection on the transcription of its host, Bacillus subtilis. Analysis of whole-genome transcription revealed early, late, and continuously expressed AR9 genes. Alignment of sequences upstream of the 5′ ends of AR9 transcripts revealed consensus sequences that define early and late phage promoters. Continuously expressed AR9 genes have both early and late promoters in front of them. Early AR9 transcription is independent of protein synthesis and must be determined by virion RNA polymerase injected together with viral DNA. During infection, the overall amount of host mRNAs is significantly decreased. Analysis of relative amounts of host transcripts revealed notable differences in the levels of some mRNAs. The physiological significance of up- or downregulation of host genes for AR9 phage infection remains to be established. AR9 infection is significantly affected by rifampin, an inhibitor of host RNA polymerase transcription. The effect is likely caused by the antibiotic-induced killing of host cells, while phage genome transcription is solely performed by viral RNA polymerases.

  4. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Esquerré; Marie Bouvier; Catherine Turlan; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Laurence Girbal; Muriel Cocaign-Bousquet

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype...

  5. RNA-interference components are dispensable for transcriptional silencing of the drosophila bithorax-complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo M Cernilogar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Beyond their role in post-transcriptional gene silencing, Dicer and Argonaute, two components of the RNA interference (RNAi machinery, were shown to be involved in epigenetic regulation of centromeric heterochromatin and transcriptional gene silencing. In particular, RNAi mechanisms appear to play a role in repeat induced silencing and some aspects of Polycomb-mediated gene silencing. However, the functional interplay of RNAi mechanisms and Polycomb group (PcG pathways at endogenous loci remains to be elucidated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that the endogenous Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway is dispensable for the PcG mediated silencing of the homeotic Bithorax Complex (BX-C. Although Dicer-2 depletion triggers mild transcriptional activation at Polycomb Response Elements (PREs, this does not induce transcriptional changes at PcG-repressed genes. Moreover, Dicer-2 is not needed to maintain global levels of methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 and does not affect PRE-mediated higher order chromatin structures within the BX-C. Finally bioinformatic analysis, comparing published data sets of PcG targets with Argonaute-2-bound small RNAs reveals no enrichment of these small RNAs at promoter regions associated with PcG proteins. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway, despite its role in pairing sensitive gene silencing of transgenes, does not have a role in PcG dependent silencing of major homeotic gene cluster loci in Drosophila.

  6. RNA Polymerase II Regulates Topoisomerase 1 Activity to Favor Efficient Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranello, Laura; Wojtowicz, Damian; Cui, Kairong; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Chung, Hye-Jung; Chan-Salis, Ka Yim; Guha, Rajarshi; Wilson, Kelli; Zhang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Hongliang; Piotrowski, Jason; Thomas, Craig J; Singer, Dinah S; Pugh, B Franklin; Pommier, Yves; Przytycka, Teresa M; Kouzine, Fedor; Lewis, Brian A; Zhao, Keji; Levens, David

    2016-04-01

    We report a mechanism through which the transcription machinery directly controls topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) activity to adjust DNA topology throughout the transcription cycle. By comparing TOP1 occupancy using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) versus TOP1 activity using topoisomerase 1 sequencing (TOP1-seq), a method reported here to map catalytically engaged TOP1, TOP1 bound at promoters was discovered to become fully active only after pause-release. This transition coupled the phosphorylation of the carboxyl-terminal-domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) with stimulation of TOP1 above its basal rate, enhancing its processivity. TOP1 stimulation is strongly dependent on the kinase activity of BRD4, a protein that phosphorylates Ser2-CTD and regulates RNAPII pause-release. Thus the coordinated action of BRD4 and TOP1 overcame the torsional stress opposing transcription as RNAPII commenced elongation but preserved negative supercoiling that assists promoter melting at start sites. This nexus between transcription and DNA topology promises to elicit new strategies to intercept pathological gene expression.

  7. Bending the rules of transcriptional repression: tightly looped DNA directly represses T7 RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionberger, Troy A; Meyhöfer, Edgar

    2010-08-09

    From supercoiled DNA to the tight loops of DNA formed by some gene repressors, DNA in cells is often highly bent. Despite evidence that transcription by RNA polymerase (RNAP) is affected in systems where DNA is deformed significantly, the mechanistic details underlying the relationship between polymerase function and mechanically stressed DNA remain unclear. Seeking to gain additional insight into the regulatory consequences of highly bent DNA, we hypothesize that tightly looping DNA is alone sufficient to repress transcription. To test this hypothesis, we have developed an assay to quantify transcription elongation by bacteriophage T7 RNAP on small, circular DNA templates approximately 100 bp in size. From these highly bent transcription templates, we observe that the elongation velocity and processivity can be repressed by at least two orders of magnitude. Further, we show that minicircle templates sustaining variable levels of twist yield only moderate differences in repression efficiency. We therefore conclude that the bending mechanics within the minicircle templates dominate the observed repression. Our results support a model in which RNAP function is highly dependent on the bending mechanics of DNA and are suggestive of a direct, regulatory role played by the template itself in regulatory systems where DNA is known to be highly bent. 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. RNA-Interference Components Are Dispensable for Transcriptional Silencing of the Drosophila Bithorax-Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Cernilogar, Filippo M.

    2013-06-13

    Background:Beyond their role in post-transcriptional gene silencing, Dicer and Argonaute, two components of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, were shown to be involved in epigenetic regulation of centromeric heterochromatin and transcriptional gene silencing. In particular, RNAi mechanisms appear to play a role in repeat induced silencing and some aspects of Polycomb-mediated gene silencing. However, the functional interplay of RNAi mechanisms and Polycomb group (PcG) pathways at endogenous loci remains to be elucidated.Principal Findings:Here we show that the endogenous Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway is dispensable for the PcG mediated silencing of the homeotic Bithorax Complex (BX-C). Although Dicer-2 depletion triggers mild transcriptional activation at Polycomb Response Elements (PREs), this does not induce transcriptional changes at PcG-repressed genes. Moreover, Dicer-2 is not needed to maintain global levels of methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 and does not affect PRE-mediated higher order chromatin structures within the BX-C. Finally bioinformatic analysis, comparing published data sets of PcG targets with Argonaute-2-bound small RNAs reveals no enrichment of these small RNAs at promoter regions associated with PcG proteins.Conclusions:We conclude that the Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway, despite its role in pairing sensitive gene silencing of transgenes, does not have a role in PcG dependent silencing of major homeotic gene cluster loci in Drosophila. © 2013 Cernilogar et al.

  9. Electroporation of DNA into Physarum polycephalum Mitochondria: Effects on Transcription and RNA Editing in Isolated Organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatha M. Gott

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial RNAs in the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum contain nucleotides that are not encoded in the mitochondrial genes from which they are transcribed. These site-specific changes are quite extensive, comprising ~4% of the residues within mRNAs and ~2% of rRNAs and tRNAs. These “extra” nucleotides are added co-transcriptionally, but the means by which this is accomplished have not been elucidated. The cox1 mRNA also contains four sites of C to U changes, which occur post-transcriptionally, most likely via targeted deamination. The currently available in vitro systems for studying P. polycephalum editing are limited in that the template is the entire ~63,000 bp mitochondrial genome. This presents a significant challenge when trying to define the signals that specify editing sites. In an attempt to overcome this issue, a method for introducing DNA into isolated P. polycephalum mitochondria via electroporation has been developed. Exogenous DNA is expressed, but the transcripts synthesized from these templates are not edited under the conditions tested. However, transcripts derived from the mitochondrial genome are accurately edited after electroporation, indicating that the editing machinery is still functional. These findings suggest that this method may ultimately provide a feasible approach to elucidating editing signals.

  10. Electroporation of DNA into Physarum polycephalum Mitochondria: Effects on Transcription and RNA Editing in Isolated Organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, Jonatha M; Naegele, Gregory M; Howell, Scott J

    2016-12-14

    Mitochondrial RNAs in the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum contain nucleotides that are not encoded in the mitochondrial genes from which they are transcribed. These site-specific changes are quite extensive, comprising ~4% of the residues within mRNAs and ~2% of rRNAs and tRNAs. These "extra" nucleotides are added co-transcriptionally, but the means by which this is accomplished have not been elucidated. The cox1 mRNA also contains four sites of C to U changes, which occur post-transcriptionally, most likely via targeted deamination. The currently available in vitro systems for studying P. polycephalum editing are limited in that the template is the entire ~63,000 bp mitochondrial genome. This presents a significant challenge when trying to define the signals that specify editing sites. In an attempt to overcome this issue, a method for introducing DNA into isolated P. polycephalum mitochondria via electroporation has been developed. Exogenous DNA is expressed, but the transcripts synthesized from these templates are not edited under the conditions tested. However, transcripts derived from the mitochondrial genome are accurately edited after electroporation, indicating that the editing machinery is still functional. These findings suggest that this method may ultimately provide a feasible approach to elucidating editing signals.

  11. Post-transcriptional regulation of Transforming Growth Factor Beta-1 by microRNA-744.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Martin

    Full Text Available Transforming Growth Factor Beta-1 (TGF-β1 is a pleiotropic cytokine that is of central importance in wound healing, inflammation, and in key pathological processes including cancer and progressive tissue fibrosis. TGF-β1 is post-transcriptionally regulated, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Previously, we have extensively delineated post-transcriptional regulation of TGF-β1 synthesis in the kidney, with evidence for relief of translational repression in proximal tubular cells in the context of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we have investigated the role of the TGF-β1 3'Untranslated Region (3'UTR. Two different 3'UTR lengths have been reported for TGF-β1, of 543 and 137 nucleotides. Absolute quantification showed that, while both UTR lengths were detectable in various human cell types and in a broad range of tissues, the short form predominated in the kidney and elsewhere. Expression of both forms was up-regulated following auto-induction by TGF-β1, but the short:long UTR ratio remained constant. Incorporation of the short UTR into a luciferase reporter vector significantly reduced reporter protein synthesis without major effect on RNA amount, suggesting post-transcriptional inhibition. In silico approaches identified multiple binding sites for miR-744 located in the proximal TGF-β1 3'UTR. A screen in RNA from human tissues showed widespread miR-744 expression. miR-744 transfection inhibited endogenous TGF-β1 synthesis, while direct targeting of TGF-β1 was shown in separate experiments, in which miR-744 decreased TGF-β1 3'UTR reporter activity. This work identifies miR-744-directed post-transcriptional regulation of TGF-β1 which, given the pleiotropic nature of cellular responses to TGF-β1, is potentially widely significant.

  12. Dynein Light Chain LC8 Is Required for RNA Polymerase I-Mediated Transcription in Trypanosoma brucei, Facilitating Assembly and Promoter Binding of Class I Transcription Factor A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Justin K; Park, Sung Hee; Nguyen, Tu N; Lee, Ju Huck; Günzl, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Dynein light chain LC8 is highly conserved among eukaryotes and has both dynein-dependent and dynein-independent functions. Interestingly, LC8 was identified as a subunit of the class I transcription factor A (CITFA), which is essential for transcription by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) in the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Given that LC8 has never been identified with a basal transcription factor and that T. brucei relies on RNA Pol I for expressing the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), the key protein in antigenic variation, we investigated the CITFA-specific role of LC8. Depletion of LC8 from mammalian-infective bloodstream trypanosomes affected cell cycle progression, reduced the abundances of rRNA and VSG mRNA, and resulted in rapid cell death. Sedimentation analysis, coimmunoprecipitation of recombinant proteins, and bioinformatic analysis revealed an LC8 binding site near the N terminus of the subunit CITFA2. Mutation of this site prevented the formation of a CITFA2-LC8 heterotetramer and, in vivo, was lethal, affecting assembly of a functional CITFA complex. Gel shift assays and UV cross-linking experiments identified CITFA2 as a promoter-binding CITFA subunit. Accordingly, silencing of LC8 or CITFA2 resulted in a loss of CITFA from RNA Pol I promoters. Hence, we discovered an LC8 interaction that, unprecedentedly, has a basal function in transcription.

  13. Prdm5 Regulates Collagen Gene Transcription by Association with RNA Polymerase II in Developing Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Giorgio Giacomo; Honnens de Lichtenberg, Kristian; Carrara, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    expressed in developing bones; and, by genome-wide mapping of Prdm5 occupancy in pre-osteoblastic cells, we uncover a novel and unique role for Prdm5 in targeting all mouse collagen genes as well as several SLRP proteoglycan genes. In particular, we show that Prdm5 controls both Collagen I transcription...... and fibrillogenesis by binding inside the Col1a1 gene body and maintaining RNA polymerase II occupancy. In vivo, Prdm5 loss results in delayed ossification involving a pronounced impairment in the assembly of fibrillar collagens. Collectively, our results define a novel role for Prdm5 in sustaining...

  14. Double-Stranded-RNA-Activated Protein Kinase PKR Enhances Transcriptional Activation by Tumor Suppressor p53

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a key role in inducing G1 arrest and apoptosis following DNA damage. The double-stranded-RNA-activated protein PKR is a serine/threonine interferon (IFN)-inducible kinase which plays an important role in regulation of gene expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Since a cross talk between IFN-inducible proteins and p53 had already been established, we investigated whether and how p53 function was modulated by PKR. We analyzed p53 function in...

  15. Minor Contribution of Chimeric Host-HIV Readthrough Transcripts to the Level of HIV Cell-Associated gag RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasternak, A.O.; DeMaster, L.K.; Kootstra, N.A.; Reiss, P.; O'Doherty, U.; Berkhout, B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-associated HIV unspliced RNA is an important marker of the viral reservoir. HIV gag RNA-specific assays are frequently used to monitor reservoir activation. Because HIV preferentially integrates into actively transcribed genes, some of the transcripts detected by these assays may not represent

  16. Minor Contribution of Chimeric Host-HIV Readthrough Transcripts to the Level of HIV Cell-Associated gag RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasternak, A.O.; DeMaster, L.K.; Kootstra, N.A.; Reiss, P.; O'Doherty, U.; Berkhout, B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-associated HIV unspliced RNA is an important marker of the viral reservoir. HIV gag RNA-specific assays are frequently used to monitor reservoir activation. Because HIV preferentially integrates into actively transcribed genes, some of the transcripts detected by these assays may not represent

  17. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq and simulations to probe structure-function design principles of RNA transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Watters, Kyle E; Gasper, Paul M; Abbott, Timothy R; Carlson, Paul D; Chen, Alan A; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-06-01

    Antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators are powerful tools for controlling gene expression and creating synthetic gene networks. RNA transcriptional repressors derived from natural mechanisms called attenuators are particularly versatile, though their mechanistic complexity has made them difficult to engineer. Here we identify a new structure-function design principle for attenuators that enables the forward engineering of new RNA transcriptional repressors. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq to characterize the structures of attenuator variants within Escherichia coli, we show that attenuator hairpins that facilitate interaction with antisense RNAs require interior loops for proper function. Molecular dynamics simulations of these attenuator variants suggest these interior loops impart structural flexibility. We further observe hairpin flexibility in the cellular structures of natural RNA mechanisms that use antisense RNA interactions to repress translation, confirming earlier results from in vitro studies. Finally, we design new transcriptional attenuators in silico using an interior loop as a structural requirement and show that they function as desired in vivo. This work establishes interior loops as an important structural element for designing synthetic RNA gene regulators. We anticipate that the coupling of experimental measurement of cellular RNA structure and function with computational modeling will enable rapid discovery of structure-function design principles for a diverse array of natural and synthetic RNA regulators.

  18. Transcriptional Slippage and RNA Editing Increase the Diversity of Transcripts in Chloroplasts: Insight from Deep Sequencing of Vigna radiata Genome and Transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ping Lin

    Full Text Available We performed deep sequencing of the nuclear and organellar genomes of three mungbean genotypes: Vigna radiata ssp. sublobata TC1966, V. radiata var. radiata NM92 and the recombinant inbred line RIL59 derived from a cross between TC1966 and NM92. Moreover, we performed deep sequencing of the RIL59 transcriptome to investigate transcript variability. The mungbean chloroplast genome has a quadripartite structure including a pair of inverted repeats separated by two single copy regions. A total of 213 simple sequence repeats were identified in the chloroplast genomes of NM92 and RIL59; 78 single nucleotide variants and nine indels were discovered in comparing the chloroplast genomes of TC1966 and NM92. Analysis of the mungbean chloroplast transcriptome revealed mRNAs that were affected by transcriptional slippage and RNA editing. Transcriptional slippage frequency was positively correlated with the length of simple sequence repeats of the mungbean chloroplast genome (R2=0.9911. In total, 41 C-to-U editing sites were found in 23 chloroplast genes and in one intergenic spacer. No editing site that swapped U to C was found. A combination of bioinformatics and experimental methods revealed that the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase-transcribed genes psbF and ndhA are affected by transcriptional slippage in mungbean and in main lineages of land plants, including three dicots (Glycine max, Brassica rapa, and Nicotiana tabacum, two monocots (Oryza sativa and Zea mays, two gymnosperms (Pinus taeda and Ginkgo biloba and one moss (Physcomitrella patens. Transcript analysis of the rps2 gene showed that transcriptional slippage could affect transcripts at single sequence repeat regions with poly-A runs. It showed that transcriptional slippage together with incomplete RNA editing may cause sequence diversity of transcripts in chloroplasts of land plants.

  19. Rapidly characterizing the fast dynamics of RNA genetic circuitry with cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Chappell, James; Hayes, Clarmyra A; Sun, Zachary Z; Kim, Jongmin; Singhal, Vipul; Spring, Kevin J; Al-Khabouri, Shaima; Fall, Christopher P; Noireaux, Vincent; Murray, Richard M; Lucks, Julius B

    2015-05-15

    RNA regulators are emerging as powerful tools to engineer synthetic genetic networks or rewire existing ones. A potential strength of RNA networks is that they may be able to propagate signals on time scales that are set by the fast degradation rates of RNAs. However, a current bottleneck to verifying this potential is the slow design-build-test cycle of evaluating these networks in vivo. Here, we adapt an Escherichia coli-based cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) system for rapidly prototyping RNA networks. We used this system to measure the response time of an RNA transcription cascade to be approximately five minutes per step of the cascade. We also show that this response time can be adjusted with temperature and regulator threshold tuning. Finally, we use TX-TL to prototype a new RNA network, an RNA single input module, and show that this network temporally stages the expression of two genes in vivo.

  20. Integrative transcriptome analysis identifies deregulated microRNA-transcription factor networks in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinegaglia, Naiara C; Andrade, Sonia Cristina S; Tokar, Tomas; Pinheiro, Maísa; Severino, Fábio E; Oliveira, Rogério A; Hasimoto, Erica N; Cataneo, Daniele C; Cataneo, Antônio J M; Defaveri, Júlio; Souza, Cristiano P; Marques, Márcia M C; Carvalho, Robson F; Coutinho, Luiz L; Gross, Jefferson L; Rogatto, Silvia R; Lam, Wan L; Jurisica, Igor; Reis, Patricia P

    2016-05-17

    Herein, we aimed at identifying global transcriptome microRNA (miRNA) changes and miRNA target genes in lung adenocarcinoma. Samples were selected as training (N = 24) and independent validation (N = 34) sets. Tissues were microdissected to obtain >90% tumor or normal lung cells, subjected to miRNA transcriptome sequencing and TaqMan quantitative PCR validation. We further integrated our data with published miRNA and mRNA expression datasets across 1,491 lung adenocarcinoma and 455 normal lung samples. We identified known and novel, significantly over- and under-expressed (p ≤ 0.01 and FDR≤0.1) miRNAs in lung adenocarcinoma compared to normal lung tissue: let-7a, miR-10a, miR-15b, miR-23b, miR-26a, miR-26b, miR-29a, miR-30e, miR-99a, miR-146b, miR-181b, miR-181c, miR-421, miR-181a, miR-574 and miR-1247. Validated miRNAs included let-7a-2, let-7a-3, miR-15b, miR-21, miR-155 and miR-200b; higher levels of miR-21 expression were associated with lower patient survival (p = 0.042). We identified a regulatory network including miR-15b and miR-155, and transcription factors with prognostic value in lung cancer. Our findings may contribute to the development of treatment strategies in lung adenocarcinoma.

  1. Detection of HCV-RNA by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Using Biotinylated and Radioiodinated Primers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Cheon, Jun Hong; Chung, Yoon Young; Park, Hung Dong; Chung, Young Hwa; Lee, Young Sang [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical applicability of the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) kit of HCV-RNA using biotinylated and radioiodinated primers. Study subjects were 118 patients with positive anti-HCV. HCV-RNA in patients serum was extracted by guanidium thiocyanate method. After first amplification, the product was reamplified by primers labelled with biotin and I-125. The final amplification product was detected by counting the radioactivity after incubation in avidin coated tubes. In 51 samples, the test was repeated for evaluation of reproducibility. This new method was also compared with conventional RT-PCR methods in 34 samples from patients with chronic liver disease. The results were as follows, 1) HCV-RNA was positive in 85(97%)of 88 patients with chronic liver disease, and in 23 (73%) of 30 patients with normal liver function. 2) In comparison with conventional method, HCV-RNA was detected in 32(94%) of 34 patients with new method, whereas in 27(79% ) of the same group with conventional method 3) Repeated test with new method in 52 samples demonstrated 82% of concordant result. In conclusion, new method with biotinylated and radioiodinated primers was more sensitive than conventional method. However, great care must be taken for quality control because there were considerable interassay variation and possibility of false positivity and false negativity.

  2. Transcriptional Response of Yeast to Aflatoxin B1: Recombinational Repair Involving RAD51 and RAD1

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The potent carcinogen aflatoxin B1 is a weak mutagen but a strong recombinagen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Aflatoxin B1 exposure greatly increases frequencies of both heteroallelic recombination and chromosomal translocations. We analyzed the gene expression pattern of diploid cells exposed to aflatoxin B1 using high-density oligonucleotide arrays comprising specific probes for all 6218 open reading frames. Among 183 responsive genes, 46 are involved in either DNA repair or in control of cel...

  3. Brothers in arms: emerging roles of RNA epigenetics in DNA damage repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jinwei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is a widespread posttranscriptional RNA modification that occurs in tRNA, rRNA, snRNA, viral RNAs, and more recently is shown to occur in mRNA in a dynamic, reversible manner...

  4. Global transcript profiling of transgenic plants constitutively overexpressing the RNA-binding protein AtGRP7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennig Lars

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clock-controlled RNA-binding protein AtGRP7 influences circadian oscillations of its own transcript at the post-transcriptional level. To identify additional targets that are regulated by AtGRP7, transcript profiles of transgenic plants constitutively overexpressing AtGRP7 (AtGRP7-ox and wild type plants were compared. Results Approximately 1.4% of the transcripts represented on the Affymetrix ATH1 microarray showed changes in steady-state abundance upon AtGRP7 overexpression. One third of the differentially expressed genes are controlled by the circadian clock, and they show a distinct bias of their phase: The up-regulated genes preferentially peak around dawn, roughly opposite to the AtGRP7 peak abundance whereas the down-regulated genes preferentially peak at the end of the day. Further, transcripts responsive to abiotic and biotic stimuli were enriched among AtGRP7 targets. Transcripts encoding the pathogenesis-related PR1 and PR2 proteins were elevated in AtGRP7-ox plants but not in plants overexpressing AtGRP7 with a point mutation in the RNA-binding domain, indicating that the regulation involves RNA binding activity of AtGRP7. Gene set enrichment analysis uncovered components involved in ribosome function and RNA metabolism among groups of genes upregulated in AtGRP7-ox plants, consistent with its role in post-transcriptional regulation. Conclusion Apart from regulating a suite of circadian transcripts in a time-of-day dependent manner AtGRP7, both directly and indirectly, affects other transcripts including transcripts responsive to abiotic and biotic stimuli. This suggests a regulatory role of AtGRP7 in the output of the endogenous clock and a complex network of transcripts responsive to external stimuli downstream of the AtGRP7 autoregulatory circuit.

  5. Site-specific labeling of RNA by combining genetic alphabet expansion transcription and copper-free click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Tatsuhiko; Ando, Ami; Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro

    2015-08-18

    Site-specific labeling of long-chain RNAs with desired molecular probes is an imperative technique to facilitate studies of functional RNA molecules. By genetic alphabet expansion using an artificial third base pair, called an unnatural base pair, we present a post-transcriptional modification method for RNA transcripts containing an incorporated azide-linked unnatural base at specific positions, using a copper-free click reaction. The unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds) and pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (Pa) functions in transcription. Thus, we chemically synthesized a triphosphate substrate of 4-(4-azidopentyl)-pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (N3-PaTP), which can be site-specifically introduced into RNA, opposite Ds in templates by T7 transcription. The N3-Pa incorporated in the transcripts was modified with dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO) derivatives. We demonstrated the transcription of 17-, 76- and 260-mer RNA molecules and their site-specific labeling with Alexa 488, Alexa 594 and biotin. This method will be useful for preparing RNA molecules labeled with any functional groups of interest, toward in vivo experiments.

  6. Specific regulation of mRNA cap methylation by the c-Myc and E2F1 transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael D.; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2009-01-01

    Methylation of the mRNA 5′ guanosine cap is essential for efficient gene expression. The 5′methyl cap binds to eIF4E, which is the first step in the recruitment of mRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit. To investigate whether mRNA cap methylation is regulated in a gene-specific manner, we established a method to detect the relative level of cap methylation on specific mRNAs. We found that two transcription factors, c-Myc and E2F1, induce cap methylation of their transcriptional target genes, and therefore, c-Myc and E2F1 upregulate gene expression by simultaneously inducing transcription and promoting translation. c-Myc-induced cap methylation is greater than transcriptional induction for the majority of its target genes, indicating that this is a major mechanism by which Myc regulates gene expression. PMID:19137018

  7. Refining transcriptional programs in kidney development by integration of deep RNA-sequencing and array-based spatial profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumballe Bree A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The developing mouse kidney is currently the best-characterized model of organogenesis at a transcriptional level. Detailed spatial maps have been generated for gene expression profiling combined with systematic in situ screening. These studies, however, fall short of capturing the transcriptional complexity arising from each locus due to the limited scope of microarray-based technology, which is largely based on "gene-centric" models. Results To address this, the polyadenylated RNA and microRNA transcriptomes of the 15.5 dpc mouse kidney were profiled using strand-specific RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq to a depth sufficient to complement spatial maps from pre-existing microarray datasets. The transcriptional complexity of RNAs arising from mouse RefSeq loci was catalogued; including 3568 alternatively spliced transcripts and 532 uncharacterized alternate 3' UTRs. Antisense expressions for 60% of RefSeq genes was also detected including uncharacterized non-coding transcripts overlapping kidney progenitor markers, Six2 and Sall1, and were validated by section in situ hybridization. Analysis of genes known to be involved in kidney development, particularly during mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, showed an enrichment of non-coding antisense transcripts extended along protein-coding RNAs. Conclusion The resulting resource further refines the transcriptomic cartography of kidney organogenesis by integrating deep RNA sequencing data with locus-based information from previously published expression atlases. The added resolution of RNA-Seq has provided the basis for a transition from classical gene-centric models of kidney development towards more accurate and detailed "transcript-centric" representations, which highlights the extent of transcriptional complexity of genes that direct complex development events.

  8. Aptamers to the sigma factor mimic promoter recognition and inhibit transcription initiation by bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miropolskaya, Nataliya; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2016-01-08

    Promoter recognition by bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a multi-step process involving multiple protein-DNA interactions and several structural and kinetic intermediates which remain only partially characterized. We used single-stranded DNA aptamers containing specific promoter motifs to probe the interactions of the Thermus aquaticus RNAP σ(A) subunit with the -10 promoter element in the absence of other parts of the promoter complex. The aptamer binding decreased intrinsic fluorescence of the σ subunit, likely as a result of interactions between the -10 element and conserved tryptophan residues of the σ DNA-binding region 2. By monitoring these changes, we demonstrated that DNA binding proceeds through a single rate-limiting step resulting in formation of very stable complexes. Deletion of the N-terminal domain of the σ(A) subunit increased the rate of aptamer binding while replacement of this domain with an unrelated N-terminal region 1.1 from the Escherichia coli σ(70) subunit restored the original kinetics of σ-aptamer interactions. The results demonstrate that the key step in promoter recognition can be modelled in a simple σ-aptamer system and reveal that highly divergent N-terminal domains similarly modulate the DNA-binding properties of the σ subunit. The aptamers efficiently suppressed promoter-dependent transcription initiation by the holoenzyme of RNA polymerase, suggesting that they may be used for development of novel transcription inhibitors.

  9. Deciphering Transcriptional Programming during Pod and Seed Development Using RNA-Seq in Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazhamala, Lekha T.; Agarwal, Gaurav; Bajaj, Prasad; Kumar, Vinay; Kulshreshtha, Akanksha; Saxena, Rachit K.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Seed development is an important event in plant life cycle that has interested humankind since ages, especially in crops of economic importance. Pigeonpea is an important grain legume of the semi-arid tropics, used mainly for its protein rich seeds. In order to understand the transcriptional programming during the pod and seed development, RNA-seq data was generated from embryo sac from the day of anthesis (0 DAA), seed and pod wall (5, 10, 20 and 30 DAA) of pigeonpea variety “Asha” (ICPL 87119) using Illumina HiSeq 2500. About 684 million sequencing reads have been generated from nine samples, which resulted in the identification of 27,441 expressed genes after sequence analysis. These genes have been studied for their differentially expression, co-expression, temporal and spatial gene expression. We have also used the RNA-seq data to identify important seed-specific transcription factors, biological processes and associated pathways during seed development process in pigeonpea. The comprehensive gene expression study from flowering to mature pod development in pigeonpea would be crucial in identifying candidate genes involved in seed traits directly or indirectly related to yield and quality. The dataset will serve as an important resource for gene discovery and deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying various seed related traits. PMID:27760186

  10. Fate of HIV-1 cDNA intermediates during reverse transcription is dictated by transcription initiation site of virus genomic RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takao; Sato, Yoko; Huang, Yu-Lun; Koi, Satoshi; Takahata, Tatsuro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kawai, Gota; Kannagi, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is accomplished by sequential strand-transfers of partial cDNA intermediates copied from viral genomic RNA. Here, we revealed an unprecedented role of 5′-end guanosine (G) of HIV-1 genomic RNA for reverse transcription. Based on current consensus for HIV-1 transcription initiation site, HIV-1 transcripts possess a single G at 5′-ends (G1-form). However, we found that HIV-1 transcripts with additional Gs at 5′-ends (G2- and G3-forms) were abundantly expressed in infected cells by using alternative transcription initiation sites. The G2- and G3-forms were also detected in the virus particle, although the G1-form predominated. To address biological impact of the 5′-G number, we generated HIV clone DNA to express the G1-form exclusively by deleting the alternative initiation sites. Virus produced from the clone showed significantly higher strand-transfer of minus strong-stop cDNA (-sscDNA). The in vitro assay using synthetic HIV-1 RNAs revealed that the abortive forms of -sscDNA were abundantly generated from the G3-form RNA, but dramatically reduced from the G1-form. Moreover, the strand-transfer of -sscDNA from the G1-form was prominently stimulated by HIV-1 nucleocapsid. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the 5′-G number that corresponds to HIV-1 transcription initiation site was critical for successful strand-transfer of -sscDNA during reverse transcription. PMID:26631448

  11. The Baltic Sea Virome: Diversity and Transcriptional Activity of DNA and RNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrow, John P.; Ininbergs, Karolina; Dupont, Christopher L.; Badger, Jonathan H.; Hoffman, Jeffery M.; Ekman, Martin; Allen, Andrew E.; Bergman, Birgitta; Venter, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data were generated from size-fractionated samples from 11 sites within the Baltic Sea and adjacent marine waters of Kattegat and freshwater Lake Torneträsk in order to investigate the diversity, distribution, and transcriptional activity of virioplankton. Such a transect, spanning a salinity gradient from freshwater to the open sea, facilitated a broad genome-enabled investigation of natural as well as impacted aspects of Baltic Sea viral communities. Taxonomic signatures representative of phages within the widely distributed order Caudovirales were identified with enrichments in lesser-known families such as Podoviridae and Siphoviridae. The distribution of phage reported to infect diverse and ubiquitous heterotrophic bacteria (SAR11 clades) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp.) displayed population-level shifts in diversity. Samples from higher-salinity conditions (>14 practical salinity units [PSU]) had increased abundances of viruses for picoeukaryotes, i.e., Ostreococcus. These data, combined with host diversity estimates, suggest viral modulation of diversity on the whole-community scale, as well as in specific prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. RNA libraries revealed single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and RNA viral populations throughout the Baltic Sea, with ssDNA phage highly represented in Lake Torneträsk. Further, our data suggest relatively high transcriptional activity of fish viruses within diverse families known to have broad host ranges, such as Nodoviridae (RNA), Iridoviridae (DNA), and predicted zoonotic viruses that can cause ecological and economic damage as well as impact human health. IMPORTANCE Inferred virus-host relationships, community structures of ubiquitous ecologically relevant groups, and identification of transcriptionally active populations have been achieved with our Baltic Sea study. Further, these data, highlighting the transcriptional activity of viruses, represent one of the more

  12. Genome-wide RNA polymerase II profiles and RNA accumulation reveal kinetics of transcription and associated epigenetic changes during diurnal cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendal Le Martelot

    Full Text Available Interactions of cell-autonomous circadian oscillators with diurnal cycles govern the temporal compartmentalization of cell physiology in mammals. To understand the transcriptional and epigenetic basis of diurnal rhythms in mouse liver genome-wide, we generated temporal DNA occupancy profiles by RNA polymerase II (Pol II as well as profiles of the histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K36me3. We used these data to quantify the relationships of phases and amplitudes between different marks. We found that rhythmic Pol II recruitment at promoters rather than rhythmic transition from paused to productive elongation underlies diurnal gene transcription, a conclusion further supported by modeling. Moreover, Pol II occupancy preceded mRNA accumulation by 3 hours, consistent with mRNA half-lives. Both methylation marks showed that the epigenetic landscape is highly dynamic and globally remodeled during the 24-hour cycle. While promoters of transcribed genes had tri-methylated H3K4 even at their trough activity times, tri-methylation levels reached their peak, on average, 1 hour after Pol II. Meanwhile, rhythms in tri-methylation of H3K36 lagged transcription by 3 hours. Finally, modeling profiles of Pol II occupancy and mRNA accumulation identified three classes of genes: one showing rhythmicity both in transcriptional and mRNA accumulation, a second class with rhythmic transcription but flat mRNA levels, and a third with constant transcription but rhythmic mRNAs. The latter class emphasizes widespread temporally gated posttranscriptional regulation in the mouse liver.

  13. The role of RNA polymerase I transcription and embryonic genome activation in nucleolar development in bovine preimplantation embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrup, Olga; Strejcek, F.; Petrovicova, I.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of RNA polymerase I (RPI) transcription in nucleolar development during major transcriptional activation (MTA) in cattle. Late eight-cell embryos were cultured in the absence (control group) or presence of actinomycin D (AD) (RPI inhibition......, Ad 0.2 µg/ml; total transcriptional inhibition, AD 2.0 µg/ml). Late four-cell embryos were cultured to late eight-cell stage in 0.2 µg/ml AD (MTA prevention, ADLT (long-term total transcriptional inhibition group). Embryos were processed for autoradiography, transmission electron microscopy...

  14. Human colon cancer profiles show differential microRNA expression depending on mismatch repair status and are characteristic of undifferentiated proliferative states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Liang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon cancer arises from the accumulation of multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations to normal colonic tissue. microRNAs (miRNAs are small, non-coding regulatory RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Differential miRNA expression in cancer versus normal tissue is a common event and may be pivotal for tumor onset and progression. Methods To identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in tumors and tumor subtypes, we carried out highly sensitive expression profiling of 735 miRNAs on samples obtained from a statistically powerful set of tumors (n = 80 and normal colon tissue (n = 28 and validated a subset of this data by qRT-PCR. Results Tumor specimens showed highly significant and large fold change differential expression of the levels of 39 miRNAs including miR-135b, miR-96, miR-182, miR-183, miR-1, and miR-133a, relative to normal colon tissue. Significant differences were also seen in 6 miRNAs including miR-31 and miR-592, in the direct comparison of tumors that were deficient or proficient for mismatch repair. Examination of the genomic regions containing differentially expressed miRNAs revealed that they were also differentially methylated in colon cancer at a far greater rate than would be expected by chance. A network of interactions between these miRNAs and genes associated with colon cancer provided evidence for the role of these miRNAs as oncogenes by attenuation of tumor suppressor genes. Conclusion Colon tumors show differential expression of miRNAs depending on mismatch repair status. miRNA expression in colon tumors has an epigenetic component and altered expression that may reflect a reversion to regulatory programs characteristic of undifferentiated proliferative developmental states.

  15. Roadmap to cellular reprogramming--manipulating transcriptional networks with DNA, RNA, proteins and small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörsdörfer, P; Thier, M; Kadari, A; Edenhofer, F

    2013-06-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that the plasticity of mammalian somatic cells is much higher than previously assumed and that ectopic expression of transcription factors may have the potential to induce the conversion of any cell type into another. Fibroblast cells can be converted into embryonic stem cell-like cells, neural cells, cardiomyocytes, macrophage-like cells as well as blood progenitors. Additionally, the conversion of astrocytes into neurons or neural stem cells into monocytes has been demonstrated. Nowadays, in the era of systems biology, continuously growing holistic data sets are providing increasing insights into core transcriptional networks and cellular signaling pathways. This knowledge enables cell biologists to understand how cellular fate is determined and how it could be manipulated. As a consequence for biomedical applications, it might be soon possible to convert patient specific somatic cells directly into desired transplantable other cell types. The clinical value, however, of such reprogrammed cells is currently limited due to the invasiveness of methods applied to induce reprogramming factor activity. This review will focus on experimental strategies to ectopically induce cell fate modulators. We will emphasize those strategies that enable efficient and robust overexpression of transcription factors by minimal genetic alterations of the host genome. Furthermore, we will discuss procedures devoid of any genomic manipulation, such as the direct delivery of mRNA, proteins, or the use of small molecules. By this, we aim to give a comprehensive overview on state of the art techniques that harbor the potential to generate safe reprogrammed cells for clinical applications.

  16. Identification of maternally-loaded RNA transcripts in unfertilized eggs of Tribolium castaneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preuss Kevin M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal RNAs play a critical role in early development. Variation in the diversity and levels of maternally derived gene transcripts may be central to the origin of phenotypic novelty -- a longstanding problem in evolution and development. By studying maternal transcriptomes within and between divergent species, a better understanding of the evolutionary forces acting on maternal RNA allocation is possible. Results We present the first maternal transcriptome of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Using a tiled whole-genome microarray, we found that 58.2% of T. castaneum genes are maternally loaded into eggs. Comparison of known Drosophila melanogaster maternal genes to our results showed widespread conservation of maternal expression with T. castaneum. Additionally, we found that many genes previously reported as having sex or tissue specific expression in T. castaneum were also maternally loaded. Identification of such pleiotropy is vital for proper modeling and testing of evolutionary theory using empirical data. The microarray design also allowed the detection of 2315 and 4060 novel transcriptionally active regions greater in length than 100 bp in unfertilized and fertilized T. castaneum eggs, respectively. These transcriptionally active regions represent novel exons of potentially unknown genes for future study. Conclusions Our results lay a foundation for utilizing T. castaneum as a model for understanding the role of maternal genes in evolution.

  17. Metabolism and expression of RNA polymerase II transcripts in Influenza virus-infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katze, M.G.; Krug, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    Influenza virus infection has adverse effects on the metabolism of two representative RNA polymerase II transcripts in chicken embryo fibroblasts, those coding for BETA-actin and for avian leukosis virus (ALV) proteins. Proviral ALV DNA was integrated into host cell DNA by prior infection with ALV. By S1 endonuclease assay, it was confirmed that nuclear ALV transcripts disappeared very early after infection, already decreasing ca. 80% by 1 h postinfection. A plausible explanation for this nuclear degradation is that the viral cap-dependent endonuclease in the nucleas cleaves the 5' ends of new polymerase II transcripts, rendering the resulting decapped RNAs susceptible to hydrolysis by cellular nucleases. Similar stability of cytoplasmic host cell mRNAs was observed in infected HeLa cells, in which the levels of actin mRNA and two HeLa cell mRNAs (pHe 7 and pHe 28) remained at undiminished levels for 3 h of infection and decreased only slightly by 4.5 h postinfection. The cytoplamic actin and pHe 7 mRNAs isolated from infected HeLa cells were shown to be translated in reticulocyte extracts in biro, indicating that host mRNAs were not inactivated by a virus-induced modification. Despite the continued presence of high levels of functional host cell mRNAs, host cell protein synthesis was effectively shut off by about 3 h postinfection in both chicken embryo fibroblasts and HeLa cells. These results are consistent with the establishment of an influenza virus-specific translational system that selectively translates viral and not host mRNAs.

  18. Inhibition of post-transcriptional RNA processing by CDK inhibitors and its implication in anti-viral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Holcakova

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs are key regulators of the cell cycle and RNA polymerase II mediated transcription. Several pharmacological CDK inhibitors are currently in clinical trials as potential cancer therapeutics and some of them also exhibit antiviral effects. Olomoucine II and roscovitine, purine-based inhibitors of CDKs, were described as effective antiviral agents that inhibit replication of a broad range of wild type human viruses. Olomoucine II and roscovitine show high selectivity for CDK7 and CDK9, with important functions in the regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription. RNA polymerase II is necessary for viral transcription and following replication in cells. We analyzed the effect of inhibition of CDKs by olomoucine II on gene expression from viral promoters and compared its effect to widely-used roscovitine. We found that both roscovitine and olomoucine II blocked the phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. However the repression of genes regulated by viral promoters was strongly dependent on gene localization. Both roscovitine and olomoucine II inhibited expression only when the viral promoter was not integrated into chromosomal DNA. In contrast, treatment of cells with genome-integrated viral promoters increased their expression even though there was decreased phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. To define the mechanism responsible for decreased gene expression after pharmacological CDK inhibitor treatment, the level of mRNA transcription from extrachromosomal DNA was determined. Interestingly, our results showed that inhibition of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphorylation increased the number of transcribed mRNAs. However, some of these mRNAs were truncated and lacked polyadenylation, which resulted in decreased translation. These results suggest that phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain is critical for linking transcription and posttrancriptional

  19. An mRNA Capping Enzyme Targets FACT to the Active Gene To Enhance the Engagement of RNA Polymerase II into Transcriptional Elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Rwik; Kaja, Amala; Ferdoush, Jannatul; Lahudkar, Shweta; Barman, Priyanka; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2017-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated that an mRNA capping enzyme, Cet1, impairs promoter-proximal accumulation/pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) independently of its capping activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to control transcription. However, it is still unknown how Pol II pausing is regulated by Cet1. Here, we show that Cet1's N-terminal domain (NTD) promotes the recruitment of FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription that enhances the engagement of Pol II into transcriptional elongation) to the coding sequence of an active gene, ADH1, independently of mRNA-capping activity. Absence of Cet1's NTD decreases FACT targeting to ADH1 and consequently reduces the engagement of Pol II in transcriptional elongation, leading to promoter-proximal accumulation of Pol II. Similar results were also observed at other genes. Consistently, Cet1 interacts with FACT. Collectively, our results support the notion that Cet1's NTD promotes FACT targeting to the active gene independently of mRNA-capping activity in facilitating Pol II's engagement in transcriptional elongation, thus deciphering a novel regulatory pathway of gene expression. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 targeting of oncogenic transcripts promotes hematopoietic progenitor proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanichamy, Jayanth Kumar; Tran, Tiffany M; Howard, Jonathan M; Contreras, Jorge R; Fernando, Thilini R; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Katzman, Sol; Toloue, Masoud; Yan, Weihong; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina; Sanford, Jeremy R; Rao, Dinesh S

    2016-04-01

    Posttranscriptional control of gene expression is important for defining both normal and pathological cellular phenotypes. In vitro, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have recently been shown to play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation; however, the contribution of RBPs to cell specification is not well understood. Here, we determined that the RBP insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) is specifically overexpressed in mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged (MLL-rearranged) B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), which constitutes a subtype of this malignancy associated with poor prognosis and high risk of relapse. IGF2BP3 was required for the survival of B-ALL cell lines, as knockdown led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Enforced expression of IGF2BP3 provided murine BM cells with a strong survival advantage, led to proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and skewed hematopoietic development to the B cell/myeloid lineage. Cross-link immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing uncovered the IGF2BP3-regulated transcriptome, which includes oncogenes MYC and CDK6 as direct targets. IGF2BP3 regulated transcripts via targeting elements within 3' untranslated regions (3'UTR), and enforced IGF2BP3 expression in mice resulted in enhanced expression of Myc and Cdk6 in BM. Together, our data suggest that IGF2BP3-mediated targeting of oncogenic transcripts may represent a critical pathogenetic mechanism in MLL-rearranged B-ALL and support IGF2BP3 and its cognate RNA-binding partners as potential therapeutic targets in this disease.

  1. Salinity inhibits post transcriptional processing of chloroplast 16S rRNA in shoot cultures of jojoba (Simmondsia chinesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi-Aviv, Ela; Mills, David; Benzioni, Aliza; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2005-03-01

    Chloroplast metabolism is rapidly affected by salt stress. Photosynthesis is one of the first processes known to be affected by salinity. Here, we report that salinity inhibits chloroplast post-transcriptional RNA processing. A differentially expressed 680-bp cDNA, containing the 3' sequence of 16S rRNA, transcribed intergenic spacer, exon 1 and intron of tRNA(Ile), was isolated by differential display reverse transcriptase PCR from salt-grown jojoba (Simmondsia chinesis) shoot cultures. Northern blot analysis indicated that although most rRNA appears to be fully processed, partially processed chloroplast 16S rRNA accumulates in salt-grown cultures. Thus, salinity appears to decrease the processing of the rrn transcript. The possible effect of this decreased processing on physiological processes is, as yet, unknown.

  2. Nuclear mRNA quality control in yeast is mediated by Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment, as revealed by the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorine, Romy; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Libri, Domenico; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2011-01-01

    The production of mature export-competent transcripts is under the surveillance of quality control steps where aberrant mRNP molecules resulting from inappropriate or inefficient processing and packaging reactions are subject to exosome-mediated degradation. Previously, we have shown that the heterologous expression of bacterial Rho factor in yeast interferes in normal mRNP biogenesis leading to the production of full-length yet aberrant transcripts that are degraded by the nuclear exosome with ensuing growth defect. Here, we took advantage of this new tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which an integrated system recognizes aberrancies at each step of mRNP biogenesis and targets the defective molecules for destruction. We show that the targeting and degradation of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts is associated with a large increase of Nrd1 recruitment to the transcription complex via its CID and RRM domains and a concomitant enrichment of exosome component Rrp6 association. The targeting and degradation of the aberrant transcripts is suppressed by the overproduction of Pcf11 or its isolated CID domain, through a competition with Nrd1 for recruitment by the transcription complex. Altogether, our results support a model in which a stimulation of Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment coordinates the recognition and removal of aberrant transcripts by promoting the attachment of the nuclear mRNA degradation machinery. PMID:21113025

  3. Regulation of Peripheral Myelination through Transcriptional Buffering of Egr2 by an Antisense Long Non-coding RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot Martinez-Moreno

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Precise regulation of Egr2 transcription is fundamentally important to the control of peripheral myelination. Here, we describe a long non-coding RNA antisense to the promoter of Egr2 (Egr2-AS-RNA. During peripheral nerve injury, the expression of Egr2-AS-RNA is increased and correlates with decreased Egr2 transcript and protein levels. Ectopic expression of Egr2-AS-RNA in dorsal root ganglion (DRG cultures inhibits the expression of Egr2 mRNA and induces demyelination. In vivo inhibition of Egr2-AS-RNA using oligonucleotide GapMers released from a biodegradable hydrogel following sciatic nerve injury reverts the EGR2-mediated gene expression profile and significantly delays demyelination. Egr2-AS-RNA gradually recruits H3K27ME3, AGO1, AGO2, and EZH2 on the Egr2 promoter following sciatic nerve injury. Furthermore, expression of Egr2-AS-RNA is regulated through ERK1/2 signaling to YY1, while loss of Ser184 of YY1 regulates binding to Egr2-AS-RNA. In conclusion, we describe functional exploration of an antisense long non-coding RNA in peripheral nervous system (PNS biology.

  4. Structural Basis of Transcription Initiation: An RNA Polymerase Holoenzyme-DNA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S.; Masuda, Shoko; Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Muzzin, Oriana; Darst, Seth A.

    2002-05-01

    The crystal structure of Thermus aquaticus RNA polymerase holoenzyme (α2ββ'ωσA) complexed with a fork-junction promoter DNA fragment has been determined by fitting high-resolution x-ray structures of individual components into a 6.5-angstrom resolution map. The DNA lies across one face of the holoenzyme, completely outside the RNA polymerase active site channel. All sequence-specific contacts with core promoter elements are mediated by the σ subunit. A universally conserved tryptophan is ideally positioned to stack on the exposed face of the base pair at the upstream edge of the transcription bubble. Universally conserved basic residues of the σ subunit provide critical contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone and play a role in directing the melted DNA template strand into the RNA polymerase active site. The structure explains how holoenzyme recognizes promoters containing variably spaced -10 and -35 elements and provides the basis for models of the closed and open promoter complexes.

  5. RNA polymerase V targets transcriptional silencing components to promoters of protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi; Rowley, M Jordan; Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Sandhu, Davinder; Gregory, Brian D; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing controls transposons and other repetitive elements through RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) and heterochromatin formation. A key component of the Arabidopsis RdDM pathway is ARGONAUTE4 (AGO4), which associates with siRNAs to mediate DNA methylation. Here, we show that AGO4 preferentially targets transposable elements embedded within promoters of protein-coding genes. This pattern of AGO4 binding cannot be simply explained by the sequences of AGO4-bound siRNAs; instead, AGO4 binding to specific gene promoters is also mediated by long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) produced by RNA polymerase V. lncRNA-mediated AGO4 binding to gene promoters directs asymmetric DNA methylation to these genomic regions and is involved in regulating the expression of targeted genes. Finally, AGO4 binding overlaps sites of DNA methylation affected by the biotic stress response. Based on these findings, we propose that the targets of AGO4-directed RdDM are regulatory units responsible for controlling gene expression under specific environmental conditions.

  6. Neuronal activity rapidly induces transcription of the CREB-regulated microRNA-132, in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudelman, Aaron S; DiRocco, Derek P; Lambert, Talley J; Garelick, Michael G; Le, Josh; Nathanson, Neil M; Storm, Daniel R

    2010-04-01

    Activity-dependent changes in gene-expression are believed to underlie the molecular representation of memory. In this study, we report that in vivo activation of neurons rapidly induces the CREB-regulated microRNA miR-132. To determine if production of miR-132 is regulated by neuronal activity its expression in mouse brain was monitored by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Pilocarpine-induced seizures led to a robust, rapid, and transient increase in the primary transcript of miR-132 (pri-miR-132) followed by a subsequent rise in mature microRNA (miR-132). Activation of neurons in the hippocampus, olfactory bulb, and striatum by contextual fear conditioning, odor-exposure, and cocaine-injection, respectively, also increased pri-miR-132. Induction kinetics of pri-miR-132 were monitored and found to parallel those of immediate early genes, peaking at 45 min and returning to basal levels within 2 h of stimulation. Expression levels of primary and mature-miR-132 increased significantly between postnatal Days 10 and 24. We conclude that miR-132 is an activity-dependent microRNA in vivo, and may contribute to the long-lasting proteomic changes required for experience-dependent neuronal plasticity.

  7. Neuronal activity rapidly induces transcription of the CREB-regulated microRNA-132, in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nudelman, Aaron Samuel; DiRocco, Derek P; Lambert, Talley J

    2010-01-01

    of stimulation. Expression levels of primary and mature-miR-132 increased significantly between postnatal Days 10 and 24. We conclude that miR-132 is an activity-dependent microRNA in vivo, and may contribute to the long-lasting proteomic changes required for experience-dependent neuronal plasticity.......Activity-dependent changes in gene-expression are believed to underlie the molecular representation of memory. In this study, we report that in vivo activation of neurons rapidly induces the CREB-regulated microRNA miR-132. To determine if production of miR-132 is regulated by neuronal activity its...... expression in mouse brain was monitored by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Pilocarpine-induced seizures led to a robust, rapid, and transient increase in the primary transcript of miR-132 (pri-miR-132) followed by a subsequent rise in mature microRNA (miR-132). Activation of neurons in the hippocampus...

  8. MicroRNA filters Hox temporal transcription noise to confer boundary formation in the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Jung; Hong, Tian; Tung, Ying-Tsen; Yen, Ya-Ping; Hsu, Ho-Chiang; Lu, Ya-Lin; Chang, Mien; Nie, Qing; Chen, Jun-An

    2017-03-01

    The initial rostrocaudal patterning of the neural tube leads to differential expression of Hox genes that contribute to the specification of motor neuron (MN) subtype identity. Although several 3' Hox mRNAs are expressed in progenitors in a noisy manner, these Hox proteins are not expressed in the progenitors and only become detectable in postmitotic MNs. MicroRNA biogenesis impairment leads to precocious expression and propagates the noise of Hoxa5 at the protein level, resulting in an imprecise Hoxa5-Hoxc8 boundary. Here we uncover, using in silico simulation, two feed-forward Hox-miRNA loops accounting for the precocious and noisy Hoxa5 expression, as well as an ill-defined boundary phenotype in Dicer mutants. Finally, we identify mir-27 as a major regulator coordinating the temporal delay and spatial boundary of Hox protein expression. Our results provide a novel trans Hox-miRNA circuit filtering transcription noise and controlling the timing of protein expression to confer robust individual MN identity.

  9. Spatial Organization and Dynamics of Transcription Elongation and Pre-mRNA Processing in Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Sánchez-Álvarez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last 30 years, systematic biochemical and functional studies have significantly expanded our knowledge of the transcriptional molecular components and the pre-mRNA processing machinery of the cell. However, our current understanding of how these functions take place spatiotemporally within the highly compartmentalized eukaryotic nucleus remains limited. Moreover, it is increasingly clear that “the whole is more than the sum of its parts” and that an understanding of the dynamic coregulation of genes is essential for fully characterizing complex biological phenomena and underlying diseases. Recent technological advances in light microscopy in addition to novel cell and molecular biology approaches have led to the development of new tools, which are being used to address these questions and may contribute to achieving an integrated and global understanding of how the genome works at a cellular level. Here, we review major hallmarks and novel insights in RNA polymerase II activity and pre-mRNA processing in the context of nuclear organization, as well as new concepts and challenges arising from our ability to gather extensive dynamic information at the single-cell resolution.

  10. Dysregulation of microRNA-219 promotes neurodegeneration through post-transcriptional regulation of tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa-Maria, Ismael; Alaniz, Maria E.; Renwick, Neil; Cela, Carolina; Fulga, Tudor A.; Van Vactor, David; Tuschl, Thomas; Clark, Lorraine N.; Shelanski, Michael L.; McCabe, Brian D.; Crary, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Tau is a highly abundant and multifunctional brain protein that accumulates in neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and primary age-related tauopathy. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been linked to neurodegeneration; however, it is not clear whether miRNA dysregulation contributes to tau neurotoxicity. Here, we determined that the highly conserved brain miRNA miR-219 is downregulated in brain tissue taken at autopsy from patients with AD and from those with severe primary age-related tauopathy. In a Drosophila model that produces human tau, reduction of miR-219 exacerbated tau toxicity, while overexpression of miR-219 partially abrogated toxic effects. Moreover, we observed a bidirectional modulation of tau levels in the Drosophila model that was dependent on miR-219 expression or neutralization, demonstrating that miR-219 regulates tau in vivo. In mammalian cellular models, we found that miR-219 binds directly to the 3′-UTR of the tau mRNA and represses tau synthesis at the post-transcriptional level. Together, our data indicate that silencing of tau by miR-219 is an ancient regulatory mechanism that may become perturbed during neurofibrillary degeneration and suggest that this regulatory pathway may be useful for developing therapeutics for tauopathies. PMID:25574843

  11. Transcript-level expression analysis of RNA-seq experiments with HISAT, StringTie and Ballgown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertea, Mihaela; Kim, Daehwan; Pertea, Geo M; Leek, Jeffrey T; Salzberg, Steven L

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing of mRNA (RNA-seq) has become the standard method for measuring and comparing the levels of gene expression in a wide variety of species and conditions. RNA-seq experiments generate very large, complex data sets that demand fast, accurate and flexible software to reduce the raw read data to comprehensible results. HISAT (hierarchical indexing for spliced alignment of transcripts), StringTie and Ballgown are free, open-source software tools for comprehensive analysis of RNA-seq experiments. Together, they allow scientists to align reads to a genome, assemble transcripts including novel splice variants, compute the abundance of these transcripts in each sample and compare experiments to identify differentially expressed genes and transcripts. This protocol describes all the steps necessary to process a large set of raw sequencing reads and create lists of gene transcripts, expression levels, and differentially expressed genes and transcripts. The protocol's execution time depends on the computing resources, but it typically takes under 45 min of computer time. HISAT, StringTie and Ballgown are available from http://ccb.jhu.edu/software.shtml.

  12. DDX3 DEAD-Box RNA helicase inhibits hepatitis B virus reverse transcription by incorporation into nucleocapsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Kim, Seahee; Ryu, Wang-Shick

    2009-06-01

    Viruses utilize host factors in many steps of their life cycles. Yet, little is known about host factors that contribute to the life cycle of hepatitis B virus (HBV), which replicates its genome by reverse transcription. To identify host factors that contribute to viral reverse transcription, we sought to identify cellular proteins that interact with HBV polymerase (Pol) by using affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry. One of the HBV Pol-interacting host factors identified was DDX3 DEAD-box RNA helicase, which unwinds RNA in an ATPase-dependent manner. Recently, it was shown that DDX3 is essential for both human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus infection. In contrast, we found that the ectopic expression of DDX3 led to significantly reduced viral DNA synthesis. The DDX3-mediated inhibition of viral DNA synthesis did not affect RNA encapsidation, a step prior to reverse transcription, and indicated that DDX3 inhibits HBV reverse transcription. Mutational analysis revealed that mutant DDX3 with an inactive ATPase motif, but not that with an inactive RNA helicase motif, failed to inhibit viral DNA synthesis. Our interpretation is that DDX3 inhibits viral DNA synthesis at a step following ATP hydrolysis but prior to RNA unwinding. Finally, OptiPrep density gradient analysis revealed that DDX3 was incorporated into nucleocapsids, suggesting that DDX3 inhibits viral reverse transcription following nucleocapsid assembly. Thus, DDX3 represents a novel host restriction factor that limits HBV infection.

  13. Mammary epithelial morphogenesis and early breast cancer. Evidence of involvement of basal components of the RNA Polymerase I transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Stefano; Wierzbicki, Andrzej J; Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2016-09-16

    Upregulation of RNA Polymerase (Pol I)-mediated transcription of rRNA and increased ribogenesis are hallmarks of breast cancer. According to several datasets, including The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), amplification/upregulation of genes encoding for basal components of the Pol I transcriptional machinery is frequent at different breast cancer stages. Here we show that knock down of the RNA polymerase I-specific transcription initiation factor RRN3 (TIF-IA) in breast cancer cells is sufficient to reduce rRNA synthesis and inhibit cell proliferation, and second that stable ectopic expression of RRN3 in human mammary epithelial (HME1) cells, by increasing rRNA transcription, confers increased sensitivity to the anti-proliferative effects of a selective Pol I inhibitor. Further, RRN3-overexpressing HME1 cells, when grown in in vitro 3-dimensional (3D) culture, develop into morphologically aberrant acinar structures lacking a lumen and filled with proliferative cells, thus acquiring a morphology resembling in situ ductal breast cancer lesions (DCIS). Consequently, interference with RRN3 control of Pol I transcription seems capable of both compromising mammary epithelial morphogenetic processes at early breast cancer stages, and driving breast cancer progression by fostering proliferation.

  14. The host Integrator complex acts in transcription-independent maturation of herpesvirus microRNA 3' ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingyi; Zhang, Wei; Shu, Mei-Di; Xu, Acer; Lenis, Diana A; DiMaio, Daniel; Steitz, Joan A

    2015-07-15

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus that produces microRNAs (miRNAs) by cotranscription of precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA) hairpins immediately downstream from viral small nuclear RNAs (snRNA). The host cell Integrator complex, which recognizes the snRNA 3' end processing signal (3' box), generates the 5' ends of HVS pre-miRNA hairpins. Here, we identify a novel 3' box-like sequence (miRNA 3' box) downstream from HVS pre-miRNAs that is essential for miRNA biogenesis. In vivo knockdown and rescue experiments confirmed that the 3' end processing of HVS pre-miRNAs also depends on Integrator activity. Interaction between Integrator and HVS primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) substrates that contain only the miRNA 3' box was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and an in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) that we developed to localize specific transient RNA-protein interactions inside cells. Surprisingly, in contrast to snRNA 3' end processing, HVS pre-miRNA 3' end processing by Integrator can be uncoupled from transcription, enabling new approaches to study Integrator enzymology.

  15. Characterization of a Novel Class I Transcription Factor A (CITFA) Subunit That Is Indispensable for Transcription by the Multifunctional RNA Polymerase I of Trypanosoma brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, T. N.

    2012-10-26

    Trypanosoma brucei is the only organism known to have evolved a multifunctional RNA polymerase I (pol I) system that is used to express the parasite\\'s ribosomal RNAs, as well as its major cell surface antigens, namely, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) and procyclin, which are vital for establishing successful infections in the mammalian host and the tsetse vector, respectively. Thus far, biochemical analyses of the T. brucei RNA pol I transcription machinery have elucidated the subunit structure of the enzyme and identified the class I transcription factor A (CITFA). CITFA binds to RNA pol I promoters, and its CITFA-2 subunit was shown to be absolutely essential for RNA pol I transcription in the parasite. Tandem affinity purification (TAP) of CITFA revealed the subunits CITFA-1 to -6, which are conserved only among kinetoplastid organisms, plus the dynein light chain DYNLL1. Here, by tagging CITFA-6 instead of CITFA-2, a complex was purified that contained all known CITFA subunits, as well as a novel proline-rich protein. Functional studies carried out in vivo and in vitro, as well as a colocalization study, unequivocally demonstrated that this protein is a bona fide CITFA subunit, essential for parasite viability and indispensable for RNA pol I transcription of ribosomal gene units and the active VSG expression site in the mammalian-infective life cycle stage of the parasite. Interestingly, CITFA-7 function appears to be species specific, because expression of an RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant CITFA-7 transgene from Trypanosoma cruzi could not rescue the lethal phenotype of silencing endogenous CITFA-7.

  16. Target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers for reverse transcription support retroviral infection at low efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Alexander; Lund, Anders H; Hansen, Anette C

    2002-01-01

    by cases of correction of single mismatches between Akv-MLV vectors and complementary tRNA primers toward the primer sequence in the integrated vector. Thus, target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers are able to initiate first-strand cDNA synthesis and plus-strand transfer leading to a complete provirus......RNA primers derived from the target cell can sustain reverse transcription during murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection. Transduction efficiencies were 4-5 orders of magnitude below those of comparable producer-cell complementations. However, successful usage of a target-cell-derived tRNA primer was proven...

  17. Disruption of Runx1 and Runx3 Leads to Bone Marrow Failure and Leukemia Predisposition due to Transcriptional and DNA Repair Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsia Qiuxia Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The RUNX genes encode transcription factors involved in development and human disease. RUNX1 and RUNX3 are frequently associated with leukemias, yet the basis for their involvement in leukemogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we show that Runx1;Runx3 double-knockout (DKO mice exhibited lethal phenotypes due to bone marrow failure and myeloproliferative disorder. These contradictory clinical manifestations are reminiscent of human inherited bone marrow failure syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA, caused by defective DNA repair. Indeed, Runx1;Runx3 DKO cells showed mitomycin C hypersensitivity, due to impairment of monoubiquitinated-FANCD2 recruitment to DNA damage foci, although FANCD2 monoubiquitination in the FA pathway was unaffected. RUNX1 and RUNX3 interact with FANCD2 independently of CBFβ, suggesting a nontranscriptional role for RUNX in DNA repair. These findings suggest that RUNX dysfunction causes DNA repair defect, besides transcriptional misregulation, and promotes the development of leukemias and other cancers.

  18. Repair of the 3' proximal and internal deletions of a satellite RNA associated with Cucumber mosaic virus is directed toward restoring structural integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun-Jung; Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A L N

    2014-02-01

    The phenomenon of rapid turnover of 3' proximal nucleotides (nt) lost by the action of nuclease in RNA viruses is integral to replication. Here, a set of six deletions encompassing the 3' 23 nt region of a satellite RNA (satRNA) of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) strain Q (Q-sat), were engineered. Repair of the 3' end was not observed in the absence of CMV. However, co-expression with CMV in planta revealed that Q-sat mutants lacking the 3' 18 nt but not the 3' 23 nt are repaired and the progeny accumulation was inversely proportional to the extent of the deletion. Progeny of the 3'Δ3 mutant were repaired to wild type (wt) while those from the remaining four mutants were heterogeneous, exhibiting a wt secondary structure. Analysis of additional 3' internal deletions mutants revealed that progeny with a repaired sequence reminiscent of wt secondary structure were competent for replication and systemic spread.

  19. Alternative splicing and extensive RNA editing of human TPH2 transcripts.

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    Maik Grohmann

    Full Text Available Brain serotonin (5-HT neurotransmission plays a key role in the regulation of mood and has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of 5-HT. Recently, we discovered a second TPH isoform (TPH2 in vertebrates, including man, which is predominantly expressed in brain, while the previously known TPH isoform (TPH1 is primarly a non-neuronal enzyme. Overwhelming evidence now points to TPH2 as a candidate gene for 5-HT-related psychiatric disorders. To assess the role of TPH2 gene variability in the etiology of psychiatric diseases we performed cDNA sequence analysis of TPH2 transcripts from human post mortem amygdala samples obtained from individuals with psychiatric disorders (drug abuse, schizophrenia, suicide and controls. Here we show that TPH2 exists in two alternatively spliced variants in the coding region, denoted TPH2a and TPH2b. Moreover, we found evidence that the pre-mRNAs of both splice variants are dynamically RNA-edited in a mutually exclusive manner. Kinetic studies with cell lines expressing recombinant TPH2 variants revealed a higher activity of the novel TPH2B protein compared with the previously known TPH2A, whereas RNA editing was shown to inhibit the enzymatic activity of both TPH2 splice variants. Therefore, our results strongly suggest a complex fine-tuning of central nervous system 5-HT biosynthesis by TPH2 alternative splicing and RNA editing. Finally, we present molecular and large-scale linkage data evidencing that deregulated alternative splicing and RNA editing is involved in the etiology of psychiatric diseases, such as suicidal behaviour.

  20. Identification and Characterization of Two Novel RNA Editing Sites in grin1b Transcripts of Embryonic Danio rerio

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    Pedro Pozo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovering RNA editing sites in model organisms provides an insight into their adaptations in addition to finding potential sites for the regulation of neural activity and the basis of integrated models of metazoan editing with a variety of applications, including potential clinical treatments of neural dysregulation. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is an important vertebrate model system. We focused on the grin1b gene of zebrafish due to its important function in the nervous tissue as a glutamate receptor. Using a comparative sequence-based approach, we located possible RNA editing events within the grin1b transcript. Surprisingly, sequence analysis also revealed a new editing site which was not predicted by the comparative approach. We here report the discovery of two novel RNA editing events in grin1b transcripts of embryonic zebrafish. The frequency of these editing events and their locations within the grin1b transcript are also described.

  1. Transcription of Leishmania major U2 small nuclear RNA gene is directed by extragenic sequences located within a tRNA-like and a tRNA-Ala gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Sánchez, Saúl; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa; Moreno-Campos, Rodrigo; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E; Manning-Cela, Rebeca G; Martínez-Calvillo, Santiago

    2016-07-19

    Leishmania and other trypanosomatid parasites possess atypical mechanisms of gene expression, including the maturation of mRNAs by trans-splicing and the involvement of RNA Polymerase III in transcription of all snRNA molecules. Since snRNAs are essential for trans-splicing, we are interested in the study of the sequences that direct their expression. Here we report the characterization of L. major U2 snRNA promoter region. All species of Leishmania possess a single U2 snRNA gene that contains a divergently-oriented tRNA-Ala gene in the upstream region. Between these two genes we found a tRNA-like sequence that possesses conserved boxes A and B. Primer extension and RT-qPCR analyses with RNA from transiently-transfected cells showed that transcription of L. major U2 snRNA is almost abolished when boxes A and B from the tRNA-like are deleted or mutated. The levels of the U2 snRNA were also highly affected when base substitutions were introduced into box B from the tRNA-Ala gene and the first nucleotides of the U2 snRNA gene itself. We also demonstrate that the tRNA-like is transcribed, generating a main transcript of around 109 bases. As pseudouridines in snRNAs are required for splicing in other organisms, we searched for this modified nucleotide in the L. major U2 snRNA. Our results show the presence of six pseudouridines in the U2 snRNA, including one in the Sm site that has not been reported in other organisms. Four different regions control the transcription of the U2 snRNA gene in L. major: boxes A and B from the neighbor tRNA-like, box B from the upstream tRNA-Ala gene and the first nucleotides of the U2 snRNA. Thus, the promoter region of L. major U2 snRNA is different from any other promoter reported for snRNAs. Pseudouridines could play important roles in L. major U2 snRNA, since they were found in functionally important regions, including the branch point recognition region and the Sm binding site.

  2. Circadian transcription factor BMAL1 regulates innate immunity against select RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Tanmay; Dhar, Jayeeta; Patel, Sonal; Kondratov, Roman; Barik, Sailen

    2017-02-01

    BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT-like protein 1, also known as MOP3 or ARNT3) belongs to the family of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS domain-containing transcription factors, and is a key component of the molecular oscillator that generates circadian rhythms. Here, we report that BMAL1-deficient cells are significantly more susceptible to infection by two major respiratory viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family, namely RSV and PIV3. Embryonic fibroblasts from Bmal1(-/-) mice produced nearly 10-fold more progeny virus than their wild type controls. These results were supported by animal studies whereby pulmonary infection of RSV produced a more severe disease and morbidity in Bmal1(-/-)mice. These results show that BMAL1 can regulate cellular innate immunity against specific RNA viruses.

  3. Adaptation of Organisms by Resonance of RNA Transcription with the Cellular Redox Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    Sequence variation in organisms differs across the genome and the majority of mutations are caused by oxidation, yet its origin is not fully understood. It has also been shown that the reduction-oxidation reaction cycle is the fundamental biochemical cycle that coordinates the timing of all biochemical processes in that cell, including energy production, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. It is shown that the temporal resonance of transcriptome biosynthesis with the oscillating binary state of the reduction-oxidation reaction cycle serves as a basis for non-random sequence variation at specific genome-wide coordinates that change faster than by accumulation of chance mutations. This work demonstrates evidence for a universal, persistent and iterative feedback mechanism between the environment and heredity, whereby acquired variation between cell divisions can outweigh inherited variation.

  4. Whole Blood RNA as a Source of Transcript-Based Nutrition- and Metabolic Health-Related Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Petar D.; Bonet, M. Luisa; Reynés, Bárbara; Oliver, Paula; Palou, Andreu; Ribot, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Blood cells are receiving an increasing attention as an easily accessible source of transcript-based biomarkers. We studied the feasibility of using mouse whole blood RNA in this context. Several paradigms were studied: (i) metabolism-related transcripts known to be affected in rat tissues and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by fasting and upon the development of high fat diet (HFD)-induced overweight were assessed in whole blood RNA of fasted rats and mice and of HFD-fed mice; (ii) retinoic acid (RA)-responsive genes in tissues were assessed in whole blood RNA of control and RA-treated mice; (iii) lipid metabolism-related transcripts previously identified in PBMC as potential biomarkers of metabolic health in a rat model were assessed in whole blood in an independent model, namely retinoblastoma haploinsufficient (Rb+/-) mice. Blood was collected and stored in RNAlater® at -80°C until analysis of selected transcripts by real-time RT-PCR. Comparable changes with fasting were detected in the expression of lipid metabolism-related genes when RNA from either PBMC or whole blood of rats or mice was used. HFD-induced excess body weight and fat mass associated with expected changes in the expression of metabolism-related genes in whole blood of mice. Changes in gene expression in whole blood of RA-treated mice reproduced known transcriptional actions of RA in hepatocytes and adipocytes. Reduced expression of Fasn, Lrp1, Rxrb and Sorl1 could be validated as early biomarkers of metabolic health in young Rb+/- mice using whole blood RNA. Altogether, these results support the use of whole blood RNA in studies aimed at identifying blood transcript-based biomarkers of nutritional/metabolic status or metabolic health. Results also support reduced expression of Fasn, Lrp1, Rxrb and Sorl1 in blood cells at young age as potential biomarkers of metabolic robustness. PMID:27163124

  5. Thousands of novel transcripts identified in mouse cerebrum, testis, and ES cells by ribo-minus RNA sequencing method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanfei eLiu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies provide an excellent opportunity for the detection of less-abundance transcripts that may not be identifiable by previously-available techniques. Here, we report a discovery of thousands of novel transcripts (mostly non-coding RNAs that are expressed in mouse cerebrum, testis, and embryonic stem (ES cells, through in-depth analysis of rmRNA-seq data. These transcripts show significant associations with transcriptional start and elongation signals. At the upstream of these transcripts we observe significant enrichment of histone marks (histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, H3K4me3, RNAPII binding, and CAGE tags that marks transcriptional start sites. Along the length of these transcripts, we also observe enrichment of histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3. Moreover, these transcripts show strong purifying selection in their genomic loci, exonic sequences, and promoter regions, implying functional constraints on the evolution of these transcripts. These results define a collection of novel transcripts in the mouse genome and indicate the potential function in the mouse tissues or cells.

  6. Thousands of Novel Transcripts Identified in Mouse Cerebrum, Testis, and ES Cells Based on ribo-minus RNA Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanfei; Zhao, Yuhui; Cui, Peng; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Xin, Chengqi; Tan, Xinyu; Song, Shuhui; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian

    2011-01-01

    The high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies provide an excellent opportunity for the detection of less-abundance transcripts that may not be identifiable by previously available techniques. Here, we report a discovery of thousands of novel transcripts (mostly non-coding RNAs) that are expressed in mouse cerebrum, testis, and embryonic stem (ES) cells, through an in-depth analysis of rmRNA-seq data. These transcripts show significant associations with transcriptional start and elongation signals. At the upstream of these transcripts we observed significant enrichment of histone marks (histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, H3K4me3), RNAPII binding sites, and cap analysis of gene expression tags that mark transcriptional start sites. Along the length of these transcripts, we also observed enrichment of histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3). Moreover, these transcripts show strong purifying selection in their genomic loci, exonic sequences, and promoter regions, implying functional constraints on the evolution of these transcripts. These results define a collection of novel transcripts in the mouse genome and indicate their potential functions in the mouse tissues and cells. PMID:22303387

  7. 5-Formyl- and 5-carboxyl-cytosine reduce the rate and substrate specificity of RNA polymerase II transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Kellinger, Matthew W.; Song, Chun-Xiao; Chong, Jenny; Lu, Xing-Yu; He, Chuan; Wang, Dong

    2012-01-01

    While the roles of 5-methyl-cytosine and 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine in epigenetic regulation of gene expression are well-established, the functional effects of 5-formyl-cytosine and 5-carboxyl-cytosine in the genome on transcription are not clear. Here we report the first systematic study of the effects of five different forms of cytosine in DNA on mammalian and yeast RNA polymerase II transcription, providing new insights into potential functional interplay between cytosine methylation status ...

  8. Structure and associated DNA-helicase activity of a general transcription initiation factor that binds to RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopta, M; Burton, Z F; Greenblatt, J

    1989-10-05

    RAP30/74 is a heteromeric general transcription initiation factor which binds to RNA polymerase II. Here we report that preparations of RAP30/74 contain an ATP-dependent DNA helicase whose probable function is to melt the DNA at transcriptional start sites. The sequence of the RAP30 subunit of RAP30/74 indicates that RAP30 may be distantly related to bacterial sigma factors.

  9. Long non-coding RNA-mediated transcriptional interference of a permease gene confers drug tolerance in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ard, Ryan; Tong, Pin; Allshire, Robin C

    2014-11-27

    Most long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) encoded by eukaryotic genomes remain uncharacterized. Here we focus on a set of intergenic lncRNAs in fission yeast. Deleting one of these lncRNAs exhibited a clear phenotype: drug sensitivity. Detailed analyses of the affected locus revealed that transcription of the nc-tgp1 lncRNA regulates drug tolerance by repressing the adjacent phosphate-responsive permease gene transporter for glycerophosphodiester 1 (tgp1(+)). We demonstrate that the act of transcribing nc-tgp1 over the tgp1(+) promoter increases nucleosome density, prevents transcription factor access and thus represses tgp1(+) without the need for RNA interference or heterochromatin components. We therefore conclude that tgp1(+) is regulated by transcriptional interference. Accordingly, decreased nc-tgp1 transcription permits tgp1(+) expression upon phosphate starvation. Furthermore, nc-tgp1 loss induces tgp1(+) even in repressive conditions. Notably, drug sensitivity results directly from tgp1(+) expression in the absence of the nc-tgp1 RNA. Thus, transcription of an lncRNA governs drug tolerance in fission yeast.

  10. Modeling RNA polymerase competition: the effect of σ-subunit knockout and heat shock on gene transcription level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seliverstov Alexandr V

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modeling of a complex biological process can explain the results of experimental studies and help predict its characteristics. Among such processes is transcription in the presence of competing RNA polymerases. This process involves RNA polymerases collision followed by transcription termination. Results A mathematical and computer simulation model is developed to describe the competition of RNA polymerases during genes transcription on complementary DNA strands. E.g., in the barley Hordeum vulgare the polymerase competition occurs in the locus containing plastome genes psbA, rpl23, rpl2 and four bacterial type promoters. In heat shock experiments on isolated chloroplasts, a twofold decrease of psbA transcripts and even larger increase of rpl23-rpl2 transcripts were observed, which is well reproduced in the model. The model predictions are in good agreement with virtually all relevant experimental data (knockout, heat shock, chromatogram data, etc.. The model allows to hypothesize a mechanism of cell response to knockout and heat shock, as well as a mechanism of gene expression regulation in presence of RNA polymerase competition. The model is implemented for multiprocessor platforms with MPI and supported on Linux and MS Windows. The source code written in C++ is available under the GNU General Public License from the laboratory website. A user-friendly GUI version is also provided at http://lab6.iitp.ru/en/rivals. Conclusions The developed model is in good agreement with virtually all relevant experimental data. The model can be applied to estimate intensities of binding of the holoenzyme and phage type RNA polymerase to their promoters using data on gene transcription levels, as well as to predict characteristics of RNA polymerases and the transcription process that are difficult to measure directly, e.g., the intensity (frequency of holoenzyme binding to the promoter in correlation to its nucleotide composition and the

  11. Simultaneous DNA-RNA Extraction from Coastal Sediments and Quantification of 16S rRNA Genes and Transcripts by Real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatti, Enrico; McKew, Boyd A; Whitby, Corrine; Smith, Cindy J

    2016-06-11

    Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction also known as quantitative PCR (q-PCR) is a widely used tool in microbial ecology to quantify gene abundances of taxonomic and functional groups in environmental samples. Used in combination with a reverse transcriptase reaction (RT-q-PCR), it can also be employed to quantify gene transcripts. q-PCR makes use of highly sensitive fluorescent detection chemistries that allow quantification of PCR amplicons during the exponential phase of the reaction. Therefore, the biases associated with 'end-point' PCR detected in the plateau phase of the PCR reaction are avoided. A protocol to quantify bacterial 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from coastal sediments via real-time PCR is provided. First, a method for the co-extraction of DNA and RNA from coastal sediments, including the additional steps required for the preparation of DNA-free RNA, is outlined. Second, a step-by-step guide for the quantification of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from the extracted nucleic acids via q-PCR and RT-q-PCR is outlined. This includes details for the construction of DNA and RNA standard curves. Key considerations for the use of RT-q-PCR assays in microbial ecology are included.

  12. MAGIA²: from miRNA and genes expression data integrative analysis to microRNA-transcription factor mixed regulatory circuits (2012 update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisognin, Andrea; Sales, Gabriele; Coppe, Alessandro; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Romualdi, Chiara

    2012-07-01

    MAGIA(2) (http://gencomp.bio.unipd.it/magia2) is an update, extension and evolution of the MAGIA web tool. It is dedicated to the integrated analysis of in silico target prediction, microRNA (miRNA) and gene expression data for the reconstruction of post-transcriptional regulatory networks. miRNAs are fundamental post-transcriptional regulators of several key biological and pathological processes. As miRNAs act prevalently through target degradation, their expression profiles are expected to be inversely correlated to those of the target genes. Low specificity of target prediction algorithms makes integration approaches an interesting solution for target prediction refinement. MAGIA(2) performs this integrative approach supporting different association measures, multiple organisms and almost all target predictions algorithms. Nevertheless, miRNAs activity should be viewed as part of a more complex scenario where regulatory elements and their interactors generate a highly connected network and where gene expression profiles are the result of different levels of regulation. The updated MAGIA(2) tries to dissect this complexity by reconstructing mixed regulatory circuits involving either miRNA or transcription factor (TF) as regulators. Two types of circuits are identified: (i) a TF that regulates both a miRNA and its target and (ii) a miRNA that regulates both a TF and its target.

  13. Transcription of the 5S rRNA heterochromatic genes is epigenetically controlled in Arabidopsis thaliana and Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douet, J; Tourmente, S

    2007-07-01

    5S ribosomal DNA is a highly conserved tandemly repeated multigenic family. As suggested for a long time, we have shown that only a fraction of the 5S rRNA genes are expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Xenopus laevis, there is a developmental control of the expression of the 5S rRNA genes with only one of the two 5S rDNA families expressed during oogenesis. For both Arabidopsis and Xenopus, the strongest transcription of 5S rRNA, respectively in the seed and during oogenesis is correlated with heterogeneity in the transcribed 5S rRNAs. Epigenetic mechanisms such as modification of the chromatin structure are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the 5S rRNA genes in both organisms. In Arabidopsis, two silencing pathways, methylation-dependent (RNAi) and methylation-independent (MOM pathway), are involved in the silencing of a 5S rDNA fraction.

  14. Rapid and Specific Detection of tdh, trh1, and trh2 mRNA of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by Transcription-Reverse Transcription Concerted Reaction with an Automated System

    OpenAIRE

    Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Ishizuka, Tetsuya; Ohnaka, Satoru; Hayashi, Toshinori; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Ishiguro, Takahiko; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2004-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains carrying the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) tdh gene, the TDH-related hemolysin (trh) gene, or both genes are considered virulent strains. We previously demonstrated that the transcription-reverse transcription concerted (TRC) method could be used to quantify the amount of mRNA transcribed from the tdh gene by using an automated detection system. In this study, we devised two TRC-based assays to quantify the mRNAs transcribed from the trh1 and trh2 genes, ...

  15. AGO6 functions in RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in shoot and root meristems in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changho Eun

    Full Text Available RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM is a small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated epigenetic modification that contributes to transposon silencing in plants. RdDM requires a complex transcriptional machinery that includes specialized RNA polymerases, named Pol IV and Pol V, as well as chromatin remodelling proteins, transcription factors, RNA binding proteins, and other plant-specific proteins whose functions are not yet clarified. In Arabidopsis thaliana, DICER-LIKE3 and members of the ARGONAUTE4 group of ARGONAUTE (AGO proteins are involved, respectively, in generating and using 24-nt siRNAs that trigger methylation and transcriptional gene silencing of homologous promoter sequences. AGO4 is the main AGO protein implicated in the RdDM pathway. Here we report the identification of the related AGO6 in a forward genetic screen for mutants defective in RdDM and transcriptional gene silencing in shoot and root apical meristems in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identification of AGO6, and not AGO4, in our screen is consistent with the primary expression of AGO6 in shoot and root growing points.

  16. Targeting RNA polymerase I transcription and the nucleolus for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Ross D; Drygin, Denis; Pearson, Richard B

    2013-08-01

    The nucleoli are the site of the production of ribosomes, the protein synthetic apparatus of the cell. The presence of enlarged nucleoli, reflecting increased ribosomal gene transcription, has long been used by pathologists as an indicator of aggressive tumors. However, over the last 10 years a growing body of evidence has revealed that the nucleolus contains a dynamic cohort of over 4500 proteins, the majority of which have no function in ribosome production. The activity of some of these proteins is modulated by their regulated sequestration and release from the nucleolus. In particular, the nucleolus plays a central role in sensing cellular stress to modulate the abundance of the critical tumor suppressor protein p53. The finding that p53 activity is dysregulated in up to 50% of all human cancers highlights the importance of the nucleolar stress response in limiting malignant transformation. The development of drugs to selectively inhibit transcription of the ribosomal RNA genes in the nucleolus has paved the way for a new therapeutic approach to hijack nucleolar stress to selectively and non-genotoxically activate p53 in tumor cells. Here, we describe the potential application of this exciting new class of drugs for the treatment of human cancer.

  17. RNA-Seq Reveals OTA-Related Gene Transcriptional Changes in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerin, Donato; De Miccolis Angelini, Rita M; Pollastro, Stefania; Faretra, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin harmful for animals and humans. Aspergillus carbonarius is the main responsible for OTA contamination of grapes and derived products. Gene transcriptional profiling of 4 A. carbonarius strains was carried out by RNA-Seq analysis to study transcriptome changes associated with OTA production. By comparing OTA inducing (OTAI) vs. non-inducing (OTAN) cultural conditions, a total of 3,705 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (fold change > |2| and FDR ≤ 0.05) were identified. Several genes involved in primary metabolic processes, with particular regard to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, secondary metabolic processes, transport, response to stress and sporulation were up-regulated by OTAI conditions at all the analysed sampling times (4, 6 and 8 DAI) or starting from 6 DAI. Highly up-regulated DEGs encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidoreductases, transporters and transcription factors were examined for their potential involvement in OTA biosynthesis and related metabolic pathways. Differential expression of genes encoding polyketide synthases (pks), non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (nrps) and chloroperoxidase (cpo) was validated by RT-qPCR. Among clusters of co-regulated genes involved in SM biosynthesis, one putative OTA-gene cluster, including both pks and nrps genes, was detected in the A. carbonarius genome.

  18. RNA-Seq Reveals OTA-Related Gene Transcriptional Changes in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Gerin

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA is a mycotoxin harmful for animals and humans. Aspergillus carbonarius is the main responsible for OTA contamination of grapes and derived products. Gene transcriptional profiling of 4 A. carbonarius strains was carried out by RNA-Seq analysis to study transcriptome changes associated with OTA production. By comparing OTA inducing (OTAI vs. non-inducing (OTAN cultural conditions, a total of 3,705 differentially expressed genes (DEGs (fold change > |2| and FDR ≤ 0.05 were identified. Several genes involved in primary metabolic processes, with particular regard to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, secondary metabolic processes, transport, response to stress and sporulation were up-regulated by OTAI conditions at all the analysed sampling times (4, 6 and 8 DAI or starting from 6 DAI. Highly up-regulated DEGs encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidoreductases, transporters and transcription factors were examined for their potential involvement in OTA biosynthesis and related metabolic pathways. Differential expression of genes encoding polyketide synthases (pks, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (nrps and chloroperoxidase (cpo was validated by RT-qPCR. Among clusters of co-regulated genes involved in SM biosynthesis, one putative OTA-gene cluster, including both pks and nrps genes, was detected in the A. carbonarius genome.

  19. RNA-Seq Reveals OTA-Related Gene Transcriptional Changes in Aspergillus carbonarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerin, Donato; De Miccolis Angelini, Rita M.; Pollastro, Stefania; Faretra, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin harmful for animals and humans. Aspergillus carbonarius is the main responsible for OTA contamination of grapes and derived products. Gene transcriptional profiling of 4 A. carbonarius strains was carried out by RNA-Seq analysis to study transcriptome changes associated with OTA production. By comparing OTA inducing (OTAI) vs. non-inducing (OTAN) cultural conditions, a total of 3,705 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (fold change > |2| and FDR ≤ 0.05) were identified. Several genes involved in primary metabolic processes, with particular regard to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, secondary metabolic processes, transport, response to stress and sporulation were up-regulated by OTAI conditions at all the analysed sampling times (4, 6 and 8 DAI) or starting from 6 DAI. Highly up-regulated DEGs encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidoreductases, transporters and transcription factors were examined for their potential involvement in OTA biosynthesis and related metabolic pathways. Differential expression of genes encoding polyketide synthases (pks), non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (nrps) and chloroperoxidase (cpo) was validated by RT-qPCR. Among clusters of co-regulated genes involved in SM biosynthesis, one putative OTA-gene cluster, including both pks and nrps genes, was detected in the A. carbonarius genome. PMID:26765536

  20. Targeted protein footprinting: where different transcription factors bind to RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traviglia, S L; Datwyler, S A; Yan, D; Ishihama, A; Meares, C F

    1999-11-30

    Gene transcription is regulated through the interactions of RNA polymerase (RNAP) with transcription factors, such as the bacterial sigma proteins. We have devised a new strategy that relies on targeted protein footprinting to make an extensive survey of proximity to the protein surface. This involves attaching cutting reagents randomly to lysine residues on the surface of a protein such as sigma. The lysine-labeled sigma protein is then used to cleave the polypeptide backbones of the RNAP proteins at exposed residues adjacent to the sigma binding site. We used targeted protein footprinting to compare the areas near which sigma(70), sigma(54), sigma(38), sigma(E), NusA, GreA, and omega bind to the protein subunits of Escherichia coli RNAP. The sigma proteins and NusA cut sites in similar regions of the two large RNAP subunits, beta and beta', outlining a common surface. GreA cuts a larger set of sites, whereas omega shows no overlap with the others, cutting only the beta' subunit at a unique location.

  1. The Escherichia coli RNA polymerase alpha subunit and transcriptional activation by bacteriophage lambda CII protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, M; Obuchowski, M; Ciesielska, A; Latała, B; Wegrzyn, A; Thomas, M S; Wegrzyn, G

    1998-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda is not able to lysogenise the Escherichia coli rpoA341 mutant. This mutation causes a single amino acid substitution Lys271Glu in the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit (alphaCTD). Our previous studies indicated that the impaired lysogenisation of the rpoA341 host is due to a defect in transcriptional activation by the phage CII protein and suggested a role for alphaCTD in this process. Here we used a series of truncation and point mutants in the rpoA gene placed on a plasmid to investigate the process of transcriptional activation by the cII gene product. Our results indicate that amino-acid residues 265, 268 and 271 in the a subunit may play an important role in the CII-mediated activation of the pE promoter (most probably residue 271) or may be involved in putative interactions between alphaCTD and an UP-like element near pE (most probably residues 265 and 268). Measurement of the activity of pE-lacZ, pI-lacZ and p(aQ)-lacZ fusions in the rpoA+ and rpoA341 hosts demonstrated that the mechanism of activation of these CII-dependent promoters may be in each case different.

  2. Parseq: reconstruction of microbial transcription landscape from RNA-Seq read counts using state-space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirauta, Bogdan; Nicolas, Pierre; Richard, Hugues

    2014-05-15

    The most common RNA-Seq strategy consists of random shearing, amplification and high-throughput sequencing of the RNA fraction. Methods to analyze transcription level variations along the genome from the read count profiles generated by the RNA-Seq protocol are needed. We developed a statistical approach to estimate the local transcription levels and to identify transcript borders. This transcriptional landscape reconstruction relies on a state-space model to describe transcription level variations in terms of abrupt shifts and more progressive drifts. A new emission model is introduced to capture not only the read count variance inside a transcript but also its short-range autocorrelation and the fraction of positions with zero counts. The estimation relies on a particle Gibbs algorithm whose running time makes it more suited to microbial genomes. The approach outperformed read-overlapping strategies on synthetic and real microbial datasets. A program named Parseq is available at: http://www.lgm.upmc.fr/parseq/. bodgan.mirauta@upmc.fr Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. Defects in the DNA repair and transcription gene ERCC2(XPD) in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, K.; Salazar, E.P.; Thompson, L.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by brittle hair with reduced sulfur content, ichthyosis, peculiar face, and mental and growth retardation. Clinical photosensitivity is present in {approximately}50% of TTD patients but is not associated with an elevated frequency of cancers. Previous complementation studies show that the photosensitivity in nearly all of the studied patients is due to a defect in the same genetic locus that underlies the cancer-prone genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XP-D). Nucleotide-sequence analysis of the ERCC2 cDNA from three TTD cell strains (TTD1VI, TTD3VI, and TTD1RO) revealed mutations within the region from amino acid 713-730 and within previously identified helicase functional domains. The various clinical presentations and DNA repair characteristics of the cell strains can be correlated with the particular mutations found in the ERCC2 locus. Mutations of Arg658 to either His or Cys correlate with TTD cell strains with intermediate UV-sensitivity, mutation of Arg722 to Trp correlates with highly UV-sensitive TTD cell strains, and mutation of Arg683 to Trp correlates with XP-D. Alleles with mutation of Arg616 to Pro or with the combined mutation of Leu461 to Val and deletion of 716-730 are found in both XP-D and TTD cell strains. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.