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Sample records for repaired bilateral cleft

  1. [Clinical effect of functional repair of bilateral cleft lip in 66 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Jiang, Hong-bing; Yuan, Hua; DU, Yi-fei; Wu, Yu-nong; Wan, Lin-zhong

    2014-10-01

    To explore the clinical effect of functional repair for bilateral cleft lip using modified Mulliken method. Sixty-six patients with bilateral cleft lip were selected and assigned to receive modified Mulliken method. During the operation, the prolabium was kept as narrow "tie" shape, the orbicularis oris was anatomically repositioned, and the orbicularis oris ring was re-built. Vermilion tubercle was reconstructed with the lateral red vermillion. The nasal deformity was preliminarily repaired. and the nasal columella was elongated at the same time. All the patients were followed-up for 0.5-2 years, there was no "trisection upper lip". The symmetry and natural shape of Cupid's bow were obtained in more than 80% patients. The width of philtrum was similar to normal children. Full vermilion of the lips, moderate-size vermilion tubercles and good dynamic and static shape were obtained without whistle deformities. Normal width of nasal base and nostril symmetry were gained. The columella was elongated. Satisfactory contour of the nasal tip was achieved. Modified Mulliken method could functionally repair bilateral cleft lip and effectively correct nasolabial deformities. It is worthy of wide clinical application.

  2. Intraoperative vascular anatomy, arterial blood flow velocity, and microcirculation in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, A.A.; Schumann, D.; Reddy, R.R.; Schwenzer-Zimmerer, K.; Mueller-Gerbl, M.; Zeilhofer, H.F.; Sailer, H.F.; Reddy, S.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cleft lip repair aims to normalize the disturbed anatomy and function. The authors determined whether normalization of blood circulation is achieved. METHODS: The authors measured the microcirculatory flow, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin level in the lip and nose of controls (n = 22)

  3. Bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Arun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral cleft lip nose deformity is a multi-factorial and complex deformity which tends to aggravate with growth of the child, if not attended surgically. The goals of primary bilateral cleft lip nose surgery are, closure of the nasal floor and sill, lengthening of the columella, repositioning of the alar base, achieving nasal tip projection, repositioning of the lower lateral cartilages, and reorienting the nares from horizontal to oblique position. The multiplicity of procedures in the literature for correction of this deformity alludes to the fact that no single procedure is entirely effective. The timing for surgical intervention and its extent varies considerably. Early surgery on cartilage may adversely affect growth and development; at the same time, allowing the cartilage to grow in an abnormal position and contributing to aggravation of deformity. Some surgeons advocate correction of deformity at an early age. However, others like the cartilages to grow and mature before going in for surgery. With peer pressure also becoming an important consideration during the teens, the current trend is towards early intervention. There is no unanimity in the extent of nasal dissection to be done at the time of primary lip repair. While many perform limited nasal dissection for the fear of growth retardation, others opt for full cartilage correction at the time of primary surgery itself. The value of naso-alveolar moulding (NAM too is not universally accepted and has now more opponents than proponents. Also most centres in the developing world have neither the personnel nor the facilities for the same. The secondary cleft nasal deformity is variable and is affected by the extent of the original abnormality, any prior surgeries performed and alteration due to nasal growth. This article reviews the currently popular methods for correction of nasal deformity associated with bilateral cleft lip, it′s management both at the time of cleft lip repair

  4. Cleft lip and palate repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002979.htm Cleft lip and palate repair To use the sharing features on this ... Cheiloplasty; Cleft rhinoplasty; Palatoplasty; Tip rhinoplasty Patient Instructions Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge Images Cleft lip repair - series References ...

  5. The use of SymNose for quantitative assessment of lip symmetry following repair of complete bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, James H B; Kiddy, Harriet C; Mercer, Nigel S

    2014-07-01

    The SymNose computer program has been proposed as an objective method for the quantitative assessment of lip symmetry following unilateral cleft lip repair. This study aims to demonstrate the use of SymNose in patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP), a group previously excluded from computer-based analysis. A retrospective cohort study compared several parameters of lip symmetry between BCLP cases and non-cleft controls. 15 BCLP cases aged 10 (±1 year) who had undergone primary repair were recruited from the patient database at the South West Cleft Unit, Frenchay Hospital. Frontal facial photographs were selected for measurement. 15 age-matched controls were recruited from a local school. Lip symmetry was expressed as: percentage mismatch of left vermillion border and upper lip area over the right, horizontal lip tilt and lateral deviation of the lip. A significant increase in lip asymmetry was found in the BCLP group expressed as upper vermillion border mismatch across computer-defined and user-defined midlines (mean difference was 16.4% (p lip asymmetry remains in BCLP patients even after primary repair. This challenges previous assumptions that those with bilateral defects would be relatively symmetrical. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Asyndromic Bilateral Transverse Facial Cleft

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-23

    of this atypical cleft is unknown although the frequency ... on Tuesday, April 23, 2013, IP: 41.132.185.55] || Click here to download free Android application for this journal ... Facial cleft remains a source of social anxiety and in the past has lead ...

  7. Primary unilateral cleft lip repair

    OpenAIRE

    Adenwalla, H. S.; Narayanan, P. V.

    2009-01-01

    The unilateral cleft lip is a complex deformity. Surgical correction has evolved from a straight repair through triangular and quadrilateral repairs to the Rotation Advancement Technique of Millard. The latter is the technique followed at our centre for all unilateral cleft lip patients. We operate on these at five to six months of age, do not use pre-surgical orthodontics, and follow a protocol to produce a notch-free vermillion. This is easy to follow even for trainees. We also perform clos...

  8. Primary unilateral cleft lip repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenwalla, H S; Narayanan, P V

    2009-10-01

    The unilateral cleft lip is a complex deformity. Surgical correction has evolved from a straight repair through triangular and quadrilateral repairs to the Rotation Advancement Technique of Millard. The latter is the technique followed at our centre for all unilateral cleft lip patients. We operate on these at five to six months of age, do not use pre-surgical orthodontics, and follow a protocol to produce a notch-free vermillion. This is easy to follow even for trainees. We also perform closed alar dissection and extensive primary septoplasty in all these patients. This has improved the overall result and has no long-term deleterious effect on the growth of the nose or of the maxilla. Other refinements have been used for prevention of a high-riding nostril, and correction of the vestibular web.

  9. Primary unilateral cleft lip repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adenwalla H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The unilateral cleft lip is a complex deformity. Surgical correction has evolved from a straight repair through triangular and quadrilateral repairs to the Rotation Advancement Technique of Millard. The latter is the technique followed at our centre for all unilateral cleft lip patients. We operate on these at five to six months of age, do not use pre-surgical orthodontics, and follow a protocol to produce a notch-free vermillion. This is easy to follow even for trainees. We also perform closed alar dissection and extensive primary septoplasty in all these patients. This has improved the overall result and has no long-term deleterious effect on the growth of the nose or of the maxilla. Other refinements have been used for prevention of a high-riding nostril, and correction of the vestibular web.

  10. An evaluation of surgical outcome of bilateral cleft lip surgery using a modified Millard′s (Fork Flap technique

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    W L Adeyemo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The central third of the face is distorted by the bilateral cleft of the lip and palate and restoring the normal facial form is one of the primary goals for the reconstructive surgeons. The history of bilateral cleft lip repair has evolved from discarding the premaxilla and prolabium and approximating the lateral lip elements to a definitive lip and primary cleft nasal repair utilising the underlying musculature. The aim of this study was to review surgical outcome of bilateral cleft lip surgery (BCLS done at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: A review of all cases of BCLS done between January 2007 and December 2012 at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital was done. Data analysis included age and sex of patients, type of cleft deformity and type of surgery (primary or secondary and whether the cleft deformity was syndromic and non-syndromic. Techniques of repair, surgical outcome and complications were also recorded. Results: A total of 39 cases of BCLS involving 21 males and 18 females were done during the period. This constituted 10% (39/390 of all cases of cleft surgery done during the period. There were 5 syndromic and 34 non-syndromic cases. Age of patients at time of surgery ranged between 3 months and 32 years. There were 24 bilateral cleft lip and palate deformities and 15 bilateral cleft lip deformities. Thirty-one of the cases were primary surgery, while 8 were secondary (revision surgery. The most common surgical technique employed was modified Fork flap (Millard technique, which was employed in 37 (95% cases. Conclusion: Bilateral cleft lip deformity is a common cleft deformity seen in clinical practice, surgical repair of which can be a challenge to an experienced surgeon. A modified Fork flap technique for repair of bilateral cleft lip is a reliable and versatile technique associated with excellent surgical outcome.

  11. Maxillary arch width in unoperated adult bilateral cleft lip and alveolus and complete bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latief, B.S.; Lekkas, C.; Kuijpers, M.A.R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study maxillary arch width in adult patients with bilateral cleft lip and alveolus (BCLA) or with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP), who have not had any surgery. SETTING AND SAMPLING POPULATION: Eighteen patients with BCLA, 13 patients with BCLP, and 24 controls from

  12. Surgical repair of large cyclodialysis clefts.

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    Gross, Jacob B; Davis, Garvin H; Bell, Nicholas P; Feldman, Robert M; Blieden, Lauren S

    2017-05-11

    To describe a new surgical technique to effectively close large (>180 degrees) cyclodialysis clefts. Our method involves the use of procedures commonly associated with repair of retinal detachment and complex cataract extraction: phacoemulsification with placement of a capsular tension ring followed by pars plana vitrectomy and gas tamponade with light cryotherapy. We also used anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a noninvasive mechanism to determine the extent of the clefts and compared those results with ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) and gonioscopy. This technique was used to repair large cyclodialysis clefts in 4 eyes. All 4 eyes had resolution of hypotony and improvement of visual acuity. One patient had an intraocular pressure spike requiring further surgical intervention. Anterior segment OCT imaging in all 4 patients showed a more extensive cleft than UBM or gonioscopy. This technique is effective in repairing large cyclodialysis clefts. Anterior segment OCT more accurately predicted the extent of each cleft, while UBM and gonioscopy both underestimated the size of the cleft.

  13. Pre: Surgical orthopedic pre-maxillary alignment in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Prasad Kamavaram Ellore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-surgical orthopedic appliances are mainly used to retract and align the protruded and deviated pre-maxilla and to facilitate initial lip repair. This article presents a case report of a five year old male child patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate in whom a special custom made pre-surgical orthopedic appliance was delivered. Use of a special custom made presurgical orthopedic appliance for repositioning pre-maxilla in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient is discussed in this article.

  14. Prevalence of dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullo, R; Festa, V M; Rullo, R; Addabbo, F; Chiodini, P; Vitale, M; Perillo, L

    2015-09-01

    To examine the prevalence of different types of dental anomalies in children with nonsyndromic cleft lip, unilateral cleft lip-palate, and bilateral cleft lip-palate. A sample of 90 patients (aged 4-20 years) affected by isolated cleft lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate was examined. Cleft patients were classified into one of three groups according to cleft type: (1) Unilateral Cleft Lip-Palate, (2) Bilateral Cleft Lip-Palate, and (3) Cleft Lip. Intraoral exams, panoramic radiographs and dental casts, were used to analyse the prevalence of the various dental anomalies included in this study. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with cleft lip, unilateral cleft lip and palate and bilateral cleft lip and palate. The congenital absence of the cleft-side lateral incisor was observed in 40% of the sample, and a total of 30% patients showed supernumerary teeth at the incisors region. Second premolar agenesis was found in 4.4% of patients, whereas in 18.9% of the sample there was an ectopic dental eruption. Lateral or central incisors rotation was noted in 31.1% of the sample, while shape anomaly, lateral incisor microdontia, and enamel hypoplasia were detected respectively in 25.6%, 5.6% and 18.9% of cleft patients. High prevalence of different dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate has been confirmed. This study, in particular, shows the presence of ectopic and rotated teeth in the cleft area.

  15. Bilateral optic disc pit with maculopathy in a patient with cleft lip and cleft palate

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    Anisha Seth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic disc pit (ODP is small, gray-white, oval depression found at the optic nerve head. It is a congenital defect that occurs due to imperfect closure of superior edge of the embryonic fissure. Cleft lip and palate are also congenital midline abnormalities occurring due to defect in the fusion of frontonasal prominence, maxillary prominence and mandibular prominence. There is only one case report describing the occurrence of ODP in a young patient with cleft lip and palate who also had basal encephalocele. We describe a 52-year-old patient with congenital cleft lip and palate with bilateral ODP with maculopathy but without any other midline abnormality.

  16. A influência da queiloplastia realizada em tempo único e em dois tempos cirúrgicos no padrão oclusal de crianças com fissura bilateral completa de lábio e palato Influence of lip repair performed in one and two surgical times on the dental pattern of children with bilateral cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Gabriel da Silva Filho

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar a influência da queiloplastia realizada em tempo único e em dois tempos cirúrgicos no padrão oclusal de cirnaças com fissuras bilateral completa de lábio e palato. METODOLOGIA: a relação oclusal, de acordo com o índice Bauru, para a fissura bilateral completa de lábio e palato, foi estudada em uma amostra de 91 crianças nos estágios de dentadura decídua e mista. As crianças apresentavam fissura bilateral completa de lábio e palato e encontravam-se distribuídas na faixa etária compreendida entre 4 anos e 3 meses e 11 anos no momento do exame oclusal. Todas as crianças foram operadas na infância, no Hospital de Reabilitação de Anomalias Craniofaciais da Universidade de São Paulo (HRAC-USP, obedecendo dois protocolos de queiloplastia primária: 53 crianças foram submetidas à queiloplastia em tempo único (G1 e 38 crianças foram submetidas à queiloplastia em dois tempos cirúrgicos (G2. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: o padrão oclusal, mensurado com base numa escala de 1 a 5, de acordo com o índice Bauru para fissura bilateral completa de lábio e palato, obteve média de 2,28 e 2,51 para a queiloplastia realizada em tempo único e em dois tempos cirúrgicos, respectivamente. Os resultados permitem concluir que as cirurgias plásticas primárias comprometem a oclusão na dentadura decídua e mista, independentemente do número de etapas para a realização da queiloplastia.AIM: To analyse the influence of lip repair performed in one and two surgical times on the dental pattern of children with bilateral cleft lip and palate. METHODS: The occlusal relationship of 91 children in the primary and mixed dentition with bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP and aged 4 years and 4 months to 21 years was assessed according the Bauru yardstick. All children had BCLP and were operated at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, University of São Paulo, on the basis of two surgical protocols. Of the

  17. Early Cleft Lip Repair Revisited: A Safe and Effective Approach Utilizing a Multidisciplinary Protocol.

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    Hammoudeh, Jeff A; Imahiyerobo, Thomas A; Liang, Fan; Fahradyan, Artur; Urbinelli, Leo; Lau, Jennifer; Matar, Marla; Magee, William; Urata, Mark

    2017-06-01

    The optimal timing for cleft lip repair has yet to be established. Advances in neonatal anesthesia, along with a growing body of literature, suggesting benefits of earlier cleft lip and nasal repair, have set the stage for a reexamination of current practices. In this prospective study, cleft lip and nasal repair occurred on average at 34.8 days (13-69 days). Nasal correction was achieved primarily through molding the nasal cartilage without the placement of nasal sutures at the time of repair. A standardized anesthetic protocol aimed at limiting neurotoxicity was utilized in all cases. Anesthetic and postoperative complications were assessed. A 3-dimensional nasal analysis compared pre- and postoperative nasal symmetry for unilateral clefts. Surveys assessed familial response to repair. Thirty-two patients were included (27 unilateral and 5 bilateral clefts). In this study, the overall complication rate was 3.1%. Anthropometric measurements taken from 3-dimensional-image models showed statistically significant improvement in ratios of nostril height (preoperative mean, 0.59; postoperative mean, 0.80), nasal base width (preoperative mean, 1.96; postoperative mean, 1.12), columella length (preoperative mean, 0.62; postoperative mean, 0.89; and columella angle (preoperative mean, 30.73; postoperative mean, 9.1). Survey data indicated that families uniformly preferred earlier repair. We present evidence that early cleft lip and nasal repair can be performed safely and is effective at improving nasal symmetry without the placement of any nasal sutures. Utilization of this protocol has the potential to be a paradigm shift in the treatment of cleft lip and nasal deformity.

  18. Variations in Velopharyngeal Structure in Adults With Repaired Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jamie L; Kotlarek, Katelyn J; Sutton, Bradley P; Kuehn, David P; Jaskolka, Michael S; Fang, Xiangming; Point, Stuart W; Rauccio, Frank

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in velopharyngeal structures between adults with repaired cleft palate and normal resonance and adults without cleft palate. Thirty-six English-speaking adults, including 6 adults (2 males and 4 females) with repaired cleft palate (M = 32.5 years of age, SD = 17.4 years) and 30 adults (15 males and 15 females) without cleft palate (M = 23.3 years of age, SD = 4.1 years), participated in the study. Fourteen velopharyngeal measures were obtained on magnetic resonance images and compared between groups (cleft and noncleft). After adjusting for body size and sex effects, there was a statistically significant difference between groups for 10 out of the 14 velopharyngeal measures. Compared to those without cleft palate, participants with repaired cleft palate had a significantly shorter hard palate height and length, shorter levator muscle length, shorter intravelar segment, more acute levator angles of origin, shorter and thinner velum, and greater pharyngeal depth. Although significant differences were evident in the cleft palate group, individuals displayed normal resonance. These findings suggest that a wide variability in velopharyngeal anatomy can occur in the presence of normal resonance, particularly for those with repaired cleft palate. Future research is needed to understand how anatomic variability impacts function, such as during speech.

  19. Perioperative adverse airway events in cleft lip and palate repair ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Airway-related problems account for the majority of anaesthetic morbidity in paediatric anaesthesia, but more so for cleft lip and palate repair. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency, pattern, management and outcome of adverse airway events during the perioperative period in cleft lip and palate ...

  20. Orthodontic management of excessive incisor display of an adult bilateral cleft lip and palate patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Kharbanda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This report entails successful orthodontic treatment of a case of postsurgical malocclusion, short upper lip, and excessive incisor display in an adult patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patient underwent cleft lip repair at an early age of 2 years followed by palatoplasty at the age of 6 years and alveoloplasty at an age of 26 years. He reported with irregular teeth, inability to close lips, excessive visibility of upper incisors associated with short upper lip and difficulty in speech. He was treated with maxillary arch expansion, arch alignment, and intrusion of the incisors followed by prosthetic replacement of the missing right and left lateral incisors. Subsequently, he underwent nose and lip revision surgery at the age of 32 years. The orthodontic procedures and prosthetic rehabilitation have resulted in a near normal dental occlusion with significant improvement in esthetics and psychosocial benefits to the individual. These benefits were further enhanced by nose and lip revision surgery.

  1. Parental satisfaction in Ugandan children with cleft lip and palate following synchronous lip and palatal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, Anke; D'haeseleer, Evelien; Budolfsen, Dorte; Hodges, Andrew; Galiwango, George; Vermeersch, Hubert; Van Lierde, Kristiane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present case control study was to assess parental satisfaction with speech and facial appearance in Ugandan children with complete unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP), who underwent a synchronous lip and palatal closure. The results are compared with an age- and gender-matched control group. The experimental group consisted of the parents or guardians of 44 Ugandan patients (21 males, 23 females) with complete unilateral or bilateral CLP (mean age: 3;1 years). The control group included the foster mothers of 44 orphan children matched by age and gender (mean age: 3;7 years). A survey based on the Cleft Evaluation Profile was used to assess the perceived satisfaction for individual features related to cleft care. Overall high levels of satisfaction were observed in the experimental group for all features (range: 56-100%). No significant differences could be established regarding age, gender, age of lip and palatal closure, cleft type or maternal vs. paternal judgments. In participants who were dissatisfied with the appearance of the lip, the time period between the cleft closure and the survey was significantly larger compared with satisfied participants. Furthermore, significantly lower levels of satisfaction were observed in the cleft group for speech and the appearance of the teeth and the nose compared with the control group. Satisfaction with speech and facial appearance in Ugandan children with cleft lip and/or palate is important since normal esthetics and speech predominantly determine the children's social acceptance in the Ugandan society. As a result of reading this manuscript, the reader will be able to explain the attitudes of parents toward the surgical repair of their children's cleft lip and palate. As a result of reading this manuscript, the reader will be able to identify differences in parental attitudes toward synchronous lip and palate repair. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving Informed Consent for Cleft Palate Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-07

    Cleft Palate; Jaw Abnormalities; Maxillofacial Abnormalities; Mouth Abnormalities; Congenital Abnormalities; Jaw Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Craniofacial Abnormalities; Musculoskeletal Abnormalities; Stomatognathic Diseases; Stomatognathic System Abnormalities

  3. An anatomical subunit-based outcome assessment scale for bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanthaya, K; Shetty, P N; Fudalej, P S; Rao, D D; Bitra, S; Pabari, M; Rachwalski, M

    2017-08-01

    As there is currently no internationally accepted outcome measurement tool available for complete bilateral cleft lip and palate (CBCLP), the goal of this prospective study was to develop a numerical evaluation scale that allows reliable scoring of this cleft deformity. Our cohort comprised 121 Indian subjects with CBCLP who underwent surgical repair (mean age at time of surgery 6.53 months) using a modified Millard technique. A panel of three professionals evaluated each subject's outcome of bilateral cleft lip repair 6 months postoperatively on two-dimensional (2D) full-face photographs in the frontal view and worm's eye view. A simple two-point rating system was applied to separately analyse a total of 12 components of lip, nose, and scar. The results and mean scores for the analysed anatomical areas were 2.2±1.01 (max=3) for nose, 5.4±1.54 (max=8) for lip, and 1.9±1.3 (max=3) for scar, with a total score 7.7±2.21 (max=12) indicating a good surgical outcome. The inter-examiner ICC for nose, lip, scar, and total score was calculated at 0.836, 0.889, 0.723, and 0.927 respectively and indicated a strong level of repeatability and reliability that was highly significant (P<0.001). In conclusion, we were able to develop and test a scoring system for measuring outcomes in CBCLP that warrants simplicity of use, reliability and reproducibility. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Current surgical practices in cleft care: cleft palate repair techniques and postoperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzel, Evan B; Basile, Patrick; Koltz, Peter F; Marcus, Jeffrey R; Girotto, John A

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to objectively report practices commonly used in cleft palate repair in the United States. This study investigates current surgical techniques, postoperative care, and complication rates for cleft palate repair surgery. All 803 surgeon members of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association were sent online and/or paper surveys inquiring about their management of cleft palate patients. Three-hundred six surveys were received, a 38 percent response rate. This represented responses of surgeons from 100 percent of American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association registered cleft teams. Ninety-six percent of respondents perform a one-stage repair. Eighty-five percent of surgeons perform palate surgery when the patient is between 6 and 12 months of age. The most common one-stage repair techniques are the Bardach style (two flaps) with intravelar veloplasty and the Furlow palatoplasty. After surgery, 39 percent of surgeons discharge patients within 24 hours. Another 43 percent discharge patients within 48 hours. During postoperative management, 92 percent of respondents implement feeding restrictions. Eighty-five percent of physicians use arm restraints. Surgeons' self-reported complications rates are minimal: 54 percent report a fistula in less than 5 percent of cases. The reported need for secondary speech surgery varies widely. The majority of respondents repair clefts in one stage. The most frequently used repair techniques are the Furlow palatoplasty and the Bardach style with intravelar veloplasty. After surgery, the majority of surgeons discharge patients in 1 or 2 days, and nearly all surgeons implement feeding restrictions and the use of arm restraints. The varying feeding protocols are reviewed in this article.

  5. [Bilateral labio-maxillo-palatal clefts. Therapeutic evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphaël, B; Morand, B; Bettega, G; Lesne, V; Lesne, C; Lebeau, J

    2001-06-01

    The wide diversity of bilateral facial clefts makes it most difficult to assess surgical success, particularly in terms of long-term outcome. The aim of this work was to examine the rationale for the current protocol used for cleft surgery at the Grenoble University Hospital. In a first group of 28 children, a 3-step surgical protocol was applied. The first two steps were performed between 4 and 8 months with at least 3 months between each procedure. Skoog's unilateral cheilo-rhino-uranoplasty was used, associated with a periosteal tibial graft. The third step, performed between 10 and 12 months, was for staphylorraphy. Outcome was analyzed at 15 years and evidenced the deleterious effect of excessive and asymmetrical premaxillary scars, of the 2-step cheiloplasty and of columella lengthenings from the lip. The frequency of secondary revision of the superior labial vestibule and the medial labial tubercule (43%) was considered to be high; this procedure should be re-examined as should be osteotomy (32% revision). Palatine closure, acquired in 82% of the cases and premaxillary stability, achieved in 86%, would appear to favor use of the periosteal tibial graft. The osteogenic capacity of this graft tissue was less satisfactory after a second harvesting (from the same tibia three months later). These results have led us to modify our protocol, favoring early and total closure of the bony palate and continued use of the periosteal tibial graft. We now use the following operative protocol: premaxillary alignment using an active orthopedic plate at 2 months, lip adhesion associated with staphylorraphy and passive palatine contention plate at 3 months, definitive bilateral cheilo-uranoplasty associated with a single periosteal graft at 7 months. The preliminary results with this protocol in a group of 12 children have shown better quality scars, more harmonious maxillary arches, an excellent occlusion of the deciduous dentition, and preservation of the positive results

  6. Frequency of oronasal fistulae in complete cleft palate repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of oro-nasal fistula in patients undergoing complete cleft palate repair by two flappalatoplasty. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Plastic Surgery, Services Hospital, Lahore, from January to December 2013. Methodology: Patients admitted to the study place for repair of cleft palate after informed consent obtained were included. Cleft palate was repaired by two-flap palatoplasty, using Bardach technique. Patients were discharged on the second postoperative day and followed-up at third week postoperatively. During follow-up visits, fistulae formation and their sites were recorded on pre-designed proforma. Results: Among the total 90 patients, 40 patients (44.4%) were male and 50 patients (55.6%) were female. The mean age was 6.4 +- 5.7 years ranging from 9 months to 20 years. At third week follow-up, 5 patients (5.6%) had fistulae formation. Four patients (80%) had anterior fistulae and one patient (20%) had posterior fistula. Conclusion: With two-flap palatoplasty Bardach procedure for repair of cleft palate, the complication of fistula formation was uncommon at 5.6%, provided the repair was tension free and multi-layered. (author)

  7. Cleft Palate Repair Using a Double Opposing Z-Plasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Craig; Shah, Ajul; Steinbacher, Derek M

    2016-07-01

    Cleft palate is a common congenital defect with several described surgical repairs. The most successful treatment modality remains a controversy. The goals of repair focus on achievement of normal speech and optimizing velopharyngeal function while minimizing both fistula formation and facial growth restriction. In this video, the authors demonstrate use of the double opposing Z-plasty technique in the repair of a Veau II type cleft palate. The video demonstrates the marking, incisions, dissection, and repair of the cleft. It also examines the use of von Langenbeck-type relaxing incisions and demonstrates a specific approach to the repair of this particular cleft. The authors believe that the Furlow double opposing Z-plasty with the von Langenbeck relaxing incision can provide the best postoperative outcome by combining the benefits of each individual operation. The Z-plasty technique works to correct the aberrant muscle of the soft palate while increasing the length of the palate. The authors believe that this results in better velopharyngeal function.

  8. Contemporary Approaches in the Repair of Alveolar Clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Tatli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. The repair of the alveolar clefts is an important part of the treatment for patients with cleft lip and palate. The treatment concepts of alveolar bone grafting are still controversial. The corresponding controversial issues are; timing of alveolar bone grafting, graft materials, and timing of the orthodontic expansion. In the present article, aforementioned controversial issues and contemporary treatment modalities of the maxillary alveolar clefts were reviewed in the light of current literature. In conclusion, the most suitable time for alveolar bone grafting is mixed dentition period. Grafting procedure may be performed in the early or late phases of this period depending on some clinical features. Adjunct orthodontic expansion procedures should be performed before and/or after grafting depending on the patient's current features. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 563-574

  9. [A modified Onizuka cheiloplasty for repairing the unilateral cleft lip].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Chao; Liu, Qiang; Li, Zengjian; Xu, Xianyi

    2011-08-01

    To explore the surgical technique of a modified Onizuka cheiloplasty for repairing the unilateral cleft lip. 24 patients with unilateral cleft lip were repaired by modified Onizuka cheiloplasty. The rotation flap ended at the midpoint of nasal columella crease. A small triangle skin flap was formed above the vermilion border of the advancement flap. The small triangle flap was inserted to the medial side after the Cupid's bow was built. The skin of the flap C was denuded along the nasal columella crease and the muscle was sutured to the alar base for augmentation of nostril floor on the cleft side. The tip of the advancement flap was sutured at the midpoint of nasal columella crease and the skin of nasal floor was trimmed to hide the incision line around the nasal columella base. It was found that the Cupid's bow was rebuilt in a natural form and the configuration of the upper lip was reconstructed symmetrically. The long term follow up studies showed that the philtrum column was not disturbed by the small triangle flap and the nasal floor was rebuilt without obvious scars. The modified Onizuka cheiloplasty is an easy learning technique and efficient for repairing the unilateral cleft lip. This technique can satisfy the patients by reducing the length of scar as well as rebuilding a natural form of upper lip and nostril floor.

  10. The "Double" Tessier 7 Cleft: An Unusual Presentation of a Transverse Facial Cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveendran, Janani A; Chao, Jerry W; Rogers, Gary F; Boyajian, Michael J

    2018-07-01

    Congenital macrostomia, or Tessier number 7 cleft, is a rare craniofacial anomaly. We present a unique patient with bilateral macrostomia that consisted of a "double" transverse cleft on the left side and a single transverse cleft on the right side. A staged reconstructive approach was used to repair the "double" left-sided clefts. This staged technique produced a satisfactory aesthetic and functional outcome.

  11. Swallowing function after laryngeal cleft repair: more than just fixing the cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Alexander J; de Alarcon, Alessandro; Tabangin, Meredith E; Miller, Claire K; Cotton, Robin T; Rutter, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate and describe the swallowing function in children after laryngeal cleft repair. Ten-year (2002-2012) retrospective chart review. Academic tertiary care pediatric otolaryngology practice. Records of 60 children who had surgical repair of laryngeal cleft (ages 2 weeks-14 years) and postoperative functional endoscopic evaluation of swallowing or videofluoroscopic swallow studies were examined retrospectively. Twenty-nine children had one postoperative swallow evaluation, 19 children had two, 4 children had three, 5 children had four, and 3 children had five. Median time to the first evaluation was 10.8 weeks (interquartile range [IQR]: 36.5, 231). On the final swallow evaluation, 34 (57%) children demonstrated normal swallowing parameters, 12 (20%) children showed penetration, and 14 (23%) children showed aspiration. Forty-three (72%) children were able to take everything by mouth normally or with minor behavioral modifications, 11 (18%) children required thickened fluids, and six (10%) children were kept nil per os (NPO). Mean improvement on the penetration-aspiration (pen-asp) scale was 2.13. On multivariable analysis, neurodevelopmental issues and gastronomy tube use were associated with the need for NPO status. Despite a high rate of surgical success, a substantial minority of children have persistent swallowing dysfunction after laryngeal cleft repair. Swallowing dysfunction after repair is multifactorial and arises from concomitant neurologic, anatomic, or other comorbidities that contribute to oropharyngeal and pharyngeal dysphagia. Based on our results, we recommend a testing schedule for postoperative swallowing evaluations after cleft repair. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health conditions > Cleft lip and cleft palate Cleft lip and cleft palate E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... repair cleft lip and palate. What are cleft lip and cleft palate? Cleft lip is a birth defect in which ...

  13. Bilateral branchial cleft anomaly type two and type three seen together

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Okan Gürsel; Yusuf Eren; Vefa Kınış; Cüneyt Kucur

    2012-01-01

    Branchial apparatus begins to develop at about secondweek of gestation and each complex will transform intodifferent structures in the head and neck. Branchial cleftanomalies develop due to defect in the closure of thesestructures by time. Branchial cleft anomalies may be diagnosedat any age but most of them are seen in pediatricpopulation. Although, branchial cleft anomalies are frequentlyseen, bilateral cases, which have been reportedare very rare. We present a 14 years old boy who wasdiagn...

  14. Frontal Encephalocele Associated With a Bilateral Tessier Number Three Cleft and Fraser Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Benjamin C; Yi, Sojung; Oh, Albert K; Rogers, Gary F; Magge, Suresh N

    2015-09-01

    Oblique craniofacial clefts and encephaloceles are each rare conditions, and only a few instances of these findings in combination have been described. Each pathologic entity presents a unique reconstructive challenge. The authors report the case of a male infant who presented with a large right frontoencephalocele and bilateral Tessier number 3 clefts. A review of the pertinent literature, including specific considerations related to perioperative management and technical aspects of the surgical approach, is discussed.

  15. Craniofacial morphology in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate patients consecutively treated with 1-stage repair of the cleft.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fudalej, P.S.; Surowiec, Z.; Offert, B.; Dudkiewicz, Z.; Katsaros, C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively evaluate the craniofacial morphology of children with a complete unilateral cleft lip and palate treated with a 1-stage simultaneous cleft repair performed in the first year of life. METHODS: Cephalograms and extraoral profile photographs of 61 consecutively treated

  16. Esthetic evaluation of the facial profile in rehabilitated adults with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari Júnior, Flávio Mauro; Ayub, Priscila Vaz; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Pereira Lauris, José Roberto; Garib, Daniela Gamba

    2015-01-01

    To assess the facial esthetics of patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate, and to compare the judgment of raters related and unrelated to cleft care. The sample comprised 23 adult patients (7 women and 16 men) with a mean age of 26.1 years, rehabilitated at a single center. Standardized photographs of the right and left facial profile were taken of each patient and subjectively evaluated by 25 examiners: 5 orthodontists and 5 plastic surgeons with expertise in oral cleft rehabilitation, 5 orthodontists and 5 plastic surgeons without expertise in oral cleft rehabilitation, and 5 laypersons. The facial profiles were classified into 3 categories: esthetically unpleasant, esthetically acceptable, and esthetically pleasant. Intraexaminer and interexaminer agreements were evaluated with the Spearman correlation coefficient and Kendall coefficient of concordance. The differences between rater categories were analyzed using the Student-Newman-Keuls test (with P esthetically acceptable. Orthodontists and plastic surgeons related to oral cleft rehabilitation gave the best scores to the facial profiles, followed by layperson examiners and by orthodontists and plastic surgeons unrelated to oral cleft rehabilitation. The middle third of the face, the nose, and the upper lip were frequently pointed out as contributors to the esthetic impairment. The facial profile of rehabilitated adult patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate was considered esthetically acceptable because of morphologic limitations in the structures affected by the cleft. Laypersons and professionals unrelated to oral cleft rehabilitation seem to be more critical regarding facial esthetics than professionals involved with cleft rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Bilateral branchial cleft anomaly type two and type three seen together

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Okan Gürsel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Branchial apparatus begins to develop at about secondweek of gestation and each complex will transform intodifferent structures in the head and neck. Branchial cleftanomalies develop due to defect in the closure of thesestructures by time. Branchial cleft anomalies may be diagnosedat any age but most of them are seen in pediatricpopulation. Although, branchial cleft anomalies are frequentlyseen, bilateral cases, which have been reportedare very rare. We present a 14 years old boy who wasdiagnosed and operated due to bilateral branchial cleftanomaly. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3(1: 99-101

  18. Economic Analysis of Cleft Palate Repair in International Adoptees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson-Hansen, Sandra; Paliga, J Thomas; Tahiri, Youssef; Paine, Kaitlyn M; Bartlett, Scott P; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-09-01

    Retrospective cohort study. Major international tertiary care referral center for cleft palate repair. One hundred thirty-eight patients at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia who had palate repair performed between 2010 and 2013, excluding syndromic patients, patients undergoing palate revision, and patients with incomplete payment information. None. Fees and charges for procedures. Surgeon payment was significantly higher for international adoptees (Δ = $2047.51 [$128.35 to $3966.66], P = .038). Medicaid-adjusted surgeon payments averaged $1006 more for adoptees ([-$394.19 to $2406.98], P = .158). Hospital and anesthesiology costs for adoptee palate repair were highly variable but did not differ significantly from those for nonadoptees. Partly due to payer mix, surgeon reimbursement was somewhat higher for international adoptees. No difference in total payment was found.

  19. Satisfaction with treatment outcome in bilateral cleft lip and palate patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, B.C.; Dijkstra, Pieter; Remmelink, H; van Oort, R.P.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, S.M.; Sandham, John; de Bont, L.G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this case-controlled study was to assess satisfaction with facial appearance and function, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in bilateral cleft lip and palate patients (BCLP). The study sample was composed of adult BCLP subjects and controls matched for age, gender and

  20. Surgical repair of a congenital sternal cleft in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Ilona; Bavegems, Valerie C A; Vandekerckhove, Peter M F P; Melis, Sanne M; Cornillie, Pieter; de Rooster, Hilde

    2014-07-01

    To describe the clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment of an incomplete cleft of the 5th-8th sternebra and a cranioventral abdominal wall hernia in a 2 month old Ragdoll kitten and to evaluate the short- and long-term outcome. Clinical report. Ragdoll cat (n = 1), 2 months old. Sternal cleft was confirmed by thoracic radiographs. Computed tomography (CT) was used to plan an optimal surgical approach. A ventral median incision was made, starting at the 3rd sternebra and extended into the abdomen. Ostectomy of the proximal part of the 5th left sternebra was performed. Lateral periosteal flaps were created, unfolded, and absorbable monofilament sutures preplaced to facilitate closure and the repair was reinforced by 2 peristernal sutures. A bone graft was applied, and the free margin of the omentum was sutured to the cranial aspect of the wound. No major complications occurred. At 3 weeks, CT scan confirmed approximation of the hemisternebrae and at 10 months, complete fusion of the hemisternebrae had not occurred, but a strong connection of the sternal bars was present. Sternal cleft is a rare congenital abnormality that can be corrected surgically with favorable outcome. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. Cleft Lip and Palate Repair Using a Surgical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Motoi; Watanabe, Azusa; Watanabe, Shoji; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Takayuki; Ogishima, Shinya

    2017-11-01

    Cleft lip and palate repair requires a deep and small surgical field and is usually performed by surgeons wearing surgical loupes. Surgeons with loupes can obtain a wider surgical view, although headlights are required for the deepest procedures. Surgical microscopes offer comfort and a clear and magnification-adjustable surgical site that can be shared with the whole team, including observers, and easily recorded to further the education of junior surgeons. Magnification adjustments are convenient for precise procedures such as muscle dissection of the soft palate. We performed a comparative investigation of 18 cleft operations that utilized either surgical loupes or microscopy. Paper-based questionnaires were completed by staff nurses to evaluate what went well and what could be improved in each procedure. The operating time, complication rate, and scores of the questionnaire responses were statistically analyzed. The operating time when microscopy was used was not significantly longer than when surgical loupes were utilized. The surgical field was clearly shared with surgical assistants, nurses, anesthesiologists, and students via microscope-linked monitors. Passing surgical equipment was easier when sharing the surgical view, and preoperative microscope preparation did not interfere with the duties of the staff nurses. Surgical microscopy was demonstrated to be useful during cleft operations.

  2. Growth-related changes of skeletal and upper-airway features in bilateral cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu-Guven, Bengisu; Karakaya, Jale; Ozgur, Figen; Aksu, Muge

    2015-10-01

    The craniofacial morphology of subjects with cleft lip and palate differs from that of subjects without clefts. Subjects with bilateral cleft lip and palate tend to have maxillary retrognathism, a smaller mandible with an obtuse gonial angle, greater anterior upper and lower facial heights, and retroclined maxillary incisors. The purposes of this research were to compare the skeletal and upper-airway features of subjects with bilateral cleft lip and palate with the same features in control subjects without clefts and to determine the growth-related changes at different growth stages. The sample comprised 212 subjects divided into 2 groups: 68 with bilateral cleft lip and palate, and 144 controls without clefts; each group was further divided into 4 subgroups according to growth stage using the cervical vertebral maturation stage method. The subgroups were defined as early childhood (stage 1), prepubertal (stage 2), pubertal (stage 3), and postpubertal (stage 4). The cephalometric variables were evaluated with 2-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni test. Maxillary position showed no significant differences between the male groups. The maxilla was more prognathic at stage 2 and became more retrognathic at stages 3 and 4 in the females. The mandible was more retrusive in the bilateral cleft lip and palate subjects at stage 1 in males and at stages 3 and 4 in females. ANB was larger at stages 1 and 2, and it became similar to the controls at stages 3 and 4 in male and female bilateral cleft lip and palate subjects. Vertical growth was seen in the bilateral cleft lip and palate subjects regardless of sex, and no change was observed with age. Posterior airway space was narrower in all stages (except for stage 1 in females). Middle airway space was wider after stage 1 in the male and female bilateral cleft lip and palate subjects. Inferior airway space was narrower in the male bilateral cleft lip and palate patients at the early childhood and pubertal stages. Age

  3. A new incision for unilateral cleft lip repair developed using animated simulation of repair on computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahay A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unilateral cleft lip repair continues to leave behind some amount of dissatisfaction, as a scope for further improvement is always felt. Most surgeons do not like to deviate from the standard Millard′s/ triangular techniques, or their minor modifications, as no one likes to experiment on the face for fear of unfavourable outcomes. The computer can be utilized as a useful tool in the analysis and planning of surgery and new methods can be developed and attempted subsequently with greater confidence. Aim: We decided to see if an improved lip repair could be developed with the use of computers. Materials and Methods: Analysis of previous lip repairs was done to determine where an improvement was required. Movement of tissues, by simulating an ideal repair, using image warping software, on digital images of cleft lip was studied in animation sequences. A repair which could reproduce these movements was planned. A new incision emerged, which had combined the principles of Millard′s and Randall / Tennyson repairs, with additional features. The new method was performed on 30 cases. Conclusions: The results were encouraging as the shortcomings of these methods were minimized, and the advantages maximized.

  4. Analysis of the correlative factors for velopharyngeal closure of patients with cleft palate after primary repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Li, Yang; Shi, Bing; Yin, Heng; Zheng, Guang-Ning; Zheng, Qian

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the correlative factors for velopharyngeal closure of patients with cleft palate after primary repair. Ninety-five nonsyndromic patients with cleft palate were enrolled. Two surgical techniques were applied in the patients: simple palatoplasty and combined palatoplasty with pharyngoplasty. All patients were assessed 6 months after the operation. The postoperative velopharyngeal closure (VPC) rate was compared by χ(2) test and the correlative factors were analyzed with logistic regression model. The postoperative VPC rate of young patients was higher than that of old patients, the group with incomplete cleft palate was higher than the group with complete cleft palate, and combined palatoplasty with pharyngoplasty was higher than simple palatoplasty. Operative age, cleft type, and surgical technique were the contributing factors for postoperative VPC rate. Operative age, cleft type, and surgical technique were significant factors influencing postoperative VPC rate of patients with cleft palate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dental anomalies associated with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Wafa A; Beiraghi, Soraya; Leon-Salazar, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of dental anomalies in the primary and permanent dentition of patients with unilateral (UCLP) and bilateral (BCLP) cleft lip with or without palate. One hundred two complete clinical records were randomly selected for review from a university-based cleft palate clinic. Only nonsyndromic UCLP and BCLP cases were further selected for analysis of dental anomalies. The prevalence of 9 dental categories, including anomalies in number, crown structure, position, and maxillary-mandibular relationship, was assessed and compared between UCLP and BCLP cases using Fisher's exact test. Of the 102 charts evaluated, there were 67 cases of UCLP and 29 cases of BCLP for a total of 96 cases. There was a high prevalence of dental anomalies in primary and permanent teeth; 93% of UCLP cases and 96% of BCLP cases presented with at least 1 dental anomaly. Significant differences ( P dental anomalies associated with orofacial clefts regardless of whether they are unilateral or bilateral cleft lip with or without palate.

  6. The impact of cleft lip and palate repair on maxillofacial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bing; Losee, Joseph E

    2015-03-23

    Surgical correction is central to current team-approached cleft treatment. Cleft surgeons are always concerned about the impact of their surgical maneuver on the growth of the maxilla. Hypoplastic maxilla, concaved mid-face and deformed dental arch have constantly been reported after cleft treatments. It is very hard to completely circumvent these postoperative complications by current surgical protocols. In this paper, we discussed the factors that inhibit the maxillofacial growth on cleft patients. These factors included pre-surgical intervention, the timing of cleft palate and alveolae repair, surgical design and treatment protocol. Also, we made a review about the influence on the maxillary growth in un-operated cleft patients. On the basis of previous researches, we can conclude that most of scholars express identity of views in these aspects: early palatoplasty lead to maxilla growth inhibition in all dimensions; secondary alveolar bone graft had no influence on maxilla sagittal growth; cleft lip repair inhibited maxilla sagittal length in patients with cleft lip and palate; Veau's pushback palatoplasty and Langenbeck's palatoplasty with relaxing incisions were most detrimental to growth; Furlow palatoplasty showed little detrimental effect on maxilla growth; timing of hard palate closure, instead of the sequence of hard or soft palate repair, determined the postoperative growth. Still, scholars hold controversial viewpoints in some issues, for example, un-operated clefts have normal growth potential or not, pre-surgical intervention and pharyngoplasty inhibited maxillofacial growth or not.

  7. The impact of cleft lip and palate repair on maxillofacial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bing; Losee, Joseph E

    2015-01-01

    Surgical correction is central to current team-approached cleft treatment. Cleft surgeons are always concerned about the impact of their surgical maneuver on the growth of the maxilla. Hypoplastic maxilla, concaved mid-face and deformed dental arch have constantly been reported after cleft treatments. It is very hard to completely circumvent these postoperative complications by current surgical protocols. In this paper, we discussed the factors that inhibit the maxillofacial growth on cleft patients. These factors included pre-surgical intervention, the timing of cleft palate and alveolae repair, surgical design and treatment protocol. Also, we made a review about the influence on the maxillary growth in un-operated cleft patients. On the basis of previous researches, we can conclude that most of scholars express identity of views in these aspects: early palatoplasty lead to maxilla growth inhibition in all dimensions; secondary alveolar bone graft had no influence on maxilla sagittal growth; cleft lip repair inhibited maxilla sagittal length in patients with cleft lip and palate; Veau's pushback palatoplasty and Langenbeck's palatoplasty with relaxing incisions were most detrimental to growth; Furlow palatoplasty showed little detrimental effect on maxilla growth; timing of hard palate closure, instead of the sequence of hard or soft palate repair, determined the postoperative growth. Still, scholars hold controversial viewpoints in some issues, for example, un-operated clefts have normal growth potential or not, pre-surgical intervention and pharyngoplasty inhibited maxillofacial growth or not. PMID:25394591

  8. Bilateral acute visual loss from Rathke's cleft cyst apoplexy in a patient with dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia De Franco Suzuki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic complications of optic pathway diseases are extremely rare causes of acute visual loss associated with dengue fever. In this paper we report a patient presenting with dengue fever and bilateral acute visual loss caused by chiasmal compression due to Rathke's cleft cyst apoplexy. Considering the importance of early diagnosis and treatment to visual recovery, apoplexy of sellar and suprasellar tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute visual loss and dengue fever.

  9. Nasalance Scores of Children with Repaired Cleft Palate Who Exhibit Normal Velopharyngeal Closure during Aerodynamic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if children with repaired cleft palate and normal velopharyngeal (VP) closure as determined by aerodynamic testing exhibit greater acoustic nasalance than control children without cleft palate. Method: Pressure-flow procedures were used to identify 2 groups of children based on VP closure during the production of /p/ in the…

  10. Techniques and outcome of repair of cleft of the secondary palate at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The technique adopted in the repair of cleft of the secondary palate must not just be based on the choice of the surgeon but on several factors which include the width of the cleft, length of palate and age of the patient. The aim of the article was to document our 4-year experience of the techniques and outcome ...

  11. Bilateral pharyngoceles (branchial cleft anomalies?) and endoscopic surgical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Christopher Y; Furdyna, Julia A

    2005-07-01

    A case report of bilateral pharyngoceles without a history of elevated intrapharyngeal pressures is used to support the hypothesis that pharyngoceles may be an adult manifestation of an internal branchial sinus anomaly. The development of a pharyngocele from a branchial sinus origin would suggest a predictable relationship to the hypoglossal, glossopharyngeal, and superior laryngeal nerves, which may influence the choice of surgical approach (open versus endoscopic) and the counseling of patients who are considering surgical correction.

  12. One-Stage Cleft Lip and Palate Repair in an Older Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guneren, Ethem; Canter, Halil Ibrahim; Yildiz, Kemalettin; Kayan, Resit Burak; Ozpur, Mustafa Aykut; Baygol, Emre Gonenc; Sagir, Haci Omer; Kuzu, Ismail Melih; Akman, Onur; Arslan, Serap

    2015-07-01

    In underdeveloped countries one-stage definitive repair of cleft lip and palate is considered for late-presenting patients. A total of 25 patients with unoperated cleft lip and palate more than 2 years of age were enrolled in this study for one-stage simultaneous repair of cleft lip and palate. According to Veau-Wardill-Kilner push-back technique, 2 flap palatoplasties were performed for palatal repairs; all of the lips were repaired with the Millard II rotation-advancement technique. The authors experienced no perioperative or postoperative life-threatening complications. With respect to the registered operation periods, longer times were required to perform these double operations, but this elongation is shorter than the sum of the periods if the 2 operations had been performed separately. Although the authors were unable to evaluate the late postoperative results because the authors could not follow-up the patients after they were discharged the day after surgery, the early results related to the success of the operation without any surgical complication were prone to meet the parents' and patients' expectations. The authors presented their experiences with many volunteer cleft lip and palate trips to third world countries; however the structure of this article is not a new hypothesis and data based to support a scientific study, but observations are objective to get a conclusion. To perform one-stage definitive repair of the cleft lip and palate in late-presented patients was the reality that they had only 1 chance to undergo these operations. According to the terms and conditions of this challenging operation, one-stage simultaneous repair of cleft lip and palate is a more demanding and time-consuming procedure than is isolated cleft lip repair or cleft palate repair. Although technically challenging, single-stage repair of the whole deformity in late-presenting patients is a feasible, reliable, successful, and safe procedure in authors' experience.

  13. Fourth-dimensional changes in nasolabial dimensions following rotation-advancement repair of unilateral cleft lip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulliken, John B; LaBrie, Richard A

    2012-02-01

    Repair of unilateral cleft lip requires three-dimensional craftsmanship and understanding four-dimensional changes. Ninety-nine children with unilateral complete or incomplete cleft lip were measured by direct anthropometry following rotation-advancement repair (intraoperatively) and again in childhood. Changes in heminasal width, labial height, and labial width were analyzed and compared measures depending on whether the cleft was incomplete/complete or involved left/right side. Average heminasal width (sn-al) was set 1 mm less on the cleft side and measured only 0.7 mm less at 6 years. Labial height (sn-cphi) was slightly greater on the cleft side at repair and matched the noncleft side at follow-up. Vertical dimension (sbal-cphi) was slightly less at operation; the percent change was the same on both sides. Transverse labial width (cphi-ch) was set short on the cleft side and lengthened disproportionately, resulting in less than 1 mm difference at 6 years. All anthropometric dimensions grew less in complete cleft lips compared with incomplete forms; however, only labial height and width were significantly different. There were no disparities in nasolabial growth between left- and right-sided cleft lips. Cleft side alar base drifts laterally and should be positioned slightly more medial and secured to nasalis or periosteum. Growth in labial height lags and, therefore, the repaired side should be equal to or slightly greater than on the normal side, particularly in a complete labial cleft. Transverse labial width grows more on the cleft side; thus, lateral Cupid's bow peak point can be marked closer to the commissure to match the labial height on the noncleft side. Therapeutic, IV.

  14. Influence of different palate repair protocols on facial growth in unilateral complete cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xue; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Shi, Bing; Zheng, Qian; Yin, Heng; Li, Chenghao

    2015-01-01

    To address the question of whether one- or two-stage palatal treatment protocol has fewer detrimental effects on craniofacial growth in patients aged 5 years with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate. Forty patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCCLPs) who had received primary cleft lip repair at age 6-12 months and cleft palate repair at age 18-30 months were selected in this study. Eighteen UCCLP patients who received two-stage palate repair were selected as group 1, and 22 UCCLP patients who received one-stage palate repair were selected as group 2. The control group consisted of 20 patients with unilateral incomplete cleft lip (UICL patients) whose age and gender matched with UCCLP patients. A one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to analyze the nature of data distribution. Bonferroni test and Kruskal-Wallis H tests were used for multiple comparisons. Both case groups showed reduced maxillary sagittal length (ANS-PMP, A-PM, p palate repair had a reduced posterior maxillary vertical height (R-PMP, p palate repair. Vomer flap repair inhibited maxilla vertical growth. Delayed hard palate repair showed less detrimental effects on maxillary growth compared to early hard palate repair in UCCLP patients aged 5 years. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Relationship between nasolabial appearance and self-esteem in adolescent with repaired cleft lip and cleft palate at Khon Kaen University Cleft Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patjanasoontornm, Niramol; Wongniyom, Kusalapom; Pradubwong, Suteera; Piyavhakul, Navanant; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2014-10-01

    To examine levels of self-esteem of adolescents with repaired cleft lip and cleft palate at Khon Kaen University Cleft Center and its correlation with nasolabial appearance. Across-sectional survey of 93 adolescents with repaired cleft lip and palate. A total nasolabial appearance score was 2.8 +/- 0.36 (fair to good). The mean of the total self-esteem score for all respondents was 20.11 +/- 3.27 (maximum 30). There was no-significant correlation between nasolabial appearance and self esteem (Pearson product-moment correlation coefficiency (r) = 0.18, p = 0.08. The self-esteem scores of good, fair and poor appearance were 20.5 +/- 0.98, 19.8 +/- 0.32, 19 +/- 2.09 respectively. The nasolabial appearance of repaired cleft lip and palate not be the only factor but other psychosocialfactors also may play a role in their self-esteem. The analysis of this study found no relationship between self-esteem and appearance.

  16. Bilateral Laparoscopic Totally Extraperitoneal Repair Without Mesh Fixation

    OpenAIRE

    Dehal, Ahmed; Woodward, Brandon; Johna, Samir; Yamanishi, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Mesh fixation during laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair is thought to be necessary to prevent recurrence. However, mesh fixation may increase postoperative chronic pain. This study aimed to describe the experience of a single surgeon at our institution performing this operation. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of all patients who underwent bilateral laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair without mesh fixation for ing...

  17. Dentofacial morphology in adolescent or early adult patients with cleft lip and palate after a treatment regimen that included vomer flap surgery and pushback palatal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, H; Lilja, J

    1994-06-01

    Dentofacial morphology was evaluated in 94 adolescent or early adult patients born with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate. As well as lip closure, the primary treatment included vomer flap surgery and pushback palatal repair. Roentgencephalometric measurements as well as classification of the patients into different classes of dentofacial deformity indicated development of bimaxillary retrognathia with severe midfacial deficiency in about a quarter of the cases. Our results were similar to those reported by other teams who used similar surgical regimen.

  18. Bilateral inguinal hernia repair: laparoscopic or open approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliu, X; Clavería, R; Besora, P; Camps, J; Fernández-Sallent, E; Viñas, X; Abad, J M

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate outcomes in the treatment of bilateral inguinal hernia, comparing the laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) and open tension-free mesh repair (LICHT) approaches. We performed a prospective controlled non randomized clinical study in 128 patients with bilateral inguinal hernia over a period of 3 years. LICHT was used in 106 cases (53 patients) while TEP was employed in 150 cases (75 patients). The main outcome measurements were: recurrence rate, operating time, hospital stay and postoperative complications. There were three recurrences (2.3%): two in the LICHT group (3.8%) and one (1.3%) in the TEP group P = NS. The TEP procedure was faster than LICHT repair (48.8 ± 10.8 vs. 70.4 ± 11.2 min) P approach is an effective option for the treatment of bilateral inguinal hernia when performed by experienced surgeons.

  19. Barriers to Cleft Lip and Palate Repair Around the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massenburg, Benjamin B; Jenny, Hillary E; Saluja, Saurabh; Meara, John G; Shrime, Mark G; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2016-10-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) is estimated to occur in 1 out of every 700 births, but for many people residing in low- and middle-income countries this deformity may be repaired late in life or not at all. This study aims to analyze worldwide provider-perceived barriers to the surgical repair of CLP in low- and middle-income countries. From 2011 to 2014, Smile Train distributed a multiple-choice, voluntary survey to healthcare providers to identify areas of need in CLP care worldwide. Data on provider-reported barriers to care were aggregated by year, country, and larger world regions. A total of 1997 surveys were completed by surgeons and healthcare providers (60.7% response rate). The most commonly reported barriers were "patient travel costs" (60.7%), "lack of patient awareness" (54.1%), and "lack of financial support" (52.8%). "Patient travel costs" was the most commonly reported barrier in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, and South and Southeast Asia. "Lack of financial support" was the most commonly reported barrier in the Americas, Eastern Europe, and East Asia. This is the largest intercontinental study on healthcare provider-identified barriers to care, representing the limitations experienced by healthcare professionals in providing corrective surgery for CLP around the world. Financial risk protection from hidden costs, such as patient travel costs, is essential. Community health workers and nurses are critical for communication and linking CLP care to the rest of the community. Recognition of these barriers can inform future policy decisions, targeted by region, for surgical systems delivering care for patients with CLP worldwide.

  20. Intracranial Migration of K-wire in a Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Vimala

    2014-01-01

    A 16-year-old female patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate reported for orthodontic treatment. Upon routine investigations, presence of a K-wire that was fixed when patient was around 6 months old, and now had migrated intracranially was made. As K-wire is notorious for its migration to distant places and, that any further impending migration, may in future present a serious problem, the wire was removed after necessary precautions. This case report should be an eye opener and post a caution to general, medical, surgical practitioners and orthodontists.

  1. Strategies to Improve Regeneration of the Soft Palate Muscles After Cleft Palate Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L.; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A.D.T.G.

    2012-01-01

    Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. These patients are unable to separate the nasal from the oral cavity leading to air loss during speech. Although surgical repair ameliorates soft palate function by joining the clefted muscles of the soft palate, optimal function is often not achieved. The regeneration of muscles in the soft palate after surgery is hampered because of (1) their low intrinsic regenerative capacity, (2) the muscle properties related to clefting, and (3) the development of fibrosis. Adjuvant strategies based on tissue engineering may improve the outcome after surgery by approaching these specific issues. Therefore, this review will discuss myogenesis in the noncleft and cleft palate, the characteristics of soft palate muscles, and the process of muscle regeneration. Finally, novel therapeutic strategies based on tissue engineering to improve soft palate function after surgical repair are presented. PMID:22697475

  2. Pre-directional appliance: A new approach to correct shifted premaxilla in bilateral cleft cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Daigavane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of bilateral cleft lip and palate cases is a challenging task, and if the premaxilla is shifted to either side, it poses a problem for the surgeon to operate and also for the orthodontist to do the orthodontic alignment. The aim of this study was to reposition the shifted premaxilla for better retraction with presurgical infant orthopedics, thus reducing the tissue tension and further scarring which have detrimental effects on maxillary growth. The innovative technique with pre-directional (PD appliance is easy to fabricate and use and works in this direction. Acrylic, springs, permasoft liner, elastics, retentive tapes. Previous approach for the shifted premaxilla was more focused on the surgical correction. In adults, surgery with osteotomy is the only option, with its own limitations and disadvantages, in repositioning the shifted premaxilla. Thus, PD appliance aids to correct the shifted premaxilla in presurgical molding stage. The premaxilla was thus shifted 5.5 mm to the left side, with premaxilla in facial symmetry, with the PD appliance. Presurgical orthopedics with PD appliance is worth in infants with shifted premaxilla in bilateral clefts cases.

  3. Assessing the effectiveness of massage therapy for bilateral cleft lip reconstruction scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Emilie

    2014-06-01

    Bilateral cleft lips occur when the bones that form the upper lip fail to fuse at birth. Surgical reconstruction creates scars, which may lead to the following impairments: adhesions, decreased oral range of motion, decreased strength of orbicularis oris muscle, and asymmetry of oral region leading to poor self-esteem. The purpose of this case study is to determine the effectiveness of massage therapy in its ability to improve these impairments. A five-week treatment plan consisting of fascial release, kneading, and intraoral techniques. Subjective information was assessed on two scales: restriction of scar and clients attitudes and acceptance of scar. Objective information was cataloged through photographs, a palpatory chart, and a self-created "Pen Test". Results included increase range of motion and strength, decrease restrictions (palpable and subjective), and increase of symmetry. Client's perceived confidence of scar and its appearance increased. The evidence suggests that massage therapy helped with the impairments associated with scars formed by bilateral cleft lip reconstruction.

  4. Nasal airway and septal variation in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Friel, Michael T; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Flores, Roberto L; Tholpady, Sunil; Kula, Katherine

    2014-10-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) affects the dentoalveolar and nasolabial facial regions. Internal and external nasal dysmorphology may persist in individuals born with CLP despite surgical interventions. 7-18 year old individuals born with unilateral and bilateral CLP (n = 50) were retrospectively assessed using cone beam computed tomography. Anterior, middle, and posterior nasal airway volumes were measured on each facial side. Septal deviation was measured at the anterior and posterior nasal spine, and the midpoint between these two locations. Data were evaluated using principal components analysis (PCA), multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and post-hoc ANOVA tests. PCA results show partial separation in high dimensional space along PC1 (48.5% variance) based on age groups and partial separation along PC2 (29.8% variance) based on CLP type and septal deviation patterns. MANOVA results indicate that age (P = 0.007) and CLP type (P ≤ 0.001) significantly affect nasal airway volume and septal deviation. ANOVA results indicate that anterior nasal volume is significantly affected by age (P ≤ 0.001), whereas septal deviation patterns are significantly affected by CLP type (P ≤ 0.001). Age and CLP type affect nasal airway volume and septal deviation patterns. Nasal airway volumes tend to be reduced on the clefted sides of the face relative to non-clefted sides of the face. Nasal airway volumes tend to strongly increase with age, whereas septal deviation values tend to increase only slightly with age. These results suggest that functional nasal breathing may be impaired in individuals born with the unilateral and bilateral CLP deformity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cleft palate repair with the use of osmotic expanders: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Kazimierz F

    2007-01-01

    A new method of cleft palate repair by expansion of tissue by means of osmotic expanders implanted in the first stage of treatment is described. Self-expanding expanders manufactured by OSMED (Ilmenau, Germany) were implanted under the mucoperiosteal layer of the hard palate, on purpose to generate more tissue and provide facility for palate repair performed 24-48h later. Nineteen children aged from 2 to 3 years were operated from January 2004 to 15 April 2005. In clefts10mm, cleft palate repair was more difficult and the outcomes were less favourable. Despite more generous dissection of the neurovascular bundles and other adjunctive measures such as mucosal V-Y plasty [Bardach J, Salyer K. Surgical techniques in cleft lip and palate. Chicago, London: Year Book Medical Publishers, Inc.; 1987.] and suturing of the mucosal grafts at the border of the hard and soft palate, seven 2-4mm fistulae were noted, however. Concluding, in spite of some shortcomings and unacceptable rate of fistula in wide clefts, the above-presented method seems to be an attractive concept. Despite some technical problems related mostly to still tested optimal filling phase, tissue expansion makes palate repair easier, probably without relaxing incisions and bone denudation. Consequently, some adverse effects on facial growth may be reduced. So far, there is no evidence for it, however, and since this is a preliminary report, there is a need for longer observations and larger material.

  6. The Effects of Age at Cleft Palate Repair on Middle Ear Function and Hearing Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qun; Zhu, Hongping; Luo, Yi; Zhou, Zhibo; Ma, Lian; Ma, Xiaoran; Fu, Yuan

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the age effects of cleft palate repair on middle ear function and hearing level in patients who underwent cleft palate repair at different ages by audiologic examination. Medical histories were gathered in detail, and audiologic tests (ie, tympanometry and pure tone hearing threshold) were conducted in 126 patients after palatoplasty. The patients were divided into the following 4 groups according to their ages when they underwent cleft palate repair: group I (0-3 years, 73 patients), group II (4-7 years, 29 patients), group III (8-11 years, 16 patients), and group IV (12 years and older, 8 patients). The data regarding tympanograms, hearing levels, and the average hearing thresholds of each group were analyzed using chi-square tests. The prevalence of middle ear dysfunction and hearing loss in the patients who underwent palatoplasty before 3 years old (27.4% and 2.0% respectively) was significantly lower than that in patients who underwent palatopalsty at 12 years or older (75.0% and 43.7%, respectively). Linear-by-linear association revealed that the prevalences of middle ear dysfunction and hearing loss among the 4 groups were significantly different ( P cleft palate repair. From an audiologist's perspective, palatoplasty at an early age is very beneficial in helping children with cleft palates acquire better middle ear function and hearing level.

  7. White Roll Vermilion turn down flap in primary unilateral cleft lip repair: A novel approach

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    R K Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Numerous modifications of Millard′s technique of rotation - advancement repair have been described in literature. This article envisions a new modification in Millard′s technique of primary unilateral chieloplasty. Material and Methods: Eliminating or reducing the secondary deformities in children with cleft lip has been a motivating factor for the continual refinement of cleft lip surgical techniques through the years. Vermilion notching, visibility of paramedian scars and scar contracture along the white roll are quite noticeable in close-up view even in good repairs. Any scar is less noticeable if it is in midline or along the lines of embryological closure. White Roll Vermilion turn down Flap (WRV Flap, a modification in the Millard′s repair is an attempt to prevent these secondary deformities during the primary cleft lip sugery. This entails the use of white roll and the vermilion from the lateral lip segment for augmenting the medial lip vermilion with the final scar in midline at the vermilion. Result: With an experience of more than 100 cases of primary cleft lip repair with this technique, we have achieved a good symmetry and peaking of cupid′s bow with no vermilion notching of the lips. Conclusion: WRV flap aims to high light the importance of achieving a near normal look of the cleft patient with the only drawback of associated learning curve with this technique.

  8. Critical analysis of consecutive unilateral cleft lip repairs: determining ideal sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Stephanie M; Matic, Damir B

    2013-03-01

    Objective : Cleft surgeons often show 10 consecutive lip repairs to reduce presentation bias, however the validity remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine the number of consecutive cases that represent average outcomes. Secondary objectives are to determine if outcomes correlate with cleft severity and to calculate interrater reliability. Design : Consecutive preoperative and 2-year postoperative photographs of the unilateral cleft lip-nose complex were randomized and evaluated by cleft surgeons. Parametric analysis was performed according to chronologic, consecutive order. The mean standard deviation over all raters enabled calculation of expected 95% confidence intervals around a mean tested for various sample sizes. Setting : Meeting of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association in 2009. Patients, Participants : Ten senior cleft surgeons evaluated 39 consecutive lip repairs. Main Outcome Measures : Preoperative severity and postoperative outcomes were evaluated using descriptive and quantitative scales. Results : Intraclass correlation coefficients for cleft severity and postoperative evaluations were 0.65 and 0.21, respectively. Outcomes did not correlate with cleft severity (P  =  .28). Calculations for 10 consecutive cases demonstrated wide 95% confidence intervals, spanning two points on both postoperative grading scales. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals narrowed within one qualitative grade (±0.30) and one point (±0.50) on the 10-point scale for 27 consecutive cases. Conclusions : Larger numbers of consecutive cases (n > 27) are increasingly representative of average results, but less practical in presentation format. Ten consecutive cases lack statistical support. Cleft surgeons showed low interrater reliability for postoperative assessments, which may reflect personal bias when evaluating another surgeon's results.

  9. Functional outcomes after bilateral arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Alexander W; Syed, Usman Ali M; Wascher, Jocelyn; Zoga, Adam C; Close, Koby; Abboud, Joseph A; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears is a common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons. There is a well-known incidence of up to 35% of bilateral rotator cuff tear disease in patients who have a known unilateral tear. The majority of the literature focuses on outcomes after unilateral surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine if there are clinical differences in shoulders of patients who underwent staged bilateral rotator cuff repairs during their lifetime. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent staged bilateral arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery at our institution was performed. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Clinical outcome scores including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation, and Rowe measures were obtained. A subset of patients returned for clinical and ultrasound evaluation performed by an independent fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist. Overall, 110 shoulders in 55 patients, representing 68% of all eligible patients, participated. No clinical or statistical difference was found in any outcome measure. ASES scores averaged 86.5 (36.7-100) in the dominant shoulder compared with 89.6 (23.3-100) in the nondominant shoulder (P = .42). Ultrasound was available on 34 shoulders and showed complete healing rate of 88%. The shoulders with retearing of the rotator cuff (12%) demonstrated clinically relevant lower ASES scores (72.5) compared with shoulders with confirmed healed repairs (86.2; P = .2). Patients who undergo staged bilateral rotator cuff repair can expect to have similarly good clinical outcomes regardless of hand dominance or chronologic incidence with excellent healing rates in both shoulders. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypertrophic scarring in cleft lip repair: a comparison of incidence among ethnic groups

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    Soltani AM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ali M Soltani, Cameron S Francis, Arash Motamed, Ashley L Karatsonyi, Jeffrey A Hammoudeh, Pedro A Sanchez-Lara, John F Reinisch, Mark M UrataDivision of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, CA, USA; The Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: Although hypertrophic scar (HTS formation following cleft lip repair is relatively common, published rates vary widely, from 1% to nearly 50%. The risk factors associated with HTS formation in cleft patients are not well characterized. The primary aim of this retrospective study of 180 cleft lip repairs is to evaluate the frequency of postoperative HTS among various ethnic groups following cleft lip repair.Methods: A retrospective chart view of patients undergoing primary cleft lip repair over a 16-year period (1990–2005 by the senior surgeon was performed. The primary outcome was the presence of HTS at 1 year postoperatively. Bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were used to evaluate potential risk factors for HTS, including ethnicity, type and laterality of cleft, and gender.Results: One hundred and eighty patients who underwent cleft lip repair were included in the study. The overall rate of postoperative HTS formation was 25%. Ethnicity alone was found to be an independent predictor of HTS formation. Caucasian patients had the lowest rate of HTS formation (11.8% and were used as the reference group. HTS rates were significantly higher in the other ethnicities, 32.2% in Hispanic patients (odds ratio [OR]: 3.51; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.53–8.85, and 36.3% for Asian patients (OR 4.27; 95% CI: 1.36–13.70. Sex, cleft type, and cleft laterality were not associated with increased rates of HTS.Conclusions: Differences in ethnic makeup of respective patient populations may be a major factor influencing the wide variability of reported

  11. Increase in age is associated with worse outcomes in alveolar bone grafting in patients with bilateral complete cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Adriana Maria; Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; da Silva Filho, Omar Gabriel; Carvalho, Roberta Martineli; de Souza Faco, Renato André; Ozawa, Terumi Okada; Cintra, Flávia; Trindade, Alceu Sergio; Trindade, Inge Elly Kiemle

    2014-03-01

    This prospective study aimed at evaluating the surgical outcomes of alveolar bone grafting (ABG) in subjects with bilateral cleft lip and palate treated at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, University of São Paulo, Bauru, Brazil, by means of cone-beam computed tomography. Twenty-five patients with bilateral complete cleft lip and palate, resulting in 50 clefts, were analyzed. Subjects were divided into 2 groups according to the dentition status at the time of surgery: (1) SABG group: subjects with mixed dentition operated on before or immediately after eruption of the permanent canine (10-13 years); (2) TABG group: subjects with permanent dentition (15-23 years). Cone-beam computed tomography analysis was performed in the buccal, intermediate, and palatal views, 2 and 6 to 12 months postoperatively. In the SABG group, 96% of the grafts were classified as successful, and no failure cases were observed. In the TABG group, successful cases decreased to 65%, and failures were seen in 27% of the cleft sites. In both postoperative periods, significantly better outcomes (lower mean scores) were observed for the SABG group in all the cone-beam computed tomography views (P < 0.05). Results show that the timing of surgery is an important factor in determining the outcomes of ABG in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate, with increasing age being associated with the worse outcomes.

  12. Perceptual Speech Assessment after Maxillary Advancement Osteotomy in Patients with a Repaired Cleft Lip and Palate

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    Seok-Kwun Kim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMaxillary hypoplasia refers to a deficiency in the growth of the maxilla commonly seen in patients with a repaired cleft palate. Those who develop maxillary hypoplasia can be offered a repositioning of the maxilla to a functional and esthetic position. Velopharyngeal dysfunction is one of the important problems affecting speech after maxillary advancement surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of maxillary advancement on repaired cleft palate patients without preoperative deterioration in speech compared with non-cleft palate patients.MethodsEighteen patients underwent Le Fort I osteotomy between 2005 and 2011. One patient was excluded due to preoperative deterioration in speech. Eight repaired cleft palate patients belonged to group A, and 9 non-cleft palate patients belonged to group B. Speech assessments were performed preoperatively and postoperatively by using a speech screening protocol that consisted of a list of single words designed by Ok-Ran Jung. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to determine if there were significant differences between the preoperative and postoperative outcomes in each group A and B. And Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine if there were significant differences in the change of score between groups A and B.ResultsNo patients had any noticeable change in speech production on perceptual assessment after maxillary advancement in our study. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between groups A and B.ConclusionsRepaired cleft palate patients without preoperative velopharyngeal dysfunction would not have greater risk of deterioration of velopharyngeal function after maxillary advancement compared to non-cleft palate patients.

  13. Perceptual speech assessment after maxillary advancement osteotomy in patients with a repaired cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok-Kwun; Kim, Ju-Chan; Moon, Ju-Bong; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2012-05-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia refers to a deficiency in the growth of the maxilla commonly seen in patients with a repaired cleft palate. Those who develop maxillary hypoplasia can be offered a repositioning of the maxilla to a functional and esthetic position. Velopharyngeal dysfunction is one of the important problems affecting speech after maxillary advancement surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of maxillary advancement on repaired cleft palate patients without preoperative deterioration in speech compared with non-cleft palate patients. Eighteen patients underwent Le Fort I osteotomy between 2005 and 2011. One patient was excluded due to preoperative deterioration in speech. Eight repaired cleft palate patients belonged to group A, and 9 non-cleft palate patients belonged to group B. Speech assessments were performed preoperatively and postoperatively by using a speech screening protocol that consisted of a list of single words designed by Ok-Ran Jung. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to determine if there were significant differences between the preoperative and postoperative outcomes in each group A and B. And Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine if there were significant differences in the change of score between groups A and B. No patients had any noticeable change in speech production on perceptual assessment after maxillary advancement in our study. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between groups A and B. Repaired cleft palate patients without preoperative velopharyngeal dysfunction would not have greater risk of deterioration of velopharyngeal function after maxillary advancement compared to non-cleft palate patients.

  14. Effect of an intraoral retrusion plate on maxillary arch dimensions in complete bilateral cleft lip and palate patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, B.C.; van Oort, R.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stellingsma, K.; Bierman, M.W.; de Bont, L.G.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze maxillary arch dimensions in patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate treated with an intraoral retrusion plate prior to lip closure. Patients: The effects of the intraoral retrusion plate were evaluated on serially obtained maxillary

  15. Craniofacial morphology of Dutch patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate and noncleft controls at the age of 15 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dungen, G.M.; Ongkosuwito, E.M.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Prahl-Andersen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Comparison of craniofacial morphology in bilateral cleft lip and palate patients to that of a noncleft control group at the age of 15 years. Design: A cross-sectional study of cephalometric data. Subjects and Methods: Cephalometric records of 41 consecutive patients (32 boys and 9 girls)

  16. Orthodontic Space Closure Versus Prosthetic Replacement of Missing Upper Lateral Incisors in Patients With Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, Barbara C. M.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Remmelink, Hendrik J.; van Oort, Robert P.; Sandham, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare dental aesthetics and function of orthodontic space closure versus prosthetic replacement of upper lateral incisors in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate The predominant mode of prosthetic replacement was resin-bonded bridges Patients and Methods The retrospective

  17. Transoral robotic-assisted laryngeal cleft repair in the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardis, Rachel L; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Mehta, Deepak

    2014-09-01

    To assess the feasibility of performing robotic-assisted laryngeal cleft repair in the pediatric population. Retrospective chart review at a tertiary academic children's hospital. All patients underwent transoral robotic-assisted laryngeal cleft repair from March 2011 to June 2013. Demographics, robotic docking time, operative time, and postoperative course and swallowing function were collected and analyzed. Five children, three male and two female, underwent successful transoral robotic-assisted laryngeal cleft repair for closure of a type I laryngeal cleft. Mean age at time of surgery was 21.6 months (standard deviation 6.1 months; range, 15-29 months). From case 1 to case 5, robotic docking time (18-10 minutes), robotic operative time (102-36 minutes), and total operating room time (173-105 minutes) decreased. There were no complications with time until extubation (range, 2-3 days), length of intensive care unit stay (range, 3-4 days), and total hospital stay (range, 3-5 days) within acceptable range following laryngeal cleft repair. Modified barium swallow (two patients) or fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (three patients) was performed postoperatively, with all patients showing complete resolution of penetration and aspiration. In addition, all patients experienced subjective resolution of dysphagia and/or choking with feeds postoperatively. Transoral robotic-assisted laryngeal cleft repair may offer specific advantages over a traditional endoscopic approach. In our experience, the procedure was well tolerated and associated with definitive surgical cure in all patients. The scope of robotic technology continually expands and should be considered a feasible tool at an institution-based level. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Bilateral first branchial cleft anomaly with evidence of a genetic aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, L M; Prats-Golczer, V E; Montes Carmona, J F; Heurtebise Saavedra, J M

    2014-03-01

    Anomalies of the first branchial cleft (FBC) are uncommon, and recognizing them can be difficult. Although present at birth, many cases do not become evident until later in childhood or adolescence, with an initial clinical presentation in adulthood being encountered only rarely. Typically, FBC anomalies present as a unilateral cyst, sinus, or fistula associated with the external auditory canal, or with swelling or an inflammatory opening in the peri-auricular/parotid area. They are commonly misdiagnosed and are often treated inadequately before being excised completely. A 40-year-old woman presented to the maxillofacial outpatient clinic with an episode of bilateral pre-auricular tumefaction, initially diagnosed as temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome. This was associated with bilateral pre-auricular pain that increased with mandibular movements. In relation to the patient's history, and given the bilateral presence of a pre-auricular pit, a diagnosis of FBC anomaly was made. Further investigation showed a related asymptomatic history in five other cases across four generations of the same family. The authors describe here the case, the diagnostic methodology, and the wide local excision technique used for removal of the branchial sinus. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Post-operative outcomes after cleft palate repair in syndromic and non-syndromic children: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zach; Stein, Michael; Mercer, Nigel; Malic, Claudia

    2017-03-09

    There is a lack of high-level evidence on the surgical management of cleft palate. An appreciation of the differences in the complication rates between different surgical techniques and timing of repair is essential in optimizing cleft palate management. A comprehensive electronic database search will be conducted on the complication rates associated with cleft palate repair using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Two independent reviewers with expertise in cleft pathology will screen all appropriate titles, abstracts, and full-text publications prior to deciding whether each meet the predetermined inclusion criteria. The study findings will be tabulated and summarized. The primary outcomes will be the rate of palatal fistula, the incidence and severity of velopharyngeal insufficiency, and the rate of maxillary hypoplasia with different techniques and also the timing of the repair. A meta-analysis will be conducted using a random effects model. The evidence behind the optimal surgical approach to cleft palate repair is minimal, with no gold standard technique identified to date for a certain type of cleft palate. It is essential to appreciate how the complication rates differ between each surgical technique and each time point of repair, in order to optimize the management of these patients. A more critical evaluation of the outcomes of different cleft palate repair methods may also provide insight into more effective surgical approaches for different types of cleft palates.

  20. Congenital superior sternal cleft repair using our modified Sally technique: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Kuwata

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of an 8-month-old male neonate who underwent reconstructive surgery for a congenital superior sternal cleft to decrease the risk of commotio cordis. With regard to use of the Sally technique for the repair of a relatively wide cleft (4 × 4 cm, we were concerned about respiratory problems caused by compression following closure of the sternal halves. By closing the sternal halves imperfectly, elevation of intrapleural pressure can be avoided to some extent. By bridging the surplus resected cartilage from the lower sternum over the gap of the upper sternum, the heart is protected by more rigid material. We recommend our modified Sally technique because it is both flexible and effective for sternal cleft repair.

  1. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: gold standard in bilateral hernia repair? Results of more than 2800 patients in comparison to literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauschkuhn, Constantin Aurel; Schwarz, Jochen; Boekeler, Ulf; Bittner, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of open and endoscopic hernia surgery are still being discussed. Until now there has been no study that evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of bilateral hernia repair in a large number of patients. Our prospectively collected database was analyzed to compare the results of laparoscopic bilateral with laparoscopic unilateral hernia repair. We then compared these results with the results of a literature review regarding open and laparoscopic bilateral hernia repair. From April 1993 to December 2007 there were 7240 patients with unilateral primary hernia (PH) and 2880 patients with bilateral hernia (5760 hernias) who underwent laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal patch plastic (TAPP). Of the 10,120 patients, 28.5% had bilateral hernias. Adjusted for the number of patients operated on, the mean duration of surgery for unilateral hernia repair was shorter than that for bilateral repair (45 vs. 70 min), but period of disability (14 vs. 14 days) was the same. Adjusted for the number of hernias repaired, morbidity (1.9 vs. 1.4%), reoperation (0.5 vs. 0.43%), and recurrence rate (0.63 vs. 0.42%) were similar for unilateral versus bilateral repair, respectively. The review of the literature shows a significantly shorter time out of work after laparoscopic bilateral repair than after the bilateral open approach. Simultaneous laparoscopic repair of bilateral inguinal hernias does not increase the risk for the patient and has an equal length of down time compared with unilateral repair. According to literature, recovery after laparoscopic repair is faster than after open simultaneous repair. Laparoscopic/endoscopic inguinal hernia repair of bilateral hernias should be recommended as the gold standard.

  2. Speech Analysis of Bengali Speaking Children with Repaired Cleft Lip & Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Madhushree; Kumar, Suman; Chatterjee, Indranil; Maheshwari, Neha

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims at analyzing speech samples of four Bengali speaking children with repaired cleft palates with a view to differentiate between the misarticulations arising out of a deficit in linguistic skills and structural or motoric limitations. Spontaneous speech samples were collected and subjected to a number of linguistic analyses…

  3. One-flap Palatoplasty: A Cohort Study to Evaluate a Technique for Unilateral Cleft Palate Repair

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    Percy Rossell-Perry, PhD, FACS

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Use of a 1-flap technique for unilateral cleft palate repair allowed us to achieve results comparable to those of a 2-flap technique in terms of postoperative fistula development and hypernasal speech. Additional studies are required to evaluate the effect of this technique on palatal growth.

  4. beta-TCP Versus Autologous Bone for Repair of Alveolar Clefts in a Goat Model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, A. de; Meijer, G.J.; Dormaar, T.; Janssen, N.; Bilt, A. van der; Slootweg, P.J.; Bruijn, J. de; Rijn, L. van; Koole, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective : The aim of this study in goats was to test the hypothesis that a novel synthetic bone substitute beta tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) can work as well as autologous bone harvested from the iliac crest for grafting and repair of alveolar clefts. Design : Ten adult Dutch milk goats ( Capra

  5. Roberts-SC syndrome, a rare syndrome and cleft palate repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Jyotsna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Roberts SC syndrome is a rare syndrome with only 17 previously recognized patients reported in medical literature. The syndrome is characterized by multiple malformations, particularly, symmetrical limb reduction, craniofacial anomalies such as bilateral cleft lip and palate, micrognathia, and severe growth and mental retardation. Our patient, a young child of five years having Roberts-SC, was successfully operated for cleft palate under general anesthesia. The main features of the syndrome and the technical problems of anesthesia and surgery are discussed in this report.

  6. Simultaneous bilateral distal biceps tendon repair: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Medeiros Storti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the distal biceps tendon is a rare clinical entity, seldom reported in the literature and with unclear therapeutic setting. The authors report the case of a 39-year-old white man who suffered a simultaneous bilateral rupture while working out. When weightlifting with elbows at 90° of flexion, he suddenly felt pain on the anterior aspect of the arms, coming for evaluation after two days. He presented bulging contour of the biceps muscle belly and ecchymosis in the antecubital fossa, extending distally to the medial aspect of the forearm, as well as a marked decrease of supination strength and pain in active elbow flexion. MRI confirmed the rupture with retraction of the distal biceps bilaterally. The authors opted for performing the tendon repairs simultaneously through the double incision technique and fixation to the bicipital tuberosity with anchors. The patient progressed quite well, with full return to labor and sports activities, being satisfied with the result after two years of surgery. In the literature search, few reports of simultaneous bilateral rupture of the distal biceps were retrieved, with only one treated in the acute phase of injury. Therefore, the authors consider this procedure to be a good option to solve this complex condition.

  7. Simultaneous bilateral distal biceps tendon repair: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storti, Thiago Medeiros; Paniago, Alexandre Firmino; Faria, Rafael Salomon Silva

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the distal biceps tendon is a rare clinical entity, seldom reported in the literature and with unclear therapeutic setting. The authors report the case of a 39-year-old white man who suffered a simultaneous bilateral rupture while working out. When weightlifting with elbows at 90° of flexion, he suddenly felt pain on the anterior aspect of the arms, coming for evaluation after two days. He presented bulging contour of the biceps muscle belly and ecchymosis in the antecubital fossa, extending distally to the medial aspect of the forearm, as well as a marked decrease of supination strength and pain in active elbow flexion. MRI confirmed the rupture with retraction of the distal biceps bilaterally. The authors opted for performing the tendon repairs simultaneously through the double incision technique and fixation to the bicipital tuberosity with anchors. The patient progressed quite well, with full return to labor and sports activities, being satisfied with the result after two years of surgery. In the literature search, few reports of simultaneous bilateral rupture of the distal biceps were retrieved, with only one treated in the acute phase of injury. Therefore, the authors consider this procedure to be a good option to solve this complex condition.

  8. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case.

  9. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debangshu Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case.

  10. The Implications of Nasal Substitutions in the Early Phonology of Toddlers With Repaired Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin-Jones, Mary A; Chapman, Kathy L

    2018-01-01

    To examine the implications of nasal substitutions in the early words of toddlers with cleft palate. Retrospective. Thirty-four toddlers with nonsyndromic cleft palate and 20 noncleft toddlers, followed from ages 13 to 39 months. The groups were compared for the percentage of toddlers who produced nasal substitutions in their early words. The percentage of toddlers with repaired cleft palate who produced nasal substitutions and were later suspected of having velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) was also examined. Seventy-six percent of the toddlers in the cleft group (n = 26) and 35% of toddlers in the noncleft group (n = 7) produced nasal substitutions on one or more of their early words. Only 38% (10/26) of the toddlers with cleft palate who produced nasal substitutions in their early words were later diagnosed as having moderate-severe hypernasality and suspected VPD. The presence of nasal substitutions following palatal surgery was not always an early sign of VPD. These substitutions were present in the early lexicon of children with and without cleft palate.

  11. Extent of palatal lengthening after cleft palate repair as a contributing factor to the speech outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yong-Chan; Choi, Soo-Jong; Lee, Jae-Woo; Seo, Hyoung-Joon

    2015-03-01

    Operative techniques in performing cleft palate repair have gradually evolved to achieve better speech ability with its main focus on palatal lengthening and accurate approximation of the velar musculature. The authors doubted whether the extent of palatal lengthening would be directly proportional to the speech outcome. Patients with incomplete cleft palates who went into surgery before 18 months of age were intended for this study. Cases with associated syndromes, mental retardation, hearing loss, or presence of postoperative complications were excluded from the analysis. Palatal length was measured by the authors' devised method before and immediately after the cleft palate repair. Postoperative speech outcome was evaluated around 4 years by a definite pronunciation scoring system. Statistical analysis was carried out between the extent of palatal lengthening and the postoperative pronunciation score by Spearman correlation coefficient method. However, the authors could not find any significant correlation. Although the need for additional research on other variables affecting speech outcome is unequivocal, we carefully conclude that other intraoperative constituents such as accurate reapproximation of the velar musculature should be emphasized more in cleft palate repair rather than palatal lengthening itself.

  12. Special distraction osteogenesis before bone grafting for alveolar cleft defects to correct maxillary deformities in patients with bilateral cleft lips and palates: distraction osteogenesis performed separately for each bone segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Saiga, Atsuomi; Morishita, Tadashi; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2014-07-01

    Patients with bilateral cleft lips and palates have premaxillary protrusion and characteristic jaw deformities involving three-dimensional malposition of the premaxilla and bilateral maxillary bone segments. This study examined patients with bilateral cleft lips and palates who had deviation and hypoplasia of the premaxillas and bilateral maxillary segments. Before bone grafting, the patients were treated with special distraction performed separately for each bone segment using a halo-type external device. This report describes this novel treatment method which produced good results. The subjects were five patients with severe jaw deformities due to bilateral cleft lip and palate. They were treated with maxillary Le Fort I osteotomy and subsequent distraction performed separately for each bone segment using a halo device. In three of five patients, premaxillary osteotomy was not performed, and osteotomy and distraction were performed only for the right and left lateral segments with severe hypoplasia. All patients achieved distraction close to the desired amount. The widths of the alveolar clefts were narrowed, and satisfactory occlusion and maxillary arch form were achieved. After the surgery, three of five patients underwent bone grafting for bilateral alveolar cleft defects and the bone graft survival was satisfactory. This method had many benefits, including narrowing of alveolar clefts, improvement of maxillary hypoplasia, and achievement of a good maxillary arch form. In addition, subsequent bone grafting for alveolar cleft defects was beneficial, dental prostheses were unnecessary, and frequency of surgery and surgical invasiveness were reduced. This method is a good surgical procedure that should be considered for patients with bilateral cleft lips and palates who have premaxillary protrusion and hypoplasia of the right and left lateral segments. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  13. Assessing an avoidable and dispensable reoperative entity: Self-referred flawed cleft lip and palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroglou, Pericles; Tsimponis, Antonis; Goula, Olga-Christina; Demiri, Efterpi

    2015-01-01

    aesthetically improved outcome. Indications for surgery include widened scars, lip contour deformities, shortened lips, poorly defined and flattened nasal tip, short columella and irregularities of the nostrils (narrow or high-riding) and cartilages. Wound dehiscence, contractures, vermilion notching, white roll malalignment and orovestibular fistulas are possible unfavourable results after cleft lip repair. The psychological status of children and adults with repaired cleft lip and palate has been the subject of extensive research especially regarding the way of their evaluation facial appearance, satisfaction and need for secondary corrective surgical procedures in the hope of increasing their self-esteem and self-confidence. The aim of this study was to assess secondary CLP deformity management in an accredited present-day tertiary hospital facility with an existing infrastructure of a specialist teams however not formed in a multidisciplinary group. Equally, to answer questions of specific operation indications and choice as related to prior surgeries, hospitalization time and cost, provision of adequate preoperative information, correlation between paediatric and plastic surgeons and effect of post-plastic surgical care on patients' health and well-being. It also aims at presenting, beyond our current primary cleft lip and palate repair approach, appropriate indications and timing of secondary repair and achieved results.

  14. Repairing a Facial Cleft by Polyether-Ether-Ketone Implant Combined With Titanium Mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuan; Tang, Weiwei; Li, Zhengkang

    2018-05-15

    The Tessier Number 4 cleft is one of the rarest, most complex craniofacial anomalies that presents difficulties in surgical treatment. In this article, we report a case of simultaneous facial depression, eye displacement, and medial canthus deformity. In this case, the maxillary bony defect was reconstructed using computer-assisted design computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) material, and the orbital floor defect was repaired with AO prefabricated titanium mesh. Additionally, the medial canthus was modified with canthopexy and a single Z-plasty flap. Owing to its relative rarity and varied clinical presentations, no definitive operative methods have been accepted for Tessier No. 4 facial cleft. This study presents the combination of CAD-CAM manufactured PEEK material and titanium mesh as an alternative approach for reconstructing the bony defect of Tessier No. 4 facial clefts.

  15. Is unilateral laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair a job half done? The case for bilateral repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawanindra Lal; Philips, Prejesh; Chander, Jagdish; Ramteke, Vinod K

    2010-07-01

    Bilateral laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair of unilateral hernia is conspicuous in published literature by its absence. There are no studies or data on the feasibility, advantages or disadvantages of bilateral repair in all cases or in any subset of patients with unilateral primary inguinal hernia. The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of bilateral laparoscopic exploration for all unilateral cases followed by laparoscopic TEP in all cases and to compare complications, recurrence rates, postoperative pain, patient satisfaction, and return to work retrospectively with a similar number of age-matched retrospective controls. One hundred fifty TEP operations were performed in 75 patients (group A) prospectively and were compared with 75 unilateral TEP operations (group B) in age-matched controls done previously by the same surgeon. All cases were performed under general anesthesia, and TEP repair was performed using three midline ports. All uncomplicated patients were discharged at 24 h, in keeping with departmental policy. Of 75 patients (group A), 25 (33.3%) were clinically diagnosed with bilateral hernia and the rest (50, 66.66%) with unilateral hernia. The distribution of the 25 bilateral cases was 11 bilateral direct and 14 bilateral indirect inguinal hernias. The distribution of the 75 age-matched controls (group B) was all unilateral hernia, of which 47 were right-sided and 28 were left-sided. There were 23 direct hernias and 52 indirect hernias among the control group. The mean operative time for all 150 cases was 76.66 +/- 15.92 min. The operative time in the control group (unilateral hernias) was 66.16 +/- 12.44 min, whereas the operative time in the test group (bilateral repair) was 87.2 +/- 11.32 min. The operative time in the bilateral group was significantly higher, by 21.04 min or 31.88% (p = 0.000). The operative time in the true unilateral group was 82.45 +/- 9.38 min, whereas the operative time in the former

  16. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Analysis of the Nasopharyngeal Airway in Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fahdawi, Mahmood Abd; Farid, Mary Medhat; El-Fotouh, Mona Abou; El-Kassaby, Marwa Abdelwahab

    2017-03-01

      To assess the nasopharyngeal airway volume, cross-sectional area, and depth in previously repaired nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate versus bilateral cleft lip and palate patients compared with noncleft controls using cone-beam computed tomography with the ultimate goal of finding whether cleft lip and palate patients are more liable to nasopharyngeal airway obstruction.   A retrospective analysis comparing bilateral cleft lip and palate, unilateral cleft lip and palate, and control subjects. Significance at P ≤ .05.   Cleft Care Center and the outpatient clinic that are both affiliated with our faculty.   Cone-beam computed tomography data were selected of 58 individuals aged 9 to 12 years: 14 with bilateral cleft lip and palate and 20 with unilateral cleft lip and palate as well as 24 age- and gender-matched noncleft controls.   Volume, depth, and cross-sectional area of nasopharyngeal airway were measured.   Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger nasopharyngeal airway volume than controls and patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger cross-sectional area than those with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P .05). Patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate showed significantly larger depth than controls and those with unilateral cleft lip and palate (P cleft lip and palate showed insignificant nasopharyngeal airway volume, cross-sectional area, and depth compared with controls (P > .05).   Unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients did not show significantly less volume, cross-sectional area, or depth of nasopharyngeal airway than controls. From the results of this study we conclude that unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients at the studied age and stage of repaired clefts are not more prone to nasopharyngeal airway obstruction than controls.

  17. Three-Dimensional Assessment of Early Surgical Outcome in Repaired Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate: Part 2. Lip Changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ayoub, Ashraf

    2010-09-08

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate 3D lip morphology, following primary reconstruction in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) relative to contemporaneous non-cleft data Design: Prospective, cross-sectional, controlled study Setting: Glasgow Dental Hospital & School, University of Glasgow, The UK. Patients and Participants: Two groups of 3-year old children (21 with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 96 controls) with facial images taken using a 3D vision based capture technique. Methods: 3D images of the face were reflected so the cleft was on the left side to create a homogenous group for statistical analysis. Three-dimensional co-ordinates of anthropometric landmarks were extracted from facial images. 3D generalised Procustes superimposition was employed and a set of linear measurements were utilised to compare between cleft and control subjects for right and left sides, adjusting for sex differences. Results: Christa philteri on both the cleft and non-cleft sides were displaced laterally and posteriorly; there was also a statistically significant increase in philtrum width. No significant differences between cleft and control regarding the cutaneous height of the upper lip. The lip in the cleft cases was flatter than in the non-cleft cases with less prominence of labialis superioris. Conclusions: Stereophotogrammetry allows detection of residual dysmorphology following cleft repair. There was significant increase of the philtrum width. The lip appeared flatter and more posterior displaced in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate (UCLP) cases compared with control. Keywords: child, cleft lip and palate, lip repair, three-dimensional imaging.

  18. The need for orthognathic surgery in nonsyndromic patients with repaired isolated cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, Gregory S; Watts, Guy; Daskalogiannakis, John

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of need for orthognathic surgery among nonsyndromic patients with isolated cleft palate repaired during infancy at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. Retrospective cohort study. PATIENTS with nonsyndromic isolated cleft palate born between 1970 and 1997 with available records including a lateral cephalometric radiograph taken at ≥15 years of age. PATIENTS who had undergone or were being prepared for orthognathic surgery were automatically counted as requiring surgery. For the remaining patients, lateral cephalometric radiographs were traced and analyzed. Arbitrarily set cephalometric criteria were used to identify the "objective" need for orthognathic surgery. Of the 189 patients identified with nonsyndromic isolated cleft palate and for whom records were available, 25 (13.2%) were deemed to require orthognathic surgery. Of the surgical cohort, 92% required surgical correction for a Class III malocclusion. Similar percentages of males and females required orthognathic surgery. An apparently greater proportion of patients of Asian background (18.5%) than of white background (10.6%) required surgery, but this difference was not significant (P = .205). The current results suggest that approximately one in eight patients at our institution with nonsyndromic isolated cleft palate requires orthognathic surgery. There is a tendency for this to be higher in patients of Asian descent and lower in patients of white descent. Variability in extent, severity, and phenotype of the cleft, which may be attributed largely to genetics, may play an important role in dictating the need for orthognathic surgery.

  19. Use of autologous platelet-rich plasma in complete cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Nofal, Ahmed Abdel Fattah; Khalifa, Mohamed; Quriba, Amal Saeed

    2016-07-01

    Evaluate the effect of topical application of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in primary repair of complete cleft palate and then compare the result with another group of patients using the same surgical technique, without application of PRP with regard to the incidence of oronasal fistula, velopharyngeal closure, and grade of nasality. Case control study. This study was carried on 44 children with complete cleft palate with age range from 12 to 23 months. The children were divided into two age- and gender-matched groups: All children were subjected to the same technique of V-Y pushback repair of the complete cleft palate. In group A (22 children), the PRP prepared from the patient was topically applied between the nasal and oral mucosa layer during palatoplasty, whereas in group B (22 children) the PRP was not applied. All cases were recovered smoothly without problems. In group A, no oronasal fistula was reported, whereas in group B three patients (13.6%) had postoperative fistulae and two patients (9.1%) needed revision palatoplasty. At 6 months postoperative assessment, group A (with PRP application) showed significantly better grade of nasality (P = 0.024) and better endoscopic velopharyngeal closure (P = 0.016) than group B. Usage of autologous PRP in complete cleft palate repair is simple; effective; can decrease the incidence of oronasal fistula; and also significantly improves the grade of nasality and velopharyngeal closure, which decreases the need of further surgical intervention in cleft palate patients. 3b. Laryngoscope, 126:1524-1528, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of the Pharyngeal Airways and Related Soft Tissues of Unilateral and Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients With the Noncleft Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Isil; Dogan, Servet

    2017-01-01

      This study is a comparison of pharyngeal airways and associated soft tissues of unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients with the noncleft individuals.   Twenty-four unilateral cleft lip and palate patients (UCLP), 21 bilateral cleft lip and palate patients (BCLP), and 26 noncleft patients (NC) between ages 15 to 17 were included in the study. Eleven linear, 1 angular, and 1 proportional measurements were carried out on pretreatment lateral cephalometric head films of these individuals.   The nasopharyngeal depths were markedly reduced in BCLP when compared with the NC (P clefts, BCLP showed significant (P cleft groups compared to the controls. Similarly, the hyoid bone was positioned in a significantly (P cleft patients. Comparison of the mean ratio of velar length to nasopharyngeal depth of the three groups revealed significant (P cleft patients with significantly (P cleft patients show serious inadequacies compared to controls, with significant diversities among cleft types pertaining to some of the parameters investigated. It should be kept in mind that these variations can influence function in terms of respiration and phonation.

  1. Trans-oral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy does not worsen the speech after cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad; Khalifa, Badawy; Shawky, Ahmed; Rashed, Mohammed; Naguib, Nader; Abdel-Hameed, Asmaa

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid hypertrophy may play a role in velopharyngeal closure especially in patients with palatal abnormality; adenoidectomy may lead to velopharyngeal insufficiency and hyper nasal speech. Patients with cleft palate even after repair should not undergo adenoidectomy unless absolutely needed, and in such situations, conservative or partial adenoidectomy is performed to avoid the occurrence of velopharyngeal insufficiency. Trans-oral endoscopic adenoidectomy enables the surgeon to inspect the velopharyngeal valve during the procedure. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy on the speech of children with repaired cleft palate. Twenty children with repaired cleft palate underwent transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy to relieve their airway obstruction. The procedure was completely visualized with the use of a 70° 4mm nasal endoscope; the upper part of the adenoid was removed using adenoid curette and St. Claire Thompson forceps, while the lower part was retained to maintain the velopharyngeal competence. Preoperative and postoperative evaluation of speech was performed, subjectively by auditory perceptual assessment, and objectively by nasometric assessment. Speech was not adversely affected after surgery. The difference between preoperative and postoperative auditory perceptual assessment and nasalance scores for nasal and oral sentences was insignificant (p=0.231, 0.442, 0.118 respectively). Transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy is a safe method; it does not worsen the speech of repaired cleft palate patients. It enables the surgeon to strictly inspect the velopharyngeal valve during the procedure with better determination of the adenoidal part that may contribute in velopharyngeal closure. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Three-dimensional facial analysis of Chinese children with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Siti Adibah; Aidil Koay, Noor Airin

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the facial features of Chinese children with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and compared them with a normal control group using a three-dimensional (3D) stereophotogrammetry camera. This cross-sectional study examined 3D measurements of the facial surfaces of 20 Chinese children with repaired UCLP and 40 unaffected Chinese children aged 7 to 12 years old, which were captured using the VECTRA 3D five-pod photosystem and analyzed using Mirror software. Twenty-five variables and two ratios were compared between both groups using independent t-test. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was determined using ten randomly selected images and analyzed using intra-class correlation coefficient test (ICC). The level of significance was set at p cleft group exhibited wider alar base root width, flattened nose and broader nostril floor width on the cleft side. They tended to have shorter upper lip length and thinner upper vermillion thickness. Faces of Chinese children with repaired UCLP displayed meaningful differences when compared to the normal group especially in the nasolabial regions.

  3. Unilateral microform cleft lip repair: application of muscle tension line group theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ningbei; Song, Tao; Wu, Jiajun; Chen, Bo; Ma, Hengyuan; Zhao, Zhenmin; Wang, Yongqian; Li, Haidong; Wu, Di

    2015-03-01

    In microform cleft lip repair, reconstructing the elaborate structures is difficult. We describe a new technique of unilateral microform cleft lip repair that is based on the muscle tension line group theory. According to the shape of Cupid bow, a different small incision is used without creating an obvious cutaneous scar. First, the nasolabial muscle around the nasal floor (the first auxiliary tension line group) is reconstructed, and then the orbicularis oris muscle around the philtrum (the second auxiliary tension line group) is reconstructed based on the muscle tension line group theory. From June 2006 to June 2012, the technique was used in 263 unilateral microform cleft lip repairs. For 18 months, 212 patients were followed up. The appearance of the nasal alar, nasal sill, philtrum, and Cupid bow peak improved. Most patients had a satisfactory appearance. Based on the muscle tension line group theory, using this technique offers the ability to adduct the nasal alar effectively to form a good nasal sill and philtrum.

  4. Effect of cleft palate repair on the susceptibility to contraction-induced injury of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenitally-clefted goat palates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite cleft palate repair, velopharyngeal competence is not achieved in ~ 15% of patients, often necessitating secondary surgical correction. Velopharyngeal competence postrepair may require the conversion of levator veli palatini muscle fibers from injury-susceptible type 2 fibers to injury-resi...

  5. Micro-structured Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate for Repair of the Alveolar Cleft in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, AP; Janssen, Nard; van Es, Robert; Frank, Michael; Meijer, Gert; Koole, Ron; Rosenberg, Toine

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Can a synthetic bone substitute be used to repair the alveolar cleft to bypass donor site morbidity as well as to shorten the operating time? In earlier experimental studies, micro-structured beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) provided similar bone healing when compared with grafting with

  6. The Effect of Cleft Lip and Palate, and the Timing of Lip Repair on Mother-Infant Interactions and Infant Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Lynne; Hentges, Francoise; Hill, Jonathan; Karpf, Janne; Mistry, Beejal; Kreutz, Marianne; Woodall, Peter; Moss, Tony; Goodacre, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Background: Children with cleft lip and palate are at risk for psychological problems. Difficulties in mother-child interactions may be relevant, and could be affected by the timing of lip repair. Method: We assessed cognitive development, behaviour problems, and attachment in 94 infants with cleft lip (with and without cleft palate) and 96…

  7. Neonatal cleft lip repair in babies with breastfeeding difficulties at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In many African settings, the birth of a CL and CLP baby is attributed to ... lip repair with subsequent improvement in maternal confidence and interaction with the baby. At follow up, weight gain was above the 50th .... recovery bay in theatre.

  8. Factors prognostic for phonetic development after cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon Seok; Kim, Jae Bong; Lee, Jeong Woo; Yang, Jung Dug; Chung, Ho Yun; Cho, Byung Chae; Choi, Kang Young

    2015-10-01

    Palatoplasty is aimed to achieve normal speech, improve food intake, and ensure successful maxillary growth. However, the velopharyngeal function is harder to control than other functions. Therefore, many studies on the prognostic factor of velopharyngeal insufficiency have been conducted. This study aimed to evaluate the relationships between speech outcomes and multimodality based on intraoral and preoperative three-dimensional computerized tomographic (CT) findings. Among 73 children with cleft palate who underwent palatoplasty between April 2011 and August 2014 at Kyungpook National University Hospital (KNUH), 27 were retrospectively evaluated. The 27 cases were non-syndromic, for which successful speech evaluation was conducted by a single speech-language pathologist (Table 1). Successful speech evaluation was defined as performing the test three times in 6-month intervals. Three intraoral parameters were measured before and immediately after operation (Fig. 1). On axial- and coronal-view preoperative facial CT, 5 and 2 different parameters were analyzed, respectively (Figs. 2 and 3). Regression analysis (SPSS IBM 22.0) was used in the statistical analysis. Two-flap palatoplasty and Furlow's double opposing Z-plasty were performed in 15 and 12 patients, respectively. The operation was performed 11 months after birth on average. Children with a higher palatal arch and wider maxillary tuberosity distance showed hypernasality (p palate width and height, rather than initial diagnosis, treatment method, or palate length. Therefore, a more active intervention is needed, such as orthopedic appliance, posterior pharyngeal wall augmentation, or early speech training. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating the Rule of 10s in Cleft Lip Repair: Do Data Support Dogma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ian; Purnell, Chad A; Hanwright, Philip J; Gosain, Arun K

    2016-09-01

    Cleft lip represents one of the most common birth defects in the world. Although the timing of cleft lip repair is contingent on a number of factors, the "rule of 10s" remains a frequently quoted safety benchmark. Initially reported by Wilhelmsen and Musgrave in 1966 and modified by Millard in 1976, this rule referred to performing surgery once patients had reached cutoffs in weight, hemoglobin, and age/leukocyte count. Despite significant advances in both surgical and anesthetic technique, the oft-quoted "rule of 10s" has not been systematically investigated since its inception. Patients who underwent primary cleft lip repair were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric database. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the independent effect of each rule of 10 metric or violation of the rule of 10s as a whole on postoperative complications, and to determine independent risk factors for complications in cleft lip surgery. One thousand three hundred thirteen patients met inclusion criteria, with a 3.6 percent complication rate. Of the included patients, 151 (11.5 percent) violated at least one facet of the rule of 10s. Other than patient weight, neither the rule of 10s nor any individual metric was significantly predictive of postoperative complications. Since its introduction nearly a half century ago, the risks associated with performing surgery in patients who violate the rule of 10s has undergone dramatic reductions. This analysis highlights the need to continually validate and evaluate dogma as the field continues to advance. Risk, III.

  10. Long-term effects of palate repair on craniofacial morphology in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Fang; Mars, Michael

    2005-11-01

    To identify the long-term effects of palate repair on craniofacial growth in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). Retrospective cross-sectional study. Sri Lankan Cleft Lip and Palate Project. Forty-eight adults with nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate, 29 men and 19 women, had lip repair only (LRO group). Fifty-eight adults with nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate, 35 men and 23 women, had lip and palate repairs by the age of 9 (LPR group). Clinical notes were used to record surgical treatment histories. Cephalometry was used to determine craniofacial morphology. In the lip and palate repair group, the depth of the bony pharynx (Ba-PMP), the maxillary length at the alveolar level (PMP-A), the effective length of the maxilla (Ar-IZ, Ar-ANS, Ar-A), the maxillary protrusion (S-N-ANS, SNA), the anteroposterior jaw relation (ANS-N-Pog, ANB), and the overjet were smaller than in the lip repair only group. There were no significant differences in the maxillary length at the basal level (PMP-IZ, PMP-ANS) and the anterior and posterior maxillary heights (N-ANS and R-PMP, respectively) in the two groups. Palate repair inhibits the forward displacement of the basal maxilla and anteroposterior development of the maxillary dentoalveolus in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Palate repair has no detrimental effects on the downward displacement of the basal maxilla or on palatal remodeling in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

  11. Bilateral absence of fifth ray in feet, cleft palate, malformed ears, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-01-04

    Jan 4, 2014 ... Abstract Background: Miller syndrome is one of the acrofacial dysostosis syndromes, which are characterized by ... scar of cleft lip operation, thin upper lip, and high arched pal- ... rise of serum testosterone from baseline level.

  12. Laryngotracheoesophageal Cleft Type 3 and Severe Laryngotracheomalacia; Delayed Surgical Repair, a Treatment Challenge with an Excellent Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Khaleghnejad

    Full Text Available Laryngotracheoesophageal clefts (LTEC are rare malformations which involve the upper respiratory and digestive tract. Surgical repair should be undertaken promptly to maintain a secure airway and prevent serious pulmonary aspiration. This paper reports the first case of LTEC type 3 with severe laryngotracheomalacia that was brought to Mofid children's hospital in late infancy with a poor health status. Delayed defect correction was our team strategy for the patient when she had achieved good weight gain. At the age of 22 months in collaboration with the pediatric surgical and otolaryngologist team, the repair of the laryngeal cleft was done with lateral open approach method. She was discharged with tracheostomy and gastrostomy. In the next six months follow up after the surgery tracheostomy decannulation and gastrostomy tube removal were done and the infant is now in regular follow-up. Keywords: Laryngotracheoesophageal clefts, Laryngotracheomalacia, Surgical repair

  13. [Cleft palate repair with a combined method of mucosal flap pushback of the hard palate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z; Li, S; Xu, J

    1996-03-01

    From January of 1992, we applied a combined method to repair cleft palate in 20 patients and received satisfactory results. The method is characterized by pushing back the mucosal flap of the hard palate, a Z-plasty on the nasal mucosa, repositioning the levator muscle to lengthen the palate, circumferential pharyng oplasty using denervated extensor hallucis brevis muscle, without making relaxing incisions and elevating the mucoperiosteal flap, avoiding interference to the greater and lesser palatine vessels and nerves, without relaxing palatal aponeurosis. The advantages of this method are preserving the normal anatomy and function of the palate and nasopharyngeal cavity, improving the function of velopharyngeal closure and minimizing secondary deformities.

  14. Team Management of a Young Adult with a Traumatic Cleft Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini V Kamat

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes management of an adult patient with a traumatically repaired cleft. The maxilla was deficient in all three planes and the mandible appeared protrusive. The patient′s speech had nasalance and articulation problems. The patient was informed about the possibility of speech deterioration post-surgery and was explained about the options available. After appropriate presurgical orthodontics, maxilla was surgically expanded and was also advanced by 5 mm. After surgery, speech was more intelligible because of improved articulation. It was possible to get optimum esthetic and functional result due to coordinated team approach.

  15. Comparison of the fistula risk associated with rotation palatoplasty and conventional palatoplasty for cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Ahmet; Yuce, Serdar; Kocak, Omer Faruk; Canbaz, Yasin; Guner, Sukriye Ilkay; Atik, Bekir; Isik, Daghan

    2014-09-01

    The aims of the cleft palate repair techniques are to reduce the velopharyngeal insufficiency risk and oronasal fistula development to minimal levels without affecting the maxillofacial development. In this article, we present a retrospective study comparing the conventional palatoplasty techniques with the new technique of rotation palatoplasty for the risk of development of oronasal fistula. Of the 100 patients who were operated on because of cleft palate between the years 2002 and 2008, 12 patients had Furlow palatoplasty, and 88 patients received the Veau-Wardill-Kilner (V-Y pushback) operation (group C). A total of 67 patients who were operated on between 2008 and 2011 had rotation palatoplasty (group R). One hundred patients were men, and 67 were women. Among all the patient groups, 22.8% were classified as Veau 1, 24.6% were classified as Veau 2, 37.1% were classified as Veau 3, and 15.6% were classified as Veau 4. The rate of fistula was found to be 17.7% in all patients. Fistula development was found in 6% of the patients in group R (4/67) and in 18% of the patients in group C (18/100). The difference between group R and group C regarding the number of patients who developed fistula was statistically significant (P = 0.011). The Veau classification of the cleft palate affects the risk of fistula development, and the risk for fistula after rotation palatoplasty is lower than that associated with the V-Y pushback technique.

  16. Orthodontic space closure versus prosthetic replacement of missing upper lateral incisors in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterkamp, Barbara C M; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Remmelink, Hendrik J; van Oort, Robert P; Sandham, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    To compare dental aesthetics and function of orthodontic space closure versus prosthetic replacement of upper lateral incisors in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate. The predominant mode of prosthetic replacement was resin-bonded bridges. The retrospective study group consisted of 17 patients treated with orthodontic space closure (13 men, four women; median age, 27.1 years; interquartile range, 20.6 to 33.3 years) and 10 patients treated with prosthetic replacement (five men, five women; median age, 27.7 years; interquartile range, 20.9 to 39.7 years). Dental aesthetics were evaluated by the patients and by a professional panel. Mandibular function was evaluated by means of the mandibular function impairment questionnaire. The level of mandibular impairment was calculated using the Function Impairment Rating Scale. With respect to dental aesthetics, no significant differences between patients treated with orthodontic space closure and prosthetic replacement were found. With respect to function, the level of mandibular impairment was significantly higher in patients treated with prosthetic replacement compared with patients treated with orthodontic space closure, as indicated by high scores on specific masticatory functions. Orthodontic space closure and prosthetic replacement in bilateral cleft lip and palate patients produce similar results in terms of aesthetics. In terms of function, prosthetic replacement results in significantly more impairment of specific masticatory functions.

  17. [STUDY ON WOUND HEALING AFTER Sommerlad TECHNIQUE REPAIR OF ISOLATED CLEFT PALATE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong; Shi, Bing; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhan, Xin

    2014-07-01

    To study the inhibitory effect of Sommerlad technique on the growth of the maxilla by comparing the wound healing between Sommerlad and Von Langenbeck techniques in repair of isolated cleft palate. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 54 patients with isolated cleft palate who received palatoplasty with levator veli palatini retropositioning according to Sommerlad between June 2005 and August 2011 as trial group; 89 cleft patients received Von Langenbeck technique repair between June 2003 and September 2006 as control group. There was no significant difference in gender and age between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, body temperature, and fever were recorded and compared; the wound healing was observed, and the palatal mucosa was graded according to Karsten standard. The operation time of trial group [(72.2 ± 5.5) minutes] was significantly longer than that of control group [(58.1 ± 6.8) minutes] (t = 4.494, P = 0.000); the intraoperative blood loss of trial group [(18.6 ± 6.5) mL] was significantly less than that of control group [(34.2 ± 10.2) mL] (t = 2.447, P = 0.000). Within postoperative 48 hours, the highest body temperature was 36.6-37.6°C (mean, 36.9°C) in trial group, and was 36.8-38.2°C (mean, 37.3°C) in control group; fever occurred in 5 patients (9.3%) of trial group and 21 patients (23.6%) of control group, showing significant difference (χ2 = 4.640, P = 0.030). The patients were followed up 3-18 months (mean, 9 months) in the trial group, and 3-6 years (mean, 4 years) in the control group. Scar was rated as level 0, level 1, and level 2 in 38, 13, and 3 cases of trial group, and in 6, 35, and 48 cases of control group, showing significant difference (Z = -7.785, P = 0.000). The isolated cleft palate repair using Sommerlad technique has the advantages of less injury and less scar tissue, indicating no inhibitory effect on the growth of the maxilla.

  18. Three-Dimensional Assessment of Early Surgical Outcome in Repaired Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate: Part 1. Nasal changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ayoub, Ashraf

    2010-08-11

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate 3D nasal morphology following primary reconstruction in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate relative to contemporaneous non-cleft data Design: Prospective, cross-sectional, controlled study. Setting: Glasgow Dental Hospital & School, Faculty of Medicine, Glasgow University Patients and Participants: Two groups of 3-year old children (21 with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 96 controls) with facial images taken using a 3D vision based capture technique. Methods: 3D images of the face were reflected so the cleft was on the left side to create a homogenous group for statistical analysis. Three-dimensional co-ordinates of anthropometric landmarks were extracted from facial images by a single operator. A set of linear measurements was utilised to compare cleft and control subjects on right and left sides, adjusting for sex differences Results: the mean nasal base width and the width of the nostril floor on right and left sides differed significantly between control and Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate (UCLP) groups. The measurements were greater in UCLP children. The difference in the mean nasal height and mean nasal projection between the groups were not statistically significant. Mean columellar lengths were different between the left and right sides in UCLP cases. Conclusions: There were significant nasal deformities following the surgical repair of UCLP. Keywords: child, cleft lip and palate, three-dimensional imaging.

  19. Herpes simplex 1 stomatitis after cleft palate repair: a case report and guidelines for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Maristella S; Tracy, Lauren; Wells, James H

    2015-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) primary infection and reactivation has been associated with the inflammation and transient decrease in immunocompetence after surgery and local trauma. In addition, HSV infection is known to impair wound healing, increase risk of scarring, and impede connective tissue graft transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first case of HSV infection complicating cleft palate repair presented in literature. In this report, we present a case of primary HSV infection occurring in a healthy 26-month-old patient after repair of the secondary cleft palate with mucoperichondrial flaps and V-Y pushback. The patient developed high fever on postoperative day 1, which was followed by perioral vesicular lesions and multiple intraoral ulcerations involving the lips, palate, and posterior pharynx. Unknown to the surgeons, the patient was exposed to HSV before surgery by a sibling with orolabial HSV infection. The infective cause was ascertained via polymerase chain reaction for HSV-1 DNA, and the infection was treated with topical and intravenous acyclovir for 1 week. The patient recovered well with adequate flap healing, good aesthetic outcome, and no complications on 1-month follow-up. This report underscores the importance of prompt recognition of herpetic infections in the patient with craniofacial surgery and reviews the association and complications of HSV infection in surgical healing. Early identification with prompt antiviral therapy and meticulous wound care are essential to ameliorate the scarring and delayed wound healing associated with HSV infection.

  20. A SECOND CASE OF BILATERAL RHEGMATOGENOUS RETINAL DETACHMENTS REPAIRED WITH SIMULTANEOUS BILATERAL PNEUMATIC RETINOPEXY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Uriel; De Jager, Cornelis; Zakour, Moayed; Gonder, J Thomas

    2017-01-01

    To present a case of a patient with simultaneous bilateral retinal detachments treated successfully with bilateral pneumatic retinopexy. Case report. This is a case of an otherwise healthy 49-year-old woman with no remarkable ocular history that presented with simultaneous phakic superior bilateral rhegmatogenous retinal detachments. Treatment on the day of presentation included laser retinopexy of the inferior lattice degeneration in the left eye and bilateral intravitreal injection of 0.4 cc of 100% C3F8 gas preceded by topical anesthesia. After 48 hours, both retinas were completely reattached, and bilateral laser retinopexy was performed to the superior tears. After a review of the literature, the authors could find only two reported cases of simultaneous bilateral retinal detachments treated successfully with pneumatic retinopexy. This is not only a cost-effective procedure but also allows treatment when there is no immediate operating room availability or a when a quick referral for surgery is not possible.

  1. Repair of Primary Cleft Palate and Oronasal Fistula With Acellular Dermal Matrix: A Systematic Review and Surgeon Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andrew; Samargandi, Osama A; Wong, Alison; Graham, M Elise; Bezuhly, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The current review and survey aim to assess the effectiveness of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in the repair of cleft palate and oronasal fistula and to evaluate the current trends of ADM use in palate surgery. A systematic review of English articles was conducted using MEDLINE (1960 to July 1, 2016), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (1960 to July 1, 2016), and EMBASE (1991 to July 1, 2016). Additional studies were identified through a review of references cited in initially identified articles. Search terms included "cleft palate," "palatal," "oronasal fistula," "acellular dermal matrix," and "Alloderm®." An online survey was disseminated to members of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association to assess current trends in ADM use in palate surgery. All studies evaluating the outcome of primary palate repair or repair of oronasal fistula with the use of aceullar dermal matrix products were included in the review. Twelve studies met inclusion criteria for review. Studies were generally of low quality, as indicated by methodological index for non-randomized studies (MINORS) scores ranging from 7 to 14. The pooled estimate for fistula formation after primary palatoplasty following ADM use was 7.1%. The pooled estimate for recurrence of fistula after attempted repair using ADM was 11%. Thirty-six cleft surgeons responded to the online survey study. Of these, 45% used ADM in primary cleft palate repair, while 67% used ADM for repair of oronasal fistulae. Use of ADM products is commonplace in palate surgery. Despite this, there is a paucity of high-quality data demonstrating benefit. Further randomized controlled trials examining ADM in palate surgery are required to help develop structured guidelines and improve care.

  2. Case Report: Bilateral absence of fifth ray in feet, cleft palate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Miller syndrome is one of the acrofacial dysostosis syndromes, which are characterized by malformations of the craniofacial region and limbs. Case report: A 26 month old male child, the product of healthy nonconsanguineous parents has many typical features of Miller syndrome. He has cleft lip and palate, ...

  3. [The apron mucosal flap of the lower lip for the repair of the secondary deformities of the cleft lip].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K; Xu, J; Lin, Y

    1996-05-01

    Twelve cases of secondary deformities of the cleft lip were repaired with the apron mucosal flap of the lower lip. The operation method is described. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Good results were obtained in patients with mild or medium secondary deformities.

  4. Dentoskeletal outcomes of a rapid maxillary expander with differential opening in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate: A prospective clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garib, Daniela; De Cássia Moura Carvalho Lauris, Rita; Calil, Louise Resti; De Medeiros Alves, Arthur César; Janson, Guilherme; De Almeida, Araci Malagodi; Cevidanes, Lúcia Helena Soares; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this 2-arm parallel study was to evaluate the dentoskeletal effects of rapid maxillary expansion with differential opening (EDO) compared with the hyrax expander in patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. Methods A sample of patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate was prospectively and consecutively recruited. Eligibility criteria included participants in the mixed dentition with lip and palate repair performed during early childhood and maxillary arch constriction with a need for maxillary expansion before the alveolar bone graft procedure. The participants were consecutively divided into 2 study groups. The experimental and control groups comprised patients treated with rapid maxillary expansion using EDO and the hyrax expander, respectively. Cone-beam computed tomography examinations and digital dental models of the maxillary dental arches were obtained before expansion and 6 months postexpansion. Standardized cone-beam computed tomography coronal sections were used for measuring maxillary transverse dimensions and posterior tooth inclinations. Digital dental models were used for assessing maxillary dental arch widths, arch perimeters, arch lengths, palatal depths, and posterior tooth inclinations. Blinding was used only during outcome assessment. The chi-square test was used to compare the sex ratios between groups (P <0.05). Intergroup comparisons were performed using independent t tests with the Bonferroni correction for multiple tests. Results Fifty patients were recruited and analyzed in their respective groups. The experimental group comprised 25 patients (mean age, 8.8 years), and the control group comprised 25 patients (mean age, 8.6 years). No intergroup significant differences were found for age, sex ratio, and dentoskeletal variables before expansion. No significant differences were found between the EDO and the hyrax expander groups regarding skeletal changes. The EDO promoted significantly

  5. Isolated cleft palate requires different surgical protocols depending on cleft type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elander, Anna; Persson, Christina; Lilja, Jan; Mark, Hans

    2017-08-01

    A staged protocol for isolated cleft palate (CPO), comprising the early repair of the soft palate at 6 months and delayed repair of the eventual cleft in the hard palate until 4 years, designed to improve maxillary growth, was introduced. CPO is frequently associated with additional congenital conditions. The study evaluates this surgical protocol for clefts in the soft palate (CPS) and for clefts in the hard and soft palate (CPH), with or without additional malformation, regarding primary and secondary surgical interventions needed for cleft closure and for correction of velopharyngeal insufficiency until 10 years of age. Of 94 consecutive children with CPO, divided into four groups with (+) or without (-) additional malformations (CPS + or CPS - and CPH + or CPH-), hard palate repair was required in 53%, performed with small local flaps in 21% and with bilateral mucoperiosteal flaps in 32%. The total incidence of soft palate re-repair was 2% and the fistula repair of the hard palate was 5%. The total incidence of secondary velopharyngeal surgery was 17% until 10 years, varying from 0% for CPS - and 15% for CPH-, to 28% for CPS + and 30% for CPH+. The described staged protocol for repair of CPO is found to be safe in terms of perioperative surgical results, with comparatively low need for secondary interventions. Furthermore, the study indicates that the presence of a cleft in the hard palate and/or additional conditions have a negative impact on the development of the velopharyngeal function.

  6. Tessier 3 cleft with bilateral anophthalmia: case report and surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesenna, Enrico; Anghinoni, Marilena L; Modugno, Alessandra C; Magri, Alice S

    2012-12-01

    Tessier clefts type 3 and 4 are rare. In this paper the authors report on the management of a wide Tessier 3 cleft. There is no standardized protocol or timing of the surgical procedures in this rare disfiguring condition. Generally speaking, the aim is to preserve the function of important anatomical structures (e.g., a seeing eye.) and reconstruct, as best as possible, harmonic facial features. The authors present a "step by step" solution of the malformation pointing out the limitations of the surgical procedures they used and the goals they wanted to obtain. Despite of the uniqueness and the complexity of the pathology, the authors think they obtained reasonable results both in term of function and aesthetics, permitting the patient to be accepted in the social environment. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dental arch relationship in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate following warsaw (one-stage repair) and oslo protocols.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fudalej, P.S.; Hortis-Dzierzbicka, M.; Dudkiewicz, Z.; Semb, G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the dental arch relationship following one-stage repair of unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) in Warsaw with a matched sample of patients treated by the Oslo Cleft Team. MATERIAL: Study models of 61 children (mean age, 11.2; SD, 1.7) with a nonsyndromic complete UCLP

  8. Cryptophthalmos and Bilateral Renal Agenesis with Cleft Lip and Palate: Fraser Syndrome: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Pabuçcu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder consisting of multiple anomalies including variable expression of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, abnormal genitalia, malformations of the nose, ear and larynx, renal agenesis, oro-facial clefts, skeletal defects, umbilical hernia and mental retardation. Antenatally detected multiple congenital fetal anomalies during 22nd week of gestation is reported in this paper. Fraser Syndrome was diagnosed according to major and minor criteria. Early antenatal detection is mandatory and clinician should be awere of the high recurrence rates of this syndrome among siblings threatening subsequent pregnancies and should inform affected families.

  9. Effect of intravenous magnesium sulphate or dexamethasone as adjuvants to sevoflurane anesthesia to prevent delirium during primary cleft palate repair, controlled randomized blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elsonbaty

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Co-administration of intravenous magnesium sulphate or dexamethasone with to sevoflurane anesthesia during primary cleft palate repair provides more vital hemodynamic state and decrease in postoperative vomiting and delirium when compared with control group.

  10. Spectral Analysis of Word-Initial Alveolar and Velar Plosives Produced by Iranian Children with Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, Marziye; Zajac, David J.; Bijankhan, Mahmood; Shirazi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Spectral moment analysis (SMA) was used to describe voiceless alveolar and velar stop-plosive production in Persian-speaking children with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP). Participants included 11 children with bilateral CLP who were undergoing maxillary expansion and 20 children without any type of orofacial clefts. Four of the children with…

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of a 1.6-Mb 4p16.3 interstitial microdeletion encompassing FGFRL1 and TACC3 associated with bilateral cleft lip and palate of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome facial dysmorphism and short long bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Haploinsufficiency of FGFRL1 and TACC3 at 4p16.3 can be associated with bilateral cleft lip and palate of WHS facial dysmorphism and short long bones. Prenatal diagnosis of facial cleft with short long bones should raise a suspicion of chromosome microdeletion syndromes.

  12. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...

  13. Prevalence of Dental Anomalies in Patients With Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and/or Palate in a Brazilian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranaiba, Lívia Máris Ribeiro; Coletta, Ricardo D; Swerts, Mário Sérgio Oliveira; Quintino, Rafaela Pacífico; de Barros, Letízia Monteiro; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio

    2013-07-01

    Objective : Many studies have demonstrated a high frequency of dental anomalies in patients with cleft lip and/or palate. Because dental anomalies may complicate dental treatment, we investigated the prevalence of dental anomalies in a group of Brazilian patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate. Design, Participants, Setting : Retrospective analysis was performed using clinical records of 296 patients aged between 12 and 30 years with repaired nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate without history of tooth extraction and orthodontic treatment. Associations between oral clefts and presence of dental anomalies outside the cleft area were investigated. Results : Dental anomalies were identified in 39.9% of the nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate patients, and tooth agenesis (47.5%), impacted tooth (13.1%), and microdontia (12.7%) were the most common anomalies. Cleft lip patients were less affected by dental anomalies compared with cleft palate or cleft lip and palate patients (p  =  .057). Specifically, patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate were significantly more affected by dental anomalies than those with bilateral cleft lip and palate (p  =  .00002), and individuals with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (p  =  .002) and complete cleft palate (p  =  .01) were significantly more affected by tooth agenesis than other cleft types. Agenesis of the premolars (p  =  .043) and maxillary lateral incisors (p  =  .03) were significantly more frequent in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate. Conclusions : The present study revealed a high frequency of dental anomalies in nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate patients and further demonstrated that patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate were frequently more affected by dental anomalies than those with bilateral cleft lip and palate. Moreover, our results demonstrate that dental anomalies should be considered during dental treatment planning for

  14. Comparison of dental arch dimensions in models of preschool children with cleft lip/palate repaired by means of surgery alone versus controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhan, Ahmad S; Nawaya, Fehmieh R

    2016-09-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) anomaly is one of the most prevalent congenital defects causing disturbances of dental arch dimensions. This study aimed at investigating differences in these dimensions between preschool children with cleft lip/palate and a matched control group representing healthy individuals with normal occlusion (NO). The sample of this cross-sectional analytical study consisted of 108 plaster models of children aged from 4 to 5.5 years. They were divided into five groups: the cleft lip group, the cleft palate (CP) group, the unilateral cleft lip and palate group, the bilateral cleft lip and palate group, and the NO group. The NO group was used as a control group. All cleft-affected children were treated only with surgery. Dental arch length and widths were measured. The dental arch dimensions of the cleft lip group were nearly similar to those in the controls. Moreover, the mandibular transverse widths of the CP group were close to those in the controls. However, the mandibular arch length and all maxillary dimensions of the CP group were smaller than those in the controls. In the unilateral cleft lip and palate group, the arch lengths in both jaws and the maxillary transverse widths were smaller than those in the controls, whereas the mandibular transverse widths were similar to those in the controls. In the bilateral cleft lip and palate group, the arch lengths in both jaws were close to those in the controls, but both arches were narrower than those in the controls. The various types of CLP were found to be associated with differences in most maxillary and some mandibular arch dimensions. These data can be used for cleft patient counseling and treatment planning.

  15. Pre-maxillary complex morphology in bilateral cleft and hypothesis on laterality of deviated pre-maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Murthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pre-maxillary complex (pre-maxilla [PMX] + vomer morphology in bilateral complete cleft of primary and secondary palate (BCLCP is very complex and less reviewed in literature. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 200 consecutive BCLCP patients were selected. Their pre-operative clinical photographs and dental casts were evaluated by a single investigator at two different points of time, to study the morphology of PMX and vomer with special emphasis on deviation of vomer and rotation of PMX. Results: It is found that in above 70% of patients, PMX and vomer both displaced or deviated towards left side in horizontal plane and PMX rotated anticlockwise at PMX vomerine suture (PVS. In 10% of cases, both PMX and vomer are displaced towards the right side, PMX rotated clockwise at PVS. In 11% of cases, vomer is displaced towards the left side, but PMX rotated clockwise at PVS. In 5% of cases, vomer is displaced towards the right side, but PMX rotated anticlockwise at PVS. Both PMX and vomer are in midline in 4% of cases. Conclusion: Specific morphological deviation of vomer and PMX has been studied. We put forward the probable hypothesis to explain the deviation and rotation of PMX.

  16. Photometric Evaluation in Adolescence of Patients With Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Treated With Nasoalveolar Molding and Primary Columella Lengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meazzini, Maria Costanza; Chiavenna, Carlo; Autelitano, Luca; Garattini, Giovanna; Brusati, Roberto

    2018-04-01

    Nasal stigma in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) are a short columella and a flattened nasal tip. The aim of this study was to evaluate the aesthetics of adolescents with BCLP, operated with a modified Cutting primary columella lengthening technique, associated to a modified Grayson orthopedic nasoalveolar molding (NAM). 72 BCLP patients were operated with this approach. Standardized photographic records were taken every 2 years. A group of 23 patients between 12 and 13 years of age was compared through normalized photogrammetry to a matched control of 23 noncleft adolescents. Nasal protrusion and length of the columella were very close to normal. On the other hand, nasolabial angle and interalar width were still excessively wide compared to the noncleft sample. NAM and primary columella lengthening in BCLP has allowed to avoid traditional secondary columella lengthening at 5 to 6 years of age and given the patients a more pleasing, near-normal nasolabial appearance until adolescence. Some of the patients will require correction of the nasal width at a later stage.

  17. Repair of a submucous cleft palate by W-pushback and levator repositioning without incision to the nasal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun

    2012-03-01

    The author created an innovative method of W-pushback and levator repositioning without having to make an incision to the nasal mucosa for submucous cleft palate repair.The W-shaped mucoperiosteal flap is outlined where the 2 peaks of W are the alveolar processes of both canine teeth and the midpoint of W is the anterior limit of the cleft notch of the hard palate. A short incision, medial to and behind the maxillary tuberosity and curved forward onto the palate and extended forward just medial to the alveolar process, is joined by a second incision from the apex of the cleft to the region of the canine tooth. The W-shaped mucoperiosteal flap is raised until the midline notch of the hard palate is exposed. The nasal mucosa and abnormally inserted levator veli palatini muscle to the posterior border of the hard palate bone are detached. By leaving the nasal mucosa intact, the detached levator veli palatini muscle is approximated at the midline and so the zona pellucida is obliterated. The cleft uvulas are cut in half and closed. The approximated W-flap is joined to the small anterior flap by 1 or more sutures (the W-pushback).Three patients were operated on with this technique without serious complications.The author believes that this method can make the levator sling and increase the length of the soft palate without making an incision to the nasal mucosa.

  18. Prevalence and Characteristics of Developmental Dental Anomalies in Iranian Orofacial Cleft Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Shabnam; Pakshir, Hamidreza; Samady, Hedyeh

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with oral clefts exhibit considerably more dental anomalies than individuals without clefts. These problems could initially be among the symptoms of their disease and/or they may be the side effect of their treatments. Pushback palatoplasty could cause some interference during the development of teeth and result in tooth defects. The study was performed to assess the prevalence and characteristics of developmental dental anomalies in orofacial cleft patients who attended Shiraz Orthodontics Research Center-Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic. We managed to compare dental anomaly traits based on gender and cleft side. Eighty out of 121 cleft patients were included in this cross-sectional study. All the patients used pushback palatoplasty in their palate closure surgeries. Intraoral photographs, panoramic and intraoral radiographs, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and dental and medical histories were examined and recorded by two observers. Data were analyzed using SPSS PC version 20.0. The differences in the side of cleft and dental anomalies were compared using the Mann-Whitney test. The mean age of patients was 14.27 years (SD=5.06). The most frequent cleft type was unilateral cleft lip and palate (50%) followed by bilateral cleft lip and palate (43.75%), cleft palate (2.5%) and cleft lip (1.25%). Male predominance (70%) was observed. 92.5 percent had at least one developmental dental anomaly. The most prevalent anomalies were hypodontia (71.25%) followed by microdontia (30%), root dilacerations (21.25%) and supernumerary teeth (15%). The most prevalent cleft types were unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate with male and left side predominance. Hypodontia, microdontia, dilacerations and supernumerary teeth were the most prevalent developmental dental anomalies among Iranian southwestern cleft patients. The surgical technique used to repair their cleft palate may have played a role in developmental dental defects.

  19. A lining vomer flap for palate pushback in unilateral cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavin, H D; Owsley, J Q

    1978-01-01

    A combinaation vomer mucoperiosteal flap and nasal floor mucoperiosteal flap is described which is used to achieve nasal coverage in unilateral cleft palate patients requiring pushbacks. A posteriorly based readily accessible vomer flap is raised on the cleft side and used as nasal lining for the palatal mucoperiosteal flap on the non-cleft side. On the cleft side, a symmetrically sized nasal floor flap is easily elevated under direct vision and used to cover the nasal aspect of the corresponding mucoperiosteal palatal flap.

  20. Salvage of bilateral renal artery occlusion after endovascular aneurysm repair with open splenorenal bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Jessula, MDCM

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report renal salvage maneuvers after accidental bilateral renal artery coverage during endovascular aneurysm repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. A 79-year-old man with an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm was treated with endovascular aneurysm repair. Completion angiography demonstrated coverage of the renal arteries. Several revascularization techniques were attempted, including endograft repositioning and endovascular stenting through the femoral and brachial approach. The patient eventually underwent open splenorenal bypass with a Y Gore-Tex graft (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz. After 3 months, computed tomography showed no evidence of endoleak and patent renal arteries. Renal function was well maintained, and the patient did not require dialysis.

  1. Prenatal cleft lip and maxillary alveolar defect repair in a 2-step fetal lamb model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenghoefer, M.H.; Deprest, J.; Goetz, W.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Bergé, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: As there is no satisfying animal model simulating the complex cleft lip and palate anatomy in a standardized defect on one hand, and comprising the possibilities for extensive surgical procedures on the other hand, an improved fetal lamb model for cleft surgery was developed. MATERIALS AND

  2. A novel computer system for the evaluation of nasolabial morphology, symmetry and aesthetics after cleft lip and palate treatment. Part 2: Comparative anthropometric analysis of patients with repaired unilateral complete cleft lip and palate and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietruski, Piotr; Majak, Marcin; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Skiba, Adam; Antoszewski, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to use a novel system, 'Analyse It Doc' (A.I.D.) for a complex anthropometric analysis of the nasolabial region in patients with repaired unilateral complete cleft lip and palate and in healthy individuals. A set of standardized facial photographs in frontal, lateral and submental view have been taken in 50 non-cleft controls (mean age 20.6 years) and 42 patients with repaired unilateral complete cleft and palate (mean age 19.57 years). Then, based on linear, angular and area measurements taken from the digital photographs with the aid of the A.I.D. system, a photogrammetric analysis of intergroup differences in nasolabial morphology and symmetry was conducted. Patients with cleft lip and palate differed from the controls in terms of more than half of analysed angular measurements and proportion indices derived from linear and area measurements of the nasolabial region. The findings presented herein imply that despite primary surgical repair, patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate still show some degree of nasolabial dysmorphology. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that the novel computer system is suitable for a reliable, simple and time-efficient anthropometric analysis in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps for repair of large sacrococcygeal pressure sores].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Henglin; Li, Huatao; Chen, Yang; Li, Qiang; Wu, Shenggang; Lili, Wang; Yan, Lei; Xiaoying, Zhou

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps for repairing large sacrococcygeal pressure sores. Between June 2003 and August 2011, 6 paraplegia patients with large sacrococcygeal pressure sores were repaired with the pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps. There were 2 males and 4 females with an average age of 45.6 years (range, 37-62 years). The mean disease duration was 8.4 months (range, 3-26 months). According to National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) standard, 6 cases rated as degree IV. The size of pressure sores ranged from 15 cm x 13 cm to 18 cm x 16 cm. The size of flaps ranged from 18 cm x 14 cm to 21 cm x 15 cm. After operation, all flaps survived successfully. The wounds healed by first intention in 5 cases; partial dehiscence of incision occurred in 1 case, which was cured after dressing change for 26 days. Six patients were followed up 6-24 months (mean, 12.5 months). The appearance and texture of the flaps were smooth and soft with good elasticity and no ulceration. Pedicled superior gluteal artery perforator bilateral quadrilobed flaps can repair large sacrococcygeal pressure sores. The appearance of flaps is smooth and has good compression-resistance effect.

  4. Conventional mesh repair of a giant iatrogenic bilateral diaphragmatic hernia with an enterothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingohr P

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Philipp Lingohr,1 Thomas Galetin,2 Boris Vestweber,2 Hanno Matthaei,1 Jörg C Kalff,1 Karl-Heinz Vestweber2 1Department of Surgery, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; 2Department of Surgery, Klinikum Leverkusen, Leverkusen, Germany Purpose: Diaphragmatic hernias (DHs are divided into congenital and acquired hernias, most of which are congenital. Among acquired DHs, up to 80% are left-sided, only a few iatrogenic DHs have been reported, and bilateral hernias are extremely rare. For diagnostic reasons, many DHs are overlooked by ultrasonography or X-ray and are only recognized at a later stage when complications occur. Methods: In 2009, we performed three partial diaphragm replacements in our clinic for repairing DHs using a PERMACOL™ implant. Results: As all patients had uneventful postoperative courses and the clinical outcomes were very good, we present one special case of a 65-year-old male with a giant iatrogenic bilateral DH with an enterothorax. Conclusion: We see a good indication for diaphragm replacements by using a PERMACOL™ implant for fixing especially DHs with huge hernial gaps and in cases with fragile tissue. Keywords: bilateral diaphragmatic hernia, enterothorax, conventional hernia repair, PERMACOL™, biological implant, diaphragm replacement, mesh repair

  5. Factors contributing to hearing impairment in patients with cleft lip/palate in Malaysia: A prospective study of 346 ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jack Pein; Soo, Siew Shuin; Manuel, Anura Michelle

    2016-09-01

    To determine the factors contributing towards hearing impairment in patients with cleft lip/palate. A prospective analysis was conducted on 173 patients (346 ears) with cleft lip and palate (CL/P) who presented to the combined cleft clinic at University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) over 12 months. The patients' hearing status was determined using otoacoustic emission (OAE), pure tone audiometry (PTA) and auditory brainstem response (ABR). These results were analysed against several parameters, which included age, gender, race, types of cleft pathology, impact and timing of repair surgery. The patients' age ranged from 1-26 years old. They comprised 30% with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), 28% with bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP), 28% with isolated cleft palate (ICP) and 14% with isolated cleft lip (ICL). Majority of the patients (68.2%) had normal otoscopic findings. Out of the 346 ears, 241 ears (70%) ears had passed the hearing tests. There was no significant relationship between patients' gender and ethnicity with their hearing status. The types of cleft pathology significantly influenced the outcome of PTA and ABR screening results (p cleft groups and the outcome of hearing tests. However, hearing improvement occurred when palatal repair was performed at the age of cleft patients had normal hearing (70%). Hearing threshold varied significantly between the different types of cleft pathology. Surgery conferred no significant impact on the hearing outcome unless surgery was performed at the age of <1 year old. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bilateral cleft lip and palate: A morphometric analysis of facial skeletal form using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-07-01

    Bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) is caused by a lack of merging of maxillary and nasal facial prominences during development and morphogenesis. BCLP is associated with congenital defects of the oronasal facial region that can impair ingestion, mastication, speech, and dentofacial development. Using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, 7- to 18-year old individuals born with BCLP (n = 15) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 15) were retrospectively assessed. Coordinate values of three-dimensional facial skeletal anatomical landmarks (n = 32) were measured from each CBCT image. Data were evaluated using principal coordinates analysis (PCOORD) and Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis (EDMA). PCOORD axes 1-3 explain approximately 45% of the morphological variation between samples, and specific patterns of morphological differences were associated with each axis. Approximately, 30% of facial skeletal measures significantly differ by confidence interval testing (α = 0.10) between samples. While significant form differences occur across the facial skeleton, strong patterns of differences are localized to the lateral and superioinferior aspects of the nasal aperture. In conclusion, the BCLP deformity significantly alters facial skeletal morphology of the midface and oronasal regions of the face, but morphological differences were also found in the upper facial skeleton and to a lesser extent, the lower facial skeleton. This pattern of strong differences in the oronasal region of the facial skeleton combined with differences across the rest of the facial complex underscores the idea that bones of the craniofacial skeleton are integrated. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A Rare Interstitial Duplication of 8q22.1–8q24.3 Associated with Syndromic Bilateral Cleft Lip/Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Ferreira Rezek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of 8q interstitial duplication derived from maternal balanced translocations in a patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate in syndromic form associated with other congenital malformations. G-banding cytogenetic analysis revealed a chromosomal abnormality in the form of the karyotype 46,XX der(22t(8;22(q22.1;p11.1mat. Chromosome microarray analysis evidenced a 49 Mb duplicated segment of chromosome 8q with no pathogenic imbalances on chromosome 22. Two siblings also carry the balanced translocation. We have compared this case with other “pure” trisomies of 8q patients reported in the literature and with genome wide association studies recently published. This work highlights the involvement of chromosome 8q in orofacial clefts.

  8. Primary Cleft Lip and Palate Repair in Assam, India: Does Preoperative Anthropometric Analysis Help Identify Patients With Increased Surgical Risk in a Clinically Prescreened Population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, Mairin A; Gillenwater, Justin; Laub, Donald R; Osler, Turner; Allan, Anna Y; Restrepo, Carolina; Campbell, Alex

    2017-11-01

      To compare anthropometric z-scores with incidence of post-operative complications for patients undergoing primary cleft lip or palate repair.   This was a retrospective observational analysis of patients from a surgical center in Assam, India, and includes a cohort from a single surgical mission completed before the opening of the center.   Patients included in the study underwent surgery during an Operation Smile mission before the opening of Operation Smile's Guwahati Comprehensive Cleft Care Center in Guwahati, India. The remaining cohort received treatment at the center. All patients received preoperative assessment and screening; surgery; and postoperative care, education, and follow-up.   Our sample size included 1941 patients and consisted of all patients with complete information in the database who returned for follow-up after receiving primary cleft lip repair or primary cleft palate repair between January 2011 and April 2013.   Preoperative anthropometric measurements.   Postoperative complications.   Anthropometric z-scores were not a significant predictor of adverse surgical outcomes in the group analyzed. Palate surgery had increased risk of complication versus lip repair, with an overall odds ratio of 5.66 (P < .001) for all patients aged 3 to 228 months.   Anthropometric z-scores were not correlated with increased risk of surgical complications, possibly because patients were well screened for malnutrition before surgery at this center. Primary palate repair is associated with an approximate fivefold increased risk of developing postoperative complication(s) compared with primary lip repair.

  9. Surgically repaired cleft lips depicted in paintings of the late Gothic period and the Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirsig, W; Haase, S; Palm, F

    2001-04-01

    Paintings and drawings by Lucas Moser, Leonardo da Vinci, Albrecht Dürer, and Jacob Cornelisz van Oostsanen suggest that they employed people who had had cleft lips operated on as models for their works of art. Created between 1431 and 1520, the portraits show diagnostic facial profiles with a curved nasal dorsum, short columella, maxillary retrusion, and pseudoprogenia. The first medical illustration of cleft lip surgery was published in 1564 by Ambroise Paré. It was therefore late Gothic and Renaissance artists who depicted the conspicuous signs of surgically treated patients with cleft lip more than 130 years before the surgeons. Copyright 2001 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

  10. Siamese twins with craniofacial duplication and bilateral cleft lip/palate in a ceramic representation of the Chimú culture (Peru): a comparative analysis with a current case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachajoa, Harry; Hernandez-Amaris, Maria F; Porras-Hurtado, Gloria Liliana; Rodriguez, Carlos A

    2014-06-01

    Craniofacial duplication or diprosopus is a very rare malformation that is present in approximately 0.4% of conjoined twins. Here is presented a case of craniofacial duplication in association with bilateral cleft lip/palate in both heads found in a ceramic representation from the early Chimú culture from Peru. A comparative analysis is made with a current case of a 28-week-old fetus with similar characteristics. After reviewing the medical literature on conjoined twins, very few reports of facial cleft in both twins were found, with no reports at all of bilateral cleft lip/palate. This ceramic crock is considered one of the first representations suggestive of craniofacial duplication, and probably the first reporting it in association with facial cleft.

  11. Evaluation of the intercanine distance in newborns with cleft lip and palate using 3D digital casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Zeponi Fernandes Mello

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this present study was to compare, by means of 3D digital casts, the anterior transverse dimension of the dental arch of newborns with and without cleft lip and palate. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample was composed of ninety-four children aged from 3 to 9 months divided into three study groups: Group I - children without craniofacial deformities (control group; Group II - children with unilateral cleft lip and palate; Group III - children with bilateral cleft lip and palate. Impressions were executed before lip and palate repair in patients with clefts. Dental casts were digitized using a 3D scanner linked to a computer. Measurements of the intercanine distance were measured on the digital casts. Intergroup comparisons were performed using ANOVA (p<0.05. RESULTS: The results showed a mean of 36.5 mm for unilateral cleft lip and palate group, 34.8 mm for bilateral cleft lip and palate group and 27.52 mm for the control group. There was a statistically significant difference between the control group and both groups of patients with cleft lip and palate. There was no statistically significant difference between complete unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate groups. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with complete cleft lip and palate were born with an increased anterior dimension of the maxillary dental arch compared to non cleft patients.

  12. Evaluation of the intercanine distance in newborns with cleft lip and palate using 3D digital casts

    Science.gov (United States)

    MELLO, Bianca Zeponi Fernandes; FERNANDES, Viviane Mendes; CARRARA, Cleide Felício Carvalho; MACHADO, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; GARIB, Daniela Gamba; OLIVEIRA, Thais Marchini

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this present study was to compare, by means of 3D digital casts, the anterior transverse dimension of the dental arch of newborns with and without cleft lip and palate. Material and Methods The sample was composed of ninety-four children aged from 3 to 9 months divided into three study groups: Group I - children without craniofacial deformities (control group); Group II - children with unilateral cleft lip and palate; Group III - children with bilateral cleft lip and palate. Impressions were executed before lip and palate repair in patients with clefts. Dental casts were digitized using a 3D scanner linked to a computer. Measurements of the intercanine distance were measured on the digital casts. Intergroup comparisons were performed using ANOVA (p<0.05). Results The results showed a mean of 36.5 mm for unilateral cleft lip and palate group, 34.8 mm for bilateral cleft lip and palate group and 27.52 mm for the control group. There was a statistically significant difference between the control group and both groups of patients with cleft lip and palate. There was no statistically significant difference between complete unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate groups. Conclusions Patients with complete cleft lip and palate were born with an increased anterior dimension of the maxillary dental arch compared to non cleft patients. PMID:24212990

  13. Comparative Evaluation of the Pharyngeal Airway Space in Unilateral and Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Individuals With Noncleft Individuals: A Cone Beam Computed Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandedkar, Narayan H; Chng, Chai Kiat; Basheer, Mohammad Abdul; Chen, Por Yong; Yeow, Vincent Kok Leng

    2017-09-01

      To evaluate the pharyngeal airway space changes in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) individuals, and compare with age and sex-matched noncleft (NC) control subjects.   Retrospective study.   Cleft and Craniofacial Centre, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore.   Twenty UCLP (mean age: 13.4 ± 0.5 years), 18 BCLP (mean age: 13.5 ± 0.5 years) and 20 skeletal Class I subjects (mean age: 13.4 ± 0.6 years) were included in the study. Cone beam computed tomography scans were assessed for pharyngeal airway space (PAS) (oropharyngeal, nasopharyngeal, total airway space volume), and compared with PAS of age and sex-matched skeletal Class I NC individuals.   Pharyngeal airway space showed statistically significant differences in the UCLP, BCLP, and NC control subjects. Oropharyngeal (9338 ± 1108 mm 3 , P space (12 250 ± 1185 mm 3 , P .05).   The pharyngeal airway space was significantly reduced in the BCLP group than were those in UCLP and control groups. This reduced PAS should be taken into account when planning treatment for these individuals.

  14. Incisor and molar overjet, arch contraction, and molar relationship in the mixed dentition in repaired complete unilateral cleft lip and palate: A qualitative and quantitative appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disthaporn, Suteeta; Suri, Sunjay; Ross, Bruce; Tompson, Bryan; Baena, Diogenes; Fisher, David; Lou, Wendy

    2017-07-01

    To compare the mixed dentition incisor and molar overjet, severity of contraction of the dental arch, and the sagittal molar relationship on the cleft side vs the noncleft side in children with repaired complete unilateral cleft of the lip and palate (UCLP). Orthodontic records taken prior to orthodontic preparation for alveolar bone grafting were screened to select study casts from patients with nonsyndromic repaired complete UCLP who did not have mandibular skeletal or dental asymmetry. The study sample comprised dental casts from 74 children aged 8.9 ± 1 years. Standardized digital photographs were acquired at 1:1 magnification. A coordinate system was developed using digital image-processing software (Photoshop CS4 and Adobe Illustrator). Incisor and molar overjet, Angle's classification, and arch contraction were recorded. Descriptive statistics, paired t-tests, and kappa statistics were used to compare the cleft and noncleft sides. A negative overjet of -1 to -5 mm was often present at the incisors, with greater frequency and magnitude on the cleft side. Class II molar relation was more frequent on the cleft side (61.1%) than on the noncleft side (47.2%). Significantly greater contraction of the cleft side deciduous canine and deciduous first molar was noted, while the difference was very minor at the first permanent molar. Cleft side maxillary arch contraction was most severe in the deciduous canine and first deciduous molar region and progressively less severe in the posterior region of the arch. A greater frequency and severity of negative overjet and Class II molar relationship was seen on the cleft side.

  15. Development of the first permanent mandibular molar in young children with bilateral complete cleft lip and palate (BCCLP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N.V., Hermann; T.A., Darvann; S., Kreiborg

    2017-01-01

    . The relationship between stage of mineralization in BCCLP and controls was tested using a Mantel-Haenszel test. Pearson's correlation coefficient R was used to describe the relationship between FW and FM. Differences between group means of FW as well as of CW were tested using Student's t-test. Level......Background/Purpose: Previous studies have shown that the develop-ment of the first permanent mandibular molar (M1inf.) is deviant in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCCLP) and in children with isolated cleft palate (CP). Also, a significant correlation between severity of CP...

  16. Unilateral cleft lip and palate: Simultaneous early repair of the nose, anterior palate and lip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Louise Caouette

    2007-01-01

    Unilateral cleft lip and palate is a defect involving the lip, nose and maxilla. These structures are inter-related, and simultaneous early correction of all the aspects of the defect is necessary to obtain a satisfactory result that will be maintained with growth. The surgical technique combining various procedures is presented and compared with previously published reports. PMID:19554125

  17. Myofibroblasts in palatal wound healing: prospects for the reduction of wound contraction after cleft palate repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, H.E. van; Hoff, J.W. Von den; Torensma, R.; Maltha, J.C.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The surgical closure of orofacial clefts is considered to impair maxillary growth and dento-alveolar development. Wound contraction and subsequent scar tissue formation, during healing of these surgical wounds, contribute largely to these growth disturbances. The potential to minimize wound

  18. Successful early neonatal repair of cleft lip within first 8 days of life

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borský, J.; Velemínská, J.; Jurovčík, M.; Kozák, J.; Hechtová, D.; Tvrdek, M.; Černý, M.; Kabelka, Z.; Fajstavr, J.; Janota, J.; Zach, J.; Peterková, Renata; Peterka, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 11 (2012), s. 1616-1626 ISSN 0165-5876 Grant - others:MZd(CZ) NS10012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : total cleft lip and palate * neonate * malformation Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines Impact factor: 1.350, year: 2012

  19. Morphological evaluation of changes in velopharyngeal function following maxillary distraction in patients with repaired cleft palate during mixed dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Koichi; Nagata, Junko; Shomura, Kenji; Wada, Takeshi; Tachimura, Takashi; Fukuda, Jinichi; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-07-01

    To describe the morphological changes of nasopharyngeal components after maxillary distraction and clarify whether the morphological characteristics are related to velopharyngeal function (VPF). Perceptual judgments of hypernasality and nasendoscopy were performed before and after treatment. Lateral cephalograms were obtained to describe the morphological changes. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Miyazaki Medical College, Miyazaki, Japan. Nine patients with repaired cleft palate in the mixed dentition stage underwent maxillary distraction using a face mask and an intraoral fixed appliance system. The severity of hypernasality, velopharyngeal insufficiency, and measurements such as pharyngeal depth, velar length, and the rotation of the palatal plane were evaluated. Increase in pharyngeal depth was not always proportional to the amount of advancement. It depended on the posture of the posterior pharyngeal wall and the rotation of palatal plane. Cephalometric measurements of the nasopharynx before and after surgery confirmed subsequent changes in VPF. These were suggested to be useful in predicting future VPF. When performing maxillary distraction in patients with cleft palate in the mixed dentition stage, and when velopharyngeal closure is found to occur by velar contact against the hypertrophied adenoid, patients should be counseled about risks of subsequent deterioration in their speech before surgery.

  20. Receptive and expressive language performance in children with and without Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamônica, Dionísia Aparecida Cusin; Silva-Mori, Mariana Jales Felix da; Ribeiro, Camila da Costa; Maximino, Luciana Paula

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance in the abilities of receptive and expressive language of children with cleft lip and palate with that of children without cleft lip and palate with typical 12 to 36-month chronological development. The sample consisted of 60 children aged 12 and 36 months: 30 with cleft lip and palate diagnosis and 30 without cleft lip and palate diagnosis with typical development. The groups were paired according to gender, age (in months), and socioeconomic level. The procedures consisted of analysis of medical records, anamnesis with family members, and valuation of the Early Language Milestone Scale (ELMS). The chart analysis showed 63.34% of the children with unilateral cleft lip and palate, 16.66% with bilateral incisive transforamen cleft, and 20% with post-foramen cleft. Children with cleft lip and palate underwent surgeries (lip repair and/or palatoplasty) at the recommended ages and participated in early intervention programs; 40% presented recurrent otitis history, and 50% attended schools. Statistical analysis included the use of the Mann Whitney test with significance level of p cleft lip and palate showed statistically significant low performance in receptive and expressive language compared with children without cleft lip and palate.

  1. Innate lymphoid cells: a paradigm for low SSI in cleft lip repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmerman, Erika; Qin, Xu; Marshall, Brendan; Perry, Libby; Cai, Lei; Wang, Tailing; Yu, Jack; Akbari, Omid; Baban, Babak

    2016-10-01

    Cleft lip and palate reconstructions demonstrate significantly lower surgical site infection rates compared with clean-contaminated cases, prompting investigation into the pathophysiology causing this discrepancy. Recent studies have identified a new group of innate lymphocytes called innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), located in barrier surfaces of the skin, airways, and intestine. Our objectives were to explore for the first time the presence of ILCs in the vermillion of neonates and young children undergoing cleft lip reconstruction and characterize their composition by measuring the three classes of ILCs. Lip tissue samples were collected from 13 subjects undergoing vermillion resection during cleft lip reconstructive surgery. Preparative, transmission electron microscopy, and analytical flow cytometry were performed. The functionality of ILCs was tested in terms of their capacity to produce type 1 (IFN-γ/TNF-α), type 2 (IL-5/IL-13), and type 3 (IL-17/IL-22) cytokines. Data were analyzed using Student t test or the analysis of variance to establish significance (P < 0.05) among groups for all other data. All three classes of ILCs were detected and visualized in the tissue samples. In all samples, the level of ILC2 subset was significantly higher than the other two ILC subsets (P < 0.01), followed by the ILC1 subset, which was present in significantly higher levels than the ILC3 subset (P < 0.05). Our data place ILCs for the first time in the interface of oral mucosal immunity, tissue microenvironment, and homeostasis during and after tissue development, possibly explaining lower infection rates in cleft lip or palate reconstructions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Repair of a pediatric bilateral condylar and symphyseal fracture using a transfacial Steinman pin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, Jacob N; Flores, Roberto L; Tholpady, Sunil S

    2014-01-01

    The proper management of complex pediatric mandibular fractures remains a topic of debate because of the relatively uncommon presentation of these fractures, combined with concerns related with deciduous teeth, tooth buds, and growth inhibition. In this current study, we present a novel approach to the repair of bilateral condylar fractures with concomitant symphyseal fracture in a 4-year-old girl. Manual closed reduction was first obtained, followed by placement of a transfacial Steinman pin through the angles of the mandible and placement of circummandibular wires. Maxillomandibular fixation remained for 2 weeks and the Steinman pin was removed after 11 weeks. At 3 months of postsurgical follow-up, the patient displayed class I occlusion, facial symmetry, full range of jaw motion, and absence of deviation or pain on full oral excursion. Radiographic findings also revealed complete resolution of the symphyseal fracture with appropriate condylar healing and alignment.

  3. Dental arch relationship in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate following Warsaw (one-stage repair) and Oslo protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudalej, Piotr; Hortis-Dzierzbicka, Maria; Dudkiewicz, Zofia; Semb, Gunvor

    2009-11-01

    To compare the dental arch relationship following one-stage repair of unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) in Warsaw with a matched sample of patients treated by the Oslo Cleft Team. Study models of 61 children (mean age, 11.2; SD, 1.7) with a nonsyndromic complete UCLP consecutively treated with one-stage closure of the cleft at 9.2 months (range, 6.0 to 15.8 months; SD, 2.0) by the Warsaw Cleft Team at the Institute of Mother and Child, Poland, were compared with a sample drawn from a consecutive series of patients with UCLP treated by the Oslo Cleft Team and matched for age, gender, and soft tissue band. The study models were given random numbers to blind their origin. Four examiners rated the dental arch relationship using the GOSLON Yardstick. The strength of agreement of rating was assessed with weighted Kappa statistics. An independent t-test was carried out to compare the GOSLON scores between Warsaw and Oslo samples, and Fisher's exact tests were performed to evaluate the difference of distribution of the GOSLON scores. The intrarater and interrater agreements were high (K > or = .800). No difference in dental arch relationship between Warsaw and Oslo groups was found (mean GOSLON score = 2.68 and 2.65 for Warsaw and Oslo samples, respectively). The distribution of the GOSLON grades was similar in both groups. The dental arch relationship following one-stage repair (Warsaw protocol) was comparable with the outcome of the Oslo Cleft Team's protocol.

  4. Enhancement of the repair of dog alveolar cleft by an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuanzheng, Chen; Yan, Gao; Ting, Li; Yanjie, Fu; Peng, Wu; Nan, Bai

    2015-05-01

    Autologous bone graft has been regarded as the criterion standard for the repair of alveolar cleft. However, the most prominent issue in alveolar cleft treatment is the high absorption rate of the bone graft. The authors' objective was to investigate the effects of an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture on the repair of dog alveolar cleft. Twenty beagle dogs with unilateral alveolar clefts created by surgery were divided randomly into four groups: group A underwent repair with an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture; group B underwent repair with autologous iliac bone and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells; group C underwent repair with autologous iliac bone and platelet-rich fibrin; and group D underwent repair with autologous iliac bone as the control. One day and 6 months after transplantation, the transplant volumes and bone mineral density were assessed by quantitative computed tomography. All of the transplants were harvested for hematoxylin and eosin staining 6 months later. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin transplants formed the greatest amounts of new bone among the four groups. The new bone formed an extensive union with the underlying maxilla in groups A, B, and C. Transplants with the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich fibrin, and their mixture retained the majority of their initial volume, whereas the transplants in the control group showed the highest absorption rate. Bone mineral density of transplants with the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich fibrin, and their mixture 6 months later was significantly higher than in the control group (p platelet-rich fibrin mixed transplants. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that the structure of new bones formed the best in group A. Both bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet

  5. Does crossover innervation really affect the clinical outcome? A comparison of outcome between unilateral and bilateral digital nerve repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Oruç

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital nerve injuries are the mostly detected nerve injury in the upper extremity. However, since the clinical phenomenon of crossover innervation at some degree from uninjured digital nerve to the injured side occurs after digital nerve injuries is sustained, one could argue that this concept might even result in the overestimation of the outcome of the digital nerve repair. With this knowledge in mind, this study aimed to present novel, pure, focused and valuable clinical data by comparing the outcomes of bilateral and unilateral digital nerve repair. A retrospective review of 28 fingers with unilateral or bilateral digital nerve repair using end-to-end technique in 19 patients within 2 years was performed. Weber′s two-point discrimination, sharp/dull discrimination, warm/cold sensation and Visual Analog Scale scoring were measured at final 12-month follow ups in all patients. There was no significant difference in recovery of sensibility after unilateral and bilateral digital nerve repairs. Though there is crossover innervation microscopically, it is not important in the clinical evaluation period. According to clinical findings from this study, crossover innervations appear to be negligible in the estimation of outcomes of digital neurorrhaphy.

  6. Incidence of Cleft Lip and Palate in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreise, Marieke; Galiwango, George; Hodges, Andrew

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to estimate the need for resources for cleft repairs in Uganda by determining the overall incidence of oral-facial clefts and the ratio of isolated cleft lip to isolated cleft palate to cleft lip and palate. Design: A 1-year prospective study was implemented

  7. One-stage (Warsaw) and two-stage (Oslo) repair of unilateral cleft lip and palate: Craniofacial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudalej, Piotr Stanislaw; Wegrodzka, Ewa; Semb, Gunvor; Hortis-Dzierzbicka, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare facial development in subjects with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (CUCLP) treated with two different surgical protocols. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of 61 patients (42 boys, 19 girls; mean age, 10.9 years; SD, 1) treated consecutively in Warsaw with one-stage repair and 61 age-matched and sex-matched patients treated in Oslo with two-stage surgery were selected to evaluate craniofacial morphology. On each radiograph 13 angular and two ratio variables were measured in order to describe hard and soft tissues of the facial region. The analysis showed that differences between the groups were limited to hard tissues – the maxillary prominence in subjects from the Warsaw group was decreased by almost 4° in comparison with the Oslo group (sella-nasion-A-point (SNA) = 75.3° and 79.1°, respectively) and maxillo-mandibular morphology was less favorable in the Warsaw group than the Oslo group (ANB angle = 0.8° and 2.8°, respectively). The soft tissue contour was comparable in both groups. In conclusion, inter-group differences suggest a more favorable outcome in the Oslo group. However, the distinctiveness of facial morphology in background populations (ie, in Poles and Norwegians) could have contributed to the observed results. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Speech outcomes of early palatal repair with or without intravelar veloplasty in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Jean-Charles; Herlin, Christian; Captier, Guillaume; Baylon, Hélène; Verdeil, Mélanie; Bigorre, Michèle

    2013-12-01

    We compared the early speech outcomes of 40 consecutive children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) who had been treated according to different 2-stage protocols: the Malek protocol (soft palate closure without intravelar veloplasty at 3 months; lip and hard palate repair at 6 months) (n=20), and the Talmant protocol (cheilorhinoplasty and soft palate repair with intravelar veloplasty at 6 months; hard palate closure at 18 months) (n=20). We compared the speech assessments obtained at a mean (SD) age of 3.3 (0.35) years after treatment by the same surgeon. The main outcome measures evaluated were acquisition and intelligibility of speech, velopharyngeal insufficiency, and incidence of complications. A delay in speech articulation of one year or more was seen more often in patients treated by the Malek protocol (11/20) than in those treated according to the Talmant protocol (3/20, p=0.019). Good intelligibility was noted in 15/20 in the Talmant group compared with 6/20 in the Malek group (p=0.010). Assessment with an aerophonoscope showed that nasal air emission was most pronounced in patients in the Malek group (p=0.007). Velopharyngeal insufficiency was present in 11/20 in the Malek group, and in 3/20 in the Talmant group (p=0.019). No patients in the Talmant group had an oronasal fistula (ppalate, early speech outcomes were better in the Talmant group because intravelar veloplasty was successful and there were no fistulas after closure of the hard palate in 2 layers. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Facial Appearance among Patients With Repaired Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate: Comparison of Patient- and Clinician-Ratings of Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thittiwong, Rungkarn; Manosudprasit, Montian; Wangsrimongkol, Tasanee; Kongsomboon, Supaporn; Pitiphat, Waranuch; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp; Uttaravichien, Akasith; Pisek, Poonsak

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the levels of patient-satisfaction on facial and dental appearance compared with clinician ratings. Participants included 61 patients with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), aged 14-25 years. Raters comprised three cleft team clinicians. A Likert scale was used to assess the levels of satisfaction of the patients themselves and the clinicians. The results revealed that the patients were moderately satisfied with their appearance. Nose was the least satisfactory feature, followed by lip appearance. When compared to the clinician ratings, the patients were less satisfied with their own nose and lip, but more satisfied with teeth. Concerning age, self-assessment did not differ between adolescents and young adults. Females were less likely to be satisfied compared to males, but the difference was not statistically significant. In conclusion, patients with repaired UCLP were moderately satisfied with their facial and dental appearance. Clinician- and patient-opinions were different in some aspects. This study highlights the importance of patient satisfaction as a meaningful treatment outcome assessment, which could lead to an improvement in cleft care to meet the patient expectations.

  10. Important points for primary cleft palate repair for speech derived from speech outcome after three different types of palatoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funayama, Emi; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Nishizawa, Noriko; Mikoya, Tadashi; Okamoto, Toru; Imai, Satoko; Murao, Naoki; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Oyama, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    This study was performed to investigate speech outcomes after three different types of palatoplasty for the same cleft type. The objective of this study was to investigate the surgical techniques that are essential for normal speech on the basis of each surgical characteristic. Thirty-eight consecutive nonsyndromic patients with unilateral complete cleft of the lip, alveolus, and palate were enrolled in this study. Speech outcomes, i.e., nasal emission, velopharyngeal insufficiency, and malarticulation after one-stage pushback (PB), one-stage modified Furlow (MF), or conventional two-stage MF palatoplasty, were evaluated at 4 (before intensive speech therapy) and 8 (after closure of oronasal fistula/unclosed hard palate) years of age. Velopharyngeal insufficiency at 4 (and 8) years of age was present in 5.9% (0.0%), 0.0% (0.0%), and 10.0% (10.0%) of patients who underwent one-stage PB, one-stage MF, or two-stage MF palatoplasty, respectively. No significant differences in velopharyngeal function were found among these three groups at 4 and 8 years of age. Malarticulation at 4 years of age was found in 35.3%, 10.0%, and 63.6% of patients who underwent one-stage PB, one-stage MF, and two-stage MF palatoplasty, respectively. Malarticulation at 4 years of age was significantly related to the presence of a fistula/unclosed hard palate (P<0.01). One-stage MF palatoplasty that was not associated with postoperative oronasal fistula (ONF) showed significantly better results than two-stage MF (P<0.01). Although the incidences of malarticulation at 8 years of age were decreased in each group compared to at 4 years of age, the incidence was still high in patients treated with two-stage MF (45.5%). On the whole, there was a significant correlation between ONF/unclosed hard palate at 4 years of age and malarticulation at 8 years of age (P<0.05). Appropriate muscle sling formation can compensate for a lack of retropositioning of the palate for adequate velopharyngeal closure

  11. Use of early hard palate closure using a vomer flap in cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarius, Bram J A; Breugem, Corstiaan C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of the vomer flap during cleft palate closure. A retrospective review was performed of all consecutive unilateral/bilateral complete cleft lip and palate (Veau III en IV) children who were treated by a simultaneous lip and hard palate closure using a vomer flap. Data were collected for sex, date of birth, syndrome, adoption, cleft palate type, type of repair, date of cleft repair, cleft width, lateral incisions, fistula and location of fistula. Ninety-one children (M = 62, F 29) were operated. Mean age at time of lip closure and vomer flap was 5.8 months (range 2.9 months to 49.2 months, SD 7.1) and the mean age at palate closure was 13.6 months (range 6.3 months to 79.9 months, SD 10.8). The mean cleft width at first assessment was 13.0 mm (range 7-22 mm) compared to 8.8 mm (range 4-15 mm) at second assessment (mean difference 4.6 mm, 95% CI 3.93-5.35, p cleft width, subsequently leading to a low fistula incidence (1.1%). Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of timing of hard palate repair in a two-stage procedure on early language development in Danish children with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the influence of timing of hard palate closure on early language development from 18 months to 3 years of age. Design: a prospective, randomized clinical trial. Participants: thirty-four children with UCLP with velum closure at 4 months of age, and hard palate closure...... language development in cleft palate children. Key words: cleft palate, phonological development, lexical development, surgical timing....... at 12 months (EarlyHPR (Early hard palate repair)) or 36 months (LateHPU (Late hard palate Unrepaired)) by random assignment. Thirty-five control children matched for gender and age. Methods: all children were video recorded during a play interaction with a parent at 18 months of age. These recordings...

  13. Frequency and socio-psychological impact of taunting in school-age patients with cleft lip-palate surgical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorot-Marchand, A; Guerreschi, P; Pellerin, P; Martinot, V; Gbaguidi, C C; Neiva, C; Devauchelle, B; Frochisse, C; Poli-Merol, M L; Francois-Fiquet, C

    2015-07-01

    Cleft lip-palate (CLP) is a "social" pathology because of its impact on the child's facial appearance and speech. School is the first place where children are confronted to others and when they start socializing. Taunting and bullying are common and their psychological impact remains hard to assess. The aim of this study was to evaluate the importance of taunting in school and its impact in CLP patients who had surgical repair. We conducted a multicenter prospective study where we consecutively included patients ≥ 12 years who had CLP repair. During a multidisciplinary consultation they were asked to complete a questionnaire (3 parts: surgical outcomes, taunting and its impact, socio-economic status) previously approved by our psychologists. 55 patients were included (37 B, 18 G) (mean age 15.5 years): 11 CL, 13 CP and 31 CLP. 69% of patients reported having suffered from taunting and peer victimization in school. In 84% of the cases, taunting was linked to the CLP defect itself. The teasing started in primary school to reach a peak of aggressiveness in middle school. 42% of patients reported that bullying occurred at least once a day (16/38). Regarding the psychological impact of taunting, 50% of patients reported sadness, 31% depression and 26.3% were marked for life. At one time or another 29% of patients did not want to attend school because of the teasing. The grade retention rate amounted to 37.7% (20/53), and 2 patients were in special education classes. As a matter of fact, 50% of these children repeated their 1st or 2nd year of primary school. Furthermore, 47% of patients wanted to change something to their face, but 63% of them never spoke to their surgeon about additional surgeries even though they were teased in school. Taunting is common in children with CLP. This study highlights the high frequency and impact of taunting on the daily lives and self-perception of patients with CLP or CLP repair. It is important for healthcare professionals to be

  14. The effects of palatal lengthening on the functional and speech outcomes after submucous cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Abdelrahman E M; El-Begermy, Marwa M; Eid, Mustafa I; Akel, Mabrouk M

    2016-02-29

    This study was designed to compare intravelar veloplasty with and without V-Y pushback palatoplasty regarding postoperative functional and speech outcomes. is to find out the importance and influence of palatal lengthening on the functional and speech outcomes after SMCP repair. This is a prospective randomized comparative study of 20 patients divided into 2 equal groups. The study was conducted between February 2008 and January 2015. Radical Intravelar Veloplasty (RIVVP group): included 10 patients with a mean age of 5.539±1.335 years and V-Y Pushback Pharyngoplasty and Radical Intravelar Veloplasty (VYP+RIVVP group): included 10 patients with a mean age of 5.688±1.341 years for non-syndromic SMCP. Academic tertiary care medical centres. In both groups there was a significant change in Eustachian tube function, nasal emission and nasal tone of voice postoperatively than preoperatively, while there was no significant difference between both groups in the postoperative outcomes as regards the same parameters (ET function, nasal emission and resonance) (p=0.558, 0.563 and 0.164 respectively). However, there was a significant difference between both groups as regards palatal lengthening, no statistically significant difference was present between both groups as regards the postoperative mean pharyngeal gap, using videoendoscopic analysis. In conclusion, RIVVP and VYP+RIVVP are both effective methods to repair non-syndromic SMCP. Moreover, the lengthening of the palate in non-syndromic SMCP is an unnecessary process.

  15. Rare Combination of Frontonasal and Bilateral Naso-orbital Encephaloceles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Alan A.; Saettele, Megan R.; L’Heureux, Daniel; Shah, Paras A.; Fickenscher, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Encephaloceles, while a common entity affecting 1:4000 live births, typically occur in the occipital region. Encephaloceles involving the frontal region comprise only 15% of all cases. Naso-orbital encephaloceles are rarely seen. Our case profiles a child born at term with an atrial septal defect (ASD), micrognathia, cleft lip, and frontonasal as well as bilateral naso-orbital encephaloceles. At birth the encephaloceles were undetected. During the cleft palate pre-operative preparation, the bilateral naso-orbital encephaloceles were diagnosed as dacrocystoceles for which the child underwent surgical repair. Misdiagnosis and loss to follow up lead to delayed surgical treatment until the child was almost two years of age; the right eye was near complete closure due to the increasing size of the encephalocele. This case highlights the importance of meticulous radiologic interpretation of midline nasal masses, as a correct diagnosis impacts clinical management and directs surgical repair. PMID:22470768

  16. [The usage of inferior turbinate mucosal flap for repairing cleft lip].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pu; Zhao, Min; Qi, Ke-ming; Zhao, Zhen-min; Xiong, Bin

    2004-05-01

    To evaluate a technique for decreasing the tension of the nasal floor during the procedures of repairing complete clef lip. With the designation of an inferior turbinate mucosal flap combined with an oral mucosal flap in the splitting side, the tension was effectively decreased and the nasal floor was closed easily. Eighteen patients was selected for the treatment with this technique since 2000. The follow-ups were 10 to 24 months. All of the patients showed wound healing well with the significant improvement in the donor site. The above mentioned technique may effectively decrease the tension and be used to close the nasal floor safely. It could also reduce the incidence of the complications.

  17. A study of nasal cavity volume in patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Kenichi

    1996-01-01

    Nasal cavity volume was studied in 11 patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging. The areas of horizontal sections of the nasal cavity on the cleft and non-cleft sides were measured with the help of a personal computer and image analyzing software. Nasal cavity volume was determined by integrated volume calculation. The volume of each side was measured before and after cleft lip repair. Before cleft lip repair nasal cavity volume on the non-cleft side was larger than on the cleft side. However there was no significant difference in the volume of the cleft and non-cleft sides after cleft lip repair. (author)

  18. A study of nasal cavity volume in patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Kenichi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-02-01

    Nasal cavity volume was studied in 11 patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging. The areas of horizontal sections of the nasal cavity on the cleft and non-cleft sides were measured with the help of a personal computer and image analyzing software. Nasal cavity volume was determined by integrated volume calculation. The volume of each side was measured before and after cleft lip repair. Before cleft lip repair nasal cavity volume on the non-cleft side was larger than on the cleft side. However there was no significant difference in the volume of the cleft and non-cleft sides after cleft lip repair. (author)

  19. Width and elevation of the palatal shelves in unoperated unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate patients in the permanent dentition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latief, B.S.; Lekkas, K.C.; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Fudalej, P.S.; Kuijpers, M.A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with cleft left lip and palate (CLP) normally require extensive surgery from an early age up to the end of adolescence. These surgeries affect the growth of the maxillofacial complex. The degree to which the cleft itself affects growth of the maxillofacial complex remains poorly understood.

  20. Early assessment of bilateral inguinal hernia repair: A comparison between the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal and Stoppa approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivaldo Massazo Utiyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present clinical trial was designed to compare the results of bilateral inguinal hernia repair between patients who underwent the conventional Stoppa technique and laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair (LTE with a single mesh and without staple fixation. Patients and Methods: This controlled, randomised clinical trial was conducted at General Surgery and Trauma of the Clinics Hospital, Medical School, the University of São Paulo between September 2010 and February 2011. Totally, 50 male patients, with a bilateral inguinal hernia, older than 25 years were considered eligible for the study. The following parameters were analysed during the early post-operative period: (1 The intensity of surgical trauma, operation time, C-reactive protein (CRP levels, white blood cell count, bleeding and pain intensity; (2 quality of life assessment; and (3 post-operative complications. Results: LTE procedure was longer than the Stoppa procedure (134.6 min ± 38.3 vs. 90.6 min ± 41.3; P 0.05. There was no difference in pain during the 1st and 7th post-operative, physical functioning, physical limitation, the impact of pain on daily activities, and the Carolinas Comfort Scale during the 7th and 15th post-operative (P > 0.05. Complications occurred in 88% of Stoppa group (22 patients and 64% in LTE group (16 patients (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The comparative study between the Stoppa and LTE approaches for the bilateral inguinal hernia repair demonstrated that: (1 The LTE approach showed less surgical trauma despite the longer operation time; (2 Quality of life during the early post-operative period were similar; and (3 Complication rates were higher in the Stoppa group.

  1. Social life aspects of young adults with cleft lip and palate: grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetpakdeechit, Woranuch; Hallberg, Ulrika; Hagberg, Catharina; Mohlin, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    The findings of many questionnaire and inventory studies suggest that people with cleft lip and/or palate report a decreased quality of life. Common problems include dissatisfaction with the external appearance of the lips and nose, speech problems, depression, and anxiety. This qualitative study aimed to explore the subjective perceptions and values of young adults with clefts, particularly with regard to their social lives. Twelve persons participated in an in-depth interview. Among those, seven had a repaired isolated cleft palate involving only the hard/soft palate. Five had a repaired bilateral cleft lip and palate that had been a continuous lesion of the lip, the alveolar process, and the palate. A grounded theory approach was used to conduct and analyze the interviews. The study revealed seven important categories--hoping to be like other people, being treated differently from others, experiencing deviation from others, regarding oneself as being different from others, lack of recognition, low self-esteem, and receiving recognition from significant others--with hoping to be like other people as the core category. Young adults with either cleft lip and palate or isolated cleft palate who received recognition from significant others reported increased self-esteem and greater ability to cope with their social lives.

  2. The Correction of a Secondary Bilateral Cleft Lip Nasal Deformity Using Refined Open Rhinoplasty with Reverse-U Incision, V-Y Plasty, and Selective Combination with Composite Grafting: Long-term Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Chae Cho

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis article presents long-term outcomes after correcting secondary bilateral cleft lip nasal deformities using a refined reverse-U incision and V-Y plasty or in combination with a composite graft in order to elongate the short columella.MethodsA total of forty-six patients underwent surgery between September 1996 and December 2008. The age of the patients ranged from 3 to 19 years of age. A bilateral reverse-U incision and V-Y plasty were used in 24 patients. A composite graft from the helical root was combined with a bilateral reverse-U incision in the 22 patients who possessed a severely shortened columella. The follow-up period ranged between 2 and 10 years.ResultsA total of 32 patients out of 46 were evaluated postoperatively. The average columella length was significantly improved from an average of 3.7 mm preoperatively to 8.5 mm postoperatively. The average ratio of the columella height to the alar base width was 0.18 preoperatively and 0.29 postoperatively. The postoperative basal and lateral views revealed a better shape of the nostrils and columella. The elongated columella, combined with a composite graft, presented good maintenance of the corrected position with no growth disturbance. A composite graft showed color mismatching in several patients. Twenty-six patients demonstrated no alar-columella web deformity and satisfactory symmetry of the nostrils. Four patients experienced a drooping and overhanging of the corrected alar-columella web.ConclusionsA bilateral reverse-U incision with V-Y plasty or in combination with a composite graft was effective in correcting secondary bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity.

  3. Repair and replication of DNA in hereditary (bilateral) retinoblastoma cells after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Char, D.; Charles, W.C.; Rand, N.

    1982-01-01

    Fibroblasts from patients with hereditary retinoblastoma reportedly exhibit increased sensitivity to killing by X-rays. Although some human syndromes with similar or greater hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents (e.g., X-rays, ultraviolet light, and chemical carcinogens), such as xeroderma pigmentosum, are deficient in DNA repair, most do not have such clearly demonstrable defects in repair. Retinoblastoma cells appear to be normal in repairing single-strand breaks and performing repair replication after X-irradiation and also in synthesizing poly(adenosine diphosphoribose). Semiconservative DNA replication in these cells, however, is slightly more resistant than normal after X-irradiation, suggesting that continued replication of damaged parental DNA could contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. This effect is small, however, and may be a consequence rather than a cause of the fundamental enzymatic abnormality in retinoblastoma that causes the tumorigenesis

  4. Changing strategy and implementation of a new treatment protocol for cleft palate surgery in "Maria Sklodowska Curie" (MSC) Children's Hospital, Bucharest, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spataru, Radu; Mark, Hans

    2014-12-01

    In "Maria Sklodowska Curie" (MSC) Children's Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, cleft palate repair has been performed according to von Langenbeck since 1984. The speech was good in most patients but wide clefts had a high percentage of fistulas, abnormal speech due to short length and limited mobility of the soft palate. In 2009, the protocol was changed to Gothenburg Delayed Hard Palate Closure, (DHPC) technique. The present evaluation was performed to study the implementation of this technique. One hundred and sixty-eight patients with cleft palate were admitted, 89 isolated cleft palate (ICP), 53 unilateral (UCLP) and 26 bilateral (BCLP). In these, 228 surgical interventions were performed. Soft Palate Repair (SPR) and Hard Palate Repair (HPR) were performed with the DHPC procedure. The transfer to this technique was successfully performed in three steps: one team visit to Gothenburg by a surgeon from MSC and two visits by surgeons from Gothenburg to the MSC. Patients with SPR and HPR were operated on without major complications and there were no differences in results between Gothenburg surgeons and MSC surgeons. The interventions with SPR and HPR technique were proven to be easy to teach and learn and successfully performed without major complications. For cleft patients at MSC hospital it has meant earlier surgery, less re-operations and complications. This report shows a successful change of strategy for palatal repair with improved outcome regarding surgery. In future, speech and growth will be followed on a regular basis and will be compared with results from the Gothenburg Cleft Team.

  5. Psychological status as a function of residual scarring and facial asymmetry after surgical repair of cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Keith; Bell, Aileen; Bowman, Adrian; Brown, Denise; Lo, Tsz-Wai; Siebert, Paul; Simmons, David; Ayoub, Ashraf

    2013-03-01

    Objective : Objective measure of scarring and three-dimensional (3D) facial asymmetry after surgical correction of unilateral cleft lip (UCL) and unilateral cleft lip (UCLP). It was hypothesized that the degree of scarring or asymmetry would be correlated with poorer psychological function. Design : In a cross-sectional design, children underwent 3D imaging of the face and completed standardized assessments of self-esteem, depression, and state and trait anxiety. Parents rated children's adjustment with a standard scale. Setting : Glasgow Dental School, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences. Patients : Fifty-one children aged 10 years with UCLP and 43 with UCL were recruited from the cohort treated with the surgical protocol of the CLEFTSIS managed clinical network in Scotland. Methods : Objective assessment to determine the luminance and redness of the scar and facial asymmetry. Depression, anxiety, and a self-esteem assessment battery were used for the psychological analysis. Results : Cleft cases showed superior psychological adjustment when compared with normative data. Prevalence of depression matched the population norm. The visibility of the scar (luminance ratio) was significantly correlated with lower self-esteem and higher trait anxiety in UCLP children (P  =  .004). Similar but nonsignificant trends were seen in the UCL group. Parental ratings of poorer adjustment also correlated with greater luminance of the scar. Conclusions : The objectively defined degree of postoperative cleft scarring was associated with subclinical symptoms of anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem.

  6. One-stage (Warsaw) and two-stage (Oslo) repair of unilateral cleft lip and palate: Craniofacial outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fudalej, P.S.; Wegrodzka, E.; Semb, G.; Hortis-Dzierzbicka, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare facial development in subjects with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (CUCLP) treated with two different surgical protocols. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of 61 patients (42 boys, 19 girls; mean age, 10.9 years; SD, 1) treated consecutively in Warsaw

  7. Three-dimensional computer graphics for surgical procedure learning: Web three-dimensional application for cleft lip repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Nakajima, Tatsuo; Mori, Ayako; Tanaka, Daigo; Fujino, Toyomi; Chiyokura, Hiroaki

    2006-05-01

    In surgical procedures for cleft lip, surgeons attempt to use various skin incisions and small flaps to achieve a better and more natural shape postoperatively. They must understand the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the lips. However, they may have difficulty learning the surgical procedures precisely from normal textbooks with two-dimensional illustrations. Recent developments in 3D computed tomography (3D-CT) and laser stereolithography have enabled surgeons to visualize the structures of cleft lips from desired viewpoints. However, this method cannot reflect the advantages offered by specific surgical procedures. To solve this problem, we used the benefits offered by 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) and 3D animation. By using scanning 3D-CT image data of patients with cleft lips, 3D-CG models of the cleft lips were created. Several animations for surgical procedures such as incision designs, rotation of small skin flaps, and sutures were made. This system can recognize the details of an operation procedure clearly from any viewpoint, which cannot be acquired from the usual textbook illustrations. This animation system can be used for developing new skin-flap design, understanding the operational procedure, and using tools in case presentations. The 3D animations can also be uploaded to the World Wide Web for use in teleconferencing.

  8. Cleft lip repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright ...

  9. The impact of a single surgical intervention for patients with a cleft lip living in rural Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, Matthew J; Hoyle, Tom; Abebe, Mekonen E; Kebede, Yegeremu; Medhin, Yohannes D; Hiwot, Fikre A; Cifeta, Taye H; Ali, Ibrahim M; McGurk, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Humanitarian organisations commonly provide reconstructive treatment for patients with cleft lip within developing countries, but follow-up is often non-existent, particularly for those living in rural areas. This study aimed to assess whether a single surgical intervention was sufficient to produce an observable change to the life of a patient with cleft lip living in rural Hararghe in eastern Ethiopia. 356 patients with isolated cleft lips, who received a single surgical treatment at least 6 months previously, were evaluated in 21 rural health centres. Patients and their families expressed unhappiness before treatment, mainly because the society reacted negatively towards the deformities, isolating the patients from community activities. Postoperatively, the percentage of school-aged children participating in education increased from 46% to 79%, some older patients were able to marry, but employment was unaffected. The prevalence of wound dehiscence in the lip repair was 3% and occurred more frequently in patients with a bilateral cleft lip compared to a unilateral cleft lip (p charitable organisations treating rural patients and that the majority of patients report a positive impact following surgical intervention. We recommend that bilateral cleft lips have a more intense rural aftercare. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence-Based Medicine: Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Albert S

    2017-01-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the incidence of cleft palate and risk factors associated with development of an orofacial cleft. 2. Understand differences among several techniques to repair clefts of both the hard and soft palates. 3. Discuss risk factors for development of postoperative fistulas, velopharyngeal insufficiency, and facial growth problems. 4. Establish a treatment plan for individualized care of a cleft palate patient. Orofacial clefts are the most common congenital malformations of the head and neck region, and approximately three-quarters of these patients have some form of cleft palate deformity. Cleft palate repair is generally performed in children between 6 and 12 months of age. The goals of palate repair are to minimize the occurrence of fistulas, establish a normal velopharyngeal mechanism, and optimize facial growth. This Maintenance of Certification review discusses the incidence and epidemiology associated with cleft palate deformity and specifics associated with patient care, including analgesia, surgical repair techniques, and complications associated with repair of the cleft palate.

  11. Variability in palatal shape and size in patients with bilateral complete cleft lip and palate assessed using dense surface model construction and 3D geometric morphometrics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bejdová, Š.; Krajíček, V.; Peterka, Miroslav; Trefný, P.; Velemínská, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 3 (2012), s. 201-208 ISSN 1010-5182 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : orofacial cleft * palatal shape * laser scranning Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.610, year: 2012

  12. Comparison between autogenous iliac bone and freeze-dried bone allograft for repair of alveolar clefts in the presence of plasma rich in growth factors: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirani, Gholamreza; Abbasi, Amir J; Mohebbi, Simin Z; Moharrami, Mohammad

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of alveolar cleft repair using iliac bone and freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) in the presence of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF). Patients with unilateral alveolar cleft (n = 32) were randomly allocated to either the iliac plus PRGF group or the FDBA plus PRGF group. CBCT images were obtained before and 6 months after the surgery to assess the regenerated bone volume. Paired t-tests and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were applied to analyze the data using SPSS 16.0 software. The patients' mean age was 15 ± 5.7 years (range = 8-27). In the iliac plus PRGF group, the mean volume of cleft before the surgery and the mean regenerated bone volume 6 months after were 1.67 ± 0.66 and 1.14 ± 0.47 cm 3 , respectively. The corresponding values were 1.5 ± 0.54 and 0.72 ± 0.23 cm 3 in the FDBA plus PRGF group. The remaining bone to cleft volume ratio was not associated with grafting time (secondary or tertiary) and the original cleft volume. Iliac bone reinforced with PRGF was more successful than FDBA plus PRGF in repairing alveolar cleft (p = 0.007). Due to the poor performance of the allograft, autografts should still be preferred in spite of possible donor site morbidity. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Minimally Invasive Direct Repair of Bilateral Lumbar Spine Pars Defects in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A. Widi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spondylolysis of the lumbar spine has traditionally been treated using a variety of techniques ranging from conservative care to fusion. Direct repair of the defect may be utilized in young adult patients without significant disc degeneration and lumbar instability. We used minimally invasive techniques to place pars interarticularis screws with the use of an intraoperative CT scanner in three young adults, including two athletes. This technique is a modification of the original procedure in 1970 by Buck, and it offers the advantage of minimal muscle dissection and optimal screw trajectory. There were no intra- or postoperative complications. The detailed operative procedure and the postoperative course along with a brief review of pars interarticularis defect treatment are discussed.

  14. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refers to a cleft in the lip only accounting for 20 percent of all clefts. What causes ... malformation of the upper airway can affect the function of the Eustachian tube and increase the possibility ...

  15. Improved Early Cleft Lip and Palate Complications at a Surgery Specialty Center in the Developing World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eugene; Deshpande, Gaurav; Schonmeyr, Bjorn; Restrepo, Carolina; Campbell, Alex

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate complication rates following cleft lip and cleft palate repairs during the transition from mission-based care to center-based care in a developing region. We performed a retrospective review of 3419 patients who underwent cleft lip repair and 1728 patients who underwent cleft palate repair in Guwahati, India between December 2010 and February 2014. Of those who underwent cleft lip repair, 654 were treated during a surgical mission and 2765 were treated at a permanent center. Of those who underwent cleft palate repair, 236 were treated during a surgical mission and 1491 were treated at a permanent center. Two large surgical missions to Guwahati, India, and the Guwahati Comprehensive Cleft Care Center (GCCCC) in Assam, India. Overall complication rates following cleft lip and cleft palate repair. Overall complication rates following cleft lip repair were 13.2% for the first mission, 6.7% for the second mission, and 4.0% at GCCCC. Overall complication rates following cleft palate repair were 28.0% for the first mission, 30.0% for the second mission, and 15.8% at GCCCC. Complication rates following cleft palate repair by the subset of surgeons permanently based at GCCCC (7.2%) were lower than visiting surgeons ( P cleft care delivery in the developing world can lead to decreased complication rates.

  16. The Correction of a Secondary Bilateral Cleft Lip Nasal Deformity Using Refined Open Rhinoplasty with Reverse-U Incision, V-Y Plasty, and Selective Combination with Composite Grafting: Long-term Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Chae Cho

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background This article presents long-term outcomes after correcting secondary bilateralcleft lip nasal deformities using a refined reverse-U incision and V-Y plasty or in combinationwith a composite graft in order to elongate the short columella.Methods A total of forty-six patients underwent surgery between September 1996 andDecember 2008. The age of the patients ranged from 3 to 19 years of age. A bilateral reverse-Uincision and V-Y plasty were used in 24 patients. A composite graft from the helical rootwas combined with a bilateral reverse-U incision in the 22 patients who possessed a severelyshortened columella. The follow-up period ranged between 2 and 10 years.Results A total of 32 patients out of 46 were evaluated postoperatively. The average columellalength was significantly improved from an average of 3.7 mm preoperatively to 8.5 mmpostoperatively. The average ratio of the columella height to the alar base width was 0.18preoperatively and 0.29 postoperatively. The postoperative basal and lateral views revealed abetter shape of the nostrils and columella. The elongated columella, combined with a compositegraft, presented good maintenance of the corrected position with no growth disturbance. Acomposite graft showed color mismatching in several patients. Twenty-six patients demonstratedno alar-columella web deformity and satisfactory symmetry of the nostrils. Four patientsexperienced a drooping and overhanging of the corrected alar-columella web.Conclusions A bilateral reverse-U incision with V-Y plasty or in combination with acomposite graft was effective in correcting secondary bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity.

  17. Assessment of scar quality after cleft lip closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frans, Franceline A.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.; Griot, J. P. W. Don; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    To assess scar quality after cleft lip repair. The linear scars of patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate were evaluated in a prospective study using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Linear regression was performed to identify which scar characteristics were important

  18. The Role of Lip Adhesion in the Treatment of Cleft Lips

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2004-12-02

    Dec 2, 2004 ... presence of a wide alveolar cleft (gap>7mm) with severely malpositioned maxillary segments. LA was performed at ... example head caps and elastic bands and intraoral orthodontic .... arch alignment in bilateral cleft lip and.

  19. Management of Commonly Encountered Secondary Cleft Deformities of Face-A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob John

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Orofacial clefts are one of the commonest congenital deformities occurring due to disturbances during the embryological formation, development and growth of orofacial region. The treatment of cleft deformities in the early period of life is mandatory to address the aesthetic, functional and psychological problems affecting the child. A considerable number of surgical modalities for definitive correction of unilateral and bilateral cleft lip, nose, and eyelid deformities have been reported over the past half century. After the initial cleft repair, there is a long period of dramatic growth. This powerful variable of growth may ultimately distort the immediate surgical result. Hence, the correction of secondary deformities plays a very important part in the care of these patients. In this article we are enlisting some simple techniques to correct the commonly encountered secondary cleft deformities of face that gave acceptable results to the patients. These corrective surgeries not only improved the function and aesthetics but also increased the confidence level, satisfaction and overall quality of life of the patient.

  20. Botulinum toxin to improve results in cleft lip repair: a double-blinded, randomized, vehicle-controlled clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Shin Chang

    Full Text Available Most patients with facial scarring would value even a slight improvement in scar quality. Botulinum toxin A is widely used to alleviate facial dynamic rhytides but is also believed to improve scar quality by reducing wound tension during healing. The main objective was to assess the effect of Botulinum toxin on scars resultant from standardized upper lip wounds.In this double-blinded, randomized, vehicle-controlled, prospective clinical trial, 60 consecutive consenting adults undergoing cleft lip scar revision (CLSR surgery between July 2010 and March 2012 were randomized to receive botulinum toxin A (n = 30 or vehicle (normal saline; n = 30 injections into the subjacent orbicularis oris muscle immediately after wound closure. Scars were independently assessed at 6-months follow-up in blinded fashion using: Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and photographic plus ultrasound measurements of scar widths.58 patients completed the trial. All scar assessment modalities revealed statistically significantly better scars in the experimental than the vehicle-control group.Quality of surgical upper lip scars, which are oriented perpendicular to the direction of pull of the underlying orbicularis oris muscle, is significantly improved by its temporary paralysis during wound healing.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01429402.

  1. Chin Symphysis Bone, Allograft, and Platelet-Rich Fibrin: Is the Combination Effective in Repair of Alveolar Cleft?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedian Attar, Bijan; Naghdi, Navid; Etemadi Sh, Milad; Mehdizadeh, Mojdeh

    2017-05-01

    Secondary grafting of alveolar defects with iliac crest bone is a common treatment method in cleft patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the combination of symphysis bone, allograft, and platelet-rich fibrin in regeneration of alveolar defects compared with iliac bone graft. In this randomized clinical trial, patients with unilateral alveolar defects were divided randomly into two categories. Group A comprised patients in whom the combination of chin symphysis bone plus allogeneic bone material plus leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin was considered for treatment. Group B comprised patients in whom iliac bone graft was considered. Cone beam computed tomography before treatment and 1 year postoperatively was used for measurement of bone formation (bone volume in cubic centimeters). The data were analyzed by paired t and χ 2 tests via SPSS software (version 23; IBM, Armonk, NY). P platelet-rich fibrin is a proper combination for bone regeneration in alveolar defects with a small to moderate volume range. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nasal Airway Dysfunction in Children with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate: Results of a Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study, with Anatomical and Surgical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Danielle L; Allori, Alexander C; Carlson, Anna R; Pien, Irene J; Watkins, Stephanie E; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Meyer, Robert E; Pimenta, Luiz A; Strauss, Ronald P; Ramsey, Barry L; Raynor, Eileen; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    The aesthetic aspects of the cleft lip nasal deformity have been appreciated for over a century, but the functional implications have remained largely underappreciated or misunderstood. This study describes the frequency and severity of nasal obstructive symptoms among children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, addressing the hypotheses that age, cleft type, and severity are associated with the development of nasal obstructive symptoms. Children with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate and a comparison group of unaffected children born from 1997 to 2003 were identified through the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program and birth certificates. Nasal airway obstruction was measured using the validated Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale. The survey was completed by parental proxy for 176 children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and 333 unaffected children. Nasal obstructive symptoms were more frequently reported in cleft lip with cleft palate compared with unaffected children (p cleft lip with or without alveolus and isolated cleft palate were not statistically different from unaffected children. Patients with unilateral cleft lip with cleft palate were found to be more severely affected than bilateral cases. Nasal obstruction was observed in early childhood, although severity worsened in adolescence. This population-based study reports a high prevalence of nasal obstructive symptoms in children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate based on type and severity of the cleft. The authors encourage cleft teams to consider using this or similar screening methods to identify which children may benefit from functional rhinoplasty. Risk, I.

  3. Assessing Angle's malocclusion among cleft lip and/or palate patients in Jammu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akshay; Gupta, Anur; Bhardwaj, Amit; Vikram, S; Gomathi, Ajeetha; Singh, Karanprakash

    2016-04-01

    The study was conducted to examine the patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate and its association with different types of malocclusion. This descriptive study was done among 168 patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate. Angle's classification of malocclusion was applied for assessment of occlusion as Class I, Class II, and Class III. The types of oral clefts classification such as cleft lip unilateral and cleft lip bilateral, cleft palate (CP), unilateral cleft lip with palate (UCLP) and bilateral cleft lip with palate (BCLP) was considered. Chi-square test was applied to analyze the data at P clefts patients as cleft lip (81), CP (31), and both cleft lip and palate (53). The occurrence of unilateral cleft lip (44) was maximum among the sample followed by UCLP (39), and bilateral cleft lip (31). Maximum subjects with Class II (10.7%) and Class III (4.9%) malocclusion were seen with unilateral cleft lip deformities. None of the patients with UCLP had Class III malocclusion. Cleft lip was the most commonly observed deformity and high frequency of Class II and III malocclusion was evident. Therefore, patients with such abnormalities should be screened timely.

  4. Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... can make referrals to cleft/craniofacial treatment teams. Cleft Lip & Palate Foundation of Smiles Cleft Lip & Palate Foundation of ...

  5. Influence of lip closure on alveolar cleft width in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmelzle Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of surgery on growth and stability after treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate are topics still under discussion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of early lip closure on the width of the alveolar cleft using dental casts. Methods A total of 44 clefts were investigated using plaster casts, 30 unilateral and 7 bilateral clefts. All infants received a passive molding plate a few days after birth. The age at the time of closure of the lip was 2.1 month in average (range 1-6 months. Plaster casts were obtained at the following stages: shortly after birth, prior to lip closure, prior to soft palate closure. We determined the width of the alveolar cleft before lip closure and prior to soft palate closure measuring the alveolar cleft width from the most lateral point of the premaxilla/anterior segment to the most medial point of the smaller segment. Results After lip closure 15 clefts presented with a width of 0 mm, meaning that the mucosa of the segments was almost touching one another. 19 clefts showed a width of up to 2 mm and 10 clefts were still over 2 mm wide. This means a reduction of 0% in 5 clefts, of 1-50% in 6 clefts, of 51-99% in 19 clefts, and of 100% in 14 clefts. Conclusions Early lip closure reduces alveolar cleft width. In most cases our aim of a remaining cleft width of 2 mm or less can be achieved. These are promising conditions for primary alveolar bone grafting to restore the dental bony arch.

  6. Ambulatory cleft lip surgery: A value analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneja, Jugpal S; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Socialized health systems face fiscal constraints due to a limited supply of resources and few reliable ways to control patient demand. Some form of prioritization must occur as to what services to offer and which programs to fund. A data-driven approach to decision making that incorporates outcomes, including safety and quality, in the setting of fiscal prudence is required. A value model championed by Michael Porter encompasses these parameters, in which value is defined as outcomes divided by cost. To assess ambulatory cleft lip surgery from a quality and safety perspective, and to assess the costs associated with ambulatory cleft lip surgery in North America. Conclusions will be drawn as to how the overall value of cleft lip surgery may be enhanced. A value analysis of published articles related to ambulatory cleft lip repair over the past 30 years was performed to determine what percentage of patients would be candidates for ambulatory cleft lip repair from a quality and safety perspective. An economic model was constructed based on costs associated with the inpatient stay related to cleft lip repair. On analysis of the published reports in the literature, a minority (28%) of patients are currently discharged in an ambulatory fashion following cleft lip repair. Further analysis suggests that 88.9% of patients would be safe candidates for same-day discharge. From an economic perspective, the mean cost per patient for the overnight admission component of ambulatory cleft surgery to the health care system in the United States was USD$2,390 and $1,800 in Canada. The present analysis reviewed germane publications over a 30-year period, ultimately suggesting that ambulatory cleft lip surgery results in preservation of quality and safety metrics for most patients. The financial model illustrates a potential cost saving through the adoption of such a practice change. For appropriately selected patients, ambulatory cleft surgery enhances overall health care value.

  7. Submucous Clefts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Local Cleft/Craniofacial Specialists Booklets & Factsheets College Scholarships School-Age Support Resources Connections Conference View More… ... for speech problems, middle ear disease, and swallowing difficulties. However, there are some individuals with a submucous ...

  8. Cause analysis, prevention, and treatment of postoperative restlessness after general anesthesia in children with cleft palate

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Hao; Mei, Xiao-Peng; Xu, Li-Xian

    2017-01-01

    Cleft palate is one of the most common congenital malformations of the oral and maxillofacial region, with an incidence rate of around 0.1%. Early surgical repair is the only method for treatment of a cleft lip and palate. However, because of the use of inhalation anesthesia in children and the physiological characteristics of the cleft palate itself combined with the particularities of cleft palate surgery, the incidence rate of postoperative emergence agitation (EA) in cleft palate surgery ...

  9. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Surgery: Malpractice Litigation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin, Grant A; Brietzke, Scott E

    2017-01-01

      This study examined malpractice claims related to cleft lip and cleft palate surgery to identify common allegations and injuries and reviewed financial outcomes.   The WestlawNext legal database was analyzed for all malpractice lawsuits and settlements related to the surgical repair of cleft lip and palate.   Inclusion criteria included patients undergoing surgical repair of a primary cleft lip or palate or revision for complications of previous surgery. Data evaluated included patient demographics, type of operation performed, plaintiff allegation, nature of injury, and litigation outcomes.   A total of 36 cases were identified, with 12 unique cases from 1981 to 2006 meeting the inclusion criteria. Six cases (50%) were decided by a jury and six by settlement. Five cases involved complications related to the specific surgery, and the other seven were associated with any surgery and perioperative care of children and adults. Cleft palate repair (50%) was the most frequently litigated surgery. Postoperative negligent supervision was the most common allegation (42%) and resulted in a payout in each case (mean = $3,126,032). Death (42%) and brain injury (25%) were the most frequent injuries reported. Financial awards were made in nine cases (after adjusting for inflation, mean = $2,470,552, range = $0 to $7,704,585). The awards were significantly larger for brain injury than other outcomes ($4,675,395 versus $1,368,131 after adjusting for inflation, P = .0101).   Malpractice litigation regarding cleft lip and palate surgery is uncommon. However, significant financial awards involving perioperative brain injury have been reported.

  10. Fetal cleft lip with and without cleft palate: Comparison between MR imaging and US for prenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Guangbin, E-mail: wgb7932596@hotmail.com [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, 324 Jingwu Road, Jinan, 250021 (China); Shan Ruiqin [Jinan Maternity and Child Care Hospital, Jinan (China); Zhao Lianxin; Zhu Xiangyu; Zhang Xinjuan [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, 324 Jingwu Road, Jinan, 250021 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of fetal CL/CP and evaluate its diagnostic value. Methods and materials: Twelve fetuses with CL/CP diagnosed by transabdominal US underwent MR imaging within 2 days of US. Half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) sequence on T2-weighted images was performed on sagittal, coronal, and axial planes anatomic to the fetuses during maternal breath holding. US and MR imaging findings were compared with final diagnoses obtained from post-natal physical examination or fetal autopsy. Results: Final diagnoses confirmed incomplete midline cleft lip (n = 1), unilateral cleft lip and palate (n = 7), bilateral cleft lip and palate (n = 1), midline cleft lip and palate (n = 3). US and MR imaging diagnosed all 12 fetuses with cleft lip and the laterality. 5 (45.5%) of 11 cleft palates were identified with US, 2 of 7 fetuses with unilateral cleft palate, 2 of 3 fetuses with midline cleft palate, and one fetus with bilateral cleft palate. On MR imaging, 10 (91%) of 11 cleft palates were correctly detected. One fetus with unilateral cleft palate was not detected. No false-positives occurred. Conclusion: MR imaging is valuable for diagnosis of fetal CL/CP. It can demonstrate additional findings and provide more information compared with US.

  11. Fetal cleft lip with and without cleft palate: Comparison between MR imaging and US for prenatal diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangbin; Shan Ruiqin; Zhao Lianxin; Zhu Xiangyu; Zhang Xinjuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of fetal CL/CP and evaluate its diagnostic value. Methods and materials: Twelve fetuses with CL/CP diagnosed by transabdominal US underwent MR imaging within 2 days of US. Half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) sequence on T2-weighted images was performed on sagittal, coronal, and axial planes anatomic to the fetuses during maternal breath holding. US and MR imaging findings were compared with final diagnoses obtained from post-natal physical examination or fetal autopsy. Results: Final diagnoses confirmed incomplete midline cleft lip (n = 1), unilateral cleft lip and palate (n = 7), bilateral cleft lip and palate (n = 1), midline cleft lip and palate (n = 3). US and MR imaging diagnosed all 12 fetuses with cleft lip and the laterality. 5 (45.5%) of 11 cleft palates were identified with US, 2 of 7 fetuses with unilateral cleft palate, 2 of 3 fetuses with midline cleft palate, and one fetus with bilateral cleft palate. On MR imaging, 10 (91%) of 11 cleft palates were correctly detected. One fetus with unilateral cleft palate was not detected. No false-positives occurred. Conclusion: MR imaging is valuable for diagnosis of fetal CL/CP. It can demonstrate additional findings and provide more information compared with US.

  12. The Epidemiology of Cleft Lip and Palate in Canada, 1998 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Jennifer L K; Oddone-Paolucci, Elizabeth; Harrop, Robertston A

    2015-07-01

    To examine the birth prevalence, gender distribution, and pattern of surgical intervention for clefts in Canada (1998 to 2007). Also to highlight the difficulties associated with studying the epidemiology of clefts using the current data collection mechanisms. Epidemiologic data acquired from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Population-based study in Canada 1998 to 2007. All live births with an International Classification of Diseases (9th or 10th revision) diagnostic code for cleft palate or for cleft lip with or without cleft palate or with a surgical intervention code for repair of cleft lip or cleft palate. Birth prevalence, gender distribution, and pattern of surgical intervention. There were 3,015,325 live births in Canada (1998 to 2007). The mean birth prevalence was 0.82 per 1000 live births for cleft lip with or without cleft palate and 0.58 per 1000 live births for cleft palate. The birth prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate was significantly higher in boys, with a stable boy to girl ratio of 1.75:1. Cleft palate was significantly greater in girls; however, the boy to girl ratio decreased from 0.97:1 in 1998 to 0.59:1 in 2007. The median age of repair in Canada from 1998 to 2007 was 4.7 months for cleft lip and 11.6 months for cleft palate. Thirty percent of patients underwent cleft palate repair after age 1. The birth prevalence of cleft palate and cleft lip with or without cleft palate is stable in Canada. An increasing birth prevalence of cleft palate in girls is suggested. The timing of surgical intervention is consistent with current standards. The challenges associated with collecting these data in Canada are discussed.

  13. The second branchial cleft fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalozzo, John; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Dreyfuss, Heath F; Jaffar, Reema; Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-07-01

    To review the surgical anatomy and histopathology of second branchial cleft fistulae. Retrospective study of patients treated for second branchial cleft fistulae at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. The senior author noted anatomic and histologic features of second branchial cleft fistulae, not previously described. Tertiary care children's hospital. Retrospective examination of 28 patients was conducted who were operated upon for second branchial cleft fistula. Data collected included age at surgery, initial presentation, imaging characteristics prior to surgery, laterality of the fistula tract, pathology results and follow-up data. Twenty-eight patients met the criteria for inclusion. Three patients (11%) had bilateral fistulae. 11 (39%) were male and 17 (61%) were female. 23 (74.2%) tracts were lined with ciliated columnar epithelium, 3 (9.7%) had cuboidal epithelium, and 5 (16.7%) had squamous epithelium. Nineteen (61.3%) tracts contained salivary tissue. Of the unilateral fistula tracts, 25 (100%) were on the right side. Of the 3 patients with bilateral lesions, 2 (66%) had associated branchio-oto-renal syndrome (BORS). Second branchial cleft fistulae are rare. They are usually right-sided. If bilateral fistulae are present, one should consider an underlying genetic disorder. The histology of the fistulae mostly demonstrates ciliated columnar epithelium with the majority of specimens showing salivary tissue. There is a clear association with the internal jugular vein (IJV). Dissection should continue until superior to the hyoid bone, ensuring near complete surgical dissection and less risk of recurrence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Considerations Regarding Age at Surgery and Fistula Incidence Using One- and Two-stage Closure for Cleft Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Stoicescu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although cleft lip and palate (CLP is one of the most common congenital malformations, occurring in 1 in 700 live births, there is still no generally accepted treatment protocol. Numerous surgical techniques have been described for cleft palate repair; these techniques can be divided into one-stage (one operation cleft palate repair and two-stage cleft palate closure. The aim of this study is to present our cleft palate team experience in using the two-stage cleft palate closure and the clinical outcomes in terms of oronasal fistula rate. Material and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on medical records of 80 patients who underwent palate repair over a five-year period, from 2008 to 2012. All cleft palate patients were incorporated. Information on patient’s gender, cleft type, age at repair, one- or two-stage cleft palate repair were collected and analyzed. Results: Fifty-three (66% and twenty-seven (34% patients underwent two-stage and one-stage repair, respectively. According to Veau classification, more than 60% of them were Veau III and IV, associating cleft lip to cleft palate. Fistula occurred in 34% of the two-stage repairs versus 7% of one-stage repairs, with an overall incidence of 24%. Conclusions: Our study has shown that a two-stage cleft palate closure has a higher rate of fistula formation when compared with the one-stage repair. Two-stage repair is the protocol of choice in wide complete cleft lip and palate cases, while one-stage procedure is a good option for cleft palate alone, or some specific cleft lip and palate cases (narrow cleft palate, older age at surgery

  15. Presurgical Unilateral Cleft Lip Anthropometrics and the Presence of Dental Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, Gregory S; Fisher, David M

    2015-07-01

    To investigate associations between cleft lip anthropometrics and dental anomalies in the permanent dentition in unilateral cleft lip patients. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Children with unilateral clefts of the lip, with or without cleft palate. Anthropometric lip measurements, made immediately prior to lip repair, were available for each patient. The presence of dental anomalies in the permanent dentition was assessed radiographically. The presence of associations between anthropometric lip measurements and prevalence rates of different dental anomalies were determined using logistic regression analyses. In the 122 included patients, the cleft lateral lip element was deficient in height in 80% and in transverse length in 84% of patients. Patients with more deficient cleft side lateral lip height and less deficient cleft side lateral lip transverse length were more likely to present with cleft side maxillary lateral incisor agenesis. On the other hand, patients with a less deficient cleft side lateral lip height and more deficient cleft side lateral lip transverse length were more likely to present with a cleft side supernumerary maxillary lateral incisor. When looking only at incomplete clefts, the cleft side lateral lip transverse length deficiency was more predictive of the presence of supernumerary maxillary lateral incisors (P = .030), while for complete clefts, the cleft side lateral lip height deficiency was more predictive of the presence of maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (P = .035). In patients with unilateral clefts, cleft lip anthropometrics have a predictive role in determining the occurrence of dental anomalies.

  16. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  17. A study on the dental anomalities and site of cleft associated with cleft lip and/or palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Hyung Kyu

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate possible correlation between the dental anomalies and site of cleft in cleft lip and palate. In this study, 142 patients who had cleft lip and/or cleft palate were examined. The results are as follows. 1. The incidence of missing tooth was high in the permanent dentition as compared to the incidence in the deciduous dentition. 2. There was not much difference of incidence of supernumerary tooth between deciduous and permanent dentition in the group of patients who had cleft lip and jaw with or without cleft palate. 3. In the group of patients who had cleft lip and jaw with or without cleft palate, the frequency of incidence of cleft sides was higher in unilateral than bilateral cases. And, incidence of left sides was higher than right sides. 4. The type of cleft between central incisor and canine with missing lateral incisor was most frequent in permanent dentition and the type of cleft between central and lateral incisor was most frequent in deciduous dentition. 5. The type of cleft associated with tooth position in deciduous dentition was not almost the same in the succeeding permanent dentition.

  18. A study on the dental anomalities and site of cleft associated with cleft lip and/or palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Hyung Kyu [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate possible correlation between the dental anomalies and site of cleft in cleft lip and palate. In this study, 142 patients who had cleft lip and/or cleft palate were examined. The results are as follows. 1. The incidence of missing tooth was high in the permanent dentition as compared to the incidence in the deciduous dentition. 2. There was not much difference of incidence of supernumerary tooth between deciduous and permanent dentition in the group of patients who had cleft lip and jaw with or without cleft palate. 3. In the group of patients who had cleft lip and jaw with or without cleft palate, the frequency of incidence of cleft sides was higher in unilateral than bilateral cases. And, incidence of left sides was higher than right sides. 4. The type of cleft between central incisor and canine with missing lateral incisor was most frequent in permanent dentition and the type of cleft between central and lateral incisor was most frequent in deciduous dentition. 5. The type of cleft associated with tooth position in deciduous dentition was not almost the same in the succeeding permanent dentition.

  19. Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are birth defects that occur when a baby's lip or mouth do not form properly. They happen early during ... A baby can have a cleft lip, a cleft palate, or both. A cleft lip happens if the ...

  20. Cleft Palate Fistula Closure Utilizing Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emodi, Omri; Ginini, Jiriys George; van Aalst, John A; Shilo, Dekel; Naddaf, Raja; Aizenbud, Dror; Rachmiel, Adi

    2018-03-01

    Fistulas represent failure of cleft palate repair. Secondary and tertiary fistula repair is challenging, with high recurrence rates. In the present retrospective study, we review the efficacy of using acellular dermal matrix as an interposition layer for cleft palate fistula closure in 20 consecutive patients between 2013 and 2016. Complete fistula closure was obtained in 16 patients; 1 patient had asymptomatic recurrent fistula; 2 patients had partial closure with reduction of fistula size and minimal nasal regurgitation; 1 patient developed a recurrent fistula without changes in symptoms (success rate of 85%). We conclude that utilizing acellular dermal matrix for cleft palate fistula repair is safe and simple with a high success rate.

  1. Sequential Hybrid Repair of Aorta and Bilateral Common Iliac Arteries Secondary to Chronic Aortic Dissection with Extensive Aneurysmal Degeneration in a Marfan Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Carlos A; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Laparra-Escareno, Hugo; Lizola, Rene; Torres-Machorro, Adriana

    2017-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder associated with aortic dissection, aneurysmal degeneration and rupture. These cardiovascular complications represent the main cause of mortality, therefore repair is indicated. We present a 35-year-old woman who experienced acute onset of chest pain. Her imaging revealed a chronic DeBakey type I dissection with aortic root dilation and descending thoracic aneurysmal degeneration. She underwent a Bentall procedure and endovascular exclusion of the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. She was closely followed and 2 years later a computed tomography angiography (CTA) revealed the aneurysmal degeneration of the thoracoabominal aorta and bilateral iliac arteries. The patient underwent a composite reconstruction using multi-visceral branched and bifurcated Dacron grafts. At 5 years from her last surgery, a CTA revealed no new dissection or further aneurysmal degenerations. Aortic disease in Marfan patients is a complex clinical problem that may lead to secondary or tertiary aortic reconstructions; close follow-up is mandatory.

  2. Oral Clefting in China Over the Last Decade: 205,679 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochelle R. Kling, MD

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: This study provides insight into cleft care in China as it reports the largest cohort of cleft patients treated by surgeons to date. Our results generally follow trends previously reported in China and developed countries. The male:female ratio for cleft palate patients was higher than expected. The average age at primary repair is higher than recommended, but seems to be decreasing.

  3. Variation among cleft centres in the use of secondary surgery for children with cleft palate: a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzman, Thomas J; Hossain, Monir; Carle, Adam C; Heaton, Pamela C; Britto, Maria T

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To test whether cleft centres vary in their use of secondary cleft palate surgery, also known as revision palate surgery, and if so to identify modifiable hospital factors and surgeon factors that are associated with use of secondary surgery. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Forty-three paediatric hospitals across the USA. Patients Children with cleft lip and palate who underwent primary cleft palate repair from 1999 to 2013. Main outcome measures Time from primary cleft palate repair to secondary palate surgery. Results We identified 4939 children who underwent primary cleft palate repair. At 10 years after primary palate repair, 44% of children had undergone secondary palate surgery. Significant variation existed among hospitals (ppalate repair before 9 months of age was associated with an increased hazard of secondary palate surgery (initial HR 6.74, 95% CI 5.30 to 8.73). Postoperative antibiotics, surgeon procedure volume and hospital procedure volume were not associated with time to secondary surgery (p>0.05). Of the outcome variation attributable to hospitals and surgeons, between-hospital differences accounted for 59% (ppalate surgery exists depending on a child’s age at primary palate repair and the hospital and surgeon performing their repair. Performing primary palate repair before 9 months of age substantially increases the hazard of secondary surgery. Further research is needed to identify other factors contributing to variation in palate surgery outcomes among hospitals and surgeons. PMID:29479567

  4. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Kiemle Trindade-Suedam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1 to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2 to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3 to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.

  5. Effect of Carbon Dioxide Laser on Increasing Vestibular Depth in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaei, Sogra; Aghili, Hossein; Azam, Alireza Navab; Moghadam, Mahjobeh Gholdani; Safari, Isa

    2017-09-01

    Shallow upper buccal sulcus deformity in cleft lip and palate patients is one of the common secondary deformities after primary cleft lip and palate repair; this deformity may prevent or complicate orthodontic and prosthodontic procedures causing aesthetic and functional problems. A number of methods are described to increase the anterior maxillary sulcus in these patients. This study assessed the use of a carbon dioxide laser (CO 2 ) to increase the sulcus depth. Fifteen patients with cleft lip and palate (eight unilateral and seven bilateral) were studied. The surgical procedure was performed using CO 2 laser. The vestibular depth and lip length were measured at three time points namely before surgery (T0), 1 week following surgery (T1), and 4 months following surgery (T2). After data collection, statistical analyses were done using PASW ® version 18 SPSS. The mean values of vestibular depth were 9.46 ± 1.92, 13.83 ± 1.88, and 13.23 ± 1.76 mm for T0, T1, and T2, respectively. The vestibular depth significantly increased after 4 months of follow-up (p = 0.001). The mean amount of vestibular depth gain was not significantly different in unilateral and bilateral cleft groups (p = 0.908). The mean value of upper lip length increased by a mean of 1.23 mm and was statistically significant (p = 0.001). Upper buccal sulcus reconstruction with CO 2 laser provides successful and stable results. CO 2 laser application is suggested as an alternative to conventional vestibuloplasty.

  6. Speech in Adults Treated for Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate: Long-Term Follow-Up After One- or Two-Stage Palate Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morén, Staffan; Mani, Maria; Lilian, Stålhammar; Lindestad, Per Åke; Holmström, Mats

    2017-11-01

      To evaluate speech in adults treated for unilateral cleft lip and palate with one-stage or two-stage palate closure and compare the speech of the patients with that of a noncleft control group.   Cross-sectional study with long-term follow-up.   All unilateral cleft lip and palate patients born from 1960 to 1987 and treated at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden, were invited (n = 109). Participation rate was 67% (n = 73) at a mean of 35 years after primary surgery. Forty-seven had been treated according to one-stage palate closure and 26 according to two-stage palate closure. Pharyngeal flap surgery had been performed in 11 of the 73 patients (15%). The noncleft control group consisted of 63 age-matched volunteers.   Speech-language pathologists rated perceptual speech characteristics from blinded audio recordings.   Among patients, seven (10%) presented with hypernasality, 12 (16%) had audible nasal emission and/or nasal turbulence, five (7%) had consonant production errors, one (2%) had glottal reinforcements/substitutions, and one (2%) had reduced intelligibility. Controls had no audible signs of velopharyngeal insufficiency and no quantifiable problems with the other speech production variables. No significant differences were identified between patients treated with one-stage and two-stage palate closure for any of the variables.   The prevalence of speech outcome indicative of velopharyngeal insufficiency among adult patients treated for unilateral cleft lip and palate was low but higher compared with individuals without cleft. Whether palatal closure is performed in one or two stages does not seem to affect the speech outcome at a mean age of 35 years.

  7. Bone-borne palatal distraction to correct the constricted cleft maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Raj M; Jarrahy, Reza; Sisodia, Manisha; Jourabchi, Natanel; Wasson, Kristy L; Bradley, James P

    2009-05-01

    Transverse maxillary hypoplasia, with or without cleft deformity, is typically treated with orthodontic expansion. However, the management of those patients who present later in life with severe uncorrected deformities or who have failed prior orthodontic care remains controversial. Tooth-borne palatal expanders have limitations in this subset of patients with scarred, constricted cleft palate. In this study, we assess the efficacy and safety of using a bone-borne palatal distraction device as an alternative treatment for this difficult subset of patients. Older children with a constricted maxilla who previously had unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate repairs and failed orthodontic expansion were included in the study (n = 15). Patients underwent Le Fort I corticotomy with placement of the bone-borne distraction device, expansion at a rate of 0.5 mm/d, and subsequent alveolar bone grafting. Preoperative and follow-up maxillary impressions were compared with assessed improvements in intermolar distance, intercanine distance, alveolar cleft width, and total palatal area. In addition, a small group of noncleft patients with constricted maxillas was treated with bone-borne palatal distraction without a corticotomy (n = 4). The mean amount of distraction in all patients was 14.1 mm, with a follow-up period of 19 months (range, 8-30 months). The average increase in intermolar distance was 8.4 mm, intercanine distance increased by an average of 9.5 mm, and palate surface areas were increased by a mean of 28.9 mm2. Relapse was between 4% and 7%, and all patients underwent subsequent alveolar bone grafting. In addition, the noncleft patients successfully underwent bone-borne palatal distraction without a corticotomy, with a 4% to 5% relapse. Rapid palatal expansion using a bone-borne distraction device in cleft patients with transverse maxillary hypoplasia who have failed nonsurgical orthodontic expansion provides adequate expansion necessary for alveolar bone

  8. Lower lip deformity in patients with cleft and non-cleft Class III malocclusion before and after orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo Seok; Koh, Kyung S; Choi, Jong Woo

    2015-10-01

    Orthognathic surgery does not yield the same cosmetic benefits in patients with Class III jaw deformities associated with clefts as for patients without clefts. Preoperative upper lip tightness caused by cleft lip repair may not fully explain this difference, suggesting that a lower lip deformity is present. The study compared the outcomes of orthognathic surgery in patients with cleft and non-cleft Class III malocclusion, focusing on lip relationship. The surgical records of 50 patients with Class III malocclusion, including 25 with and 25 without clefts, who had undergone orthognathic surgery, were retrospectively analyzed. Lateral cephalometric tracings, preoperatively and at 6 months postoperatively, were superimposed to analyze the soft tissue changes at seven reference points. At 6 months after surgery, there were no significant differences in skeletal location, whereas the soft tissues of the lower lip differed significantly between patients with and without cleft (p=0.002), indicating the persistence of a lower lip deformity in cleft patients. Moreover, the soft tissues of the lower lip receded in non-cleft patients and protruded in cleft patients after orthognathic surgery. Lower lip deformity and upper lip tightness may result in an unsatisfactory relationship between the upper and lower lips of patients with cleft-related jaw deformity after orthognathic surgery. Other factors were less important than the pathology of the lower lip. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Occlusal Classification in Relation to Original Cleft Width in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Andrew H; Patel, Kamlesh B; Maschhoff, Clayton W; Huebener, Donald V; Skolnick, Gary B; Naidoo, Sybill D; Woo, Albert S

    2015-09-01

    To determine a correlation between the width of the cleft palate measured at the time of lip adhesion, definitive lip repair, and palatoplasty and the subsequent occlusal classification of patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Retrospective, observational study. Referral, urban, children's hospital Participants : Dental models and records of 270 patients were analyzed. None. Angle occlusion classification. The mean age at which occlusal classification was determined was 11 ± 0.3 years. Of the children studies, 84 were diagnosed with Class I or II occlusion, 67 were diagnosed with Class III occlusion, and 119 were lost to follow up or transferred care. Mean cleft widths were significantly larger in subjects with Class III occlusion for all measures at time of lip adhesion and definitive lip repair (P cleft widths were significantly greater at the alveolus (P = .025) but not at the midportion of the hard palate (P = .35) or posterior hard palate (P = .10). Cleft widths from the lip through to the posterior hard palate are generally greater in children who are diagnosed with Class III occlusion later in life. Notably, the alveolar cleft width is significantly greater at each time point for patients who went on to develop Class III occlusion. There were no significant differences in cleft widths between patients diagnosed later with Class I and Class II occlusions.

  10. Aspiration pneumonia in patients with cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Uhm, Ki Il [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To assess the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in infants with cleft palate and to compare the incidence between complete and incomplete types of cleft palate. A review of medical records revealed 100 infants who had undergone initial surgery to repair cleft palate in our hospital during a recent three-year period. Aspiration pneumonia was defined as the coexistence of pneumonia at chest radiography with a history of frequent choking during feeding. The anatomic distribution of aspiration pneumonia was analyzed, and the incidences of aspiration pneumonia in infants with complete and incomplete cleft palate were compared. Among 100 children, aspiration pneumonia was found in 35 (35%). Those with complete and incomplete cleft palate showed similar incidences of the condition (27 of 70 [39%] vs 8 of 30 [27%], p=0.36). Pneumonia was most commonly seen in the left lower lobe (11 of 35), followed by the right upper and lower lobes. Aspiration pneumonia is frequently associated with infants with cleft palate. There is no statistical difference in the incidence of aspiration pneumonia between the complete and the incomplete cleft palate group.

  11. Aspiration pneumonia in patients with cleft palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Uhm, Ki Il

    2003-01-01

    To assess the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in infants with cleft palate and to compare the incidence between complete and incomplete types of cleft palate. A review of medical records revealed 100 infants who had undergone initial surgery to repair cleft palate in our hospital during a recent three-year period. Aspiration pneumonia was defined as the coexistence of pneumonia at chest radiography with a history of frequent choking during feeding. The anatomic distribution of aspiration pneumonia was analyzed, and the incidences of aspiration pneumonia in infants with complete and incomplete cleft palate were compared. Among 100 children, aspiration pneumonia was found in 35 (35%). Those with complete and incomplete cleft palate showed similar incidences of the condition (27 of 70 [39%] vs 8 of 30 [27%], p=0.36). Pneumonia was most commonly seen in the left lower lobe (11 of 35), followed by the right upper and lower lobes. Aspiration pneumonia is frequently associated with infants with cleft palate. There is no statistical difference in the incidence of aspiration pneumonia between the complete and the incomplete cleft palate group

  12. Evidence-based medicine: cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepla, Kyle J; Gosain, Arun K

    2013-12-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe recent changes in treatment of cleft palate. 2. Compare the efficacy of different surgical treatments. 3. Assess their own knowledge of cleft palate repair. 4. Determine where further individual in-depth study and development are warranted. The Maintenance of Certification in Plastic Surgery series is designed to ensure professional development and measure continued competency within a specialty or subspecialty. The present article provides an evaluation of the interval studies regarding the management of cleft palate with a specific focus on craniofacial growth, speech outcomes, and obstructive sleep apnea since the last Maintenance of Certification in Plastic Surgery article on the subject published in 2010. This purpose of this article is to update plastic and craniomaxillofacial surgeons on recent changes in treatment of cleft palate, provide a means for accurate self-assessment, and guide further individual in-depth study and development.

  13. Early correction of septum JJ deformity in unilateral cleft lip-cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Paolo G; Pinto, Valentina; Negosanti, Luca; Firinu, Antonella; Fabbri, Erich

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of patients affected by unilateral cleft lip-cleft palate is based on a multistage procedure of surgical and nonsurgical treatments in accordance with the different types of deformity. Over time, the surgical approach for the correction of a nasal deformity in a cleft lip-cleft palate has changed notably and the protocol of treatment has evolved continuously. Not touching the cleft lip nose in the primary repair was dogmatic in the past, even though this meant severe functional, aesthetic, and psychological problems for the child. McComb reported a new technique for placement of the alar cartilage during lip repair. The positive results of this new approach proved that the early correction of the alar cartilage anomaly is essential for harmonious facial growth with stable results and without discomfort for the child. The authors applied the same principles used for the treatment of the alar cartilage for correction of the septum deformity, introducing a primary rhinoseptoplasty during the cheiloplasty. The authors compared two groups: group A, which underwent septoplasty during cleft lip repair; and group B, which did not. After the anthropometric evaluation of the two groups, the authors observed better symmetry regarding nasal shape, correct growth of the nose, and a strong reduction of the nasal deformity in the patients who underwent primary JJ septum deformity correction. The authors can assume that, similar to the alar cartilage, the septum can be repositioned during the primary surgery, without causing growth anomaly, improving the morphologic/functional results.

  14. Epiphysical clefts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brent Harrison, R.; Keats, T.E.

    1980-01-01

    Defects or clefts may be seen in the growing epiphysis and are usually observed just before puberty. The basal epiphysis of the proximal phalanx of the great toe is the most common site but similar defects have been observed in a numer of other epiphyseso At least some of these defects develop within a single normal appearing epiphysis and are not associated with signs or symptoms suggestive of fracture. The mechanism of formation of these defects is not clear. The defects probably close spontaneously some-time around late puberty. (orig.) [de

  15. Evaluation of the Transverse Craniofacial Morphology of Adolescents With Repaired Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmiş; Celikoglu, Mevlut; Benkli, Yasin Atakan; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the transverse craniofacial morphology of the adolescent patients affected by unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and to compare the findings with age- and sex-matched control group without any cleft using their cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. The study sample (n = 56 patients; mean age: 14.35 ± 3.06 years) consisted of 26 UCLP (n = 26 patients; 10 women and 16 men; mean age: 13.70 ± 2.94 years) and 30 control (n = 30 patients; 19 women and 11 men; mean age: 14.90 ± 3.10 years) subjects. Twenty-five conventional skeletal and dental tissue landmarks were identified. Twenty widely used frontal cephalometric variables (14 linear distances, 3 angles, and 3 ratios) were measured. The data were analyzed using the independent t-test between the groups. Patients affected by UCLP had statistically significantly smaller interorbital width (89.83 ± 4.16 mm), maxillary width (58.02 ± 5.77 mm), maxillary intermolar width (52.83 ± 4.83 mm), and upper face height (57.64 ± 4.57 mm) (P cleft width had significant effect on Cr-ANS (r = 0.446, P = 0.022) and the ANS-isf (r = 0.459, P = 0.018) measurements. The UCLP group showed statistically significantly smaller values for interorbital width, maxillary width, maxillary intermolar width, and upper face height than the noncleft controls.

  16. Patterns of orofacial clefting in the facial morphology of bats: a possible naturally occurring model of cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, David J A; Teeling, Emma C; Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Finarelli, John A

    2016-11-01

    A normal feature of the facial anatomy of many species of bat is the presence of bony discontinuities or clefts, which bear a remarkable similarity to orofacial clefts that occur in humans as a congenital pathology. These clefts occur in two forms: a midline cleft between the two premaxillae (analogous to the rare midline craniofacial clefts in humans) and bilateral paramedian clefts between the premaxilla and the maxillae (analogous to the typical cleft lip and palate in humans). Here, we describe the distribution of orofacial clefting across major bat clades, exploring the relationship of the different patterns of clefting to feeding mode, development of the vomeronasal organ, development of the nasolacrimal duct and mode of emission of the echolocation call in different bat groups. We also present the results of detailed radiographic and soft tissue dissections of representative examples of the two types of cleft. The midline cleft has arisen independently multiple times in bat phylogeny, whereas the paramedian cleft has arisen once and is a synapomorphy uniting the Rhinolophidae and Hipposideridae. In all cases examined, the bony cleft is filled in by a robust fibrous membrane, continuous with the periosteum of the margins of the cleft. In the paramedian clefts, this membrane splits to enclose the premaxilla but forms a loose fold laterally between the premaxilla and maxilla, allowing the premaxilla and nose-leaf to pivot dorsoventrally in the sagittal plane under the action of facial muscles attached to the nasal cartilages. It is possible that this is a specific adaptation for echolocation and/or aerial insectivory. Given the shared embryological location of orofacial clefts in bats and humans, it is likely that aspects of the developmental control networks that produce cleft lip and palate in humans may also be implicated in the formation of these clefts as a normal feature in some bats. A better understanding of craniofacial development in bats with and

  17. Dental anomalies inside the cleft region in individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Jamile; Araújo, Luana; Guimarães, Laís; Maranhão, Samário; Lopes, Gabriela; Medrado, Alena; Coletta, Ricardo; Reis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL±P) present high frequency of dental anomalies, which may represent complicating factors for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies inside cleft area in a group of Brazilians with NSCL±P. Retrospective analysis of 178 panoramic radiographs of patients aged from 12 to 45 years old and without history of tooth extraction or orthodontic treatment was performed. Association between cleft type and the prevalence of dental anomalies was assessed by chi-square test with a significance level set at p≤ 0.05. Dental anomalies were found in 88.2% (n=157) of the patients. Tooth agenesis (47.1%), giroversion (20%) and microdontia (15.5%) were the most common anomalies. Individuals with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (CLP, pdental anomalies inside cleft region in NSCL±P patients, and further demonstrated that patients with unilateral complete CLP and bilateral incomplete CLP were frequently more affected by dental anomalies. Moreover, our results demonstrate that dental anomalies should be considered during dental treatment planning of individuals affected by NSCL±P.

  18. Cleft palate with/without cleft lip in French children: radiographic evaluation of prevalence, location and coexistence of dental anomalies inside and outside cleft region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Francesca; Nguyen, Laure; Foumou, Nathalie; Bocquet, Emmanuelle; Dursun, Elisabeth

    2018-03-01

    Prevalence of dental anomalies in cleft patients is higher than that in general population. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of dental anomalies and their coexistence in French children with cleft and, then, to investigate the relation between the dental anomalies and the cleft type. Seventy-four non-syndromic cleft patients (6-16 years old) from Lille Regional University and Mondor-Chenevier Hospitals (France) were included. Clefts were classified as right/left unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) and cleft palate (CP). Dental anomalies were investigated on panoramic radiographs and categorized as agenesis, supernumerary teeth, incisor rotations, impacted canines and shape anomalies. Prevalence and gender distribution of dental anomalies, mean number of affected teeth per patient, agenesis occurrence and location, and coexistence of dental anomalies were analysed by cleft type. 96.0% of patients presented at least one dental anomaly (agenesis 83.8%, incisor rotations 25.7%, shape anomalies 21.6%, impacted canines 18.9%, supernumerary teeth 8.1%). BCLP patients had a higher number of affected teeth, and left UCLP patients had a higher one compared to right UCLP patients. Distribution of inside (45.3%) and outside (54.7%) cleft region agenesis was similar. Adjacent (31.8%) and not adjacent (33.3%) combined dental anomalies were often encountered. Dental anomalies were localized inside as well as outside cleft region and were often associated with each other. BCLP patients were more affected. Early radiographic evaluation allows a comprehensive diagnosis of inside and outside cleft region anomalies, required for the multidisciplinary dental treatment.

  19. Management of an infant with cleft lip and palate with phocomelia in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, M S

    2000-12-01

    Cleft lip and palate is a severe birth defect occurring approximately one in 800-1000 newborn infants. The incidence varies widely among races. Cleft lip and palate together account for approximately 50% of all cases whereas isolated cleft lip and isolated cleft palate occur in about 25% of cases. Many of these congenital anomalies appear to be genetically determined though the majority are of unknown causes or teratogenic influences. Presented here is a 3 day old infant with bilateral cleft lip and palate and phocomelia for whom a feeding obturator was made and delivered to facilitate feeding.

  20. Oblique lip-alveolar banding in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, S; Bütow, K-W

    2015-04-01

    We report an oblique lip-alveolar band, a rare banding of soft tissue that involves the lip and alveolus, which we have found in five patients with cleft lip and palate (0.2%), compared with an incidence of the Simonartz lip-lip band of 5.7%). To our knowledge this has not been reported previously. In two patients the bands affected the cleft lip and alveolus bilaterally, with or without the palatal cleft, and in three the bands were unilateral cleft lip and alveolus with or without the palatal cleft. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nasal Glial Heterotopia with Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandna, Sudhir; Mehta, Milind A; Kulkarni, Abhishek Kishore

    2018-01-01

    Congenital midline nasal masses are rare anomalies of which nasal glial heterotopia represents an even rarer subset. We report a case of a 25-day-old male child with nasal glial heterotopia along with cleft palate suggesting embryonic fusion anomaly which was treated with excision and primary closure for nasal mass followed by palatal repair at later date.

  2. Nasal glial heterotopia with cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Chandna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital midline nasal masses are rare anomalies of which nasal glial heterotopia represents an even rarer subset. We report a case of a 25-day-old male child with nasal glial heterotopia along with cleft palate suggesting embryonic fusion anomaly which was treated with excision and primary closure for nasal mass followed by palatal repair at later date.

  3. Assessing Technical Performance and Determining the Learning Curve in Cleft Palate Surgery Using a High-Fidelity Cleft Palate Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolsky, Dale J; Fisher, David M; Wong Riff, Karen W; Szasz, Peter; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James M; Forrest, Christopher R

    2018-06-01

    This study assessed technical performance in cleft palate repair using a newly developed assessment tool and high-fidelity cleft palate simulator through a longitudinal simulation training exercise. Three residents performed five and one resident performed nine consecutive endoscopically recorded cleft palate repairs using a cleft palate simulator. Two fellows in pediatric plastic surgery and two expert cleft surgeons also performed recorded simulated repairs. The Cleft Palate Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (CLOSATS) and end-product scales were developed to assess performance. Two blinded cleft surgeons assessed the recordings and the final repairs using the CLOSATS, end-product scale, and a previously developed global rating scale. The average procedure-specific (CLOSATS), global rating, and end-product scores increased logarithmically after each successive simulation session for the residents. Reliability of the CLOSATS (average item intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), 0.85 ± 0.093) and global ratings (average item ICC, 0.91 ± 0.02) among the raters was high. Reliability of the end-product assessments was lower (average item ICC, 0.66 ± 0.15). Standard setting linear regression using an overall cutoff score of 7 of 10 corresponded to a pass score for the CLOSATS and the global score of 44 (maximum, 60) and 23 (maximum, 30), respectively. Using logarithmic best-fit curves, 6.3 simulation sessions are required to reach the minimum standard. A high-fidelity cleft palate simulator has been developed that improves technical performance in cleft palate repair. The simulator and technical assessment scores can be used to determine performance before operating on patients.

  4. Cleft lip and palate review: Epidemiology, risk factors, quality of life, and importance of classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureen Supit

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip with or without cleft palate is the most occurring craniofacial anomaly in human, resulting from a complex etiology involving multiple genetic and environmental factors. The defect carries lifelong morbidity and economic burden. Children with clefts will require continuous medical interventions for at least the first 18 years of life, affecting many aspects of their lives. The extent and complexity of clefts vary infinitely, later determining individual management and outcome. Identification and classification play significant roles in initial assessment of these unique cleft cases, which affect options for following correctional attempts. Some classifications even allow measurement of progress after anatomical repositioning, and success rate after surgical repairs. The challenge of developing one such widely inclusive classification is discussed. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 226-39Keywords: Cleft lip, cleft palate, congenital anomaly, cleft  classfications

  5. Teaching Palatoplasty Using a High-Fidelity Cleft Palate Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Homan; Podolsky, Dale J; Fisher, David M; Wong, Karen W; Lorenz, H Peter; Khosla, Rohit K; Drake, James M; Forrest, Christopher R

    2018-01-01

    Cleft palate repair is a challenging procedure for cleft surgeons to teach. A novel high-fidelity cleft palate simulator has been described for surgeon training. This study evaluates the simulator's effect on surgeon procedural confidence and palatoplasty knowledge among learners. Plastic surgery trainees attended a palatoplasty workshop consisting of a didactic session on cleft palate anatomy and repair followed by a simulation session. Participants completed a procedural confidence questionnaire and palatoplasty knowledge test immediately before and after the workshop. All participants reported significantly higher procedural confidence following the workshop (p cleft palate surgery experience had higher procedural confidence before (p cleft palate experience did not have higher mean baseline test scores than those with no experience (30 percent versus 28 percent; p > 0.05), but did have significantly higher scores after the workshop (61 percent versus 35 percent; p cleft palate simulator as a training tool to teach palatoplasty. Improved procedural confidence and knowledge were observed after a single session, with benefits seen among trainees both with and without previous cleft experience.

  6. Cleft Palate Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... craniofacial journeys. Read the press release here. American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association 1504 East Franklin Street, Suite 102 ... order bottles Order ACPA publications © Copyright 2017 American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Website by Mixer Creative Follow us ...

  7. The financial impact of multidisciplinary cleft care: an analysis of hospital revenue to advance program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleyiannis, Frederic W-B; TeBockhorst, Seth; Castro, Darren A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the financial impact of cleft care on the hospital and to evaluate trends in reimbursement over the past 6 years. Medical and accounting records of 327 consecutive infants undergoing cleft repair between 2005 and 2011 were reviewed. Charges, payments, and direct cost data were analyzed to illustrate hospital revenue and margins. Hospital payments for all inpatient services (cleft and noncleft) during the first 24 months of life were $9,483,168. Mean hospital payment varied from $5525 (Medicaid) to $10,274 (managed care) for a cleft lip repair (p < 0.0001) and from $6573 (Medicaid) to $12,933 (managed care) for a cleft palate repair (p < 0.0001). Hospital charges for a definitive lip or palate repair to both Medicaid and managed care more than doubled between 2005 and 2011 (p < 0.0001). Overall, mean hospital margins were $3904 and $3520, respectively, for a cleft lip repair and cleft palate repair. Medicaid physician payments for cleft lip and palate were, respectively, $588 and $646. From 2005 to 2006, 2007 to 2008, and 2009 to 2010, 41 percent, 43 percent, and 63 percent of patients, respectively, were enrolled in Medicaid. Cleft care generates substantial revenue for the hospital. For their mutual benefit, hospitals should join with their cleft teams to provide administrative support. Bolstered reimbursement figures, based on the overall value of cleft care to the hospital system, would better attract and retain skilled clinicians dedicated to cleft care. This may become particularly important if Medicaid enrollment continues to increase.

  8. Anatomic Severity, Midfacial Growth, and Speech Outcomes in Van der Woude/Popliteal Pterygium Syndromes Compared to Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip/Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Jeffrey B; Brustowicz, Katherine A; Marrinan, Eileen M; Mulliken, John B; Padwa, Bonnie L

    2015-11-01

    To summarize the clinical characteristics and surgical and speech outcomes for patients with Van der Woude/popliteal pterygium syndromes (VWS/PPS) and to compare them with a historic cohort of patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip/cleft palate (CL/P). Retrospective chart review. Tertiary care center. All patients with VWS/PPS seen at Boston Children's Hospital from 1979 to 2012: 28 patients with VWS (n = 21)/PPS (n = 7) whose mean age was 17.3 ± 10.4 years, including 18 females (64%) and 10 males (36%); 18 patients (64%) had a family history of VWS/PPS. Cleft type, operative procedures, speech, and midfacial growth. Data were compared with historic cohorts of patients with nonsyndromic CL/P treated at one tertiary care center. There were 24 patients (86%) with CP±L, Veau types I (n = 4, 17%), II (n = 4, 17%), III (n = 5, 21%), and IV (n = 11, 46%). Nine patients (38%) had palatal fistula after palatoplasty. Fourteen of 23 (61%) patients with CL/P age 5 years or older had midfacial retrusion, and 10 (43%) required a pharyngeal flap for velopharyngeal insufficiency. Fisher's exact test demonstrated higher frequencies of Veau type IV CP±L (P = .0016), bilateral CL±P (P = .0001), and complete CL±P (P palatal fistula (P clefting and higher incidences of midfacial retrusion, palatal fistula, and velopharyngeal insufficiency following primary repair as compared with nonsyndromic CL/P.

  9. Evaluation of pre- and post-treatment changes in the alveolus of infants with cleft lip and palate using nasoalveolar molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishna Shetty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in maxillary alveolar morphology in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip palate infants treated with presurgical nasoalveolar molding (PNAM. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 10 infants, less than 6 months of age, with cleft lip and palate (CLP treated with PNAM prior to surgical repair, were evaluated. Pre-PNAM (T1 and Post-PNAM (T2 study models were analyzed. Critical linear dimensions like inter-canine width, inter-tuberosity width, and arch length were measured and compared at the T1 and T2 stages using a grid comparison system. Results: The width of the alveolar cleft, arch length, and arch width showed a significant decrease in infants treated with PNAM. The inter-tuberosity width and arch perimeter showed a statistically significant increase with PNAM. Conclusion: PNAM was effective in reducing the severity of the initial cleft deformity mainly at the anterior portion of the maxillary arch.

  10. Clefting of the Alveolus: Emphasizing the Distinction from Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Nicholas; Sidman, James; Block, William

    2016-05-01

    Oral clefting is one of the most common significant fetal abnormalities. Cleft lip and cleft palate have drastically different clinical ramifications and management from one another. A cleft of the alveolus (with or without cleft lip) can confuse the diagnostic picture and lead to a false assumption of cleft palate. The cleft alveolus should be viewed on the spectrum of cleft lip rather than be associated with cleft palate. This is made evident by understanding the embryological development of the midface and relevant terminology. Cleft alveolus carries significantly different clinical implications and treatment options than that of cleft palate. Accurately distinguishing cleft alveolus from cleft palate is crucial for appropriate discussions regarding the patient's care. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. A cross-sectional analysis of the prevalence of tooth agenesis and structural dental anomalies in association with cleft type in non-syndromic oral cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantonis, Dimitrios; Alexandropoulos, Alexandros; Konstantoni, Nikoleta; Nassika, Maria

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tooth agenesis, microdontia, and tooth malformation among non-syndromic oral cleft patients and their potential association with cleft type and gender. Intraoral records and radiographs of 154 patients (97 males and 57 females) were examined. The variables assessed were tooth agenesis, microdontia, dental malformations, and cleft types. The statistics included chi-square and Fisher's exact tests as well as logistic regression to assess any mutual effects of gender and cleft type on the dental variables. Tooth agenesis occurred in 50% of the sample and microdontia in 18%. Non-statistically significant odds ratios for the association of gender and cleft type with tooth agenesis were obtained. Tooth agenesis was substantially higher at the unilateral right CL + P and the bilateral CL + P in quadrant 1 and at the unilateral left CL + P and bilateral CL + P in quadrant 2. It was also higher, at the isolated cleft palate (CP) in quadrants 3 and 4. These results were attributed to teeth 22 (31.8%) and 12 (21.6%) in the maxilla and to teeth 35 (6.1%) and 45 (5.4%) in the mandible. In unilateral CL + P patients, the cleft quadrant that presented tooth agenesis was associated with the side of the cleft. Interdisciplinary treatment of the oral cleft patients should take into consideration the high prevalence of tooth agenesis and their association with the different cleft types. The most frequently affected teeth by cleft are by far the upper lateral incisors. Results indicate that tooth agenesis appears to be a genetically controlled anomaly related to the orofacial cleft development through various genetic links and not caused by the cleft disruptive process.

  12. [Suture simulator - Cleft palate surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinck, F; Riot, S; Qassemyar, A; Belkhou, A; Wolber, A; Martinot Duquennoy, V; Guerreschi, P

    2017-04-01

    Cleft palate requires surgery in the first years of life, furthermore repairing anatomically the soft and hard palate is complex on a surgical level because of the fine tissues and the local intraoral configuration. It is valuable to train first on simulators before going to the operating room. However, there is no material dedicated to learning how to perform intraoral sutures in cleft palate surgery. We made one, in an artisanal manner, in order to practice before the real surgical gesture. The simulator was designed based on precise anatomical data. A steel pipe, fixed on a rigid base represented the oral cavity. An adapted split spoon represented the palate. All pieces could be removed in order to apply a hydrocellular dressing before training for sutures. Our simulator was tested by 3 senior surgeons in our department in close to real-life conditions in order to evaluate its anatomical accuracy. It is valuable to have a simulator to train on cleft palate sutures within teaching university hospitals that manage this pathology. Our simulator has a very low cost, it is easy to make and is anatomically accurate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  14. Oral clefting in china over the last decade: 205,679 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Rochelle R; Taub, Peter J; Ye, Xiaoqian; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2014-10-01

    China is the most populated country and has one of the highest prevalences of oral clefting. The present study reports the epidemiology and surgical procedures performed on the largest reported cohort of individuals with clefting in China. A retrospective review of patients who received cleft repair through Smile Train in China from 2000 to 2011 was conducted. Data on demographics, cleft characteristics, associated malformations, pregnancy and family history, and surgical technique were analyzed using SPSS (IBM, Chicago, Ill.). A total of 205,679 patients underwent 209,169 cleft procedures. Cleft lip and palate (42.7%) was most common followed by isolated cleft palate (32.4%) and isolated cleft lip (24.9%). Males accounted for 63.5% of cases. The average age at initial surgery was 6.12 years. By 2011, this decreased to 1.8 years of age for lip repair and to 5.9 years of age for palate repair. The preferred techniques were rotation-advancement (55%) for unilateral lip repair and Von-Langenbeck (38%) and pushback (39%) for palate repair. The percentages of cases with associated anomalies and surgical complications were 12.8% and 0.36%, respectively. This study provides insight into cleft care in China as it reports the largest cohort of cleft patients treated by surgeons to date. Our results generally follow trends previously reported in China and developed countries. The male:female ratio for cleft palate patients was higher than expected. The average age at primary repair is higher than recommended, but seems to be decreasing.

  15. Effect of early correction of nasal septal deformity in unilateral cleft lip and palate on inferior turbinate hypertrophy and nasal patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Valentina; Piccin, Ottavio; Burgio, Luca; Summo, Valeria; Antoniazzi, Elisa; Morselli, Paolo G

    2018-05-01

    A relatively neglected aspect of cleft lip nasal deformity is the effect of septal deviation and inferior turbinate hypertrophy (ITH) on the functional airway. In particular, ITH in the noncleft side can be especially problematic, because it reduces the healthy nasal area, creating bilateral nasal obstruction that might affect the growth of the maxillofacial skeleton. Although these anatomic and functional changes are documented, few recommendations have been developed regarding the proper approach to ITH. The aim of the present study was to asses the ITH severity and determine the degree of nasal airway patency in patients who have undergone primary correction of the nasal septum during lip repair compared to patients operated on without primary septal correction. The study population included two groups. One group consisted of twenty unilateral cleft lip palate UCLP patients who have previously undergone primary rhinoseptoplasty as part of their treatment plan. The control group consisted of twenty UCLP patients operated on without rhinoseptal correction. The Nasal Obstructive Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scale and nasal endoscopy were used to assess nasal obstruction. The overall untreated group reported severe symptoms across all NOSE scale dimensions more frequently than children who have undergone primary rhinoseptoplasty. The difference was statistically significant for each dimensions (p cleft lip repair results in a statistically significant reduction in IT size and improvement of nasal patency. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Bilateral Odontogenic Keratocyst of the Mandible

    OpenAIRE

    Ram, Hari; Mohammad, Shadab; Husain, Nuzhat; Gupta, Shalini; Kumar, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a cyst of dental origin with an aggressive clinical behavior, having high recurrence rate. Multiple cysts are associated with bifid-rib basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). We present a case of bilateral odontogenic keratocyst in a cleft lip patient.

  17. Congenital Palatal Fistula Associated with Submucous Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshete, Mekonen; Camison, Liliana; Abate, Fikre; Hailu, Taye; Demissie, Yohannes; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Butali, Azeez; Losken, H. Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common congenital malformations, the presence of an isolated congenital palatal fistula along with a submucous cleft is very rare. This appears as an oval-shaped, full-thickness fenestration in the palatal midline that does not fully extend anteriorly or posteriorly, accompanied by the findings of a submucous cleft. Because of the uncommon nature of this entity, there is controversy about its etiology, diagnosis, and management. Methods: Two cases of children with congenital palatal fistulae and a submucous cleft palate are presented who were treated in different settings by different surgeons. Cases are discussed along with a thorough review of the available literature. Results: Patient 1 presented at 4 years of age with “a hole in the palate” since birth and abnormal speech. His palatal fistula and submucous cleft were repaired with a modified von Langenbeck technique in Ethiopia. At a 2-year follow-up, the palate remained closed, but hypernasal speech persisted. Patient 2 was a 1-year-old presenting with failure to thrive and nasal regurgitation, who underwent a Furlow palatoplasty in the United States with good immediate results. She was unfortunately lost to follow-up. Conclusions: A congenital fenestration of the palate is rare. Reports reveal suboptimal speech at follow-up, despite various types of repair, especially when combined with a submucous cleft. Available literature suggests that repair should not focus on fistula closure only but instead on providing adequate palate length to provide good velopharyngeal function, as in any cleft palate repair. PMID:27014542

  18. Unilateral Cleft Hand with Cleft Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Asif Nazir; Bhat, Yasmeen J.; Ahmed, Sheikh Mushtaq; Nazir, Abid

    2009-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the hand form an important class of congenital malformations. They have a huge functional importance because of the part played by the hand in the daily activities of a person. The deformities also have significant cosmetic significance and may also be associated with other anomalies. Amongst the congenital anomalies, central deficiency or cleft hand is relatively rare. The association of cleft foot with cleft hand is an even more rare occurance. We present a case report of a 6 year old child, born of a non-consanginous marriage, having congenital central deficiency of ipsilateral hand and foot. PMID:21475543

  19. Prevalence of dental anomalies in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Neda; Majidi, Mohammad Reza; Aliakbarian, Majid; Hasanzadeh, Nadia

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies in a group of patients with cleft lip and palate (CL/P) in the northeast of Iran. Ninety-one patients referring to the Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic of Mashhad Dental School were enrolled and classified into right CL/P, left CL/P, and bilateral CL/P groups. Photographs, dental casts, and panoramic and periapical radiographs were retrieved, and dental anomalies were recorded. χ test was used to analyze the frequency of dental anomalies according to type of cleft and sex. Missing maxillary lateral incisors was the most frequent dental anomaly, which was slightly higher in the bilateral group (61.1%). There were significantly more cases of missing lateral incisors outside the cleft area in right CL/P (P = 0.015). Peg lateral incisors were observed in 33.3% of bilateral CL/P compared with 28% of right and 23.3% of left unilateral cases. The sample presented rotations of central incisors in the cleft area in 33.3% of bilateral clefts. In unilateral clefts, it occurred more frequently in the right side (48%). Sexual dimorphism appeared only for maxillary central incisor rotation in the cleft area, which showed significantly greater frequency in females (P = 0.025). Transposition of maxillary canine and first premolars was found in 5.5% of bilateral, 8% of right, and 3.3% of left unilateral clefts. The prevalence of dental anomalies in the studied sample seems to be higher than that reported in the normal population. More anomalies were observed at the cleft side. The frequency of most anomalies was not significantly different between the 2 sexes.

  20. We can predict postpalatoplasty velopharyngeal insufficiency in cleft palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Jacques E; Godbout, Audrey; Arteau-Gauthier, Isabelle; Lacour, Sophie; Abel, Kati; McConnell, Elisa-Maude

    2014-02-01

    To find an anatomical measurement of the cleft palate (or a calculated parameter) that predicts the occurrence of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) after palatal cleft repair. Retrospective cohort study. Charts were reviewed from cleft palate patients who underwent palatoplasty by the Von Langenbeck technique for isolated cleft palate or Bardach two-flap palatoplasty for cleft lip-palate. Seven anatomical cleft parameters were prospectively measured during the palatoplasty procedure. Three blinded speech-language pathologists retrospectively scored the clinically assessed VPI at 4 years of age. The recommendation of pharyngoplasty was also used as an indicator of VPI. From 1993 to 2008, 67 patients were enrolled in the study. The best predicting parameter was the ratio a/(30 - b1), in which a is defined as the posterior gap between the soft palate and the posterior pharyngeal wall and b1 is the width of the cleft at the hard palate level. An a/(30 - b1) ratio >0.7 to 0.8 is associated with a higher risk of developing VPI (relative risk = 2.2-5.1, sensitivity = 72%-81%, P cleft at the hard palate level and the posterior gap between the soft palate and the posterior pharyngeal wall were found to be the most significant parameters in predicting VPI. The best correlation was obtained with the ratio a/(30 - b1). 4. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Tessier Number 30 Median Mandibular Cleft With Congenital Heart Anomalies in Qena, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed Ali Abdelrahim

    2018-01-01

    Median cleft deformities of the lower lip and mandible are very rare congenital anomalies. Our patient had median cleft of the lower lip, mandible, and the chin with tongue duplication, ankyloglossia, and cleft strap muscles with 2 neck contracture bands. This anomaly was associated with congenital heart disease transposition of great vessels, large ventricular septal defect, and severe pulmonary stenosis. Early repair was done at 6 months to improve feeding.

  2. 3D computed tomographic evaluation of secondary alveolar bone grafts in cleft lip and palate patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Fumio; Akai, Hidemi; Hosaka, Yoshiaki

    2001-01-01

    Alveolar bone grafting in patients with cleft lip and palate has becomes a routine part of most treatment regimes. This study was undertaken to estimate how much bone needs to be grafted into the cleft cavity and to evaluate the grafted bone using 3-DCT over a period from the early postoperative stage to after one year. Seventy-five patients divided into four groups according to the type of cleft were studied. All patients underwent secondary alveolar bone grafting using particulate cancellous bone from the anterior iliac crest. The bone graft areas were divided into two regions: the extra-cleft region and the intra-cleft region. The weight and the volume of the grafted bone were correlated and the average density was 1.5 g/ml regardless of the cleft type. The bone in the extra-cleft region could be seen in almost all slices of the CT scans, from the lower alveolar process to the piriform aperture. The extra-cleft graft ratio of unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate is higher than that of cleft lip and alveolus. The extra-cleft grafting is necessary to restore facial symmetry. The grafted bone was decreased in both height and volume following three months and adequate bone bridging was maintained for one year. We concluded that 3-DCT findings are one of the most valuable methods to evaluate postoperative conditions after alveolar bone grafting. (author)

  3. Root development of permanent lateral incisor in cleft lip and palate children: A radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarlal Deepti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the root development of lateral incisor on the cleft side with the root development of its contralateral tooth in cleft lip and palate children. Setting: Cleft lip and palate wing, Meenakshi Ammal Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: A sample of 96 orthopantamograms of patients with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and/or cleft palate was selected, regardless of sex and race. Main Outcome Measure: Orthopantamograms were analyzed for root development of lateral incisor on the cleft and noncleft side. Associated anomalies like hypodontia, supernumerary teeth, malformed lateral incisors and root development of canine, if present, were recorded. Findings and Conclusions: Root development of permanent lateral incisor was delayed on the cleft side compared to the noncleft side. There was a statistically significant relationship between levels of root development of lateral incisors on the cleft side within the different study groups ( P < 0.05. Incidence of hypodontia increased in proportion to cleft severity. Frequency of missing second premolars, supernumerary teeth and malformed lateral incisors increased in cleft lip and palate patients. Root development of canine showed a slight delay on the cleft side when compared to the canine on the noncleft side.

  4. 3D computed tomographic evaluation of secondary alveolar bone grafts in cleft lip and palate patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, Fumio; Akai, Hidemi; Hosaka, Yoshiaki [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-04-01

    Alveolar bone grafting in patients with cleft lip and palate has becomes a routine part of most treatment regimes. This study was undertaken to estimate how much bone needs to be grafted into the cleft cavity and to evaluate the grafted bone using 3-DCT over a period from the early postoperative stage to after one year. Seventy-five patients divided into four groups according to the type of cleft were studied. All patients underwent secondary alveolar bone grafting using particulate cancellous bone from the anterior iliac crest. The bone graft areas were divided into two regions: the extra-cleft region and the intra-cleft region. The weight and the volume of the grafted bone were correlated and the average density was 1.5 g/ml regardless of the cleft type. The bone in the extra-cleft region could be seen in almost all slices of the CT scans, from the lower alveolar process to the piriform aperture. The extra-cleft graft ratio of unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate is higher than that of cleft lip and alveolus. The extra-cleft grafting is necessary to restore facial symmetry. The grafted bone was decreased in both height and volume following three months and adequate bone bridging was maintained for one year. We concluded that 3-DCT findings are one of the most valuable methods to evaluate postoperative conditions after alveolar bone grafting. (author)

  5. Description of Mexican Cleft Surgeons' Experience With Foreign Surgical Volunteer Missions in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbrunner, Anna R; Kelley, Kristen D; Buckstaff, Taylor; McIntyre, Joyce K; Sigler, Alicia; Gosman, Amanda A

    2018-05-01

    Mexican cleft surgeons provide multidisciplinary comprehensive cleft lip and palate care to children in Mexico. Many Mexican cleft surgeons have extensive experience with foreign, visiting surgeons. The purpose of this study was to characterize Mexican cleft surgeons' domestic and volunteer practice and to learn more about Mexican cleft surgeons' experience with visiting surgeons. A cross-sectional validated e-mail survey tool was sent to Mexican cleft surgeons through 2 Mexican plastic surgery societies and the Asociación Mexicana de Labio y Paladar Hendido y Anomalías Craneofaciales, the national cleft palate society that includes plastic and maxillofacial surgeons who specialize in cleft surgery. We utilized validated survey methodology, including neutral fact-based questions and repeated e-mails to survey nonresponders to maximize validity of statistical data; response rate was 30.6% (n = 81). Mexican cleft surgeons performed, on average, 37.7 primary palate repairs per year with an overall complication rate of 2.5%; 34.6% (n = 28) of respondents had direct experience with patients operated on by visiting surgeons; 53.6% of these respondents performed corrective surgery because of complications from visiting surgeons. Respondents rated 48% of the functional outcomes of visiting surgeons as "acceptable," whereas 43% rated aesthetic outcomes of visiting surgeons as "poor"; 73.3% of respondents were never paid for the corrective surgeries they performed. Thirty-three percent of Mexican cleft surgeons believe that there is a role for educational collaboration with visiting surgeons. Mexican cleft surgeons have a high volume of primary cleft palate repairs in their domestic practice with good outcomes. Visiting surgeons may play an important role in Mexican cleft care through educational collaborations that complement the strengths of Mexican cleft surgeons.

  6. Cleft Palate Fistula Closure Utilizing Acellular Dermal Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omri Emodi, DMD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Fistulas represent failure of cleft palate repair. Secondary and tertiary fistula repair is challenging, with high recurrence rates. In the present retrospective study, we review the efficacy of using acellular dermal matrix as an interposition layer for cleft palate fistula closure in 20 consecutive patients between 2013 and 2016. Complete fistula closure was obtained in 16 patients; 1 patient had asymptomatic recurrent fistula; 2 patients had partial closure with reduction of fistula size and minimal nasal regurgitation; 1 patient developed a recurrent fistula without changes in symptoms (success rate of 85%. We conclude that utilizing acellular dermal matrix for cleft palate fistula repair is safe and simple with a high success rate.

  7. A cone beam computed tomographic evaluation of the size of the sella turcica in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Khaleghi, Iman

    2017-09-01

    Changes in the size of the sella turcica are frequently related to pathologies and syndromes. The aim of this was to compare the sella turcica dimensions in patients with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate and non-cleft subjects. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of three groups consisted of 20 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate; 20 patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate and a control group consisting of 20 non-cleft subjects were the research population in this pilot study. The sella turcica linear dimensions in terms of length, depth and diameter were measured for all subjects. One-way ANOVA test was used to determine any significant differences among the three groups for the measured parameters. The length, depth and diameter of sella turcica were found to be significantly smaller in the unilateral and bilateral groups compared with the normal age and gender matched group. No significant differences were found in the measured variables between the unilateral and bilateral cleft patients. CBCT images showed a greater likelihood of abnormal sella turcica dimensions in patients with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate. Therefore, the sella turcica dimensions may have an intrinsic relationship to the cleft condition.

  8. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Mandibular Asymmetry in Patients with Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Bahrampour, Ehsan; Beladi, Amir Saied; Khojastepour, Leila

    2018-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to compare mandibular vertical asymmetry in patients with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate and subjects with normal occlusion. Materials and Methods Cone beam computed tomography scans of three groups consisting of 20 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate, 20 patients affected by bilateral cleft lip and palate, and a control group of 20 subjects with normal occlusion were analyzed for this study. Condylar, ramal, and condylar plus ramal asymmetry indices were measured for all subjects using the method of Habets et al. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to determine any significant differences between the groups for all indices at the 95% level of confidence. Results There were no significant differences regarding sex for all mandibular asymmetry indices in all three groups. All Asymmetry indices (condylar, ramal, and condylar plus ramal asymmetry) were significantly higher in the unilateral cleft group compared with the other two groups. Conclusion Cone beam computed tomography images showed that patients with cleft lip and palate suffered from mandibular asymmetry. Subjects with unilateral cleft lip and palate had a more asymmetric mandible compared with the bilateral cleft lip and palate and control groups. Therefore, the mandible appears to be the leading factor in facial asymmetry in subjects with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

  9. Risk factors leading to mucoperiosteal flap necrosis after primary palatoplasty in patents with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossell-Perry, Percy; Figallo-Hudtwalcker, Olga; Vargas-Chanduvi, Roberto; Calderon-Ayvar, Yvette; Romero-Narvaez, Carolina

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have been published reporting risk factors for flap necrosis after primary palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate. This complication is rare, and the event is a disaster for both the patient and the surgeon. This study was performed to explore the associations between different risk factors and the development of flap necrosis after primary palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate. This is a case-control study. A 20 years retrospective analysis (1994-2015) of patients with nonsyndromic cleft palate was identified from medical records and screening day registries). Demographical and risk factor data were collected using a patient´s report, including information about age at surgery, gender, cleft palate type, and degree of severity. Odds ratios and 95% confident intervals were derived from logistic regression analysis. All cases with diagnoses of flap necrosis after primary palatoplasty were included in the study (48 patients) and 156 controls were considered. In multivariate analysis, female sex, age (older than 15 years), cleft type (bilateral and incomplete), and severe cleft palate index were associated with significantly increased risk for flap necrosis. The findings suggest that female sex, older age, cleft type (bilateral and incomplete), and severe cleft palatal index may be associated with the development of flap necrosis after primary palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate.

  10. Fissura palatina reparada: fechamento velofaríngeo antes e durante o som basal Cleft palate repair: velopharyngeal closure before and during the basal tone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giseane Conterno

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Portadores de fissura palatina apresentam inadequado fechamento velofaríngeo (FVF, com consequente hipernasalidade vocal que pode ser diminuída com o som basal. OBJETIVO: Comparar o FVF durante a realização do som basal com a emissão em registro modal, em pacientes com fissura palatina pós-forame reparada. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo de Casos com quatro homens adultos, portadores de fissura palatina pós-forame reparada. Imagens do FVF por nasofaringoscopia, durante a emissão da vogal [a] em registro modal e basal. Julgamento das imagens realizado por quatro otorrinolaringologistas. RESULTADOS: Em três sujeitos, não houve mudança no tipo de FVF entre os registros analisados; as modificações que ocorreram na maioria dos sujeitos referem-se apenas ao grau de movimentação das estruturas envolvidas, pois, em registro basal, o movimento das paredes laterais da faringe se manteve, o movimento da parede posterior da faringe estabilizou, o movimento do véu palatino diminuiu discretamente, e a Prega de Passavant se evidenciou. CONCLUSÕES: O tipo de FVF se manteve em três dos quatro sujeitos analisados, quando comparado o registro modal com o basal, havendo modificações no grau da movimentação das estruturas envolvidas, evidenciando a Prega de Passavant.Patients with palatine fissure have inadequate velopharyngeal closure (VPC, with consequent vocal hypernasality which can be reduced by a basal tone. AIM: to compare VPC during a basal tone with the emission of a modal recording, in patients with repaired post-foramen palatine fissure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: case study with four adult men, all with repaired post-foramen palatine fissure. VPC images through nasal-pharyngoscopy during the emission o f the [a] vowel in a modal and basal recording. The images were studied by four ENTs. RESULTS: in three subjects there was no change in the type of VPC considering the recordings analyzed; the changes which happened to most of the subjects

  11. Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding in unilateral cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Zuhaib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNAM is a non-surgical method of reshaping the cleft lip, alveolus, palate and the nose to minimize the severity of the cleft deformity, before primary cheiloplastyand palatoplasty. In this context, PNAM proves to be an invaluable asset in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate. Aims: The study was conducted to evaluate the effi cacy of PNAM in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate with the following objectives: (1 To assess and compare the degree of reduction in the size of cleft palate and alveolus (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM. (2 To evaluate and compare the improvement in columellar length and correction of columellar deviation (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM. (3 To assess the changes in the position of the alar base and the alar cartilages. Settings and Design: Prospective study. Subjects and Methods: A prospective study consisting of, which included 20 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate was conducted. The age at the start of PNAM treatment of the infants ranged from 2 to 44 days of age reporting to our institute between December 2011 and August 2013. All the patients underwent PNAM therapy before primary cheiloplasty at 6 months of age; clinical parameters were assessed pre- and post-therapy using photographs and dental study models of the maxilla. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test for paired comparisons. Results: Results of the study showed a promising reduction in the cleft size before the surgery, signifi cant improvement in nasal symmetry, including the columellar length on the cleft side. Conclusions: PNAM is a valuable adjunct to our surgical armamentarium in dealing with the challenges of primary closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate thereby enhancing the overall surgical outcome. The advantages of this method include the simplicity of the procedure and improving the quality of surgical repair, particularly in obtaining tension free muscle

  12. Induction of cleft palate in newborn pigs by maternal ingestion of poison hemlock (Conium maculatum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, K E; Keeler, R F; Buck, W B

    1985-06-01

    Cleft palates were induced in newborn pigs of gilts fed Conium maculatum seed or plant during gestation days 30 through 45. Twelve of 23 newborn pigs born to 3 gilts given Utah-grown C maculatum seed and 9 of 12 newborn pigs born to a single gilt given the fresh Utah spring-growth C maculatum plant had cleft palates. The cleft palates ranged from a unilateral cleft, involving only 1 side of the palate, to a full bilateral cleft. Brachygnathia was also observed in some of these newborn pigs with cleft palate. Other malformations were not observed. Chemical analysis of seed and plant samples indicated that gamma-coniceine was the responsible teratogenic alkaloid. A daily dose of plant or seed that provided greater than or equal to 1.07 mg of gamma-coniceine/kg of body weight fed to gilts during the 30th through the 45th day of pregnancy resulted in teratogenic effects.

  13. The value of multislice spiral CT in the pre-operative diagnosis of cleft palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Guangxi; Sun Lianfen; Zhang Xiaolin; Yu Chengxin; Lu Ji; Wang Xiaopeng; Li Liya; Yang Cheng; Wang Jun; Tian Yiqing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the practical value of multislice spiral CT (MSCT) in the preoperative diagnosis of cleft palate. Methods: Twenty patients with cleft palate were examined by using thin-slice (1.25 mm/4i) axial MSCT scanning and CT virtual endoscope (CTVE) imaging before and after operations. The cleft of each lesion was measured in the primary axial images. Results: Of the 20 cases, soft-and-hard cleft palate (grade II) was detected in 10 cases, with the clefts of soft palate between 1.5 cm and 2.2 cm, and the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 1.2 cm and 2.0 cm. The right utter cleft palates were found in 3 cases with the clefts of soft palate between 2.0 cm and 2.5 cm, the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 2.0 cm and 2.4 cm, and the clefts of hard palate between 1.8 cm and 2.2 cm. The left utter cleft palates (grade III) were found in 5 cases with the clefts of soft palate between 1.2 cm and 1.8 cm, the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 0.9 cm and 2.0 cm, and the clefts of hard palate between 0.9 cm and 1.8 cm. The bilateral utter cleft palates (grade III) were detected in 2 cases with the clefts of soft palate between 2.1 cm and 2.3 cm, the clefts of soft-and-hard palate between 1.8 cm and 2.0 cm, and the clefts of hard palate between 1.9 cm and 2.3 cm. Conclusion: MSCT could excellently display the shape of all lesions before operation, especially the splitting degree of hard cleft palates in the axial images. Accurate measurements could be done for the cleft of different lesions in MSCT images. CTVE could clearly and directly show the shape of the lesion's interior surface. The pre-operative and post-operative images of each case could be perfectly compared by the combination of MSCT and CTVE

  14. Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cleft Lip or Cleft Palate Print en español Labio leporino y paladar hendido Tilt your head back a bit and look in the mirror. Do you see the way your nose connects to your upper lip? Now open your mouth. Do you see the ...

  15. Outcomes and Resource Utilization of Endoscopic Mass-Closure Technique for Laryngeal Clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Karthik; Cheng, Esther; de Alarcon, Alessandro; Sidell, Douglas R; Hart, Catherine K; Rutter, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    To compare resource utilization and clinical outcomes between endoscopic mass-closure and open techniques for laryngeal cleft repair. Case series with chart review. Tertiary academic children's hospital. Pediatric patients undergoing repair for Benjamin-Inglis type 1-3 laryngeal clefts over a 15-year period. All 20 patients undergoing endoscopic repair were included. Eight control patients undergoing open repair were selected using matching by age and cleft type. Demographic, clinical, and resource utilization data were collected. Twenty-eight patients were included (20 endoscopic, 8 open). Mean age, rates of tracheostomy and vocal fold immobility, and distribution of cleft types were not different between the 2 groups (all P > .2). Mean operative time (P = .004) and duration of hospital stay (P group. All repairs were intact in both groups at final postoperative endoscopy. Rates of persistent laryngeal penetration or aspiration on swallow study were not different between groups (P = 1.000), although results were available for only 11 patients. Endoscopic laryngeal cleft repair using a mass-closure technique provides a durable result while requiring significantly shorter operative times and hospital stays than open repair and avoiding the potential morbidity of laryngofissure. However, open repair may allow the simultaneous performance of other airway reconstructive procedures and may be a useful salvage technique when endoscopic repair fails. Postoperative swallowing results require further study. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  16. Patterns of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Northern Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Khan

    2012-04-01

    Results: A total of 159 patients of cleft lip and cleft palate deformities were included in the study, having a mean age of 3.5+6.59 years and containing 59.1% males and 40.9% females with a ratio of 1.4:1. A cleft lip with palate, cleft palate and cleft lip were found in 51.6%, 31.4% and 17% of cases, respectively. Left-sided clefts were most common in the cleft lip with palate and the isolated cleft lip deformity. A cleft lip with palate was a male dominant variety (62.8% of cases, while in the cleft palate variety, the dominant gender was female. In 61.6% of cases, the parent had a consanguineous relationship. In 21.4% of cases, family history was positive for the cleft lip/palate. Other congenital anomalies were associated in 10.7% of cases. Conclusion: Cleft deformities of the lip and palate affect the male population more than females with cleft lips, in association with a cleft palate being the most common anomaly. Females are mainly affected by an isolated cleft palate. The high prevalence of these deformities in consanguineous marriages emphasizes educating people. The lower number of patients from distant distracts of Northern Pakistan calls for the attention of the health department. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 63-70

  17. Cleft characteristics and treatment outcomes in hemifacial microsomia compared to non-syndromic cleft lip/palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentino, K M; Valstar, A; Padwa, B L

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM) and cleft lip/palate (CL/P), and to compare them to a historic cohort of patients with non-syndromic CL/P treated at the same centre. A retrospective review of patients with HFM and CL/P was performed; the main outcome measures assessed were cleft type/side, surgical outcome, midfacial retrusion, and speech. Twenty-six patients (13 male, 13 female; mean age 22.7±14.9, range 1-52 years) with cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL±P) were identified: three with cleft lip (12%), two with cleft lip and alveolus and an intact secondary palate (8%), and 21 with cleft lip and palate (CLP) (81%; 15 unilateral and six bilateral). Four patients (19%) had a palatal fistula after palatoplasty. Twelve of 22 patients aged >5 years (55%) had midfacial retrusion and two (9%) required a pharyngeal flap for velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Fisher's exact test demonstrated a higher frequency of complete labial clefting (P=0.004), CLP (P=0.009), midfacial retrusion (P=0.0009), and postoperative palatal fistula (P=0.03) in HFM compared to non-syndromic CL±P. There was no difference in VPI prevalence. This study revealed that patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe forms of orofacial clefting than patients with non-syndromic CL±P. Patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe midfacial retrusion and a higher palatal fistula rate compared to patients with non-syndromic CL±P. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture ?

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, Jos? Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a s...

  19. Study of relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure in cleft palate patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Zheng, Qian; Shi, Bing; Yin, Heng; Meng, Tian; Zheng, Guang-ning

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to analyze the relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure (VPC) in cleft palate patients. METHODS: Chi-square test was used to compare the postoperative velopharyngeal closure rate. Logistic regression model was used to analyze independent variables associated with velopharyngeal closure. RESULTS: Difference of postoperative VPC rate in different cleft types, operative ages and surgical techniques was significant (P=0.000). Results of logistic regression analysis suggested that when operative age was beyond deciduous dentition stage, or cleft palate type was complete, or just had undergone a simple palatoplasty without levator veli palatini retropositioning, patients would suffer a higher velopharyngeal insufficiency rate after primary palatal repair. CONCLUSIONS: Cleft type, operative age and surgical technique were the contributing factors influencing VPC rate after primary palatal repair of cleft palate patients. PMID:22279464

  20. Skull thickness in patients with clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arntsen, T; Kjaer, I; Sonnesen, L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to analyze skull thickness in incomplete cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and combined cleft lip and palate (UCLP).......The purpose was to analyze skull thickness in incomplete cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and combined cleft lip and palate (UCLP)....

  1. Trans-sinusoidal maxillary distraction in three cleft patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenghoefer, M.H.; Martini, M.; Nadjmi, N.; Schutyser, F.A.C.; Jagtman, A.K.; Bergé, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    The trans-sinusoidal maxillary distractor (TS-MD) was used to achieve maxillary advancement in three patients with repaired cleft lip and palate. After preoperative computer-aided planning of the distraction vectors, each TS-MD was bent on a stereolithographic model of the maxilla of the patient.

  2. Airway and Respiratory Complications in Children Undergoing Cleft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... Standard inhalational halothane induction or intravenous induction using thiopentone or propofol was employed. The trachea was intubated with a RAE tube (for cleft lip repair only) or armoured endotracheal tube (for palatal surgery) under deep inhalational anaesthesia or muscle relaxants. Standard intra-.

  3. [Evaluation and treatment of children's laryngeal clefts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Tan, L T; Xu, Z M

    2018-01-07

    Objectives: To provide the experience about the diagnostic process and following management, and to discuss the outcome and predictors in children with laryngeal cleft (LC). Methods: A retrospective case study was conducted at an academic children's hospital. Thirty children were diagnosed as laryngeal cleft between January 2016 and April 2017.Airway evaluations were performed using both flexible and rigid endoscopy, and swallowing evaluations were performed using fiberoptic endoscopic examination of swallowing or modified barium swallow. Results: Of 30 cases, 18 were male and 12 were female, ranging in age from birth to 8 years. Two cases were diagnosed as type 0 LC, and they were offered thickened liquid without medication. Throughout follow-up, they remained asymptomatic and showed no respiratory complications. Nineteen children were diagnosed as type Ⅰ LC. Six of them were significantly improved by anti-reflux therapy and feeding instructions. Four children were concomitant with swallowing dysfunction and/or neuromuscular disorders, and they were given a tracheotomy and routine management. Another 4 children were submitted surgical repair when routine treatment failed, and their symptoms were relieved. Five children were concomitant with larygomalacia, and their symptoms were totally ameliorated by supraglottoplasty. Three children were diagnosed as type Ⅱ LC. Two of them received surgical repair and clinically improved, and the rest one was treated by anti-reflux therapy and still under follow-up. Three children were diagnosed as type Ⅲ LC. One of them was underwent surgical repair and clinically improved. Two children were tracheotomized and treated by anti-reflux therapy. Three cases were diagnosed as type Ⅳ LC at birth and no one survived. Conclusions: Laryngeal cleft is a rare congenital anomaly manifesting with a variety of symptoms, including swallowing disorder, aspirations, dyspnea, stridor and hoarseness. Diagnosis and treatment of laryngeal

  4. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery is ... the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the ...

  5. Hypertelorism and orofacial clefting revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinberg, Seth M.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Since the 1960s, multiple studies have reported a tendency toward hypertelorism in individuals with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts (OFCs). However, the association between specific cleft types and increased interorbital distance has been inconsistent. Using threedimensional (3D) surface...

  6. Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NOT eat include: Seeds, nuts, bits of candy, chocolate chips, or granola (not plain, nor mixed into ... child to a speech therapist. Most times, speech therapy lasts 2 months. You will be told when ...

  7. Facial tissue depths in children with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is a craniofacial malformation affecting more than seven million people worldwide that results in defects of the hard palate, teeth, maxilla, nasal spine and floor, and maxillodental asymmetry. CLP facial soft-tissue depth (FSTD) values have never been published. The purpose of this research is to report CLP FSTD values and compare them to previously published FSTD values for normal children. Thirty-eight FSTDs were measured on cone beam computed tomography images of CLP children (n = 86; 7-17 years). MANOVA and ANOVA tests determined whether cleft type, age, sex, and bone graft surgical status affect tissue depths. Both cleft type (unilateral/bilateral) and age influence FSTDs. CLP FSTDs exhibit patterns of variation that differ from normal children, particularly around the oronasal regions of the face. These differences should be taken into account when facial reconstructions of children with CLP are created. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  8. Anophthalmia, cleft lip/palate, absent vomer bone, nystagmus, and mental-motor retardation: a new syndrome or Fryns "anophthalmia-plus" syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Derya; Sağlam, Ibrahim; SIlan, Fatma; Sezen, Gülbin; Unveren, Toygar

    2008-05-01

    We report that a 4-year-old boy presented with right unilateral complete cleft lip and palate, right anophthalmos, left congenital nystagmus, absence of the vomer bone, mental-motor retardation, and normal lymphocyte karyotype (46, XY). For reconstruction of the deformities, we performed cleft lip repair by Millard's rotation-advancement technique and planned cleft palate repair. This combination of cleft lip and palate, anophthalmos, congenital nystagmus, absent vomer bone, and mental-motor retardation has not, to our knowledge, previously been described. We suggest that this represents either another case of the rare Fryns "anophthalmia-plus" syndrome or a new syndrome.

  9. [Maxillary advancement osteotomy with sequelae cleft lip and palate: Dilemma between occlusion and aesthetic profile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, A; Morand, B; Lafontaine, V; Lesne, V; Lesne, C; Bettega, G

    2015-11-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a common sequela of cleft lip and palate. Its surgical treatment consists in a maxillary advancement by distraction or by conventional orthognathic surgery but morphological results are unpredictable. Our goal in this study was to see if the esthetical results (on the lip and the nose) of maxillary advancement were correlated to the preservation of lateral incisor space of the cleft side. This retrospective study included 38 patients operated between 2002 and 2013. Unilateral clefts were studied independently from bilateral clefts. Profile aesthetics was evaluated independently and subjectively by two surgeons and scored on an 8-point scale. The result was classified as "good" if the score was superior or equal to 6. The score was correlated to the following parameters: amount of maxillary advancement, upper incisor axis, preservation of the missing lateral incisor space. In the "good result" group, the space of the lateral incisor was less often preserved. The nasolabial angle was more open and the upper central incisor axis more vertical. These results were more pronounced in bilateral clefts, but also found in unilateral clefts. Under reservation of the subjective evaluation and of the small number of patients, it seemed that lateral incisor space closure improved the profile of patients treated by maxillary advancement for cleft lip and palate sequelae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Presurgical Nasal Molding With a Nasal Spring in Patients With Mild-to-Moderate Nasal Deformity With Incomplete Unilateral Cleft Lip With or Without Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanchitlertkajorn, Supakit

    2018-01-01

    Traditional nasoalveolar molding (NAM) requires steep learning curve for clinicians and significant compliance from parents. Nasal springs have been developed by the author to simplify presurgical nasal molding. This article presents the design, construction, and application of the spring. The treatment goal is to improve nasal deformity prior to primary repair in infants born with incomplete unilateral cleft lip with or without cleft palate. The design, fabrication, and utility of the nasal spring are described. The spring has a simpler design and construction compared to a traditional NAM appliance. Two patients with incomplete unilateral cleft lip with and without cleft palate are presented. The spring is constructed and delivered. The active arm of the spring can be 3-dimensionally (3-D) adjusted to mold the alar cartilage of the affected nostril. The spring does not require an oral plate for adherence as a traditional NAM appliance does, hence an oral impression is not needed. The spring is easy for clinicians to adjust. It also requires less compliance by parents. Main Outcome Measures/Results: The presurgical molding achieved by the use of a nasal spring improved surgical nasolabial aesthetic outcomes. The nasal springs are effective in reducing the initial cleft nasal deformity. This facilitates primary surgical cleft lip and nose correction and improves surgical outcomes in patients with incomplete unilateral cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

  11. Africa has unique and urgent barriers to cleft care: lessons from practitioners at the Pan-African Congress on Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetayo, Oluwaseun; Ford, Rachel; Martin, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The goals of this study were to delineate the protocols employed for managing patients with cleft lip and palate deformities, delineate the challenges facing practitioners and patients, and to determine the patient and physician barriers to cleft care delivery in the region. Survey questionnaires were administered to practitioners attending the second Pan-African Congress on Cleft Lip and Palate (PACCLIP), which took place in Ibadan, Nigeria, West Africa from February 4-7, 2007. The conference included 225 participants, representing 17 African countries Protocols for repair of cleft lip and palate deformities were varied, with Millard's and von Langenbeck's techniques being the preferred approach for the management of cleft lip and palate deformities, respectively. A large proportion of providers have limited access to core cleft care supporting teams, especially speech language pathologists, orthodontists, and audiologists. Several challenging barriers to cleft care were also identified at both the institutional and individual levels and are reported. Geographic separation in Africa presents a similar challenge due to isolationism as it does to surgeons in Europe. Specific to Africa are the increased barriers to care, and economic and financial hardship at various levels. A focus on funding, team building, infrastructural support, and patient education appear to be crucial in improving the care and lives of children with facial clefts in Africa.

  12. [Bilateral torticollis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustos, T; Magdics, M

    1993-12-19

    Bilateral torticollis is a very rare form of a well known deformity i.e. muscular torticollis. This malformation might present a differential diagnostic problem both for orthopaedic surgeons and ophthalmologists, as well as, for neurologists. In agreement with the literature, the role of an injury during labour or defective embriogenesis is suggested to play a part.

  13. The impact of congenital cardiovascular malformations on the assessment and surgical management of infants with cleft lip and/or palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Brian L; TeBockhorst, Seth; Deleyiannis, Frederic W-B

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cardiac evaluation of cleft lip and/or palate patients, characterize their cardiovascular malformations, and determine the impact of cardiovascular malformations on surgical management. A single-institution retrospective study of 329 consecutive cleft patients was performed. Cardiovascular malformations were categorized according to involvement of cardiac septa, vasculature, and valves. Their impact on the need for cardiac surgery, timing of cleft repair, need for subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) prophylaxis, and the perioperative experience was evaluated. Ten percent (33/329) of cleft patients had a cardiovascular malformation, and 3% underwent cardiac surgery prior to cleft repair. Malformations of the septa, vasculature, and valves were present in 9%, 6%, and 2% of cleft infants, respectively. Murmur as a sign of structural cardiovascular disease was 79% sensitive and 97% specific. Cleft palate repair was delayed by 2 months in patients with a cardiovascular malformation (P = .001). Subacute bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis was recommended, not recommended, or not specified by cardiology in 18%, 33%, and 48% of cleft patients with a cardiovascular malformation, respectively. Postoperative stay and surgical complications were not associated with cardiovascular malformation. Even in the absence of a murmur, echocardiographic screening should be considered in infants with nonspecific signs of cardiovascular disease. Greater awareness of the guidelines for SBE prophylaxis is needed. Most cleft patients with a cardiovascular malformation do not require cardiac surgery and do not experience an increased rate of complications associated with cleft surgery.

  14. Branchial Cleft Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahata, Vaishali

    2016-01-01

    Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which was a characteristic finding of branchial cleft cyst. The aim of presenting this case is its rarity. PMID:27904209

  15. Branchial cleft cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Nahata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which was a characteristic finding of branchial cleft cyst. The aim of presenting this case is its rarity.

  16. Branchial Cleft Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahata, Vaishali

    2016-01-01

    Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which was a characteristic finding of branchial cleft cyst. The aim of presenting this case is its rarity.

  17. 3D-Printed Models of Cleft Lip and Palate for Surgical Training and Patient Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Pang-Yun; Hallac, Rami R; Shih, Ellen; Trieu, Jenny; Penumatcha, Anjani; Das, Priyanka; Meyer, Clark A; Seaward, James R; Kane, Alex A

    2018-03-01

    Sculpted physical models and castings of the anatomy of cleft lip and palate are used for parent, patient, and trainee education of cleft lip and palate conditions. In this study, we designed a suite of digital 3-dimensional (3D) models of cleft lip and palate anatomy with additive manufacturing techniques for patient education. CT scans of subjects with isolated cleft palate, unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate, and a control were obtained. Soft tissue and bony structures were segmented and reconstructed into digital 3D models. The oral soft tissues overlying the cleft palate were manually molded with silicone putty and scanned using CT to create digital 3D models. These were then combined with the original model to integrate with segmentable soft tissues. Bone and soft tissues were 3D printed in different materials to mimic the rigidity/softness of the relevant anatomy. These models were presented to the parents/patients at our craniofacial clinic. Visual analog scale (VAS) surveys were obtained pertaining to the particular use of the models, to ascertain their value in parental education. A total of 30 parents of children with cleft conditions completed VAS evaluations. The models provided the parents with a better understanding of their child's condition with an overall evaluation score of 9.35 ± 0.5. We introduce a suite of 3D-printed models of cleft conditions that has a useful role in patient, parental, and allied health education with highly positive feedback.

  18. Bilateral agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    The bilateral agreements concern Brazil with United States relative to the co operation in nuclear energy, Germany with Russian Federation relative to the elimination and disposal of nuclear weapons; The multilateral agreements concerns the signature of the Protocols to amend the Paris and Brussels Conventions, the multilateral nuclear environmental programme in the Russian Federation, the status of Conventions in the field of nuclear energy. (N.C.)

  19. Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from surgery, coping with speech problems, or improving self-esteem. Some teens join support groups or online forums where they can talk to other people who were born with cleft lip or palate. Reviewed by: Rupal Christine Gupta, MD Date reviewed: ...

  20. The role of the tensor veli palatini muscle in the development of cleft palate-associated middle ear problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidsieck, David S P; Smarius, Bram J A; Oomen, Karin P Q; Breugem, Corstiaan C

    2016-09-01

    Otitis media with effusion is common in infants with an unrepaired cleft palate. Although its prevalence is reduced after cleft surgery, many children continue to suffer from middle ear problems during childhood. While the tensor veli palatini muscle is thought to be involved in middle ear ventilation, evidence about its exact anatomy, function, and role in cleft palate surgery is limited. This study aimed to perform a thorough review of the literature on (1) the role of the tensor veli palatini muscle in the Eustachian tube opening and middle ear ventilation, (2) anatomical anomalies in cleft palate infants related to middle ear disease, and (3) their implications for surgical techniques used in cleft palate repair. A literature search on the MEDLINE database was performed using a combination of the keywords "tensor veli palatini muscle," "Eustachian tube," "otitis media with effusion," and "cleft palate." Several studies confirm the important role of the tensor veli palatini muscle in the Eustachian tube opening mechanism. Maintaining the integrity of the tensor veli palatini muscle during cleft palate surgery seems to improve long-term otological outcome. However, anatomical variations in cleft palate children may alter the effect of the tensor veli palatini muscle on the Eustachian tube's dilatation mechanism. More research is warranted to clarify the role of the tensor veli palatini muscle in cleft palate-associated Eustachian tube dysfunction and development of middle ear problems. Optimized surgical management of cleft palate could potentially reduce associated middle ear problems.

  1. Presurgical nasoalveolar molding therapy in cleft lip and palate individuals: Case series and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan H Gandedkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nasoalveolar molding (NAM therapy is advocated to reduce the severity of alveolar cleft and nasal deformity. NAM therapy has demonstrated to be an effective method for reducing cleft and improve nose anatomy. This paper presents a case report of three cleft lip and palate individuals treated with NAM therapy. Furthermore, the paper highlights the advantages of NAM therapy along with an enumeration of literature suggesting in favor of NAM therapy and otherwise. Regardless of controversies and divergent views involved with NAM therapy, the immediate success of NAM therapy facilitating primary lip repair surgery cannot be under-emphasized.

  2. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, José Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  3. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Lino Moura

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  4. Branchial cleft anomalies: CT evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Eul Hye; Park, Chan Sup [College of Medicine, Inha University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the CT findings of a variety of branchial cleft anomalies in the head and neck area. We reviewed the CT findings of 16 patients with neck lesion pathologically proved as branchial cleft anomalies. There were two first and 12 second branchial cleft cysts, one first and one second branchial cleft sinuses. Two cases of first branchial cleft cysts were manifested as thin-walled, cystic masses at auricular area. One first branchial cleft sinus was an external opening type and manifested as an ill-defined, enhancing solid lesion at posterior auricular area. All 12 cases of second branchial cleft cysts demonstrated a typical location, displacing the sternocleidomastoid muscle posteriorly, the carotid artery and internal jugular vein complex medially and the submandibular gland anteriorly. Eight cases of second branchial cleft cysts were seen as fluid-filled, round or ovoid-shaped cysts, and 3 cases of them were seen as irregular-shaped cysts. In one case, suppurative adenopathy with loss of soft tissue planes around the cyst was observed. One case of second branchial cleft sinus was manifested as a tubular-shaped, enhancing lesion at submental area and containing external opening site draining into the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. We conclude that CT provides important diagnostic and therapeutic information in patients with a neck mass believed to be a branchial cleft anomaly, as it can differentiate various forms of the branchial anomalies by their characteristic location and shape.

  5. Branchial cleft anomalies: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seok, Eul Hye; Park, Chan Sup

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the CT findings of a variety of branchial cleft anomalies in the head and neck area. We reviewed the CT findings of 16 patients with neck lesion pathologically proved as branchial cleft anomalies. There were two first and 12 second branchial cleft cysts, one first and one second branchial cleft sinuses. Two cases of first branchial cleft cysts were manifested as thin-walled, cystic masses at auricular area. One first branchial cleft sinus was an external opening type and manifested as an ill-defined, enhancing solid lesion at posterior auricular area. All 12 cases of second branchial cleft cysts demonstrated a typical location, displacing the sternocleidomastoid muscle posteriorly, the carotid artery and internal jugular vein complex medially and the submandibular gland anteriorly. Eight cases of second branchial cleft cysts were seen as fluid-filled, round or ovoid-shaped cysts, and 3 cases of them were seen as irregular-shaped cysts. In one case, suppurative adenopathy with loss of soft tissue planes around the cyst was observed. One case of second branchial cleft sinus was manifested as a tubular-shaped, enhancing lesion at submental area and containing external opening site draining into the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. We conclude that CT provides important diagnostic and therapeutic information in patients with a neck mass believed to be a branchial cleft anomaly, as it can differentiate various forms of the branchial anomalies by their characteristic location and shape

  6. Cleft lip and Palate: A 30-year Epidemiologic Study in North-East of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Kianifar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are among the most common congenital anomalies worldwide. This study was conducted in order to explore the incidence and related factors of cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P among live births in Mashhad, North-Eastern Iran.   Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, records of 28,519 infants born between March 1982 and March 2011 at three major hospitals in Mashhad were screened for oral clefts. Clinical and demographic factors relating to diagnosed cases, including birth date, gender, birth weight, maternal age, number of pregnancies, type and side of cleft and presence of other congenital anomalies were recorded for analysis.   Results: The overall incidence of CL/P was 1.9 per 1,000 live births. Cleft lip associated with cleft palate (CLP was the most prevalent type of cleft (50%, followed by isolated cleft lip         (35.2% and isolated cleft palate (14.8%. A total of 92.6% of oral clefts were bilateral and 5.5% were located on the right side. In addition, clefts were found to be more common in male than female births (male/female ratio=2.3. The rate of associated congenital anomalies in CL/P newborns was 37%. No significant differences were observed in the incidence of oral clefts across three decades of study; except for CLP which was significantly more prevalent between 2002–2011 (P=0.027. There were no significant differences with regard to season of birth, associated anomalies or maternal age of affected newborns in the three time periods of the study. Furthermore, maternal age and number of pregnancies were not significantly different among the three types of cleft (P=0.43 and P=0.91, respectively. Although the mean birth weight of patients affected with isolated cleft palate was considerably lower than that of the other two types of cleft, the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.05.    Conclusion:  This study indicates a frequency of CL/P close to the findings

  7. Causal attributions of cleft lip and palate across cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednick, Lauren; Snyder, Julie; Schook, Carolyn; Blood, Emily A; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Weatherley-White, R C A

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To describe and compare the causal beliefs associated with cleft lips and/or palates across several different countries. Design : Cross-sectional survey. Setting : Operation Smile surgery screenings in six developing countries. Participants : Two hundred seventy-nine adult patients and parents of children with cleft lips and/or palates in Kenya, Russia, Cambodia, India, Egypt, and Peru. Interventions : In person interviews were conducted with interpreters. Main Outcome Measure : As part of a larger study, a semistructured questionnaire was created to explore cleft perceptions, belief systems that affect these perceptions, and social reactions to individuals with clefts. Results : Causal attributions were grouped by category (environment, self-blame, supernatural, chance, unknown, or other) and type of locus of control (external, internal, or unknown). Results indicate significant difference by country for both causal attribution category (P < .001) and type (P < .001). This difference was maintained in multivariate analyses, which controlled for differences by demographic variables between countries. Conclusions : This study provides evidence that causal attributions for clefts are influenced by culture. As harmful beliefs about cause may continue to impact affected individuals and their families even after a repair, it is insufficient to provide surgical care alone. Care of the entire person must include attempts to change misinformed cultural beliefs through educating the broader community.

  8. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair in a Developing Nation: Short ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bilateral hernias, and recurrent hernias), there are data demonstrating an ... no reports of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair from the. Anglophone ... MATERIALS AND METHODS .... inguinal hernia repair has advantages over open repair for.

  9. Management of cleft lip and palate in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Jyotsna

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With advancement of medical services in developed countries and awareness among the patients, it is rare to find an adult with an unoperated cleft lip and palate. However, the scenario is totally different in developing countries. Working as a part of a team in developing country, where co-coordinated team work is primitive, resources to provide treatment are very thin, public awareness of availability of treatment for this anomaly is minimal, the age of patients reaching for primary treatment varies from few days to late forties. Though the aim and aspiration is to provide holistic multidisciplinary care, the priority is getting treatment for all cleft patients. In such situation, the management of cleft lip and palate demands changes of approach, techniques and philosophy. Aims and Objectives: The deformed anatomy especially the facial bones and dentition is described. Due to well established deformities, the approach for management is individualized. The procedures and modification of procedures has been described. Results and Outcome: The outcome of the primary repair is adults certainly have less than satisfactory outcome for obvious reasons. The expected outcome and expectation of patients and families following primary surgeries in cleft lip and palate has been discussed. Though all adult patients got some improvement in speech after palate repair, achieving normal speech was difficult. The naso-labial appearance was not perfect, but well accepted by the patients and families. There are many psychosocial problems in these patients, the objective evaluation could not be done due to too many variables. However, primary repair of cleft lip and palate is justified and beneficial for the patients.

  10. Psychological issues in cleft lip and cleft palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa Avinash

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vocational and social issues affect rehabilitation and development of patients with cleft lip and cleft palate. However, psychological problems like lowered self esteem and difficulties in social interaction have also been noted in them. Not many pediatric reconstructive surgery teams have a psychiatrist on their panel. It is likely that psychological problems are higher in incidence than literature actually suggests. Hence it is very essential that such cases are identified by the surgical team to maximize positive outcome of surgery and rehabilitation. This study discusses psychological issues revolving around cleft lip and cleft palate along with lacunae in many psychological research studies.

  11. Esthetic composition of smile in individuals with cleft lip, alveolus, and palate: visibility of the periodontium and the esthetics of smile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Luis Augusto; Sbrana, Michyele Cristhiane; Cunha, Mércia Jussara da Silva; Moreira, Guilherme Santos; de Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate characteristics of smile related to visibility in individuals with cleft lip, alveolus, and palate. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. HRAC/USP, Brazil. Patients. Individuals with repaired complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (n = 45), aged 15-30 years. Interventions. Frontal facial photographs were obtained in natural and forced smiles (n = 135). Six specialists in periodontics evaluated the photographs as to the smile line, thickness, and curve of the upper lip. Main Outcome Measures. The cleft area was compared with the contralateral region. Results were expressed as percentages and means. The findings were compared between groups of periodontists. Results. Statistically significant relationship was observed in the smile line between examiners and between natural and forced smiles, regardless of the association with the cleft side. The lip was thicker at rest and thinner in the forced smile, as also evaluated by the group not experienced with cleft care. The curve of the upper lip in natural and forced smiles was considered as close to straight by both groups, regardless of the cleft. Conclusion. The smile in individuals with clefts was regarded as average for both cleft and noncleft sides. The thickness was characterized as average to thin, being thinner in forced smile and when analyzed by the group not experienced with cleft care. In the average, the curve of the upper lip was considered as straight. The present study elucidates some characteristics related to the smile in individuals with repaired unilateral cleft lip, alveolus, and palate.

  12. Esthetic Composition of Smile in Individuals with Cleft Lip, Alveolus, and Palate: Visibility of the Periodontium and the Esthetics of Smile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Augusto Esper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate characteristics of smile related to visibility in individuals with cleft lip, alveolus, and palate. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. HRAC/USP, Brazil. Patients. Individuals with repaired complete unilateral cleft lip and palate , aged 15–30 years. Interventions. Frontal facial photographs were obtained in natural and forced smiles . Six specialists in periodontics evaluated the photographs as to the smile line, thickness, and curve of the upper lip. Main Outcome Measures. The cleft area was compared with the contralateral region. Results were expressed as percentages and means. The findings were compared between groups of periodontists. Results. Statistically significant relationship was observed in the smile line between examiners and between natural and forced smiles, regardless of the association with the cleft side. The lip was thicker at rest and thinner in the forced smile, as also evaluated by the group not experienced with cleft care. The curve of the upper lip in natural and forced smiles was considered as close to straight by both groups, regardless of the cleft. Conclusion. The smile in individuals with clefts was regarded as average for both cleft and noncleft sides. The thickness was characterized as average to thin, being thinner in forced smile and when analyzed by the group not experienced with cleft care. In the average, the curve of the upper lip was considered as straight. The present study elucidates some characteristics related to the smile in individuals with repaired unilateral cleft lip, alveolus, and palate.

  13. Schizencephaly/congenital cerebral clefts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.; Naidich, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Schizencephaly (from the Greek meaning ''split brain''), is a term developed in the 1940s to explain symmetric clefts in the brain seen at autopsy in children with histories of severe neurologic defects. Use of the term has been expanded to include a variety of cerebral clefts. A review of the experience at Children's Memorial Hospital as well as case materials made available to the authors are presented, including CT, MR imaging, and US findings. Theories of etiology and pathogenesis of these congenital clefts, associated anomalies, and the spectrum of appearance of these clefts are discussed

  14. Long-Term Incisal Relationships After Palatoplasty in Patients With Isolated Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Elizabeth B; Woo, Albert S; Mendonca, Derick A; Huebener, Donald V; Nissen, Richard J; Skolnick, Gary B; Patel, Kamlesh B

    2016-06-01

    Various palatoplasty techniques have limited incisions in the hard palate due to concerns that these incisions may limit maxillary growth. There is little convincing long-term evidence to support this. Our purpose is to determine incisal relationships, an indicator for future orthognathic procedure, in patients after repair of an isolated cleft of the secondary palate. Our craniofacial database was used to identify patients aged 10 years or greater with an isolated cleft of the secondary palate who underwent palatoplasty between 1985 and 2002. Data collected included age at palatoplasty and follow-up, cleft type, associated syndrome, Robin sequence, surgeon, repair technique, number of operations, and occlusion. Incisal relationship was determined through clinical observation by a pediatric dentist and orthodontist. Seventy eligible patients operated on by 9 surgeons were identified. Class III incisal relationship was seen in 5 patients (7.1%). Palatoplasty techniques over the hard palate (63 of 70 patients) included 2-flap palatoplasty, VY-pushback, and Von Langenbeck repair. There was an association between class III incisal relationship and syndromic diagnosis (P <0.001). Other study variables were not associated with class III incisal relationships. In patients with an isolated cleft of the secondary palate, there was no association between class III incisal relationship and surgeon, age at repair, cleft type, palatoplasty technique, or number of operations. Increased likelihood of class III incisal relationship was associated primarily with syndromic diagnosis.

  15. Branchial Cleft Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Neil; Mustard, Robert A.

    1966-01-01

    The embryology, anatomy and pathology of branchial cleft anomalies are discussed and 87 cases reviewed. The most frequent anomaly was branchial cleft cyst, of which there were 77 cases. Treatment in all cases consisted of complete excision. There were five cases of external branchial sinus and five cases of complete branchial fistula. Sinograms were helpful in demonstrating these lesions. Excision presented little difficulty. No proved case of branchiogenic carcinoma has been found in the Toronto General Hospital. Five cases are described in which the original diagnosis was branchiogenic carcinoma—in four of these a primary tumour has already been found. The authors believe that the diagnosis of branchiogenic carcinoma should never be accepted until repeated examinations over a period of at least five years have failed to reveal a primary tumour. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:5901161

  16. Branchial Cleft Cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Nahata, Vaishali

    2016-01-01

    Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which wa...

  17. Simultaneous maxillary distraction osteogenesis using a twin-track distraction device combined with alveolar bone grafting in cleft patients: preliminary report of a technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Eduardo Yugo; Watanabe, Masayo; Buranastidporn, Boonsiva; Baba, Yoshiyuki; Ohyama, Kimie; Ishii, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    The simultaneous use of cleft reduction and maxillary advancement by distraction osteogenesis has not been applied routinely because of the difficulty in three-dimensional control and stabilization of the transported segments. This report describes a new approach of simultaneous bilateral alveolar cleft reduction and maxillary advancement by distraction osteogenesis combined with autogenous bone grafting. A custom-made Twin-Track device was used to allow bilateral alveolar cleft closure combined with simultaneous maxillary advancement, using distraction osteogenesis and a rigid external distraction system in a bilateral cleft lip and palate patient. After a maxillary Le Fort I osteotomy, autogenous iliac bone graft was placed in the cleft spaces before suturing. A latency period of six days was observed before activation. The rate of activation was one mm/d for the maxillary advancement and 0.5 mm/d for the segmental transport. Accordingly, the concave facial appearance was improved with acceptable occlusion, and complete bilateral cleft closure was attained. No adjustments were necessary to the vector of the transported segments during the activation and no complications were observed. The proposed Twin-Track device, based on the concept of track-guided bone transport, permitted three-dimensional control over the distraction processes allowing simultaneous cleft closure, maxillary distraction, and autogenous bone grafting. The combined simultaneous approach is extremely advantageous in correcting severe deformities, reducing the number of surgical interventions and, consequently, the total treatment time.

  18. Clefting in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, F.; Schur, W.

    NASA's effort to develop a large payload, high altitude, long duration balloon, the Ultra Long Duration Balloon, focuses on a pumpkin shape super-pressure design. It has been observed that a pumpkin balloon may be unable to pressurize into the desired cyclically symmetric equilibrium configuration, settling into a distorted, undesired stable state instead. Hoop stress considerations in the pumpkin design leads to choosing the lowest possible bulge radius, while robust deployment is favored by a large bulge radius. Some qualitative understanding of design aspects on undesired equilibria in pumpkin balloons has been obtained via small-scale balloon testing. Poorly deploying balloons have clefts, but most gores away from the cleft deploy uniformly. In this paper, we present models for pumpkin balloons with clefts. Long term success of the pumpkin balloon for NASA requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon of multiple stable equilibria and means for quantitative assessment of measures that prevent their occurrence. This paper attempts to determine numerical thresholds of design parameters that distinguish between properly deploying designs and improperly deploying designs by analytically investigating designs in the vicinity of criticality. Design elements which may trigger the onset undesired equilibria and remedial measures that ensure deployment are discussed.

  19. Social integration and inclusion after pre-maxilla surgical repositioning in patients with bilateral cleft palate and lip A inclusão e a integração social pós-reposicionamento cirúrgico da pré-maxila em portadores de fissura lábio palatal bilateral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelston Ulbricht Gomes

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral alveolar process fissure causes important functional and aesthetical limitations and thus difficulties in terms of social and family integration and interaction for these patients. AIM: (A to assess motivations and expectations Treatment-wise and (B to assess social inclusion and integration brought about by the surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: retrospective observational study involving 50 participants recruited among the patients submitted to the pre-maxilla repositioning procedure from January of 2003 to July of 2005 at the Centro de Atendimento Integral ao Fissurado Lábio-Palatal in Curitiba (CAIF, Paraná, and an assessment questionnaire was used. RESULTS: as far as the care protocol is concerned, results show a 90% success rate of surgeries. As to surgical and personal satisfaction rates are concerned, 76% sought treatment for personal satisfaction reasons and 86% reported having had more self-confidence after the surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the patients submitted to the maxilla repositioning saw surgery as a continuation of the care previously given, with the expectation of better looks and self-confidence and, 96% of them were pleased with the results attained, which facilitated their social inclusion and re-integration.A fissura alveolar bilateral determina limitações funcionais e estéticas, determinando dificuldades de interação e integração no âmbito familiar e social. OBJETIVO: (A avaliar as motivações e expectativas em relação ao tratamento e (b avaliar a inclusão e integração social obtida pelo procedimento. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo observacional, retrospectivo em 50 participantes recrutados dentre os pacientes submetidos ao procedimento de reposicionamento de pré-maxila, no período de janeiro de 2003 a julho de 2005, no Centro de Atendimento Integral ao Fissurado Lábio-Palatal em Curitiba (CAIF, Paraná, sendo aplicado questionário de avaliação RESULTADOS: Com relação ao protocolo de

  20. The Nasolabial Angle Among Patients with Total Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Stolarz, Anna M; Kawala, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Nasolabial angle is the angle that is measured between points columella, subnasale and labiale superius. The reference values vary from 90 to 120 degrees (the mean value is 109.8 degrees). In some disorders, nasolabial angle might change. This influences the facial profile. One of such deformities are clefts. The nasolabial angle might be decreased in cleft patients due to deformation of the nose and upper lip that might be caused by the reconstructive surgical procedures performed. The aim of the study was to compare the nasolabial angle between the groups of patients with total clefts of the lip, alveolar bone and palate and healthy individuals. The cephalometric X-rays of 118 patients with clefts (73 boys and 45 girls) and 101 healthy individuals (32 boys and 69 girls) were taken into account to measure nasolabial angle and compared. In patients with cleft deformities, the nasolabial angle values were smaller than in healthy individuals. Among the patients with clefts, the ones with a bilateral type of deformity are characterized by the highest mean values of nasolabial angle. The angle is smaller in groups of girls when compared to boys. Nasolabial angle in patients with total clefts of lip, alveolar bone and palate is statistically smaller than in healthy individuals. This might be a result of either the deformation of the upper lip or (more probably) the nose. The orthodontic treatment should be individualized.

  1. Bilateral cleft lip and palate : management and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, Barbara Constance Maria

    2007-01-01

    Schisis, in de volksmond ook wel hazenlip, is een aangeboren afwijking van het gezicht. De spleet kan zich beperken tot de bovenlip, maar kan ook doorlopen in de bovenkaak en het gehemelte. Ook een spleet alleen in het gehemelte komt voor. UMCG-promovendus Barbara Oosterkamp onderzocht de gevolgen

  2. Regional anaesthesia for cleft lip surgery in a developing world setting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method. A retrospective chart review of 100 patients aged >14 years who had cleft lip surgery during an Operation Smile South Africa (OSSA) volunteer surgical programme in Madagascar during 2007 and 2008. The nerve blocks used included a bilateral infraorbital nerve block, a dorsalnasal nerve block and a septal block ...

  3. Genetic determinants of facial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Facial clefts are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. To identify fetal genetic risk factors for clefting, 1536 SNPs in 357 candidate genes were genotyped in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (Norway: 562 case-parent and 592 control-parent triads; Denmark...

  4. A Longitudinal Study of the Presence of Dental Anomalies in the Primary and Permanent Dentitions of Cleft Lip and/or Palate Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akira; Nakano, Masayuki; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yasunaga, Atsushi; Haruyama, Naoto; Takahashi, Ichiro

    2017-05-01

      The aim is to survey primary and permanent dental anomalies: hypodontia, microdontia, a supernumerary tooth, and fused teeth in patients with cleft lip and/or palate.   Retrospective longitudinal study Subjects :  The subjects were selected from all 1724 patients with cleft lip and/or palate who were registered at the orthodontic clinic of Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan, from 1970 to 2009. Finally, 994 subjects were evaluated for primary dentition, 1352 for permanent dentition, and 871 for the longitudinal changes from primary to permanent dentition.   The prevalence of dental anomalies was compared for each tooth type, among various cleft types, between males and females, and between the alveolar cleft area and the noncleft area.   The prevalence of hypodontia was 16.2% for primary dentition and 52.7% for permanent dentition in the subjects with cleft lip and/or palate. Hypodontia increased with the severity of the cleft type. Multiple hypodontia was found more frequently in the subjects with bilateral cleft lip and palate and the subjects with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Microformed lateral incisors were found in 22.7% of permanent lateral incisors but not in primary dentition. Supernumerary teeth were found in 17.7% of the subjects with cleft lip and/or palate for primary maxillary dentition and in 5.7% for permanent maxillary dentition.   The prevalence of hypodontia was greater in permanent dentition than in primary dentition; although, it was not much different between males and females or between the right and left sides. The prevalence of dental anomalies was significantly different among four groups by cleft type: cleft lip, cleft lip and alveolus, cleft lip and palate, and cleft palate.

  5. Otolaryngology Service Usage in Children With Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Kenneth R; Dargie, Jenna M; Dornan, Briana K; Boudreau, Brian

    2018-05-01

    To determine the usage of otolaryngology services by children with cleft palate at a pediatric tertiary care facility. Retrospective case series. Specialty clinic at a pediatric tertiary care hospital. Children born between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2002, with the diagnosis of cleft palate or cleft lip and palate. A total of 41 female and 48 male patients were included. Total number of otolaryngology clinic visits and total number of otolaryngologic surgeries (tympanostomy tube placements and other otologic or upper airway procedures). In the first 5 years of life, these children utilized an average of 8.2 otolaryngology clinic visits (SD = 5.0; range: 1-22) and underwent 3.3 tympanostomy tube surgeries (SD = 2.0; range: 0-10). Seventy-three had their first tube placed at the time of palate repair, and 4 at the time of lip repair. Fifty-one (57.3%) required other otologic or upper airway procedures, including tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy (27 children), removal of tympanostomy tubes (24 children), tympanomastoidectomy (3 children), and tympanoplasty (14 children). Of the children who underwent other procedures, they underwent a mean of 1.67 (SD = 0.84; range: 1-4) surgeries. Children with cleft palate are at increased risk for eustachian tube dysfunction, frequently utilize otolaryngology care, and typically receive multiple sets of tympanostomy tubes. This study found that children with cleft palate receive on average of approximately 3 sets of tympanostomy tubes, and the majority required another otologic or upper airway surgery.

  6. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  7. Bilateral agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Ten bilateral agreements are presented. These are: 1) Co-operation agreement relating to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy between Argentina and EURATOM (1996); 2) Agreement on co-operation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy between Argentina and Greece (1997); 3) Implementing arrangement for technical exchange and co-operation in the area of peaceful uses of nuclear energy between Argentina and the United States (1997); 4) Agreement concerning co-operation in nuclear science and technology between Australia and Indonesia (1997); 5) Implementation of the 1985 Agreement for co-operation concerning the peaceful uses of nuclear energy between the People's Republic of China and the United States (1998); 6) Protocol of co-operation between France and Lithuania (1997); 7) Agreement on co-operation in energy research, science and technology, and development between Germany and the United States (1998); 8) Agreement on early notification of a nuclear accident and exchange of information on nuclear facilities between Greece and Romania (1997); 9) Agreement on early notification of nuclear accidents and co-operation in the field of nuclear safety between Hungary and the Ukraine (1997); 10) Agreement in the field of radioactive waste management between Switzerland and the United States (1997). (K.A.)

  8. Communication disorders in individuals with cleft lip and palate: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Roopa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The need for an interdisciplinary approach in the comprehensive management of individuals with cleft lip and palate is well recognized. This article provides an introduction to communication disorders in individuals with cleft lip and palate for members of cleft care teams. The speech pathologist is involved in identifying those infants who are at risk for communication disorders and also for initiating early intervention to prevent or mitigate communication disorders caused by the cleft. Even with early cleft repair, some children exhibit ′cleft palate speech′ characterized by atypical consonant productions, abnormal nasal resonance, abnormal nasal airflow, altered laryngeal voice quality, and nasal or facial grimaces. These manifestations are evaluated to identify those that (a are developmental, (b can be corrected through speech therapy alone, and, (c those that may require both surgery and speech therapy. Speech is evaluated perceptually using several types of stimuli. It is important to identify compensatory and obligatory errors in articulation. When velopharyngeal dysfunction is suspected, the assessment should include at least one direct measure such as nasoendoscopy or videofluoroscopy. This provides information about the adequacy of the velopharyngeal valve for speech production, and is useful for planning further management of velopharyngeal dysfunction. The basic principle of speech therapy in cleft lip and palate is to establish the correct placement of the articulators and appropriate air flow. Appropriate feedback is important during therapy for establishing the correct patterns of speech.

  9. Cause analysis, prevention, and treatment of postoperative restlessness after general anesthesia in children with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Mei, Xiao-Peng; Xu, Li-Xian

    2017-03-01

    Cleft palate is one of the most common congenital malformations of the oral and maxillofacial region, with an incidence rate of around 0.1%. Early surgical repair is the only method for treatment of a cleft lip and palate. However, because of the use of inhalation anesthesia in children and the physiological characteristics of the cleft palate itself combined with the particularities of cleft palate surgery, the incidence rate of postoperative emergence agitation (EA) in cleft palate surgery is significantly higher than in other types of interventions. The exact mechanism of EA is still unclear. Although restlessness after general anesthesia in children with cleft palate is self-limiting, its effects should be considered by clinicians. In this paper, the related literature on restlessness after surgery involving general anesthesia in recent years is summarized. This paper focuses on induction factors as well as prevention and treatment of postoperative restlessness in children with cleft palate after general anesthesia. The corresponding countermeasures to guide clinical practice are also presented in this paper.

  10. Cleft Lip and Palate: An Experience of a Developing Center in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulezz, Tarek A

    2017-11-01

    Cleft lip and palate is the most common congenital anomaly in the head and neck region. These clefts are not just a distortion of the normal appearance, but they may impose a major influence on the whole patient's life, both functionally and psychologically. Clefts affect feeding, teething, hearing, speech, and social communication. The incidence of cleft lip and palate is variable in different countries and different communities. The surgical correction of cleft lip and palate went through many evolutions, but still there is no single universal protocol of repair; however, many European countries have adopted national protocols and have established cleft centers for the management and follow up of affected population. In this study, the problem of cleft lip and palate in the area of upper Egypt was presented through the records of patients admitted to the Department of Plastic Surgery at the Sohag University Hospital in a 15-year period (2001-2015). A total number of 1318 patients, who were admitted and had been operated upon in our department, were included in this study. The majority of patients presented to the department with a primary disease, yet 14.7% (194 patients) of them were first presented for a secondary interference after being operated upon elsewhere. A total number of 1923 surgical procedures were performed.

  11. Evaluation of changes in sleep breathing patterns after primary palatoplasty in cleft children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justice E. Reilly

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a need to more clearly understand the characteristics of breathing patterns in children with cleft palate inthe first year of life, as there is little data available to guide current practice. Pierre Robin patients are known to have a higher incidence, however we hypothesised sleep breathing disturbance is not confined to this sub-group of cleft patient. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study of sleep disordered breathing patterns in a cohort of infants with oronasal clefts (cleft palate with or without cleft lip to describe the spectrum of sleep breathing patterns both pre and post palate repair. Sleep breathing studies were performed pre- and post-operatively in sequential infants referred to a regional cleft lip andpalate unit. Results of sleep breathing studies were analysed according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine scoring guidelines and correlated with clinical history and details of peri-operative respiratory compromise. The degree of sleep disordered breathingwas characterised using desaturation indices (number of desaturations from baseline SpO2 of >=4%, per hour. Results: Thirty-nine infants were included in this study, twenty-five female and fourteen male. Twelve had isolated Cleft Palate aspart of an associated syndrome. Patients were categorised into Isolated Cleft Palate, Isolated Cleft Palate in the context of Pierre Robin Sequence, and those with Cleft Lip and Palate. All groups demonstrated some degree of sleep breathing abnormality. Not unsurprisingly the eight infants with Pierre Robin Sequence had a significantly higher desaturation index before surgicalintervention (p=0.043, and were more likely to require a pre-operative airway intervention (p=0.009. Palate repair in this group did not alter the relative distribution of patients in each severity category of sleep disorder breathing. Surgical repair ofthe secondary palate in the remaining children was associated with some

  12. Prevalence of dental anomalies in a population of cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jamal, Ghaida A; Hazza'a, Abdalla M; Rawashdeh, Ma'amon A

    2010-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate radiographically the prevalence of dental anomalies in a group of Jordanian cleft lip and/or palate subjects. This is a retrospective review of panoramic radiographs of 78 subjects with cleft lip and/or palate that were evaluated from their file records and investigated for possible dental anomalies. Dental anomalies were found frequently in cleft lip and/or palate subjects. Missing teeth were found in 66.7% of the patients; the tooth most commonly missing was the maxillary lateral incisor. Supernumerary teeth were found in 16.7% of patients; 37% had microdontia; 70.5% had taurodontism; 30.8% had transposition and/or ectopic teeth; 19.2% had dilacerations; and 30.8% had hypoplastic teeth. There was no statistically significant difference in the above anomalies' prevalence between males and females. However, it was found that subjects with bilateral cleft lip and/or palate had significantly more microdontia (p = .005), dilaceration (p = .002), and hypoplastic teeth (p = .0001) than subjects with unilateral cleft lip and/or palate. The prevalence of dental anomalies in cleft lip and/or palate patients was higher than what had been reported in the normal Jordanian population. This emphasizes the relation of cleft lip and/or palate to all dental anomalies studied. Although our study represents a thorough and complete description of dental anomalies present in a sample of cleft lip and/or palate subjects, larger samples are required to effectively determine the relationship of each dental anomaly with cleft type.

  13. Assessment of Speech in Primary Cleft Palate by Two-layer Closure (Conservative Management).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Harsha; Rao, Dayashankara; Sharma, Shailender; Gupta, Saurabh

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of the cleft palate has evolved over a long period of time. Various techniques of cleft palate repair that are practiced today are the results of principles learned through many years of modifications. The challenge in the art of modern palatoplasty is no longer successful closure of the cleft palate but an optimal speech outcome without compromising maxillofacial growth. Throughout these periods of evolution in the treatment of cleft palate, the effectiveness of various treatment protocols has been challenged by controversies concerning speech and maxillofacial growth. In this article we have evaluated the results of Pinto's modification of Wardill-Kilner palatoplasty without radical dissection of the levator veli palitini muscle on speech and post-op fistula in two different age groups in 20 patients. Preoperative and 6-month postoperative speech assessment values indicated that two-layer palatoplasty (modified Wardill-Kilner V-Y pushback technique) without an intravelar veloplasty technique was good for speech.

  14. First branchial cleft anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fallouji, M. A.; Butler, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl presented with a cystic swelling since birth behind the ramus of the right mandible and diagnosed clinically as a dermoid cyst. Surgical exploration, however, showed that it was closely related to the external auditory canal, with an extension running medially behind the parotid gland and ending in the bony middle ear. The facial nerve was closely related to the deep part of the cyst. Such an anatomical position indicates that this was a first branchial cleft anomaly. Surgical excision of the cyst was performed. PMID:6622327

  15. Prevalence of cleft lip and/or palate in children from Lodz between years 1981-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoszewski, Bogusław; Fijałkowska, Marta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital malformations constitute a serious problem of both medical and social nature. Cleft lip and/or palate represent the most common congenital anomaly of the face that is why it is essential to know the real frequency of the described phenomenon. The aim of this paper is to determine the frequency of cleft lip and/or palate and the types of malformations that occurred in Lodz city between the years 1981-2010. Our clinic has been carrying on the studies concerning the incidence of cleft lip and/or palate since 1981. The Polish Registry of Congenital Malformations has been operating in Poland since 1 April 1997. The team has managed to obtain data, from the Registry, concerning the total number of all live born infants and the number of children with cleft lip and/or palate, who were born in Lodz, between 1998 and 2010. In years 1981-2010, 319 children, in 210 952 live born infants, were born with cleft lip and/or palate in Lodz. The isolated cleft palate was observed more frequently in girls and the unilateral cleft of lip and palate in boys. In all three decades palate clefts are more common whereas bilateral lip, alveolus and palate clefts are more infrequent. A small tendency to decrease in actual cleft lip and/or palate frequency among children, in the period of 30 years, is observed in Lodz. Over the years it has still been observed that the isolated cleft palate is the most common type of defect. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  16. Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmander, Anette; Persson, Christina; Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Adequate velopharyngeal function and speech are main goals in the treatment of cleft palate. The objective was to investigate if there were differences in velopharyngeal competency (VPC) and hypernasality at age 5 years in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP...... cleft teams in five countries: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway, and the UK. METHODS: Three different surgical protocols for primary palatal repair were tested against a common procedure in the total cohort of 448 children born with a non-syndromic UCLP. Speech audio and video recordings of 391 children......) operated on with different surgical methods for primary palatal repair. A secondary aim was to estimate burden of care in terms of received additional secondary surgeries and speech therapy. DESIGN: Three parallel group, randomised clinical trials were undertaken as an international multicentre study by 10...

  17. The evaluation and surgical management of cyclodialysis clefts that have failed to respond to conservative management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, Alexander S; Bunce, Catey; Barton, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate factors that may influence successful correction of hypotony in a consecutive series of patients with cyclodialysis clefts repaired surgically over a 10-year period. Design Retrospective interventional case series. Methods Interventional case series of consecutive patients with cyclodialysis clefts and hypotony treated surgically after failure of conservative treatment. Results Eighteen patients (18 eyes) of mean (SD) age 48.3 (15.8) years at the time of surgery were included (16 male, 2 female). All were diagnosed using gonioscopy, usually assisted with intracameral viscoelastic injection. Imaging used in three cases was not found to be sufficiently precise to plan surgical intervention, without prior gonioscopic cleft visualisation. The intraocular pressure (IOP) was restored in nine cases (50%) after one procedure with a postoperative IOP (mean±SD) of 13.6±4.5 mm Hg (6/11 who had cyclopexy as a first procedure and 3/6 who had cryopexy). 2–3 procedures were required in the remaining nine patients. There was a trend towards the use of cyclopexy for larger clefts and cryopexy for smaller clefts (NS). We observed a trend for a lower likelihood of successful closure of larger clefts after one intervention. Two eyes that had cyclopexy required later IOP-lowering surgery to achieve IOP control. Conclusions Most clefts were closed with one procedure. A trend towards larger cleft size as a preoperative risk factor for failure to achieve closure with one procedure was observed. In this series, imaging was not found to be sufficiently precise to replace viscoelastic-assisted gonioscopy in the diagnosis and evaluation of cyclodialysis clefts. PMID:24457370

  18. Internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werker, C L; de Wilde, H; Mink van der Molen, A B; Breugem, C C

    2017-12-01

    The treatment approach for internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate differs from locally born children with cleft lip and/or palate. They are older at initial presentation, may have had treatment abroad of different quality, and are establishing new and still fragile relationships with their adoptive parents. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics and initial care and treatment of this group. A retrospective cohort study was performed including all internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate presenting to the cleft team outpatient clinic in the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital between January 1994 and December 2014. Medical records of all patients were reviewed; information concerning demographic characteristics, characteristics at initial presentation, and treatment were obtained. A total number of 132 adopted patients were included: 15% had cleft lip, 7% had cleft palate, and 78% had cleft lip and palate. The average age at the time of adoption was 26.5 months. In most cases, China was the country of origin. Seventy-eight percent had surgery in their country of origin, primarily lip repair. Fistulae in need of revision surgery were found in 8% of the patients. Pharyngoplasty was needed in 48% of the patients. No significant differences were found for mean age at adoption, gender, cleft type, and one- or two-stage palatal closure. Internationally adopted children with cleft lip and/or palate are a very diverse group of patients with challenging treatment. These children undergo surgery late and frequently need additional surgery. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Psychological issues in cleft lip and cleft palate

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa Avinash; Devare Shibani; Ghanshani Jyoti

    2009-01-01

    Vocational and social issues affect rehabilitation and development of patients with cleft lip and cleft palate. However, psychological problems like lowered self esteem and difficulties in social interaction have also been noted in them. Not many pediatric reconstructive surgery teams have a psychiatrist on their panel. It is likely that psychological problems are higher in incidence than literature actually suggests. Hence it is very essential that such cases are identified by the surgical t...

  20. Bilateral cervical lung hernia with T1 nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mesbah; Buchan, Keith G; Mandana, Kyapanda M; Butchart, Eric G

    2006-02-01

    Lung hernia is a rare condition. Approximately one third of cases occur in the cervical position. We report a case of bilateral cervical lung hernia associated with neuralgic pain that was repaired using bovine pericardium and biological glue.

  1. Oral Clefts and Academic Performance in Adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Nicola G; Pedersen, Dorthe A; Pedersen, Jacob K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:   Early life exposure to anesthesia and surgery is suspected to associate with cognitive impairment later in life. We compared academic achievement among adolescents with cleft lip only (CL), cleft palate only (CP), and cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) with a noncleft control group to ......:   Oral cleft type rather than number and timing of anesthesia and operations associate to poorer academic performance. Although a potential neurotoxic effect due to anesthetic agents is not reflected in the data, it cannot be completely excluded.......OBJECTIVE:   Early life exposure to anesthesia and surgery is suspected to associate with cognitive impairment later in life. We compared academic achievement among adolescents with cleft lip only (CL), cleft palate only (CP), and cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) with a noncleft control group...

  2. Dental Anomalies in Different Types of Cleft Lip and Palate: Is There Any Relation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germec Cakan, Derya; Nur Yilmaz, Rahime Burcu; Bulut, Feyza Nur; Aksoy, Ayca

    2018-02-26

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in Turkish patients with different types of cleft lip and palate (CLP) and investigate the relationship between the type of cleft and the dental anomaly. Eighty-eight patients with cleft lip and/or palate (mean age: 14.1 ± 6.4 years) were enrolled in this retrospective study. Dental models, panoramic radiographs, and intraoral photographs of these patients were evaluated to detect any maxillary dental anomaly (number and size anomalies). Two hundred fifty unaffected subjects (mean age: 15.2 ± 7.2 years) composed the control group. Data were evaluated using the independent t test, χ, Fischer exact test, and the odds ratio. Dental anomaly frequency was significantly higher in the cleft group compared with the control group. Tooth agenesis was the most common dental anomaly, followed by microdontia and supernumerary tooth. Lateral incisor agenesis was seen in 69% of the unilateral CLP, in 78% of the bilateral CLP, and in 18% of the cleft palate patients. A significant association was revealed between the right unilateral CLP and the right lateral incisor agenesis (P = 0.0001), the left unilateral CLP and the left lateral incisor agenesis (P = 0.002), and the bilateral CLP and the bilateral lateral incisor agenesis (P = 0.0001). Dental anomalies are more frequently seen in patients with CLP compared with the general population. There is a relationship between the cleft type and the ipsilateral lateral incisor agenesis.

  3. Remote Digital Preoperative Assessments for Cleft Lip and Palate May Improve Clinical and Economic Impact in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher; Campbell, Jacob; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; McCormack, Susan; Silverman, Richard; Lalikos, Janice; Babigian, Alan; Castiglione, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Reconstructive surgical care can play a vital role in the resource-poor settings of low- and middle-income countries. Telemedicine platforms can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of surgical care. The purpose of this study is to determine whether remote digital video evaluations are reliable in the context of a short-term plastic surgical intervention. The setting for this study was a district hospital located in Latacunga, Ecuador. Participants were 27 consecutive patients who presented for operative repair of cleft lip and palate. We calculated kappa coefficients for reliability between in-person and remote digital video assessments for the classification of cleft lip and palate between two separate craniofacial surgeons. We hypothesized that the technology would be a reliable method of preoperative assessment for cleft disease. Of the 27 (81.4%) participants, 22 received operative treatment for their cleft disorder. Mean age was 11.1 ± 8.3 years. Patients presented with a spectrum of disorders, including cleft lip (24 of 27, 88.9%), cleft palate (19 of 27, 70.4%), and alveolar cleft (19 of 27, 70.4%). We found a 95.7% agreement between observers for cleft lip with substantial reliability (κ = .78, P cleft palate, with a moderate interrater reliability (κ = .55, P = .01). We found only a 47.8% agreement between observers for alveolar cleft with a nonsignificant, weak kappa agreement (κ = .06, P = .74). Remote digital assessments are a reliable way to preoperatively diagnose cleft lip and palate in the context of short-term plastic surgical interventions in low- and middle-income countries. Future work will evaluate the potential for real-time, telemedicine assessments to reduce cost and improve clinical effectiveness in global plastic surgery.

  4. Incidence of Speech-Correcting Surgery in Children With Isolated Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Charlotta; Heliövaara, Arja; Leikola, Junnu; Rautio, Jorma

    2018-01-01

    Speech-correcting surgeries (pharyngoplasty) are performed to correct velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). This study aimed to analyze the need for speech-correcting surgery in children with isolated cleft palate (ICP) and to determine differences among cleft extent, gender, and primary technique used. In addition, we assessed the timing and number of secondary procedures performed and the incidence of operated fistulas. Retrospective medical chart review study from hospital archives and electronic records. These comprised the 423 consecutive nonsyndromic children (157 males and 266 females) with ICP treated at the Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Center of Helsinki University Hospital during 1990 to 2016. The total incidence of VPI surgery was 33.3% and the fistula repair rate, 7.8%. Children with cleft of both the hard and soft palate (n = 300) had a VPI secondary surgery rate of 37.3% (fistula repair rate 10.7%), whereas children with only cleft of the soft palate (n = 123) had a corresponding rate of 23.6% (fistula repair rate 0.8%). Gender and primary palatoplasty technique were not considered significant factors in need for VPI surgery. The majority of VPI surgeries were performed before school age. One fifth of patients receiving speech-correcting surgery had more than one subsequent procedure. The need for speech-correcting surgery and fistula repair was related to the severity of the cleft. Although the majority of the corrective surgeries were done before the age of 7 years, a considerable number were performed at a later stage, necessitating long-term observation.

  5. Cleft lip and palate treatment of 530 children over a decade in a single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, I M; Koudoumnakis, E; Houlakis, M; Nasika, M; Griva, M; Stylogianni, E

    2009-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the process of care and the outcomes of cleft lip and palate operations carried by a multidisciplinary team at a centre of craniofacial anomalies with a high patients' volume. A retrospective review of all cleft lips and/or palates cases treated in the centre from 1995 to 2007 was performed. Direct and long term complication rates, clinical, audiologic, speech intelligibility and dental arch assessments were analyzed. A total of 530 children have been operated this period in the centre (64 isolated cleft lip closures). A detailed presentation of the outcomes is performed in relation to the various types of cleft lip and palates. The majority of parents (70%) reported very good or excellent results 2-5 years after the lip closure with the Millard technique, although those with bilateral clefts were significantly less satisfied (Ppalate and otitis media with effusion were self-improved 2-8 months after palate reconstruction and 83.3% of children treated with the two flaps palatoplasty technique had a rather high or very high intelligibility score. Muscles' retropositioning had a significant effect on intelligibility (P=0.04). Children with cleft lips and palates have a variety of conditions and functional limitations even after the surgical correction of their problem that need to be evaluated and treated by several specialists. The treatment protocol utilized by the multidisciplinary team of our centre is efficient with a relative low percentage of complications and unfavorable results.

  6. Esthetic, Functional, and Everyday Life Assessment of Individuals with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkantidis, Nikolaos; Papamanou, Despina A; Karamolegkou, Marina; Dorotheou, Domna

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the level of satisfaction of individuals with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) and their parents concerning the esthetic and functional treatment outcomes, the impact of the cleft on everyday life, and potential associations with treatment outcome satisfaction. The sample consisted of 33 patients (7 CP, 20 unilateral CLP, and 6 bilateral CLP; median age: 17.1, range: 9.0-33.1 years) and 30 parents, who responded to a questionnaire in an interview-guided session. All participants received their orthodontic treatment at the Department of Orthodontics in the University of Athens. Patients and their parents were quite satisfied with esthetics and function. Patients with UCLP primarily were concerned about nose esthetics (BCLP about lip esthetics and CP about speech). Increased satisfaction was associated with decreased influence of the cleft in everyday life (0.35 < rho < 0.64, P < 0.05). Parents reported significant influence of the cleft on family life, while patients did not. Despite the limited sample size of subgroups, the main concerns of patients with different cleft types and the importance of satisfying lip, nose, and speech outcomes for an undisturbed everyday life were quite evident. Thus, the need for targeted treatment strategies is highlighted for individuals with cleft lip and/or palate.

  7. Holoprosencephaly in an Egyptian baby with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metwalley Kalil Kotb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip or palate syndrome (OMIM No. 129900 is characterized by the triad of ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and facial clefting (of the lip and/or palate. Holoprosencephaly denotes a failure in the division of the embryonic forebrain (prosencephalon into distinct lateral cerebral hemisphere. The association between ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip or palate syndrome and holoprosencephaly is very rare. Here we report holoprosencephaly in an Egyptian infant with ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip or palate syndrome. Case presentation An 11-month-old Egyptian female baby was referred to our institution for an evaluation of poor growth; the pregnancy and perinatal history were uneventful. On examination, her growth parameters were below the third centile, she had bilateral ectrodactyly of both hands and feet, dry rough skin, sparse hair of the scalp and operated right cleft lip and cleft palate. Computerized tomography of her brain revealed holoprosencephaly. Conclusion The importance of the early diagnosis of this syndrome should be emphasized in order to implement a multidisciplinary approach for proper management of such cases.

  8. Dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and palate in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this paper was to describe the prevalence and type of dental anomalies in the primary and permanent dentition in children with a cleft condition at Princess Margaret Hospital in Perth, Western Australia. Materials and Methods: The details of 162 current dental patients extracted from the main dental database through their year of birth for the period 1998–2001 were selected consecutively. Dental records and X-rays were examined by one examiner (WN) and verified by a second examiner (RB) to determine dental development. The mean age of the subjects was 10.8 years with equal numbers of males and females. Subjects were further divided into cleft type; unilateral cleft lip (UCL) and palate, bilateral cleft lip (BCL) and palate, UCL, BCL, and cleft palate. Results: One hundred sixty-two subjects were grouped into 21 categories of anomaly or abnormality. Prevalence rates for the categories were calculated for the overall group and for gender and cleft type. Conclusion: Overall, 94% of patients were found to have at least one dental anomaly, with fifty-six (34%) patients having more than one anomaly or abnormality. PMID:27095907

  9. A case of adult congenital laryngeal cleft asymptomatic until hypopharynx cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kotaro; Uno, Atsuhiko; Takemura, Kazuya; Ashida, Naoki; Oya, Ryohei; Kitamura, Takahiro; Takenaka, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi

    2018-06-01

    Laryngeal cleft is an anomaly of failed posterior closure of the larynx. Most cases are diagnosed and need treatment early in life due to respiratory and swallowing problems. We report an unusual case of a 66-year-old man with an asymptomatic laryngeal cleft until treatment for hypopharyngeal cancer. During concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), despite reduced tumor volume, he presented severe dysphagia and dyspnea, followed by severe pneumonia twice. Because CCRT had to be discontinued, a pharyngolaryngectomy was performed for the cancer treatment. The resected specimen showed total removal of the tumor and a total longitudinal cleft of the cricoid cartilage, classified as a type III laryngeal cleft by the Benjamin and Inglis' classification. A review of computed tomography images indicated that the redundant mucosa from bilateral edges closed the separation of the posterior cricoid cartilage and narrowed the laryngeal airway during CCRT. Adult presentations of laryngeal cleft are quite rare with only ten reported cases in English literature; the present case is of the oldest patient. Undiagnosed cases with laryngeal cleft may exist asymptomatically or without severe symptoms. The awareness of this condition may increase its diagnosis as a cause of diseases such as aspiration and recurrent pneumonia even in adult patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and palate in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe the prevalence and type of dental anomalies in the primary and permanent dentition in children with a cleft condition at Princess Margaret Hospital in Perth, Western Australia. The details of 162 current dental patients extracted from the main dental database through their year of birth for the period 1998-2001 were selected consecutively. Dental records and X-rays were examined by one examiner (WN) and verified by a second examiner (RB) to determine dental development. The mean age of the subjects was 10.8 years with equal numbers of males and females. Subjects were further divided into cleft type; unilateral cleft lip (UCL) and palate, bilateral cleft lip (BCL) and palate, UCL, BCL, and cleft palate. One hundred sixty-two subjects were grouped into 21 categories of anomaly or abnormality. Prevalence rates for the categories were calculated for the overall group and for gender and cleft type. Overall, 94% of patients were found to have at least one dental anomaly, with fifty-six (34%) patients having more than one anomaly or abnormality.

  11. Three-dimensional assessment of facial asymmetry in preschool patients with orofacial clefts after neonatal cheiloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslerová, Veronika; Dadáková, Martina; Dupej, Ján; Hoffmannova, Eva; Borský, Jiří; Černý, Miloš; Bejda, Přemysl; Kočandrlová, Karolína; Velemínská, Jana

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate facial asymmetry changes in pre-school patients with orofacial clefts after neonatal cheiloplasty and to compare facial asymmetry with age-matched healthy controls. The sample consisted of patients with unilateral cleft lip (UCL), unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), and bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP). The patients were divided in two age groups with a mean age of 3 years (n = 51) and 4.5 years (n = 45), respectively, and 78 age-matched individuals as controls. Three-dimensional (3D) facial scans were analyzed using geometric morphometry and multivariate statistics. Geometric morphometry showed positive deviations from perfect symmetry on the right side of the forehead in the intervention groups and the controls. The UCL groups showed the greatest asymmetric nasolabial area on the cleft-side labia and the contralateral nasal tip. The UCLP group showed, moreover, asymmetry in buccal region due to typical maxillar hypoplasia, which was accentuated in the older group. The BCLP groups showed slightly similar but greater asymmetry than the control groups, except for the philtrum region. Asymmetry of each of the cleft groups significantly differed from the controls. Except for the buccal region in the UCLP and BCLP groups, asymmetry did not significantly increase with age. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel GREM1 Variations in Sub-Saharan African Patients With Cleft Lip and/or Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowans, Lord Jephthah Joojo; Oseni, Ganiyu; Mossey, Peter A; Adeyemo, Wasiu Lanre; Eshete, Mekonen A; Busch, Tamara D; Donkor, Peter; Obiri-Yeboah, Solomon; Plange-Rhule, Gyikua; Oti, Alexander A; Owais, Arwa; Olaitan, Peter B; Aregbesola, Babatunde S; Oginni, Fadekemi O; Bello, Seidu A; Audu, Rosemary; Onwuamah, Chika; Agbenorku, Pius; Ogunlewe, Mobolanle O; Abdur-Rahman, Lukman O; Marazita, Mary L; Adeyemo, A A; Murray, Jeffrey C; Butali, Azeez

    2018-05-01

    Cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P) are congenital anomalies of the face and have multifactorial etiology, with both environmental and genetic risk factors playing crucial roles. Though at least 40 loci have attained genomewide significant association with nonsyndromic CL/P, these loci largely reside in noncoding regions of the human genome, and subsequent resequencing studies of neighboring candidate genes have revealed only a limited number of etiologic coding variants. The present study was conducted to identify etiologic coding variants in GREM1, a locus that has been shown to be largely associated with cleft of both lip and soft palate. We resequenced DNA from 397 sub-Saharan Africans with CL/P and 192 controls using Sanger sequencing. Following analyses of the sequence data, we observed 2 novel coding variants in GREM1. These variants were not found in the 192 African controls and have never been previously reported in any public genetic variant database that includes more than 5000 combined African and African American controls or from the CL/P literature. The novel variants include p.Pro164Ser in an individual with soft palate cleft only and p.Gly61Asp in an individual with bilateral cleft lip and palate. The proband with the p.Gly61Asp GREM1 variant is a van der Woude (VWS) case who also has an etiologic variant in IRF6 gene. Our study demonstrated that there is low number of etiologic coding variants in GREM1, confirming earlier suggestions that variants in regulatory elements may largely account for the association between this locus and CL/P.

  13. Bilateral cervical spondylolysis of C7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Nam Chull

    2010-11-01

    Cervical spondylolysis, which is defined as a cleft between the superior and inferior articular facets of the articular pillar, is a rare condition. The sixth cervical vertebra (C6) is the level most commonly affected. Cases involving C2, C3, C4, or C5 have also been reported. However, to date, no case of C7 spondylolysis has been reported. To present a rare case of bilateral spondylolysis of the seventh cervical vertebra (C7) in a 58-year-old man. A case report. A 58-year-old man visited our hospital with chronic posterior neck pain radiating to the left upper extremity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study revealed left foraminal disc herniations at C5-C6 and C6-C7. Cervical spondylolysis involving C7 was discovered incidentally during computed tomography (CT)-guided transforaminal steroid injection. Plain radiographs, CT images, and MRIs were reviewed thoroughly once again. The patient's symptoms were relieved after he received CT-guided transforaminal steroid injections. Plain radiographs revealed a radiolucent defect in the articular pillar and cleft at the spinous process of C7. Computed tomography confirmed bilateral spondylolysis and spina bifida occulta of the C7 vertebra. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed absence of edema, which was suggestive of a chronic lesion. Involvement of C7 is not exceptional in a case of cervical spondylolysis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Case Report: A true median facial cleft (crano-facial dysraphia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Report: A true median facial cleft (crano-facial dysraphia, atessier type O) in Bingham University Teaching Hospital, Jos. ... Patient had a multidisciplinary care by the obstetrician, Neonatologist, anesthesiologist and the plastic surgery team who scheduled a soft tissue repair of the upper lip defect, columella and ...

  15. Amyad's hernia while reparing the bilateral inguinal hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Arif Aslaner; Tuğrul Çakır; Umut Rıza Gündüz; Burhan Mayir; Nurullah Bülbüller

    2015-01-01

    Amyand's hernia is the term used for inguinal hernia containing appendix. It is a rare condition and found in 1% of inguinal hernia repairs. Here we report a case of Amyand's hernia in a 61 years old male who was diagnosed with bilateral inguinal hernia. He underwent surgery and bilateral inguinal hernia repair with prosthetic meshes and without appendectomy. The patient was discharged uneventfully. 

  16. Amyad's hernia while reparing the bilateral inguinal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Aslaner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyand's hernia is the term used for inguinal hernia containing appendix. It is a rare condition and found in 1% of inguinal hernia repairs. Here we report a case of Amyand's hernia in a 61 years old male who was diagnosed with bilateral inguinal hernia. He underwent surgery and bilateral inguinal hernia repair with prosthetic meshes and without appendectomy. The patient was discharged uneventfully. 

  17. Centralisation of services for children with cleft lip or palate in England: a study of hospital episode statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In 1998, a process of centralisation was initiated for services for children born with a cleft lip or palate in the UK. We studied the timing of this process in England according to its impact on the number of hospitals and surgeons involved in primary surgical repairs. Methods All live born patients with a cleft lip and/or palate born between April 1997 and December 2008 were identified in Hospital Episode Statistics, the database of admissions to English National Health Service hospitals. Children were included if they had diagnostic codes for a cleft as well as procedure codes for a primary surgical cleft repair. Children with codes indicating additional congenital anomalies or syndromes were excluded as their additional problems could have determined when and where they were treated. Results We identified 10,892 children with a cleft. 21.0% were excluded because of additional anomalies or syndromes. Of the remaining 8,606 patients, 30.4% had a surgical lip repair only, 41.7% a palate repair only, and 28.0% both a lip and palate repair. The number of hospitals that carried out these primary repairs reduced from 49 in 1997 to 13, with 11 of these performing repairs on at least 40 children born in 2008. The number of surgeons responsible for repairs reduced from 98 to 26, with 22 performing repairs on at least 20 children born in 2008. In the same period, average length of hospital stay reduced from 3.8 to 3.0 days for primary lip repairs, from 3.8 to 3.3 days for primary palate repairs, and from 4.6 to 2.6 days for combined repairs with no evidence for a change in emergency readmission rates. The speed of centralisation varied with the earliest of the nine regions completing it in 2001 and the last in 2007. Conclusions Between 1998 and 2007, cleft services in England were centralised. According to a survey among patients’ parents, the quality of cleft care improved in the same period. Surgical care became more consistent with current

  18. Cleft deformities (lip and palate)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    hospital between February 2008 and February 2009, seventeen neonates presented with ..... are low necessitating very large sample sizes often limited by resources. ... Bianco-Davila F: Incidence of cleft lip and palate in northeast of Mexico.

  19. Bite force evaluation in subjects with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Renata Sipert

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the masticatory function of subjects with cleft lip and palate by analyzing the bite force developed by these individuals. Bite force was evaluated in a group of 27 individuals with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (14 males and 13 females - aged 18-26 years and compared to the data achieved from a group of 20 noncleft subjects (10 males and 10 females - aged 18-26 years. Measurement was achieved on three positions within the dental arch (incisors, right molars and left molars, three times at each position considering the highest value for each one. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA and Mann-Whitney test ( α = 5%. There was a significant deficit in bite force in male individuals with cleft lip and palate compared to the male control group (p=0.02, p=0.004, p=0.003 for incisors, right and left molars, respectively. For the female group, the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.79, p=0.06, p=0.47. In the group of individuals with clefts, 92.6% were under orthodontic treatment, which could be a reason for the present findings, since it can decrease the bite force more remarkably in males than in females. In conclusion, the bite force is significantly reduced in men when comparing the cleft group to the noncleft group. In females, this reduction was not significant in the same way. However, the main reason for this reduction and for the different behavior between genders should be further investigated.

  20. Penatalaksanaan Repair Palatoplasty dengan Teknik Furlow Double Opposing Z Plasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingky Krisna Arindra

    2015-06-01

    metode Furlow double opposing z plasty dengan kombinasi insisi lateral, dan didapatkan hasil menutupnya celah di palatum mole sampai dengan uvula. Telah dilakukan operasi repair palatoplasi dengan metode Furlow double opposing z plasty. Teknik ini dilakukan untuk menghindari insisi yang terlalu luas dikarenakan terdapatnya jaringan fibrous yang tebal pada mukosa palatum pasca operasi sebelumnya. Tujuan studi kasus adalah untuk mengetahui kemampuan teknik Furlow Double Opposing Z Plasty sebagai prosedur repair palatoplasty.   Repair Palatoplasty Management with Furlow Double Opposing Z Plasty Technique. Cases of cleft lip and palate are one of the deformity disorders that often occur. There are variety of clinical appearance ranging from incomplete to complete cases. Clinical appearance with different width requires proper surgical technique. Patients with cleft lip and palate had undergone surgical intervention, so that they needed surgical correction to repair the result or failure of the previous surgery. A Four year old boy complain there was cleft on the soft palate. The patient was diagnosed with labiognatopalatoscisis. The patient had undergone two stages of cleft lip surgery and twice of cleft palate surgery with pushback method and repair with z plasty, however the result was unsatisfactory. Further, the patient underwent repair palatoplasty surgery with Furlow double opposing z plasty method combined with lateral relaxing insicion. The result in the post surgery was the closure of cleft soft palate up to uvula. Repair palataplasty surgery has been done with Furlow double opposing z plasty method. This technique could avoid extended incision due to thick fibrous tissue on the palatum mucosa as the result of serial previous surgery. The aim of this case case study is to determine the technical capabilities of Furlow Double Opposing Z Plasty as palatoplasty repair procedure.

  1. Anophthalmia with cleft palate and micrognathia: a new syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, S R; Sharma, A K; Agarwal, S S

    1994-01-01

    A 5 day old male with bilateral anophthalmos, hypospadias, bifid scrotum, micrognathia, and cleft palate with normal chromosomes is described. There have been two case reports with similar clinical manifestations but associated with interstitial deletion of 14q (q22q23). We propose that either our patient represents a new syndrome or has a microdeletion which could not be detected on routine cytogenetics. High quality cytogenetics and FISH may show microdeletions in patients presenting with this clinical picture and normal chromosomes. Images PMID:7891380

  2. Secondary bone grafting for alveolar cleft in children with cleft lip or cleft lip and palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, J.; Li, C.; Zhang, Q.; Wu, G.; Deacon, S.A.; Chen, J.; Hu, H.; Zou, S.; Ye, Q.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary alveolar bone grafting has been widely used to reconstruct alveolar cleft. However, there is still some controversy. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness and safety of different secondary bone grafting methods. SEARCH STRATEGY: The final electronic and handsearches were

  3. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  4. Evolution of my philosophy in the treatment of unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusati, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    At the end of 50-year-long clinical activity, the evolution of my approach to the treatment of unilateral cleft of the lip and palate is discussed. I had several teachers in this field (Rusconi, Reherman, Perko, Delaire, Talmant, Sommerlad and others) and I introduced in my approach what I considered to be improvements from all of them. My current protocol is related to the anatomy of the cleft: for wide clefts a two-stage protocol is applied (1° step: soft palate and lip and nose repair; 2° step: hard palate repair with gingivoalveoloplasty); for narrow cleft (less than 1 cm at the posterior border of hard palate) an "all in one" protocol is performed with or without gingivoalveoloplasty (in accordance to the presence or absence of contact between the stumps at alveolar level). The most important details regarding surgery of the lip and palate are discussed. Robust data collection on speech and skeletal growth is still needed to determine whether the "all in one" approach can be validated as the treatment of choice for unilateral complete lip and palate cleft in selected cases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Postoperative alar base symmetry in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate:A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyloppilli, Suresh; Krishnakumar, K S; Sayd, Shermil; Latheef, Sameer; Narayanan, Saju V; Pati, Ajit

    2017-11-01

    In the evolution of cleft lip repair, there have been continuous attempts to minimize local trauma and to improve lip and nasal appearances. In order to obtain an aesthetically balanced development of midface, the primary surgical correction of the nasolabial area is of paramount importance. In this study, the importance of a back-cut extending cephalically above the inferior turbinate at the mucocutaneous junction which elevates the nostril floor on the cleft side for the purpose of achieving symmetry of the alar bases are analyzed by pre and postoperative photographic anthropometry. This study comprised of fifty cases of the unilateral complete cleft lip. At the time of surgery, the patient age ranged from 3-9 months. The surgeries, performed by a single surgeon, employed the standard Millard technique, incorporating Mohler modifications of lip repair. Anthropometric analysis revealed that the preoperative mean difference between the normal side and the cleft side was 0.2056 with a standard deviation of 0.133. In the postoperative analysis, the mean difference was reduced to 0.0174 with a standard deviation of 0.141. The paired t-test showed that the p-value is cleft lip and palate, the geometrically placed nasal back-cut incision has a definite role in the correction of the alar base symmetry during primary surgery. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of fecal microorganisms of children with cleft palate before and after palatoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narciso Almeida Vieira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study isolated and quantified intestinal bacteria of children with cleft palate before and after palatoplasty. A prospective study was conducted from May 2007 to September 2008 on 18 children with cleft palate, aged one to four years, of both genders, attending a tertiary cleft center in Brazil for palatoplasty, to analyze the effect of surgical palate repair on the concentration of anaerobes Bacteroides sp, Bifidobacterium sp and microaerophiles Lactobacillus sp in feces of infants with cleft palate before and 24 hours after treatment with cefazolin for palatoplasty. There was significant reduction of Lactobacillus sp (p < 0.002, Bacteroides sp (p < 0.001 and Bifidobacterium sp (p = 0.021 after palatoplasty, revealing that surgery and utilization of cefazolin significantly influenced the fecal microbiota comparing collections before and after surgery. However, due to study limitations, it was not possible to conclude that other isolated factors, such as surgical stress, anesthetics and other medications used in palatoplasty might have a significant influence on the microbiota. Considering the important participation of the intestinal microbiota on both local and systemic metabolic and immunological activities of the host, professionals should be attentive to the possible influence of these changes in patients submitted to cleft repair.

  7. Cleft deformities in adults and children aged over six years in Nigeria: Reasons for late presentation and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasiu L Adeyemo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Wasiu L Adeyemo1, Mobolanle O Ogunlewe1, Ibironke Desalu2, Akinola L Ladeinde1, Bolaji O Mofikoya3, Michael O Adeyemi4, Adegbenga A Adepoju4, Olufemi O Hassan41Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dental Sciences, 2Department of Anaesthesia, 3Department of Surgery, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria; 4Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, NigeriaAbstract: In developing countries, untreated cleft lips and palates are found with increasing frequency and patients often present to the surgeon far past the optimal time for closure of the cleft deformities. A prospective study was conducted between March 2007 and September 2009, to identify the reasons and treatment challenges of delayed presentation of cleft lip and palate deformities at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Out of a total of 150 patients with cleft defects during the period, 43 (28.7% were adults and children aged over six years. The mean age of these patients at the time of presentation was 17.3 years. The most common reasons for late presentation were lack of money (56.7%, lack of health care services nearby (18.4%, and lack of awareness of treatment availability (13.3%. Common challenges in these patients included surgical, orthodontic, speech, anesthetic, and psychological. Although adult clefts were significantly enlarged in three dimensions the anatomic landmarks were easier to discern than in an infant. However, extensive soft tissue dissection in adult cleft lip repair resulted in significant postoperative edema. Closure of wide palatal cleft often required the use of adjunct intraoral flaps. Despite late presentation, surgical outcome of these patients was satisfactory and comparable to cleft repair in infants.Keywords: cleft deformities, adults, adolescents, late presentation, management, challenges

  8. Six years analysis of cleft palate in a university hospital center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahvash M

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Cleft palate is a congenital condition that occurs with the incidence rate of one out of 2000 births. This anomaly produces intraoral pressure changes (increase or decrease, can cause speech, sucking and feeding problems of involved patient. On the other hand, if cleft palate is associated with cleft of the lip or alveolar area, growth and alignment of teeth may change the appearance of the patient and affect the psychologic and occupational future of the patient. Eustatian tube malfunction in involved neonates increase. Many procedures are used to repair the cleft palate and correction of palatal muscles which are: 1 Von Langenbeck (18.5%. 2 Veau-Wardil-Kilner (72.5%. 3 Double opposing Z-Plasty (9%. In this research the demographic criteria of patients including age of the patient at operation rime (mean age 30.14 months, city of residence, family history of cleft palate (12.4%, familial relation of parents (15.2%, associated anomalies, complete or incomplete lesion, weight of patients at the time of surgery (mean 11.28 Kg, hemoglobin (11.3 mg/dl, complications, otitis media and the side of cleft palate are studied in 178 admitted patients to Imam General Hospital between 1989 and 1995.

  9. Palate dimensions in six-year-old children with unilateral cleft lip and palate: a six-center study on dental casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koželj, Vesna; Vegnuti, Miljana; Drevenšek, Martina; Hortis-Dzierzbicka, Maria; Gonzalez-Landa, Gonzalo; Hanstein, Siiri; Klimova, Irena; Kobus, Kazimierz; Kobus-Zaleśna, Katarzyna; Semb, Gunvor; Shaw, Bill

    2012-11-01

    To compare palatal dimensions in 6-year-old children with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) treated by different protocols with those of noncleft children. Retrospective intercenter outcome study. Patients : Upper dental casts from 129 children with repaired UCLP and 30 controls were analyzed by the trigonometric method. Six European cleft centers. Main outcome measures : Sagittal, transverse, and vertical dimensions of the palate were observed. Palate variables were analyzed with descriptive methods and nonparametric tests. Regarding several various characteristics measured on a relatively small number of subjects, hierarchical, k-means clustering, and principal component analyses were used. Mean values of the observed dimensions for five cleft groups differed significantly from the control (p cleft differed significantly from all other cleft groups in most variables (p palate. A similar number of treated children were classified into each cluster, while all children without clefts were classified in the same cluster. The percentage of treated children from a particular group that fit this cluster ranged from 0% to 70% and increased with age at palatal closure and number of primary surgical procedures. At 6 years of age, children with stepwise repair and hard palate closure after the age of two more frequently result in palatal dimensions of noncleft control than children with earlier palatal closure and one-stage cleft repair.

  10. Three dimensional analysis of CT image on naso-maxillary complex in cleft lip and palate patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Rong-Rong

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to clarify the three dimensional features of naso-maxillary complex in cleft lip and palate (CLP) by using computed tomography (CT) and to examine its change following an upper dental arch expansion. Sequential CT images with 2mm-thickness were obtained for 11 unilateral CLP boys (UCLP), 6 bilateral CLP boys (BCLP) and 4 boys without cleft (non-cleft). Additionally, two serial sets of upper dental cast before and after dental arch expansion coupled with CT images in UCLP were used to evaluate the effect of dental arch expansion on the naso-maxillary complex. UCLP demonstrated a remarkable naso-maxillary deformity characterized by a decreased volume of maxillary sinus in comparison with the non-cleft patients. Both the volume and shape of nasal cavity were significantly different between the cleft and non cleft side. Naso-maxillary morphology of BCLP, however, was similar to that of the non cleft except for the decreased volume of alveolar arch. Comparative study of UCLP and BCLP showed a significant difference in naso-maxillary morphology. There were some significant correlations between the dental arch expansion and change of each naso-maxillary component, suggesting the effect of expansion stress on the naso-maxillary complex in UCLP. However, deformation caused by expansion stress varied, depending on each component of the naso-maxillary complex. (author) 61 refs

  11. Three dimensional analysis of CT image on naso-maxillary complex in cleft lip and palate patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Rong-Rong [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1994-12-01

    This study was designed to clarify the three dimensional features of naso-maxillary complex in cleft lip and palate (CLP) by using computed tomography (CT) and to examine its change following an upper dental arch expansion. Sequential CT images with 2mm-thickness were obtained for 11 unilateral CLP boys (UCLP), 6 bilateral CLP boys (BCLP) and 4 boys without cleft (non-cleft). Additionally, two serial sets of upper dental cast before and after dental arch expansion coupled with CT images in UCLP were used to evaluate the effect of dental arch expansion on the naso-maxillary complex. UCLP demonstrated a remarkable naso-maxillary deformity characterized by a decreased volume of maxillary sinus in comparison with the non-cleft patients. Both the volume and shape of nasal cavity were significantly different between the cleft and non cleft side. Naso-maxillary morphology of BCLP, however, was similar to that of the non cleft except for the decreased volume of alveolar arch. Comparative study of UCLP and BCLP showed a significant difference in naso-maxillary morphology. There were some significant correlations between the dental arch expansion and change of each naso-maxillary component, suggesting the effect of expansion stress on the naso-maxillary complex in UCLP. However, deformation caused by expansion stress varied, depending on each component of the naso-maxillary complex. (author) 61 refs.

  12. Maxillary distraction complications in cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeblaoui, Y; Morand, B; Brix, M; Lebeau, J; Bettega, G

    2010-06-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients often present with a class III malocclusion in connection with a three dimensional maxillary hypoplasia. Twenty-five to 60% of these patients need maxillary advancement. Two solutions are possible: orthognathic surgery and maxillary distraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complications of maxillary distraction in CLP patients. Data was collected from the records of patients treated in our surgery unit between 2000 and 2007. Among the eight patients (four male and four female), five presented with a bilateral CLP, two with a unilateral CLP, and one with a unilateral cleft lip associated to a soft palate cleft. The average age at surgery was 17 years. All underwent a Le Fort I osteotomy with a pterygomaxillary disjunction. An external distractor was used for the first two patients and an internal distractor for the six following patients. After a seven-day latency, activation was implemented at a rate of 1mm twice a day. The average period of consolidation was four months. Maxillary advancement ranged between 7 and 19mm, with an average of 12.6mm. The average follow-up was four years. Complications were noted in seven patients: one intra-operative hemorrhage, one avulsion of a tooth anchored at the pterygoid process during osteotomy, three cases of device dysfunction, two cases of significant pain during activation, one loosening of the orthodontic arch in an external system, two cases of labial ulceration, and one maxillary sinusitis due to migration of a wisdom tooth. Complications of maxillary distraction in CLP patients were very frequent. Most were related to the device and did not interfere with the final result. This must be taken into account when indicating distraction and choosing the device. Two types of complications can occur during distraction: those related to the osteotomy and those related to the device. The complications related to the osteotomy are linked to the cicatricial ground of previous

  13. [Maxillary distraction complications in cleft patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeblaoui, Y; Morand, B; Brix, M; Lebeau, J; Bettega, G

    2008-09-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients often present with a class III malocclusion in connection with a three dimensional maxillary hypoplasia. Twenty-five to 60% of these patients require a maxillary advancement. Two solutions are possible: orthognathic surgery and maxillary distraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complications of the maxillary distraction in CLP patients. Data was collected from the records of patients treated at our Surgery Unit between 2000 and 2007. Among the eight patients (four male and four female), five presented a bilateral CLP, two a unilateral CLP and one a unilateral cleft lip associated to a soft palate cleft. The average age at surgery was 17 years old. All had a Le Fort I osteotomy with a pterygomaxillary disjunction. The first two patients had external distractors and the six following internal ones. After a seven-day latency, activation was led to the rate of 1mm per day twice. The period of consolidation was four months on average. The maxillary advancement varied between 7 and 19 mm with an average of 12.6mm. The average follow-up was four years. We encountered difficulties and/or complications in seven patients: one intraoperatively haemorrhage, one avulsion of a tooth fixed at the pterygoid process during the osteotomy, three device failures, two cases of significant pains during activation, one dissociation of the dental anchorage of an external system, two labial ulcerations and one maxillary sinusitis by migration of the 18. Difficulties of maxillary distraction in CLP patients are very frequent. The majority is related to the distractors and did not interfere with the final result. But this frequency must be taken into account in the indication and in the choice of the material. Two types of complications can occur during distraction: those related to the osteotomy and those related to the material. The complications related to the osteotomy are in connection with the cicatricial ground of the CLP. They are

  14. Cleft Lip – A Comprehensive Review

    OpenAIRE

    Shkoukani, Mahdi A.; Chen, Michael; Vong, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts comprise a range of congenital deformities and are the most common head and neck congenital malformation. Clefting has significant psychological and socio- economic effects on patient quality of life and require a multidisciplinary team approach for management. The complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors play a significant role in the incidence and cause of clefting. In this review, the embryology, classification, epidemiology, and etiology of cleft lip ar...

  15. 28 Comparative Study of Open Mesh Repair and Desarda's No ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... Methods: This is a retrospective study of 269 hernias operated by the ... principle and this concept of physiological repair of inguinal hernia ... laparoscopic repairs or the patients given .... 11 obstructed and 17 bilateral hernias.

  16. Recurrence and complications of pediatric inguinal hernia repair ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    complications of inguinal hernia repair in pediatric patients ... surgery. Patients and methods This retrospective study was ... Bilateral inguinal hernia was observed ..... single-blind comparison of laparoscopic versus open repair of pediatric.

  17. Recurrence and Pain after Mesh Repair of Inguinal Hernias

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Surgery for inguinal hernias has ... repair. Methods: The study was conducted on all inguinal hernia patients operated between 1st. October ... bilateral (1.6%). Only 101 .... Open Mesh Versus Laparoscopic Mesh. Repair ...

  18. Midline cervical cleft: a rare congenital anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renukaswamy, Gayathri Mandya; Soma, Marlene A; Hartley, Benjamin E J

    2009-11-01

    A midline cervical cleft (MCC) is a rare congenital anomaly due to failure of fusion of the first and second branchial arches during embryogenesis. It may present as a midline defect of the anterior neck skin with a skin projection or sinus, or as a subcutaneous fibrous cord. This report evaluates the clinical features and surgical management of an MCC. We analyzed a series of 4 patients with an MCC successfully treated at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London. Three male patients and 1 female patient between 4 and 11 months of age were found to have an MCC. Each patient presented with an erythematous, fibrous band of tissue extending between the chin and the suprasternal notch. Treatment comprised surgical excision of the lesion and Z-plasty repair. We present the embryology, common clinical presentation, investigations, differential diagnosis, and histology, along with a literature review, of this uncommon malformation of the anterior neck. An MCC is a differential diagnosis to consider when assessing a child with a midline cervical lesion. Early surgical excision with Z-plasty repair of the soft tissue defect is the treatment of choice to prevent long-term complications.

  19. The use of throat packs in pediatric cleft lip/palate surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarius, B J A; Guillaume, C H A L; Jonker, G; van der Molen, A B Mink; Breugem, C C

    2018-02-22

    Throat packs are commonly used to prevent ingestion or aspiration of blood and other debris during cleft lip/palate surgery. However, dislodgement or (partial) retainment after extubation could have serious consequences. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of omitting pharyngeal packing during cleft lip/palate surgery on the incidence of early postoperative complications in children. A retrospective study was performed on all children who underwent cleft lip/palate surgery at the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital. This study compared the period January 2010 through December 2012 when pharyngeal packing was applied according to local protocol (group A) with the period January 2013 till December 2015 when pharyngeal packing was no longer applied after removal from the protocol (group B). Data were collected for sex, age at operation, cleft lip/palate type, type of repair, lateral incisions, length of hospital stay, and complications in the first 6 weeks after surgery. Early complications included wound dehiscence, postoperative bleeding, infection, fever, upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), and lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). This study included 489 cleft lip/palate operations (group A n = 246, group B n = 243). A total of 39 (15.9%) early complications were recorded in group A and a total of 40 (16.5%) in group B. There were no significant differences (P = 0.902) in complications between the two groups; however, there was a significant difference (P cleft lip/palate surgery was not associated with an increased early postoperative complication rate. Therefore, the traditional, routine placement of a throat pack during cleft lip/palate surgery can be questioned. The traditional, routine placement of a throat pack during cleft lip/palate surgery can be questioned.

  20. Unusual case of cleft hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahasrabudhe Parag

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a six-year-old male child with cleft hand deformity involving the dominant right hand. It was a rare case of atypical cleft hand with no missing tissue but cleft extending to metacarpal level and associated hypoplasia of thumb and index finger. As per Manske′s classification of cleft hand our patient belongs to the Class III variety. There was associated malposition of the index finger with absence of first web space and syndactly of thumb and index finger at the metacarpal level. A modified Snow-Littler procedure was planned. The surgical plan involved closure of cleft, release of thumb and index finger syndactly and reconstruction of the first web space. The functional outcome was good considering hypoplasia of the index finger and thumb. Depending upon the function of the thumb tendon transfers can be planned to augment thumb function at a later date along with correction of rotational deformities of the index and middle finger.

  1. Scandcleft randomised trials of primary surgery for unilateral cleft lip and palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heliövaara, Arja; Küseler, Annelise; Skaare, Pål

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Good dentofacial growth is a major goal in the treatment of unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). The aim was to evaluate dental arch relationships at age 5 years after four different protocols of primary surgery for UCLP. DESIGN: Three parallel randomised clinical trials were...... undertaken as an international multi-centre study by 10 cleft teams in five countries: Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway, and the UK. METHODS: Three different surgical procedures for primary palatal repair (Arms B, C, D) were tested against a common procedure (Arm A) in the total cohort of 448 children born...

  2. The Effect of Furlow Palatoplasty Timing on Speech Outcomes in Submucous Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jordan W; Mitchell, Brianne T; Cohen, Marilyn; Solot, Cynthia; Jackson, Oksana; Low, David; Bartlett, Scott P; Taylor, Jesse A

    2017-08-01

    Because some patients with submucous cleft palate (SMCP) are asymptomatic, surgical treatment is conventionally delayed until hypernasal resonance is identified during speech production. We aim to identify whether speech outcomes after repair of a SMCP is influenced by age of repair. We retrospectively studied nonsyndromic children with SMCP. Speech results, before and after any surgical treatment or physical management of the palate were compared using the Pittsburgh Weighted Speech Scoring system. Furlow palatoplasty was performed on 40 nonsyndromic patients with SMCP, and 26 patients were not surgically treated. Total composite speech scores improved significantly among children repaired between 3 and 4 years of age (P = 0.02), but not older than 4 years (P = 0.63). Twelve (86%) of 14 patients repaired who are older than 4 years had borderline or incompetent speech (composite Pittsburgh Weighted Speech Scoring ≥3) compared with 2 (29%) of 7 repaired between 3 and 4 years of age (P = 0.0068), despite worse prerepair scores in the latter group. Resonance improved in children repaired who are older than 4 years, but articulation errors persisted to a greater degree than those treated before 4 years of age (P = 0.01.) CONCLUSIONS: Submucous cleft palate repair before 4 years of age appears associated with lower ultimate rates of borderline or incompetent speech. Speech of patients repaired at or after 4 years of age seems to be characterized by persistent misarticulation. These findings highlight the importance of timely diagnosis and management.

  3. [Double second branchial cleft anomaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Fernández, Noelia; Mallea-Cañizares, Ismael; Fernández-Julián, Enrique; De La Fuente-Arjona, Luís; Marco-Algarra, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Second branchial cleft anomalies are the most common of this type of neck masses. They can be classified in four types (Bailey/Proctor classification) according to their location. Type II is the most common, and related to vital neck structures such as the carotid artery and jugular vein. Cysts are the most frequent among them. Management consists of surgical excision of the cyst and tract by cervicotomy to avoid recurrence. We present an extremely rare case of a 32-year-old male who presented a sudden appearance of a right lateral neck mass that was identified by an image study as a double branchial cleft cyst. A review of simultaneous branchial cleft cyst in the literature is also made. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. [Surgical correction of cleft palate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, F T; Pavia Noble, A; Soriano Padilla, F; Soto Miranda, A; Medellín Rodríguez, A

    1990-04-01

    This study presents a statistical review of corrective surgery for cleft palate, based on cases treated at the maxillo-facial surgery units of the Pediatrics Hospital of the Centro Médico Nacional and at Centro Médico La Raza of the National Institute of Social Security of Mexico, over a five-year period. Interdisciplinary management as performed at the Cleft-Palate Clinic, in an integrated approach involving specialists in maxillo-facial surgery, maxillar orthopedics, genetics, social work and mental hygiene, pursuing to reestablish the stomatological and psychological functions of children afflicted by cleft palate, is amply described. The frequency and classification of the various techniques practiced in that service are described, as well as surgical statistics for 188 patients, which include a total of 256 palate surgeries performed from March 1984 to March 1989, applying three different techniques and proposing a combination of them in a single surgical time, in order to avoid complementary surgery.

  5. Gene p63: In ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting, ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia, Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straten, Cornelia; Butow, Kurt-W

    2013-01-01

    An analysis was made of three different syndromes associated with p63 gene mutations, known as ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome (EEC), ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (AEC or Hay-Wells) and Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome (RHS). The postoperative complications associated with their cleft reconstructions were also evaluated. Extensive demographic information, in particular of the clinical appearances, associated malformations, and the types and complications of the reconstructive surgical procedures, were recorded of these syndromic cases occurring in a database of 3621 facial cleft deformity patients. The data was analyzed using the Microsoft Excel program. A total of 10 (0.28%) cases of p63 associated syndromes were recorded: EEC (6), RHS (3), and AEC (1). The following clinical cleft appearances were noted - EEC = 6: CLA 1 -right side unilateral (female); CLAP 4 - right side (1) + left side (1) unilateral (male + female); bilateral (2) (males); hPsP 1 (female) (divided in 3 Black, 2 White, 1 Indian); RHS = 3: CLAP 2 (White males); hPsP 1 (White female); AEC = 1: CLAP bilateral (White male). Other features of the syndromes were: skin, hand, foot, tooth, hair and nail involvement, and light sensitivity. Postoperative complications included: (i) stenosis of nasal opening, especially after reconstruction of the bilateral cleft lip and the columella lengthening (2 cases), (ii) premaxilla-prolabium fusion (2 cases), (iii) repeated occurrence of oro-nasal fistula in the hard palate (4 cases), and (iv) dysgnathial development of midfacial structures (3 cases). Three different p63 associated syndromes (EEC, AEC, and RHS) were diagnosed (0.27% of the total facial cleft deformities database). The majority of the cases presented with a bilateral CLAP in males only. A number of females and males had unilateral CLA. The hPsP-cleft was recorded in females only. The associated ectodermal component most probably had a profoundly negative influence

  6. Surgical treatment of cleft lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Domingues Miachon

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic review of the literature on the surgical treatment of cleft lip, emphasizing the prevalence, complications associated with the treatment and the points of disagreement between authors. We conducted a literature cross-sectional search that analyzed publications in books, articles and on the databases SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online, PubMed, of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. We conclude that: 1 the severity of the cleft will indicate the technique presenting more advantages; 2 the different approaches indicate that there is no consensus on the optimal technique; and 3 the surgeon experience contributes to choosing the best option.

  7. Spontaneous Bilateral Meningoencephalocoeles of the Temporal Bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Rose

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous tegmen tympani defects are rare with even rarer bilateral cases. The symptoms are nonspecific; hence, a high index of suspicion is required to prevent serious intracranial complications. We present a case of spontaneous bilateral tegmen tympani defects with associated meningoencephalocoeles in a 54-year-old male who presented with the signs and symptoms of severe meningitis. After careful workup which included a lumbar puncture, CT and MRI scans, both defects were repaired using a middle fossa approach. The patient made an uneventful recovery with complete cessation of otorrhoea and improvement in his hearing.

  8. Orthognathic Consequences of Sphincter Pharyngoplasty in Cleft Patients: A 2-Institutional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikane, Frances; Lai, Li Han; Hui, Brian K.; Martins, Deborah B.; Farias-Eisner, Gina; Mandelbaum, Rachel S.; Hoang, Han; Bradley, James P.; Wilson, Libby

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding long-term sequelae of cleft treatment is paramount in the refinement of treatment algorithms to accomplish optimized immediate and long-term outcomes. In this study, we reviewed sphincter pharyngoplasties as a method of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) treatment in relationship to orthognathic surgery. Methods: Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients, 15 years of age and older, were reviewed for demographics, VPI surgery, revisions, and subsequent orthognathic surgery at 2 institutions. Chi-square test, Student’s t test, and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: In 214 patients reviewed (mean age, 19.5 years), 61.7% were male, 18.2% had isolated cleft palate, 61.2% had unilateral cleft lip and palate, and 20.6% had bilateral cleft lip and palate. A total of 33.6% were diagnosed with VPI and received a sphincter pharyngoplasty (mean age, 11.9 years). When subsequent orthognathic surgery was examined, sphincter pharyngoplasty was not associated with maxillary advancement (P = 0.59) but did correlate with an increase in mandibular surgery from 2.8% to 11.1% (P = 0.02). The indications for mandibular surgery in the pharyngoplasty population were related to congenital micrognathia. When cephalometric analyses were evaluated, sphincter pharyngoplasty resulted in a decreased sella-to-nasion-to-B point angle (mean, 79.0–76.3 degrees, P = 0.02) and a higher incidence of normal to class II maxillomandibular relationships as defined by A point-to-nasion-to-B point angles >0.5 (P = 0.02). Conclusions: Sphincter pharyngoplasty decreases anterior mandibular growth and the discrepancy between maxillomandibular skeletal relationships because of the frequent predisposition of cleft patients to maxillary hypoplasia. In patients with congenital mandibular micrognathia, a small increase in mandibular surgeries may occur. PMID:27200238

  9. Maxillary dental anomalies in patients with cleft lip and palate: a cone beam computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikoglu, M; Buyuk, S K; Sekerci, A E; Cantekin, K; Candirli, C

    2015-01-01

    To compare the frequency of maxillary dental anomalies in patients affected by unilateral (UCLP) and bilateral (BCLP) cleft lip with palate and to determine whether statistical differences were present or not between cleft and normal sides in UCLP group by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). In addition, the frequency of those dental anomalies was compared with previous studies presenting the same population without cleft Study Design: Fifty non-syndromic patients affected by UCLP (28 patients) and BCLP (22 patients) were selected for analysis of dental anomalies by means of CBCT. The frequency of maxillary dental anomalies including tooth agenesis, microdontia of lateral incisor, ectopic eruption and impaction of canine and supernumerary tooth were examined. Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for statistical comparisons. All patients affected by UCLP and BCLP were found to have at least one maxillary dental anomaly. The most frequently observed dental anomaly was tooth agenesis (92.5% and 86.4%, respectively) in UCLP and BCLP groups. Tooth agenesis and canine impaction were observed more commonly in the cleft side (75.0% and 35.7%, respectively) than in the normal side (57.1% and 14.3%, respectively) in UCLP group (p≯0.05). All dental anomalies were found to be higher in both cleft groups than in general populations not affected by cleft. Since patients affected by UCLP and BCLP had at least one dental anomaly and higher dental anomaly frequency as compared to patients without cleft, those patients should be examined carefully prior to orthodontic treatment.

  10. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts.

  11. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts.

  12. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF TOOTH DECAY IN YOUNG CHILDREN WITH CLEFT LIP AND PALATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana-Gabriela HALIŢCHI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluation of the extension of caries risk and incidence of decays of temporary teeth in children with cleft lip and palate. Materials and methods. The study was conducted on a sample of 64 children with various types of cleft lip and palate (31 children with unilateral cleft lip and palate, 18 children with bilateral cleft lip and palate, 5 children with cleft lip and 10 children with cleft palate, aged between 3 and 6 years, investigated in the Orthodontics Clinic of „Apollonia” University. The tooth surfaces were examined with the probe and the mirror, incipient caries and tooth decay with manifest cavities detectable by probing being identified. The gingival status was examined, whichever the inflammatory signs from the free gingival margin and papillae. Oral hygiene was rated by the presence/absence of dental biofilm after examining the buccal and lingual surfaces of the teeth. Statistical analysis was based on the non-parametric Pearson correlation, frequency analysis and linear regression method for determining the functional interrelationships between variables. Results and discussion. In children with cleft lip and palate, the highest incidence of caries occurs on the upper deciduous central incisors and first molars. Carious lesions of the central and lateral incisors tend to increase and decrease in frequency symmetrically and have a strong causal relationship. In 80.6% of cases, the decay of central incisors causes caries on the lateral incisors. Mean number of teeth affected by caries in temporary dentition at ages between 4-6 years is 7.27. The average ratio of dmft is 8.6136, a quite higher value, compared with the normal values registered in normal children, evidencing a faster and more rapid development of dental caries. Poor oral hygiene is associated with cleft and number of caries. It seems that the parents of children with cleft lip and palate have difficulties in implementing an effective brushing technique, given

  13. CIRPLAST: Cleft Lip and Palate Missions in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Carlos E

    2015-06-01

    The author presents a 20-year experience leading cleft lip and palate surgical volunteer missions in Peru for CIRPLAST, a nonprofit volunteer plastic surgery goodwill program that has provided free surgery for patients with cleft lip and palate deformities in remote areas of Peru. Surgical procedures were performed by the author, together with a group of experienced plastic surgeons, under the auspices of the Peruvian Plastic Surgery Society, and local health authorities. CIRPLAST missions are scheduled annually in different locations around Peru. Selected patients for surgery after adequate screening are photographed, and their cleft deformity is recorded. Scheduled patients or their parents, when they are minors, sign an informed consent form. Patients operated on in any given day are examined and photographed 1 day after surgery, before discharge. Between 30 and 35 patients are operated on at each mission site. About 2 weeks after the mission, patients are checked and photographed, and the outcome of surgery is recorded. Complications that may occur are recorded and treated by the CIRPLAST team as soon as possible. Almost all operations are performed under general endotracheal anesthesia coupled by local anesthesia containing a vasoconstrictor, to reduce bleeding and facilitate tissue dissection. All wounds of the lip and palate are closed with absorbable sutures, to avoid the need for suture removal. After cleft lip surgery, patients go to the recovery room for monitoring by nurses until they recover completely. A total of 6108 cleft lip and palate repairs, primary and secondary, were performed by CIRPLAST in 141 missions, between May 12, 1994, and October 15, 2014. The medical records of the 5162 patients (84.5%) who returned for follow-up (ranging from 12 days to 9 years) were reviewed retrospectively. Between 45% and 70% of the patients operated on a mission have returned for early follow-up and some the following year. There were 3176 males (51.9%) and 2932

  14. Orthognathic surgery in cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John H; Nish, Iain; Daskalogiannakis, John

    2012-03-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Identify the skeletal changes in the cleft patient that necessitate surgery. 2. Describe the orthodontic principles that precede surgical treatment. 3. Demonstrate the surgical principles involved in cleft orthognathic surgery and how to avoid common pitfalls particular to cleft orthognathic surgery. 4. Anticipate when dentoalveolar distraction can help in the treatment of problems not easily treated with conventional orthognathic techniques. This CME article covers the basic multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of patients requiring a combined orthodontic orthognathic approach to their skeletally based malocclusion. The dentoskeletal abnormalities are described for these patients, as are the fundamental orthodontic principles in the presurgical treatment of these patients. The basic surgical principles are discussed in general, and the reader is provided with advice on avoiding common pitfalls. Specific attention is given to the more recent advances in dentoalveolar distraction in cases of large defects that would have been difficult to treat using conventional orthognathic surgery. Videos are provided to illustrate the general principles in treating the cleft orthognathic patient and to illustrate the treatment of large defects using dentoalveolar distraction.

  15. Simulating clefts in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Frank; Brakke, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The geometry of a large axisymmetric balloon with positive differential pressure, such as a sphere, leads to very high film stresses. These stresses can be significantly reduced by using a tendon re-enforced lobed pumpkin-like shape. A number of schemes have been proposed to achieve a cyclically symmetric pumpkin shape, including the constant bulge angle (CBA) design, the constant bulge radius (CBR) design, CBA/CBR hybrids, and NASA’s recent constant stress (CS) design. Utilizing a hybrid CBA/CBR pumpkin design, Flight 555-NT in June 2006 formed an S-cleft and was unable to fully deploy. In order to better understand the S-cleft phenomenon, a series of inflation tests involving four 27-m diameter 200-gore pumpkin balloons were conducted in 2007. One of the test vehicles was a 1/3-scale mockup of the Flight 555-NT balloon. Using an inflation procedure intended to mimic ascent, the 1/3-scale mockup developed an S-cleft feature strikingly similar to the one observed in Flight 555-NT. Our analysis of the 1/3-scale mockup found it to be unstable. We compute asymmetric equilibrium configurations of this balloon, including shapes with an S-cleft feature.

  16. Esthetic Composition of Smile in Individuals with Cleft Lip, Alveolus, and Palate: Visibility of the Periodontium and the Esthetics of Smile

    OpenAIRE

    Esper, Luis Augusto; Sbrana, Michyele Cristhiane; Cunha, Mércia Jussara da Silva; Moreira, Guilherme Santos; de Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate characteristics of smile related to visibility in individuals with cleft lip, alveolus, and palate. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. HRAC/USP, Brazil. Patients. Individuals with repaired complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (n = 45), aged 15–30 years. Interventions. Frontal facial photographs were obtained in natural and forced smiles (n = 135). Six specialists in periodontics evaluated the photographs as to the smile line, thickness, and curve of the upper lip. Ma...

  17. Alternatives to Autologous Bone Graft in Alveolar Cleft Reconstruction: The State of Alveolar Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fan; Leland, Hyuma; Jedrzejewski, Breanna; Auslander, Allyn; Maniskas, Seija; Swanson, Jordan; Urata, Mark; Hammoudeh, Jeffrey; Magee, William

    2018-05-01

    Alveolar cleft reconstruction has historically relied on autologous iliac crest bone grafting (ICBG), but donor site morbidity, pain, and prolonged hospitalization have prompted the search for bone graft substitutes. The authors evaluated bone graft substitutes with the highest levels of evidence, and highlight the products that show promise in alveolar cleft repair and in maxillary augmentation. This comprehensive review guides the craniofacial surgeon toward safe and informed utilization of biomaterials in the alveolar cleft.A literature search was performed to identify in vitro human studies that fulfilled the following criteria: Level I or Level II of evidence, ≥30 subjects, and a direct comparison between a autologous bone graft and a bone graft substitute. A second literature search was performed that captured all studies, regardless of level of evidence, which evaluated bone graft substitutes for alveolar cleft repair or alveolar augmentation for dental implants. Adverse events for each of these products were tabulated as well.Sixteen studies featuring 6 bone graft substitutes: hydroxyapatite, demineralized bone matrix (DBM), β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP), calcium phosphate, recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), and rhBMP7 fit the inclusion criteria for the first search. Through our second search, the authors found that DBM, TCP, rhBMP-2, and rhBMP7 have been studied most extensively in the alveolar cleft literature, though frequently in studies using less rigorous methodology (Level III evidence or below). rhBMP-2 was the best studied and showed comparable efficacy to ICBG in terms of volume of bone regeneration, bone density, and capacity to accommodate tooth eruption within the graft site. Pricing for products ranged from $290 to $3110 per 5 mL.The balance between innovation and safety is a complex process requiring constant vigilance and evaluation. Here, the authors profile several bone graft substitutes that demonstrate the most

  18. Cleft Lip and Palate in CHARGE Syndrome: Phenotypic Features That Influence Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Kathryn V; Ganske, Ingrid M; Rottgers, Stephen A; Lim, So Young; Mulliken, John B

    2018-03-01

    Infants with syndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P) often require more complex care than their nonsyndromic counterparts. Our purpose was to (1) determine the prevalence of CL/P in patients with CHARGE syndrome and (2) highlight factors that affect management in this subset of children. This is a retrospective review from 1998 to 2016. Patients with CHARGE syndrome were diagnosed clinically and genetically. Prevalence of CL/P was determined and clinical details tabulated: phenotypic anomalies, cleft types, operative treatment, and results of repair. CHARGE syndrome was confirmed in 44 patients: 11 (25%) had cleft lip and palate and 1 had cleft palate only. Surgical treatment followed our usual protocols. Two patients with cardiac anomalies had prolonged recovery following surgical correction, necessitating palatal closure prior to nasolabial repair. One of these patients was too old for dentofacial orthopedics and underwent combined premaxillary setback and palatoplasty, prior to labial closure. Velopharyngeal insufficiency was frequent (n = 3/7). All patients had feeding difficulty and required a gastrostomy tube. All patients had neurosensory hearing loss; anomalies of the semicircular canals were frequent (n = 3/4). External auricular anomalies, colobomas, and cardiovascular anomalies were also common (n = 8/11). Other associated anomalies were choanal atresia (n = 4/11) and tracheoesophageal fistula (n = 2/11). CHARGE syndrome is an under-recognized genetic cause of cleft lip and palate. Hearing loss and speech and feeding difficulties often occur in these infants. Diagnosis can be delayed if the child presents with covert phenotypic features, such as chorioretinal colobomas, semicircular canal hypoplasia, and unilateral choanal atresia.

  19. An Analysis of Deformities in Revision Surgeries for Secondary Unilateral Cleft Lip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheema, S. A.; Asim, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the secondary cleft lip deformities and the possible causes in a cohort of cases. Study Design: A case series. Place and Duration of Study: Services Institute of Medical Sciences and WAPDA Teaching Hospital Complex, Lahore, from September 2008 to March 2012. Methodology: Consecutive cases of secondary unilateral cleft lip deformities were selected for the study. These cases were interviewed and deformities recorded. Pre and postoperative photographs were taken for comparison. Per operative photographs were taken, after marking of the incisions, to keep a record of the intervention needed to correct the deformities. These cases were then further analyzed to know the deformities and interventions needed for correction of these deformities. Results: Study subjects comprised 114 males and 75 females. Secondary correction was the most common in second decade of life with 82 cases in this group. The most common deformity was unfavorable scar in 150 cases followed by notch at the vermilion border in 124 cases. Short lip was found in 119 cases. Complete revision of the repair was required in 158 cases and 25 cases required partial redo of the initial repair. In other 6 cases, only scar revision was carried out. Conclusion: Unfavorable scar followed by vermilion notch and short lip were the most common secondary cleft lip deformities. Better technique helps favorable scar. Vermilion notch and short lip can be overcome by switching from rotation advancement repair to the triangular flap repair of Noordhoff. (author)

  20. Clinical Study of Second Branchial Cleft Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2018-03-30

    The objective of this study was to review the clinical characteristics and surgical treatment outcomes of second branchial cleft anomalies, and to evaluate the usefulness and accuracy of preoperative fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in the diagnosis of branchial cleft cysts. A retrospective chart review was performed at Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital from January 2010 to December 2016. Among 25 patients with second branchial cleft anomalies, in 23 patients (92.0%), these anomalies presented as cysts, and in the remaining 2 patients (8.0%), these anomalies presented as fistulas. Fine-needle aspiration cytology had a diagnostic sensitivity of 100%, a positive-predictive value of 100%, and accuracy of 100% for diagnosing second branchial cleft cyst. All patients of second branchial cleft anomalies were treated surgically under general anesthesia. No recurrence of second branchial cleft anomalies was observed. Branchial cleft cysts were the most common type of second branchial cleft anomalies. Preoperative FNAC is a useful and accurate method for preoperative evaluation of branchial cleft cysts. Surgical excision of second branchial cleft anomalies is the treatment of choice without any complications and with no recurrence.

  1. Australian children with cleft palate achieve age-appropriate speech by 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Antonia; Parkin, Melissa; Broome, Kate; Purcell, Alison

    2017-12-01

    Children with cleft palate demonstrate atypical speech sound development, which can influence their intelligibility, literacy and learning. There is limited documentation regarding how speech sound errors change over time in cleft palate speech and the effect that these errors have upon mono-versus polysyllabic word production. The objective of this study was to examine the phonetic and phonological speech skills of children with cleft palate at ages 3 and 5. A cross-sectional observational design was used. Eligible participants were aged 3 or 5 years with a repaired cleft palate. The Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology (DEAP) Articulation subtest and a non-standardised list of mono- and polysyllabic words were administered once for each child. The Profile of Phonology (PROPH) was used to analyse each child's speech. N = 51 children with cleft palate participated in the study. Three-year-old children with cleft palate produced significantly more speech errors than their typically-developing peers, but no difference was apparent at 5 years. The 5-year-olds demonstrated greater phonetic and phonological accuracy than the 3-year-old children. Polysyllabic words were more affected by errors than monosyllables in the 3-year-old group only. Children with cleft palate are prone to phonetic and phonological speech errors in their preschool years. Most of these speech errors approximate typically-developing children by 5 years. At 3 years, word shape has an influence upon phonological speech accuracy. Speech pathology intervention is indicated to support the intelligibility of these children from their earliest stages of development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Addressing the challenges of cleft lip and palate research in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mossey Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Indian sub-continent remains one of the most populous areas of the world with an estimated population of 1.1 billion in India alone. This yields an estimated 24.5 million births per year and the birth prevalence of clefts is somewhere between 27,000 and 33,000 clefts per year. Inequalities exist, both in access to and quality of cleft care with distinct differences in urban versus rural access and over the years the accumulation of unrepaired clefts of the lip and palate make this a significant health care problem in India. In recent years the situation has been significantly improved through the intervention of Non Governmental Organisations such as SmileTrain and Transforming Faces Worldwide participating in primary surgical repair programmes. The cause of clefts is multi factorial with both genetic and environmental input and intensive research efforts have yielded significant advances in recent years facilitated by molecular technologies in the genetic field. India has tremendous potential to contribute by virtue of improving research expertise and a population that has genetic, cultural and socio-economic diversity. In 2008, the World Health Organisation (WHO has recognised that non-communicable diseases, including birth defects cause significant infant mortality and childhood morbidity and have included cleft lip and palate in their Global Burden of Disease (GBD initiative. This will fuel the interest of India in birth defects registration and international efforts aimed at improving quality of care and ultimately prevention of non-syndromic clefts of the lip and palate.

  3. Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Spotlight Fundraising Ideas Vehicle Donation Volunteer Efforts Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and ... submenu What We Do Cleft & Craniofacial Educational Materials Dental Care for a Child with Cleft Lip and ...

  4. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here What treatment is available for adults with cleft lip and palate? Treatments currently available to infants and children with cleft lip and palate are also available to adults with clefts. Although ...

  5. The Association study of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2016-11-25

    Nov 25, 2016 ... These authors contributed equally to this work. .... individuals without a family history of orofacial clefts or other major congenital defects. ..... Wehby G. L., Cassell C. H. 2010 The impact of orofacial clefts on quality of life and.

  6. Language Parameters of 4- to 7-Year-Old Persian-Speaking Children with Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayoumi Anaraki, Zahra; Faham, Maryam; Derakhshandeh, Fatemeh; Hashemi Hosseinabad, Hedieh; Haresabadi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    There are several risk factors including hearing difficulties, lack of language stimulation, and parents' low level of expectation leading to language disorders in children with cleft palate. Therefore, formal language assessments of children with cleft palate are of great importance in order to prevent further disabilities. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate language parameters in 4- to 7-year old Persian-speaking children with cleft palate. 16 children with unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate aged between 4 and 7 years participated in the experiment. The Test of Language Development-Primary, third edition (TOLD-P3) was performed to evaluate the language parameters. The results were scored according to the test manual and compared to normative data published with the TOLD-P3. t test analysis showed a significant difference between language parameters in children with cleft lip and palate and the normative data (p language performance. The findings emphasize that speech-language pathologists should also concentrate on early language assessment and treatment for children with cleft lip and palate. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Maxillary Arch Dimensions and Spectral Characteristics of Children with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Produce Middorsum Palatal Stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, David J.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Shah, Sonam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine maxillary arch dimensions of children with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP) who produced middorsum palatal stops and (b) to describe some spectral characteristics of middorsum palatal stops. Method: Maxillary arch width, length, and height dimensions and first spectral moments of…

  8. Bilateral Giant Retinal Tear and Sequential Vitrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Mushawiahti; Roufail Franzco, Edward

    2017-01-01

    To describe the excellent outcome of surgery for bilateral giant retinal tears (GRTs) with better options of endotamponade. This is a case report of a 62-year-old man who presented with bilateral GRTs and associated retinal detachment. The tear in the right eye was supero-temporal and silicone oil was used as an endotamponade. The tear in the left eye was infero-temporal and perfluorocarbon liquid was used as an endotamponade. The outcome at 6 months after surgery was excellent with visual acuities of 6/6 in both eyes. Improved availability of endotamponade agents allows repair of bilateral GRTs to be done at the same time, with good surgical outcomes.

  9. Maternal Risk Factors Associated with Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Barrera, Catalina; Mezarobba, Naiara

    2016-01-01

    Disruptions in the development of the nasal and oral structures lead to cleft palate and cleft lip. There are many different factors that can affect this development such as genetic, mechanical traumas or teratogeny. The oral clefts are one of the most common birth defects worldwide affecting approximately 1 in 700 to 1000 children. The development of oral clefts is multifactorial and affect a significant portion of the population. The study results showed that smoking is the risk factor most...

  10. FOXE1 Association with both Isolated Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate; and Isolated Cleft Palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreno, Lina M; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Bullard, Steve A

    2009-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are a common complex birth defect caused by genetic and environmental factors and/or their interactions. A previous genome-wide linkage scan discovered a novel locus for cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) at 9q22-q33. To identify the etiologic gene, we......) and rs4460498 (p=6.51E-12) were located inside a 70Kb high LD block containing FOXE1. Association signals for Caucasians and Asians clustered 5' and 3' of FOXE1, respectively. Isolated cleft palate (CP) was also associated indicating that FOXE1 plays a role in two phenotypes thought to be genetically...

  11. Maxillary Anterior Segmental Distraction Osteogenesis to Correct Maxillary Deficiencies in a Patient With Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama-Iwata, Asuka; Haraguchi, Seiji; Iida, Seiji; Aikawa, Tomonao; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    This report describes a case of successful orthodontic treatment using maxillary anterior segmental distraction osteogenesis with an internal maxillary distractor and bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy in a girl with cleft lip and palate. A 16-year-old girl with unilateral cleft lip and palate exhibited midface retrusion because of growth inhibition of the maxillary complex and mandibular excess. After the presurgical orthodontic treatment, 6.0-mm advancement of the maxillary anterior segment and 4.0-mm set back of the mandible were performed. After a retention period, the patient's midface convexity was greatly improved and the velopharyngeal competence was preserved without relapse.

  12. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  13. Fetal genetic risk of isolated cleft lip only versus isolated cleft lip and palate: A subphenotype analysis using two population-based studies of orofacial clefts in scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Shi, Min; Gjessing, Håkon Kristian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cleft lip only (CLO) and cleft lip and palate (CLP) are commonly regarded as variants of the same defect and are traditionally combined to form the single group of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) prior to analysis. However, recent data have suggested that at least a subg...

  14. Laparoscopic Repair of Inguinal Hernias

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Jonathan; Duh, Quan-Yang

    2011-01-01

    For patients with recurrent inguinal hernia, or bilateral inguinal hernia, or for women, laparoscopic repair offers significant advantages over open techniques with regard to recurrence risk, pain, and recovery. For unilateral first-time hernias, either laparoscopic or open repair with mesh can offer excellent results. The major drawback of laparoscopy is that the technique requires a significant number of cases to master. For surgeons in group practice, it makes sense to have one surgeon in ...

  15. Face facts: Genes, environment, and clefts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.C. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City IA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate provides an ideal, albeit complex, model for the study of human developmental anomalies. Clefting disorders show a mix of well-defined syndromic causes (many with single-gene or environmental etiologies) coupled with their more common presentation in the nonsyndromic form. This summary presents some insight into the genetic causes of, etiology of and animal models for cleft lip and/or palate. 79 refs.

  16. Invasive cervical resorption and the oro-facial cleft patient: a review and case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, A; McNamara, C; Ireland, A; Sandy, J; Puryer, J

    2017-05-12

    Introduction Invasive cervical resorption (ICR) has an unknown aetiology, yet it exhibits very aggressive behaviour compared with typical external root resorption, posing a high risk of tooth loss.Aim To investigate the number of patients at the Dublin Cleft Prosthodontic Department with an oro-facial cleft who experienced ICR and to identify any possible aetiological factors.Materials and method A retrospective investigation of all oro-facial cleft patients treated at the Dublin Cleft Prosthodontic Department, St James's Hospital, Dublin. All patients' clinical and radiological records were reviewed. Patients where tooth loss became inevitable due to Class 4 ICR were analysed.Results From 588 oro-facial cleft patients, 14 (2.38%) patients with ICR were identified. Of these eight (57%) were female and six (43%) were male. Mean age at diagnosis was 28 years (range = 16-49 years). Cleft type: six (42.1%) unilateral cleft lip and palate, eight (57.9%) bilateral cleft lip and palate. Seventeen ICR affected teeth in total, with eleven (65%) maxillary central incisors, two (12%) maxillary lateral incisors, four (23%) maxillary canines, and one (7%) central, lateral and canine affected. Some, (N = 10, 71.4%) presented with ICR resulting in immediate tooth loss. Other patients (N = 4, 28.6%) developed ICR during or following prosthodontic treatment at the Cleft Centre. Tooth loss for this cohort, though not immediate, was inevitable. All had undergone fixed orthodontic appliance treatment and twelve had received dento-alveolar bone grafts. A number (N = 7, 50%) had undergone osteotomy, two (14%) had received night guard vital dental whitening and one had a history of trauma.Conclusions ICR, given its aggressive nature and ill-understood aetiology, poses significant treatment challenges. The most severe form of ICR (Class 4) leads inevitably to tooth loss. The slow-moderate progression of ICR may explain the late presentation found in this study, reinforcing the importance

  17. Bilateral herpes zoster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh K

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of bilateral herpes zoster of lumbosacral region is reported in association with diabetes mellitus in a 55 years old female. The case is of interest due to bilateral distribution which is rare and sacral region involvement which is quite uncommon.

  18. Bilateral herpes zoster

    OpenAIRE

    Singh K; Bajaj A; Dwivedi N; Merchery A

    1993-01-01

    A case of bilateral herpes zoster of lumbosacral region is reported in association with diabetes mellitus in a 55 years old female. The case is of interest due to bilateral distribution which is rare and sacral region involvement which is quite uncommon.

  19. Laryngo-tracheo-oesophageal clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leboulanger Nicolas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft (LC is a congenital malformation characterized by an abnormal, posterior, sagittal communication between the larynx and the pharynx, possibly extending downward between the trachea and the esophagus. The estimated annual incidence of LC is 1/10,000 to 1/20,000 live births, accounting for 0.2% to 1.5% of congenital malformations of the larynx. These incidence rates may however be underestimated due to difficulty in diagnosing minor forms and a high mortality rate in severe forms. A slightly higher incidence has been reported in boys than in girls. No specific geographic distribution has been found. Depending on the severity of the malformation, patients may present with stridor, hoarse cry, swallowing difficulties, aspirations, cough, dyspnea and cyanosis through to early respiratory distress. Five types of laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft have been described based on the downward extension of the cleft, which typically correlates with the severity of symptoms: Type 0 laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft to Type 4 laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft. LC is often associated with other congenital abnormalities/anomalies (16% to 68%, mainly involving the gastro-intestinal tract, which include laryngomalacia, tracheo-bronchial dyskinesia, tracheo-bronchomalacia (mostly in types 3 and 4, and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD. The syndromes most frequently associated with an LC are Opitz/BBB syndrome, Pallister Hall syndrome, VACTERL/VATER association, and CHARGE syndrome. Laryngeal clefts result from failure of fusion of the posterior cricoid lamina and abnormal development of the tracheo-esophageal septum. The causes of the embryological developmental anomalies leading to LC are not known but are thought to be multifactorial. LC appears to be mostly sporadic although some familial cases with suspected autosomal dominant transmission have been reported. The age of diagnosis depends mainly on the severity of

  20. Laryngo-tracheo-oesophageal clefts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft (LC) is a congenital malformation characterized by an abnormal, posterior, sagittal communication between the larynx and the pharynx, possibly extending downward between the trachea and the esophagus. The estimated annual incidence of LC is 1/10,000 to 1/20,000 live births, accounting for 0.2% to 1.5% of congenital malformations of the larynx. These incidence rates may however be underestimated due to difficulty in diagnosing minor forms and a high mortality rate in severe forms. A slightly higher incidence has been reported in boys than in girls. No specific geographic distribution has been found. Depending on the severity of the malformation, patients may present with stridor, hoarse cry, swallowing difficulties, aspirations, cough, dyspnea and cyanosis through to early respiratory distress. Five types of laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft have been described based on the downward extension of the cleft, which typically correlates with the severity of symptoms: Type 0 laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft to Type 4 laryngo-tracheo-esophageal cleft. LC is often associated with other congenital abnormalities/anomalies (16% to 68%), mainly involving the gastro-intestinal tract, which include laryngomalacia, tracheo-bronchial dyskinesia, tracheo-bronchomalacia (mostly in types 3 and 4), and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The syndromes most frequently associated with an LC are Opitz/BBB syndrome, Pallister Hall syndrome, VACTERL/VATER association, and CHARGE syndrome. Laryngeal clefts result from failure of fusion of the posterior cricoid lamina and abnormal development of the tracheo-esophageal septum. The causes of the embryological developmental anomalies leading to LC are not known but are thought to be multifactorial. LC appears to be mostly sporadic although some familial cases with suspected autosomal dominant transmission have been reported. The age of diagnosis depends mainly on the severity of the clinical symptoms and

  1. Management of Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia with Anterior Maxillary Distraction: Our Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Chacko, Tojan; Vinod, Sankar; Mani, Varghese; George, Arun; Sivaprasad, K. K.

    2013-01-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a common developmental problem in cleft lip and palate deformities. Since 1970s these deformities have traditionally been corrected by means of orthognathic surgery. Management of skeletal deformities in the maxillofacial region has been an important challenge for maxillofacial surgeons and orthodontists. Distraction osteogenesis is a surgical technique that uses body’s own repairing mechanisms for optimal reconstruction of the tissues. We present four cases of anterio...

  2. Large Sphenoethmoidal Encephalocele Associated with Agenesis of Corpus Callosum and Cleft Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basir Hashemi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBasal encephalocele is a rare craniofacial anomaly. In the presentpaper we report a 10-year-old boy presented with cleftpalate, congenital nystagmus, and hypertelorism. During preoperativeevaluation for cleft palate repair, a pulsatile masswas detected in the pharynx. Magnetic resonance imagingshowed sphenoethmoidal type of basal encephalocele andagenesis of corpus callosum. Neurosurgical consultation wasperformed for further evaluation and management.Iran J Med Sci 2010; 35(2: 154-156.

  3. Bilateral Morgagni Hernia: A Unique Presentation of a Rare Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Leshen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morgagni hernia is an unusual congenital herniation of abdominal content through the triangular parasternal gaps of the anterior diaphragm. They are commonly asymptomatic and right-sided. We present a case of a bilateral Morgagni hernia resulting in delayed growth in a 10-month-old boy. The presentation was unique due to its bilateral nature and its symptomatic compression of the mediastinum. Diagnosis was made by 3D reconstructed CT angiogram. The patient underwent medical optimization until he was safely able to tolerate laparoscopic surgical repair of his hernia. Upon laparoscopy, the CT findings were confirmed and the hernia was repaired.

  4. Short mandible - a possible risk factor for cleft palate with/without a cleft lip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Darvann, Tron Andre; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objectives To estimate the influence of a short mandible on the risk of developing a cleft palate with/without a cleft lip (CP). Setting and sample population The retrospective sample consisted of 115 2-month-old Danish infants with CP, and 70 control infants with unilateral...... the risk of having a cleft palate. Results The mean mandibular length in the group with CP was about 4mm shorter than in the control group. Odds ratio (OR) was calculated to be 0.58 (95% confidence interval 0.48-0.68), implying that an individual's risk of cleft palate with/without a cleft lip increases...... about 50% per mm decrease in mandibular length. Conclusions A special facial type including a short mandible is a possible risk factor for cleft palate, and it was found that the risk of cleft palate increases 58% per mm decreases in mandibular length....

  5. [Bilateral cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, J

    2017-07-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) are standard for the hearing rehabilitation of severe to profound deafness. Nowadays, if bilaterally indicated, bilateral implantation is usually recommended (in accordance with German guidelines). Bilateral implantation enables better speech discrimination in quiet and in noise, and restores directional and spatial hearing. Children with bilateral CI are able to undergo hearing-based hearing and speech development. Within the scope of their individual possibilities, bilaterally implanted children develop faster than children with unilateral CI and attain, e.g., a larger vocabulary within a certain time interval. Only bilateral implantation allows "binaural hearing," with all the benefits that people with normal hearing profit from, namely: better speech discrimination in quiet and in noise, as well as directional and spatial hearing. Naturally, the developments take time. Binaural CI users benefit from the same effects as normal hearing persons: head shadow effect, squelch effect, and summation and redundancy effects. Sequential CI fitting is not necessarily disadvantageous-both simultaneously and sequentially fitted patients benefit in a similar way. For children, earliest possible fitting and shortest possible interval between the two surgeries seems to positively influence the outcome if bilateral CI are indicated.

  6. Pregnancy following bilateral salpingectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oturai, Annette Bang

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a rare case of spontaneous pregnancy following bilateral salpingectomy. A woman with a history of bilateral salpingectomy was admitted to hospital because of abdominal pain and positive urine HCG. Surprisingly, ultrasound confirmed a live intrauterine fetus. The pregnancy...... was unwanted, and the woman decided to terminate the pregnancy. She was offered diagnostic examination to localise a potential fistula, but she declined. In a MEDLINE search of English literature this is only the second case of spontaneous pregnancy following bilateral salpingectomy Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4/21...

  7. Risk of Oral Clefts in Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Dorthe; Bille, Camilla; Petersen, Inge

    2011-01-01

    and heritability. Twins (207 affected/130,710) and singletons (7766 affected/4,798,526) born from 1936 through 2004 in Denmark were ascertained by linkage among the Danish Facial Cleft Database, the Danish Twin Registry, and the Civil Registration System. We computed oral cleft prevalence and prevalence proportion...

  8. Maternal occupational risk factors for oral clefts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorente, C; Cordier, S; Bergeret, A; De Walle, HEK; Goujard, J; Ayme, S; Knill-Jones, R; Calzolari, E

    Objectives This study investigated the role of maternal exposures at work during pregnancy in the occurrence of oral clefts. Methods The occupational exposures of 851 women (100 mothers of babies with oral clefts and 751 mothers of healthy referents) who worked during the first trimester of

  9. An undescribed first branchial cleft anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockey, Jason Gabriel; John, D Gareth; Herbetko, John

    2003-06-01

    A variant of a type 2 first branchial cleft anomaly, in which accessory ossicles were found, is described. There follows a discussion of the classification of first branchial cleft abnormalities and how this particular case falls outside the standard classification. CT scanning is mentioned as the investigation that is most useful for defining these abnormalities.

  10. Dating brittle tectonic movements with cleft monazite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Gnos, E.; Janots, E.

    2013-01-01

    stress axis, which is characteristic for strike slip deformation. The inferred stress situation is consistent with observed kinematics and the opening of such clefts. Therefore, the investigated monazite-bearing cleft formed at the end of D2 and/or D3, and dextral movements along NNW dipping planes...

  11. Comparison of Hyoid Bone Position Among Cleft Lip Palate and Normal Subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahaj, A.; Erum, G.; Ahmed, I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the hyoid bone position between cleft lip/palate and normal patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences (DIEKIOHS), Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), Karachi, from March 2012 to February 2013. Methodology: The sample for this study consisted of total 68 subjects among which Group 1 consisted of 34 nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate (both unilateral and bilateral) and Group 2 included 34 subjects with normal facial morphology. Both groups included males and females with mean age 14.3 +- 0.1 year. Analysis was done on lateral cephalometric radiographs of patients including angulations taken as Hp-Mp, Hp-Ol, Hp-Sn, Cvt-Evt, Opt-Cvt, Nke, Sn-Vert, Cvt-Vert, Sn-Vert and linear distance of hyoid bone measured as C3-H, C3-RGN, and H-RGN. Results: Statistically significant differences (p < 0.001) in C3-H, C3-Rgn, H-Rgn, and Sn-Cvt were found between cleft lip/palate group and normal group. Conclusion: Hyoid bone is located anteriorly and caudally in cleft lip and palate group. (author)

  12. The financial impact of unrepaired cleft lip and palate in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntz, Harlan R; Meier, Jeremy D

    2013-12-01

    There are over 96 million people in the Philippines. Close to 77 thousand persons in this country have orofacial clefting. We estimate nearly 64 thousand are unrepaired. Unemployment and underemployment because of the communication disorders associated with unrepaired clefts will affect family income and hence tax revenues. The purpose of this study is to understand the financial impact of unrepaired cleft lip and/or palate on families and identify how that would translate to the Philippine government in tax revenues. The incidence of orofacial cleft in the Philippines was estimated to be at least 1 in 750 people, with only 16% anticipated to be repaired under current conditions. Assuming a 21% unemployment rate in subjects with untreated clefts, and a tax rate of 6-12.4%, projected lost personal income and federal tax revenue was calculated. In 2012 alone the financial impact on the families may be as much as $US 73-88 million in lost revenue from unemployment and underemployment. This would cost the government between $8.0 and $9.8 million dollars in lost tax revenue. Over a 20 year period at least $US 1.7 billion dollars in family income would be affected costing the government at least $US 194 million in taxes. By appropriately caring for the cleft population tax revenues should increase substantially. The development of the infrastructure for surgical care of this problem would be costly but could be more than offset by revenues. Inattention to surgically correctable causes of communication disorders is not affordable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cleft lip and palate surgery in children: Anaesthetic considerations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Care of cleft patients is very challenging. Team cleft care is usually lacking in many developing countries due to shortage of qualified manpower. This study is aimed at highlighting anaesthetic challenges in the management of cleft in children. Patients and Methods: This was a study of cleft lip and palate ...

  14. X-linked genes and risk of orofacial clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Skare, Øivind; Lie, Rolv T

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are common birth defects of complex etiology, with an excess of males among babies with cleft lip and palate, and an excess of females among those with cleft palate only. Although genes on the X chromosome have been implicated in clefting, there has been no association analysis...

  15. Genome-wide meta-analyses of nonsyndromic orofacial clefts identify novel associations between FOXE1 and all orofacial clefts, and TP63 and cleft lip with or without cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Carlson, Jenna C.; Shaffer, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts (OFCs) are a heterogeneous group of common craniofacial birth defects with complex etiologies that include genetic and environmental risk factors. OFCs are commonly categorized as cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and cleft palate alone (CP), which have h...

  16. Dimensions of the cleft nasal airway in adults: a comparison with subjects without cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairfield, W M; Warren, D W

    1989-01-01

    The prevalence of mouthbreathing among individuals with cleft lip and palate is significantly higher than in the normal population. This has been attributed to nasal deformities that tend to reduce nasal airway size. The purpose of the present study was to determine how a heterogeneous adult group with cleft lip and palate differs in terms of nasal airway cross-sectional area from an adult group without cleft during the inspiratory and expiratory phases of breathing. The pressure-flow technique was used to estimate nasal airway size in 15 adults without cleft (15 years or older) and 37 adults with cleft lip, cleft palate, or both. Mean areas and standard deviations for subjects without cleft were 0.63 cm2 +/- 0.17 during inspiration and 0.56 cm2 +/- 0.14 during expiration. This difference is statistically significant (p less than 0.01). Mean areas and standard deviations for all subjects with cleft were 0.37 cm2 +/- 0.18 during inspiration and 0.40 cm2 +/- 0.20 during expiration. This difference is not statistically significant (p greater than 0.15). Twenty-two of the subjects with cleft had nasal areas considered to be impaired (below 0.40 cm2) as compared with only three of the subjects without cleft. A two factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that area changes during respiration are different for subjects with and without cleft (p less than 0.005), and that cleft nasal areas are smaller than noncleft areas for both phases of breathing (p less than 0.001). Inspiratory-expiratory differences between subjects with and without cleft are probably the result of developmental defects, reparative surgery or both.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  18. Characterization of subtle brain abnormalities in a mouse model of Hedgehog pathway antagonist-induced cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, Robert J; Holloway, Hunter T; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K; Ament, Jacob J; Pecevich, Stephen J; Cofer, Gary P; Budin, Francois; Everson, Joshua L; Johnson, G Allan; Sulik, Kathleen K

    2014-01-01

    Subtle behavioral and cognitive deficits have been documented in patient cohorts with orofacial clefts (OFCs). Recent neuroimaging studies argue that these traits are associated with structural brain abnormalities but have been limited to adolescent and adult populations where brain plasticity during infancy and childhood may be a confounding factor. Here, we employed high resolution magnetic resonance microscopy to examine primary brain morphology in a mouse model of OFCs. Transient in utero exposure to the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway antagonist cyclopamine resulted in a spectrum of facial dysmorphology, including unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate, cleft of the secondary palate only, and a non-cleft phenotype marked by midfacial hypoplasia. Relative to controls, cyclopamine-exposed fetuses exhibited volumetric differences in several brain regions, including hypoplasia of the pituitary gland and olfactory bulbs, hyperplasia of the forebrain septal region, and expansion of the third ventricle. However, in affected fetuses the corpus callosum was intact and normal division of the forebrain was observed. This argues that temporally-specific Hh signaling perturbation can result in typical appearing OFCs in the absence of holoprosencephaly--a condition classically associated with Hh pathway inhibition and frequently co-occurring with OFCs. Supporting the premise that some forms of OFCs co-occur with subtle brain malformations, these results provide a possible ontological basis for traits identified in clinical populations. They also argue in favor of future investigations into genetic and/or environmental modulation of the Hh pathway in the etiopathogenesis of orofacial clefting.

  19. Early secondary alveoloplasty in cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arangio, Paolo; Marianetti, Tito M; Tedaldi, Massimiliano; Ramieri, Valerio; Cascone, Piero

    2008-09-01

    The aims of this study were to present a personal surgical technique throughout the review of international literature concerning surgical techniques, objectives, and outcomes in early secondary alveoloplasty and to describe our personal surgical techniques in alveolar bone defect repair in cleft lip and palate.Throughout a literature analysis, it is now settled that early secondary alveoloplasty could reestablish the continuity of alveolar bone and prevent upper dental arch collapse after presurgical orthopedic upper maxilla expansion; it also might give a good bone support for teeth facing the cleft and allow the eruption of permanent elements with the bone graft and rebalance the symmetry of dental arch, improve facial aesthetic, guarantee an adequate amount of bone tissue for a further prosthetic reconstruction with implant, and finally close the eventual oronasal fistula.The surgical technique we are presenting permitted a total number of 35 early secondary alveoloplasty on which a long-term follow-up is still taking place.We can assess that early secondary alveoloplasty must be performed before permanent canine eruption. Iliac crest is the suggested donor site for bone grafting; orthopedic and orthodontic treatments must be performed in association with surgery, and if there is the dental element agenesia, an implantation treatment must be considered.

  20. Dental Caries Experience in Texan Children with Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderji, Sabrina; Acharya, Bhavini; Flaitz, Catherine; Chiquet, Brett

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the caries experience in the primary dentition of children born with cleft lip and palate (CLP). A retrospective chart review was conducted on subjects between two and six years old recruited from a university-based pediatric dentistry residency clinic. The number of dental visits and professional fluoride applications, the plaque index and treatment modality, and the presence/location of caries, white spot lesions, and enamel hypoplastic lesions were compared between CLP patients and healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Descriptive statistics, Student's t test, Mann-Whitney U test, and regression analysis were completed. A total of 183 charts were reviewed. Compared to healthy children, CLP children had increases in number of dental visits (P0.05). Children with cleft lip and palate are at a greater risk of enamel hypoplasia and dental caries. No significant caries experience difference was found between unilateral or bilateral CLP cases.

  1. Global oral health inequalities: challenges in the prevention and management of orofacial clefts and potential solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossey, P A; Shaw, W C; Munger, R G; Murray, J C; Murthy, J; Little, J

    2011-05-01

    The birth prevalence of orofacial clefts, one of the most common congenital anomalies, is approximately one in 700 live births, but varies with geography, ethnicity, and socio-economic status. There is a variation in infant mortality and access to care both between and within countries, so some clefts remain unrepaired into adulthood. Quality of care also varies, and even among repaired clefts there is residual deformity and morbidity that significantly affects some children. The two major issues in attempts to address these inequalities are (a) etiology/possibilities for prevention and (b) management and quality of care. For prevention, collaborative research efforts are required in developing countries, in line with the WHO approach to implement the recommendations of the 2008 Millennium Development Goals (www.un.org/millenniumgoals). This includes the "common risk factor" approach, which analyzes biological and social determinants of health alongside other chronic health problems such as diabetes and obesity, as outlined in the Marmot Health inequalities review (2008) (www.ucl.ac.uk/gheg/marmotreview). Simultaneously, orofacial cleft research should involve clinical researchers to identify inequalities in access to treatment and identify the best interventions for minimizing mortality and residual deformity. The future research agenda also requires engagement with implementation science to get research findings into practice.

  2. Respiratory Polysomnographic Findings in Patients Treated Primarily for Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, Davi Sandes; Faller, Gustavo Juliane; Collares, Marcus Vinícius Martins

    2018-02-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is the most common congenital craniofacial abnormality. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a highly prevalent but underdiagnosed disease and is frequently associated with craniofacial anomalies. There are few studies describing the sleep breathing pattern of children with CLP. This study sought to characterize the respiratory profile of 23 children with unilateral cleft lip and palate, aged 7-12 years, who had undergone cleft lip and nasal repair at age 3-4 months and palatoplasty at 12-15 months, with a particular focus on evaluating the presence of OSAS in children with CLP. Polysomnography was performed and findings were analyzed descriptively. We found a mean and median for apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) of 1.11/h (SD = 0.78) and 0.9/h, respectively. The mean obstructive apnea index (OAI) was 0.27/h (SD = 0.38) and the median, 0.1/h. Nearly 30% of patients had an AHI above 1.4 events/h. There was no significant oxyhemoglobin desaturation in the study group. In this group, the prevalence of OSAS was higher than in noncleft populations when compared to the normality values adopted. This sample of patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate exhibited an increased prevalence of OSAS during the mixed dentition stage. Although the results showed that OSAS was mild, we advise closer observation of these patients. Polysomnography is recommended for the assessment of children with airway abnormalities, to individualize the extent of treatment.

  3. Assessment of complete unilateral cleft lip and palate treatment outcome using EUROCRAN index and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Anas Imran; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2017-09-01

    Assessment of treatment outcome is the only non-invasive approach to identify the effects of cleft lip and palate repair and modify management accordingly. Here the aim is to assess the outcome of complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (CUCLP) patients using EUROCRAN index and to check whether there are any factors associated with the treatment outcome. It is a retrospective cross sectional study. Dental models were collected from archives of two cleft referral centers in Pakistan. Five blinded examiners scored 101 models twice at two week interval. The primary outcome was mean EUROCRAN scores based on dental arch relationships and palatal surface morphology. A mean(SD) score of 2.72 (0.76) and 2.20 (0.73) was determined based on dental arch relationships and palatal surface morphology, respectively. According to the final logistic regression model, modified Millard technique (cheiloplasty) and Veau-Wardill-Kilners' method (palatoplasty) had higher odds of producing unfavorable treatment outcome. Present study determined a fair and a fair to poor treatment outcome based on dental arch relationships and palatal surface morphology, respectively. Our study suggests a significant association between treatment outcome and primary surgical techniques for lip and palate. These findings could warrant a modification of management protocols to ensure improvement in future cleft outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Current status of presurgical infant orthopaedic treatment for cleft lip and palate patients: A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Priyanka Niranjane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate (CLP patients is a challenge for all the concerned members of the cleft team, and various treatment modalities have been attempted to obtain aesthetic results. Presurgical infant orthopaedics (PSIO was introduced to reshape alveolar and nasal segments prior to surgical repair of cleft lip. However, literature reports lot of controversy regarding the use of PSIO in patients with CLP. Evaluation of long-term results of PSIO can provide scientific evidence on the efficacy and usefulness of PSIO in CLP patients. The aim was to assess the scientific evidence on the efficiency of PSIO appliances in patients with CLP and to critically analyse the current status of PSIO. A PubMed search was performed using the terms PSIO, presurgical nasoalveolar moulding and its long-term results and related articles were selected for the review. The documented studies report no beneficial effect of PSIO on maxillary arch dimensions, facial aesthetics and in the subsequent development of dentition and occlusion in CLP patients. Nasal moulding seems to be more beneficial and effective in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with better long-term results.

  5. Evaluation of nasal cartilage using three-dimensional soft tissue images in patients with unilateral cleft lip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yoshimichi; Saijo, Hideto; Yonehara, Yoshiyuki; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Nakatuka, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    In the treatment of nasal deformities associated with cleft lip and palate, deformities of the alar cartilage and upper lateral cartilage are usually repaired. It is very useful if deformities of the nasal cartilage are evaluated preoperatively. We created three-dimensional CT images of soft tissues by the volume rendering method, the nasal cartilage. In 26 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate, the alar cartilage, upper lateral cartilage, and septal cartilage were evaluated morphologically. As a result, in each case, these cartilages were deviated and deformed. However, the size of both the alar cartilage and the upper lateral cartilage on the cleft side were approximately similar to those on the healthy side. It is suggested that using this method formulated for the imaging of cartilaginous morphology, preoperative planning and follow-up can be performed easily. (author)

  6. Implementing the Brazilian Database on Orofacial Clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lopes Monlleó

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. High-quality clinical and genetic descriptions are crucial to improve knowledge of orofacial clefts and support specific healthcare polices. The objective of this study is to discuss the potential and perspectives of the Brazilian Database on Orofacial Clefts. Methods. From 2008 to 2010, clinical and familial information on 370 subjects was collected by geneticists in eight different services. Data was centrally processed using an international system for case classification and coding. Results. Cleft lip with cleft palate amounted to 198 (53.5%, cleft palate to 99 (26.8%, and cleft lip to 73 (19.7% cases. Parental consanguinity was present in 5.7% and familial history of cleft was present in 26.3% subjects. Rate of associated major plus minor defects was 48% and syndromic cases amounted to 25% of the samples. Conclusions. Overall results corroborate the literature. Adopted tools are user friendly and could be incorporated into routine patient care. The BDOC exemplifies a network for clinical and genetic research. The data may be useful to develop and improve personalized treatment, family planning, and healthcare policies. This experience should be of interest for geneticists, laboratory-based researchers, and clinicians entrusted with OC worldwide.

  7. Calvarial periosteal graft for second-stage cleft palate surgery: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Cecilia; Dakpe, Stephanie; Gbaguidi, Cica; Testelin, Sylvie; Devauchelle, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of cleft palate surgery are to achieve optimal outcomes regarding speech development, hearing, maxillary arch development and facial skull growth. Early two-stage cleft palate repair has been the most recent protocol of choice to achieve good maxillary arch growth without compromising speech development. Hard palate closure occurs within one year of soft palate surgery. However, in some cases the residual hard palate cleft width is larger than 15 mm at the age of two. As previously reported, integrated speech development starts around that age and it is a challenge since we know that early mobilization of the mucoperiosteum interferes with normal facial growth on the long-term. In children with large residual hard palate clefts at the age 2, we report the use of calvarial periosteal grafts to close the cleft. With a retrospective 6-year study (2006-2012) we first analyzed the outcomes regarding impermeability of hard palate closure on 45 patients who at the age of two presented a residual cleft of the hard palate larger than 15 mm and benefited from a periosteal graft. We then studied the maxillary growth in these children. In order to compare long-term results, we included 14 patients (age range: 8-20) treated between 1994 & 2006. Two analyses were conducted, the first one on dental casts from birth to the age of 6 and the other one based on lateral cephalograms following Delaire's principles and TRIDIM software. After the systematic cephalometric analysis of 14 patients, we found no evidence of retrognathia or Class 3 dental malocclusion. In the population of 45 children who benefited from calvarial periosteal grafts the rate of palate fistula was 17% vs. 10% in the overall series. Despite major advances in understanding cleft defects, the issues of timing and choice of the surgical procedure remain widely debated. In second-stage surgery for hard palate closure, using a calvarial periosteal graft could be the solution for large residual clefts

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Yasushi; Tasaka, Yasuyuki; Honjo, Iwao; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    1987-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasopharynx and the eustachian tube was performed in five patients with cleft palate and compared with the results of those without this anomaly. Various degrees of deformity of the eustachian tube cartilage were found in cleft palate patients. The levator veli palatini muscles were situated more laterally in cleft palate patients than in normal subjects. Also, changes in the position of these muscles after palatoplasty were clearly depicted by MRI. Besides several autopsy reports, this is the first demonstration of the characteristic anomaly around the eustachian tube by a non-invasive method.

  9. Branchial cleft cyst encircling the hypoglossal nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kristin L.; Spears, Carol; Kenady, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Branchial cleft anomalies are a common cause of lateral neck masses and may present with infection, cyst enlargement or fistulas. They may affect any of the nearby neck structures, causing compressive symptoms or vessel thrombosis. We present a case of a branchial cleft cyst in a 10-year-old boy who had been present for 1year. At the time of operation, the cyst was found to completely envelop the hypoglossal nerve. While reports of hypoglossal nerve palsies due to external compression from cysts are known, we believe this to be the first report of direct nerve involvement by a branchial cleft cyst. PMID:24963902

  10. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Tranexamic Acid on the Surgical Field in Primary Cleft Palate Surgery on Children-A Prospective, Randomized Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durga, Padmaja; Raavula, Parvathi; Gurajala, Indira; Gunnam, Poojita; Veerabathula, Prardhana; Reddy, Mukund; Upputuri, Omkar; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2015-09-01

    To assess the effect of tranexamic acid on the quality of the surgical field. Prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Institutional, tertiary referral hospital. American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class I patients, aged 8 to 60 months with Group II or III (Balakrishnan's classification) clefts scheduled for cleft palate repair. Children were randomized into two groups. The control group received saline, and the tranexamic acid group received tranexamic acid 10 mg/kg as a bolus, 15 minutes before incision. Grade of surgical field on a 10-point scale, surgeon satisfaction, and primary hemorrhage. Significant improvements were noted in surgeon satisfaction and median grade of assessment of the surgical field (4 [interquartile range, 4 to 6] in the control group vs. 3 [interquartile range, 2 to 4] in the test group; P = .003) in the tranexamic acid group compared to the control group. Preincision administration of 10 mg/kg of tranexamic acid significantly improved the surgical field during cleft palate repair.

  11. Preoperative Cleft Lip Measurements and Maxillary Growth in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, Gregory S; Tompson, Bryan D; Fisher, David M

    2016-11-01

    Maxillary growth in patients with cleft lip and palate is highly variable. The authors' aim was to investigate associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and maxillary growth determined cephalometrically in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (cUCLP). Retrospective cross-sectional study. Children with cUCLP. Preoperative cleft lip measurements were made at the time of primary cheiloplasty and available for each patient. Maxillary growth was evaluated on lateral cephalometric radiographs taken prior to any orthodontic treatment and alveolar bone grafting (8.5 ± 0.7 years). The presence of associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and cephalometric measures of maxillary growth was determined using regression analyses. In the 58 patients included in the study, the cleft lateral lip element was deficient in height in 90% and in transverse width in 81% of patients. There was an inverse correlation between cleft lateral lip height and transverse width with a β coefficient of -0.382 (P = .003). Patients with a more deficient cleft lateral lip height displayed a shorter maxillary length (β coefficient = 0.336; P = .010), a less protruded maxilla (β coefficient = .334; P = .008), and a shorter anterior maxillary height (β coefficient = 0.306; P = .020) than those with a less deficient cleft lateral lip height. Patients with cUCLP present with varying degrees of lateral lip hypoplasia. Preoperative measures of lateral lip deficiency are related to later observed deficiencies of maxillary length, protrusion, and height.

  12. Prevalence of cleft lip and cleft palate in rural north-central guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Jorge; Lydick, Elaine A; Torres, Olga R; Owen, Karen K; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2015-05-01

    To estimate the number of new cases of cleft lip and cleft palate in the department (state) of Alta Verapaz, Guatemala, in 2012. Cross-sectional survey of midwives from communities identified through a two-stage cluster-sampling process. Midwives were asked how many babies they had delivered in the past year and how many of those newborns had various types of birth defects, as illustrated in pictures. Indigenous Mayan communities in rural north-central Guatemala. Midwives (n = 129) who had delivered babies in the previous year. Reports of babies born with cleft lip and cleft palate. A 1-year prevalence rate of 18.9 per 10,000 for cleft lip and 4.7 per 10,000 for cleft palate was estimated for Alta Verapaz. None of the cases of cleft lip also had cleft palate. The indigenous communities in north-central Guatemala might have a relatively high cleft lip prevalence rate compared with the global average.

  13. Longitudinal Comparison of the Speech and Language Performance of United States-Born and Internationally Adopted Toddlers with Cleft Lip and Palate: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Nancy J; Baker, Shauna; Kaiser, Ann; Frey, Jennifer R

    2018-01-01

    Objective This study compares the early speech and language development of children with cleft palate with or without cleft lip who were adopted internationally with children born in the United States. Design Prospective longitudinal description of early speech and language development between 18 and 36 months of age. Participants This study compares four children (age range = 19 to 38 months) with cleft palate with or without cleft lip who were adopted internationally with four children (age range = 19 to 38 months) with cleft palate with or without cleft lip who were born in the United States, matched for age, gender, and cleft type across three time points over 10 to 12 months. Main Outcome Measures Children's speech-language skills were analyzed using standardized tests, parent surveys, language samples, and single-word phonological assessments to determine differences between the groups. Results The mean scores for the children in the internationally adopted group were lower than the group born in the United States at all three time points for expressive language and speech sound production measures. Examination of matched pairs demonstrated observable differences for two of the four pairs. No differences were observed in cognitive performance and receptive language measures. Conclusions The results suggest a cumulative effect of later palate repair and/or a variety of health and environmental factors associated with their early circumstances that persist to age 3 years. Early intervention to address the trajectory of speech and language is warranted. Given the findings from this small pilot study, a larger study of the long-term speech and language development of children who are internationally adopted and have cleft palate with or without cleft lip is recommended.

  14. Risk of oral clefts in children born to mothers taking Topamax (topiramate)Risk of Oral Clefts (Cleft Lip and/or ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug Safety and Availability FDA Drug Safety Communication: Risk of oral clefts in children born to mothers ... data that show that there is an increased risk for the development of cleft lip and/or ...

  15. Nasolabial Growth in Individuals With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate: A Preliminary Study of Longitudinal Observation Using Three-Dimensional Stereophotogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazzawi, Omar; Morioka, Daichi; Miyabe, Mai; Tosa, Yasusoshi; Ohkubo, Fumio; Yoshimoto, Shinya

    2017-07-01

    There are limited numbers of studies comparing the preoperative and postoperative facial features of infants with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) using three-dimensional (3D) stereophotogrammetry. The authors attempted an anthropometric analysis of nasolabial asymmetry 1 year after primary lip repair using a handheld 3D imaging system. Five different nasolabial dimensions in 24 infants with UCLP were measured using 3D images captured during primary lip repair and again, 1 year after the repair. The nasal and upper-lip elements of the cleft side were significantly changed after primary lip repair, and nasolabial asymmetry was anthropometrically improved. This is a preliminary longitudinal observation of nasolabial growth in individuals with UCLP using 3D stereophotogrammetric technique. The authors would like to follow these children until adulthood, capturing 3D images at every intervention.

  16. Bilateral iatrogenic maxillary fractures after dental treatment in two aged horses

    OpenAIRE

    Widmer, A; Fürst, A; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, R; Makara, M; Geyer, H; Kummer, M

    2010-01-01

    This clinical report describes two horses with bilateral maxillary fractures following dental treatment. The fractures occurred during dental treatment by a veterinarian, and both had rostral, transverse, and complete bilateral maxillary fractures with instability and minimal displacement. The fractures were repaired using bilateral intraoral wiring with the patients under general anesthesia. The postoperative period was without complications and the fractures healed as expected. Maxillary fr...

  17. Staged bilateral carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Engell, Hans Christian

    1986-01-01

    In a series of 56 staged bilateral carotid endarterectomies, new neurologic symptoms developed in 5% and 20% following the first and second procedure, respectively. All complications were transient or minor. The incidence of postendarterectomy hypertension was significantly higher following...... the second procedure, when operations were staged less than 3 weeks apart. A correlation between these hypertensive episodes and the occurrence of new neurologic symptoms could not be shown. However, as this correlation has been proved in several other reports, bilateral carotid endarterectomy is advised...... to be staged at least 3 weeks apart. In addition, a conservative attitude towards contralateral asymptomatic lesions is proposed....

  18. Distraction osteogenesis and orthognathic surgery for a patient with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Il Hong; Lee, Sang Min; Yang, Byoung Eun; Park, In Young

    2015-03-01

    Maxillary deficiency is a common feature in patients with repaired cleft lip and palate. Orthognathic surgery has been the conventional approach for the management of cleft-related maxillary hypoplasia. However, for patients with a severe maxillary deficiency, orthognathic surgery alone has many disadvantages, such as high relapse rates of 25% to 40%, instability, limited amount of advancement, and a highly invasive surgical technique. As an alternative treatment method, distraction osteogenesis has been used successfully in the distraction of the mandible, the maxilla, the entire midface, and the orbits as well as the cranial bones, with stable outcomes. The type of distraction device, either external or internal, can be chosen based on the surgical goals set for the patient. In this study, we report on the use of a rigid external distraction device for maxillary advancement in a 22-year-old woman with a repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate and severe maxillary hypoplasia. After the distraction osteogenesis, 2-jaw surgery was performed to correct the maxillary yaw deviation and the mandibular prognathism. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Acoustic analysis of voice in children with cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafuerte-Gonzalez, Rocio; Valadez-Jimenez, Victor M; Hernandez-Lopez, Xochiquetzal; Ysunza, Pablo Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic analysis of voice can provide instrumental data concerning vocal abnormalities. These findings can be used for monitoring clinical course in cases of voice disorders. Cleft palate severely affects the structure of the vocal tract. Hence, voice quality can also be also affected. To study whether the main acoustic parameters of voice, including fundamental frequency, shimmer and jitter are significantly different in patients with a repaired cleft palate, as compared with normal children without speech, language and voice disorders. Fourteen patients with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate and persistent or residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) were studied. A control group was assembled with healthy volunteer subjects matched by age and gender. Hypernasality and nasal emission were perceptually assessed in patients with VPI. Size of the gap as assessed by videonasopharyngoscopy was classified in patients with VPI. Acoustic analysis of voice including Fundamental frequency (F0), shimmer and jitter were compared between patients with VPI and control subjects. F0 was significantly higher in male patients as compared with male controls. Shimmer was significantly higher in patients with VPI regardless of gender. Moreover, patients with moderate VPI showed a significantly higher shimmer perturbation, regardless of gender. Although future research regarding voice disorders in patients with VPI is needed, at the present time it seems reasonable to include strategies for voice therapy in the speech and language pathology intervention plan for patients with VPI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. First branchial cleft anomalies: avoiding the misdiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Sikka, Kapil; Sagar, Prem; Kakkar, Aanchal; Thakar, Alok

    2013-07-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies are a very rare entities accounting for less than 1 % of all branchial cleft malformations. They are often misdiagnosed for other cystic lesions occurring in parotid gland and inadequately treated (incision and drainage or incomplete excision) leading to multiple recurrences. We report a series of four patients who were previously operated (incision and drainage) for misdiagnosed first branchial cleft anomalies with subsequent recurrences. All patients underwent superficial parotidectomy with complete tract excision using facial nerve monitoring to prevent iatrogenic injury because of extensive fibrosis. We discuss the literature pertaining to first branchial cleft anomalies, their varied presentations and their relationship to facial nerve in parotid gland and importance of facial nerve monitoring in revision surgery.

  1. Cleft Lip and Palate (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things That Help Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes ... spite of these and other social, psychological, and educational challenges, kids with clefts just want to be ...

  2. Prevalence, cause, and location of palatal fistula in operated complete unilateral cleft lip and palate: retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Agostino Biella Passos, Vivian; de Carvalho Carrara, Cleide Felício; da Silva Dalben, Gisele; Costa, Beatriz; Gomide, Marcia Ribeiro

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of fistulas after palate repair and analyze their location and association with possible causal factors. Retrospective analysis of patient records and evaluation of preoperative initial photographs. Tertiary craniofacial center. Five hundred eighty-nine individuals with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate that underwent palate repair at the age of 12 to 36 months by the von Langenbeck technique, in a single stage, by the plastic surgery team of the hospital, from January 2003 to July 2007. The cleft width was visually classified by a single examiner as narrow, regular, or wide. The following regions of the palate were considered for the location: anterior, medium, transition (between hard and soft palate), and soft palate. Descriptive statistics and analysis of association between the occurrence of fistula and the different parameters were evaluated. Palatal fistulas were observed in 27% of the sample, with a greater proportion at the anterior region (37.11%). The chi-square statistical test revealed statistically significant association (P ≤ .05) between the fistulas and initial cleft width (P = .0003), intraoperative problems (P = .0037), and postoperative problems (P = .00002). The prevalence of palatal fistula was similar to mean values reported in the literature. Analysis of causal factors showed a positive association between palatal fistulas with wide and regular initial cleft width and intraoperative and postoperative problems. The anterior region presented the greatest occurrence of fistulas.

  3. Bilateral meandering pulmonary veins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thupili, Chakradhar R.; Udayasankar, Unni [Pediatric Imaging, Imaging Institute Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Renapurkar, Rahul [Imaging Institute Cleveland Clinic, Thoracic Imaging, L10, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Meandering pulmonary veins is a rare clinical entity that can be mistaken for more complex congenital syndromes such as hypogenetic lung syndrome. We report imaging findings in a rare incidentally detected case of bilateral meandering pulmonary veins. We briefly discuss the role of imaging in diagnosing this condition, with particular emphasis on contrast-enhanced CT. (orig.)

  4. Bilateral Periventricular Nodular Heterotopia

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1998-01-01

    Two unrelated boys, ages 8 and 5 years, with a syndrome of bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia (BPNH), regional cortical dysplasia, mild mental retardation, and frontonasal malformation (FNM) are reported from the Instituto di Neuropsychiatria Infantile, University of Pisa, Italy, and the Institute of Human Genetics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN.

  5. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Douglas class were classified in [3]; they are unilateral block shifts of arbitrary block size (i.e. dim H(n) can be anything). However, no examples of irreducible homogeneous bilateral block shifts of block size larger than 1 were known until now.

  6. Synchronous, bilateral tonsillar carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nami Saber, Camelia; Grønhøj, Christian; Jensen, David Hebbelstrup

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increasing, but data on the incidence of synchronous, bilateral tonsillar squamous cell carcinomas (BiTSCCs) is sparse. In this study, we report the incidence and tumour characteristics of BiTSCCs in a population-base...

  7. Bilateral breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eung Jo; Oh, Ki Keun

    1990-01-01

    We evaluate 311 breast cancer patients admitted to Yong Dong Severance Hospital Between October 1st 1985 and July 31th 1989, and were able to obtain the following conclusions. 1) There were 14(4.5%) bilateral breast cancers among the 311 confirmed breast cancers. 2) Among the bilateral breast cancers, 5(31%) were synchronous and 9(69%) metachronous. 3) Average interval between the first and the second breast cancer in metachronous cancers was 3.8 year(1-15 years). 4) Bilateral breast cancer was most prevalent in the fifth decade (6/14) with the mean age of 47 years. 5) Film mammogram and sonomammogram showed findings of typical breast malignancies. There was no additional specific findings for each cancer in bilateral breast cancers which was different from unilateral cancers. Therefor, in the patients with unilateral breast cancer, possibility of the second lesion in the contralateral side must be considered and a close follow up observation should be done for at least 3 years

  8. Second branchial cleft cyst of the oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Sang Hyun; Kim, Hyun Sook; Moon Seung Il; Choi, Yun Sun; Cho, Jae Min; Cho, Sung Bum; Yoon, Sook Ja; Kim, Dai Hong; Yoon, Yong Kyu

    2001-01-01

    We report a very rare type of second branchial cleft cyst located at the oropharynx, and include a review of the literature. CT scans of the neck revealed a homogeneous non-enhancing low-density mass in the right posterolateral mucosal wall of the oropharynx. Only the peripheral capsule of the mass was enhanced. The cyst was resected perorally and proved to be a type-IV second branchial cleft cyst

  9. Second branchial cleft cyst of the oropharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Sang Hyun; Kim, Hyun Sook; Moon Seung Il; Choi, Yun Sun; Cho, Jae Min; Cho, Sung Bum; Yoon, Sook Ja; Kim, Dai Hong; Yoon, Yong Kyu [Eulji Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    We report a very rare type of second branchial cleft cyst located at the oropharynx, and include a review of the literature. CT scans of the neck revealed a homogeneous non-enhancing low-density mass in the right posterolateral mucosal wall of the oropharynx. Only the peripheral capsule of the mass was enhanced. The cyst was resected perorally and proved to be a type-IV second branchial cleft cyst.

  10. "Nara" knot for suturing of cleft lip in children to make removal easy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaidullah

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft patients usually go through a lifetime of repeated hospital admissions and multiple procedures. Suture removal at a tender age and on a sensitive area like the lip becomes a challenge for the nursing staff. It is also emotionally demanding on the part of the parents. Hence, in most centres these patients are at least sedated if not anaesthetised. We have been using a simple knot and running prolene material so that undoing of the knot becomes easy and suture removal more or less atraumatic. We would like to share our experience with readers through this article. An analysis of 53 cleft lip repairs has shown that this knot is safe and easily removable.

  11. From birth till palatoplasty: Prosthetic procedural limitations and safeguarding infants with palatal cleft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Bhandari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The most imminent issue to be addressed in a child born with cleft lip and/or palate is restoration of normal feeding. Early surgical treatment for cleft repair is crucial but may need to be postponed until certain age and weight gain is attained in an infant. When other feeding interventions fail in these children, prosthetic obturation of the defect with feeding instructions in the interim period is indicated to ward off the prevailing concerns. However, the entire prosthetic management presents a significant challenge with respect to the child's age, scope of iatrogenic injury to the delicate oral tissues, and potential for life-threatening situation during the procedures. This article draws attention toward preemptive measures which should be undertaken in the clinical setting during the fabrication of obturator to ascertain a desirable outcome without experiencing a grave complication that may arise due to ignorance and/or lack of facilities.

  12. Dental Anomalies in a Brazilian Cleft Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Jamile; Mariano, Lorena C; Canguçu, Daiane; Coutinho, Thaynara S L; Hoshi, Ryuichi; Medrado, Alena Peixoto; Martelli-Junior, Hercílio; Coletta, Ricardo D; Reis, Silvia R A

    2016-11-01

      The aim of this study was to radiographically investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies outside the cleft area in a group of Brazilian patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCL/P).   A retrospective analysis of 207 panoramic radiographs of patients with NSCL/P aged 12 to 45 years without history of tooth extraction and orthodontic treatment was performed.   Dental anomalies were found in 75.4% of the patients, and tooth agenesis (29.2%) and supernumerary tooth (2.6%) were the most common anomalies. The risk of agenesis was higher among the individuals with cleft palate (CP) compared with individuals with cleft lip (CL) and cleft lip and palate (CLP) (agenesis: CP versus CL: odds ratio 6.27, 95% confidence interval 2.21-17.8, P = .0003; CP versus CLP: odds ratio 2.94; 95% confidence interval 1.27-6.81, P = .01). The frequency of dental agenesis was higher in patients with unilateral complete CLP (agenesis: P dental agenesis (P dental anomalies in patients with NSCL/P was higher than that reported in overall population. This study found preferential associations between dental anomalies and specific extensions of NSCL/P, suggesting that dental agenesis and ectopic tooth may be part of oral cleft subphenotypes.

  13. Stabilization of Bilateral Progressive Rheumatoid Corneal Melt with Infliximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheelah F. Antao

    2012-01-01

    Results. A patient with rheumatoid arthritis presented with bilateral PUK following a 2-month history of ocular discomfort and redness. His systemic prednisolone (PDN and methotrexate (MTX were increased and, despite an initial favorable response, bilateral recurrent corneal perforations ensued. Both eyes underwent cyanoacrylate glue repair, amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT, and penetrating keratoplasty (PKP. Recurrence of the disease and bilateral perforations of the second PKP in both eyes prompted administration of intravenous infliximab immediately after the fourth PKP. The disease activity rapidly settled in both eyes, and at eighteen-month followup, after 12 infliximab infusions, the PUK remains quiescent with no further graft thinning or perforation. Conclusion. Infliximab can be used to arrest the progression of severe bilateral rheumatoid PUK in cases that are refractory to conventional treatment.

  14. Smile designing for cleft lip and palate patient: The prosthodontic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuna Gajanan Pawashe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The case report describes smile designing of a 22-year-old male patient who was surgically operated for unilateral cleft lip (left side with Andrew's Bridge system. It is composed of two components: Fixed component (retainers on abutments joined by bar and removable component. The patient exhibited maxillary anterior defect (Siebert's Class-III anterior ridge defect, teeth transposition, increased mesiodistal edentulous space, bilaterally missing lateral incisor. When there is a limitation of bone grafting/surgical augmentation, alternative treatment modalities such as removable partial dentures, fixed partial dentures with gingival porcelain and/or fixed-removable partial dentures known as Andrew's bridge are indicated.

  15. Cleft sidedness and congenitally missing teeth in patients with cleft lip and palate patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Jamilian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cleft sidedness, and the number of congenitally missing teeth in regard to cleft type and gender. Methods The charts, models, radiographs, and intraoral photographs of 201 cleft patients including 131 males with the mean age of 12.3 ± 4 years and 70 females with the mean age of 12.6 ± 3.9 years were used for the study. T test, Chi-square, and binomial tests were used for assessment of the data. Results and conclusions One hundred forty-eight of the subjects suffered from cleft lip and palate followed by 41 subjects who suffered from cleft lip and alveolus. Chi-square test did not show any significant difference between the genders. Binomial test showed that left-sided cleft was more predominant in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients (P < 0.001. This study also showed that the upper lateral incisors were the most commonly missing teeth in the cleft area.

  16. Dental fear in children with a cleft lip and/or cleft Palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogels, W.E.J.C.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the level of dental fear in children with a cleft lip and/or palate, to compare this level with that of a normative group testing the hypothesis that children with a cleft lip and/or palate have a higher level of dental anxiety than children from the general population, and to

  17. Lower incidence of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... In India, as in other parts of the world, nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL±P) is a highly prevalent birth defect, its incidence in males being twice that in females. A case–control association study has been carried out with respect to homocysteine level and MTHFR C677T, A1298C and ...

  18. Humanitarian Cleft Lip/Palate Surgeries in Buddhist Thailand and Neighboring Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Tetsuji; Preeyanont, Piyoros; Udnoon, Sopridee

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluates surgeries done on patients with cleft lip and/or palate in Thailand and its neighboring countries from 1988 to 2008. This 21-year-long volunteer surgical mission was sponsored by Duang-Kaew Foundation, a volunteer organization. Countries involved, besides Thailand, were Vietnam, Myanmar, Laos, Cambodia, China, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, and India. The same surgical method for primary and secondary repair of lip and/or palate was used throughout: Onizuka method by single surgeon, the second author mainly. We assessed, by way of the patients' medical records including their background, the results of surgeries. The healing rates and complication rates associated with patients for primary and secondary repair of lip and/or palate. The study consisted of a total of 6832 patients: 3120 with cleft lip (CL); 2190 with cleft palate (CP); and 1522 with cleft lip and palate (CLP). Their primary cases were 675 (CL), 799 (CP), and 301 (CLP). All CP operations were done under general anesthesia. Of the CL surgeries, 10% of adult cases were done under local anesthesia. Of all the patients, 78%, or 5329, had one surgery; and 22%, or 1503, had 2 or more surgeries. Good healing was seen in 73.3%, whereas wound infection was noted in 2.0% and healing by second intention was in 1.2% of all cases. It is important that the Onizuka method was the only method used in all the countries throughout the mission period. The method has an advantage over other methods in that its design is simple enough so that even a beginning plastic surgeon can easily master, and operative results are constantly good regardless of who did the operation. The Duang-Kaew Foundation's long-term surgical program helped reduce the number of untreated patients to manageable levels for local health care providers in Thailand and neighboring countries for as long as 21 years.

  19. Not All Clefts Are Created Equal: Patterns of Hospital-Based Care Use among Children with Cleft Lip and Palate within 4 Years of Initial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligh, Cassandra A; Fox, Justin P; Swanson, Jordan; Yu, Jason W; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    This study compares hospital-based care and associated charges among children with cleft lip, cleft palate, or both, and identifies subgroups generating the greatest cumulative hospital charges. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of cleft lip, cleft palate, or cleft lip and palate who underwent initial surgery from 2006 to 2008 in four U.S. states. Primary outcome was hospital-based care-emergency, outpatient, inpatient-within 4 years of surgery. Regression models compared outcomes and classification tree analysis identified patients at risk for being in the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. The authors identified 4571 children with cleft lip (18.2 percent), cleft palate (39.2 percent), or cleft lip and palate (42.6 percent). Medical comorbidity was frequent across all groups, with feeding difficulty (cleft lip, 2.4 percent; cleft palate, 13.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 6.0 percent; p cleft lip, 1.8 percent; cleft palate, 9.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 3.6 percent; p cleft palate were most likely to return to the hospital (p cleft lip group, yet comparable among those with cleft palate and cleft lip and palate (p cleft palate cohort (cleft lip, $56,966; cleft palate, $106,090; cleft lip and palate, $91,263; p cleft lip versus cleft palate with or without cleft lip), and age at initial surgery were the most important factors associated with the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. Cleft lip and palate children experience a high rate of hospital-based care early in life, with degree of medical comorbidity being a significant burden. Understanding this relationship and associated needs may help deliver more efficient, patient-centered care.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 with a Demineralized Bone Matrix versus Iliac Crest Bone Graft for Secondary Alveolar Bone Grafts in Patients with Cleft Lip and Palate: Review of 501 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudeh, Jeffrey A; Fahradyan, Artur; Gould, Daniel J; Liang, Fan; Imahiyerobo, Thomas; Urbinelli, Leo; Nguyen, JoAnna T; Magee, William; Yen, Stephen; Urata, Mark M

    2017-08-01

    Alveolar cleft reconstruction using iliac crest bone graft is considered standard of care for children with complete cleft lip and palate at the time of mixed dentition. Harvesting bone may result in donor-site morbidity and additional operating time and length of hospitalization. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2 with a demineralized bone matrix is an alternative bone source for alveolar cleft reconstruction. The authors investigated the outcomes of rhBMP-2/demineralized bone matrix versus iliac crest bone graft for alveolar cleft reconstruction by reviewing postoperative surgical complications and cleft closure. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 258 rhBMP-2/demineralized bone matrix procedures (mean follow-up, 2.9 years) and 243 iliac crest bone graft procedures (mean follow-up, 4.1 years) on 414 patients over a 12-year period. The authors compared complications, canine eruption, and alveolar cleft closure between the two groups. In the rhBMP-2/demineralized bone matrix group, one patient required prolonged intubation because of intraoperative airway swelling not thought to be caused by rhBMP-2, 36 reported facial swelling and one required outpatient steroids as treatment, and 12 had dehiscence; however, half of these complications resolved without intervention. Twenty-three of the 228 rhBMP-2/demineralized bone matrix patients and 28 of the 242 iliac crest bone graft patients required repeated surgery for alveolar cleft repair. Findings for canine tooth eruption into the cleft site through the graft were similar between the groups. The rhBMP-2/demineralized bone matrix appears to be an acceptable alternative for alveolar cleft repair. The authors found no increase in serious adverse events with the use of this material. Local complications, such as swelling and minor wound dehiscence, predominantly improved without intervention. Therapeutic, III.

  1. Hospital admissions for dental treatment among children with cleft lip and/or palate born between 1997 and 2003: an analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimons, Kate J; Copley, Lynn P; Smallridge, Jacqueline A; Clark, Victoria J; van der Meulen, Jan H; Deacon, Scott A

    2014-05-01

    Children with clefts have an increased tendency for dental anomalies and caries. To determine the pattern of hospital admissions for dental treatment during primary dentition among children with clefts. Cohort study based on Hospital Episode Statistics, an administrative database of all admissions to National Health Service hospitals in England. Patients born alive between 1997 and 2003 who had both a cleft diagnosis and cleft repair were included. The number of hospital admissions for surgical removal of teeth, simple extraction of teeth, and restoration of teeth before the age of seven was examined. Eight hundred and fifty-eight hospital admissions for dental treatment among 6551 children (dental treatment. The presence of additional anomalies, having a more severe cleft type, and living in relatively deprived areas increased the risk of hospital admission. Factors increasing the risk of hospital admission among cleft children should be taken into account when planning services. Efforts to reduce the number of hospital admissions should be focused on disease prevention, particularly among those most at risk of caries. © 2013 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Primary Care Pediatrician and the Care of Children With Cleft Lip and/or Cleft Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charlotte W; Jacob, Lisa S; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2017-05-01

    Orofacial clefts, specifically cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P), are among the most common congenital anomalies. CL/P vary in their location and severity and comprise 3 overarching groups: cleft lip (CL), cleft lip with cleft palate (CLP), and cleft palate alone (CP). CL/P may be associated with one of many syndromes that could further complicate a child's needs. Care of patients with CL/P spans prenatal diagnosis into adulthood. The appropriate timing and order of specific cleft-related care are important factors for optimizing outcomes; however, care should be individualized to meet the specific needs of each patient and family. Children with CL/P should receive their specialty cleft-related care from a multidisciplinary cleft or craniofacial team with sufficient patient and surgical volume to promote successful outcomes. The primary care pediatrician at the child's medical home has an essential role in making a timely diagnosis and referral; providing ongoing health care maintenance, anticipatory guidance, and acute care; and functioning as an advocate for the patient and a liaison between the family and the craniofacial/cleft team. This document provides background on CL/P and multidisciplinary team care, information about typical timing and order of cleft-related care, and recommendations for cleft/craniofacial teams and primary care pediatricians in the care of children with CL/P. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Bilateral renal calculi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenevasan, G

    1974-01-01

    Bilateral renal calculi were present in 114 (10.7%) of 1,070 cases of proved urinary calculus admitted to the Urological Department of the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, during the period November 1968—May 1973. The management of bilateral renal calculi is discussed with reference to the first 100 cases in this series. The introduction of renography has greatly facilitated the decision as to which kidney should be operated on first. The management of patients with and without uraemia is discussed and the use of the modified V and V—Y incisions for the removal of staghorn calculi is described. Complications and results are briefly reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:4845653

  4. Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen-Ranberg, Nina Christine; Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Bergholt, Bo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (bCSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition frequently associated with the need for retreatment. The reason for the high rate of retreatment has not been thoroughly investigated. Thus, the authors focused on determining which independent predictors...... are associated with the retreatment of bCSDH with a focus on surgical laterality. METHODS In a national database of CSDHs (Danish Chronic Subdural Hematoma Study) the authors retrospectively identified all bCSDHs treated in the 4 Danish neurosurgical departments over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2012...... that a separated hematoma density and the absence of postoperative drainage were independent predictors of retreatment. CONCLUSIONS In bCSDHs bilateral surgical intervention significantly lowers the risk of retreatment compared with unilateral intervention and should be considered when choosing a surgical...

  5. Bilateral Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolm, A.W.; Jaffe, N.; Folkman, M.J.; Cassady, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty children with bilateral Wilms' tumor were presented to the Children's Hospital Medical Center and Children's Cancer Research Foundation, Sidney Farber Cancer Institute, and Joint Center for Radiation Therapy (CHMC-CCRF, SFCI, JCRT) from January 1, 1956 to December 31, 1976. Of these 20, 16 had simultaneous and 4 had metachronous disease on presentation. All patients were treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Of the 16 patients with simultaneous disease, 10 (63%) are alive and free of disease 12+ to 175+ months post diagnosis and treatment, with median follow-up of 121 months. There were no long-term survivors in the metachronous group; all were dead of disease within 21 months from initial presentation of original tumor. With these data we relate prognosis to extent of disease and discuss a general approach to the management of bilateral Wilms' tumor

  6. Multilateral and bilateral agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, H.

    1993-01-01

    Finland has made both multilateral and bilateral agreements on the exchange of information related to radiation safety. The first arrangements for international agreements and exchange of information were made after the Chernobyl accident. In 1987, Finland joined the convention on early notification of a nuclear power accident coordinated by International Atomic Energy Agency. The convention is applied to accidents that cause of may cause emissions of radioactive substances that might affect the radiation safety of another country. Besides the convention on early notification, some other individual agreements have also been made. These include the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) system and power companies own information exchange systems. Finland has conducted bilateral agreements with the Nordic countries and the Soviet Union on the notification of accidents and exchange of nuclear power plant information. Today, Russia answers for the Soviet Union's contractual obligations. (orig.)

  7. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in WNT genes with the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafighdoost, Houshang; Hashemi, Mohammad; Asadi, Hossein; Bahari, Gholamreza

    2018-01-22

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate is a common congenital deformity worldwide with multifaceted etiology. Interaction of genes and environmental factors has been indicated to be related with susceptibility to nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Some WNT genes which are involved in craniofacial embryogenesis may play a key role in the pathogenesis of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate. In the present study, we aimed to inspect the relationship between WNT3 (rs3809857 and rs9890413), WNT3A (rs752107 and rs3121310), and WNT10a rs201002930 (c.392 C>T) polymorphisms and nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in an Iranian population. The present case-control study was carried out on 120 unrelated nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate patients and 112 healthy subjects. The variants were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The findings suggest that the rs3809857 polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in codominant (odds ratio = 0.16, 95% confidence interval = 0.03-0.75, P = 0.020, TT vs GG), recessive (odds ratio = 0.16, 95% confidence interval = 0.03-0.72, P = 0.009, TT vs GG + GT) inheritance models. The rs9890413 variant marginally decreased the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in codominant (odds ratio = 0.41, 95% confidence interval = 0.17-0.99, P = 0.047, AG vs AA) model. Regarding C392T variant, the findings revealed that this variant significantly decreased the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in codominant (odds ratio = 0.24, 95% confidence interval = 0.10-0.58, P = 0.002, CT vs CC) and allele (odds ratio = 0.26, 95% confidence interval = 0.11-0.62, P = 0.002, T vs C) models. No significant association was observed between the rs752107 and rs3121310 variants

  8. Bilateral renal artery variation

    OpenAIRE

    Üçerler, Hülya; Üzüm, Yusuf; İkiz, Z. Aslı Aktan

    2014-01-01

    Each kidney is supplied by a single renal artery, although renal artery variations are common. Variations of the renal arteryhave become important with the increasing number of renal transplantations. Numerous studies describe variations in renalartery anatomy. Especially the left renal artery is among the most critical arterial variations, because it is the referred side forresecting the donor kidney. During routine dissection in a formalin fixed male cadaver, we have found a bilateral renal...

  9. File: International bilateral relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feltin, Ch.; Rabouhams, J.; Bravo, X.; Rousseau, M.; Le Breton, S.; Saint Raymond, Ph.; Brigaud, O.; Pertuis, V.; McNair, J.; Sayers, M.R.; Bye, R.; Scherrer, J.

    1998-01-01

    Since its creation in 1973, the Authority of Safety was assigned missions in the international field with following objectives: to develop information exchanges with its foreign counterpart, to make know and to explain the French approach and practice; to give to concerned countries the useful information on french nuclear facilities situated near the border; This file shows with some examples, how bilateral relations allow to fill up these objectives and how the French Authority got the foreign experience. (N.C.)

  10. Idiopathic bilateral male breast abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Sinha, Mithilesh Kumar; Gaurav, Kumar; Kumar, Amar

    2014-03-10

    A 38-year-old man presented with bilateral breast swelling, along with pain and redness for 7 days. Bilateral axillary nodes were also palpable; which were multiple and discrete. A provisional diagnosis of bilateral breast abscess was made with suspicion of underlying malignancy. Incision and drainage through subareolar incision was performed and the adjoining tissue was excised and sent for histopathological examination.

  11. Prevalence of orofacial clefts and risks for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in newborns at a university hospital from West Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Rivera, Jorge Román; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo; Peña-Padilla, Christian; Olvera-Molina, Sandra; Orozco-Martín, Miriam A; García-Cruz, Diana; Ríos-Flores, Izabel M; Gómez-Rodríguez, Brian Gabriel; Rivas-Soto, Gemma; Pérez-Molina, J Jesús

    2018-02-19

    We determined the overall prevalence of typical orofacial clefts and the potential risks for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in a university hospital from West México. For the prevalence, 227 liveborn infants with typical orofacial clefts were included from a total of 81,193 births occurred during the period 2009-2016 at the "Dr. Juan I. Menchaca" Civil Hospital of Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico). To evaluate potential risks, a case-control study was conducted among 420 newborns, including only those 105 patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (cases), and 315 infants without birth defects (controls). Data were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis expressed as adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals . The overall prevalence for typical orofacial clefts was 28 per 10,000 (95% confidence interval: 24.3-31.6), or 1 per 358 live births. The mean values for the prepregnancy weight, antepartum weight, and pre-pregnancy body mass index were statistically higher among the mothers of cases. Infants with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate had a significantly higher risk for previous history of any type of congenital anomaly (adjusted odds ratio: 2.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.4-5.1), history of a relative with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (adjusted odds ratio: 19.6; 95% confidence interval: 8.2-47.1), and first-trimester exposures to progestogens (adjusted odds ratio: 6.8; 95% CI 1.8-25.3), hyperthermia (adjusted odds ratio: 3.4; 95% confidence interval: 1.1-10.6), and common cold (adjusted odds ratio: 3.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.1-11.9). These risks could have contributed to explain the high prevalence of orofacial clefts in our region of Mexico, emphasizing that except for history of relatives with cleft lip with or without cleft palate, most are susceptible of modification. © 2018 Japanese Teratology Society.

  12. Speech and Speech-Related Quality of Life After Late Palate Repair: A Patient's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönmeyr, Björn; Wendby, Lisa; Sharma, Mitali; Jacobson, Lia; Restrepo, Carolina; Campbell, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Many patients with cleft palate deformities worldwide receive treatment at a later age than is recommended for normal speech to develop. The outcomes after late palate repairs in terms of speech and quality of life (QOL) still remain largely unstudied. In the current study, questionnaires were used to assess the patients' perception of speech and QOL before and after primary palate repair. All of the patients were operated at a cleft center in northeast India and had a cleft palate with a normal lip or with a cleft lip that had been previously repaired. A total of 134 patients (7-35 years) were interviewed preoperatively and 46 patients (7-32 years) were assessed in the postoperative survey. The survey showed that scores based on the speech handicap index, concerning speech and speech-related QOL, did not improve postoperatively. In fact, the questionnaires indicated that the speech became more unpredictable (P reported that their self-confidence had improved after the operation. Thus, the majority of interviewed patients who underwent late primary palate repair were satisfied with the surgery. At the same time, speech and speech-related QOL did not improve according to the speech handicap index-based survey. Speech predictability may even become worse and nasal regurgitation may increase after late palate repair, according to these results.

  13. Midline nasal dermoid cyst with Tessier's 0 cleft

    OpenAIRE

    Guruprasad, Yadavalli; Chauhan, Dinesh Singh

    2014-01-01

    This is a rare anomaly of midline nasal dermoid cyst (NDC) along with Tessier's 0 cleft. Midline NDCs present most commonly result from aberrant embryological development, and most commonly give rise to bifid nasal deformity resulting in midline cleft of the nose. Craniofacial clefts are among the most disfiguring of all facial anomalies. They exist in a multitude of patterns and with varying degrees of severity. The bifid nose deformity is generally an indicator of Tessier number 0 cleft. We...

  14. Unusual extension of the first branchial cleft anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ada, Mehmet; Korkut, Nazim; Güvenç, M Güven; Acioğlu, Engin; Yilmaz, Süleyman; Cevikbaş, Uğur

    2006-03-01

    First branchial cleft is the only branchial structure that persists as the external ear canal, while all other clefts are resorbed. Incomplete obliteration and the degree of closure cause the varied types of first branchial cleft anomalies. They were classified based on the anatomical and histological features. We present an unusual type of first branchial cleft anomaly involving the external auditory canal, the middle ear and the nasopharynx through the eustachian tube.

  15. The nature of articulation errors in Egyptian Arabic-speaking children with velopharyngeal insufficiency due to cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elsaad, Tamer; Baz, Hemmat; Afsah, Omayma; Mansy, Alzahraa

    2015-09-01

    Even with early surgical repair, the majority of cleft palate children demonstrate articulation errors and have typical cleft palate speech. Was to determine the nature of articulation errors of Arabic consonants in Egyptian Arabic-speaking children with velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Thirty Egyptian Arabic-speaking children with VPI due to cleft palate (whether primary repaired or secondary repaired) were studied. Auditory perceptual assessment (APA) of children speech was conducted. Nasopharyngoscopy was done to assess the velopharyngeal port (VPP) movements while the child was repeating speech tasks. Mansoura Arabic Articulation test (MAAT) was performed to analyze the consonants articulation of these children. The most frequent type of articulatory errors observed was substitution, more specifically, backing. Pharyngealization of anterior fricatives was the most frequent substitution, especially for the /s/ sound. The most frequent substituting sounds for other sounds were /ʔ/ followed by /k/ and /n/ sounds. Significant correlations were found between the degrees of the open nasality and VPP closure and the articulation errors. On the other hand, the sounds (/ʔ/,/ħ/,/ʕ/,/n/,/w/,/j/) were normally articulated in all studied group. The determination of articulation errors in VPI children could guide the therapists for designing appropriate speech therapy programs for these cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mothers' experiences when their infants were diagnosed with cleft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traditionally the diagnosis of cleft lip and palate was made at birth or soon thereafter, but modern technology has led to the identification of cleft lip prenatally. The aim of this study was to describe 16 mothers' experiences of pre- and postnatal diagnosis of their infants' cleft lip and palate, and to develop clinical guidelines for ...

  17. Evaluation of Teeth Development in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... in patients with cleft lip and palate using medical software ... to be used in routine dental treatment and in particular the need to do more study. ... cleft palate/lip surgery were examined. ... segment from the “evaluate” tab of the program. Teeth .... cases of cleft palate or lip. ..... of maxillary canines: A CT study.

  18. Feeding interventions for growth and development in infants with cleft lip, cleft palate or cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell, Alyson; Hooper, Lee; Shaw, William C; Reilly, Sheena; Reid, Julie; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2011-02-16

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are common birth defects, affecting about one baby of every 700 born. Feeding these babies is an immediate concern and there is evidence of delay in growth of children with a cleft as compared to those without clefting. In an effort to combat reduced weight for height, a variety of advice and devices are recommended to aid feeding of babies with clefts. This review aims to assess the effects of these feeding interventions in babies with cleft lip and/or palate on growth, development and parental satisfaction. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 27 October 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 4), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 27 October 2010), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 27 October 2010), PsycINFO via OVID (1950 to 27 October 2010) and CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 27 October 2010). Attempts were made to identify both unpublished and ongoing studies. There was no restriction with regard to language of publication. Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of feeding interventions for babies born with cleft lip, cleft palate or cleft lip and palate up to the age of 6 months (from term). Studies were assessed for relevance independently and in duplicate. All studies meeting the inclusion criteria were data extracted and assessed for validity independently by each member of the review team. Authors were contacted for clarification or missing information whenever possible. Five RCTs with a total of 292 babies, were included in the review. Comparisons made within the RCTs were squeezable versus rigid feeding bottles (two studies), breastfeeding versus spoon-feeding (one study) and maxillary plate versus no plate (two studies). No statistically significant differences were shown for any of the primary outcomes when comparing bottle types, although squeezable bottles were less likely to require

  19. Cleft palate caused by congenital teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyssière, Alexis; Streit, Libor; Traoré, Hamady; Bénateau, Hervé

    2017-02-01

    A cleft palate results from incomplete fusion of the lateral palatine processes, the median nasal septum and the median palatine process. This case report describes a rare case of congenital teratoma originating from the nasal septum that may have interfered with the fusion of the palatal shelves during embryonic development, resulting in a cleft palate. An infant girl was born at 40 weeks of gestation weighing 3020 g with a complete cleft palate associated with a large central nasopharyngeal tumour. Computed tomography (CT) of the head showed a well defined mass of mixed density. The tumour was attached to the nasal septum in direct contact with the cleft palate. A biopsy confirmed the teratoma. Tumour resection was performed at 5 months, soft palate reconstruction at 7 months and hard palate closure at 14 months. There was no sign of local recurrence 1 year later. Most teratomas are benign and the prognosis is usually good. However, recurrence is not rare if germ cell carcinomatous foci are present within the teratoma. For these reasons, we advocate the use of a two-stage procedure in which closure of the cleft palate is postponed until histological examination confirms complete excision of the teratoma.

  20. A Reliable Method to Measure Lip Height Using Photogrammetry in Unilateral Cleft Lip Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zeeuw, Frederique; Murabit, Amera; Volcano, Johnny; Torensma, Bart; Patel, Brijesh; Hay, Norman; Thorburn, Guy; Morris, Paul; Sommerlad, Brian; Gnarra, Maria; van der Horst, Chantal; Kangesu, Loshan

    2015-09-01

    There is still no reliable tool to determine the outcome of the repaired unilateral cleft lip (UCL). The aim of this study was therefore to develop an accurate, reliable tool to measure vertical lip height from photographs. The authors measured the vertical height of the cutaneous and vermilion parts of the lip in 72 anterior-posterior view photographs of 17 patients with repairs to a UCL. Points on the lip's white roll and vermillion were marked on both the cleft and the noncleft sides on each image. Two new concepts were tested. First, photographs were standardized using the horizontal (medial to lateral) eye fissure width (EFW) for calibration. Second, the authors tested the interpupillary line (IPL) and the alar base line (ABL) for their reliability as horizontal lines of reference. Measurements were taken by 2 independent researchers, at 2 different time points each. Overall 2304 data points were obtained and analyzed. Results showed that the method was very effective in measuring the height of the lip on the cleft side with the noncleft side. When using the IPL, inter- and intra-rater reliability was 0.99 to 1.0, with the ABL it varied from 0.91 to 0.99 with one exception at 0.84. The IPL was easier to define because in some subjects the overhanging nasal tip obscured the alar base and gave more consistent measurements possibly because the reconstructed alar base was sometimes indistinct. However, measurements from the IPL can only give the percentage difference between the left and right sides of the lip, whereas those from the ABL can also give exact measurements. Patient examples were given that show how the measurements correlate with clinical assessment. The authors propose this method of photogrammetry with the innovative use of the IPL as a reliable horizontal plane and use of the EFW for calibration as a useful and reliable tool to assess the outcome of UCL repair.