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Sample records for repair-mediated duplication events

  1. Repair-mediated duplication by capture of proximal chromosomal DNA has shaped vertebrate genome evolution.

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    John K Pace

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are a common form of cellular damage that can lead to cell death if not repaired promptly. Experimental systems have shown that DSB repair in eukaryotic cells is often imperfect and may result in the insertion of extra chromosomal DNA or the duplication of existing DNA at the breakpoint. These events are thought to be a source of genomic instability and human diseases, but it is unclear whether they have contributed significantly to genome evolution. Here we developed an innovative computational pipeline that takes advantage of the repetitive structure of genomes to detect repair-mediated duplication events (RDs that occurred in the germline and created insertions of at least 50 bp of genomic DNA. Using this pipeline we identified over 1,000 probable RDs in the human genome. Of these, 824 were intra-chromosomal, closely linked duplications of up to 619 bp bearing the hallmarks of the synthesis-dependent strand-annealing repair pathway. This mechanism has duplicated hundreds of sequences predicted to be functional in the human genome, including exons, UTRs, intron splice sites and transcription factor binding sites. Dating of the duplication events using comparative genomics and experimental validation revealed that the mechanism has operated continuously but with decreasing intensity throughout primate evolution. The mechanism has produced species-specific duplications in all primate species surveyed and is contributing to genomic variation among humans. Finally, we show that RDs have also occurred, albeit at a lower frequency, in non-primate mammals and other vertebrates, indicating that this mechanism has been an important force shaping vertebrate genome evolution.

  2. Spider Transcriptomes Identify Ancient Large-Scale Gene Duplication Event Potentially Important in Silk Gland Evolution.

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    Clarke, Thomas H; Garb, Jessica E; Hayashi, Cheryl Y; Arensburger, Peter; Ayoub, Nadia A

    2015-06-08

    The evolution of specialized tissues with novel functions, such as the silk synthesizing glands in spiders, is likely an influential driver of adaptive success. Large-scale gene duplication events and subsequent paralog divergence are thought to be required for generating evolutionary novelty. Such an event has been proposed for spiders, but not tested. We de novo assembled transcriptomes from three cobweb weaving spider species. Based on phylogenetic analyses of gene families with representatives from each of the three species, we found numerous duplication events indicative of a whole genome or segmental duplication. We estimated the age of the gene duplications relative to several speciation events within spiders and arachnids and found that the duplications likely occurred after the divergence of scorpions (order Scorpionida) and spiders (order Araneae), but before the divergence of the spider suborders Mygalomorphae and Araneomorphae, near the evolutionary origin of spider silk glands. Transcripts that are expressed exclusively or primarily within black widow silk glands are more likely to have a paralog descended from the ancient duplication event and have elevated amino acid replacement rates compared with other transcripts. Thus, an ancient large-scale gene duplication event within the spider lineage was likely an important source of molecular novelty during the evolution of silk gland-specific expression. This duplication event may have provided genetic material for subsequent silk gland diversification in the true spiders (Araneomorphae). © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. Pinda: a web service for detection and analysis of intraspecies gene duplication events.

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    Kontopoulos, Dimitrios-Georgios; Glykos, Nicholas M

    2013-09-01

    We present Pinda, a Web service for the detection and analysis of possible duplications of a given protein or DNA sequence within a source species. Pinda fully automates the whole gene duplication detection procedure, from performing the initial similarity searches, to generating the multiple sequence alignments and the corresponding phylogenetic trees, to bootstrapping the trees and producing a Z-score-based list of duplication candidates for the input sequence. Pinda has been cross-validated using an extensive set of known and bibliographically characterized duplication events. The service facilitates the automatic and dependable identification of gene duplication events, using some of the most successful bioinformatics software to perform an extensive analysis protocol. Pinda will prove of use for the analysis of newly discovered genes and proteins, thus also assisting the study of recently sequenced genomes. The service's location is http://orion.mbg.duth.gr/Pinda. The source code is freely available via https://github.com/dgkontopoulos/Pinda/.

  4. The fate of the duplicated androgen receptor in fishes: a late neofunctionalization event?

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    Haendler Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the observation of an increased number of paralogous genes in teleost fishes compared with other vertebrates and on the conserved synteny between duplicated copies, it has been shown that a whole genome duplication (WGD occurred during the evolution of Actinopterygian fish. Comparative phylogenetic dating of this duplication event suggests that it occurred early on, specifically in teleosts. It has been proposed that this event might have facilitated the evolutionary radiation and the phenotypic diversification of the teleost fish, notably by allowing the sub- or neo-functionalization of many duplicated genes. Results In this paper, we studied in a wide range of Actinopterygians the duplication and fate of the androgen receptor (AR, NR3C4, a nuclear receptor known to play a key role in sex-determination in vertebrates. The pattern of AR gene duplication is consistent with an early WGD event: it has been duplicated into two genes AR-A and AR-B after the split of the Acipenseriformes from the lineage leading to teleost fish but before the divergence of Osteoglossiformes. Genomic and syntenic analyses in addition to lack of PCR amplification show that one of the duplicated copies, AR-B, was lost in several basal Clupeocephala such as Cypriniformes (including the model species zebrafish, Siluriformes, Characiformes and Salmoniformes. Interestingly, we also found that, in basal teleost fish (Osteoglossiformes and Anguilliformes, the two copies remain very similar, whereas, specifically in Percomorphs, one of the copies, AR-B, has accumulated substitutions in both the ligand binding domain (LBD and the DNA binding domain (DBD. Conclusion The comparison of the mutations present in these divergent AR-B with those known in human to be implicated in complete, partial or mild androgen insensitivity syndrome suggests that the existence of two distinct AR duplicates may be correlated to specific functional differences that may be

  5. Actin evolution in ciliates (Protist, Alveolata) is characterized by high diversity and three duplication events.

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    Yi, Zhenzhen; Huang, Lijuan; Yang, Ran; Lin, Xiaofeng; Song, Weibo

    2016-03-01

    Ciliates possess two distinct nuclear genomes and unique genomic features, including highly fragmented chromosomes and extensive chromosomal rearrangements. Recent transcriptomic surveys have revealed that ciliates have several multi-copy genes providing an ideal template to study gene family evolution. Nonetheless, this process remains little studied in ciliated protozoa and consequently, the evolutionary patterns that govern it are not well understood. In this study, we focused on obtaining fine-scale information relative to ciliate species divergence for the first time. A total of 230 actin gene sequences were derived from this study, among which 217 were from four closely related Pseudokeronopsis species and 13 from other hypotrichous ciliates. Our investigation shows that: (1) At least three duplication events occurred in ciliates: diversification of three actin genes (Actin I, II, III) happened after the divergence of ciliate classes but before that of subclasses. And several recent and genus-specific duplications were followed within Actin I (Sterkiella, Oxytricha, Uroleptus, etc.), Actin II (Sterkiella), respectively. (2) Within the genus Pseudokeronopsis, Actin I gene duplication events happened after P. carnea and P. erythrina diverged. In contrast, in the morphologically similar species P. flava and P. rubra, the duplication event preceded diversification of the two species. The Actin II gene duplication events preceded divergence of the genus Pseudokeronopsis. (3) Phylogenetic analyses revealed that actin is suitable for resolving ciliate classes, but may not be used to infer lower taxon relationships.

  6. Characterization and evolution of conserved MicroRNA through duplication events in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera.

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    Yong Xiao

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level in a wide range of species. Highly conserved miRNAs regulate ancestral transcription factors common to all plants, and control important basic processes such as cell division and meristem function. We selected 21 conserved miRNA families to analyze the distribution and maintenance of miRNAs. Recently, the first genome sequence in Palmaceae was released: date palm (Phoenix dactylifera. We conducted a systematic miRNA analysis in date palm, computationally identifying and characterizing the distribution and duplication of conserved miRNAs in this species compared to other published plant genomes. A total of 81 miRNAs belonging to 18 miRNA families were identified in date palm. The majority of miRNAs in date palm and seven other well-studied plant species were located in intergenic regions and located 4 to 5 kb away from the nearest protein-coding genes. Sequence comparison showed that 67% of date palm miRNA members were present in duplicated segments, and that 135 pairs of miRNA-containing segments were duplicated in Arabidopsis, tomato, orange, rice, apple, poplar and soybean with a high similarity of non coding sequences between duplicated segments, indicating genomic duplication was a major force for expansion of conserved miRNAs. Duplicated miRNA pairs in date palm showed divergence in pre-miRNA sequence and in number of promoters, implying that these duplicated pairs may have undergone divergent evolution. Comparisons between date palm and the seven other plant species for the gain/loss of miR167 loci in an ancient segment shared between monocots and dicots suggested that these conserved miRNAs were highly influenced by and diverged as a result of genomic duplication events.

  7. Analyses of transcriptome sequences reveal multiple ancient large-scale duplication events in the ancestor of Sphagnopsida (Bryophyta).

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    Devos, Nicolas; Szövényi, Péter; Weston, David J; Rothfels, Carl J; Johnson, Matthew G; Shaw, A Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate whether there has been a whole-genome duplication (WGD) in the ancestry of Sphagnum (peatmoss) or the class Sphagnopsida, and to determine if the timing of any such duplication(s) and patterns of paralog retention could help explain the rapid radiation and current ecological dominance of peatmosses. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data were generated for nine taxa in Sphagnopsida (Bryophyta). Analyses of frequency plots for synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks ) between paralogous gene pairs and reconciliation of 578 gene trees were conducted to assess evidence of large-scale or genome-wide duplication events in each transcriptome. Both Ks frequency plots and gene tree-based analyses indicate multiple duplication events in the history of the Sphagnopsida. The most recent WGD event predates divergence of Sphagnum from the two other genera of Sphagnopsida. Duplicate retention is highly variable across species, which might be best explained by local adaptation. Our analyses indicate that the last WGD could have been an important factor underlying the diversification of peatmosses and facilitated their rise to ecological dominance in peatlands. The timing of the duplication events and their significance in the evolutionary history of peat mosses are discussed.

  8. Using Probabilistic Record Linkage of Structured and Unstructured Data to Identify Duplicate Cases in Spontaneous Adverse Event Reporting Systems.

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    Kreimeyer, Kory; Menschik, David; Winiecki, Scott; Paul, Wendy; Barash, Faith; Woo, Emily Jane; Alimchandani, Meghna; Arya, Deepa; Zinderman, Craig; Forshee, Richard; Botsis, Taxiarchis

    2017-07-01

    Duplicate case reports in spontaneous adverse event reporting systems pose a challenge for medical reviewers to efficiently perform individual and aggregate safety analyses. Duplicate cases can bias data mining by generating spurious signals of disproportional reporting of product-adverse event pairs. We have developed a probabilistic record linkage algorithm for identifying duplicate cases in the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) and the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). In addition to using structured field data, the algorithm incorporates the non-structured narrative text of adverse event reports by examining clinical and temporal information extracted by the Event-based Text-mining of Health Electronic Records system, a natural language processing tool. The final component of the algorithm is a novel duplicate confidence value that is calculated by a rule-based empirical approach that looks for similarities in a number of criteria between two case reports. For VAERS, the algorithm identified 77% of known duplicate pairs with a precision (or positive predictive value) of 95%. For FAERS, it identified 13% of known duplicate pairs with a precision of 100%. The textual information did not improve the algorithm's automated classification for VAERS or FAERS. The empirical duplicate confidence value increased performance on both VAERS and FAERS, mainly by reducing the occurrence of false-positives. The algorithm was shown to be effective at identifying pre-linked duplicate VAERS reports. The narrative text was not shown to be a key component in the automated detection evaluation; however, it is essential for supporting the semi-automated approach that is likely to be deployed at the Food and Drug Administration, where medical reviewers will perform some manual review of the most highly ranked reports identified by the algorithm.

  9. Insights into the coupling of duplication events and macroevolution from an age profile of animal transmembrane gene families.

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    Guohui Ding

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of new gene families subsequent to gene duplication may be coupled to the fluctuation of population and environment variables. Based upon that, we presented a systematic analysis of the animal transmembrane gene duplication events on a macroevolutionary scale by integrating the palaeontology repository. The age of duplication events was calculated by maximum likelihood method, and the age distribution was estimated by density histogram and normal kernel density estimation. We showed that the density of the duplicates displays a positive correlation with the estimates of maximum number of cell types of common ancestors, and the oxidation events played a key role in the major transitions of this density trace. Next, we focused on the Phanerozoic phase, during which more macroevolution data are available. The pulse mass extinction timepoints coincide with the local peaks of the age distribution, suggesting that the transmembrane gene duplicates fixed frequently when the environment changed dramatically. Moreover, a 61-million-year cycle is the most possible cycle in this phase by spectral analysis, which is consistent with the cycles recently detected in biodiversity. Our data thus elucidate a strong coupling of duplication events and macroevolution; furthermore, our method also provides a new way to address these questions.

  10. Evolutionary consequences of a large duplication event in Trypanosoma brucei: Chromosomes 4 and 8 are partial duplicons

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    Jackson Andrew P

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene order along the genome sequence of the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei provides evidence for a 0.5 Mb duplication, comprising the 3' regions of chromosomes 4 and 8. Here, the principal aim was to examine the contribution made by this duplication event to the T. brucei genome sequence, emphasising the consequences for gene content and the evolutionary change subsequently experienced by paralogous gene copies. The duplicated region may be browsed online at http://www.genedb.org/genedb/tryp/48dup_image.jsp Results Comparisons of trypanosomatid genomes demonstrated widespread gene loss from each duplicon, but also showed that 47% of duplicated genes were retained on both chromosomes as paralogous loci. Secreted and surface-expressed genes were over-represented among retained paralogs, reflecting a bias towards important factors at the host-parasite interface, and consistent with a dosage-balance hypothesis. Genetic divergence in both coding and regulatory regions of retained paralogs was bimodal, with a deficit in moderately divergent paralogs; in particular, non-coding sequences were either conserved or entirely remodelled. The conserved paralogs included examples of remarkable sequence conservation, but also considerable divergence of both coding and regulatory regions. Sequence divergence typically displayed strong negative selection; but several features, such as asymmetric evolutionary rates, positively-selected codons and other non-neutral substitutions, suggested that divergence of some paralogs was driven by functional change. The absence of orthologs to retained paralogs in T. congolense indicated that the duplication event was specific to T. brucei. Conclusion The duplication of this chromosomal region doubled the dosage of many genes. Rather than creating 'more of the same', these results show that paralogs were structurally modified according to various evolutionary trajectories. The retention of paralogs, and

  11. Genesis of the vertebrate FoxP subfamily member genes occurred during two ancestral whole genome duplication events.

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    Song, Xiaowei; Tang, Yezhong; Wang, Yajun

    2016-08-22

    The vertebrate FoxP subfamily genes play important roles in the construction of essential functional modules involved in physiological and developmental processes. To explore the adaptive evolution of functional modules associated with the FoxP subfamily member genes, it is necessary to study the gene duplication process. We detected four member genes of the FoxP subfamily in sea lampreys (a representative species of jawless vertebrates) through genome screenings and phylogenetic analyses. Reliable paralogons (i.e. paralogous chromosome segments) have rarely been detected in scaffolds of FoxP subfamily member genes in sea lampreys due to the considerable existence of HTH_Tnp_Tc3_2 transposases. However, these transposases did not alter gene numbers of the FoxP subfamily in sea lampreys. The coincidence between the "1-4" gene duplication pattern of FoxP subfamily genes from invertebrates to vertebrates and two rounds of ancestral whole genome duplication (1R- and 2R-WGD) events reveal that the FoxP subfamily of vertebrates was quadruplicated in the 1R- and 2R-WGD events. Furthermore, we deduced that a synchronous gene duplication process occurred for the FoxP subfamily and for three linked gene families/subfamilies (i.e. MIT family, mGluR group III and PLXNA subfamily) in the 1R- and 2R-WGD events using phylogenetic analyses and mirror-dendrogram methods (i.e. algorithms to test protein-protein interactions). Specifically, the ancestor of FoxP1 and FoxP3 and the ancestor of FoxP2 and FoxP4 were generated in 1R-WGD event. In the subsequent 2R-WGD event, these two ancestral genes were changed into FoxP1, FoxP2, FoxP3 and FoxP4. The elucidation of these gene duplication processes shed light on the phylogenetic relationships between functional modules of the FoxP subfamily member genes.

  12. Increments and duplication events of enzymes and transcription factors influence metabolic and regulatory diversity in prokaryotes.

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    Mario Alberto Martínez-Núñez

    Full Text Available In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM and structural domains (Superfamily. For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22% than in the bacterial ones (27% was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected.

  13. Increments and duplication events of enzymes and transcription factors influence metabolic and regulatory diversity in prokaryotes.

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    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected.

  14. Increments and Duplication Events of Enzymes and Transcription Factors Influence Metabolic and Regulatory Diversity in Prokaryotes

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    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected. PMID:23922780

  15. Domain duplication, divergence, and loss events in vertebrate Msx paralogs reveal phylogenomically informed disease markers

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    Finnerty John R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Msx originated early in animal evolution and is implicated in human genetic disorders. To reconstruct the functional evolution of Msx and inform the study of human mutations, we analyzed the phylogeny and synteny of 46 metazoan Msx proteins and tracked the duplication, diversification and loss of conserved motifs. Results Vertebrate Msx sequences sort into distinct Msx1, Msx2 and Msx3 clades. The sister-group relationship between MSX1 and MSX2 reflects their derivation from the 4p/5q chromosomal paralogon, a derivative of the original "MetaHox" cluster. We demonstrate physical linkage between Msx and other MetaHox genes (Hmx, NK1, Emx in a cnidarian. Seven conserved domains, including two Groucho repression domains (N- and C-terminal, were present in the ancestral Msx. In cnidarians, the Groucho domains are highly similar. In vertebrate Msx1, the N-terminal Groucho domain is conserved, while the C-terminal domain diverged substantially, implying a novel function. In vertebrate Msx2 and Msx3, the C-terminal domain was lost. MSX1 mutations associated with ectodermal dysplasia or orofacial clefting disorders map to conserved domains in a non-random fashion. Conclusion Msx originated from a MetaHox ancestor that also gave rise to Tlx, Demox, NK, and possibly EHGbox, Hox and ParaHox genes. Duplication, divergence or loss of domains played a central role in the functional evolution of Msx. Duplicated domains allow pleiotropically expressed proteins to evolve new functions without disrupting existing interaction networks. Human missense sequence variants reside within evolutionarily conserved domains, likely disrupting protein function. This phylogenomic evaluation of candidate disease markers will inform clinical and functional studies.

  16. Cheetahs have 4 serum amyloid a genes evolved through repeated duplication events.

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    Chen, Lei; Une, Yumi; Higuchi, Keiichi; Mori, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is a leading cause of mortality in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). We performed genome walking and PCR cloning and revealed that cheetahs have 4 SAA genes (provisionally named SAA1A, SAA1B, SAA3A, and SAA3B). In addition, we identified multiple nucleotide polymorphisms in the 4 SAA genes by screening 51 cheetahs. The polymorphisms defined 4, 7, 6, and 4 alleles for SAA1A, SAA3A, SAA1B, and SAA3B, respectively. Pedigree analysis of the inheritance of genotypes for the SAA genes revealed that specific combinations of alleles for the 4 SAA genes cosegregated as a unit (haplotype) in pedigrees, indicating that the 4 genes were linked on the same chromosome. Notably, cheetah SAA1A and SAA1B were highly homologous in their nucleotide sequences. Likewise, SAA3A and SAA3B genes were homologous. These observations suggested a model for the evolution of the 4 SAA genes in cheetahs in which duplication of an ancestral SAA gene first gave rise to SAA1 and SAA3. Subsequently, each gene duplicated one more time, uniquely making 4 genes in the cheetah genome. The monomorphism of the cheetah SAA1A protein might be one of the factors responsible for the high incidence of AA amyloidosis in this species.

  17. Tandem Duplication Events in the Expansion of the Small Heat Shock Protein Gene Family in Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706)

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    Krsticevic, Flavia J.; Arce, Débora P.; Ezpeleta, Joaquín; Tapia, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In plants, fruit maturation and oxidative stress can induce small heat shock protein (sHSP) synthesis to maintain cellular homeostasis. Although the tomato reference genome was published in 2012, the actual number and functionality of sHSP genes remain unknown. Using a transcriptomic (RNA-seq) and evolutionary genomic approach, putative sHSP genes in the Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706) genome were investigated. A sHSP gene family of 33 members was established. Remarkably, roughly half of the members of this family can be explained by nine independent tandem duplication events that determined, evolutionarily, their functional fates. Within a mitochondrial class subfamily, only one duplicated member, Solyc08g078700, retained its ancestral chaperone function, while the others, Solyc08g078710 and Solyc08g078720, likely degenerated under neutrality and lack ancestral chaperone function. Functional conservation occurred within a cytosolic class I subfamily, whose four members, Solyc06g076570, Solyc06g076560, Solyc06g076540, and Solyc06g076520, support ∼57% of the total sHSP RNAm in the red ripe fruit. Subfunctionalization occurred within a new subfamily, whose two members, Solyc04g082720 and Solyc04g082740, show heterogeneous differential expression profiles during fruit ripening. These findings, involving the birth/death of some genes or the preferential/plastic expression of some others during fruit ripening, highlight the importance of tandem duplication events in the expansion of the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome. Despite its evolutionary diversity, the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome seems to be endowed with a core set of four homeostasis genes: Solyc05g014280, Solyc03g082420, Solyc11g020330, and Solyc06g076560, which appear to provide a baseline protection during both fruit ripening and heat shock stress in different tomato tissues. PMID:27565886

  18. Tandem Duplication Events in the Expansion of the Small Heat Shock Protein Gene Family in Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706

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    Flavia J. Krsticevic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In plants, fruit maturation and oxidative stress can induce small heat shock protein (sHSP synthesis to maintain cellular homeostasis. Although the tomato reference genome was published in 2012, the actual number and functionality of sHSP genes remain unknown. Using a transcriptomic (RNA-seq and evolutionary genomic approach, putative sHSP genes in the Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Heinz 1706 genome were investigated. A sHSP gene family of 33 members was established. Remarkably, roughly half of the members of this family can be explained by nine independent tandem duplication events that determined, evolutionarily, their functional fates. Within a mitochondrial class subfamily, only one duplicated member, Solyc08g078700, retained its ancestral chaperone function, while the others, Solyc08g078710 and Solyc08g078720, likely degenerated under neutrality and lack ancestral chaperone function. Functional conservation occurred within a cytosolic class I subfamily, whose four members, Solyc06g076570, Solyc06g076560, Solyc06g076540, and Solyc06g076520, support ∼57% of the total sHSP RNAm in the red ripe fruit. Subfunctionalization occurred within a new subfamily, whose two members, Solyc04g082720 and Solyc04g082740, show heterogeneous differential expression profiles during fruit ripening. These findings, involving the birth/death of some genes or the preferential/plastic expression of some others during fruit ripening, highlight the importance of tandem duplication events in the expansion of the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome. Despite its evolutionary diversity, the sHSP gene family in the tomato genome seems to be endowed with a core set of four homeostasis genes: Solyc05g014280, Solyc03g082420, Solyc11g020330, and Solyc06g076560, which appear to provide a baseline protection during both fruit ripening and heat shock stress in different tomato tissues.

  19. Opossum carboxylesterases: sequences, phylogeny and evidence for CES gene duplication events predating the marsupial-eutherian common ancestor

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    Chan Jeannie

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carboxylesterases (CES perform diverse metabolic roles in mammalian organisms in the detoxification of a broad range of drugs and xenobiotics and may also serve in specific roles in lipid, cholesterol, pheromone and lung surfactant metabolism. Five CES families have been reported in mammals with human CES1 and CES2 the most extensively studied. Here we describe the genetics, expression and phylogeny of CES isozymes in the opossum and report on the sequences and locations of CES1, CES2 and CES6 'like' genes within two gene clusters on chromosome one. We also discuss the likely sequence of gene duplication events generating multiple CES genes during vertebrate evolution. Results We report a cDNA sequence for an opossum CES and present evidence for CES1 and CES2 like genes expressed in opossum liver and intestine and for distinct gene locations of five opossum CES genes,CES1, CES2.1, CES2.2, CES2.3 and CES6, on chromosome 1. Phylogenetic and sequence alignment studies compared the predicted amino acid sequences for opossum CES with those for human, mouse, chicken, frog, salmon and Drosophila CES gene products. Phylogenetic analyses produced congruent phylogenetic trees depicting a rapid early diversification into at least five distinct CES gene family clusters: CES2, CES1, CES7, CES3, and CES6. Molecular divergence estimates based on a Bayesian relaxed clock approach revealed an origin for the five mammalian CES gene families between 328–378 MYA. Conclusion The deduced amino acid sequence for an opossum cDNA was consistent with its identity as a mammalian CES2 gene product (designated CES2.1. Distinct gene locations for opossum CES1 (1: 446,222,550–446,274,850, three CES2 genes (1: 677,773,395–677,927,030 and a CES6 gene (1: 677,585,520–677,730,419 were observed on chromosome 1. Opossum CES1 and multiple CES2 genes were expressed in liver and intestine. Amino acid sequences for opossum CES1 and three CES2 gene products

  20. A dense linkage map for Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reveals variable chromosomal divergence after an ancestral whole genome duplication event.

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    Brieuc, Marine S O; Waters, Charles D; Seeb, James E; Naish, Kerry A

    2014-03-20

    Comparisons between the genomes of salmon species reveal that they underwent extensive chromosomal rearrangements following whole genome duplication that occurred in their lineage 58-63 million years ago. Extant salmonids are diploid, but occasional pairing between homeologous chromosomes exists in males. The consequences of re-diploidization can be characterized by mapping the position of duplicated loci in such species. Linkage maps are also a valuable tool for genome-wide applications such as genome-wide association studies, quantitative trait loci mapping or genome scans. Here, we investigated chromosomal evolution in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) after genome duplication by mapping 7146 restriction-site associated DNA loci in gynogenetic haploid, gynogenetic diploid, and diploid crosses. In the process, we developed a reference database of restriction-site associated DNA loci for Chinook salmon comprising 48528 non-duplicated loci and 6409 known duplicated loci, which will facilitate locus identification and data sharing. We created a very dense linkage map anchored to all 34 chromosomes for the species, and all arms were identified through centromere mapping. The map positions of 799 duplicated loci revealed that homeologous pairs have diverged at different rates following whole genome duplication, and that degree of differentiation along arms was variable. Many of the homeologous pairs with high numbers of duplicated markers appear conserved with other salmon species, suggesting that retention of conserved homeologous pairing in some arms preceded species divergence. As chromosome arms are highly conserved across species, the major resources developed for Chinook salmon in this study are also relevant for other related species.

  1. Reconciling gene and genome duplication events: using multiple nuclear gene families to infer the phylogeny of the aquatic plant family Pontederiaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Rob W; Graham, Sean W; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2011-11-01

    Most plant phylogenetic inference has used DNA sequence data from the plastid genome. This genome represents a single genealogical sample with no recombination among genes, potentially limiting the resolution of evolutionary relationships in some contexts. In contrast, nuclear DNA is inherently more difficult to employ for phylogeny reconstruction because major mutational events in the genome, including polyploidization, gene duplication, and gene extinction can result in homologous gene copies that are difficult to identify as orthologs or paralogs. Gene tree parsimony (GTP) can be used to infer the rooted species tree by fitting gene genealogies to species trees while simultaneously minimizing the estimated number of duplications needed to reconcile conflicts among them. Here, we use GTP for five nuclear gene families and a previously published plastid data set to reconstruct the phylogenetic backbone of the aquatic plant family Pontederiaceae. Plastid-based phylogenetic studies strongly supported extensive paraphyly of Eichhornia (one of the four major genera) but also depicted considerable ambiguity concerning the true root placement for the family. Our results indicate that species trees inferred from the nuclear genes (alone and in combination with the plastid data) are highly congruent with gene trees inferred from plastid data alone. Consideration of optimal and suboptimal gene tree reconciliations place the root of the family at (or near) a branch leading to the rare and locally restricted E. meyeri. We also explore methods to incorporate uncertainty in individual gene trees during reconciliation by considering their individual bootstrap profiles and relate inferred excesses of gene duplication events on individual branches to whole-genome duplication events inferred for the same branches. Our study improves understanding of the phylogenetic history of Pontederiaceae and also demonstrates the utility of GTP for phylogenetic analysis.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of eukaryotic NEET proteins uncovers a link between a key gene duplication event and the evolution of vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inupakutika, Madhuri A.; Sengupta, Soham; Nechushtai, Rachel; Jennings, Patricia A.; Onuchic, Jose’ N.; Azad, Rajeev K.; Padilla, Pamela; Mittler, Ron

    2017-02-01

    NEET proteins belong to a unique family of iron-sulfur proteins in which the 2Fe-2S cluster is coordinated by a CDGSH domain that is followed by the “NEET” motif. They are involved in the regulation of iron and reactive oxygen metabolism, and have been associated with the progression of diabetes, cancer, aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Despite their important biological functions, the evolution and diversification of eukaryotic NEET proteins are largely unknown. Here we used the three members of the human NEET protein family (CISD1, mitoNEET; CISD2, NAF-1 or Miner 1; and CISD3, Miner2) as our guides to conduct a phylogenetic analysis of eukaryotic NEET proteins and their evolution. Our findings identified the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum’s CISD proteins as the closest to the ancient archetype of eukaryotic NEET proteins. We further identified CISD3 homologs in fungi that were previously reported not to contain any NEET proteins, and revealed that plants lack homolog(s) of CISD3. Furthermore, our study suggests that the mammalian NEET proteins, mitoNEET (CISD1) and NAF-1 (CISD2), emerged via gene duplication around the origin of vertebrates. Our findings provide new insights into the classification and expansion of the NEET protein family, as well as offer clues to the diverged functions of the human mitoNEET and NAF-1 proteins.

  3. Gallbladder duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagan Pillay

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Duplication of the gallbladder is a rare congenital abnormality, which requires special attention to the biliary ductal and arterial anatomy. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy with intraoperative cholangiography is the appropriate treatment in a symptomatic gallbladder. The removal of an asymptomatic double gallbladder remains controversial.

  4. Closely linked H2B genes in the marine copepod, Tigriopus californicus indicate a recent gene duplication or gene conversion event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D; Cook, A; Wagner, M; Wells, D

    1992-01-01

    Two nonallelic histone gene clusters were characterized in the marine copepod, Tigriopus californicus. The DNA sequence of one of the clusters reveals six genes in the contiguous arrangement of H2B, H1, H3, H4, H2B and H2A. The order of genes within the second cluster is H3, H4, H2B and H2A. There is no evidence for the presence of an H1 gene in this cluster. Comparison of the three copepod H2B genes reveals a high degree of similarity between the 5' upstream regions and between the amino terminal halves of the two H2B genes found within the same cluster. From these data we infer that gene duplication and/or gene conversion events occurred within this cluster in the recent past.

  5. Diversification of genes encoding granule-bound starch synthase in monocots and dicots is marked by multiple genome-wide duplication events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Cheng

    Full Text Available Starch is one of the major components of cereals, tubers, and fruits. Genes encoding granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS, which is responsible for amylose synthesis, have been extensively studied in cereals but little is known about them in fruits. Due to their low copy gene number, GBSS genes have been used to study plant phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships. In this study, GBSS genes have been isolated and characterized in three fruit trees, including apple, peach, and orange. Moreover, a comprehensive evolutionary study of GBSS genes has also been conducted between both monocots and eudicots. Results have revealed that genomic structures of GBSS genes in plants are conserved, suggesting they all have evolved from a common ancestor. In addition, the GBSS gene in an ancestral angiosperm must have undergone genome duplication ∼251 million years ago (MYA to generate two families, GBSSI and GBSSII. Both GBSSI and GBSSII are found in monocots; however, GBSSI is absent in eudicots. The ancestral GBSSII must have undergone further divergence when monocots and eudicots split ∼165 MYA. This is consistent with expression profiles of GBSS genes, wherein these profiles are more similar to those of GBSSII in eudicots than to those of GBSSI genes in monocots. In dicots, GBSSII must have undergone further divergence when rosids and asterids split from each other ∼126 MYA. Taken together, these findings suggest that it is GBSSII rather than GBSSI of monocots that have orthologous relationships with GBSS genes of eudicots. Moreover, diversification of GBSS genes is mainly associated with genome-wide duplication events throughout the evolutionary course of history of monocots and eudicots.

  6. Detecting long tandem duplications in genomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audemard Eric

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting duplication segments within completely sequenced genomes provides valuable information to address genome evolution and in particular the important question of the emergence of novel functions. The usual approach to gene duplication detection, based on all-pairs protein gene comparisons, provides only a restricted view of duplication. Results In this paper, we introduce ReD Tandem, a software using a flow based chaining algorithm targeted at detecting tandem duplication arrays of moderate to longer length regions, with possibly locally weak similarities, directly at the DNA level. On the A. thaliana genome, using a reference set of tandem duplicated genes built using TAIR,a we show that ReD Tandem is able to predict a large fraction of recently duplicated genes (dS  Conclusions ReD Tandem allows to identify large tandem duplications without any annotation, leading to agnostic identification of tandem duplications. This approach nicely complements the usual protein gene based which ignores duplications involving non coding regions. It is however inherently restricted to relatively recent duplications. By recovering otherwise ignored events, ReD Tandem gives a more comprehensive view of existing evolutionary processes and may also allow to improve existing annotations.

  7. Plant Genome Duplication Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Junah; Robertson, Jon S; Paterson, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    Genome duplication, widespread in flowering plants, is a driving force in evolution. Genome alignments between/within genomes facilitate identification of homologous regions and individual genes to investigate evolutionary consequences of genome duplication. PGDD (the Plant Genome Duplication Database), a public web service database, provides intra- or interplant genome alignment information. At present, PGDD contains information for 47 plants whose genome sequences have been released. Here, we describe methods for identification and estimation of dates of genome duplication and speciation by functions of PGDD.The database is freely available at http://chibba.agtec.uga.edu/duplication/.

  8. Duplication in DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masami; Kari, Lila; Kincaid, Zachary; Seki, Shinnosuke

    The duplication and repeat-deletion operations are the basis of a formal language theoretic model of errors that can occur during DNA replication. During DNA replication, subsequences of a strand of DNA may be copied several times (resulting in duplications) or skipped (resulting in repeat-deletions). As formal language operations, iterated duplication and repeat-deletion of words and languages have been well studied in the literature. However, little is known about single-step duplications and repeat-deletions. In this paper, we investigate several properties of these operations, including closure properties of language families in the Chomsky hierarchy and equations involving these operations. We also make progress toward a characterization of regular languages that are generated by duplicating a regular language.

  9. Gene duplication as a major force in evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santoshkumar Magadum; Urbi Banerjee; Priyadharshini Murugan; Doddabhimappa Gangapur; Rajasekar Ravikesavan

    2013-04-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for acquiring new genes and creating genetic novelty in organisms. Many new gene functions have evolved through gene duplication and it has contributed tremendously to the evolution of developmental programmes in various organisms. Gene duplication can result from unequal crossing over, retroposition or chromosomal (or genome) duplication. Understanding the mechanisms that generate duplicate gene copies and the subsequent dynamics among gene duplicates is vital because these investigations shed light on localized and genomewide aspects of evolutionary forces shaping intra-specific and inter-specific genome contents, evolutionary relationships, and interactions. Based on whole-genome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana, there is compelling evidence that angiosperms underwent two whole-genome duplication events early during their evolutionary history. Recent studies have shown that these events were crucial for creation of many important developmental and regulatory genes found in extant angiosperm genomes. Recent studies also provide strong indications that even yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), with its compact genome, is in fact an ancient tetraploid. Gene duplication can provide new genetic material for mutation, drift and selection to act upon, the result of which is specialized or new gene functions. Without gene duplication the plasticity of a genome or species in adapting to changing environments would be severely limited. Whether a duplicate is retained depends upon its function, its mode of duplication, (i.e. whether it was duplicated during a whole-genome duplication event), the species in which it occurs, and its expression rate. The exaptation of preexisting secondary functions is an important feature in gene evolution, just as it is in morphological evolution.

  10. Molecular trajectories leading to the alternative fates of duplicate genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Marotta

    Full Text Available Gene duplication generates extra gene copies in which mutations can accumulate without risking the function of pre-existing genes. Such mutations modify duplicates and contribute to evolutionary novelties. However, the vast majority of duplicates appear to be short-lived and experience duplicate silencing within a few million years. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to these alternative fates. Here we delineate differing molecular trajectories of a relatively recent duplication event between humans and chimpanzees by investigating molecular properties of a single duplicate: DNA sequences, gene expression and promoter activities. The inverted duplication of the Glutathione S-transferase Theta 2 (GSTT2 gene had occurred at least 7 million years ago in the common ancestor of African great apes and is preserved in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, whereas a deletion polymorphism is prevalent in humans. The alternative fates are associated with expression divergence between these species, and reduced expression in humans is regulated by silencing mutations that have been propagated between duplicates by gene conversion. In contrast, selective constraint preserved duplicate divergence in chimpanzees. The difference in evolutionary processes left a unique DNA footprint in which dying duplicates are significantly more similar to each other (99.4% than preserved ones. Such molecular trajectories could provide insights for the mechanisms underlying duplicate life and death in extant genomes.

  11. A Duplicate Construction Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Brent

    This experiment was designed to assess the ability of item writers to construct truly parallel tests based on a "duplicate-construction experiment" in which Cronbach argues that if the universe description and sampling are ideally refined, the two independently constructed tests will be entirely equivalent, and that within the limits of item…

  12. Near Duplicate Document Detection Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassma S. Alsulami

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Search engines are the major breakthrough on the web for retrieving the information. But List of retrieved documents contains a high percentage of duplicated and near document result. So there is the need to improve the performance of search results. Some of current search engine use data filtering algorithm which can eliminate duplicate and near duplicate documents to save the users’ time and effort. The identification of similar or near-duplicate pairs in a large collection is a significant problem with wide-spread applications. In this paper survey present an up-to-date review of the existing literature in duplicate and near duplicate detection in Web

  13. Profiling of gene duplication patterns of sequenced teleost genomes: evidence for rapid lineage-specific genome expansion mediated by recent tandem duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jianguo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication has had a major impact on genome evolution. Localized (or tandem duplication resulting from unequal crossing over and whole genome duplication are believed to be the two dominant mechanisms contributing to vertebrate genome evolution. While much scrutiny has been directed toward discerning patterns indicative of whole-genome duplication events in teleost species, less attention has been paid to the continuous nature of gene duplications and their impact on the size, gene content, functional diversity, and overall architecture of teleost genomes. Results Here, using a Markov clustering algorithm directed approach we catalogue and analyze patterns of gene duplication in the four model teleost species with chromosomal coordinates: zebrafish, medaka, stickleback, and Tetraodon. Our analyses based on set size, duplication type, synonymous substitution rate (Ks, and gene ontology emphasize shared and lineage-specific patterns of genome evolution via gene duplication. Most strikingly, our analyses highlight the extraordinary duplication and retention rate of recent duplicates in zebrafish and their likely role in the structural and functional expansion of the zebrafish genome. We find that the zebrafish genome is remarkable in its large number of duplicated genes, small duplicate set size, biased Ks distribution toward minimal mutational divergence, and proportion of tandem and intra-chromosomal duplicates when compared with the other teleost model genomes. The observed gene duplication patterns have played significant roles in shaping the architecture of teleost genomes and appear to have contributed to the recent functional diversification and divergence of important physiological processes in zebrafish. Conclusions We have analyzed gene duplication patterns and duplication types among the available teleost genomes and found that a large number of genes were tandemly and intrachromosomally duplicated, suggesting

  14. Gastric, pancreatic, and ureteric duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Anindya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an 8-month-old, asymptomatic child who was incidentally detected to have two cystic structures in the abdomen. Surgical exploration revealed a gastric and pancreatic duplication cyst along with a blind-ending duplication of the right ureter. Excision of the duplications was relatively straightforward, and the child made an uneventful recovery. This constellation of duplications has not been reported before.

  15. An Introduction to Duplicate Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Nauman, Felix

    2010-01-01

    With the ever increasing volume of data, data quality problems abound. Multiple, yet different representations of the same real-world objects in data, duplicates, are one of the most intriguing data quality problems. The effects of such duplicates are detrimental; for instance, bank customers can obtain duplicate identities, inventory levels are monitored incorrectly, catalogs are mailed multiple times to the same household, etc. Automatically detecting duplicates is difficult: First, duplicate representations are usually not identical but slightly differ in their values. Second, in principle

  16. MECP2 Duplication Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Signorini, Cinzia; De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) and MECP2 duplication syndrome (MDS) are neurodevelopmental disorders caused by alterations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene expression. A relationship between MECP2 loss-of-function mutations and oxidative stress has been previously documented in RTT patients...... and murine models. To date, no data on oxidative stress have been reported for the MECP2 gain-of-function mutations in patients with MDS. In the present work, the pro-oxidant status and oxidative fatty acid damage in MDS was investigated (subjects n = 6) and compared to RTT (subjects n = 24) and healthy...... condition (subjects n = 12). Patients with MECP2 gain-of-function mutations showed increased oxidative stress marker levels (plasma non-protein bound iron, intraerythrocyte non-protein bound iron, F2-isoprostanes, and F4-neuroprostanes), as compared to healthy controls (P ≤ 0.05). Such increases were...

  17. Gene and genome duplication in Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhre, Karsten

    2005-11-01

    Gene duplication is key to molecular evolution in all three domains of life and may be the first step in the emergence of new gene function. It is a well-recognized feature in large DNA viruses but has not been studied extensively in the largest known virus to date, the recently discovered Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus. Here, I present a systematic analysis of gene and genome duplication events in the mimivirus genome. I found that one-third of the mimivirus genes are related to at least one other gene in the mimivirus genome, either through a large segmental genome duplication event that occurred in the more remote past or through more recent gene duplication events, which often occur in tandem. This shows that gene and genome duplication played a major role in shaping the mimivirus genome. Using multiple alignments, together with remote-homology detection methods based on Hidden Markov Model comparison, I assign putative functions to some of the paralogous gene families. I suggest that a large part of the duplicated mimivirus gene families are likely to interfere with important host cell processes, such as transcription control, protein degradation, and cell regulatory processes. My findings support the view that large DNA viruses are complex evolving organisms, possibly deeply rooted within the tree of life, and oppose the paradigm that viral evolution is dominated by lateral gene acquisition, at least in regard to large DNA viruses.

  18. Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Karyakin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015 was held during 21st–25th October 2015 at the Novotel Hotel, Chumphon, Thailand, one of the most favored travel destinations in Asia. The 10th ARRCN Symposium 2017 will be held during October 2017 in the Davao, Philippines. International Symposium on the Montagu's Harrier (Circus pygargus «The Montagu's Harrier in Europe. Status. Threats. Protection», organized by the environmental organization «Landesbund für Vogelschutz in Bayern e.V.» (LBV was held on November 20-22, 2015 in Germany. The location of this event was the city of Wurzburg in Bavaria.

  19. Extensive local gene duplication and functional divergence among paralogs in Atlantic salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ian A; Ciborowski, Kate L; Casadei, Elisa; Hazlerigg, David G; Martin, Sam; Jordan, William C; Sumner, Seirian

    2014-06-19

    Many organisms can generate alternative phenotypes from the same genome, enabling individuals to exploit diverse and variable environments. A prevailing hypothesis is that such adaptation has been favored by gene duplication events, which generate redundant genomic material that may evolve divergent functions. Vertebrate examples of recent whole-genome duplications are sparse although one example is the salmonids, which have undergone a whole-genome duplication event within the last 100 Myr. The life-cycle of the Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, depends on the ability to produce alternating phenotypes from the same genome, to facilitate migration and maintain its anadromous life history. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that genome-wide and local gene duplication events have contributed to the salmonid adaptation. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of three key organs involved in regulating migration in S. salar: Brain, pituitary, and olfactory epithelium. We identified over 10,000 undescribed S. salar sequences and designed an analytic workflow to distinguish between paralogs originating from local gene duplication events or from whole-genome duplication events. These data reveal that substantial local gene duplications took place shortly after the whole-genome duplication event. Many of the identified paralog pairs have either diverged in function or become noncoding. Future functional genomics studies will reveal to what extent this rich source of divergence in genetic sequence is likely to have facilitated the evolution of extreme phenotypic plasticity required for an anadromous life-cycle.

  20. Restriction and Recruitment—Gene Duplication and the Origin and Evolution of Snake Venom Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Hargreaves, Adam D; Swain, Martin T.; Matthew J. Hegarty; Logan, Darren W; Mulley, John F

    2014-01-01

    Snake venom has been hypothesized to have originated and diversified through a process that involves duplication of genes encoding body proteins with subsequent recruitment of the copy to the venom gland, where natural selection acts to develop or increase toxicity. However, gene duplication is known to be a rare event in vertebrate genomes, and the recruitment of duplicated genes to a novel expression domain (neofunctionalization) is an even rarer process that requires the evolution of novel...

  1. Duplication of the MYB oncogene in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahortiga, Idoya; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Graux, Carlos; Cauwelier, Barbara; Lambert, Frederic; Mentens, Nicole; Beverloo, H Berna; Pieters, Rob; Speleman, Frank; Odero, Maria D; Bauters, Marijke; Froyen, Guy; Marynen, Peter; Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona; Meijerink, Jules P P; Cools, Jan

    2007-05-01

    We identified a duplication of the MYB oncogene in 8.4% of individuals with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and in five T-ALL cell lines. The duplication is associated with a threefold increase in MYB expression, and knockdown of MYB expression initiates T cell differentiation. Our results identify duplication of MYB as an oncogenic event and suggest that MYB could be a therapeutic target in human T-ALL.

  2. Analysis of Duplicate Genes in Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.M. Cai; K.J. Van; M.Y. Kim; S.H. Lee

    2007-01-01

    @@ Gene duplication is a major determinant of the size and gene complement of eukaryotic genomes (Lockton and Gaut, 2005). There are a number of different ways in which duplicate genes can arise (Sankoff, 2001), but the most spectacular method of gene duplication may be whole genome duplication via polyploidization.

  3. Partial 1q Duplications and Associated Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Marcos L.M.; Baroneza, José E.; Teixeira, Patricia; Medina, Cristina T.N.; Cordoba, Mara S.; Versiani, Beatriz R.; Roese, Liege L.; Freitas, Erika L.; Fonseca, Ana C.S.; dos Santos, Maria C.G.; Pic-Taylor, Aline; Rosenberg, Carla; Oliveira, Silviene F.; Ferrari, Iris; Mazzeu, Juliana F.

    2016-01-01

    Duplications of the long arm of chromosome 1 are rare. Distal duplications are the most common and have been reported as either pure trisomy or unbalanced translocations. The paucity of cases with pure distal 1q duplications has made it difficult to delineate a partial distal trisomy 1q syndrome. Here, we report 2 patients with overlapping 1q duplications detected by G-banding. Array CGH and FISH were performed to characterize the duplicated segments, exclude the involvement of other chromosomes and determine the orientation of the duplication. Patient 1 presents with a mild phenotype and carries a 22.5-Mb 1q41q43 duplication. Patient 2 presents with a pure 1q42.13qter inverted duplication of 21.5 Mb, one of the smallest distal 1q duplications ever described and one of the few cases characterized by array CGH, thus contributing to a better characterization of distal 1q duplication syndrome. PMID:27022331

  4. Gene duplication in the genome of parasitic Giardia lamblia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Roberto

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giardia are a group of widespread intestinal protozoan parasites in a number of vertebrates. Much evidence from G. lamblia indicated they might be the most primitive extant eukaryotes. When and how such a group of the earliest branching unicellular eukaryotes developed the ability to successfully parasitize the latest branching higher eukaryotes (vertebrates is an intriguing question. Gene duplication has long been thought to be the most common mechanism in the production of primary resources for the origin of evolutionary novelties. In order to parse the evolutionary trajectory of Giardia parasitic lifestyle, here we carried out a genome-wide analysis about gene duplication patterns in G. lamblia. Results Although genomic comparison showed that in G. lamblia the contents of many fundamental biologic pathways are simplified and the whole genome is very compact, in our study 40% of its genes were identified as duplicated genes. Evolutionary distance analyses of these duplicated genes indicated two rounds of large scale duplication events had occurred in G. lamblia genome. Functional annotation of them further showed that the majority of recent duplicated genes are VSPs (Variant-specific Surface Proteins, which are essential for the successful parasitic life of Giardia in hosts. Based on evolutionary comparison with their hosts, it was found that the rapid expansion of VSPs in G. lamblia is consistent with the evolutionary radiation of placental mammals. Conclusions Based on the genome-wide analysis of duplicated genes in G. lamblia, we found that gene duplication was essential for the origin and evolution of Giardia parasitic lifestyle. The recent expansion of VSPs uniquely occurring in G. lamblia is consistent with the increment of its hosts. Therefore we proposed a hypothesis that the increment of Giradia hosts might be the driving force for the rapid expansion of VSPs.

  5. X-linked congenital ptosis and associated intellectual disability, short stature, microcephaly, cleft palate, digital and genital abnormalities define novel Xq25q26 duplication syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, R S; Jensen, L R; Maas, S M

    2014-01-01

    Submicroscopic duplications along the long arm of the X-chromosome with known phenotypic consequences are relatively rare events. The clinical features resulting from such duplications are various, though they often include intellectual disability, microcephaly, short stature, hypotonia, hypogona...

  6. Covered exstrophy with anorectal malformation and vaginal duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bawa Monika

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Covered exstrophy is a rare variant of the exstrophy-epispadias complex. We report a female newborn with covered exstrophy, absent anal opening and duplication of the introitus and the lower vagina. This rare, previously unreported, combination of anomalies highlights the complexity of the embryological events in the caudal area during separation of the hindgut and allantois.

  7. Expression Divergence of Duplicate Genes in the Protein Kinase Superfamily in Pacific Oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dahai; Ko, Dennis C; Tian, Xinmin; Yang, Guang; Wang, Liuyang

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication has been proposed to serve as the engine of evolutionary innovation. It is well recognized that eukaryotic genomes contain a large number of duplicated genes that evolve new functions or expression patterns. However, in mollusks, the evolutionary mechanisms underlying the divergence and the functional maintenance of duplicate genes remain little understood. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of duplicate genes in the protein kinase superfamily using whole genome and transcriptome data for the Pacific oyster. A total of 64 duplicated gene pairs were identified based on a phylogenetic approach and the reciprocal best BLAST method. By analyzing gene expression from RNA-seq data from 69 different developmental and stimuli-induced conditions (nine tissues, 38 developmental stages, eight dry treatments, seven heat treatments, and seven salty treatments), we found that expression patterns were significantly correlated for a number of duplicate gene pairs, suggesting the conservation of regulatory mechanisms following divergence. Our analysis also identified a subset of duplicate gene pairs with very high expression divergence, indicating that these gene pairs may have been subjected to transcriptional subfunctionalization or neofunctionalization after the initial duplication events. Further analysis revealed a significant correlation between expression and sequence divergence (as revealed by synonymous or nonsynonymous substitution rates) under certain conditions. Taken together, these results provide evidence for duplicate gene sequence and expression divergence in the Pacific oyster, accompanying its adaptation to harsh environments. Our results provide new insights into the evolution of duplicate genes and their expression levels in the Pacific oyster.

  8. Accelerated evolution after gene duplication: a time-dependent process affecting just one copy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegueroles, Cinta; Laurie, Steve; Albà, M Mar

    2013-08-01

    Gene duplication is widely regarded as a major mechanism modeling genome evolution and function. However, the mechanisms that drive the evolution of the two, initially redundant, gene copies are still ill defined. Many gene duplicates experience evolutionary rate acceleration, but the relative contribution of positive selection and random drift to the retention and subsequent evolution of gene duplicates, and for how long the molecular clock may be distorted by these processes, remains unclear. Focusing on rodent genes that duplicated before and after the mouse and rat split, we find significantly increased sequence divergence after duplication in only one of the copies, which in nearly all cases corresponds to the novel daughter copy, independent of the mechanism of duplication. We observe that the evolutionary rate of the accelerated copy, measured as the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions, is on average 5-fold higher in the period spanning 4-12 My after the duplication than it was before the duplication. This increase can be explained, at least in part, by the action of positive selection according to the results of the maximum likelihood-based branch-site test. Subsequently, the rate decelerates until purifying selection completely returns to preduplication levels. Reversion to the original rates has already been accomplished 40.5 My after the duplication event, corresponding to a genetic distance of about 0.28 synonymous substitutions per site. Differences in tissue gene expression patterns parallel those of substitution rates, reinforcing the role of neofunctionalization in explaining the evolution of young gene duplicates.

  9. Comparative Inference of Duplicated Genes Produced by Polyploidization in Soybean Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmei Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max is one of the most important crop plants for providing protein and oil. It is important to investigate soybean genome for its economic and scientific value. Polyploidy is a widespread and recursive phenomenon during plant evolution, and it could generate massive duplicated genes which is an important resource for genetic innovation. Improved sequence alignment criteria and statistical analysis are used to identify and characterize duplicated genes produced by polyploidization in soybean. Based on the collinearity method, duplicated genes by whole genome duplication account for 70.3% in soybean. From the statistical analysis of the molecular distances between duplicated genes, our study indicates that the whole genome duplication event occurred more than once in the genome evolution of soybean, which is often distributed near the ends of chromosomes.

  10. Intrathoracic enteric foregut duplication cyst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birmole B

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available A one month old male child presented with respiratory distress since day 10 of life. There was intercostal retraction and decreased air entry on the right side. Investigations revealed a well defined cystic mass in the posterior mediastinum with vertebral anomalies, the cyst was excised by posterolateral thoracotomy. Histopathology revealed it to be an enteric foregut duplication cyst.

  11. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  12. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  13. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J; Han, C; Gordon, L A; Terry, A; Prabhakar, S; She, X; Xie, G; Hellsten, U; Chan, Y M; Altherr, M; Couronne, O; Aerts, A; Bajorek, E; Black, S; Blumer, H; Branscomb, E; Brown, N; Bruno, W J; Buckingham, J; Callen, D F; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Campbell, E W; Caoile, C; Challacombe, J F; Chasteen, L A; Chertkov, O; Chi, H C; Christensen, M; Clark, L M; Cohn, J D; Denys, M; Detter, J C; Dickson, M; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Escobar, J; Fawcett, J J; Flowers, D; Fotopulos, D; Glavina, T; Gomez, M; Gonzales, E; Goodstein, D; Goodwin, L A; Grady, D L; Grigoriev, I; Groza, M; Hammon, N; Hawkins, T; Haydu, L; Hildebrand, C E; Huang, W; Israni, S; Jett, J; Jewett, P B; Kadner, K; Kimball, H; Kobayashi, A; Krawczyk, M; Leyba, T; Longmire, J L; Lopez, F; Lou, Y; Lowry, S; Ludeman, T; Manohar, C F; Mark, G A; McMurray, K L; Meincke, L J; Morgan, J; Moyzis, R K; Mundt, M O; Munk, A C; Nandkeshwar, R D; Pitluck, S; Pollard, M; Predki, P; Parson-Quintana, B; Ramirez, L; Rash, S; Retterer, J; Ricke, D O; Robinson, D; Rodriguez, A; Salamov, A; Saunders, E H; Scott, D; Shough, T; Stallings, R L; Stalvey, M; Sutherland, R D; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Torney, D C; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Tsai, M; Ulanovsky, L E; Ustaszewska, A; Vo, N; White, P S; Williams, A L; Wills, P L; Wu, J; Wu, K; Yang, J; DeJong, P; Bruce, D; Doggett, N A; Deaven, L; Schmutz, J; Grimwood, J; Richardson, P; Rokhsar, D S; Eichler, E E; Gilna, P; Lucas, S M; Myers, R M; Rubin, E M; Pennacchio, L A

    2005-04-06

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes, and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin, and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. While the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  14. Autopolyploidy genome duplication preserves other ancient genome duplications in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, William S.

    2017-01-01

    Salmonids (e.g. Atlantic salmon, Pacific salmon, and trouts) have a long legacy of genome duplication. In addition to three ancient genome duplications that all teleosts are thought to share, salmonids have had one additional genome duplication. We explored a methodology for untangling these duplications from each other to better understand them in Atlantic salmon. In this methodology, homeologous regions (paralogous/duplicated genomic regions originating from a whole genome duplication) from the most recent genome duplication were assumed to have duplicated genes at greater density and have greater sequence similarity. This assumption was used to differentiate duplicated gene pairs in Atlantic salmon that are either from the most recent genome duplication or from earlier duplications. From a comparison with multiple vertebrate species, it is clear that Atlantic salmon have retained more duplicated genes from ancient genome duplications than other vertebrates--often at higher density in the genome and containing fewer synonymous mutations. It may be that polysomic inheritance is the mechanism responsible for maintaining ancient gene duplicates in salmonids. Polysomic inheritance (when multiple chromosomes pair during meiosis) is thought to be relatively common in salmonids compared to other vertebrate species. These findings illuminate how genome duplications may not only increase the number of duplicated genes, but may also be involved in the maintenance of them from previous genome duplications as well. PMID:28241055

  15. Assessment and reconstruction of novel HSP90 genes: duplications, gains and losses in fungal and animal lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysoula N Pantzartzi

    Full Text Available Hsp90s, members of the Heat Shock Protein class, protect the structure and function of proteins and play a significant task in cellular homeostasis and signal transduction. In order to determine the number of hsp90 gene copies and encoded proteins in fungal and animal lineages and through that key duplication events that this family has undergone, we collected and evaluated Hsp90 protein sequences and corresponding Expressed Sequence Tags and analyzed available genomes from various taxa. We provide evidence for duplication events affecting either single species or wider taxonomic groups. With regard to Fungi, duplicated genes have been detected in several lineages. In invertebrates, we demonstrate key duplication events in certain clades of Arthropoda and Mollusca, and a possible gene loss event in a hymenopteran family. Finally, we infer that the duplication event responsible for the two (a and b isoforms in vertebrates occurred probably shortly after the split of Hyperoartia and Gnathostomata.

  16. Congenital duplication of the gallbladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safioleas, Michael C; Papavassiliou, Vassilios G; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Angouras, Dimitrios C; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2006-03-01

    Duplication of the gallbladder is a rare congenital anomaly of the biliary system. In this article, two cases of gallbladder duplication are presented. The first case is a patient with double gallbladder and concomitant choledocholithiasis. The probable diagnosis of double gallbladder was made preoperatively by computed tomography. The patient underwent a successful open cholecystectomy and common bile duct exploration. In the second case, two cystic formations in the place of gallbladder are demonstrated with ultrasound scan in a woman with acute cholecystitis. At surgery, two gallbladders were found. A brief review of epidemiology and anatomy of double gallbladder is included, along with a discussion of the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment of this condition.

  17. Yeast genome duplication was followed by asynchronous differentiation of duplicated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold; Cliften, P.F.; Johnston, M.

    2003-01-01

    Gene redundancy has been observed in yeast, plant and human genomes, and is thought to be a consequence of whole-genome duplications(1-3). Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, contains several hundred duplicated genes(1). Duplication(s) could have occurred before or after a given speciation. ...

  18. AMID: autonomous modeler of intragenic duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Weiss, Anthony S; Fekete, Alan; Jermiin, Lars S

    2003-01-01

    Intragenic duplication is an evolutionary process where segments of a gene become duplicated. While there has been much research into whole-gene or domain duplication, there have been very few studies of non-tandem intragenic duplication. The identification of intragenically replicated sequences may provide insight into the evolution of proteins, helping to link sequence data with structure and function. This paper describes a tool for autonomously modelling intragenic duplication. AMID provides: identification of modularly repetitive genes; an algorithm for identifying repeated modules; and a scoring system for evaluating the modules' similarity. An evaluation of the algorithms and use cases are presented.

  19. Genomic evidence for adaptation by gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wenfeng; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2014-08-01

    Gene duplication is widely believed to facilitate adaptation, but unambiguous evidence for this hypothesis has been found in only a small number of cases. Although gene duplication may increase the fitness of the involved organisms by doubling gene dosage or neofunctionalization, it may also result in a simple division of ancestral functions into daughter genes, which need not promote adaptation. Hence, the general validity of the adaptation by gene duplication hypothesis remains uncertain. Indeed, a genome-scale experiment found similar fitness effects of deleting pairs of duplicate genes and deleting individual singleton genes from the yeast genome, leading to the conclusion that duplication rarely results in adaptation. Here we contend that the above comparison is unfair because of a known duplication bias among genes with different fitness contributions. To rectify this problem, we compare homologous genes from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We discover that simultaneously deleting a duplicate gene pair in S. cerevisiae reduces fitness significantly more than deleting their singleton counterpart in S. pombe, revealing post-duplication adaptation. The duplicates-singleton difference in fitness effect is not attributable to a potential increase in gene dose after duplication, suggesting that the adaptation is owing to neofunctionalization, which we find to be explicable by acquisitions of binary protein-protein interactions rather than gene expression changes. These results provide genomic evidence for the role of gene duplication in organismal adaptation and are important for understanding the genetic mechanisms of evolutionary innovation.

  20. Chromosome I duplications in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKim, K.S.; Rose, A.M. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized 76 duplications of chromosome I in the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans. The region studied is the 20 map unit left half of the chromosome. Sixty-two duplications were induced with gamma radiation and 14 arose spontaneously. The latter class was apparently the result of spontaneous breaks within the parental duplication. The majority of duplications behave as if they are free. Three duplications are attached to identifiable sequences from other chromosomes. The duplication breakpoints have been mapped by complementation analysis relative to genes on chromosome I. Nineteen duplication breakpoints and seven deficiency breakpoints divide the left half of the chromosome into 24 regions. We have studied the relationship between duplication size and segregational stability. While size is an important determinant of mitotic stability, it is not the only one. We observed clear exceptions to a size-stability correlation. In addition to size, duplication stability may be influenced by specific sequences or chromosome structure. The majority of the duplications were stable enough to be powerful tools for gene mapping. Therefore the duplications described here will be useful in the genetic characterization of chromosome I and the techniques we have developed can be adapted to other regions of the genome.

  1. Tubular Colonic Duplication Presenting as Rectovestibular Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkera, Parag J; Bendre, Pradnya; D'souza, Flavia; Ramchandra, Mukunda; Nage, Amol; Palse, Nitin

    2015-09-01

    Complete colonic duplication is a very rare congenital anomaly that may have different presentations according to its location and size. Complete colonic duplication can occur in about 15% of all gastrointestinal duplications. Double termination of tubular colonic duplication in the perineum is even more uncommon. We present a case of a Y-shaped tubular colonic duplication which presented with a rectovestibular fistula and a normal anus. Radiological evaluation and initial exploration for sigmoidostomy revealed duplicated colons with a common vascular supply. Endorectal mucosal resection of theduplicated distal segment till the colostomy site with division of the septum of the proximal segment and colostomy closure proved curative without compromise of the continence mechanism. Tubular colonic duplication should always be ruled out when a diagnosis of perineal canal is considered in cases of vestibular fistula alongwith a normal anus.

  2. Duplicability of self-interacting human genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pérez-Bercoff, Asa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. RESULTS: We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD) or small-scale duplication (SSD), and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.

  3. Narrow, duplicated internal auditory canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, T. [Servico de Neurorradiologia, Hospital Garcia de Orta, Avenida Torrado da Silva, 2801-951, Almada (Portugal); Shayestehfar, B. [Department of Radiology, UCLA Oliveview School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Lufkin, R. [Department of Radiology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2003-05-01

    A narrow internal auditory canal (IAC) constitutes a relative contraindication to cochlear implantation because it is associated with aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve or its cochlear branch. We report an unusual case of a narrow, duplicated IAC, divided by a bony septum into a superior relatively large portion and an inferior stenotic portion, in which we could identify only the facial nerve. This case adds support to the association between a narrow IAC and aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The normal facial nerve argues against the hypothesis that the narrow IAC is the result of a primary bony defect which inhibits the growth of the vestibulocochlear nerve. (orig.)

  4. Identification of large NF1 duplications reciprocal to NAHR-mediated type-1 NF1 deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Bengesser, Kathrin; Callens, Tom; Mikhail, Fady; Fu, Chuanhua; Hillmer, Morten; Walker, Martha E; Saal, Howard M; Lacassie, Yves; Cooper, David N; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 5% of all patients with neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) exhibit large deletions of the NF1 gene region. To date, only nine unrelated cases of large NF1 duplications have been reported, with none of the affected patients exhibiting multiple café au lait spots (CALS), Lisch nodules, freckling, or neurofibromas, the hallmark signs of NF1. Here, we have characterized two novel NF1 duplications, one sporadic and one familial. Both index patients with NF1 duplications exhibited learning disabilities and atypical CALS. Additionally, patient R609021 had Lisch nodules, whereas patient R653070 exhibited two inguinal freckles. The mother and sister of patient R609021 also harbored the NF1 duplication and exhibited cognitive dysfunction but no CALS. The breakpoints of the nine NF1 duplications reported previously have not been identified and hence their underlying generative mechanisms have remained unclear. In this study, we performed high-resolution breakpoint analysis that indicated that the two duplications studied were mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) and that the duplication breakpoints were located within the NAHR hotspot paralogous recombination site 2 (PRS2), which also harbors the type-1 NF1 deletion breakpoints. Hence, our study indicates for the first time that NF1 duplications are reciprocal to type-1 NF1 deletions and originate from the same NAHR events. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. Temporal pattern of loss/persistence of duplicate genes involved in signal transduction and metabolic pathways after teleost-specific genome duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Yukuto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent genomic studies have revealed a teleost-specific third-round whole genome duplication (3R-WGD event occurred in a common ancestor of teleost fishes. However, it is unclear how the genes duplicated in this event were lost or persisted during the diversification of teleosts, and therefore, how many of the duplicated genes contribute to the genetic differences among teleosts. This subject is also important for understanding the process of vertebrate evolution through WGD events. We applied a comparative evolutionary approach to this question by focusing on the genes involved in long-term potentiation, taste and olfactory transduction, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, based on the whole genome sequences of four teleosts; zebrafish, medaka, stickleback, and green spotted puffer fish. Results We applied a state-of-the-art method of maximum-likelihood phylogenetic inference and conserved synteny analyses to each of 130 genes involved in the above biological systems of human. These analyses identified 116 orthologous gene groups between teleosts and tetrapods, and 45 pairs of 3R-WGD-derived duplicate genes among them. This suggests that more than half [(45×2/(116+45] = 56.5% of the loci, probably more than ten thousand genes, present in a common ancestor of the four teleosts were still duplicated after the 3R-WGD. The estimated temporal pattern of gene loss suggested that, after the 3R-WGD, many (71/116 of the duplicated genes were rapidly lost during the initial 75 million years (MY, whereas on average more than half (27.3/45 of the duplicated genes remaining in the ancestor of the four teleosts (45/116 have persisted for about 275 MY. The 3R-WGD-derived duplicates that have persisted for a long evolutionary periods of time had significantly larger number of interacting partners and longer length of protein coding sequence, implying that they tend to be more multifunctional than the singletons after the 3R-WGD. Conclusion

  6. Effect of Incomplete Lineage Sorting On Tree-Reconciliation-Based Inference of Gene Duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Louxin

    2014-01-01

    In the tree reconciliation approach to infer the duplication history of a gene family, the gene (family) tree is compared to the corresponding species tree. Incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) gives rise to stochastic variation in the topology of a gene tree and hence likely introduces false duplication events when a tree reconciliation method is used. We quantify the effect of ILS on gene duplication inference in a species tree in terms of the expected number of false duplication events inferred from reconciling a random gene tree, which occurs with a probability predicted in coalescent theory, and the species tree. We computationally examine the relationship between the effect of ILS on duplication inference in a species tree and its topological parameters. Our findings suggest that ILS may cause non-negligible bias on duplication inference, particularly on an asymmetric species tree. Hence, when gene duplication is inferred via tree reconciliation or any other approach that takes gene tree topology into account, the ILS-induced bias should be examined cautiously.

  7. The combinatorics of tandem duplication trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascuel, Olivier; Hendy, Michael D; Jean-Marie, Alain; McLachlan, Robert

    2003-02-01

    We developed a recurrence relation that counts the number of tandem duplication trees (either rooted or unrooted) that are consistent with a set of n tandemly repeated sequences generated under the standard unequal recombination (or crossover) model of tandem duplications. The number of rooted duplication trees is exactly twice the number of unrooted trees, which means that on average only two positions for a root on a duplication tree are possible. Using the recurrence, we tabulated these numbers for small values of n. We also developed an asymptotic formula that for large n provides estimates for these numbers. These numbers give a priori probabilities for phylogenies of the repeated sequences to be duplication trees. This work extends earlier studies where exhaustive counts of the numbers for small n were obtained. One application showed the significance of finding that most maximum-parsimony trees constructed from repeat sequences from human immunoglobins and T-cell receptors were tandem duplication trees. Those findings provided strong support to the proposed mechanisms of tandem gene duplication. The recurrence relation also suggests efficient algorithms to recognize duplication trees and to generate random duplication trees for simulation. We present a linear-time recognition algorithm.

  8. Genome duplication and multiple evolutionary origins of complex migratory behavior in Salmonidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrou, Markos A; Swartz, Brian A; Matzke, Nicholas J; Oakley, Todd H

    2013-12-01

    Multiple rounds of whole genome duplication have repeatedly marked the evolution of vertebrates, and correlate strongly with morphological innovation. However, less is known about the behavioral, physiological and ecological consequences of genome duplication, and whether these events coincide with major transitions in vertebrate complexity. The complex behavior of anadromy - where adult fishes migrate up rivers from the sea to their natal site to spawn - is well known in salmonid fishes. Some hypotheses suggest that migratory behavior evolved as a consequence of an ancestral genome duplication event, which permitted salinity tolerance and osmoregulatory plasticity. Here we test whether anadromy evolved multiple times within salmonids, and whether genome duplication coincided with the evolution of anadromy. We present a method that uses ancestral character simulation data to plot the frequency of character transitions over a time calibrated phylogenetic tree to provide estimates of the absolute timing of character state transitions. Furthermore, we incorporate extinct and extant taxa to improve on previous estimates of divergence times. We present the first phylogenetic evidence indicating that anadromy evolved at least twice from freshwater salmonid ancestors. Results suggest that genome duplication did not coincide in time with changes in migratory behavior, but preceded a transition to anadromy by 55-50 million years. Our study represents the first attempt to estimate the absolute timing of a complex behavioral trait in relation to a genome duplication event.

  9. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64% consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial proteins (mt-cy families while the remaining 33 (36% were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families. Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1 relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2 from cytosol to mitochondria and 3 multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on

  10. The hidden duplication past of the plant pathogen Phytophthora and its consequences for infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martens Cindy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oomycetes of the genus Phytophthora are pathogens that infect a wide range of plant species. For dicot hosts such as tomato, potato and soybean, Phytophthora is even the most important pathogen. Previous analyses of Phytophthora genomes uncovered many genes, large gene families and large genome sizes that can partially be explained by significant repeat expansion patterns. Results Analysis of the complete genomes of three different Phytophthora species, using a newly developed approach, unveiled a large number of small duplicated blocks, mainly consisting of two or three consecutive genes. Further analysis of these duplicated genes and comparison with the known gene and genome duplication history of ten other eukaryotes including parasites, algae, plants, fungi, vertebrates and invertebrates, suggests that the ancestor of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum most likely underwent a whole genome duplication (WGD. Genes that have survived in duplicate are mainly genes that are known to be preferentially retained following WGDs, but also genes important for pathogenicity and infection of the different hosts seem to have been retained in excess. As a result, the WGD might have contributed to the evolutionary and pathogenic success of Phytophthora. Conclusions The fact that we find many small blocks of duplicated genes indicates that the genomes of Phytophthora species have been heavily rearranged following the WGD. Most likely, the high repeat content in these genomes have played an important role in this rearrangement process. As a consequence, the paucity of retained larger duplicated blocks has greatly complicated previous attempts to detect remnants of a large-scale duplication event in Phytophthora. However, as we show here, our newly developed strategy to identify very small duplicated blocks might be a useful approach to uncover ancient polyploidy events, in particular for heavily rearranged genomes.

  11. Partial Duplication of Chromosome 8p

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rme

    The partial chromosome 8p duplication is a rare syndrome and is ... clinical and cytogenetic data of 5 Arab patients with de novo inversion duplication of 8p. ... characterized by Fluorescent in situ ... thick lower lips, down turned angles of mouth ...

  12. Duodenal duplication cyst identified with MRCP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbognin, G.; Guarise, A.; Biasiutti, C.; Pagnotta, N.; Procacci, C. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital ' G.B. Rossi' , Verona (Italy)

    2000-08-01

    We report a case of a stalked cystic duodenal duplication. The lesion, hyperintense on T2-weighted GRE images, maintained the signal intensity after oral administration of a negative contrast agent (Lumirem, Guerbet, Aulnay-Sous-Bois, France), confirming its independence from the duodenal lumen. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of duodenal duplication by means of MR cholangiopancreatography. (orig.)

  13. Bilateral duplication of the internal auditory canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weon, Young Cheol; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Choi, Sung Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea); Koo, Ja-Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam-si (Korea)

    2007-10-15

    Duplication of the internal auditory canal is an extremely rare temporal bone anomaly that is believed to result from aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. We report bilateral duplication of the internal auditory canal in a 28-month-old boy with developmental delay and sensorineural hearing loss. (orig.)

  14. Simultaneous identification of duplications and lateral gene transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofigh, Ali; Hallett, Michael; Lagergren, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The incongruency between a gene tree and a corresponding species tree can be attributed to evolutionary events such as gene duplication and gene loss. This paper describes a combinatorial model where so-called DTL-scenarios are used to explain the differences between a gene tree and a corresponding species tree taking into account gene duplications, gene losses, and lateral gene transfers (also known as horizontal gene transfers). The reasonable biological constraint that a lateral gene transfer may only occur between contemporary species leads to the notion of acyclic DTL-scenarios. Parsimony methods are introduced by defining appropriate optimization problems. We show that finding most parsimonious acyclic DTL-scenarios is NP-hard. However, by dropping the condition of acyclicity, the problem becomes tractable, and we provide a dynamic programming algorithm as well as a fixed-parameter tractable algorithm for finding most parsimonious DTL-scenarios.

  15. Current incidence of duplicate publication in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Veronique Wan Fook; Lam, Gilbert O A; Wang, Yun Fan; Chadha, Neil K

    2014-03-01

    Duplicate publication--deemed highly unethical--is the reproduction of substantial content in another article by the same authors. In 1999, Rosenthal et al. identified an 8.5% incidence of duplicate articles in two otolaryngology journals. We explored the current incidence in three otolaryngology journals in North America and Europe. Retrospective literature review. Index articles in 2008 in Archives of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Laryngoscope, and Clinical Otolaryngology were searched using MEDLINE. Potential duplicate publications in 2006 through 2010 were identified using the first, second, and last authors' names. Three authors independently investigated suspected duplicate publications--classifying them by degree of duplication. Of 358 index articles screened, 75 (20.9%) had 119 potential duplicates from 2006 to 2010. Full review of these 119 potential duplicates revealed a total of 40 articles with some form of redundancy (33.6% of the potential duplicates) involving 27 index articles (7.5% of 358 index articles); one (0.8%) "dual" publication (identical or nearly identical data and conclusions to the index article); three (2.5%) "suspected" dual publications (less than 50% new data and same conclusions); and 36 (30.3%) publications with "salami-slicing" (portion of the index article data repeated) were obtained. Further analysis compared the likelihood of duplicate publication by study source and subspecialty within otolaryngology. The incidence of duplicate publication has not significantly changed over 10 years. "Salami-slicing" was a concerning practice, with no cross-referencing in 61% of these cases. Detecting and eliminating redundant publications is a laborious task, but it is essential in upholding the journal quality and research integrity. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Copy number gain at Xp22.31 includes complex duplication rearrangements and recurrent triplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Bi, Weimin; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Simmons, Alexandra D; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Fang, Ping; Eng, Patricia A; Cooper, M Lance; Sutton, V Reid; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Bodensteiner, John B; Delgado, Mauricio R; Prakash, Siddharth K; Belmont, John W; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Berg, Jonathan S; Shinawi, Marwan; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lupski, James R

    2011-05-15

    Genomic instability is a feature of the human Xp22.31 region wherein deletions are associated with X-linked ichthyosis, mental retardation and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. A putative homologous recombination hotspot motif is enriched in low copy repeats that mediate recurrent deletion at this locus. To date, few efforts have focused on copy number gain at Xp22.31. However, clinical testing revealed a high incidence of duplication of Xp22.31 in subjects ascertained and referred with neurobehavioral phenotypes. We systematically studied 61 unrelated subjects with rearrangements revealing gain in copy number, using multiple molecular assays. We detected not only the anticipated recurrent and simple nonrecurrent duplications, but also unexpectedly identified recurrent triplications and other complex rearrangements. Breakpoint analyses enabled us to surmise the mechanisms for many of these rearrangements. The clinical significance of the recurrent duplications and triplications were assessed using different approaches. We cannot find any evidence to support pathogenicity of the Xp22.31 duplication. However, our data suggest that the Xp22.31 duplication may serve as a risk factor for abnormal phenotypes. Our findings highlight the need for more robust Xp22.31 triplication detection in that such further gain may be more penetrant than the duplications. Our findings reveal the distribution of different mechanisms for genomic duplication rearrangements at a given locus, and provide insights into aspects of strand exchange events between paralogous sequences in the human genome.

  17. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-04-29

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Duplication and Divergence of Floral MADS-Box Genes in Grasses: Evidence for the Generation and Modification of Novel Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guixia Xu; Hongzhi Kong

    2007-01-01

    The process of flowering is controlled by a hierarchy of floral genes that act as flowering time genes, inflorescence/floral meristem identity genes, and/or floral organ-identity genes. The most important and well-characterized floral genes are those that belong to the MADS-box family of transcription factors. Compelling evidence suggests that floral MADS-box genes have experienced a few large-scale duplication events. In particular, the pre-core eudicot duplication events have been considered to correlate with the emergence and diversification of core eudicots. Duplication of floral MADS-box genes has also been documented in monocots, particularly in grasses, although a systematic study is lacking. In the present study, by conducting extensive phylogenetic analyses, we identified pre-Poaceae gene duplication events in each of the AP1, PI, AG, AGL11, AGL2/3/4, and AGL9gene lineages. Comparative genomic studies further indicated that some of these duplications actually resulted from the genome doubling event that occurred 66-70 million years ago (MYA). In addition, we found that after gene duplication, exonization (of intron sequences) and pseudoexonization (of exon sequences) have contributed to the divergence of duplicate genes in sequence structure and, possibly, gene function.

  19. Duplicated Ižnternal Juguler Vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Kirbas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available    Duplicated internal juguler vein (DIJV is a rare anomaly and reported incidence is 0.4 % in the literature. A 45-year-old female patient was referred to our hospital because of non pulsatile neck swelling. The magnetic resonance image (MRI showed left IJVs divided at the angles of the mandible running anterior to the common carotid artery until anterior mediastinal level. Clinicians should be aware of the rare possibility of duplicated IJVs in patients presenting with neck swelling. The development of imaging technics have revealed more cases of duplicated internal juguler vein.

  20. Genome duplication, subfunction partitioning, and lineage divergence: Sox9 in stickleback and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresko, William A; Yan, Yi-Lin; Baltrus, David A; Amores, Angel; Singer, Amy; Rodríguez-Marí, Adriana; Postlethwait, John H

    2003-11-01

    Teleosts are the most species-rich group of vertebrates, and a genome duplication (tetraploidization) event in ray-fin fish appears to have preceded this remarkable explosion of biodiversity. What is the relationship of the ray-fin genome duplication to the teleost radiation? Genome duplication may have facilitated lineage divergence by partitioning different ancestral gene subfunctions among co-orthologs of tetrapod genes in different teleost lineages. To test this hypothesis, we investigated gene expression patterns for Sox9 gene duplicates in stickleback and zebrafish, teleosts whose lineages diverged early in Euteleost evolution. Most expression domains appear to have been partitioned between Sox9a and Sox9b before the divergence of stickleback and zebrafish lineages, but some ancestral expression domains were distributed differentially in each lineage. We conclude that some gene subfunctions, as represented by lineage-specific expression domains, may have assorted differently in separate lineages and that these may have contributed to lineage diversification during teleost evolution.

  1. Cep63 and cep152 cooperate to ensure centriole duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J Brown

    Full Text Available Centrosomes consist of two centrioles embedded in pericentriolar material and function as the main microtubule organising centres in dividing animal cells. They ensure proper formation and orientation of the mitotic spindle and are therefore essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Centrosome function is crucial during embryonic development, highlighted by the discovery of mutations in genes encoding centrosome or spindle pole proteins that cause autosomal recessive primary microcephaly, including Cep63 and Cep152. In this study we show that Cep63 functions to ensure that centriole duplication occurs reliably in dividing mammalian cells. We show that the interaction between Cep63 and Cep152 can occur independently of centrosome localisation and that the two proteins are dependent on one another for centrosomal localisation. Further, both mouse and human Cep63 and Cep152 cooperate to ensure efficient centriole duplication by promoting the accumulation of essential centriole duplication factors upstream of SAS-6 recruitment and procentriole formation. These observations describe the requirement for Cep63 in maintaining centriole number in dividing mammalian cells and further establish the order of events in centriole formation.

  2. Cep63 and cep152 cooperate to ensure centriole duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicola J; Marjanović, Marko; Lüders, Jens; Stracker, Travis H; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Centrosomes consist of two centrioles embedded in pericentriolar material and function as the main microtubule organising centres in dividing animal cells. They ensure proper formation and orientation of the mitotic spindle and are therefore essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Centrosome function is crucial during embryonic development, highlighted by the discovery of mutations in genes encoding centrosome or spindle pole proteins that cause autosomal recessive primary microcephaly, including Cep63 and Cep152. In this study we show that Cep63 functions to ensure that centriole duplication occurs reliably in dividing mammalian cells. We show that the interaction between Cep63 and Cep152 can occur independently of centrosome localisation and that the two proteins are dependent on one another for centrosomal localisation. Further, both mouse and human Cep63 and Cep152 cooperate to ensure efficient centriole duplication by promoting the accumulation of essential centriole duplication factors upstream of SAS-6 recruitment and procentriole formation. These observations describe the requirement for Cep63 in maintaining centriole number in dividing mammalian cells and further establish the order of events in centriole formation.

  3. The evolution of developmental patterning under genetic duplication constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Miguel A; Krakauer, David C

    2008-02-06

    Of considerable interest are the evolutionary and developmental origins of complex, adaptive structures and the mechanisms that stabilize these structures. We consider the relationship between the evolutionary process of gene duplication and deletion and the stability of morphogenetic patterns produced by interacting activators and inhibitors. We compare the relative stability of patterns with a single activator and inhibitor (two-dimensional system) against a 'redundant' system with two activators or two inhibitors (three-dimensional system). We find that duplication events can both expand and contract the space of patterns. We study developmental robustness in terms of stochastic escape times from this space, also known as a 'canalization potential'. We embed the output of pattern formation into an explicit evolutionary model of gene duplication, gene loss and variation in the steepness of the canalization potential. We find that under all constant conditions, the system evolves towards a preference for steep potentials associated with low phenotypic variability and longer lifespans. This preference leads to an overall decrease in the density of redundant genotypes as developmental robustness neutralizes the advantages of genetic robustness.

  4. Subfunctionalization reduces the fitness cost of gene duplication in humans by buffering dosage imbalances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Ariel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Driven essentially by random genetic drift, subfunctionalization has been identified as a possible non-adaptive mechanism for the retention of duplicate genes in small-population species, where widespread deleterious mutations are likely to cause complementary loss of subfunctions across gene copies. Through subfunctionalization, duplicates become indispensable to maintain the functional requirements of the ancestral locus. Yet, gene duplication produces a dosage imbalance in the encoded proteins and thus, as investigated in this paper, subfunctionalization must be subject to the selective forces arising from the fitness bottleneck introduced by the duplication event. Results We show that, while arising from random drift, subfunctionalization must be inescapably subject to selective forces, since the diversification of expression patterns across paralogs mitigates duplication-related dosage imbalances in the concentrations of encoded proteins. Dosage imbalance effects become paramount when proteins rely on obligatory associations to maintain their structural integrity, and are expected to be weaker when protein complexation is ephemeral or adventitious. To establish the buffering effect of subfunctionalization on selection pressure, we determine the packing quality of encoded proteins, an established indicator of dosage sensitivity, and correlate this parameter with the extent of paralog segregation in humans, using species with larger population -and more efficient selection- as controls. Conclusions Recognizing the role of subfunctionalization as a dosage-imbalance buffer in gene duplication events enabled us to reconcile its mechanistic nonadaptive origin with its adaptive role as an enabler of the evolution of genetic redundancy. This constructive role was established in this paper by proving the following assertion: If subfunctionalization is indeed adaptive, its effect on paralog segregation should scale with the dosage

  5. Large-scale inference of the point mutational spectrum in human segmental duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rognes Torbjørn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent segmental duplications are relatively large (≥ 1 kb genomic regions of high sequence identity (≥ 90%. They cover approximately 4–5% of the human genome and play important roles in gene evolution and genomic disease. The DNA sequence differences between copies of a segmental duplication represent the result of various mutational events over time, since any two duplication copies originated from the same ancestral DNA sequence. Based on this fact, we have developed a computational scheme for inference of point mutational events in human segmental duplications, which we collectively term duplication-inferred mutations (DIMs. We have characterized these nucleotide substitutions by comparing them with high-quality SNPs from dbSNP, both in terms of sequence context and frequency of substitution types. Results Overall, DIMs show a lower ratio of transitions relative to transversions than SNPs, although this ratio approaches that of SNPs when considering DIMs within most recent duplications. Our findings indicate that DIMs and SNPs in general are caused by similar mutational mechanisms, with some deviances at the CpG dinucleotide. Furthermore, we discover a large number of reference SNPs that coincide with computationally inferred DIMs. The latter reflects how sequence variation in duplicated sequences can be misinterpreted as ordinary allelic variation. Conclusion In summary, we show how DNA sequence analysis of segmental duplications can provide a genome-wide mutational spectrum that mirrors recent genome evolution. The inferred set of nucleotide substitutions represents a valuable complement to SNPs for the analysis of genetic variation and point mutagenesis.

  6. Nature and management of duplicate medication alerts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, Mette; Floor, Annemieke; Meijer, Willemijn M.; De Smet, Peter A G M; Bouvy, Marcel L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/153182210

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the nature of duplicate medication (DM) alerts, their management by community pharmacists, and potential characteristics of DM alerts that lead to interventions by pharmacists. METHODS: Observational study in 53 community pharmacies. Each pharmacist registered the nature

  7. Genome duplication in early vertebrates: insights from agnathan cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo Barucchi, V; Giovannotti, M; Nisi Cerioni, P; Splendiani, A

    2013-01-01

    Agnathans represent a remnant of a primitive offshoot of the vertebrates, and the long evolutionary separation between their 2 living groups, namely hagfishes and lampreys, could explain profound biological differences, also in karyotypes and genome sizes. Here, cytogenetic studies available on these vertebrates were summarized and data discussed with reference to the recently demonstrated monophyly of this group and to the 2 events of whole genome duplication (1R and 2R) characterizing the evolution of vertebrates. The comparison of cytogenetic data and phylogenetic relationships among agnathans and gnathostomes seems to support the hypothesis that 1R and 2R occurred before the evolutionary divergence between jawless and jawed vertebrates.

  8. Two Rounds of Whole Genome Duplication in the AncestralVertebrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehal, Paramvir; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-04-12

    The hypothesis that the relatively large and complex vertebrate genome was created by two ancient, whole genome duplications has been hotly debated, but remains unresolved. We reconstructed the evolutionary relationships of all gene families from the complete gene sets of a tunicate, fish, mouse, and human, then determined when each gene duplicated relative to the evolutionary tree of the organisms. We confirmed the results of earlier studies that there remains little signal of these events in numbers of duplicated genes, gene tree topology, or the number of genes per multigene family. However, when we plotted the genomic map positions of only the subset of paralogous genes that were duplicated prior to the fish-tetrapod split, their global physical organization provides unmistakable evidence of two distinct genome duplication events early in vertebrate evolution indicated by clear patterns of 4-way paralogous regions covering a large part of the human genome. Our results highlight the potential for these large-scale genomic events to have driven the evolutionary success of the vertebrate lineage.

  9. MSOAR 2.0: Incorporating tandem duplications into ortholog assignment based on genome rearrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Liqing

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ortholog assignment is a critical and fundamental problem in comparative genomics, since orthologs are considered to be functional counterparts in different species and can be used to infer molecular functions of one species from those of other species. MSOAR is a recently developed high-throughput system for assigning one-to-one orthologs between closely related species on a genome scale. It attempts to reconstruct the evolutionary history of input genomes in terms of genome rearrangement and gene duplication events. It assumes that a gene duplication event inserts a duplicated gene into the genome of interest at a random location (i.e., the random duplication model. However, in practice, biologists believe that genes are often duplicated by tandem duplications, where a duplicated gene is located next to the original copy (i.e., the tandem duplication model. Results In this paper, we develop MSOAR 2.0, an improved system for one-to-one ortholog assignment. For a pair of input genomes, the system first focuses on the tandemly duplicated genes of each genome and tries to identify among them those that were duplicated after the speciation (i.e., the so-called inparalogs, using a simple phylogenetic tree reconciliation method. For each such set of tandemly duplicated inparalogs, all but one gene will be deleted from the concerned genome (because they cannot possibly appear in any one-to-one ortholog pairs, and MSOAR is invoked. Using both simulated and real data experiments, we show that MSOAR 2.0 is able to achieve a better sensitivity and specificity than MSOAR. In comparison with the well-known genome-scale ortholog assignment tool InParanoid, Ensembl ortholog database, and the orthology information extracted from the well-known whole-genome multiple alignment program MultiZ, MSOAR 2.0 shows the highest sensitivity. Although the specificity of MSOAR 2.0 is slightly worse than that of InParanoid in the real data experiments

  10. Distal Xq duplication and functional Xq disomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schluth-Bolard Caroline

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Distal Xq duplications refer to chromosomal disorders resulting from involvement of the long arm of the X chromosome (Xq. Clinical manifestations widely vary depending on the gender of the patient and on the gene content of the duplicated segment. Prevalence of Xq duplications remains unknown. About 40 cases of Xq28 functional disomy due to cytogenetically visible rearrangements, and about 50 cases of cryptic duplications encompassing the MECP2 gene have been reported. The most frequently reported distal duplications involve the Xq28 segment and yield a recognisable phenotype including distinctive facial features (premature closure of the fontanels or ridged metopic suture, broad face with full cheeks, epicanthal folds, large ears, small and open mouth, ear anomalies, pointed nose, abnormal palate and facial hypotonia, major axial hypotonia, severe developmental delay, severe feeding difficulties, abnormal genitalia and proneness to infections. Xq duplications may be caused either by an intrachromosomal duplication or an unbalanced X/Y or X/autosome translocation. In XY males, structural X disomy always results in functional disomy. In females, failure of X chromosome dosage compensation could result from a variety of mechanisms, including an unfavourable pattern of inactivation, a breakpoint separating an X segment from the X-inactivation centre in cis, or a small ring chromosome. The MECP2 gene in Xq28 is the most important dosage-sensitive gene responsible for the abnormal phenotype in duplications of distal Xq. Diagnosis is based on clinical features and is confirmed by CGH array techniques. Differential diagnoses include Prader-Willi syndrome and Alpha thalassaemia-mental retardation, X linked (ATR-X. The recurrence risk is significant if a structural rearrangement is present in one of the parent, the most frequent situation being that of an intrachromosomal duplication inherited from the mother. Prenatal diagnosis is performed by

  11. Dating and functional characterization of duplicated genes in the apple (Malus domestica Borkh. by analyzing EST data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanzol Javier

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication is central to genome evolution. In plants, genes can be duplicated through small-scale events and large-scale duplications often involving polyploidy. The apple belongs to the subtribe Pyrinae (Rosaceae, a diverse lineage that originated via allopolyploidization. Both small-scale duplications and polyploidy may have been important mechanisms shaping the genome of this species. Results This study evaluates the gene duplication and polyploidy history of the apple by characterizing duplicated genes in this species using EST data. Overall, 68% of the apple genes were clustered into families with a mean copy-number of 4.6. Analysis of the age distribution of gene duplications supported a continuous mode of small-scale duplications, plus two episodes of large-scale duplicates of vastly different ages. The youngest was consistent with the polyploid origin of the Pyrinae 37-48 MYBP, whereas the older may be related to γ-triplication; an ancient hexapolyploidization previously characterized in the four sequenced eurosid genomes and basal to the eurosid-asterid divergence. Duplicated genes were studied for functional diversification with an emphasis on young paralogs; those originated during or after the formation of the Pyrinae lineage. Unequal assignment of single-copy genes and gene families to Gene Ontology categories suggested functional bias in the pattern of gene retention of paralogs. Young paralogs related to signal transduction, metabolism, and energy pathways have been preferentially retained. Non-random retention of duplicated genes seems to have mediated the expansion of gene families, some of which may have substantially increased their members after the origin of the Pyrinae. The joint analysis of over-duplicated functional categories and phylogenies, allowed evaluation of the role of both polyploidy and small-scale duplications during this process. Finally, gene expression analysis indicated that 82

  12. Beyond the Whole-Genome Duplication: Phylogenetic Evidence for an Ancient Interspecies Hybridization in the Baker's Yeast Lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Marcet-Houben

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome duplications have shaped the genomes of several vertebrate, plant, and fungal lineages. Earlier studies have focused on establishing when these events occurred and on elucidating their functional and evolutionary consequences, but we still lack sufficient understanding of how genome duplications first originated. We used phylogenomics to study the ancient genome duplication occurred in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineage and found compelling evidence for the existence of a contemporaneous interspecies hybridization. We propose that the genome doubling was a direct consequence of this hybridization and that it served to provide stability to the recently formed allopolyploid. This scenario provides a mechanism for the origin of this ancient duplication and the lineage that originated from it and brings a new perspective to the interpretation of the origin and consequences of whole-genome duplications.

  13. 48 CFR 1331.205-70 - Duplication of effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of effort....205-70 Duplication of effort. The Department will not pay any costs for work that is duplicative of..., Duplication of Effort, in all cost-reimbursement, time and materials, and labor hour solicitations...

  14. 44 CFR 204.62 - Duplication and recovery of assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication and recovery of... Administration § 204.62 Duplication and recovery of assistance. (a) Duplication of benefits. We provide supplementary assistance under the Stafford Act, which generally may not duplicate benefits received by...

  15. Partial duplication of the APBA2 gene in chromosome 15q13 corresponds to duplicon structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesterson Robert A

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal abnormalities affecting human chromosome 15q11-q13 underlie multiple genomic disorders caused by deletion, duplication and triplication of intervals in this region. These events are mediated by highly homologous segments of DNA, or duplicons, that facilitate mispairing and unequal cross-over in meiosis. The gene encoding an amyloid precursor protein-binding protein (APBA2 was previously mapped to the distal portion of the interval commonly deleted in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and duplicated in cases of autism. Results We show that this gene actually maps to a more telomeric location and is partially duplicated within the broader region. Two highly homologous copies of an interval containing a large 5' exon and downstream sequence are located ~5 Mb distal to the intact locus. The duplicated copies, containing the first coding exon of APBA2, can be distinguished by single nucleotide sequence differences and are transcriptionally inactive. Adjacent to APBA2 maps a gene termed KIAA0574. The protein encoded by this gene is weakly homologous to a protein termed X123 that in turn maps adjacent to APBA1 on 9q21.12; APBA1 is highly homologous to APBA2 in the C-terminal region and is distinguished from APBA2 by the N-terminal region encoded by this duplicated exon. Conclusion The duplication of APBA2 sequences in this region adds to a complex picture of different low copy repeats present across this region and elsewhere on the chromosome.

  16. Four unrelated patients with Lubs X-linked mental retardation syndrome and different Xq28 duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Oliver; Gebauer, Konstanze; Lechno, Stanislav; van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Bonin, Michael; Seidel, Jörg; Thamm-Mücke, Barbara; Horn, Denise; Klopocki, Eva; Hertzberg, Christoph; Zechner, Ulrich; Haaf, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    The Lubs X-linked mental retardation syndrome (MRXSL) is caused by small interstitial duplications at distal Xq28 including the MECP2 gene. Here we report on four novel male patients with MRXSL and different Xq28 duplications delineated by microarray-based chromosome analysis. All mothers were healthy carriers of the duplications. Consistent with an earlier report [Bauters et al. (2008); Genome Res 18: 847-858], the distal breakpoints of all four Xq28 duplications were located in regions containing low-copy repeats (LCRs; J, K, and L groups), which may facilitate chromosome breakage and reunion events. The proximal breakpoint regions did not contain known LCRs. Interestingly, we identified apparent recurrent breakage sites in the proximal and distal breakpoint regions. Two of the four patients displayed more complex rearrangements. Patient 2 was endowed with a quadruplicated segment and a small triplication within the duplication, whereas patient 3 displayed two triplicated segments within the duplication, supporting that the Fork Stalling and Template Switching (FoSTeS) model may explain a subset of the structural rearrangements in Xq28. Clinically, muscular hypertonia and contractures of large joints may present a major problem in children with MRXSL. Because injection of botulinum toxin (BT-A; Botox) proved to be extremely helpful for patient 1, we recommend consideration of Botox treatment in other patients with MRXSL and severe joint contractures.

  17. Restriction and recruitment-gene duplication and the origin and evolution of snake venom toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Adam D; Swain, Martin T; Hegarty, Matthew J; Logan, Darren W; Mulley, John F

    2014-08-01

    Snake venom has been hypothesized to have originated and diversified through a process that involves duplication of genes encoding body proteins with subsequent recruitment of the copy to the venom gland, where natural selection acts to develop or increase toxicity. However, gene duplication is known to be a rare event in vertebrate genomes, and the recruitment of duplicated genes to a novel expression domain (neofunctionalization) is an even rarer process that requires the evolution of novel combinations of transcription factor binding sites in upstream regulatory regions. Therefore, although this hypothesis concerning the evolution of snake venom is very unlikely and should be regarded with caution, it is nonetheless often assumed to be established fact, hindering research into the true origins of snake venom toxins. To critically evaluate this hypothesis, we have generated transcriptomic data for body tissues and salivary and venom glands from five species of venomous and nonvenomous reptiles. Our comparative transcriptomic analysis of these data reveals that snake venom does not evolve through the hypothesized process of duplication and recruitment of genes encoding body proteins. Indeed, our results show that many proposed venom toxins are in fact expressed in a wide variety of body tissues, including the salivary gland of nonvenomous reptiles and that these genes have therefore been restricted to the venom gland following duplication, not recruited. Thus, snake venom evolves through the duplication and subfunctionalization of genes encoding existing salivary proteins. These results highlight the danger of the elegant and intuitive "just-so story" in evolutionary biology.

  18. Do Children Think that Duplicating the Body also Duplicates the Mind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Bruce; Gjersoe, Nathalia L.; Bloom, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Philosophers use hypothetical duplication scenarios to explore intuitions about personal identity. Here we examined 5- to 6-year-olds' intuitions about the physical properties and memories of a live hamster that is apparently duplicated by a machine. In Study 1, children thought that more of the original's physical properties than episodic…

  19. A conserved segmental duplication within ELA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmeyer-Langford, C L; Murphy, W J; Childers, C P; Skow, L C

    2010-12-01

    The assembled genomic sequence of the horse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (equine lymphocyte antigen, ELA) is very similar to the homologous human HLA, with the notable exception of a large segmental duplication at the boundary of ELA class I and class III that is absent in HLA. The segmental duplication consists of a ∼ 710 kb region of at least 11 repeated blocks: 10 blocks each contain an MHC class I-like sequence and the helicase domain portion of a BAT1-like sequence, and the remaining unit contains the full-length BAT1 gene. Similar genomic features were found in other Perissodactyls, indicating an ancient origin, which is consistent with phylogenetic analyses. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) of mRNA from peripheral white blood cells of healthy and chronically or acutely infected horses detected transcription from predicted open reading frames in several of the duplicated blocks. This duplication is not present in the sequenced MHCs of most other mammals, although a similar feature at the same relative position is present in the feline MHC (FLA). Striking sequence conservation throughout Perissodactyl evolution is consistent with a functional role for at least some of the genes included within this segmental duplication.

  20. Origin of the Yeast Whole-Genome Duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth H Wolfe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome duplications (WGDs are rare evolutionary events with profound consequences. They double an organism's genetic content, immediately creating a reproductive barrier between it and its ancestors and providing raw material for the divergence of gene functions between paralogs. Almost all eukaryotic genome sequences bear evidence of ancient WGDs, but the causes of these events and the timing of intermediate steps have been difficult to discern. One of the best-characterized WGDs occurred in the lineage leading to the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Marcet-Houben and Gabaldón now show that, rather than simply doubling the DNA of a single ancestor, the yeast WGD likely involved mating between two different ancestral species followed by a doubling of the genome to restore fertility.

  1. Infected colonic duplication: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hye Seon; Lee, Young Hwan; Kang, Eugene; Oh, Yeon Kyun; Yun, Ki Jung [Wonkwang Univ. School of Medicine and Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    An enteric duplication is a relatively common congenital anomaly, which is rarely complicated by infection. We report the radiologic findings including ultrasound, barium enema and computed tomography (CT) of an infected colonic duplication that was confirmed by pathology. This case demonstrated a complex hypoechoic cystic mass with a thick wall and septa in the left lower quadrant of abdomen and increased the color flow on the Color Doppler ultrasonography. On CT images, the cystic mass contained multiple enhancing septa, infiltrated to the mesocolon and displaced the adjacent bowels. On exploration, a large cystic mass with an abscess attached to the mesocolic border adhering to the small bowel was found.

  2. Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappey, A Francois; Hirose, Shinjiro

    2017-04-01

    Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) may represent diseases with common embryologic etiologies, namely, faulty tracheoesophageal separation and differentiation. Here, we will re-enforce definitions for these diseases as well as review their embryology, diagnosis, and treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Metabolic Adaptation after Whole Genome Duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, M.J.A. van; Hogeweg, P.

    2009-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGDs) have been hypothesized to be responsible for major transitions in evolution. However, the effects of WGD and subsequent gene loss on cellular behavior and metabolism are still poorly understood. Here we develop a genome scale evolutionary model to study the dynamics

  4. Fetal cyst reveling retroperitoneal enteric duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imene Dahmane Ayadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroperitoneum is a very uncommon site of enteric duplication (ED. We report a new case of retroperitoneal ED cyst suspected in utero. Prenatal ultrasound showed an abdominal cystic mass. Noncommunicating retroperitoneal ED cyst measuring 70 mm × 30 mm was resected. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis.

  5. Gastric Duplication Cyst Causing Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Al Shehi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a newborn baby with gastric duplication cyst presented with non-bilious vomiting and upper abdominal distension. The diagnosis was suspected clinically and established by ultrasonography and computed tomography. The cyst was completely excised with uneventful recovery.

  6. Organising European technical documentation to avoid duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donawa, Maria

    2006-04-01

    The development of comprehensive accurate and well-organised technical documentation that demonstrates compliance with regulatory requirements is a resource-intensive, but critically important activity for medical device manufacturers. This article discusses guidance documents and method of organising technical documentation that may help avoid costly and time-consuming duplication.

  7. Incomplete urethral duplication in an adult male.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, N F

    2012-09-01

    Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly with less than 200 cases reported. It predominantly occurs in males and is nearly always diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. It is defined as a complete second passage from the bladder to the dorsum of the penis or as an accessory pathway that ends blindly on the dorsal or ventral surface.

  8. Decomposition of Parallel Copies with Duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Purohit

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available SSA form is becoming more popular in the context of JIT compilation since it allows the compiler to perform important optimizations like common sub-expression elimination or constant propagation without the drawbacks of keeping huge data structures in memory or requiring a lot of computing power. The recent approach of SSA-based register allocation performs SSA elimination after register allocation. F. Bouchez et al. proposed parallel copy motion to prevent the splitting of edges when going out of colored SSA by moving the code that should be assigned to the edges to a more convenient place. Duplications in parallel copies pose some problems when moving them. In this paper an approach has been developed to decompose parallel copies so that duplications can be handled separately and parallel copies can be easily moved away without duplication. A simple and elegant application is moving duplicated copies out of critical edges. This is often beneficial compared to the alternative splitting the edge.

  9. Ancient gene duplication provided a key molecular step for anaerobic growth of Baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masaya; Schilke, Brenda; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Williams, Barry; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles required for a number of key cellular processes. As most mitochondrial proteins are nuclear encoded, their efficient translocation into the organelle is critical. Transport of proteins across the inner membrane is driven by a multicomponent, matrix-localized "import motor," which is based on the activity of the molecular chaperone Hsp70 and a J-protein cochaperone. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two paralogous J-proteins, Pam18 and Mdj2, can form the import motor. Both contain transmembrane and matrix domains, with Pam18 having an additional intermembrane space (IMS) domain. Evolutionary analyses revealed that the origin of the IMS domain of S. cerevisiae Pam18 coincides with a gene duplication event that generated the PAM18/MDJ2 gene pair. The duplication event and origin of the Pam18 IMS domain occurred at the relatively ancient divergence of the fungal subphylum Saccharomycotina. The timing of the duplication event also corresponds with a number of additional functional changes related to mitochondrial function and respiration. Physiological and genetic studies revealed that the IMS domain of Pam18 is required for efficient growth under anaerobic conditions, even though it is dispensable when oxygen is present. Thus, the gene duplication was beneficial for growth capacity under particular environmental conditions as well as diversification of the import motor components.

  10. Duplication and amplification of antibiotic resistance genes enable increased resistance in isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    During normal bacterial DNA replication, gene duplication and amplification (GDA) events occur randomly at a low frequency in the genome throughout a population. In the absence of selection, GDA events that increase the number of copies of a bacterial gene (or a set of genes) are lost. Antibiotic ...

  11. Local synteny and codon usage contribute to asymmetric sequence divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene duplicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergthorsson Ulfar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplicated genes frequently experience asymmetric rates of sequence evolution. Relaxed selective constraints and positive selection have both been invoked to explain the observation that one paralog within a gene-duplicate pair exhibits an accelerated rate of sequence evolution. In the majority of studies where asymmetric divergence has been established, there is no indication as to which gene copy, ancestral or derived, is evolving more rapidly. In this study we investigated the effect of local synteny (gene-neighborhood conservation and codon usage on the sequence evolution of gene duplicates in the S. cerevisiae genome. We further distinguish the gene duplicates into those that originated from a whole-genome duplication (WGD event (ohnologs versus small-scale duplications (SSD to determine if there exist any differences in their patterns of sequence evolution. Results For SSD pairs, the derived copy evolves faster than the ancestral copy. However, there is no relationship between rate asymmetry and synteny conservation (ancestral-like versus derived-like in ohnologs. mRNA abundance and optimal codon usage as measured by the CAI is lower in the derived SSD copies relative to ancestral paralogs. Moreover, in the case of ohnologs, the faster-evolving copy has lower CAI and lowered expression. Conclusions Together, these results suggest that relaxation of selection for codon usage and gene expression contribute to rate asymmetry in the evolution of duplicated genes and that in SSD pairs, the relaxation of selection stems from the loss of ancestral regulatory information in the derived copy.

  12. Molecular evolution accompanying functional divergence of duplicated genes along the plant starch biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougué, Odrade; Corbi, Jonathan; Ball, Steven G; Manicacci, Domenica; Tenaillon, Maud I

    2014-05-15

    Starch is the main source of carbon storage in the Archaeplastida. The starch biosynthesis pathway (sbp) emerged from cytosolic glycogen metabolism shortly after plastid endosymbiosis and was redirected to the plastid stroma during the green lineage divergence. The SBP is a complex network of genes, most of which are members of large multigene families. While some gene duplications occurred in the Archaeplastida ancestor, most were generated during the sbp redirection process, and the remaining few paralogs were generated through compartmentalization or tissue specialization during the evolution of the land plants. In the present study, we tested models of duplicated gene evolution in order to understand the evolutionary forces that have led to the development of SBP in angiosperms. We combined phylogenetic analyses and tests on the rates of evolution along branches emerging from major duplication events in six gene families encoding sbp enzymes. We found evidence of positive selection along branches following cytosolic or plastidial specialization in two starch phosphorylases and identified numerous residues that exhibited changes in volume, polarity or charge. Starch synthases, branching and debranching enzymes functional specializations were also accompanied by accelerated evolution. However, none of the sites targeted by selection corresponded to known functional domains, catalytic or regulatory. Interestingly, among the 13 duplications tested, 7 exhibited evidence of positive selection in both branches emerging from the duplication, 2 in only one branch, and 4 in none of the branches. The majority of duplications were followed by accelerated evolution targeting specific residues along both branches. This pattern was consistent with the optimization of the two sub-functions originally fulfilled by the ancestral gene before duplication. Our results thereby provide strong support to the so-called "Escape from Adaptive Conflict" (EAC) model. Because none of the

  13. Functional divergence of gene duplicates – a domain-centric view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaladkar Mugdha

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplicates have been shown to evolve at different rates. Here we further investigate the mechanism and functional underpinning of this phenomenon by assessing asymmetric evolution specifically within functional domains of gene duplicates. Results Based on duplicate genes in five teleost fishes resulting from a whole genome duplication event, we first show that a Fisher Exact test based approach to detect asymmetry is more sensitive than the previously used Likelihood Ratio test. Using our Fisher Exact test, we found that the evolutionary rate asymmetry in the overall protein is largely explained by the asymmetric evolution within specific protein domains. Moreover, among cases of asymmetrically evolving domains, for the gene copy containing a fast evolving domain, the non-synonymous substitutions often cluster within the fast evolving domain. We found that rare substitutions were preferred within asymmetrically evolving domains suggestive of functional divergence. While overall ~32 % of the domains tested were found to be evolving asymmetrically, certain protein domains such as the Tyrosine and Ser/Thr Kinase domains had a much greater prevalence of asymmetric evolution. Finally, based on the spatial expression of Zebra fish duplicate proteins during development, we found that protein pairs containing asymmetrically evolving domains had a greater divergence in gene expression as compared to the duplicate proteins that did not exhibit asymmetric evolution. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that the previously observed asymmetry in the overall duplicate protein evolution is largely due to divergence of specific domains of the protein, and coincides with divergence in spatial expression domains.

  14. Our experience with unusual gastrointestinal tract duplications in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Mirza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Classical duplications may present along any part of gastrointestinal tract (GIT from mouth to anus. Atypical or unusual rare varieties of GIT duplications may also occur, but with different anatomical features. Materials and Methods: We reviewed our 5-year record (February 2008-January 2013 to describe clinical profile of unusual GIT duplications in neonates and small infants. Results: Three patients with atypical variety of GIT duplications were managed in our department during this tenure. Two were females and one male. Age was ranged between 11 days and 2 months. All patients presented with massive abdominal distension causing respiratory embarrassment in two of them. In all patients, the pre-operative differential diagnoses also included GIT duplication cysts. Computerized tomography (CT scan showed single huge cyst in one and multiple cysts in two patients. In one patient the CT scan also depicted a thoracic cyst in relation to posterior mediastinum. At operation, one patient had colonic tubular duplication cyst along with another isolated duplication cyst, the second case had a tubular duplication cyst of ileum with its segmental dilatation, and in the third case two isolated duplications were found. Duplication cysts were excised along with mucosal stripping in one patient, cyst excision and intestinal resection and anastomosis in one patient, and only cysts excision in one. All patients did well post-operatively. Conclusion: We presented unusual GIT duplications. These duplications are managed on similar lines as classical duplications with good prognosis when dealt early.

  15. The sequence and analysis of duplication-rich human chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Chan, Yee Man; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C; Bruno, William J; Buckingham, Judith M; Callen, David F; Campbell, Connie S; Campbell, Mary L; Campbell, Evelyn W; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F; Chasteen, Leslie A; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M; Cohn, Judith D; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A; Grady, Deborah L; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip B; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Manohar, Chitra F; Mark, Graham A; McMurray, Kimberly L; Meincke, Linda J; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K; Mundt, Mark O; Munk, A Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O; Robinson, Donna L; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P Scott; Williams, Albert L; Wills, Patricia L; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dejong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman A; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Eichler, Evan E; Gilna, Paul; Lucas, Susan M; Myers, Richard M; Rubin, Edward M; Pennacchio, Len A

    2004-12-23

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,670 aligned transcripts, 19 transfer RNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and three RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukaemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. Whereas the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene-poor pericentromere of the p arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events that are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  16. Early genome duplications in conifers and other seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Baniaga, Anthony E; Sessa, Emily B; Scascitelli, Moira; Graham, Sean W; Rieseberg, Loren H; Barker, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Polyploidy is a common mode of speciation and evolution in angiosperms (flowering plants). In contrast, there is little evidence to date that whole genome duplication (WGD) has played a significant role in the evolution of their putative extant sister lineage, the gymnosperms. Recent analyses of the spruce genome, the first published conifer genome, failed to detect evidence of WGDs in gene age distributions and attributed many aspects of conifer biology to a lack of WGDs. We present evidence for three ancient genome duplications during the evolution of gymnosperms, based on phylogenomic analyses of transcriptomes from 24 gymnosperms and 3 outgroups. We use a new algorithm to place these WGD events in phylogenetic context: two in the ancestry of major conifer clades (Pinaceae and cupressophyte conifers) and one in Welwitschia (Gnetales). We also confirm that a WGD hypothesized to be restricted to seed plants is indeed not shared with ferns and relatives (monilophytes), a result that was unclear in earlier studies. Contrary to previous genomic research that reported an absence of polyploidy in the ancestry of contemporary gymnosperms, our analyses indicate that polyploidy has contributed to the evolution of conifers and other gymnosperms. As in the flowering plants, the evolution of the large genome sizes of gymnosperms involved both polyploidy and repetitive element activity.

  17. Inverted duplications on acentric markers: mechanism of formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murmann, Andrea E; Conrad, Donald F; Mashek, Heather; Curtis, Chris A; Nicolae, Raluca I; Ober, Carole; Schwartz, Stuart

    2009-06-15

    Acentric inverted duplication (inv dup) markers, the largest group of chromosomal abnormalities with neocentromere formation, are found in patients both with idiopathic mental retardation and with cancer. The mechanism of their formation has been investigated by analyzing the breakpoints and the genotypes of 12 inv dup marker cases (three trisomic, six tetrasomic, two polysomic and one X chromosome derived marker) using a combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization, quantitative SNP array and microsatellite analysis. Inv dup markers were found to form either symmetrically with one breakpoint or asymmetrically with two distinct breakpoints. Genotype analyses revealed that all inv dup markers formed from one single chromatid end. This observation is incompatible with the previously suggested model by which the acentric inv dup markers form through inter-chromosomal U-type exchange. On the basis of the identification of DNA sequence motifs with inverted homologies within all observed breakpoint regions, a new general mechanism is proposed for the acentric inv dup marker formation: following a double-strand break an acentric fragment forms, during either meiosis or mitosis. The open DNA end of the acentric fragment is stabilized by the formation of an intra-chromosomal loop promoted by the presence of sequences with inverted homologies. Likely coinciding with the neocentromere formation, this stabilized fragment is duplicated during an early mitotic event, insuring the marker's survival during cell division and its presence in all cells.

  18. The sea lamprey meiotic map improves resolution of ancient vertebrate genome duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeramiah J; Keinath, Melissa C

    2015-08-01

    It is generally accepted that many genes present in vertebrate genomes owe their origin to two whole-genome duplications that occurred deep in the ancestry of the vertebrate lineage. However, details regarding the timing and outcome of these duplications are not well resolved. We present high-density meiotic and comparative genomic maps for the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a representative of an ancient lineage that diverged from all other vertebrates ∼550 million years ago. Linkage analyses yielded a total of 95 linkage groups, similar to the estimated number of germline chromosomes (1n ∼ 99), spanning a total of 5570.25 cM. Comparative mapping data yield strong support for the hypothesis that a single whole-genome duplication occurred in the basal vertebrate lineage, but do not strongly support a hypothetical second event. Rather, these comparative maps reveal several evolutionarily independent segmental duplications occurring over the last 600+ million years of chordate evolution. This refined history of vertebrate genome duplication should permit more precise investigations of vertebrate evolution.

  19. Comparative Evolution of Duplicated Ddx3 Genes in Teleosts: Insights from Japanese Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongkai; Liu, Wei; Song, Huayu; Wang, Huizhen; Liu, Jinxiang; Zhao, Haitao; Du, Xinxin; Zhang, Quanqi

    2015-06-24

    Following the two rounds of whole-genome duplication that occurred during deuterostome evolution, a third genome duplication event occurred in the stem lineage of ray-finned fishes. This teleost-specific genome duplication is thought to be responsible for the biological diversification of ray-finned fishes. DEAD-box polypeptide 3 (DDX3) belongs to the DEAD-box RNA helicase family. Although their functions in humans have been well studied, limited information is available regarding their function in teleosts. In this study, two teleost Ddx3 genes were first identified in the transcriptome of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). We confirmed that the two genes originated from teleost-specific genome duplication through synteny and phylogenetic analysis. Additionally, comparative analysis of genome structure, molecular evolution rate, and expression pattern of the two genes in Japanese flounder revealed evidence of subfunctionalization of the duplicated Ddx3 genes in teleosts. Thus, the results of this study reveal novel insights into the evolution of the teleost Ddx3 genes and constitute important groundwork for further research on this gene family.

  20. Gene Duplication, Population Genomics, and Species-Level Differentiation within a Tropical Mountain Shrub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Zamudio, Sergio; Jorgensen, Tove H.; Arrigo, Nils; Alvarez, Nadir; Piñero, Daniel; Emerson, Brent C.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication leads to paralogy, which complicates the de novo assembly of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data. The issue of paralogous genes is exacerbated in plants, because they are particularly prone to gene duplication events. Paralogs are normally filtered from GBS data before undertaking population genomics or phylogenetic analyses. However, gene duplication plays an important role in the functional diversification of genes and it can also lead to the formation of postzygotic barriers. Using populations and closely related species of a tropical mountain shrub, we examine 1) the genomic differentiation produced by putative orthologs, and 2) the distribution of recent gene duplication among lineages and geography. We find high differentiation among populations from isolated mountain peaks and species-level differentiation within what is morphologically described as a single species. The inferred distribution of paralogs among populations is congruent with taxonomy and shows that GBS could be used to examine recent gene duplication as a source of genomic differentiation of nonmodel species. PMID:25223767

  1. The E2F-DP1 Transcription Factor Complex Regulates Centriole Duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline G; Liu, Yan; Williams, Christopher W; Smith, Harold E; O'Connell, Kevin F

    2016-01-15

    Centrioles play critical roles in the organization of microtubule-based structures, from the mitotic spindle to cilia and flagella. In order to properly execute their various functions, centrioles are subjected to stringent copy number control. Central to this control mechanism is a precise duplication event that takes place during S phase of the cell cycle and involves the assembly of a single daughter centriole in association with each mother centriole . Recent studies have revealed that posttranslational control of the master regulator Plk4/ZYG-1 kinase and its downstream effector SAS-6 is key to ensuring production of a single daughter centriole. In contrast, relatively little is known about how centriole duplication is regulated at a transcriptional level. Here we show that the transcription factor complex EFL-1-DPL-1 both positively and negatively controls centriole duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Specifically, we find that down regulation of EFL-1-DPL-1 can restore centriole duplication in a zyg-1 hypomorphic mutant and that suppression of the zyg-1 mutant phenotype is accompanied by an increase in SAS-6 protein levels. Further, we find evidence that EFL-1-DPL-1 promotes the transcription of zyg-1 and other centriole duplication genes. Our results provide evidence that in a single tissue type, EFL-1-DPL-1 sets the balance between positive and negative regulators of centriole assembly and thus may be part of a homeostatic mechanism that governs centriole assembly.

  2. Presentation and Surgical Management of Duodenal Duplication in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline C. Jadlowiec

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal duplications in adults are exceedingly rare and their diagnosis remains difficult as symptoms are largely nonspecific. Clinical presentations include pancreatitis, biliary obstruction, gastrointestinal bleeding from ectopic gastric mucosa, and malignancy. A case of duodenal duplication in a 59-year-old female is presented, and her treatment course is reviewed with description of combined surgical and endoscopic approach to repair, along with a review of historic and current recommendations for management. Traditionally, gastrointestinal duplications have been treated with surgical resection; however, for duodenal duplications, the anatomic proximity to the biliopancreatic ampulla makes surgical management challenging. Recently, advances in endoscopy have improved the clinical success of cystic intraluminal duodenal duplications. Despite these advances, surgical resection is still recommended for extraluminal tubular duplications although combined techniques may be necessary for long tubular duplications. For duodenal duplications, a combined approach of partial excision combined with mucosal stripping may offer advantage.

  3. Duplication cysts: Diagnosis, management, and the role of endoscopic ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Roy; Adler, Douglas G

    2014-07-01

    Gastrointestinal tract duplication cysts are rare congenital gastrointestinal malformation in young patients and adults. They consist of foregut duplication cysts, small bowel duplication cysts, and large bowel duplication cysts. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been widely used as a modality for the evaluation and diagnosis of duplication cysts. EUS is the diagnostic tool of choice to investigate duplication cysts since it can distinguish between solid and cystic lesions. The question of whether or not to perform EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) on a lesion suspected of being a duplication cyst is controversial as these lesions can become infected with significant consequences, although EUS-FNA is often required to obtain a definitive diagnosis and to rule out more ominous lesions. This manuscript will review the literature on duplication cysts throughout the body and will also focus on the role of EUS and FNA with regards to these lesions.

  4. Case report: Antenatal MRI diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasami, Rajeswaran; Chandrasekharan, Anupama; Archana, Lal; Santhosh, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    Esophageal duplication cysts are classified as a subgroup of foregut duplication cysts. They are very rare and are predominantly detected in children. Antenatal detection is very rare. We report a case of an esophageal duplication cyst that was accurately identified antenatally by USG and MRI.

  5. Unilateral Pulmonary Agenesis and Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Association

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Halilbasic; Fahrija Skokic; Nesad Hotic; Edin Husaric; Gordana Radoja; Selma Muratovic; Nermina Dedic; Meliha Halilbasic

    2013-01-01

    Lung agenesis and gastric duplication cysts are both rare congenital anomalies. Gastric duplication cysts can present with nausea, vomiting, hematemesis, or vague abdominal pain. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis can present with respiratory distress which usually occurs due to retention of bronchial secretions and inflammations. We report the unique case of right pulmonary agenesis associated with gastric duplication cyst.

  6. Unilateral Pulmonary Agenesis and Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Halilbasic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung agenesis and gastric duplication cysts are both rare congenital anomalies. Gastric duplication cysts can present with nausea, vomiting, hematemesis, or vague abdominal pain. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis can present with respiratory distress which usually occurs due to retention of bronchial secretions and inflammations. We report the unique case of right pulmonary agenesis associated with gastric duplication cyst.

  7. Effect of Duplicate Genes on Mouse Genetic Robustness: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixi Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans, analyses based on the current knockout (KO mouse phenotypes led to the conclusion that duplicate genes had almost no role in mouse genetic robustness. It has been suggested that the bias of mouse KO database toward ancient duplicates may possibly cause this knockout duplicate puzzle, that is, a very similar proportion of essential genes (PE between duplicate genes and singletons. In this paper, we conducted an extensive and careful analysis for the mouse KO phenotype data and corroborated a strong effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetics robustness. Moreover, the effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetic robustness is duplication-age dependent, which holds after ruling out the potential confounding effect from coding-sequence conservation, protein-protein connectivity, functional bias, or the bias of duplicates generated by whole genome duplication (WGD. Our findings suggest that two factors, the sampling bias toward ancient duplicates and very ancient duplicates with a proportion of essential genes higher than that of singletons, have caused the mouse knockout duplicate puzzle; meanwhile, the effect of genetic buffering may be correlated with sequence conservation as well as protein-protein interactivity.

  8. 48 CFR 1352.231-71 - Duplication of effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of effort. 1352.231-71 Section 1352.231-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES... Duplication of effort. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1331.205-70, insert the following clause: Duplication of...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: 7q11.23 duplication syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions 7q11.23 duplication syndrome 7q11.23 duplication syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description 7q11.23 duplication syndrome is a condition that can cause a ...

  10. Rationality of Cross-System Data Duplication: A Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, Wiebe; Wieringa, Roel; Pernici, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Duplication of data across systems in an organization is a problem because it wastes effort and leads to inconsistencies. Researchers have proposed several technical solutions but duplication still occurs in practice. In this paper we report on a case study of how and why duplication occurs in a lar

  11. 38 CFR 10.52 - Duplication of payments prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duplication of payments prohibited. 10.52 Section 10.52 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUSTED COMPENSATION Payments § 10.52 Duplication of payments prohibited. Duplication of payments...

  12. 47 CFR 80.467 - Duplication of VHF service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of VHF service. 80.467 Section 80... STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Public Coast Stations Use of Telephony § 80.467 Duplication of VHF service. No duplication of service areas as determined by subpart P of this part will be permitted...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: 22q11.2 duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions 22q11.2 duplication 22q11.2 duplication Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description 22q11.2 duplication is a condition caused by an extra copy ...

  14. 47 CFR 76.1508 - Network non-duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Network non-duplication. 76.1508 Section 76... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Open Video Systems § 76.1508 Network non-duplication. (a... regarding the exercise of network non-duplication rights immediately available to all appropriate...

  15. 47 CFR 76.122 - Satellite network non-duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Satellite network non-duplication. 76.122... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.122 Satellite network non-duplication. (a) Upon receiving notification pursuant...

  16. Duplication Cyst of the Sigmoid Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Domajnko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old male with developmental delay presented with abdominal pain of two days' duration. He was afebrile and his abdomen was soft with mild diffuse tenderness. There were no peritoneal signs. Plain x-ray demonstrated a large air-filled structure in the right upper quadrant. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a 9×8 cm structure adjacent to the hepatic flexure containing an air-fluid level. It did not contain oral contrast and had no apparent communication with the colon. At operation, the cystic lesion was identified as a duplication cyst of the sigmoid colon that was adherent to the right upper quadrant. The cyst was excised with a segment of the sigmoid colon and a stapled colo-colostomy was performed. Recovery was uneventful. Final pathology was consistent with a duplication cyst of the sigmoid colon. The cyst was attached to the colon but did not communicate with the lumen.

  17. Identifying Tracks Duplicates via Neural Network

    CERN Document Server

    Sunjerga, Antonio; CERN. Geneva. EP Department

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the project is to study feasibility of state of the art machine learning techniques in track reconstruction. Machine learning techniques provide promising ways to speed up the pattern recognition of tracks by adding more intelligence in the algorithms. Implementation of neural network to process of track duplicates identifying will be discussed. Different approaches are shown and results are compared to method that is currently in use.

  18. Pseudomyxoma Peritonei Originating from an Intestinal Duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Lemahieu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alimentary tract duplications are rare congenital anomalies. They most often become symptomatic in childhood and rarely undergo malignant transformation. Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP is an equally uncommon condition, most frequently originating from a primary appendiceal mucinous neoplasm. We report an extremely unusual case of PMP arising from an intestinal duplication. A 67-year-old woman presented with vague upper abdominal pain, and, unexpectedly, explorative laparoscopy revealed diffuse jelly-like peritoneal implants. The histopathological diagnosis of a low-grade PMP or “disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis” was made. At that moment, no primary tumor was found. During later surgery, a cystic lesion located in the mesentery of the small bowel could be resected. Histologically, the cyst wall clearly showed the concentric layering of a normal bowel wall. The mucosa, however, displayed a diffuse low-grade villous adenoma. We concluded that this histological picture was most consistent with a small intestinal duplication, containing a low-grade villous adenoma. The adenoma caused a mucocele, which subsequently leaked or ruptured, giving rise to noninvasive mucinous peritoneal implants or low-grade PMP, also known as “disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis” (DPAM.

  19. Pseudomyxoma peritonei originating from an intestinal duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemahieu, Julie; D'Hoore, André; Deloose, Stijn; Sciot, Raf; Moerman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Alimentary tract duplications are rare congenital anomalies. They most often become symptomatic in childhood and rarely undergo malignant transformation. Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is an equally uncommon condition, most frequently originating from a primary appendiceal mucinous neoplasm. We report an extremely unusual case of PMP arising from an intestinal duplication. A 67-year-old woman presented with vague upper abdominal pain, and, unexpectedly, explorative laparoscopy revealed diffuse jelly-like peritoneal implants. The histopathological diagnosis of a low-grade PMP or "disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis" was made. At that moment, no primary tumor was found. During later surgery, a cystic lesion located in the mesentery of the small bowel could be resected. Histologically, the cyst wall clearly showed the concentric layering of a normal bowel wall. The mucosa, however, displayed a diffuse low-grade villous adenoma. We concluded that this histological picture was most consistent with a small intestinal duplication, containing a low-grade villous adenoma. The adenoma caused a mucocele, which subsequently leaked or ruptured, giving rise to noninvasive mucinous peritoneal implants or low-grade PMP, also known as "disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis" (DPAM).

  20. Evidence of duplicated Hox genes in the most recent common ancestor of extant scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant P; Santiago, Marc A; González-Santillán, Edmundo; Monod, Lionel; Wheeler, Ward C

    2015-01-01

    Scorpions (order Scorpiones) are unusual among arthropods, both for the extreme heteronomy of their bauplan and for the high gene family turnover exhibited in their genomes. These phenomena appear to be correlated, as two scorpion species have been shown to possess nearly twice the number of Hox genes present in most arthropods. Segmentally offset anterior expression boundaries of a subset of Hox paralogs have been shown to correspond to transitions in segmental identities in the scorpion posterior tagmata, suggesting that posterior heteronomy in scorpions may have been achieved by neofunctionalization of Hox paralogs. However, both the first scorpion genome sequenced and the developmental genetic data are based on exemplars of Buthidae, one of 19 families of scorpions. It is therefore not known whether Hox paralogy is limited to Buthidae or widespread among scorpions. We surveyed 24 high throughput transcriptomes and the single whole genome available for scorpions, in order to test the prediction that Hox gene duplications are common to the order. We used gene tree parsimony to infer whether the paralogy was consistent with a duplication event in the scorpion common ancestor. Here we show that duplicated Hox genes in non-buthid scorpions occur in six of the ten Hox classes. Gene tree topologies and parsimony-based reconciliation of the gene trees are consistent with a duplication event in the most recent common ancestor of scorpions. These results suggest that a Hox paralogy, and by extension the model of posterior patterning established in a buthid, can be extended to non-Buthidae scorpions.

  1. Complex rearrangements in patients with duplications of MECP2 can occur by fork stalling and template switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Claudia M.B.; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Pengfei; Patel, Ankita; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A.; Shaw, Chad; Peacock, Sandra; Pursley, Amber; Tavyev, Y. Jane; Ramocki, Melissa B.; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lupski, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Duplication at the Xq28 band including the MECP2 gene is one of the most common genomic rearrangements identified in neurodevelopmentally delayed males. Such duplications are non-recurrent and can be generated by a non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) mechanism. We investigated the potential mechanisms for MECP2 duplication and examined whether genomic architectural features may play a role in their origin using a custom designed 4-Mb tiling-path oligonucleotide array CGH assay. Each of the 30 patients analyzed showed a unique duplication varying in size from ∼250 kb to ∼2.6 Mb. Interestingly, in 77% of these non-recurrent duplications, the distal breakpoints grouped within a 215 kb genomic interval, located 47 kb telomeric to the MECP2 gene. The genomic architecture of this region contains both direct and inverted low-copy repeat (LCR) sequences; this same region undergoes polymorphic structural variation in the general population. Array CGH revealed complex rearrangements in eight patients; in six patients the duplication contained an embedded triplicated segment, and in the other two, stretches of non-duplicated sequences occurred within the duplicated region. Breakpoint junction sequencing was achieved in four duplications and identified an inversion in one patient, demonstrating further complexity. We propose that the presence of LCRs in the vicinity of the MECP2 gene may generate an unstable DNA structure that can induce DNA strand lesions, such as a collapsed fork, and facilitate a Fork Stalling and Template Switching event producing the complex rearrangements involving MECP2. PMID:19324899

  2. Divergence in Enzymatic Activities in the Soybean GST Supergene Family Provides New Insight into the Evolutionary Dynamics of Whole-Genome Duplicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Jing; Tang, Zhen-Xin; Han, Xue-Min; Yang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Fu-Min; Yang, Hai-Ling; Liu, Yan-Jing; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2015-11-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD), or polyploidy, is a major force in plant genome evolution. A duplicate of all genes is present in the genome immediately following a WGD event. However, the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for the loss of, or retention and subsequent functional divergence of polyploidy-derived duplicates remain largely unknown. In this study we reconstructed the evolutionary history of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene family from the soybean genome, and identified 72 GST duplicated gene pairs formed by a recent Glycine-specific WGD event occurring approximately 13 Ma. We found that 72% of duplicated GST gene pairs experienced gene losses or pseudogenization, whereas 28% of GST gene pairs have been retained in the soybean genome. The GST pseudogenes were under relaxed selective constraints, whereas functional GSTs were subject to strong purifying selection. Plant GST genes play important roles in stress tolerance and detoxification metabolism. By examining the gene expression responses to abiotic stresses and enzymatic properties of the ancestral and current proteins, we found that polyploidy-derived GST duplicates show the divergence in enzymatic activities. Through site-directed mutagenesis of ancestral proteins, this study revealed that nonsynonymous substitutions of key amino acid sites play an important role in the divergence of enzymatic functions of polyploidy-derived GST duplicates. These findings provide new insights into the evolutionary and functional dynamics of polyploidy-derived duplicate genes.

  3. Recombination and evolution of duplicate control regions in the mitochondrial genome of the Asian big-headed turtle, Platysternon megacephalum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenfei Zheng

    Full Text Available Complete mitochondrial (mt genome sequences with duplicate control regions (CRs have been detected in various animal species. In Testudines, duplicate mtCRs have been reported in the mtDNA of the Asian big-headed turtle, Platysternon megacephalum, which has three living subspecies. However, the evolutionary pattern of these CRs remains unclear. In this study, we report the completed sequences of duplicate CRs from 20 individuals belonging to three subspecies of this turtle and discuss the micro-evolutionary analysis of the evolution of duplicate CRs. Genetic distances calculated with MEGA 4.1 using the complete duplicate CR sequences revealed that within turtle subspecies, genetic distances between orthologous copies from different individuals were 0.63% for CR1 and 1.2% for CR2app:addword:respectively, and the average distance between paralogous copies of CR1 and CR2 was 4.8%. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed from the CR sequences, excluding the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs at the 3' end using three methods: neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood algorithm, and Bayesian inference. These data show that any two CRs within individuals were more genetically distant from orthologous genes in different individuals within the same subspecies. This suggests independent evolution of the two mtCRs within each P. megacephalum subspecies. Reconstruction of separate phylogenetic trees using different CR components (TAS, CD, CSB, and VNTRs suggested the role of recombination in the evolution of duplicate CRs. Consequently, recombination events were detected using RDP software with break points at ≈290 bp and ≈1,080 bp. Based on these results, we hypothesize that duplicate CRs in P. megacephalum originated from heterological ancestral recombination of mtDNA. Subsequent recombination could have resulted in homogenization during independent evolutionary events, thus maintaining the functions of duplicate CRs in the mtDNA of P

  4. Perforated ileal duplication cyst with haemorrhagic pseudocyst formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Im Kyung; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Heung Chul; Lee, In Sun; Hwang, Woo Chul [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University (Korea); Namkung, Sook [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University (Korea); Department of Radiology, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, 153 Kyo-dong, Chuncheon, Kangwon-do, 200-704 (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    Duplication cysts of the gastrointestinal tract are rare congenital abnormalities. Ectopic gastric mucosa, which can be found in duplications, may cause peptic ulceration, gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation. We report a 1-year-old boy with a perforated ileal duplication cyst with haemorrhagic pseudocyst formation caused by peptic ulceration of the duplication cyst. It presented a snowman-like appearance consisting of a small, thick-walled, true enteric cyst and a large, thin-walled haemorrhagic pseudocyst on US and CT. It is an unusual manifestation of a duplication cyst, which has not been reported in the English language literature. (orig.)

  5. Divergence of recently duplicated M{gamma}-type MADS-box genes in Petunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Gordon, Jonathan; Weterings, Koen; Angenent, Gerco C

    2010-02-01

    The MADS-box transcription factor family has expanded considerably in plants via gene and genome duplications and can be subdivided into type I and MIKC-type genes. The two gene classes show a different evolutionary history. Whereas the MIKC-type genes originated during ancient genome duplications, as well as during more recent events, the type I loci appear to experience high turnover with many recent duplications. This different mode of origin also suggests a different fate for the type I duplicates, which are thought to have a higher chance to become silenced or lost from the genome. To get more insight into the evolution of the type I MADS-box genes, we isolated nine type I genes from Petunia, which belong to the Mgamma subclass, and investigated the divergence of their coding and regulatory regions. The isolated genes could be subdivided into two categories: two genes were highly similar to Arabidopsis Mgamma-type genes, whereas the other seven genes showed less similarity to Arabidopsis genes and originated more recently. Two of the recently duplicated genes were found to contain deleterious mutations in their coding regions, and expression analysis revealed that a third paralog was silenced by mutations in its regulatory region. However, in addition to the three genes that were subjected to nonfunctionalization, we also found evidence for neofunctionalization of one of the Petunia Mgamma-type genes. Our study shows a rapid divergence of recently duplicated Mgamma-type MADS-box genes and suggests that redundancy among type I paralogs may be less common than expected.

  6. Genome-wide signatures of 'rearrangement hotspots' within segmental duplications in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Uddin

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to create a genome-wide high resolution map (i.e., >100 bp of 'rearrangement hotspots' which can facilitate the identification of regions capable of mediating de novo deletions or duplications in humans. A hierarchical method was employed to fragment segmental duplications (SDs into multiple smaller SD units. Combining an end space free pairwise alignment algorithm with a 'seed and extend' approach, we have exhaustively searched 409 million alignments to detect complex structural rearrangements within the reference-guided assembly of the NA18507 human genome (18× coverage, including the previously identified novel 4.8 Mb sequence from de novo assembly within this genome. We have identified 1,963 rearrangement hotspots within SDs which encompass 166 genes and display an enrichment of duplicated gene nucleotide variants (DNVs. These regions are correlated with increased non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR event frequency which presumably represents the origin of copy number variations (CNVs and pathogenic duplications/deletions. Analysis revealed that 20% of the detected hotspots are clustered within the proximal and distal SD breakpoints flanked by the pathogenic deletions/duplications that have been mapped for 24 NAHR-mediated genomic disorders. FISH Validation of selected complex regions revealed 94% concordance with in silico localization of the highly homologous derivatives. Other results from this study indicate that intra-chromosomal recombination is enhanced in genic compared with agenic duplicated regions, and that gene desert regions comprising SDs may represent reservoirs for creation of novel genes. The generation of genome-wide signatures of 'rearrangement hotspots', which likely serve as templates for NAHR, may provide a powerful approach towards understanding the underlying mutational mechanism(s for development of constitutional and acquired diseases.

  7. SANCTIONING DUPLICATION IN ADMINISTRATIVE AND PENAL AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Cabrera Delgado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a first approach from the point of view of jurisprudence, to the recurring problem of concurrency sanctions in cases where further intervention of the courts has become necessary for administrative action. In this regard, the main judgments of both the Constitutional Court and the Supreme Court is, that have shaped the decisions that must be applied from the administrative level, in particular by educational inspectors, when it is foreseeable that it can produce a duplication of disciplinary procedures in the two areas, penal and administrative.

  8. Analysis of recent segmental duplications in the bovine genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Congjun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplicated sequences are an important source of gene innovation and structural variation within mammalian genomes. We performed the first systematic and genome-wide analysis of segmental duplications in the modern domesticated cattle (Bos taurus. Using two distinct computational analyses, we estimated that 3.1% (94.4 Mb of the bovine genome consists of recently duplicated sequences (≥ 1 kb in length, ≥ 90% sequence identity. Similar to other mammalian draft assemblies, almost half (47% of 94.4 Mb of these sequences have not been assigned to cattle chromosomes. Results In this study, we provide the first experimental validation large duplications and briefly compared their distribution on two independent bovine genome assemblies using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH. Our analyses suggest that the (75-90% of segmental duplications are organized into local tandem duplication clusters. Along with rodents and carnivores, these results now confidently establish tandem duplications as the most likely mammalian archetypical organization, in contrast to humans and great ape species which show a preponderance of interspersed duplications. A cross-species survey of duplicated genes and gene families indicated that duplication, positive selection and gene conversion have shaped primates, rodents, carnivores and ruminants to different degrees for their speciation and adaptation. We identified that bovine segmental duplications corresponding to genes are significantly enriched for specific biological functions such as immunity, digestion, lactation and reproduction. Conclusion Our results suggest that in most mammalian lineages segmental duplications are organized in a tandem configuration. Segmental duplications remain problematic for genome and assembly and we highlight genic regions that require higher quality sequence characterization. This study provides insights into mammalian genome evolution and generates a valuable

  9. Whole-Genome Duplications Spurred the Functional Diversification of the Globin Gene Superfamily in Vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Federico G.; Opazo, Juan C; Storz, Jay F.

    2011-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that two successive rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) in the stem lineage of vertebrates provided genetic raw materials for the evolutionary innovation of many vertebrate-specific features. However, it has seldom been possible to trace such innovations to specific functional differences between paralogous gene products that derive from a WGD event. Here, we report genomic evidence for a direct link between WGD and key physiological innovations in the vertebrate...

  10. Two patients with duplication of 17p11.2: The reciprocal of the Smith-Magenis syndrome deletion?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, A. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Phelan, M.C.; Rogers, R.C. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-17

    J.M. and H.G. are two unrelated male patients with developmental delay. Cytogenetic analysis detected a duplication of 17p11.2 in both patients. The extent of the duplicated region was determined using single copy DNA probes: cen-D17S58-D17S29-D17S258-D17S71-D17S445-D17S122-tel. Four of the six markers, D17S29, D17S258, D17S71, and D17S445, were duplicated by dosage analysis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of H.G., using cosmids for locus D17S29, confirmed the duplication in 17p11.2. Because the deletion that causes the Smith-Magenis syndrome involves the same region of 17p11.2 as the duplication in these patients, the mechanism may be similar to that proposed for the reciprocal deletion/ duplication event observed in Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP) and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1A disease (CMT1A). 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The Duplicate-Replacement System: An Alternative Method of Handling Book Duplicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Russell T.

    This report studied the alternative method of using book duplicates as replacement copies for worn or missing stack items. The simple operational procedure which is proposed and evaluated could be adapted to virtually any library setting. When tested in Brigham Young University's Lee Library, it was found that such a procedure cost an estimated…

  12. Insights into three whole-genome duplications gleaned from the Paramecium caudatum genome sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Casey L; Gout, Jean-Francois; Doak, Thomas G; Yanagi, Akira; Lynch, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Paramecium has long been a model eukaryote. The sequence of the Paramecium tetraurelia genome reveals a history of three successive whole-genome duplications (WGDs), and the sequences of P. biaurelia and P. sexaurelia suggest that these WGDs are shared by all members of the aurelia species complex. Here, we present the genome sequence of P. caudatum, a species closely related to the P. aurelia species group. P. caudatum shares only the most ancient of the three WGDs with the aurelia complex. We found that P. caudatum maintains twice as many paralogs from this early event as the P. aurelia species, suggesting that post-WGD gene retention is influenced by subsequent WGDs and supporting the importance of selection for dosage in gene retention. The availability of P. caudatum as an outgroup allows an expanded analysis of the aurelia intermediate and recent WGD events. Both the Guanine+Cytosine (GC) content and the expression level of preduplication genes are significant predictors of duplicate retention. We find widespread asymmetrical evolution among aurelia paralogs, which is likely caused by gradual pseudogenization rather than by neofunctionalization. Finally, cases of divergent resolution of intermediate WGD duplicates between aurelia species implicate this process acts as an ongoing reinforcement mechanism of reproductive isolation long after a WGD event.

  13. FT Duplication Coordinates Reproductive and Vegetative Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Chuan-Yu [Mississippi State University (MSU); Adams, Joshua P. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Kim, Hyejin [Mississippi State University (MSU); No, Kyoungok [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ma, Caiping [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Strauss, Steven [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Drnevich, Jenny [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Wickett, Norman [Pennsylvania State University; Vandervelde, Lindsay [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ellis, Jeffrey D. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Rice, Brandon [Mississippi State University (MSU); Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Brunner, Amy M. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Page, Grier P. [RTI International; Carlson, John E. [Pennsylvania State University; DePamphilis, Claude [Pennsylvania State University; Luthe, Dawn S. [Pennsylvania State University; Yuceer, Cetin [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2011-01-01

    Annual plants grow vegetatively at early developmental stages and then transition to the reproductive stage, followed by senescence in the same year. In contrast, after successive years of vegetative growth at early ages, woody perennial shoot meristems begin repeated transitions between vegetative and reproductive growth at sexual maturity. However, it is unknown how these repeated transitions occur without a developmental conflict between vegetative and reproductive growth. We report that functionally diverged paralogs FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (FT1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T2 (FT2), products of whole-genome duplication and homologs of Arabidopsis thaliana gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), coordinate the repeated cycles of vegetative and reproductive growth in woody perennial poplar (Populus spp.). Our manipulative physiological and genetic experiments coupled with field studies, expression profiling, and network analysis reveal that reproductive onset is determined by FT1 in response to winter temperatures, whereas vegetative growth and inhibition of bud set are promoted by FT2 in response to warm temperatures and long days in the growing season. The basis for functional differentiation between FT1 and FT2 appears to be expression pattern shifts, changes in proteins, and divergence in gene regulatory networks. Thus, temporal separation of reproductive onset and vegetative growth into different seasons via FT1 and FT2 provides seasonality and demonstrates the evolution of a complex perennial adaptive trait after genome duplication.

  14. Origins of a 350-kilobase genomic duplication in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its impact on virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech, Pilar; Rog, Anya; Moolji, Jalal-ud-din; Radomski, Nicolas; Fallow, Ashley; Leon-Solis, Lizbel; Bowes, Julia; Behr, Marcel A; Reed, Michael B

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the evolution and impact on virulence of a 350-kb genomic duplication present in the most recently evolved members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis East Asian lineage. In a mouse model of infection, comparing HN878 subclones HN878-27 (no duplication) and HN878-45 (with the 350-kb duplication) revealed that the latter is impaired for in vivo growth during the initial 3 weeks of infection. Furthermore, the median survival time of mice infected with isolate HN878-45 is significantly longer (77 days) than that of mice infected with HN878-27. Whole-genome sequencing of both isolates failed to reveal any mutational events other than the duplication that could account for such a substantial difference in virulence. Although we and others had previously speculated that the 350-kb duplication arose in response to some form of host-applied selective pressure (P. Domenech, G. S. Kolly, L. Leon-Solis, A. Fallow, M. B. Reed, J. Bacteriol. 192: 4562-4570, 2010, and B. Weiner, J. Gomez, T. C. Victor, R. M. Warren, A. Sloutsky, B. B. Plikaytis, J. E. Posey, P. D. van Helden, N. C. Gey van Pittius, M. Koehrsen, P. Sisk, C. Stolte, J. White, S. Gagneux, B. Birren, D. Hung, M. Murray, J. Galagan, PLoS One 7: e26038, 2012), here we show that this large chromosomal amplification event is very rapidly selected within standard in vitro broth cultures in a range of isolates. Indeed, subclones harboring the duplication were detectable after just five rounds of in vitro passage. In contrast, the duplication appears to be highly unstable in vivo and is negatively selected during the later stages of infection in mice. We believe that the rapid in vitro evolution of M. tuberculosis is an underappreciated aspect of its biology that is often ignored, despite the fact that it has the potential to confound the data and conclusions arising from comparative studies of isolates at both the genotypic and phenotypic levels.

  15. Duplication and divergence of fgf8 functions in teleost development and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovelin, Richard; He, Xinjun; Amores, Angel; Yan, Yi-Lin; Shi, Ruihua; Qin, Baifang; Roe, Bruce; Cresko, William A; Postlethwait, John H

    2007-12-15

    Fibroblast growth factors play critical roles in many aspects of embryo patterning that are conserved across broad phylogenetic distances. To help understand the evolution of fibroblast growth factor functions, we identified members of the Fgf8/17/18-subfamily in the three-spine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus, and investigated their evolutionary relationships and expression patterns. We found that fgf17b is the ortholog of tetrapod Fgf17, whereas the teleost genes called fgf8 and fgf17a are duplicates of the tetrapod gene Fgf8, and thus should be called fgf8a and fgf8b. Phylogenetic analysis supports the view that the Fgf8/17/18-subfamily expanded during the ray-fin fish genome duplication. In situ hybridization experiments showed that stickleback fgf8 duplicates exhibited common and unique expression patterns, indicating that tissue specialization followed the gene duplication event. Moreover, direct comparison of stickleback and zebrafish embryonic expression patterns of fgf8 co-orthologs suggested lineage-specific independent subfunction partitioning and the acquisition or the loss of ortholog functions. In tetrapods, Fgf8 plays an important role in the apical ectodermal ridge of the developing pectoral appendage. Surprisingly, differences in the expression of fgf8a in the apical ectodermal ridge of the pectoral fin bud in zebrafish and stickleback, coupled with the role of fgf16 and fgf24 in teleost pectoral appendage show that different Fgf genes may play similar roles in limb development in various vertebrates.

  16. Clinical characterization and identification of duplication breakpoints in a Japanese family with Xq28 duplication syndrome including MECP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Daisuke; Yamada, Kenichiro; Nomura, Noriko; Naiki, Misako; Kimura, Reiko; Yamada, Yasukazu; Kumagai, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Kumiko; Miyake, Yoshishige; Wakamatsu, Nobuaki

    2014-04-01

    Xq28 duplication syndrome including MECP2 is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by axial hypotonia at infancy, severe intellectual disability, developmental delay, mild characteristic facial appearance, epilepsy, regression, and recurrent infections in males. We identified a Japanese family of Xq28 duplications, in which the patients presented with cerebellar ataxia, severe constipation, and small feet, in addition to the common clinical features. The 488-kb duplication spanned from L1CAM to EMD and contained 17 genes, two pseudo genes, and three microRNA-coding genes. FISH and nucleotide sequence analyses demonstrated that the duplication was tandem and in a forward orientation, and the duplication breakpoints were located in AluSc at the EMD side, with a 32-bp deletion, and LTR50 at the L1CAM side, with "tc" and "gc" microhomologies at the duplication breakpoints, respectively. The duplicated segment was completely segregated from the grandmother to the patients. These results suggest that the duplication was generated by fork-stalling and template-switching at the AluSc and LTR50 sites. This is the first report to determine the size and nucleotide sequences of the duplicated segments at Xq28 of three generations of a family and provides the genotype-phenotype correlation of the patients harboring the specific duplicated segment.

  17. RECTAL DUPLICATION CYST IN PREVIOUS ANORECTAL MALFORMATION AND DOWN SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Burgio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI tract duplications are rare congenital malformations. Most of them occur in the ileum and only 1-5%, of all duplication, were in the rectum. Different clinical features including chronic constipation, rectal prolapsed or polips. We report on a 4-years-old girl with Down syndrome and anorectal malformation (ARM who was found to have a rectal duplication cyst.

  18. Cholecystitis of a duplicated gallbladder complicated by a cholecystoenteric fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Brady K. [University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Imaging Sciences, Rochester, NY (United States); Chess, Mitchell A. [University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Imaging Sciences, Rochester, NY (United States); Advanced Imaging, Batavia, NY (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Gallbladder duplications are uncommon anatomic variants that are sometimes mistaken for other entities on imaging. We present a surgically confirmed case of cholecystitis in a ductular-type duplicated gallbladder complicated by the formation of an inflammatory fistula to the adjacent duodenum. Both US and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography were performed preoperatively, in addition to intraoperative cholangiography, which confirmed the presence of a duplicated gallbladder. (orig.)

  19. Colonic duplication in an adult mimicking a tumor of pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Duplications of the alimentary tract are uncommon congenital malformations that can present diagnostic difficulties.We report a rare case of a cystic colonic duplication in a female adult.Preoperative investigations were suggestive of pancreatic tumor.The diagnosis was established based on the histopathological examination of the resected specimen.We concluded that,though uncommon,intestinal duplication should be considered in differential diagnosis of abdominal mass.

  20. Duplicated leptin receptors in two species of eel bring new insights into the evolution of the leptin system in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morini, M.; Pasquier, J.; van den Thillart, G.;

    2015-01-01

    duplication event (3R). Leptin acts through a specific receptor (LEPR). In the European and Japanese eels, we identified two leptin genes, and for the first time in vertebrates, two LEPR genes. Synteny analyses indicated that eel LEPRa and LEPRb result from teleost 3R. LEPRb seems to have been lost...

  1. Duplicate inferior vena cava filters: more is not always better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Anup; Javed, Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of the inferior vena cava (IVC) has been reported in literature. This achieves clinical significance in the setting of lower extremity venous thromboembolism with a contraindication for anticoagulation. We describe a case of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis with duplicate IVC. Anticoagulation was contraindicated in this case leading to successful treatment with double IVC filters. We conducted a PubMed search for all current English language published literature, where filters were placed in the presence of duplicate IVC. We suggest that patients with deep vein thrombosis should have an accurate assessment of venous anatomy before IVC filter placement. Duplication of IVC, although rare, should be considered as this has management implications.

  2. MR Imaging Findings in Xp21.2 Duplication Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Helman, Guy; Gropman, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    Xp21.2 duplication syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of undetermined prevalence and clinical relevance. As the use of chromosomal microarray has become first line for the work-up of childhood developmental delay, more gene deletions and duplications have been recognized. To the best of our knowledge, the imaging findings of Xp21.2 duplication syndrome have not been reported. We report a case of a 33 month-old male referred for developmental delay that was found to have an Xp21.2 duplication containing IL1RAPL1 and multiple midline brain malformations.

  3. Genomic analysis reveals extensive gene duplication within the bovine TRB locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law Andy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diverse TR and IG repertoires are generated by V(DJ somatic recombination. Genomic studies have been pivotal in cataloguing the V, D, J and C genes present in the various TR/IG loci and describing how duplication events have expanded the number of these genes. Such studies have also provided insights into the evolution of these loci and the complex mechanisms that regulate TR/IG expression. In this study we analyze the sequence of the third bovine genome assembly to characterize the germline repertoire of bovine TRB genes and compare the organization, evolution and regulatory structure of the bovine TRB locus with that of humans and mice. Results The TRB locus in the third bovine genome assembly is distributed over 5 scaffolds, extending to ~730 Kb. The available sequence contains 134 TRBV genes, assigned to 24 subgroups, and 3 clusters of DJC genes, each comprising a single TRBD gene, 5–7 TRBJ genes and a single TRBC gene. Seventy-nine of the TRBV genes are predicted to be functional. Comparison with the human and murine TRB loci shows that the gene order, as well as the sequences of non-coding elements that regulate TRB expression, are highly conserved in the bovine. Dot-plot analyses demonstrate that expansion of the genomic TRBV repertoire has occurred via a complex and extensive series of duplications, predominantly involving DNA blocks containing multiple genes. These duplication events have resulted in massive expansion of several TRBV subgroups, most notably TRBV6, 9 and 21 which contain 40, 35 and 16 members respectively. Similarly, duplication has lead to the generation of a third DJC cluster. Analyses of cDNA data confirms the diversity of the TRBV genes and, in addition, identifies a substantial number of TRBV genes, predominantly from the larger subgroups, which are still absent from the genome assembly. The observed gene duplication within the bovine TRB locus has created a repertoire of phylogenetically

  4. Gains, losses and changes of function after gene duplication: study of the metallothionein family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Moleirinho

    Full Text Available Metallothioneins (MT are small proteins involved in heavy metal detoxification and protection against oxidative stress and cancer. The mammalian MT family originated through a series of duplication events which generated four major genes (MT1 to MT4. MT1 and MT2 encode for ubiquitous proteins, while MT3 and MT4 evolved to accomplish specific roles in brain and epithelium, respectively. Herein, phylogenetic, transcriptional and polymorphic analyses are carried out to expose gains, losses and diversification of functions that characterize the evolutionary history of the MT family. The phylogenetic analyses show that all four major genes originated through a single duplication event prior to the radiation of mammals. Further expansion of the MT1 gene has occurred in the primate lineage reaching in humans a total of 13 paralogs, five of which are pseudogenes. In humans, the reading frame of all five MT1 pseudogenes is reconstructed by sequence homology with a functional duplicate revealing that loss of invariant cysteines is the most frequent event accounting for pseudogeneisation. Expression analyses based on EST counts and RT-PCR experiments show that, as for MT1 and MT2, human MT3 is also ubiquitously expressed while MT4 transcripts are present in brain, testes, esophagus and mainly in thymus. Polymorphic variation reveals two deleterious mutations (Cys30Tyr and Arg31Trp in MT4 with frequencies reaching about 30% in African and Asian populations suggesting the gene is inactive in some individuals and physiological compensation for its loss must arise from a functional equivalent. Altogether our findings provide novel data on the evolution and diversification of MT gene duplicates, a valuable resource for understanding the vast set of biological processes in which these proteins are involved.

  5. Differential transcriptional modulation of duplicated fatty acid-binding protein genes by dietary fatty acids in zebrafish (Danio rerio: evidence for subfunctionalization or neofunctionalization of duplicated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denovan-Wright Eileen M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Duplication-Degeneration-Complementation (DDC model, subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization have been proposed as important processes driving the retention of duplicated genes in the genome. These processes are thought to occur by gain or loss of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. We tested the DDC model by determining the transcriptional induction of fatty acid-binding proteins (Fabps genes by dietary fatty acids (FAs in zebrafish. We chose zebrafish for this study for two reasons: extensive bioinformatics resources are available for zebrafish at zfin.org and zebrafish contains many duplicated genes owing to a whole genome duplication event that occurred early in the ray-finned fish lineage approximately 230-400 million years ago. Adult zebrafish were fed diets containing either fish oil (12% lipid, rich in highly unsaturated fatty acid, sunflower oil (12% lipid, rich in linoleic acid, linseed oil (12% lipid, rich in linolenic acid, or low fat (4% lipid, low fat diet for 10 weeks. FA profiles and the steady-state levels of fabp mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear RNA in intestine, liver, muscle and brain of zebrafish were determined. Result FA profiles assayed by gas chromatography differed in the intestine, brain, muscle and liver depending on diet. The steady-state level of mRNA for three sets of duplicated genes, fabp1a/fabp1b.1/fabp1b.2, fabp7a/fabp7b, and fabp11a/fabp11b, was determined by reverse transcription, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. In brain, the steady-state level of fabp7b mRNAs was induced in fish fed the linoleic acid-rich diet; in intestine, the transcript level of fabp1b.1 and fabp7b were elevated in fish fed the linolenic acid-rich diet; in liver, the level of fabp7a mRNAs was elevated in fish fed the low fat diet; and in muscle, the level of fabp7a and fabp11a mRNAs were elevated in fish fed the linolenic acid-rich or the low fat diets. In all cases

  6. Special Issue: Gene Conversion in Duplicated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Innan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene conversion is an outcome of recombination, causing non-reciprocal transfer of a DNA fragment. Several decades later than the discovery of crossing over, gene conversion was first recognized in fungi when non-Mendelian allelic distortion was observed. Gene conversion occurs when a double-strand break is repaired by using homologous sequences in the genome. In meiosis, there is a strong preference to use the orthologous region (allelic gene conversion, which causes non-Mendelian allelic distortion, but paralogous or duplicated regions can also be used for the repair (inter-locus gene conversion, also referred to as non-allelic and ectopic gene conversion. The focus of this special issue is the latter, interlocus gene conversion; the rate is lower than allelic gene conversion but it has more impact on phenotype because more drastic changes in DNA sequence are involved.

  7. Duplicación apendicular Appendicular duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidel Taquechel Barreto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El apéndice cecal es un órgano pródigamente estudiado, debido a la gran frecuencia con que se producen inflamaciones agudas en él, no obstante, son menos conocidas las anomalías congénitas que resultan en una duplicación apendicular, por ser esta una entidad rara. Se presenta un caso de una paciente que se interviene quirúrgicamente por una apendicitis aguda, en la cual se encontró otro apéndice cecal. Se realiza discusión y revisión del tema.Cecal appendix is much studied organ due to the high frequency of its acute inflammations, however, the congenital anomalies are less associated resulting in a appendicular duplication because of it is a rare entity. This is the case of a female patient operated on due to acute appendicitis founding another cecal appendix.

  8. X-linked congenital ptosis and associated intellectual disability, short stature, microcephaly, cleft palate, digital and genital abnormalities define novel Xq25q26 duplication syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, R S; Jensen, L R; Maas, S M

    2014-01-01

    Submicroscopic duplications along the long arm of the X-chromosome with known phenotypic consequences are relatively rare events. The clinical features resulting from such duplications are various, though they often include intellectual disability, microcephaly, short stature, hypotonia, hypogona...... suggested three critical regions with candidate genes (AIFM1, RAB33A, GPC3 and IGSF1) for the common phenotypes, including candidate loci for congenital bilateral ptosis, small head circumference, short stature, genital and digital defects....

  9. Characterization of the past and current duplication activities in the human 22q11.2 region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrow Bernice

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Segmental duplications (SDs on 22q11.2 (LCR22, serve as substrates for meiotic non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR events resulting in several clinically significant genomic disorders. Results To understand the duplication activity leading to the complicated SD structure of this region, we have applied the A-Bruijn graph algorithm to decompose the 22q11.2 SDs to 523 fundamental duplication sequences, termed subunits. Cross-species syntenic analysis of primate genomes demonstrates that many of these LCR22 subunits emerged very recently, especially those implicated in human genomic disorders. Some subunits have expanded more actively than others, and young Alu SINEs, are associated much more frequently with duplicated sequences that have undergone active expansion, confirming their role in mediating recombination events. Many copy number variations (CNVs exist on 22q11.2, some flanked by SDs. Interestingly, two chromosome breakpoints for 13 CNVs (mean length 65 kb are located in paralogous subunits, providing direct evidence that SD subunits could contribute to CNV formation. Sequence analysis of PACs or BACs identified extra CNVs, specifically, 10 insertions and 18 deletions within 22q11.2; four were more than 10 kb in size and most contained young AluYs at their breakpoints. Conclusions Our study indicates that AluYs are implicated in the past and current duplication events, and moreover suggests that DNA rearrangements in 22q11.2 genomic disorders perhaps do not occur randomly but involve both actively expanded duplication subunits and Alu elements.

  10. Characterization of the past and current duplication activities in the human 22q11.2 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Segmental duplications (SDs) on 22q11.2 (LCR22), serve as substrates for meiotic non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) events resulting in several clinically significant genomic disorders. Results To understand the duplication activity leading to the complicated SD structure of this region, we have applied the A-Bruijn graph algorithm to decompose the 22q11.2 SDs to 523 fundamental duplication sequences, termed subunits. Cross-species syntenic analysis of primate genomes demonstrates that many of these LCR22 subunits emerged very recently, especially those implicated in human genomic disorders. Some subunits have expanded more actively than others, and young Alu SINEs, are associated much more frequently with duplicated sequences that have undergone active expansion, confirming their role in mediating recombination events. Many copy number variations (CNVs) exist on 22q11.2, some flanked by SDs. Interestingly, two chromosome breakpoints for 13 CNVs (mean length 65 kb) are located in paralogous subunits, providing direct evidence that SD subunits could contribute to CNV formation. Sequence analysis of PACs or BACs identified extra CNVs, specifically, 10 insertions and 18 deletions within 22q11.2; four were more than 10 kb in size and most contained young AluYs at their breakpoints. Conclusions Our study indicates that AluYs are implicated in the past and current duplication events, and moreover suggests that DNA rearrangements in 22q11.2 genomic disorders perhaps do not occur randomly but involve both actively expanded duplication subunits and Alu elements. PMID:21269513

  11. Sgs1 and Exo1 suppress targeted chromosome duplication during ends-in and ends-out gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štafa, Anamarija; Miklenić, Marina; Zunar, Bojan; Lisnić, Berislav; Symington, Lorraine S; Svetec, Ivan-Krešimir

    2014-10-01

    Gene targeting is extremely efficient in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is performed by transformation with a linear, non-replicative DNA fragment carrying a selectable marker and containing ends homologous to the particular locus in a genome. However, even in S. cerevisiae, transformation can result in unwanted (aberrant) integration events, the frequency and spectra of which are quite different for ends-out and ends-in transformation assays. It has been observed that gene replacement (ends-out gene targeting) can result in illegitimate integration, integration of the transforming DNA fragment next to the target sequence and duplication of a targeted chromosome. By contrast, plasmid integration (ends-in gene targeting) is often associated with multiple targeted integration events but illegitimate integration is extremely rare and a targeted chromosome duplication has not been reported. Here we systematically investigated the influence of design of the ends-out assay on the success of targeted genetic modification. We have determined transformation efficiency, fidelity of gene targeting and spectra of all aberrant events in several ends-out gene targeting assays designed to insert, delete or replace a particular sequence in the targeted region of the yeast genome. Furthermore, we have demonstrated for the first time that targeted chromosome duplications occur even during ends-in gene targeting. Most importantly, the whole chromosome duplication is POL32 dependent pointing to break-induced replication (BIR) as the underlying mechanism. Moreover, the occurrence of duplication of the targeted chromosome was strikingly increased in the exo1Δ sgs1Δ double mutant but not in the respective single mutants demonstrating that the Exo1 and Sgs1 proteins independently suppress whole chromosome duplication during gene targeting.

  12. Benchmarking Transcriptome Quantification Methods for Duplicated Genes in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taejoon

    2015-01-01

    Xenopus is an important model organism for the study of genome duplication in vertebrates. With the full genome sequence of diploid Xenopus tropicalis available, and that of allotetraploid X. laevis close to being finished, we will be able to expand our understanding of how duplicated genes have evolved. One of the key features in the study of the functional consequence of gene duplication is how their expression patterns vary across different conditions, and RNA-seq seems to have enough resolution to discriminate the expression of highly similar duplicated genes. However, most of the current RNA-seq analysis methods were not designed to study samples with duplicate genes such as in X. laevis. Here, various computational methods to quantify gene expression in RNA-seq data were evaluated, using 2 independent X. laevis egg RNA-seq datasets and 2 reference databases for duplicated genes. The fact that RNA-seq can measure expression levels of similar duplicated genes was confirmed, but long paired-end reads are more informative than short single-end reads to discriminate duplicated genes. Also, it was found that bowtie, one of the most popular mappers in RNA-seq analysis, reports significantly smaller numbers of unique hits according to a mapping quality score compared to other mappers tested (BWA, GSNAP, STAR). Calculated from unique hits based on a mapping quality score, both expression levels and the expression ratio of duplicated genes can be estimated consistently among biological replicates, demonstrating that this method can successfully discriminate the expression of each copy of a duplicated gene pair. This comprehensive evaluation will be a useful guideline for studying gene expression of organisms with genome duplication using RNA-seq in the future.

  13. Genomic analysis of the basal lineage fungus Rhizopus oryzae reveals a whole-genome duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jun Ma

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Rhizopus oryzae is the primary cause of mucormycosis, an emerging, life-threatening infection characterized by rapid angioinvasive growth with an overall mortality rate that exceeds 50%. As a representative of the paraphyletic basal group of the fungal kingdom called "zygomycetes," R. oryzae is also used as a model to study fungal evolution. Here we report the genome sequence of R. oryzae strain 99-880, isolated from a fatal case of mucormycosis. The highly repetitive 45.3 Mb genome assembly contains abundant transposable elements (TEs, comprising approximately 20% of the genome. We predicted 13,895 protein-coding genes not overlapping TEs, many of which are paralogous gene pairs. The order and genomic arrangement of the duplicated gene pairs and their common phylogenetic origin provide evidence for an ancestral whole-genome duplication (WGD event. The WGD resulted in the duplication of nearly all subunits of the protein complexes associated with respiratory electron transport chains, the V-ATPase, and the ubiquitin-proteasome systems. The WGD, together with recent gene duplications, resulted in the expansion of multiple gene families related to cell growth and signal transduction, as well as secreted aspartic protease and subtilase protein families, which are known fungal virulence factors. The duplication of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway, especially the major azole target, lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase (ERG11, could contribute to the variable responses of R. oryzae to different azole drugs, including voriconazole and posaconazole. Expanded families of cell-wall synthesis enzymes, essential for fungal cell integrity but absent in mammalian hosts, reveal potential targets for novel and R. oryzae-specific diagnostic and therapeutic treatments.

  14. Early vertebrate chromosome duplications and the evolution of the neuropeptide Y receptor gene regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenner Sydney

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the many gene families that expanded in early vertebrate evolution is the neuropeptide (NPY receptor family of G-protein coupled receptors. Earlier work by our lab suggested that several of the NPY receptor genes found in extant vertebrates resulted from two genome duplications before the origin of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes and one additional genome duplication in the actinopterygian lineage, based on their location on chromosomes sharing several gene families. In this study we have investigated, in five vertebrate genomes, 45 gene families with members close to the NPY receptor genes in the compact genomes of the teleost fishes Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes. These correspond to Homo sapiens chromosomes 4, 5, 8 and 10. Results Chromosome regions with conserved synteny were identified and confirmed by phylogenetic analyses in H. sapiens, M. musculus, D. rerio, T. rubripes and T. nigroviridis. 26 gene families, including the NPY receptor genes, (plus 3 described recently by other labs showed a tree topology consistent with duplications in early vertebrate evolution and in the actinopterygian lineage, thereby supporting expansion through block duplications. Eight gene families had complications that precluded analysis (such as short sequence length or variable number of repeated domains and another eight families did not support block duplications (because the paralogs in these families seem to have originated in another time window than the proposed genome duplication events. RT-PCR carried out with several tissues in T. rubripes revealed that all five NPY receptors were expressed in the brain and subtypes Y2, Y4 and Y8 were also expressed in peripheral organs. Conclusion We conclude that the phylogenetic analyses and chromosomal locations of these gene families support duplications of large blocks of genes or even entire chromosomes. Thus, these results are consistent with two early vertebrate

  15. Reconciliation revisited: handling multiple optima when reconciling with duplication, transfer, and loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Mukul S; Alm, Eric J; Kellis, Manolis

    2013-10-01

    Phylogenetic tree reconciliation is a powerful approach for inferring evolutionary events like gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, and gene loss, which are fundamental to our understanding of molecular evolution. While duplication-loss (DL) reconciliation leads to a unique maximum-parsimony solution, duplication-transfer-loss (DTL) reconciliation yields a multitude of optimal solutions, making it difficult to infer the true evolutionary history of the gene family. This problem is further exacerbated by the fact that different event cost assignments yield different sets of optimal reconciliations. Here, we present an effective, efficient, and scalable method for dealing with these fundamental problems in DTL reconciliation. Our approach works by sampling the space of optimal reconciliations uniformly at random and aggregating the results. We show that even gene trees with only a few dozen genes often have millions of optimal reconciliations and present an algorithm to efficiently sample the space of optimal reconciliations uniformly at random in O(mn(2)) time per sample, where m and n denote the number of genes and species, respectively. We use these samples to understand how different optimal reconciliations vary in their node mappings and event assignments and to investigate the impact of varying event costs. We apply our method to a biological dataset of approximately 4700 gene trees from 100 taxa and observe that 93% of event assignments and 73% of mappings remain consistent across different multiple optima. Our analysis represents the first systematic investigation of the space of optimal DTL reconciliations and has many important implications for the study of gene family evolution.

  16. A rare case of congenital Y-type urethral duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Tiwari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of urethra is a rare congenital anomaly. We report a case of Y-type of urethral duplication with the accessory urethra arising from posterior urethra and opening in the perineum. The orthotopic urethra was normal. The accessory urethral tract was cored, transfixed and divided. At 1 year of follow-up, the patient has no urinary complaints

  17. Gene duplication models for directed networks with limits on growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enemark, Jakob; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-11-01

    Background: Duplication of genes is important for evolution of molecular networks. Many authors have therefore considered gene duplication as a driving force in shaping the topology of molecular networks. In particular it has been noted that growth via duplication would act as an implicit means of preferential attachment, and thereby provide the observed broad degree distributions of molecular networks. Results: We extend current models of gene duplication and rewiring by including directions and the fact that molecular networks are not a result of unidirectional growth. We introduce upstream sites and downstream shapes to quantify potential links during duplication and rewiring. We find that this in itself generates the observed scaling of transcription factors for genome sites in prokaryotes. The dynamical model can generate a scale-free degree distribution, p(k)\\propto 1/k^{\\gamma } , with exponent γ = 1 in the non-growing case, and with γ>1 when the network is growing. Conclusions: We find that duplication of genes followed by substantial recombination of upstream regions could generate features of genetic regulatory networks. Our steady state degree distribution is however too broad to be consistent with data, thereby suggesting that selective pruning acts as a main additional constraint on duplicated genes. Our analysis shows that gene duplication can only be a main cause for the observed broad degree distributions if there are also substantial recombinations between upstream regions of genes.

  18. Dynamic Delayed Duplicate Detection for External Memory Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelista, Sami

    2008-01-01

    Duplicate detection is an expensive operation of disk-based model checkers. It consists of comparing some potentially new states, the candidate states, to previous visited states. We propose a new approach to this technique called dynamic delayed duplicate detection. This one exploits some typical...

  19. Penile shaft sinus: A sequalae of circumcision in urethral duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukman O Abdur-Rahman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral duplication (UD is rare congenital anomalies with varied presentation. Careful clinical evaluation of children by specialist would enhance diagnosis, adequate management and reduce occurrence of complication. We present a 12-year-old boy with chronic post circumcision ventral penile sinus that was successfully managed for urethral duplication.

  20. 44 CFR 206.191 - Duplication of benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... individuals and families. (b) Government policy. (1) Federal agencies providing disaster assistance under the... duplication of benefits, according to the general policy guidance of the Federal Emergency Management Agency... disaster relief agencies establish and follow policies and procedures to prevent and remedy duplication...

  1. 42 CFR 457.626 - Prevention of duplicate payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prevention of duplicate payments. 457.626 Section... Payments to States § 457.626 Prevention of duplicate payments. (a) General rule. No payment shall be made... CFR 144.103, which is not part of, or wholly owned by, a governmental entity. Prompt payment...

  2. 40 CFR 25.13 - Coordination and non-duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS UNDER THE RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.13 Coordination and non-duplication. The public participation activities and materials that... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coordination and non-duplication....

  3. 10 CFR 7.21 - Cost of duplication of documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cost of duplication of documents. 7.21 Section 7.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.21 Cost of duplication of documents. Copies of the records, reports, transcripts, minutes, appendices, working papers, drafts, studies, agenda, or...

  4. MECP2 duplication: possible cause of severe phenotype in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Schwoerer, Jessica; Laffin, Jennifer; Haun, Joanne; Raca, Gordana; Friez, Michael J; Giampietro, Philip F

    2014-04-01

    MECP2 duplication syndrome, originally described in 2005, is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder comprising infantile hypotonia, severe to profound intellectual disability, autism or autistic-like features, spasticity, along with a variety of additional features that are not always clinically apparent. The syndrome is due to a duplication (or triplication) of the gene methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2). To date, the disorder has been described almost exclusively in males. Female carriers of the duplication are thought to have no or mild phenotypic features. Recently, a phenotype for females began emerging. We describe a family with ∼290 kb duplication of Xq28 region that includes the MECP2 gene where the proposita and affected family members are female. Twin sisters, presumed identical, presented early with developmental delay, and seizures. Evaluation of the proposita at 25 years of age included microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) which revealed the MECP2 gene duplication. The same duplication was found in the proposita's sister, who is more severely affected, and the proband's mother who has mild intellectual disability and depression. X-chromosome inactivation studies showed significant skewing in the mother, but was uninformative in the twin sisters. We propose that the MECP2 duplication caused for the phenotype of the proband and her sister. These findings support evidence for varied severity in some females with MECP2 duplications.

  5. 29 CFR 1912.4 - Avoidance of duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Avoidance of duplication. 1912.4 Section 1912.4 Labor... (CONTINUED) ADVISORY COMMITTEES ON STANDARDS Organizational Matters § 1912.4 Avoidance of duplication. No... advisory committee established under section 7(b) of the Act....

  6. Evolution after whole-genome duplication: a network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Lin, Zhenguo; Nakhleh, Luay

    2013-11-06

    Gene duplication plays an important role in the evolution of genomes and interactomes. Elucidating how evolution after gene duplication interplays at the sequence and network level is of great interest. In this work, we analyze a data set of gene pairs that arose through whole-genome duplication (WGD) in yeast. All these pairs have the same duplication time, making them ideal for evolutionary investigation. We investigated the interplay between evolution after WGD at the sequence and network levels and correlated these two levels of divergence with gene expression and fitness data. We find that molecular interactions involving WGD genes evolve at rates that are three orders of magnitude slower than the rates of evolution of the corresponding sequences. Furthermore, we find that divergence of WGD pairs correlates strongly with gene expression and fitness data. Because of the role of gene duplication in determining redundancy in biological systems and particularly at the network level, we investigated the role of interaction networks in elucidating the evolutionary fate of duplicated genes. We find that gene neighborhoods in interaction networks provide a mechanism for inferring these fates, and we developed an algorithm for achieving this task. Further epistasis analysis of WGD pairs categorized by their inferred evolutionary fates demonstrated the utility of these techniques. Finally, we find that WGD pairs and other pairs of paralogous genes of small-scale duplication origin share similar properties, giving good support for generalizing our results from WGD pairs to evolution after gene duplication in general.

  7. 47 CFR 61.73 - Duplication of rates or regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of rates or regulations. 61.73 Section 61.73 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Duplication of rates or regulations. A carrier concurring in schedules of another carrier must not...

  8. 49 CFR 24.3 - No duplication of payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false No duplication of payments. 24.3 Section 24.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation UNIFORM RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AND REAL PROPERTY ACQUISITION FOR FEDERAL AND FEDERALLY-ASSISTED PROGRAMS General § 24.3 No duplication of payments. No...

  9. Testing of duplicate rinse aliquots for presence of Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testing of chicken carcass rinses for Salmonella prevalence is often performed in duplicate because of the potential importance of the results, but anecdotal reports indicate that duplicate samples often disagree. This might be due to normal variation in microbiological methods or to the testing of...

  10. Two cases of the caudal duplication anomaly including a discordant monozygotic twin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, HY; Takahashi, M; Zijlstra, RJ; Baert, JALL; Kooi, KA; Hofstra, RMW; van Essen, AJ

    2002-01-01

    We present two unrelated patients with various duplications in the caudal region. One patient presented with a duplication of the distal spine from L4, left double ureter, duplication of the vagina and cervix, and duplication of the distal colon. The second patient was diagnosed with a duplication

  11. Two cases of the caudal duplication anomaly including a discordant monozygotic twin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, HY; Takahashi, M; Zijlstra, RJ; Baert, JALL; Kooi, KA; Hofstra, RMW; van Essen, AJ

    2002-01-01

    We present two unrelated patients with various duplications in the caudal region. One patient presented with a duplication of the distal spine from L4, left double ureter, duplication of the vagina and cervix, and duplication of the distal colon. The second patient was diagnosed with a duplication o

  12. Detection of tandam duplications and implications for linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matise, T.C.; Weeks, D.E. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Chakravarti, A. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)); Patel, P.I.; Lupski, J.R. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Nelis, E.; Timmerman, V.; Van Broeckhoven, C. (Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium))

    1994-06-01

    The first demonstration of an autosomal dominant human disease caused by segmental trisomy came in 1991 for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A). For this disorder, the segmental trisomy is due to a large tandem duplication of 1.5 Mb of DNA located on chromosome 17p11.2-p12. The search for the CMT1A disease gene was misdirected and impeded because some chromosome 17 genetic markers that are linked to CMT1A lie within this duplication. To better understand how such a duplication might affect genetic analyses in the context of disease gene mapping, the authors studied the effects of marker duplication on transmission probabilities of marker alleles, on linkage analysis of an autosomal dominant disease, and on tests of linkage homogeneity. They demonstrate that the undetected presence of a duplication distorts transmission ratios, hampers fine localization of the disease gene, and increases false evidence of linkage heterogeneity. In addition, they devised a likelihood-based method for detecting the presence of a tandemly duplicated marker when one is suspected. They tested their methods through computer simulations and on CMT1A pedigrees genotyped at several chromosome 17 markers. On the simulated data, the method detected 96% of duplicated markers (with a false-positive rate of 5%). On the CMT1A data the method successfully identified two of three loci that are duplicated (with no false positives). This method could be used to identify duplicated markers in other regions of the genome and could be used to delineate the extent of duplications similar to that involved in CMT1A. 18 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Histone modification pattern evolution after yeast gene duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Yangyun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication and subsequent functional divergence especially expression divergence have been widely considered as main sources for evolutionary innovations. Many studies evidenced that genetic regulatory network evolved rapidly shortly after gene duplication, thus leading to accelerated expression divergence and diversification. However, little is known whether epigenetic factors have mediated the evolution of expression regulation since gene duplication. In this study, we conducted detailed analyses on yeast histone modification (HM, the major epigenetics type in this organism, as well as other available functional genomics data to address this issue. Results Duplicate genes, on average, share more common HM-code patterns than random singleton pairs in their promoters and open reading frames (ORF. Though HM-code divergence between duplicates in both promoter and ORF regions increase with their sequence divergence, the HM-code in ORF region evolves slower than that in promoter region, probably owing to the functional constraints imposed on protein sequences. After excluding the confounding effect of sequence divergence (or evolutionary time, we found the evidence supporting the notion that in yeast, the HM-code may co-evolve with cis- and trans-regulatory factors. Moreover, we observed that deletion of some yeast HM-related enzymes increases the expression divergence between duplicate genes, yet the effect is lower than the case of transcription factor (TF deletion or environmental stresses. Conclusions Our analyses demonstrate that after gene duplication, yeast histone modification profile between duplicates diverged with evolutionary time, similar to genetic regulatory elements. Moreover, we found the evidence of the co-evolution between genetic and epigenetic elements since gene duplication, together contributing to the expression divergence between duplicate genes.

  14. The Evolutionary Relationship between Alternative Splicing and Gene Duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez, Luis P.; Hernández, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    The protein diversity that exists today has resulted from various evolutionary processes. It is well known that gene duplication (GD) along with the accumulation of mutations are responsible, among other factors, for an increase in the number of different proteins. The gene structure in eukaryotes requires the removal of non-coding sequences, introns, to produce mature mRNAs. This process, known as cis-splicing, referred to here as splicing, is regulated by several factors which can lead to numerous splicing arrangements, commonly designated as alternative splicing (AS). AS, producing several transcripts isoforms form a single gene, also increases the protein diversity. However, the evolution and manner for increasing protein variation differs between AS and GD. An important question is how are patterns of AS affected after a GD event. Here, we review the current knowledge of AS and GD, focusing on their evolutionary relationship. These two processes are now considered the main contributors to the increasing protein diversity and therefore their relationship is a relevant, yet understudied, area of evolutionary study. PMID:28261262

  15. Identification of coding exon 3 duplication in the BMPR1A gene in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Junya; Nagayama, Satoshi; Chino, Akiko; Sakata, Ai; Yamamoto, Noriko; Sato, Yuri; Ashihara, Yuumi; Kita, Mizuho; Nomura, Sachio; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Igarashi, Masahiro; Ueno, Masashi; Arai, Masami

    2014-10-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by multiple juvenile polyps arising in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers, specifically colon cancer. BMPR1A and SMAD4 germline mutations have been found in patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome. We identified a BMPR1A mutation, which involves a duplication of coding exon 3 (c.230+452_333+441dup1995), on multiple ligation dependent probe amplification in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome. The mutation causes a frameshift, producing a truncated protein (p.D112NfsX2). Therefore, the mutation is believed to be pathogenic. We also identified a duplication breakpoint in which Alu sequences are located. These results suggest that the duplication event resulted from recombination between Alu sequences. To our knowledge, partial duplication in the BMPR1A gene has not been reported previously. This is the first case report to document coding exon 3 duplication in the BMPR1A gene in a patient with juvenile polyposis syndrome.

  16. Novel Duplicate Address Detection with Hash Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, GuangJia; Ji, ZhenZhou

    2016-01-01

    Duplicate address detection (DAD) is an important component of the address resolution protocol (ARP) and the neighbor discovery protocol (NDP). DAD determines whether an IP address is in conflict with other nodes. In traditional DAD, the target address to be detected is broadcast through the network, which provides convenience for malicious nodes to attack. A malicious node can send a spoofing reply to prevent the address configuration of a normal node, and thus, a denial-of-service attack is launched. This study proposes a hash method to hide the target address in DAD, which prevents an attack node from launching destination attacks. If the address of a normal node is identical to the detection address, then its hash value should be the same as the "Hash_64" field in the neighboring solicitation message. Consequently, DAD can be successfully completed. This process is called DAD-h. Simulation results indicate that address configuration using DAD-h has a considerably higher success rate when under attack compared with traditional DAD. Comparative analysis shows that DAD-h does not require third-party devices and considerable computing resources; it also provides a lightweight security resolution.

  17. Duplicated laboratory tests: evaluation of a computerized alert intervention abstract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Sharon A; Papa, Linda; Norris, Anne E; Chase, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Redundant testing contributes to reductions in healthcare system efficiency. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine if the use of a computerized alert would reduce the number and cost of duplicated Acute Hepatitis Profile (AHP) laboratory tests and (2) assess what patient, test, and system factors were associated with duplication. This study used a quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design to determine the proportion of duplication of the AHP test before and after implementation of a computerized alert intervention. The AHP test was duplicated if the test was requested again within 15 days of the initial test being performed and the result present in the medical record. The intervention consisted of a computerized alert (pop-up window) that indicated to the clinician that the test had recently been ordered. A total of 674 AHP tests were performed in the pre-intervention period and 692 in the postintervention group. In the pre-intervention period, 53 (7.9%) were duplicated and in postintervention, 18 (2.6%) were duplicated (ptests (p≤.001). Implementation of computerized alerts may be useful in reducing duplicate laboratory tests and improving healthcare system efficiency.

  18. Foregut duplication cysts of the stomach with respiratory epithelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theodosios Theodosopoulos; Athanasios Marinis; Konstantinos Karapanos; Georgios Vassilikostas; Nikolaos Dafnios; Lazaros Samanides; Eleni Carvounis

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplication is a congenital rare disease entity. Gastric duplication cysts seem to appear even more rarely. Herein, two duplications cysts of the stomach in a 46 year-old female patient are presented.Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a cystic lesion attached to the posterior aspect of the gastric fundus, while upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was negative. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a non-communicating cyst and a smaller similar cyst embedded in the gastrosplenic ligament. Excision of both cysts along with the spleen was performed and pathology reported two smooth muscle coated cysts with a pseudostratified ciliated epithelial lining (respiratory type).

  19. Methods, apparatus and system for selective duplication of subtasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade Costa, Carlos H.; Cher, Chen-Yong; Park, Yoonho; Rosenburg, Bryan S.; Ryu, Kyung D.

    2016-03-29

    A method for selective duplication of subtasks in a high-performance computing system includes: monitoring a health status of one or more nodes in a high-performance computing system, where one or more subtasks of a parallel task execute on the one or more nodes; identifying one or more nodes as having a likelihood of failure which exceeds a first prescribed threshold; selectively duplicating the one or more subtasks that execute on the one or more nodes having a likelihood of failure which exceeds the first prescribed threshold; and notifying a messaging library that one or more subtasks were duplicated.

  20. Benchmarks for measurement of duplicate detection methods in nucleotide databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingyu; Zobel, Justin; Verspoor, Karin

    2017-01-08

    Duplication of information in databases is a major data quality challenge. The presence of duplicates, implying either redundancy or inconsistency, can have a range of impacts on the quality of analyses that use the data. To provide a sound basis for research on this issue in databases of nucleotide sequences, we have developed new, large-scale validated collections of duplicates, which can be used to test the effectiveness of duplicate detection methods. Previous collections were either designed primarily to test efficiency, or contained only a limited number of duplicates of limited kinds. To date, duplicate detection methods have been evaluated on separate, inconsistent benchmarks, leading to results that cannot be compared and, due to limitations of the benchmarks, of questionable generality. In this study, we present three nucleotide sequence database benchmarks, based on information drawn from a range of resources, including information derived from mapping to two data sections within the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL. Each benchmark has distinct characteristics. We quantify these characteristics and argue for their complementary value in evaluation. The benchmarks collectively contain a vast number of validated biological duplicates; the largest has nearly half a billion duplicate pairs (although this is probably only a tiny fraction of the total that is present). They are also the first benchmarks targeting the primary nucleotide databases. The records include the 21 most heavily studied organisms in molecular biology research. Our quantitative analysis shows that duplicates in the different benchmarks, and in different organisms, have different characteristics. It is thus unreliable to evaluate duplicate detection methods against any single benchmark. For example, the benchmark derived from UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot mappings identifies more diverse types of duplicates, showing the importance of expert curation, but

  1. Finding all sorting tandem duplication random loss operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernt, Matthias; Chen, Kuan Yu; Chen, Ming Chiang

    2011-01-01

    A tandem duplication random loss (TDRL) operation duplicates a contiguous segment of genes, followed by the random loss of one copy of each of the duplicated genes. Although the importance of this operation is founded by several recent biological studies, it has been investigated only rarely from...... a theoretical point of view. Of particular interest are sorting TDRLs which are TDRLs that, when applied to a permutation representing a genome, reduce the distance towards another given permutation. The identification of sorting genome rearrangement operations in general is a key ingredient of many algorithms...

  2. Molecular analyses of unrelated Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease patients suggest a high frequency of the CMT1A duplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, C.A.; Davis, S.N.; Heju, Z.; Pentao, L.; Patel, P.I.; Lupski, J.R. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Garcia, C.A. (Louisiana State Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. One form of CMT, CMT type 1A, is characterized by uniformly decreased nerve conduction velocities, usually shows autosomal dominant inheritance, and is associated with a large submicroscopic duplication of the p11.2-p12 region of chromosome 17. A cohort of 75 unrelated patients diagnosed clinically with CMT and evaluated by electrophysiological methods were analyzed molecularly for the presence of the CMT1A DNA duplication. Three methodologies were used to assess the duplication: Measurement of dosage differences between RFLP alleles, analysis of polymorphic (GT)[sub n] repeats, and detection of a junction fragment by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The CMT1A duplication was found in 68% of the 63 unrelated CMT patients with electrophysiological studies consistent with CMT type 1 (CMT1). The CMT1A duplication was detected as a de novo event in two CMT1 families. Twelve CMT patients who did not have decreased nerve conduction velocities consistent with a diagnosis of CMT type 2 (CMT2) were found not to have the CMT1A duplication. The most informative molecular method was the detection of the CMT1A duplication-specific junction fragment. Given the high frequency of the CMT1A duplication in CMT patients and the high frequency of new mutations, the authors conclude that a molecular test for the CMT1A DNA duplication is very useful in the differential diagnosis of patients with peripheral neuropathies. 61 refs., 4 figs.

  3. On the Complexity of Duplication-Transfer-Loss Reconciliation with Non-Binary Gene Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Misagh; Bansal, Mukul

    2015-12-23

    Duplication-Transfer-Loss (DTL) reconciliation has emerged as a powerful technique for studying gene family evolution in the presence of horizontal gene transfer. DTL reconciliation takes as input a gene family phylogeny and the corresponding species phylogeny, and reconciles the two by postulating speciation, gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, and gene loss events. Efficient algorithms exist for finding optimal DTL reconciliations when the gene tree is binary. However, gene trees are frequently non-binary. With such non-binary gene trees, the reconciliation problem seeks to find a binary resolution of the gene tree that minimizes the reconciliation cost. Given the prevalence of non-binary gene trees, many efficient algorithms have been developed for this problem in the context of the simpler Duplication-Loss (DL) reconciliation model. Yet, no efficient algorithms exist for DTL reconciliation with non-binary gene trees and the complexity of the problem remains unknown. In this work, we resolve this open question by showing that the problem is, in fact, NP-hard. Our reduction applies to both the dated and undated formulations of DTL reconciliation. By resolving this long-standing open problem, this work will spur the development of both exact and heuristic algorithms for this important problem.

  4. Homoeologous chromosomes of Xenopus laevis are highly conserved after whole-genome duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Y; Nishida, C; Takagi, C; Ueno, N; Matsuda, Y

    2013-11-01

    It has been suggested that whole-genome duplication (WGD) occurred twice during the evolutionary process of vertebrates around 450 and 500 million years ago, which contributed to an increase in the genomic and phenotypic complexities of vertebrates. However, little is still known about the evolutionary process of homoeologous chromosomes after WGD because many duplicate genes have been lost. Therefore, Xenopus laevis (2n=36) and Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis (2n=20) are good animal models for studying the process of genomic and chromosomal reorganization after WGD because X. laevis is an allotetraploid species that resulted from WGD after the interspecific hybridization of diploid species closely related to X. tropicalis. We constructed a comparative cytogenetic map of X. laevis using 60 complimentary DNA clones that covered the entire chromosomal regions of 10 pairs of X. tropicalis chromosomes. We consequently identified all nine homoeologous chromosome groups of X. laevis. Hybridization signals on two pairs of X. laevis homoeologous chromosomes were detected for 50 of 60 (83%) genes, and the genetic linkage is highly conserved between X. tropicalis and X. laevis chromosomes except for one fusion and one inversion and also between X. laevis homoeologous chromosomes except for two inversions. These results indicate that the loss of duplicated genes and inter- and/or intrachromosomal rearrangements occurred much less frequently in this lineage, suggesting that these events were not essential for diploidization of the allotetraploid genome in X. laevis after WGD.

  5. Phylogenomics of the benzoxazinoid biosynthetic pathway of Poaceae: gene duplications and origin of the Bx cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutartre Leslie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benzoxazinoids 2,4-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIBOA and 2,4-dihydroxy-7- methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA, are key defense compounds present in major agricultural crops such as maize and wheat. Their biosynthesis involves nine enzymes thought to form a linear pathway leading to the storage of DI(MBOA as glucoside conjugates. Seven of the genes (Bx1-Bx6 and Bx8 form a cluster at the tip of the short arm of maize chromosome 4 that includes four P450 genes (Bx2-5 belonging to the same CYP71C subfamily. The origin of this cluster is unknown. Results We show that the pathway appeared following several duplications of the TSA gene (α-subunit of tryptophan synthase and of a Bx2-like ancestral CYP71C gene and the recruitment of Bx8 before the radiation of Poaceae. The origins of Bx6 and Bx7 remain unclear. We demonstrate that the Bx2-like CYP71C ancestor was not committed to the benzoxazinoid pathway and that after duplications the Bx2-Bx5 genes were under positive selection on a few sites and underwent functional divergence, leading to the current specific biochemical properties of the enzymes. The absence of synteny between available Poaceae genomes involving the Bx gene regions is in contrast with the conserved synteny in the TSA gene region. Conclusions These results demonstrate that rearrangements following duplications of an IGL/TSA gene and of a CYP71C gene probably resulted in the clustering of the new copies (Bx1 and Bx2 at the tip of a chromosome in an ancestor of grasses. Clustering favored cosegregation and tip chromosomal location favored gene rearrangements that allowed the further recruitment of genes to the pathway. These events, a founding event and elongation events, may have been the key to the subsequent evolution of the benzoxazinoid biosynthetic cluster.

  6. Phylogenomics of the benzoxazinoid biosynthetic pathway of Poaceae: gene duplications and origin of the Bx cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutartre, Leslie; Hilliou, Frédérique; Feyereisen, René

    2012-05-11

    The benzoxazinoids 2,4-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIBOA) and 2,4-dihydroxy-7- methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA), are key defense compounds present in major agricultural crops such as maize and wheat. Their biosynthesis involves nine enzymes thought to form a linear pathway leading to the storage of DI(M)BOA as glucoside conjugates. Seven of the genes (Bx1-Bx6 and Bx8) form a cluster at the tip of the short arm of maize chromosome 4 that includes four P450 genes (Bx2-5) belonging to the same CYP71C subfamily. The origin of this cluster is unknown. We show that the pathway appeared following several duplications of the TSA gene (α-subunit of tryptophan synthase) and of a Bx2-like ancestral CYP71C gene and the recruitment of Bx8 before the radiation of Poaceae. The origins of Bx6 and Bx7 remain unclear. We demonstrate that the Bx2-like CYP71C ancestor was not committed to the benzoxazinoid pathway and that after duplications the Bx2-Bx5 genes were under positive selection on a few sites and underwent functional divergence, leading to the current specific biochemical properties of the enzymes. The absence of synteny between available Poaceae genomes involving the Bx gene regions is in contrast with the conserved synteny in the TSA gene region. These results demonstrate that rearrangements following duplications of an IGL/TSA gene and of a CYP71C gene probably resulted in the clustering of the new copies (Bx1 and Bx2) at the tip of a chromosome in an ancestor of grasses. Clustering favored cosegregation and tip chromosomal location favored gene rearrangements that allowed the further recruitment of genes to the pathway. These events, a founding event and elongation events, may have been the key to the subsequent evolution of the benzoxazinoid biosynthetic cluster.

  7. Attack Vulnerability of Network with Duplication-Divergence Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We study the attack vulnerability of network with duplication-divergence mechanism. Numerical results have shown that the duplication-divergence network with larger retention probability a is more robust against target attack relatively. Furthermore, duplication-divergence network is broken down more quickly than its counterpart BA network under target attack. Such result is consistent with the fact of WWW and Internet networks under target attack. So duplication-divergence model is a more realistic one for us to investigate the characteristics of the world wide web in future. We also observe that the exponent 7 of degree distribution and average degree are important parameters of networks, reflecting the performance of networks under target attack. Our results are helpful to the research on the security of network.

  8. Noncommunicating isolated enteric duplication cyst in the abdomen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    review of the literature. Hyun-Young Kim, Soo-Hong ... Keywords: abdomen, children, duplication, isolated, noncommunicating. Department of ... He also had a fever with a body ... unknown origin is observed in the abdominal cavity in children.

  9. Complete duplication of bladder and urethra: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esham, W; Holt, H A

    1980-05-01

    A case of complete duplication of the bladder and urethra in a girl is reported, demonstrating outlet obstruction in the bladder on the left side. Associated anomalies and pertinent literature are reviewed.

  10. The evolution of the tape measure protein: units, duplications and losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poisson Guylaine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large family of viruses that infect bacteria, called phages, is characterized by long tails used to inject DNA into their victims' cells. The tape measure protein got its name because the length of the corresponding gene is proportional to the length of the phage's tail: a fact shown by actually copying or splicing out parts of DNA in exemplar species. A natural question is whether there exist units for these tape measures, and if different tape measures have different units and lengths. Such units would allow us to retrace the evolution of tape measure proteins using their duplication/loss history. The vast number of sequenced phages genomes allows us to attack this problem with a comparative genomics approach. Results Here we describe a subset of phages whose tape measure proteins contain variable numbers of an 11 amino acids sequence repeat, aligned with sequence similarity, structural properties, and simple arithmetics. This subset provides a unique opportunity for the combinatorial study of phage evolution, without the added uncertainties of multiple alignments, which are trivial in this case, or of protein functions, that are well established. We give a heuristic that reconstructs the duplication history of these sequences, using divergent strains to discriminate between mutations that occurred before and after speciation, or lineage divergence. The heuristic is based on an efficient algorithm that gives an exhaustive enumeration of all possible parsimonious reconstructions of the duplication/speciation history of a single nucleotide. Finally, we present a method that allows, when possible, to discriminate between duplication and loss events. Conclusions Establishing the evolutionary history of viruses is difficult, in part due to extensive recombinations and gene transfers, and high mutation rates that often erase detectable similarity between homologous genes. In this paper, we introduce new tools to address this

  11. The evolution of the tape measure protein: units, duplications and losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaid, Mahdi; Bergeron, Anne; Poisson, Guylaine

    2011-10-05

    A large family of viruses that infect bacteria, called phages, is characterized by long tails used to inject DNA into their victims' cells. The tape measure protein got its name because the length of the corresponding gene is proportional to the length of the phage's tail: a fact shown by actually copying or splicing out parts of DNA in exemplar species. A natural question is whether there exist units for these tape measures, and if different tape measures have different units and lengths. Such units would allow us to retrace the evolution of tape measure proteins using their duplication/loss history. The vast number of sequenced phages genomes allows us to attack this problem with a comparative genomics approach. Here we describe a subset of phages whose tape measure proteins contain variable numbers of an 11 amino acids sequence repeat, aligned with sequence similarity, structural properties, and simple arithmetics. This subset provides a unique opportunity for the combinatorial study of phage evolution, without the added uncertainties of multiple alignments, which are trivial in this case, or of protein functions, that are well established. We give a heuristic that reconstructs the duplication history of these sequences, using divergent strains to discriminate between mutations that occurred before and after speciation, or lineage divergence. The heuristic is based on an efficient algorithm that gives an exhaustive enumeration of all possible parsimonious reconstructions of the duplication/speciation history of a single nucleotide. Finally, we present a method that allows, when possible, to discriminate between duplication and loss events. Establishing the evolutionary history of viruses is difficult, in part due to extensive recombinations and gene transfers, and high mutation rates that often erase detectable similarity between homologous genes. In this paper, we introduce new tools to address this problem.

  12. Transcriptional rewiring of the sex determining dmrt1 gene duplicate by transposable elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaury Herpin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Control and coordination of eukaryotic gene expression rely on transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory networks. Evolutionary innovations and adaptations often require rapid changes of such networks. It has long been hypothesized that transposable elements (TE might contribute to the rewiring of regulatory interactions. More recently it emerged that TEs might bring in ready-to-use transcription factor binding sites to create alterations to the promoters by which they were captured. A process where the gene regulatory architecture is of remarkable plasticity is sex determination. While the more downstream components of the sex determination cascades are evolutionary conserved, the master regulators can switch between groups of organisms even on the interspecies level or between populations. In the medaka fish (Oryzias latipes a duplicated copy of dmrt1, designated dmrt1bY or DMY, on the Y chromosome was shown to be the master regulator of male development, similar to Sry in mammals. We found that the dmrt1bY gene has acquired a new feedback downregulation of its expression. Additionally, the autosomal dmrt1a gene is also able to regulate transcription of its duplicated paralog by binding to a unique target Dmrt1 site nested within the dmrt1bY proximal promoter region. We could trace back this novel regulatory element to a highly conserved sequence within a new type of TE that inserted into the upstream region of dmrt1bY shortly after the duplication event. Our data provide functional evidence for a role of TEs in transcriptional network rewiring for sub- and/or neo-functionalization of duplicated genes. In the particular case of dmrt1bY, this contributed to create new hierarchies of sex-determining genes.

  13. Duplicate Appendix With Acute Ruptured Appendicitis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Nazir, Sharique; Bulanov, Alex; Ilyas, Mohammed Iyoob Mohammed; Jabbour, Ibrahim I.; Griffith, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Duplication of the appendix is a rare congenital anomaly that, in adults, is most often found incidentally during surgery for other reasons. Appendicitis in the duplicated appendix is very rare and has been reported less than 10 times in the medical literature. We describe a 33-year-old woman with worsening periumbilical pain, nausea, vomiting, and fever. Physical examination showed localized peritonitis in the right lower quadrant. She had an elevated white blood cell count with neutrophilia...

  14. Modeling protein network evolution under genome duplication and domain shuffling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isambert Hervé

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successive whole genome duplications have recently been firmly established in all major eukaryote kingdoms. Such exponential evolutionary processes must have largely contributed to shape the topology of protein-protein interaction (PPI networks by outweighing, in particular, all time-linear network growths modeled so far. Results We propose and solve a mathematical model of PPI network evolution under successive genome duplications. This demonstrates, from first principles, that evolutionary conservation and scale-free topology are intrinsically linked properties of PPI networks and emerge from i prevailing exponential network dynamics under duplication and ii asymmetric divergence of gene duplicates. While required, we argue that this asymmetric divergence arises, in fact, spontaneously at the level of protein-binding sites. This supports a refined model of PPI network evolution in terms of protein domains under exponential and asymmetric duplication/divergence dynamics, with multidomain proteins underlying the combinatorial formation of protein complexes. Genome duplication then provides a powerful source of PPI network innovation by promoting local rearrangements of multidomain proteins on a genome wide scale. Yet, we show that the overall conservation and topology of PPI networks are robust to extensive domain shuffling of multidomain proteins as well as to finer details of protein interaction and evolution. Finally, large scale features of direct and indirect PPI networks of S. cerevisiae are well reproduced numerically with only two adjusted parameters of clear biological significance (i.e. network effective growth rate and average number of protein-binding domains per protein. Conclusion This study demonstrates the statistical consequences of genome duplication and domain shuffling on the conservation and topology of PPI networks over a broad evolutionary scale across eukaryote kingdoms. In particular, scale

  15. Inferring angiosperm phylogeny from EST data with widespread gene duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Sanderson, Michael J.; McMahon, Michelle M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Most studies inferring species phylogenies use sequences from single copy genes or sets of orthologs culled from gene families. For taxa such as plants, with very high levels of gene duplication in their nuclear genomes, this has limited the exploitation of nuclear sequences for phylogenetic studies, such as those available in large EST libraries. One rarely used method of inference, gene tree parsimony, can infer species trees from gene families undergoing duplication and loss, bu...

  16. [Respiratory insufficiency due to duplications of the oesophagus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Reijo

    2015-01-01

    Duplications of the oesophagus are uncommon congenital malformations with possible occurrence in any part of the gastrointestinal tract. The duplications may be cysts, diverticula or tubular-shaped. Cysts may even occur further away from the gastrointestinal tract, not necessarily having contact with it. I present a patient case, in which a 13-month-old child was brought to the emergency room due to gradually increasing dyspnea. The child made a full recovery after the surgical procedure.

  17. Quantized Dissensus in Networks of Agents subject to Death and Duplication

    CERN Document Server

    Bauso, D; Pesenti, R

    2009-01-01

    Dissensus is a modeling framework for networks of dynamic agents in competition for scarce resources. Originally inspired by biological cells behaviors, it fits also marketing, finance and many other application areas. Competition is often unstable in the sense that strong agents, those having access to large resources, gain more and more resources at the expense of weak agents. Thus, strong agents duplicate when reaching a critical amount of resources, whereas weak agents die when loosing all their resources. To capture all these phenomena we introduce systems with a discrete time gossip and unstable state dynamics interrupted by discrete events affecting the network topology. Invariancy of states and topologies and network connectivity are explored.

  18. A novel duplicate images detection method based on PLSA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yongji; Ding, Liping; Gu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Web image search results usually contain duplicate copies. This paper considers the problem of detecting and clustering duplicate images contained in web image search results. Detecting and clustering the duplicate images together facilitates users' viewing. A novel method is presented in this paper to detect and cluster duplicate images by measuring similarity between their topics. More specifically, images are viewed as documents consisting of visual words formed by vector quantizing the affine invariant visual features. Then a statistical model widely used in text domain, the PLSA(Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis) model, is utilized to map images into a probabilistic latent semantic space. Because the main content remains unchanged despite small digital alteration, duplicate images will be close to each other in the derived semantic space. Based on this, a simple clustering process can successfully detect duplicate images and cluster them together. Comparing to those methods based on comparison between hash value of visual words, this method is more robust to the visual feature level alteration posed on the images. Experiments demonstrates the effectiveness of this method.

  19. Duplicate publication rate decline in Korean medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Young; Bae, Chong-Woo; Hahm, Chang Kok; Cho, Hye Min

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine trends in duplicate publication in Korean medical articles indexed in the KoreaMed database from 2004 to 2009, before and after a campaign against scientific misconduct launched by the Korean Association of Medical Journal Editors in 2006. The study covered period from 2007 to 2012; and 5% of the articles indexed in KoreaMed were retrieved by random sampling. Three authors reviewed full texts of the retrieved articles. The pattern of duplicate publication, such as copy, salami slicing (fragmentation), and aggregation (imalas), was also determined. Before the launching ethics campaign, the national duplication rate in medical journals was relatively high: 5.9% in 2004, 6.0% in 2005, and 7.2% in 2006. However, duplication rate steadily declined to 4.5% in 2007, 2.8% in 2008, and 1.2 % in 2009. Of all duplicated articles, 53.4% were classified as copies, 27.8% as salami slicing, and 18.8% as aggregation (imalas). The decline in duplicate publication rate took place as a result of nationwide campaigns and monitoring by KoreaMed and KoreaMed Synapse, starting from 2006.

  20. Mutational dynamics of murine angiogenin duplicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Mario A

    2010-10-01

    Angiogenin in vertebrates and highlight the plasticity of this protein after gene duplication. Our results suggest functional divergence among mAng paralogs. This puts forward mAng as a good system candidate for testing functional plasticity of such an important protein while stresses caution when using mouse as a model to infer the consequences of mutations in the single Ang copy of humans.

  1. Centrobin-centrosomal protein 4.1-associated protein (CPAP) interaction promotes CPAP localization to the centrioles during centriole duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudi, Radhika; Zou, Chaozhong; Dhar, Jayeeta; Gao, Qingshen; Vasu, Chenthamarakshan

    2014-05-30

    Centriole duplication is the process by which two new daughter centrioles are generated from the proximal end of preexisting mother centrioles. Accurate centriole duplication is important for many cellular and physiological events, including cell division and ciliogenesis. Centrosomal protein 4.1-associated protein (CPAP), centrosomal protein of 152 kDa (CEP152), and centrobin are known to be essential for centriole duplication. However, the precise mechanism by which they contribute to centriole duplication is not known. In this study, we show that centrobin interacts with CEP152 and CPAP, and the centrobin-CPAP interaction is critical for centriole duplication. Although depletion of centrobin from cells did not have an effect on the centriolar levels of CEP152, it caused the disappearance of CPAP from both the preexisting and newly formed centrioles. Moreover, exogenous expression of the CPAP-binding fragment of centrobin also caused the disappearance of CPAP from both the preexisting and newly synthesized centrioles, possibly in a dominant negative manner, thereby inhibiting centriole duplication and the PLK4 overexpression-mediated centrosome amplification. Interestingly, exogenous overexpression of CPAP in the centrobin-depleted cells did not restore CPAP localization to the centrioles. However, restoration of centrobin expression in the centrobin-depleted cells led to the reappearance of centriolar CPAP. Hence, we conclude that centrobin-CPAP interaction is critical for the recruitment of CPAP to procentrioles to promote the elongation of daughter centrioles and for the persistence of CPAP on preexisting mother centrioles. Our study indicates that regulation of CPAP levels on the centrioles by centrobin is critical for preserving the normal size, shape, and number of centrioles in the cell.

  2. Duplication and diversification of the LEAFY HULL STERILE1 and Oryza sativa MADS5 SEPALLATA lineages in graminoid Poales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Ashley R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication and the subsequent divergence in function of the resulting paralogs via subfunctionalization and/or neofunctionalization is hypothesized to have played a major role in the evolution of plant form. The LEAFY HULL STERILE1 (LHS1 SEPALLATA (SEP genes have been linked with the origin and diversification of the grass spikelet, but it is uncertain 1 when the duplication event that produced the LHS1 clade and its paralogous lineage Oryza sativa MADS5 (OSM5 occurred, and 2 how changes in gene structure and/or expression might have contributed to subfunctionalization and/or neofunctionalization in the two lineages. Methods Phylogenetic relationships among 84 SEP genes were estimated using Bayesian methods. RNA expression patterns were inferred using in situ hybridization. The patterns of protein sequence and RNA expression evolution were reconstructed using maximum parsimony (MP and maximum likelihood (ML methods, respectively. Results Phylogenetic analyses mapped the LHS1/OSM5 duplication event to the base of the grass family. MP character reconstructions estimated a change from cytosine to thymine in the first codon position of the first amino acid after the Zea mays MADS3 (ZMM3 domain converted a glutamine to a stop codon in the OSM5 ancestor following the LHS1/OSM5 duplication event. RNA expression analyses of OSM5 co-orthologs in Avena sativa, Chasmanthium latifolium, Hordeum vulgare, Pennisetum glaucum, and Sorghum bicolor followed by ML reconstructions of these data and previously published analyses estimated a complex pattern of gain and loss of LHS1 and OSM5 expression in different floral organs and different flowers within the spikelet or inflorescence. Conclusions Previous authors have reported that rice OSM5 and LHS1 proteins have different interaction partners indicating that the truncation of OSM5 following the LHS1/OSM5 duplication event has resulted in both partitioned and potentially novel gene

  3. Duplication of pilus gene complexes of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, T D; Dowdell, M; Satola, S W; Farley, M M

    1996-11-01

    Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) is a recently described pediatric septicemia caused by a strain of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius. The pilus specified by this bacterium may be important in BPF pathogenesis, enhancing attachment to host tissue. Here, we report the cloning of two haf (for H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius fimbriae) gene clusters from a cosmid library of strain F3031. We sequenced a 6.8-kb segment of the haf1 cluster and identified five genes (hafA to hafE). The predicted protein products, HafA to HafD, are 72, 95, 98, and 90% similar, respectively, to HifA to HifD of the closely related H. influenzae type b pilus. Strikingly, the putative pilus adhesion, HifE, shares only 44% identity with HafE, suggesting that the proteins may differ in receptor specificity. Insertion of a mini-gammadelta transposon in the hafE gene eliminated hemadsorption. The nucleotide sequences of the haf1 and haf2 clusters are more than 99% identical. Using the recently published sequence of the H. influenzae Rd genome, we determined that the haf1 complex lies at a unique position in the chromosome between the pmbA gene and a hypothetical open reading frame, HI1153. The location of the haf2 cluster, inserted between the purE and pepN genes, is analogous to the hif genes on H. influenzae type b. BPF fimbrial phase switching appears to involve slip-strand mispairing of repeated dinucleotides in the pilus promoter. The BPF-associated H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius pilus system generally resembles other H. influenzae, but the possession of a second fimbrial gene cluster, which appears to have arisen by a recent duplication event, and the novel sequence of the HafE adhesin may be significant in the unusual pathogenesis of BPF.

  4. Role of computed tomography in oesophageal duplications. Report of two cases; Duplications oesophagiennes: place de la tomodensitometrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouini, S.; Menif, E.; Azaiez, N.; Ben Hajel, H.; Cheikh, I.; Ben Ammar, A.; Sellami, M.; Ben Jaafar, M. [Hopital La Rabta, Tunis (Tunisia)

    1995-12-31

    The authors present two cases of esophageal duplication: tubular in one case and cystic in the other. This rare anomaly was identified in both cases by CT scan. A review of literature is proposed. (authors). 22 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Duplication and maintenance of the Myb genes of vertebrate animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J. Davidson

    2012-11-01

    Gene duplication is an important means of generating new genes. The major mechanisms by which duplicated genes are preserved in the face of purifying selection are thought to be neofunctionalization, subfunctionalization, and increased gene dosage. However, very few duplicated gene families in vertebrate species have been analyzed by functional tests in vivo. We have therefore examined the three vertebrate Myb genes (c-Myb, A-Myb, and B-Myb by cytogenetic map analysis, by sequence analysis, and by ectopic expression in Drosophila. We provide evidence that the vertebrate Myb genes arose by two rounds of regional genomic duplication. We found that ubiquitous expression of c-Myb and A-Myb, but not of B-Myb or Drosophila Myb, was lethal in Drosophila. Expression of any of these genes during early larval eye development was well tolerated. However, expression of c-Myb and A-Myb, but not of B-Myb or Drosophila Myb, during late larval eye development caused drastic alterations in adult eye morphology. Mosaic analysis implied that this eye phenotype was cell-autonomous. Interestingly, some of the eye phenotypes caused by the retroviral v-Myb oncogene and the normal c-Myb proto-oncogene from which v-Myb arose were quite distinct. Finally, we found that post-translational modifications of c-Myb by the GSK-3 protein kinase and by the Ubc9 SUMO-conjugating enzyme that normally occur in vertebrate cells can modify the eye phenotype caused by c-Myb in Drosophila. These results support a model in which the three Myb genes of vertebrates arose by two sequential duplications. The first duplication was followed by a subfunctionalization of gene expression, then neofunctionalization of protein function to yield a c/A-Myb progenitor. The duplication of this progenitor was followed by subfunctionalization of gene expression to give rise to tissue-specific c-Myb and A-Myb genes.

  6. Gene duplication of the human peptide YY gene (PYY) generated the pancreatic polypeptide gene (PPY) on chromosome 17q21.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hort, Y.; Shine, J.; Herzog, H. [Garvan Inst. of Medical Research, Sydney (Australia)

    1995-03-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) are structurally related but functionally diverse peptides, encoded by separate genes and expressed in different tissues. Although the human NPY gene has been mapped to chromosome 7, the authors demonstrate here that the genes for human PYY and PP (PPY) are localized only 10 kb apart from each another on chromosome 17q21.1. The high degree of homology between the members of this gene family, both in primary sequence and exon/intron structure, suggests that the NYP and the PYY genes arose from an initial gene duplication event, with a subsequent tandem duplication of the PYY gene being responsible for the creation of the PPY gene. A second weaker hybridization signal also found on chromosome 17q11 and results obtained by Southern blot analysis suggest that the entire PYY-PPY region has undergone a further duplication event. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Evidence of neofunctionalization after the duplication of the highly conserved Polycomb group gene Caf1-55 in the obscura group of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Martín, Juan M; Papaceit, Montserrat; Segarra, Carmen

    2017-01-17

    Drosophila CAF1-55 protein is a subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex PRC2 and other protein complexes. It is a multifunctional and evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in nucleosome assembly and remodelling, as well as in the epigenetic regulation of a large set of target genes. Here, we describe and analyze the duplication of Caf1-55 in the obscura group of Drosophila. Paralogs exhibited a strong asymmetry in evolutionary rates, which suggests that they have evolved according to a neofunctionalization process. During this process, the ancestral copy has been kept under steady purifying selection to retain the ancestral function and the derived copy (Caf1-55dup) that originated via a DNA-mediated duplication event ~18 Mya, has been under clear episodic selection. Different maximum likelihood approaches confirmed the action of positive selection, in contrast to relaxed selection, on Caf1-55dup after the duplication. This adaptive process has also taken place more recently during the divergence of D. subobscura and D. guanche. The possible association of this duplication with a previously detected acceleration in the evolutionary rate of three CAF1-55 partners in PRC2 complexes is discussed. Finally, the timing and functional consequences of the Caf1-55 duplication is compared to other duplications of Polycomb genes.

  8. Conservation, duplication, and loss of the Tor signaling pathway in the fungal kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitman Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nutrient-sensing Tor pathway governs cell growth and is conserved in nearly all eukaryotic organisms from unicellular yeasts to multicellular organisms, including humans. Tor is the target of the immunosuppressive drug rapamycin, which in complex with the prolyl isomerase FKBP12 inhibits Tor functions. Rapamycin is a gold standard drug for organ transplant recipients that was approved by the FDA in 1999 and is finding additional clinical indications as a chemotherapeutic and antiproliferative agent. Capitalizing on the plethora of recently sequenced genomes we have conducted comparative genomic studies to annotate the Tor pathway throughout the fungal kingdom and related unicellular opisthokonts, including Monosiga brevicollis, Salpingoeca rosetta, and Capsaspora owczarzaki. Results Interestingly, the Tor signaling cascade is absent in three microsporidian species with available genome sequences, the only known instance of a eukaryotic group lacking this conserved pathway. The microsporidia are obligate intracellular pathogens with highly reduced genomes, and we hypothesize that they lost the Tor pathway as they adapted and streamlined their genomes for intracellular growth in a nutrient-rich environment. Two TOR paralogs are present in several fungal species as a result of either a whole genome duplication or independent gene/segmental duplication events. One such event was identified in the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a chytrid responsible for worldwide global amphibian declines and extinctions. Conclusions The repeated independent duplications of the TOR gene in the fungal kingdom might reflect selective pressure acting upon this kinase that populates two proteinaceous complexes with different cellular roles. These comparative genomic analyses illustrate the evolutionary trajectory of a central nutrient-sensing cascade that enables diverse eukaryotic organisms to respond to their natural

  9. Complexity of Gene Expression Evolution after Duplication: Protein Dosage Rebalancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor B. Rogozin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing debates about functional importance of gene duplications have been recently intensified by a heated discussion of the “ortholog conjecture” (OC. Under the OC, which is central to functional annotation of genomes, orthologous genes are functionally more similar than paralogous genes at the same level of sequence divergence. However, a recent study challenged the OC by reporting a greater functional similarity, in terms of gene ontology (GO annotations and expression profiles, among within-species paralogs compared to orthologs. These findings were taken to indicate that functional similarity of homologous genes is primarily determined by the cellular context of the genes, rather than evolutionary history. Subsequent studies suggested that the OC appears to be generally valid when applied to mammalian evolution but the complete picture of evolution of gene expression also has to incorporate lineage-specific aspects of paralogy. The observed complexity of gene expression evolution after duplication can be explained through selection for gene dosage effect combined with the duplication-degeneration-complementation model. This paper discusses expression divergence of recent duplications occurring before functional divergence of proteins encoded by duplicate genes.

  10. Study of intrachromosomal duplications among the eukaryote genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaz, G; Netter, P; Coissac, E

    2001-12-01

    Complete eukaryote chromosomes were investigated for intrachromosomal duplications of nucleotide sequences. The analysis was performed by looking for nonexact repeats on two complete genomes, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans, and four partial ones, Drosophila melanogaster, Plasmodium falciparum, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Homo sapiens. Through this analysis, we show that all eukaryote chromosomes exhibit similar characteristics for their intrachromosomal repeats, suggesting similar dynamics: many direct repeats have their two copies physically close together, and these close direct repeats are more similar and shorter than the other repeats. On the contrary, there are almost no close inverted repeats. These results support a model for the dynamics of duplication. This model is based on a continuous genesis of tandem repeats and implies that most of the distant and inverted repeats originate from these tandem repeats by further chromosomal rearrangements (insertions, inversions, and deletions). Remnants of these predicted rearrangements have been brought out through fine analysis of the chromosome sequence. Despite these dynamics, shared by all eukaryotes, each genome exhibits its own style of intrachromosomal duplication: the density of repeated elements is similar in all chromosomes issued from the same genome, but is different between species. This density was further related to the relative rates of duplication, deletion, and mutation proper to each species. One should notice that the density of repeats in the X chromosome of C. elegans is much lower than in the autosomes of that organism, suggesting that the exchange between homologous chromosomes is important in the duplication process.

  11. Identification of genes that are essential to restrict genome duplication to once per cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Alex; Lee, Chrissie Y.; Vassilev, Boris; Zhu, Wenge; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Martin, Scott E.; DePamphilis, Melvin L.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear genome duplication is normally restricted to once per cell division, but aberrant events that allow excess DNA replication (EDR) promote genomic instability and aneuploidy, both of which are characteristics of cancer development. Here we provide the first comprehensive identification of genes that are essential to restrict genome duplication to once per cell division. An siRNA library of 21,584 human genes was screened for those that prevent EDR in cancer cells with undetectable chromosomal instability. Candidates were validated by testing multiple siRNAs and chemical inhibitors on both TP53+ and TP53- cells to reveal the relevance of this ubiquitous tumor suppressor to preventing EDR, and in the presence of an apoptosis inhibitor to reveal the full extent of EDR. The results revealed 42 genes that prevented either DNA re-replication or unscheduled endoreplication. All of them participate in one or more of eight cell cycle events. Seventeen of them have not been identified previously in this capacity. Remarkably, 14 of the 42 genes have been shown to prevent aneuploidy in mice. Moreover, suppressing a gene that prevents EDR increased the ability of the chemotherapeutic drug Paclitaxel to induce EDR, suggesting new opportunities for synthetic lethalities in the treatment of human cancers. PMID:27144335

  12. Whole-genome duplication and molecular evolution in Cornus L. (Cornaceae) – Insights from transcriptome sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Xiang, Qiuyun; Manos, Paul S.; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Song, Bao-Hua; Cheng, Shifeng; Liu, Xin; Wong, Gane

    2017-01-01

    The pattern and rate of genome evolution have profound consequences in organismal evolution. Whole-genome duplication (WGD), or polyploidy, has been recognized as an important evolutionary mechanism of plant diversification. However, in non-model plants the molecular signals of genome duplications have remained largely unexplored. High-throughput transcriptome data from next-generation sequencing have set the stage for novel investigations of genome evolution using new bioinformatic and methodological tools in a phylogenetic framework. Here we compare ten de novo-assembled transcriptomes representing the major lineages of the angiosperm genus Cornus (dogwood) and relevant outgroups using a customized pipeline for analyses. Using three distinct approaches, molecular dating of orthologous genes, analyses of the distribution of synonymous substitutions between paralogous genes, and examination of substitution rates through time, we detected a shared WGD event in the late Cretaceous across all taxa sampled. The inferred doubling event coincides temporally with the paleoclimatic changes associated with the initial divergence of the genus into three major lineages. Analyses also showed an acceleration of rates of molecular evolution after WGD. The highest rates of molecular evolution were observed in the transcriptome of the herbaceous lineage, C. canadensis, a species commonly found at higher latitudes, including the Arctic. Our study demonstrates the value of transcriptome data for understanding genome evolution in closely related species. The results suggest dramatic increase in sea surface temperature in the late Cretaceous may have contributed to the evolution and diversification of flowering plants. PMID:28225773

  13. On the origin of protein synthesis factors: a gene duplication/fusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, B; Leclerc, F; Cedergren, R

    1997-12-01

    Sequence similarity has given rise to the proposal that IF-2, EF-G, and EF-Tu are related through a common ancestor. We evaluate this proposition and whether the relationship can be extended to other factors of protein synthesis. Analysis of amino acid sequence similarity gives statistical support for an evolutionary affiliation among IF-1, IF-2, IF-3, EF-Tu, EF-Ts, and EF-G and suggests further that this association is a result of gene duplication/fusion events. In support of this mechanism, the three-dimensional structures of IF-3, EF-Tu, and EF-G display a predictable domain structure and overall conformational similarity. The model that we propose consists of three consecutives duplication/fusion events which would have taken place before the divergence of the three superkingdoms: eubacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. The root of this protein superfamily tree would be an ancestor of the modern IF-1 gene sequence. The repeated fundamental motif of this protein superfamily is a small RNA binding domain composed of two alpha-helices packed along side of an antiparallel beta-sheet.

  14. ATLAS EventIndex general dataflow and monitoring infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Casani, Alvaro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS EventIndex has been running in production since mid-2015, reliably collecting information worldwide about all produced events and storing them in a central Hadoop infrastructure at CERN. A subset of this information is copied to an Oracle relational database for fast dataset discovery, event-picking, crosschecks with other ATLAS systems and checks for event duplication. The system design and its optimization is serving event picking from requests of a few events up to scales of tens of thousand of events, and in addition, data consistency checks are performed for large production campaigns. Detecting duplicate events with a scope of physics collections has recently arisen as an important use case. This paper describes the general architecture of the project and the data flow and operation issues, which are addressed by recent developments to improve the throughput of the overall system. In this direction, the data collection system is reducing the usage of the messaging infrastructure to overcome th...

  15. ATLAS EventIndex General Dataflow and Monitoring Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, Dario; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS EventIndex has been running in production since mid-2015, reliably collecting information worldwide about all produced events and storing them in a central Hadoop infrastructure at CERN. A subset of this information is copied to an Oracle relational database for fast datasets discovery, event-picking, crosschecks with other ATLAS systems and checks for event duplication. The system design and its optimization is serving event picking from requests of a few events up to scales of tens of thousand of events, and in addition, data consistency checks are performed for large production campaigns. Detecting duplicate events with a scope of physics collections has recently arisen as an important use case. This paper describes the general architecture of the project and the data flow and operation issues, which are addressed by recent developments to improve the throughput of the overall system. In this direction, the data collection system is reducing the usage of the messaging infrastructure to overcome t...

  16. The duplication 17p13.3 phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curry, Cynthia J; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Grant, Erica

    2013-01-01

    additional patients from 21 families to further delineate the clinical, neurological, behavioral, and brain imaging findings. We found a highly diverse phenotype with inter- and intrafamilial variability, especially in cognitive development. The most specific phenotype occurred in individuals with large....... Older patients were often overweight. Three variant phenotypes included cleft lip/palate (CLP), split hand/foot with long bone deficiency (SHFLD), and a connective tissue phenotype resembling Marfan syndrome. The duplications in patients with clefts appear to disrupt ABR, while the SHFLD phenotype...... was associated with duplication of BHLHA9 as noted in two recent reports. The connective tissue phenotype did not have a convincing critical region. Our experience with this large cohort expands knowledge of this diverse duplication syndrome....

  17. Ultrasound evaluation of the enteric duplication cyst: the gut signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Serafino, Marco; Mercogliano, Carmela; Vallone, Gianfranco

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal duplication cyst is a rare congenital anomaly that may occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract from the tongue to the anus. Such cysts occur most commonly in the small bowel and about half are in the mesenteric border of the ileum. Such cystic duplications communicate only rarely with the intestinal lumen although the cysts are attached to the intestine and may even share a common wall with the adjacent alimentary tract. These lesions can vary in shape, being cystic or tubular, and often show the same structure of the adjacent normal bowel. It is usually asymptomatic and complications are rare but they may include obstruction by volvulus or intussusception, bleeding, infection, and perforation. When diagnosed these lesions should be surgically resected to avoid future possible complications. The authors present a case of enteric cystic duplication and its ultrasound appearance in a 12-month-old Caucasian female infant cause of acute abdominal pain and intestinal obstruction, thus requiring urgent surgery.

  18. The fate of tandemly duplicated genes assessed by the expression analysis of a group of Arabidopsis thaliana RING-H2 ubiquitin ligase genes of the ATL family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Hernández, Victor; Guzmán, Plinio

    2014-03-01

    Gene duplication events exert key functions on gene innovations during the evolution of the eukaryotic genomes. A large portion of the total gene content in plants arose from tandem duplications events, which often result in paralog genes with high sequence identity. Ubiquitin ligases or E3 enzymes are components of the ubiquitin proteasome system that function during the transfer of the ubiquitin molecule to the substrate. In plants, several E3s have expanded in their genomes as multigene families. To gain insight into the consequences of gene duplications on the expansion and diversification of E3s, we examined the evolutionary basis of a cluster of six genes, duplC-ATLs, which arose from segmental and tandem duplication events in Brassicaceae. The assessment of the expression suggested two patterns that are supported by lineage. While retention of expression domains was observed, an apparent absence or reduction of expression was also inferred. We found that two duplC-ATL genes underwent pseudogenization and that, in one case, gene expression is probably regained. Our findings provide insights into the evolution of gene families in plants, defining key events on the expansion of the Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura family of E3 ligases.

  19. A Method of Object-based De-duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Yan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, the world is increasingly awash in more and more unstructured data, not only because of the Internet, but also because data that used to be collected on paper or media such as film, DVDs and compact discs has moved online [1]. Most of this data is unstructured and in diverse formats such as e-mail, documents, graphics, images, and videos. In managing unstructured data complexity and scalability, object storage has a clear advantage. Object-based data de-duplication is the current most advanced method and is the effective solution for detecting duplicate data. It can detect common embedded data for the first backup across completely unrelated files and even when physical block layout changes. However, almost all of the current researches on data de-duplication do not consider the content of different file types, and they do not have any knowledge of the backup data format. It has been proven that such method cannot achieve optimal performance for compound files.In our proposed system, we will first extract objects from files, Object_IDs are then obtained by applying hash function to the objects. The resulted Object_IDs are used to build as indexing keys in B+ tree like index structure, thus, we avoid the need for a full object index, the searching time for the duplicate objects reduces to O(log n.We introduce a new concept of a duplicate object resolver. The object resolver mediates access to all the objects and is a central point for managing all the metadata and indexes for all the objects. All objects are addressable by their IDs which is unique in the universe. The resolver stores metadata with triple format. This improved metadata management strategy allows us to set, add and resolve object properties with high flexibility, and allows the repeated use of the same metadata among duplicate object.

  20. Cdc14 phosphatase directs centrosome re-duplication at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Gametes are generated through a specialized cell division called meiosis, in which ploidy is reduced by half because two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation, meiosis I and meiosis II, occur without intervening DNA replication. This contrasts with the mitotic cell cycle where DNA replication and chromosome segregation alternate to maintain the same ploidy. At the end of mitosis, CDKs are inactivated. This low CDK state in late mitosis/G1 allows for critical preparatory events for DNA replication and centrosome/spindle pole body (SPB) duplication. However, their execution is inhibited until S phase, where further preparatory events are also prevented. This “licensing” ensures that both the chromosomes and the centrosomes/SPBs replicate exactly once per cell cycle, thereby maintaining constant ploidy. Crucially, between meiosis I and meiosis II, centrosomes/SPBs must be re-licensed, but DNA re-replication must be avoided. In budding yeast, the Cdc14 protein phosphatase triggers CDK down regulation to promote exit from mitosis. Cdc14 also regulates the meiosis I to meiosis II transition, though its mode of action has remained unclear. Methods Fluorescence and electron microscopy was combined with proteomics to probe SPB duplication in cells with inactive or hyperactive Cdc14. Results We demonstrate that Cdc14 ensures two successive nuclear divisions by re-licensing SPBs at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition. We show that Cdc14 is asymmetrically enriched on a single SPB during anaphase I and provide evidence that this enrichment promotes SPB re-duplication. Cells with impaired Cdc14 activity fail to promote extension of the SPB half-bridge, the initial step in morphogenesis of a new SPB. Conversely, cells with hyper-active Cdc14 duplicate SPBs, but fail to induce their separation. Conclusion Our findings implicate reversal of key CDK-dependent phosphorylations in the differential licensing of cyclical events at the meiosis I to meiosis I

  1. Evolution of Weighted Networks by Duplication-Divergence Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-Guo; YAN Jia-Ren; LIU Zi-Ran; WANG Li

    2006-01-01

    @@ The duplication and divergence process is ubiquitous in nature and man-made networks. Motivated by the duplication-divergence mechanism which depicts the growth of protein networks, we propose a weighted network model in which topological evolution is coupled with weight dynamics. Large scale numerical results indicate that our model can naturally generate networks with power-law-like distributions of degree, strength and weight.The degree-strength correlation is illustrated as well. These properties are in agreement well with empirical data observed in real-world systems. Furthermore, by altering the retention probability σ, weighted, structured exponential networks are realized.

  2. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Venkatramani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy.

  3. A retroperitoneal foregut duplication cyst: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Woon; Lee, Jin Hee; Byun, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Byung Ki; Sohn, Kyung Sik; Kee, Se Kook; Jeon, Jin Min [Pochon CHA University, Kumi CHA Hospital, Kumi (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Young Kook [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-01-15

    Retroperitoneal foregut duplication cyst is an extremely rare congenital malformation. Pathologically, this lesion contains both gastric mucosa and respiratory type mucosa; radiologically, it is often challenging to differentiate it from the other cystic neoplasms that present a similar appearance. We report on a case of retroperitoneal foregut duplication cyst that was lined by both gastric and pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium, and it was also accompanied by a pancreatic pseudocyst. Initially, it presented with peripancreatic and intrapancreatic cystic masses in an asymptomatic 30-year-old man, and this man has since undergone surgical resection.

  4. Medical image of the week: duplicate superior vena cava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L'Heureux D

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A persistent left SVC is the most common thoracic venous anomaly and usually opens into the right atrium via the coronary sinus. A central line inserted into the left SVC may be mistaken for placement in other sites such as the subclavian or carotid artery, the mediastinum, the pericardium or pleural space. A duplicate SVC may cause difficulty in introducing central venous catheters or pulmonary artery catheters because of the narrow opening of the coronary sinus to reach the right atrium. In addition, a duplicate SVC is associated with important cardiac conditions such as atrial septal defects and ventricular arrhythmias.

  5. Multi-Factor Duplicate Question Detection in Stack Overflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张芸; David Lo; 夏鑫; 孙建伶

    2015-01-01

    Stack Overflow is a popular on-line question and answer site for software developers to share their experience and expertise. Among the numerous questions posted in Stack Overflow, two or more of them may express the same point and thus are duplicates of one another. Duplicate questions make Stack Overflow site maintenance harder, waste resources that could have been used to answer other questions, and cause developers to unnecessarily wait for answers that are already available. To reduce the problem of duplicate questions, Stack Overflow allows questions to be manually marked as duplicates of others. Since there are thousands of questions submitted to Stack Overflow every day, manually identifying duplicate questions is a di昋cult work. Thus, there is a need for an automated approach that can help in detecting these duplicate questions. To address the above-mentioned need, in this paper, we propose an automated approach named DUPPREDICTOR that takes a new question as input and detects potential duplicates of this question by considering multiple factors. DUPPREDICTOR extracts the title and description of a question and also tags that are attached to the question. These pieces of information (title, description, and a few tags) are mandatory information that a user needs to input when posting a question. DUPPREDICTOR then computes the latent topics of each question by using a topic model. Next, for each pair of questions, it computes four similarity scores by comparing their titles, descriptions, latent topics, and tags. These four similarity scores are finally combined together to result in a new similarity score that comprehensively considers the multiple factors. To examine the benefit of DUPPREDICTOR, we perform an experiment on a Stack Overflow dataset which contains a total of more than two million questions. The result shows that DUPPREDICTOR can achieve a recall-rate@20 score of 63.8%. We compare our approach with the standard search engine of Stack

  6. Intestinal duplication in adulthood: A rare entity, difficult to diagnose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorani, Cristina; Scaramuzzo, Rosa; Lazzaro, Alessandra; Biancone, Livia; Palmieri, Giampiero; Gaspari, Achille L; Sica, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Duplications of the alimentary tract (ATD) are rare congenital anomalies often found early in life. They may occur anywhere in the intestinal tract but the ileum is the most frequently affected site. Clinical presentation of ATD in adults is variable and because these lesions occur so infrequently they are rarely suspected. In the present report we describe a case of ileal duplication in a 61-year-old patient with Crohn’s disease. Despite various radiological investigations and medical consultations, the diagnosis was only made on the surgical specimen. PMID:22007281

  7. Splenic duplication: a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Alkadhi, Hatem; Gubler, Christoph; Bauerfeind, Peter; Pfammatter, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency. We report the rare case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by varices in the gastric fundus secondary to splenic duplication. Splenic duplication has been only rarely reported in the literature, and no case so far has described the associated complication of gastrointestinal bleeding, caused by venous drainage of the upper spleen via varices in the gastric fundus. We describe the imaging findings from endoscopy, endosonography, computed tomography (CT), flat-panel CT, and angiography in this rare condition and illustrate the effective role of intra-arterial embolization.

  8. The Phenotypic Plasticity of Duplicated Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the Origin of Adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Mattenberger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene and genome duplication are the major sources of biological innovations in plants and animals. Functional and transcriptional divergence between the copies after gene duplication has been considered the main driver of innovations . However, here we show that increased phenotypic plasticity after duplication plays a more major role than thought before in the origin of adaptations. We perform an exhaustive analysis of the transcriptional alterations of duplicated genes in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae when challenged with five different environmental stresses. Analysis of the transcriptomes of yeast shows that gene duplication increases the transcriptional response to environmental changes, with duplicated genes exhibiting signatures of adaptive transcriptional patterns in response to stress. The mechanism of duplication matters, with whole-genome duplicates being more transcriptionally altered than small-scale duplicates. The predominant transcriptional pattern follows the classic theory of evolution by gene duplication; with one gene copy remaining unaltered under stress, while its sister copy presents large transcriptional plasticity and a prominent role in adaptation. Moreover, we find additional transcriptional profiles that are suggestive of neo- and subfunctionalization of duplicate gene copies. These patterns are strongly correlated with the functional dependencies and sequence divergence profiles of gene copies. We show that, unlike singletons, duplicates respond more specifically to stress, supporting the role of natural selection in the transcriptional plasticity of duplicates. Our results reveal the underlying transcriptional complexity of duplicated genes and its role in the origin of adaptations.

  9. Segmental Duplications in Euchromatic Regions of Human Chromosome 5: A Source of Evolutionary Instability and Transcriptional Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courseaux, Anouk; Richard, Florence; Grosgeorge, Josiane; Ortola, Christine; Viale, Agnes; Turc-Carel, Claude; Dutrillaux, Bernard; Gaudray, Patrick; Nahon, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    Recent analyses of the structure of pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions have revealed that these particular regions of human chromosomes are often composed of blocks of duplicated genomic segments that have been associated with rapid evolutionary turnover among the genomes of closely related primates. In the present study, we show that euchromatic regions of human chromosome 5—5p14, 5p13, 5q13, 5q15–5q21—also display such an accumulation of segmental duplications. The structure, organization and evolution of those primate-specific sequences were studied in detail by combining in silico and comparative FISH analyses on human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutang, macaca, and capuchin chromosomes. Our results lend support to a two-step model of transposition duplication in the euchromatic regions, with a founder insertional event at the time of divergence between Platyrrhini and Catarrhini (25–35 million years ago) and an apparent burst of inter- and intrachromosomal duplications in the Hominidae lineage. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis suggests that the chronology and, likely, molecular mechanisms, differ regarding the region of primary insertion—euchromatic versus pericentromeric regions. Lastly, we show that as their counterparts located near the heterochromatic region, the euchromatic segmental duplications have consistently reshaped their region of insertion during primate evolution, creating putative mosaic genes, and they are obvious candidates for causing ectopic rearrangements that have contributed to evolutionary/genomic instability. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org. The following individuals kindly provided reagents, samples, or unpublished information as indicated in the paper: D. Le Paslier, A. McKenzie, J. Melki, C. Sargent, J. Scharf and S. Selig.] PMID:12618367

  10. Insight into transcription factor gene duplication from Caenorhabditis elegans Promoterome-driven expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal Marc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C. elegans Promoterome is a powerful resource for revealing the regulatory mechanisms by which transcription is controlled pan-genomically. Transcription factors will form the core of any systems biology model of genome control and therefore the promoter activity of Promoterome inserts for C. elegans transcription factor genes was examined, in vivo, with a reporter gene approach. Results Transgenic C. elegans strains were generated for 366 transcription factor promoter/gfp reporter gene fusions. GFP distributions were determined, and then summarized with reference to developmental stage and cell type. Reliability of these data was demonstrated by comparison to previously described gene product distributions. A detailed consideration of the results for one C. elegans transcription factor gene family, the Six family, comprising ceh-32, ceh-33, ceh-34 and unc-39 illustrates the value of these analyses. The high proportion of Promoterome reporter fusions that drove GFP expression, compared to previous studies, led to the hypothesis that transcription factor genes might be involved in local gene duplication events less frequently than other genes. Comparison of transcription factor genes of C. elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae was therefore carried out and revealed very few examples of functional gene duplication since the divergence of these species for most, but not all, transcription factor gene families. Conclusion Examining reporter expression patterns for hundreds of promoters informs, and thereby improves, interpretation of this data type. Genes encoding transcription factors involved in intrinsic developmental control processes appear acutely sensitive to changes in gene dosage through local gene duplication, on an evolutionary time scale.

  11. Event Management

    OpenAIRE

    Havlenová, Tereza

    2016-01-01

    Event is an experience that is perceived by all the senses. Event management is a process involving the various activities that are assigned to staffers. Organizing special events became an individual field. If the manager understand the events as a communication platform gets into the hands of a modern, multifunctional and very impressive tool. The procedure to implement a successful event in a particular area is part of this work. The first part explains the issues of event management on th...

  12. Colovesical fistula resulting from a perforated colonic duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decter, R M; Kaplan, K M; Eggli, K D; Krummel, T M

    1998-09-01

    Colovesical fistulas in children are most often associated with high anorectal imperforations. Acquired enterovesical fistulas in children only rarely have been reported as a consequence of an inflammatory process. We present a case of an acquired colovesical fistula formed by the erosion of an abscess at the distal end of a colonic duplication in a child who presented with fever of unknown origin.

  13. Non-recurrent SEPT9 duplications cause hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collie, A.M.; Landsverk, M.L.; Ruzzo, E.; Mefford, H.C.; Buysse, K.; Adkins, J.R.; Knutzen, D.M.; Barnett, K.; Brown Jr., R.H.; Parry, G.J.; Yum, S.W.; Simpson, D.A.; Olney, R.K.; Chinnery, P.F.; Eichler, E.E.; Chance, P.F.; Hannibal, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic copy number variants have been shown to be responsible for multiple genetic diseases. Recently, a duplication in septin 9 (SEPT9) was shown to be causal for hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA), an episodic peripheral neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance. This duplicat

  14. Association of anorectal malformation with anal and rectal duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla A. Santos-Jasso

    2014-08-01

    We present three cases of rectal duplications with anorectal malforma- tion with recto-perineal fistula and colonic duplication. Two of them with delayed diagnosis and bowel obstruction, treated with laparotomy, colostomy and side-to-side anastomosis of the proximal colonic duplica- tion; in the third case the diagnosis of the colonic and rectal duplication was made during a colostomy opening. For definitive correction, the three patients underwent abdomino-perineal approach and side-to-side anastomosis of the rectal duplication, placement of the rectum within the muscle complex, and later on colostomy closure. In a fourth patient with anorectal malformation and colostomy after birth, the perineal electro-stimulation showed two muscle complexes. A posterior sagittal approach in both showed two separate blind rectal pouches; an end- to-side anastomosis of the dilated rectum was made, and the muscle complex with stronger contraction was used for the anoplasty. The posterior sagittal approach is the best surgical option to preserve the muscle complex, with a better prognosis for rectal continence.

  15. Recurrent duplications of 17q12 associated with variable phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Elyse; Douglas, Andrew; Kjaegaard, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The ability to identify the clinical nature of the recurrent duplication of chromosome 17q12 has been limited by its rarity and the diverse range of phenotypes associated with this genomic change. In order to further define the clinical features of affected patients, detailed clinical information...

  16. Recombination facilitates neofunctionalization of duplicate genes via originalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Ren

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently originalization was proposed to be an effective way of duplicate-gene preservation, in which recombination provokes the high frequency of original (or wild-type allele on both duplicated loci. Because the high frequency of wild-type allele might drive the arising and accumulating of advantageous mutation, it is hypothesized that recombination might enlarge the probability of neofunctionalization (Pneo of duplicate genes. In this article this hypothesis has been tested theoretically. Results Results show that through originalization recombination might not only shorten mean time to neofunctionalizaiton, but also enlarge Pneo. Conclusions Therefore, recombination might facilitate neofunctionalization via originalization. Several extensive applications of these results on genomic evolution have been discussed: 1. Time to nonfunctionalization can be much longer than a few million generations expected before; 2. Homogenization on duplicated loci results from not only gene conversion, but also originalization; 3. Although the rate of advantageous mutation is much small compared with that of degenerative mutation, Pneo cannot be expected to be small.

  17. Duplicate 24-hour diet study 1994 organochlorine and organophosphorous pesticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumann RA; Hoogerbrugge R; Zoonen P van; LOC

    1999-01-01

    Duplicate diet samples collected in 1994 were analysed for organochlorine and organophosphorous pesticides. It was not possible to evaluate wether dietary intake exceeded the established Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI). For the other organophosphorous compounds as well as for the organoclorine pestic

  18. Intragenic duplication: a novel mutational mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken T; Geisz, Andrea; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide of cationic...

  19. Exon duplications in the ATP7A gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mie; Skjørringe, Tina; Kodama, Hiroko

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Menkes disease (MD) is an X-linked, fatal neurodegenerative disorder of copper metabolism, caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. Thirty-three Menkes patients in whom no mutation had been detected with standard diagnostic tools were screened for exon duplications in the ATP7A gene...

  20. Alimentary tract duplications in children: Report of 16 years′ experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zouari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alimentary tract duplications (ATDs are a rare condition in children, characterised by a large pathogenic, clinical, and histological polymorphism. Surgical observation and pathologic evaluation of the resected specimens are the only way to confirm the diagnosis. In this study, we want to analyse the anatomical, clinical and therapeutic aspects of this entity. Patients and Methods: A total of 12 cases of ATD were diagnosed over a 16-year period at paediatric surgery department. The diagnosis was evoked on clinical and radiological data. Histological study of the resected specimens confirmed the diagnosis in all cases. Results: The mean age of patients at diagnosis was 41 months with a peak of incidence at the 1 st year of life (42%. Out of a total 12 cases, 10 were girls and 2 were boys. Abdominal pain and vomiting were the most frequent presenting features. Ultrasonography, tomodensitometry and magnetic resonance imaging were useful for diagnosis. ATDs were localised on the oesophagus in one case, the stomach in one case, the duodenum in four cases, the ileum in five cases, and the colon in one case. All these duplications were cystic, with three communicating duplications. All patients underwent surgery, and resection procedure was chosen according to duplication type and site. Histological study confirmed the diagnosis in all cases. Conclusion: ATDs are a rare condition in children. Diagnosis relies on histology, and treatment can only be by means of surgery. The outcome after surgery is generally favourable. Diagnosis and precocious surgery of ATDs can warn serious complications.

  1. Against Unnecessary Duplication of Selves: A Sartrean Argument Against Zahavi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gusman, S.W.

    2015-01-01

    In this article I argue that Zahavi's Sartre-inspired combination of the experiential and narrative self entails an unnecessary duplication of selves. Sartre himself accused Husserl of the same mistake in The Transcendence of the Ego. He claims that Husserl's combination of the transcendental I and

  2. Novel clinical finding in MECP2 duplication syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Budisteanu, Magdalena; Papuc, Sorina Mihaela; Tutulan-Cunita, Andreea; Budisteanu, Bogdan; Arghir, Aurora

    2011-01-01

    Novel clinical finding in MECP2 duplication syndrome phone: +40-213349068 (Budisteanu, Magdalena) (Budisteanu, Magdalena) ?Victor Babes? National Institute of Pathology - 99-101 Splaiul Independentei, Sect. 5 - 050096 - Bucharest - ROMANIA (Budisteanu, Magdalena) ?Prof. Dr. Alexandru Obregia? Clinical Hospital of Psychiatry - 10-12 Berceni Av., Sector 4 - 041914 - Bucharest - ROMANIA (Budisteanu, Magdalena) ?Victor Babes? National Institute of Patholog...

  3. Harmfulness of Code Duplication - A Structured Review of the Evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, Wiebe; Ponisio, María Laura; Wieringa, Roel

    2009-01-01

    Duplication of code has long been thought to decrease changeability of systems, but recently doubts have been expressed whether this is true in general. This is a problem for researchers because it makes the value of research aimed against clones uncertain, and for practitioners as they cannot be su

  4. The functions of word duplication in Indonesian languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonda, J.

    1949-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, which is not intended to give an exhaustive collection of word-types, the author tries to review and to systematize a number of the most characteristic meanings of duplication (and reduplication) in Indonesian languages and to look more closely into some aspects of these proc

  5. Familial Lymphoproliferative Malignancies and Tandem Duplication of NF1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in a tumor suppressor gene (NF1 which codifies the protein neurofibromin. The frequent genetic alterations that modify neurofibromin function are deletions and insertions. Duplications are rare and phenotype in patients bearing duplication of NF1 gene is thought to be restricted to developmental abnormalities, with no reference to cancer susceptibility in these patients. We evaluated a patient who presented with few clinical signs of neurofibromatosis type 1 and a conspicuous personal and familiar history of different types of cancer, especially lymphoproliferative malignancies. The coding region of the NF-1 gene was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect the number of mutant copies. The NF1 gene analysis showed the following alterations: mosaic duplication of NF1, TRAF4, and MYO1D. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using probes (RP5-1002G3 and RP5-92689 flanking NF1 gene in 17q11.2 and CEP17 for 17q11.11.1 was performed. There were three signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689 in the interphases analyzed and two signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689 in 93% of cells. These findings show a tandem duplication of 17q11.2. Conclusion. The case suggests the possibility that NF1 gene duplication may be associated with a phenotype characterized by lymphoproliferative disorders.

  6. Signals of historical interlocus gene conversion in human segmental duplications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L Dumont

    Full Text Available Standard methods of DNA sequence analysis assume that sequences evolve independently, yet this assumption may not be appropriate for segmental duplications that exchange variants via interlocus gene conversion (IGC. Here, we use high quality multiple sequence alignments from well-annotated segmental duplications to systematically identify IGC signals in the human reference genome. Our analysis combines two complementary methods: (i a paralog quartet method that uses DNA sequence simulations to identify a statistical excess of sites consistent with inter-paralog exchange, and (ii the alignment-based method implemented in the GENECONV program. One-quarter (25.4% of the paralog families in our analysis harbor clear IGC signals by the quartet approach. Using GENECONV, we identify 1477 gene conversion tracks that cumulatively span 1.54 Mb of the genome. Our analyses confirm the previously reported high rates of IGC in subtelomeric regions and Y-chromosome palindromes, and identify multiple novel IGC hotspots, including the pregnancy specific glycoproteins and the neuroblastoma breakpoint gene families. Although the duplication history of a paralog family is described by a single tree, we show that IGC has introduced incredible site-to-site variation in the evolutionary relationships among paralogs in the human genome. Our findings indicate that IGC has left significant footprints in patterns of sequence diversity across segmental duplications in the human genome, out-pacing the contributions of single base mutation by orders of magnitude. Collectively, the IGC signals we report comprise a catalog that will provide a critical reference for interpreting observed patterns of DNA sequence variation across duplicated genomic regions, including targets of recent adaptive evolution in humans.

  7. FUNCTIONAL SPECIALIZATION OF DUPLICATED FLAVONOID BIOSYNTHESIS GENES IN WHEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khlestkina E.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication followed by subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization is of a great evolutionary importance. In plant genomes, duplicated genes may result from either polyploidization (homoeologous genes or segmental chromosome duplications (paralogous genes. In allohexaploid wheat Triticum aestivum L. (2n=6x=42, genome BBAADD, both homoeologous and paralogous copies were found for the regulatory gene Myc encoding MYC-like transcriptional factor in the biosynthesis of flavonoid pigments, anthocyanins, and for the structural gene F3h encoding one of the key enzymes of flavonoid biosynthesis, flavanone 3-hydroxylase. From the 5 copies (3 homoeologous and 2 paralogous of the Myc gene found in T. aestivum, only one plays a regulatory role in anthocyanin biosynthesis, interacting complementary with another transcriptional factor (MYB-like to confer purple pigmentation of grain pericarp in wheat. The role and functionality of the other 4 copies of the Myc gene remain unknown. From the 4 functional copies of the F3h gene in T. aestivum, three homoeologues have similar function. They are expressed in wheat organs colored with anthocyanins or in the endosperm, participating there in biosynthesis of uncolored flavonoid substances. The fourth copy (the B-genomic paralogue is transcribed neither in wheat organs colored with anthocyanins nor in seeds, however, it’s expression has been noticed in roots of aluminium-stressed plants, where the three homoeologous copies are not active. Functional diversification of the duplicated flavonoid biosynthesis genes in wheat may be a reason for maintenance of the duplicated copies and preventing them from pseudogenization.The study was supported by RFBR (11-04-92707. We also thank Ms. Galina Generalova for technical assistance.

  8. X-linked congenital ptosis and associated intellectual disability, short stature, microcephaly, cleft palate, digital and genital abnormalities define novel Xq25q26 duplication syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, R S; Jensen, L R; Maas, S M; Filmus, J; Capurro, M; Hansen, C; Marcelis, C L M; Ravn, K; Andrieux, J; Mathieu, M; Kirchhoff, M; Rødningen, O K; de Leeuw, N; Yntema, H G; Froyen, G; Vandewalle, J; Ballon, K; Klopocki, E; Joss, S; Tolmie, J; Knegt, A C; Lund, A M; Hjalgrim, H; Kuss, A W; Tommerup, N; Ullmann, R; de Brouwer, A P M; Strømme, P; Kjaergaard, S; Tümer, Z; Kleefstra, T

    2014-05-01

    Submicroscopic duplications along the long arm of the X-chromosome with known phenotypic consequences are relatively rare events. The clinical features resulting from such duplications are various, though they often include intellectual disability, microcephaly, short stature, hypotonia, hypogonadism and feeding difficulties. Female carriers are often phenotypically normal or show a similar but milder phenotype, as in most cases the X-chromosome harbouring the duplication is subject to inactivation. Xq28, which includes MECP2 is the major locus for submicroscopic X-chromosome duplications, whereas duplications in Xq25 and Xq26 have been reported in only a few cases. Using genome-wide array platforms we identified overlapping interstitial Xq25q26 duplications ranging from 0.2 to 4.76 Mb in eight unrelated families with in total five affected males and seven affected females. All affected males shared a common phenotype with intrauterine- and postnatal growth retardation and feeding difficulties in childhood. Three had microcephaly and two out of five suffered from epilepsy. In addition, three males had a distinct facial appearance with congenital bilateral ptosis and large protruding ears and two of them showed a cleft palate. The affected females had various clinical symptoms similar to that of the males with congenital bilateral ptosis in three families as most remarkable feature. Comparison of the gene content of the individual duplications with the respective phenotypes suggested three critical regions with candidate genes (AIFM1, RAB33A, GPC3 and IGSF1) for the common phenotypes, including candidate loci for congenital bilateral ptosis, small head circumference, short stature, genital and digital defects.

  9. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral "Salicoid" Genome Duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-06-27

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the "salicoid" duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants.

  10. Multiple tandem duplication of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase genes in Cucumis sativus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Qing-Mao; Li, Liang; Dong, Chun-Juan

    2012-10-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first entry enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway, and therefore plays a key role in both plant development and stress defense. In many plants, PAL is encoded by a multi-gene family, and each member is differentially regulated in response to environmental stimuli. In the present study, we report that PAL in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is encoded for by a family of seven genes (designated as CsPAL1-7). All seven CsPALs are arranged in tandem in two duplication blocks, which are located on chromosomes 4 and 6, respectively. The cDNA and protein sequences of the CsPALs share an overall high identity to each other. Homology modeling reveals similarities in their protein structures, besides several slight differences, implying the different activities in conversion of phenylalanine. Phylogenic analysis places CsPAL1-7 in a separate cluster rather than clustering with other plant PALs. Analyses of expression profiles in different cucumber tissues or in response to various stress or plant hormone treatments indicate that CsPAL1-7 play redundant, but divergent roles in cucumber development and stress response. This is consistent with our finding that CsPALs possess overlapping but different cis-elements in their promoter regions. Finally, several duplication events are discussed to explain the evolution of the cucumber PAL genes.

  11. Exact Algorithms for Duplication-Transfer-Loss Reconciliation with Non-Binary Gene Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Misagh; Bansal, Mukul S

    2017-06-01

    Duplication-Transfer-Loss (DTL) reconciliation is a powerful method for studying gene family evolution in the presence of horizontal gene transfer. DTL reconciliation seeks to reconcile gene trees with species trees by postulating speciation, duplication, transfer, and loss events. Efficient algorithms exist for finding optimal DTL reconciliations when the gene tree is binary. In practice, however, gene trees are often non-binary due to uncertainty in the gene tree topologies, and DTL reconciliation with non-binary gene trees is known to be NP-hard. In this paper, we present the first exact algorithms for DTL reconciliation with non-binary gene trees. Specifically, we (i) show that the DTL reconciliation problem for non-binary gene trees is fixed-parameter tractable in the maximum degree of the gene tree, (ii) present an exponential-time, but in-practice efficient, algorithm to track and enumerate all optimal binary resolutions of a non-binary input gene tree, and (iii) apply our algorithms to a large empirical data set of over 4700 gene trees from 100 species to study the impact of gene tree uncertainty on DTL-reconciliation and to demonstrate the applicability and utility of our algorithms. The new techniques and algorithms introduced in this paper will help biologists avoid incorrect evolutionary inferences caused by gene tree uncertainty.

  12. Duplicated CFTR isoforms in eels diverged in regulatory structures and osmoregulatory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Marty Kwok-Shing; Pipil, Supriya; Kato, Akira; Takei, Yoshio

    2016-09-01

    Two cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) isoforms, CFTRa and CFTRb, were cloned in Japanese eel and their structures and functions were studied in different osmoregulatory tissues in freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW) eels. Molecular phylogenetic results suggested that the CFTR duplication in eels occurred independently of the duplication event in salmonid. CFTRa was expressed in the intestine and kidney and downregulated in both tissues in SW eels, while CFTRb was specifically expressed in the gill and greatly upregulated in SW eels. Structurally, the CFTR isoforms are similar in most functional domains except the regulatory R domain, where the R domain of CFTRa is similar to that of human CFTR but the R domain of CFTRb is unique in having high intrinsic negative charges and fewer phosphorylation sites, suggesting divergence of isoforms in terms of gating properties and hormonal regulation. Immunohistochemical results showed that CFTR was localized on the apical regions of SW ionocytes, suggesting a Cl(-) secretory role as in other teleosts. In intestine and kidney, however, immunoreactive CFTR was mostly found in the cytosolic vesicles in FW eels, indicating that Cl(-) channel activity could be low at basal conditions, but could be rapidly increased by membrane insertion of the stored channels. Guanylin (GN), a known hormone that increases CFTR activity in mammalian intestine, failed to redistribute CFTR and to affect its expression in eel intestine. The results suggested that GN-independent CFTR regulation is present in eel intestine and kidney.

  13. Impact of duplicate gene copies on phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates in butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liswi Saif W

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase in availability of genomic sequences for a wide range of organisms has revealed gene duplication to be a relatively common event. Encounters with duplicate gene copies have consequently become almost inevitable in the context of collecting gene sequences for inferring species trees. Here we examine the effect of incorporating duplicate gene copies evolving at different rates on tree reconstruction and time estimation of recent and deep divergences in butterflies. Results Sequences from ultraviolet-sensitive (UVRh, blue-sensitive (BRh, and long-wavelength sensitive (LWRh opsins,EF-1α and COI were obtained from 27 taxa representing the five major butterfly families (5535 bp total. Both BRh and LWRh are present in multiple copies in some butterfly lineages and the different copies evolve at different rates. Regardless of the phylogenetic reconstruction method used, we found that analyses of combined data sets using either slower or faster evolving copies of duplicate genes resulted in a single topology in agreement with our current understanding of butterfly family relationships based on morphology and molecules. Interestingly, individual analyses of BRh and LWRh sequences also recovered these family-level relationships. Two different relaxed clock methods resulted in similar divergence time estimates at the shallower nodes in the tree, regardless of whether faster or slower evolving copies were used, with larger discrepancies observed at deeper nodes in the phylogeny. The time of divergence between the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus and the queen D. gilippus (15.3–35.6 Mya was found to be much older than the time of divergence between monarch co-mimic Limenitis archippus and red-spotted purple L. arthemis (4.7–13.6 Mya, and overlapping with the time of divergence of the co-mimetic passionflower butterflies Heliconius erato and H. melpomene (13.5–26.1 Mya. Our family-level results are congruent with

  14. Event marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Novotná, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to analyze event-marketing activities of the small firm and propose new events. At first the theoretical part describes marketing and communication mix and then especially planning and development of event marketing campaign. Research data were collected by the method of survey to propose the new events. Randomly selected customers were asked to fill the questionnaire. Its results were integrated into the proposal of the new events. The interview was realized with the owner of...

  15. [Duplication of DNA--a mechanism for the development of new functionality of genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślanka, Roman; Zadrąg-Tęcza, Renata

    2015-01-01

    The amplification of DNA is considered as a mechanism for rapid evolution of organisms. Duplication can be especially advantageous in the case of changing environmental conditions. Whole genome duplication maintains the proper balance between gene expression. This seems to be the main reason why WGD is more favorable than duplication of the fragments of DNA. The polyploidy status disappear as a result of the loss of the majority of duplicated genes. The preservation of duplicated genes is associated with the development of their new functions. Polyploidization is often noted for plants. However due to sequencing technique, the duplications episodes are more frequently reports also for the other systematic taxa, including animals. The occurrence of ancient genome duplication is also considered for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The existence of two active copies of ribosomal protein genes can be a confirmation of this process. Development of the fermentation process might be one of the probable causes of the yeast genome duplication.

  16. Laparoscopic excision of an ascending colon duplication cyst in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather R. Nolan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic intestinal duplications are infrequent and rarely present past early childhood. We present the case of a large, ascending colon duplication in a 17-year-old boy resected using minimally invasive techniques. This appears to be the first reported case of a laparoscopic en-bloc ascending colon duplication resection in an adolescent. The diagnosis and management of colonic duplications are discussed.

  17. A computational method for estimating the PCR duplication rate in DNA and RNA-seq experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Vikas

    2017-03-14

    PCR amplification is an important step in the preparation of DNA sequencing libraries prior to high-throughput sequencing. PCR amplification introduces redundant reads in the sequence data and estimating the PCR duplication rate is important to assess the frequency of such reads. Existing computational methods do not distinguish PCR duplicates from "natural" read duplicates that represent independent DNA fragments and therefore, over-estimate the PCR duplication rate for DNA-seq and RNA-seq experiments. In this paper, we present a computational method to estimate the average PCR duplication rate of high-throughput sequence datasets that accounts for natural read duplicates by leveraging heterozygous variants in an individual genome. Analysis of simulated data and exome sequence data from the 1000 Genomes project demonstrated that our method can accurately estimate the PCR duplication rate on paired-end as well as single-end read datasets which contain a high proportion of natural read duplicates. Further, analysis of exome datasets prepared using the Nextera library preparation method indicated that 45-50% of read duplicates correspond to natural read duplicates likely due to fragmentation bias. Finally, analysis of RNA-seq datasets from individuals in the 1000 Genomes project demonstrated that 70-95% of read duplicates observed in such datasets correspond to natural duplicates sampled from genes with high expression and identified outlier samples with a 2-fold greater PCR duplication rate than other samples. The method described here is a useful tool for estimating the PCR duplication rate of high-throughput sequence datasets and for assessing the fraction of read duplicates that correspond to natural read duplicates. An implementation of the method is available at https://github.com/vibansal/PCRduplicates .

  18. Brief Report: Regression Timing and Associated Features in "MECP2" Duplication Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S. U.; Hundley, R. J.; Wilson, A. K.; Carvalho, C. M. B.; Lupski, J. R.; Ramocki, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, timing, and associated features of developmental regression in "MECP2" duplication syndrome. We also examined whether duplication size was associated with regression. Comprehensive psychological evaluations were used to assess 17 boys with "MECP2" duplication syndrome.…

  19. 47 CFR 76.1609 - Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity. 76... SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1609 Non-duplication and syndicated... television station that would be entitled to exercise network non-duplication protection or...

  20. 47 CFR 76.93 - Parties entitled to network non-duplication protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Parties entitled to network non-duplication... RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.93 Parties entitled to network non-duplication...

  1. 47 CFR 76.92 - Cable network non-duplication; extent of protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable network non-duplication; extent of... RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.92 Cable network non-duplication; extent of protection....

  2. Partial craniofacial duplication: a review of the literature and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Melinda A; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lara-Sanchez, Pedro A; Schweitzer, Daniela; Jacobson, Lia; Clarke, Noreen; Hammoudeh, Jeffery; Urata, Mark M; Magee, William P

    2014-06-01

    Diprosopus (Greek; di-, "two" + prosopon, "face"), or craniofacial duplication, is a rare craniofacial anomaly referring to the complete duplication of facial structures. Partial craniofacial duplication describes a broad spectrum of congenital anomalies, including duplications of the oral cavity. This paper describes a 15 month-old female with a duplicated oral cavity, mandible, and maxilla. A Tessier type 7 cleft, midline meningocele, and duplicated hypophysis were also present. The preoperative evaluation, surgical approach, postoperative results, and a review of the literature are presented. The surgical approach was designed to preserve facial nerve innervation to the reconstructed cheek and mouth. The duplicated mandible and maxilla were excised and the remaining left maxilla was bone grafted. Soft tissue repair included closure of the Tessier type VII cleft. Craniofacial duplication remains a rare entity that is more common in females. The pathophysiology remains incompletely characterized, but is postulated to be due to duplication of the notochord, as well as duplication of mandibular growth centres. While diprosopus is a severe deformity often associated with anencephaly, patients with partial duplication typically benefit from surgical treatment. Managing craniofacial duplication requires a detailed preoperative evaluation as well as a comprehensive, staged treatment plan. Long-term follow up is needed appropriately to address ongoing craniofacial deformity.

  3. 76 FR 71060 - Clarification of Duplication of Benefits Requirements Under the Stafford Act for Community...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Clarification of Duplication of Benefits Requirements Under the Stafford Act for... duplication of benefits requirements under the Stafford Act for all active Community Development Block Grant... absence of these specific requirements, Stafford Act prohibition on duplication of benefits in section...

  4. 47 CFR 73.3556 - Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of programming on commonly owned or....3556 Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. (a) No commercial AM or FM... service area of either station. (b) For purposes of this section, duplication means the broadcasting...

  5. 36 CFR 1010.17 - Actions to eliminate duplication with State and local procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... duplication with State and local procedures. 1010.17 Section 1010.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY § 1010.17 Actions to eliminate duplication with State and local... fullest extent possible to reduce duplication between NEPA and State and local requirements....

  6. Bayesian approach for near-duplicate image detection

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, Lucas Moutinho; Torres, Ricardo da Silva

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose a bayesian approach for near-duplicate image detection, and investigate how different probabilistic models affect the performance obtained. The task of identifying an image whose metadata are missing is often demanded for a myriad of applications: metadata retrieval in cultural institutions, detection of copyright violations, investigation of latent cross-links in archives and libraries, duplicate elimination in storage management, etc. The majority of current solutions are based either on voting algorithms, which are very precise, but expensive; either on the use of visual dictionaries, which are efficient, but less precise. Our approach, uses local descriptors in a novel way, which by a careful application of decision theory, allows a very fine control of the compromise between precision and efficiency. In addition, the method attains a great compromise between those two axes, with more than 99% accuracy with less than 10 database operations.

  7. Computerized scheme for duplicate checking of bibliographic data bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giles, C.A.; Brooks, A.A.; Doszkocs, T.; Hummel, D.J.

    1976-08-01

    A technique for the automatic identification of duplicate documents within large bibliographic data bases has been designed and tested with encouraging results. The procedure is based on the generation and comparison of significant elements compressed from existing document descriptions. Problems arising from inconsistencies in editorial style and data base formats and from discrepancies in spelling, punctuation, translation and transliteration schemes are discussed; one method for circumventing ambiguities and errors of this type is proposed. The generalized computer program employs a key-making, sorting, weighting, and summation scheme for the detection of duplicates and, according to preliminary findings, achieves this objective with a high degree of accuracy. Sample results from five large data bases suggest that this automatic system performs as effectively as manual techniques.

  8. [Congenital segmental duplication of the lumbar ureter (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponthieu, A; Anfossi, G; Guidicelli, C; Boutboul, R

    1977-03-01

    In a 23-year-old man attacks of nephritic colic led to the discovery of an obstruction on the left lumbar ureter. Segmental resection of the ureter was performed, removing 10 mm of malformed, obstructed ureter. This was an incomplete duplication, the two ureteral segments lying side-by-side, each with its own musculature, for a distance of 7mm. Above and below the anomaly, the ureter was normal. This exceptional malformation is compared with other internal obstructions of the ureter.

  9. Concerted evolution of duplicated protein-coding genes in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Hickey, D. A.; Bally-Cuif, L.; Abukashawa, S; Payant, V; Benkel, B F

    1991-01-01

    Very rapid rates of gene conversion were observed between duplicated alpha-amylase-coding sequences in Drosophila melanogaster. This gene conversion process was also seen in the related species Drosophila erecta. Specifically, there is virtual sequence identity between the coding regions of the two genes within each species, while the sequence divergence between species is close to that expected based on their phylogenetic relationship. The flanking, noncoding regions are much more highly div...

  10. The evolution of developmental patterning under genetic duplication constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes, Miguel A.; Krakauer, David C

    2007-01-01

    Of considerable interest are the evolutionary and developmental origins of complex, adaptive structures and the mechanisms that stabilize these structures. We consider the relationship between the evolutionary process of gene duplication and deletion and the stability of morphogenetic patterns produced by interacting activators and inhibitors. We compare the relative stability of patterns with a single activator and inhibitor (two-dimensional system) against a ‘redundant’ system with two acti...

  11. Grebe syndrome with bilateral fibular hemimelia and thumb duplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Narasimha; Joseph, Benjamin [Department of Orthopaedics, Kasturba Medical College, Karnataka State (India)

    2002-03-01

    Grebe syndrome is a rare recessively inherited form of short-limbed dwarfism. Among the skeletal anomalies reported in the past, complete fibular hemimelia and thumb duplication have not been documented. We report a case of Grebe syndrome with these associated anomalies and review the various skeletal anomalies reported in the literature related to this syndrome. Awareness of the skeletal anomalies that can occur in this syndrome should enable an accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  12. Unusual duplication of the insulin-like receptor in the crustacean Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dufresne France

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The insulin signaling pathway (ISP has a key role in major physiological events like carbohydrate metabolism and growth regulation. The ISP has been well described in vertebrates and in a few invertebrate model organisms but remains largely unexplored in non-model invertebrates. This study is the first detailed genomic study of this pathway in a crustacean species, Daphnia pulex. Results The Daphnia pulex draft genome sequence assembly was scanned for major components of the ISP with a special attention to the insulin-like receptor. Twenty three putative genes are reported. The pathway appears to be generally well conserved as genes found in other invertebrates are present. Major findings include a lower number of insulin-like peptides in Daphnia as compared to other invertebrates and the presence of multiple insulin-like receptors (InR, with four genes as opposed to a single one in other invertebrates. Genes encoding for the Dappu_InR are likely the result of three duplication events and bear some unusual features. Dappu_InR-4 has undergone extensive evolutionary divergence and lacks the conserved site of the catalytic domain of the receptor tyrosine kinase. Dappu_InR-1 has a large insert and lacks the transmembranal domain in the β-subunit. This domain is also absent in Dappu_InR-3. Dappu_InR-2 is characterized by the absence of the cystein-rich region. Real-time q-PCR confirmed the expression of all four receptors. EST analyses of cDNA libraries revealed that the four receptors were differently expressed under various conditions. Conclusions Duplications of the insulin receptor genes might represent an important evolutionary innovation in Daphnia as they are known to exhibit extensive phenotypic plasticity in body size and in the size of defensive structures in response to predation.

  13. Slipins: ancient origin, duplication and diversification of the stomatin protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young J Peter W

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stomatin is a membrane protein that was first isolated from human red blood cells. Since then, a number of stomatin-like proteins have been identified in all three domains of life. The conservation among these proteins is remarkable, with bacterial and human homologs sharing 50 % identity. Despite being associated with a variety of diseases such as cancer, kidney failure and anaemia, precise functions of these proteins remain unclear. Results We have constructed a comprehensive phylogeny of all 'stomatin-like' sequences that share a 150 amino acid domain. We show these proteins comprise an ancient family that arose early in prokaryotic evolution, and we propose a new nomenclature that reflects their phylogeny, based on the name "slipin" (stomatin-like protein. Within prokaryotes there are two distinct subfamilies that account for the two different origins of the eight eukaryotic stomatin subfamilies, one of which gave rise to eukaryotic SLP-2, renamed here "paraslipin". This was apparently acquired through the mitochondrial endosymbiosis and is widely distributed amongst the major kingdoms. The other prokaryotic subfamily gave rise to the ancestor of the remaining seven eukaryotic subfamilies. The highly diverged "alloslipin" subfamily is represented only by fungal, viral and ciliate sequences. The remaining six subfamilies, collectively termed "slipins", are confined to metazoa. Protostome stomatin, as well as a newly reported arthropod subfamily slipin-4, are restricted to invertebrate groups, whilst slipin-1 (previously SLP-1 is present in nematodes and higher metazoa. In vertebrates, the stomatin family expanded considerably, with at least two duplication events giving rise to podocin and slipin-3 subfamilies (previously SLP-3, with the retained ancestral sequence giving rise to vertebrate stomatin. Conclusion Stomatin-like proteins have their origin in an ancient duplication event that occurred early on in the evolution

  14. Retention of duplicated long-wavelength opsins in mosquito lineages by positive selection and differential expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo-Calderón, Gloria I; Zanis, Michael J; Hill, Catherine A

    2017-03-21

    Opsins are light sensitive receptors associated with visual processes. Insects typically possess opsins that are stimulated by ultraviolet, short and long wavelength (LW) radiation. Six putative LW-sensitive opsins predicted in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti and malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and eight in the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, suggest gene expansion in the Family Culicidae (mosquitoes) relative to other insects. Here we report the first detailed molecular and evolutionary analyses of LW opsins in three mosquito vectors, with a goal to understanding the molecular basis of opsin-mediated visual processes that could be exploited for mosquito control. Time of divergence estimates suggest that the mosquito LW opsins originated from 18 or 19 duplication events between 166.9/197.5 to 1.07/0.94 million years ago (MY) and that these likely occurred following the predicted divergence of the lineages Anophelinae and Culicinae 145-226 MY. Fitmodel analyses identified nine amino acid residues in the LW opsins that may be under positive selection. Of these, eight amino acids occur in the N and C termini and are shared among all three species, and one residue in TMIII was unique to culicine species. Alignment of 5' non-coding regions revealed potential Conserved Non-coding Sequences (CNS) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in seven pairs of LW opsin paralogs. Our analyses suggest opsin gene duplication and residues possibly associated with spectral tuning of LW-sensitive photoreceptors. We explore two mechanisms - positive selection and differential expression mediated by regulatory units in CNS - that may have contributed to the retention of LW opsin genes in Culicinae and Anophelinae. We discuss the evolution of mosquito LW opsins in the context of major Earth events and possible adaptation of mosquitoes to LW-dominated photo environments, and implications for mosquito control strategies based on disrupting vision

  15. Primitive duplicate Hox clusters in the European eel's genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan V Henkel

    Full Text Available The enigmatic life cycle and elongated body of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L., 1758 have long motivated scientific enquiry. Recently, eel research has gained in urgency, as the population has dwindled to the point of critical endangerment. We have assembled a draft genome in order to facilitate advances in all provinces of eel biology. Here, we use the genome to investigate the eel's complement of the Hox developmental transcription factors. We show that unlike any other teleost fish, the eel retains fully populated, duplicate Hox clusters, which originated at the teleost-specific genome duplication. Using mRNA-sequencing and in situ hybridizations, we demonstrate that all copies are expressed in early embryos. Theories of vertebrate evolution predict that the retention of functional, duplicate Hox genes can give rise to additional developmental complexity, which is not immediately apparent in the adult. However, the key morphological innovation elsewhere in the eel's life history coincides with the evolutionary origin of its Hox repertoire.

  16. Inferring angiosperm phylogeny from EST data with widespread gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; McMahon, Michelle M

    2007-02-08

    Most studies inferring species phylogenies use sequences from single copy genes or sets of orthologs culled from gene families. For taxa such as plants, with very high levels of gene duplication in their nuclear genomes, this has limited the exploitation of nuclear sequences for phylogenetic studies, such as those available in large EST libraries. One rarely used method of inference, gene tree parsimony, can infer species trees from gene families undergoing duplication and loss, but its performance has not been evaluated at a phylogenomic scale for EST data in plants. A gene tree parsimony analysis based on EST data was undertaken for six angiosperm model species and Pinus, an outgroup. Although a large fraction of the tentative consensus sequences obtained from the TIGR database of ESTs was assembled into homologous clusters too small to be phylogenetically informative, some 557 clusters contained promising levels of information. Based on maximum likelihood estimates of the gene trees obtained from these clusters, gene tree parsimony correctly inferred the accepted species tree with strong statistical support. A slight variant of this species tree was obtained when maximum parsimony was used to infer the individual gene trees instead. Despite the complexity of the EST data and the relatively small fraction eventually used in inferring a species tree, the gene tree parsimony method performed well in the face of very high apparent rates of duplication.

  17. Duplication: a Mechanism Producing Disassortative Mixing Networks in Biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Dan; LIU Zeng-Rong; WANG Jia-Zeng

    2007-01-01

    Assortative/disassortative mixing is an important topological property of a network. A network is called assortative mixing if the nodes in the network tend to connect to their connectivity peers, or disassortative mixing if nodes with low degrees are more likely to connect with high-degree nodes. We have known that biological networks such as protein-protein interaction networks (PPI), gene regulatory networks, and metabolic networks tend to be disassortative. On the other hand, in biological evolution, duplication and divergence are two fundamental processes. In order to make the relationship between the property of disassortative mixing and the two basic biological principles clear and to study the cause of the disassortative mixing property in biological networks, we present a random duplication model and an anti-preference duplication model. Our results show that disassortative mixing networks can be obtained by both kinds of models from uncorrelated initial networks.Moreover, with the growth of the network size, the disassortative mixing property becomes more obvious.

  18. Williams Syndrome and 15q Duplication: Coincidence versus Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Aditi; Agarwal, Swashti; Perez-Colon, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystem disorder caused by contiguous gene deletion in 7q11.23, commonly associated with distinctive facial features, supravalvular aortic stenosis, short stature, idiopathic hypercalcemia, developmental delay, joint laxity, and a friendly personality. The clinical features of 15q11q13 duplication syndrome include autism, mental retardation, ataxia, seizures, developmental delay, and behavioral problems. We report a rare case of a girl with genetically confirmed Williams syndrome and coexisting 15q duplication syndrome. The patient underwent treatment for central precocious puberty and later presented with primary amenorrhea. The karyotype revealed 47,XX,+mar. FISH analysis for the marker chromosome showed partial trisomy/tetrasomy for proximal chromosome 15q (15p13q13). FISH using an ELN-specific probe demonstrated a deletion in the Williams syndrome critical region in 7q11.23. To our knowledge, a coexistence of Williams syndrome and 15q duplication syndrome has not been reported in the literature. Our patient had early pubertal development, which has been described in some patients with Williams syndrome. However, years later after discontinuing gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue treatment, she developed primary amenorrhea.

  19. Prevalent RNA recognition motif duplication in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yihsuan S; Gomez, Shawn M; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-05-01

    The sequence-specific recognition of RNA by proteins is mediated through various RNA binding domains, with the RNA recognition motif (RRM) being the most frequent and present in >50% of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Many RBPs contain multiple RRMs, and it is unclear how each RRM contributes to the binding specificity of the entire protein. We found that RRMs within the same RBP (i.e., sibling RRMs) tend to have significantly higher similarity than expected by chance. Sibling RRM pairs from RBPs shared by multiple species tend to have lower similarity than those found only in a single species, suggesting that multiple RRMs within the same protein might arise from domain duplication followed by divergence through random mutations. This finding is exemplified by a recent RRM domain duplication in DAZ proteins and an ancient duplication in PABP proteins. Additionally, we found that different similarities between sibling RRMs are associated with distinct functions of an RBP and that the RBPs tend to contain repetitive sequences with low complexity. Taken together, this study suggests that the number of RBPs with multiple RRMs has expanded in mammals and that the multiple sibling RRMs may recognize similar target motifs in a cooperative manner.

  20. The detection of large deletions or duplications in genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A L; Barton, D E; Cockburn, D J; Taylor, G R

    2002-11-01

    While methods for the detection of point mutations and small insertions or deletions in genomic DNA are well established, the detection of larger (>100 bp) genomic duplications or deletions can be more difficult. Most mutation scanning methods use PCR as a first step, but the subsequent analyses are usually qualitative rather than quantitative. Gene dosage methods based on PCR need to be quantitative (i.e., they should report molar quantities of starting material) or semi-quantitative (i.e., they should report gene dosage relative to an internal standard). Without some sort of quantitation, heterozygous deletions and duplications may be overlooked and therefore be under-ascertained. Gene dosage methods provide the additional benefit of reporting allele drop-out in the PCR. This could impact on SNP surveys, where large-scale genotyping may miss null alleles. Here we review recent developments in techniques for the detection of this type of mutation and compare their relative strengths and weaknesses. We emphasize that comprehensive mutation analysis should include scanning for large insertions and deletions and duplications. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Global analysis of human duplicated genes reveals the relative importance of whole-genome duplicates originated in the early vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Debarun; Ghosh, Tapash C

    2016-01-22

    Gene duplication is a genetic mutation that creates functionally redundant gene copies that are initially relieved from selective pressures and may adapt themselves to new functions with time. The levels of gene duplication may vary from small-scale duplication (SSD) to whole genome duplication (WGD). Studies with yeast revealed ample differences between these duplicates: Yeast WGD pairs were functionally more similar, less divergent in subcellular localization and contained a lesser proportion of essential genes. In this study, we explored the differences in evolutionary genomic properties of human SSD and WGD genes, with the identifiable human duplicates coming from the two rounds of whole genome duplication occurred early in vertebrate evolution. We observed that these two groups of duplicates were also dissimilar in terms of their evolutionary and genomic properties. But interestingly, this is not like the same observed in yeast. The human WGDs were found to be functionally less similar, diverge more in subcellular level and contain a higher proportion of essential genes than the SSDs, all of which are opposite from yeast. Additionally, we explored that human WGDs were more divergent in their gene expression profile, have higher multifunctionality and are more often associated with disease, and are evolutionarily more conserved than human SSDs. Our study suggests that human WGD duplicates are more divergent and entails the adaptation of WGDs to novel and important functions that consequently lead to their evolutionary conservation in the course of evolution.

  2. Duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies in the primary nucleotide databases: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingyu; Zobel, Justin; Verspoor, Karin

    2017-01-01

    GenBank, the EMBL European Nucleotide Archive and the DNA DataBank of Japan, known collectively as the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration or INSDC, are the three most significant nucleotide sequence databases. Their records are derived from laboratory work undertaken by different individuals, by different teams, with a range of technologies and assumptions and over a period of decades. As a consequence, they contain a great many duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies, but neither the prevalence nor the characteristics of various types of duplicates have been rigorously assessed. Existing duplicate detection methods in bioinformatics only address specific duplicate types, with inconsistent assumptions; and the impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases has not been carefully assessed, making it difficult to judge the value of such methods. Our goal is to assess the scale, kinds and impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases, through a retrospective analysis of merged groups in INSDC databases. Our outcomes are threefold: (1) We analyse a benchmark dataset consisting of duplicates manually identified in INSDC-a dataset of 67 888 merged groups with 111 823 duplicate pairs across 21 organisms from INSDC databases - in terms of the prevalence, types and impacts of duplicates. (2) We categorize duplicates at both sequence and annotation level, with supporting quantitative statistics, showing that different organisms have different prevalence of distinct kinds of duplicate. (3) We show that the presence of duplicates has practical impact via a simple case study on duplicates, in terms of GC content and melting temperature. We demonstrate that duplicates not only introduce redundancy, but can lead to inconsistent results for certain tasks. Our findings lead to a better understanding of the problem of duplication in biological databases.Database URL: the merged records are available at https

  3. Unequal sister chromatid and homolog recombination at a tandem duplication of the A1 locus in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandeau-Nelson, Marna D; Xia, Yiji; Li, Jin; Neuffer, M Gerald; Schnable, Patrick S

    2006-08-01

    Tandemly arrayed duplicate genes are prevalent. The maize A1-b haplotype is a tandem duplication that consists of the components, alpha and beta. The rate of meiotic unequal recombination at A1-b is ninefold higher when a homolog is present than when it is absent (i.e., hemizygote). When a sequence heterologous homolog is available, 94% of recombinants (264/281) are generated via recombination with the homolog rather than with the sister chromatid. In addition, 83% (220/264) of homolog recombination events involved alpha rather than beta. These results indicate that: (1) the homolog is the preferred template for unequal recombination and (2) pairing of the duplicated segments with the homolog does not occur randomly but instead favors a particular configuration. The choice of recombination template (i.e., homolog vs. sister chromatid) affects the distribution of recombination breakpoints within a1. Rates of unequal recombination at A1-b are similar to the rate of recombination between nonduplicated a1 alleles. Unequal recombination is therefore common and is likely to be responsible for the generation of genetic variability, even within inbred lines.

  4. Biological Consequences of Ancient Gene Acquisition and Duplication in the Large Genome of Candidatus Solibacter usitatus Ellin6076

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challacombe, Jean F [ORNL; Eichorst, Stephanie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kuske, Cheryl R [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01

    Members of the bacterial phylum Acidobacteria are widespread in soils and sediments worldwide, and are abundant in many soils. Acidobacteria are challenging to culture in vitro, and many basic features of their biology and functional roles in the soil have not been determined. Candidatus Solibacter usitatus strain Ellin6076 has a 9.9 Mb genome that is approximately 2 5 times as large as the other sequenced Acidobacteria genomes. Bacterial genome sizes typically range from 0.5 to 10 Mb and are influenced by gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, gene loss and other evolutionary processes. Our comparative genome analyses indicate that the Ellin6076 large genome has arisen by horizontal gene transfer via ancient bacteriophage and/or plasmid-mediated transduction, and widespread small-scale gene duplications, resulting in an increased number of paralogs. Low amino acid sequence identities among functional group members, and lack of conserved gene order and orientation in regions containing similar groups of paralogs, suggest that most of the paralogs are not the result of recent duplication events. The genome sizes of additional cultured Acidobacteria strains were estimated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the prevalence of the large genome trait within the phylum. Members of subdivision 3 had larger genomes than those of subdivision 1, but none were as large as the Ellin6076 genome. The large genome of Ellin6076 may not be typical of the phylum, and encodes traits that could provide a selective metabolic, defensive and regulatory advantage in the soil environment.

  5. Duplication and Loss of Function of Genes Encoding RNA Polymerase III Subunit C4 Causes Hybrid Incompatibility in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giao Ngoc Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive barriers are commonly observed in both animals and plants, in which they maintain species integrity and contribute to speciation. This report shows that a combination of loss-of-function alleles at two duplicated loci, DUPLICATED GAMETOPHYTIC STERILITY 1 (DGS1 on chromosome 4 and DGS2 on chromosome 7, causes pollen sterility in hybrid progeny derived from an interspecific cross between cultivated rice, Oryza sativa, and an Asian annual wild rice, O. nivara. Male gametes carrying the DGS1 allele from O. nivara (DGS1-nivaras and the DGS2 allele from O. sativa (DGS2-T65s were sterile, but female gametes carrying the same genotype were fertile. We isolated the causal gene, which encodes a protein homologous to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP III subunit C4 (RPC4. RPC4 facilitates the transcription of 5S rRNAs and tRNAs. The loss-of-function alleles at DGS1-nivaras and DGS2-T65s were caused by weak or nonexpression of RPC4 and an absence of RPC4, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that gene duplication of RPC4 at DGS1 and DGS2 was a recent event that occurred after divergence of the ancestral population of Oryza from other Poaceae or during diversification of AA-genome species.

  6. Biological consequences of ancient gene acquisition and duplication in the large genome soil bacterium, ""solibacter usitatus"" strain Ellin6076

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challacombe, Jean F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eichorst, Stephanie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kuske, Cheryl R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hauser, Loren [ORNL; Land, Miriam [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial genome sizes range from ca. 0.5 to 10Mb and are influenced by gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, gene loss and other evolutionary processes. Sequenced genomes of strains in the phylum Acidobacteria revealed that 'Solibacter usistatus' strain Ellin6076 harbors a 9.9 Mb genome. This large genome appears to have arisen by horizontal gene transfer via ancient bacteriophage and plasmid-mediated transduction, as well as widespread small-scale gene duplications. This has resulted in an increased number of paralogs that are potentially ecologically important (ecoparalogs). Low amino acid sequence identities among functional group members and lack of conserved gene order and orientation in the regions containing similar groups of paralogs suggest that most of the paralogs were not the result of recent duplication events. The genome sizes of cultured subdivision 1 and 3 strains in the phylum Acidobacteria were estimated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the prevalence of the large genome trait within the phylum. Members of subdivision 1 were estimated to have smaller genome sizes ranging from ca. 2.0 to 4.8 Mb, whereas members of subdivision 3 had slightly larger genomes, from ca. 5.8 to 9.9 Mb. It is hypothesized that the large genome of strain Ellin6076 encodes traits that provide a selective metabolic, defensive and regulatory advantage in the variable soil environment.

  7. A salmonid EST genomic study: genes, duplications, phylogeny and microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmbhatt Sonal

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonids are of interest because of their relatively recent genome duplication, and their extensive use in wild fisheries and aquaculture. A comprehensive gene list and a comparison of genes in some of the different species provide valuable genomic information for one of the most widely studied groups of fish. Results 298,304 expressed sequence tags (ESTs from Atlantic salmon (69% of the total, 11,664 chinook, 10,813 sockeye, 10,051 brook trout, 10,975 grayling, 8,630 lake whitefish, and 3,624 northern pike ESTs were obtained in this study and have been deposited into the public databases. Contigs were built and putative full-length Atlantic salmon clones have been identified. A database containing ESTs, assemblies, consensus sequences, open reading frames, gene predictions and putative annotation is available. The overall similarity between Atlantic salmon ESTs and those of rainbow trout, chinook, sockeye, brook trout, grayling, lake whitefish, northern pike and rainbow smelt is 93.4, 94.2, 94.6, 94.4, 92.5, 91.7, 89.6, and 86.2% respectively. An analysis of 78 transcript sets show Salmo as a sister group to Oncorhynchus and Salvelinus within Salmoninae, and Thymallinae as a sister group to Salmoninae and Coregoninae within Salmonidae. Extensive gene duplication is consistent with a genome duplication in the common ancestor of salmonids. Using all of the available EST data, a new expanded salmonid cDNA microarray of 32,000 features was created. Cross-species hybridizations to this cDNA microarray indicate that this resource will be useful for studies of all 68 salmonid species. Conclusion An extensive collection and analysis of salmonid RNA putative transcripts indicate that Pacific salmon, Atlantic salmon and charr are 94–96% similar while the more distant whitefish, grayling, pike and smelt are 93, 92, 89 and 86% similar to salmon. The salmonid transcriptome reveals a complex history of gene duplication that is

  8. Sorting duplicated loci disentangles complexities of polyploid genomes masked by genotyping by sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Morten; Seeb, Lisa W.; Seeb, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    detecting selection. Retained duplicates from ancient whole-genome duplications (WGDs) may be found throughout genomes, whereas retained duplicates from recent WGDs are concentrated at distal ends of some chromosome arms. Additionally, segmental duplicates can be found at distal ends or nearly anywhere...... studies. We provide guidelines on how to use this haploid strategy for studies on polyploid-origin vertebrates including how it can be used to screen duplicated loci in natural populations. We conclude by discussing areas of research that will benefit from better inclusion of polyploid loci; we...

  9. The correlation between pertinence and rate of citation duplication in multidatabase searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neway, J M; Lancaster, F W

    1983-07-01

    The rate of citation duplication was examined in three databases: MEDLINE, BIOSIS, and LIFE SCIENCES COLLECTION. Duplicate citations were found to be more pertinent than unique citations. The duplicate citations came from a highly compact literature, while those from a single database were very widely scattered. The pertinent duplicated citations were more likely to be retrieved in searches that had more terms overall, had a higher percentage of thesaurus terms, and had terms which appeared in both title and abstract. These results suggest that the rate of duplication of citations in multidatabase searches may be used to rank output according to probable pertinence.

  10. Multiple Isolated Enteric Duplication Cysts in an Infant - A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udiya, Alok Kumar; Shetty, Gurucharan S; Chauhan, Udit; Singhal, Shweta; Prabhu, Shailesh M

    2016-01-01

    Completely isolated enteric duplication cysts are a rare variety of enteric duplication cysts having an independent blood supply with no communication with any part of the adjacent bowel segment. We report a case showing two completely isolated enteric duplication cysts originating in the greater omentum and transverse mesocolon in an infant. Multiple isolated enteric duplication cysts involving non-contiguous bowel segments have not been previously reported in the literature. In addition the transverse mesocolon duplication cyst was infected showing septations and loss of double wall sign resulting in difficulty in imaging diagnosis. Both the cysts were excised and confirmed on histopathology.

  11. Prevalent role of gene features in determining evolutionary fates of whole-genome duplication duplicated genes in flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen-kai; Liu, Yun-long; Xia, En-hua; Gao, Li-zhi

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of genes and genomes after polyploidization has been the subject of extensive studies in evolutionary biology and plant sciences. While a significant number of duplicated genes are rapidly removed during a process called fractionation, which operates after the whole-genome duplication (WGD), another considerable number of genes are retained preferentially, leading to the phenomenon of biased gene retention. However, the evolutionary mechanisms underlying gene retention after WGD remain largely unknown. Through genome-wide analyses of sequence and functional data, we comprehensively investigated the relationships between gene features and the retention probability of duplicated genes after WGDs in six plant genomes, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), poplar (Populus trichocarpa), soybean (Glycine max), rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and maize (Zea mays). The results showed that multiple gene features were correlated with the probability of gene retention. Using a logistic regression model based on principal component analysis, we resolved evolutionary rate, structural complexity, and GC3 content as the three major contributors to gene retention. Cluster analysis of these features further classified retained genes into three distinct groups in terms of gene features and evolutionary behaviors. Type I genes are more prone to be selected by dosage balance; type II genes are possibly subject to subfunctionalization; and type III genes may serve as potential targets for neofunctionalization. This study highlights that gene features are able to act jointly as primary forces when determining the retention and evolution of WGD-derived duplicated genes in flowering plants. These findings thus may help to provide a resolution to the debate on different evolutionary models of gene fates after WGDs.

  12. Evolution of the duplicated intracellular lipid-binding protein genes of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Ananda B; Parmar, Manoj B; Wright, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    Increasing organismal complexity during the evolution of life has been attributed to the duplication of genes and entire genomes. More recently, theoretical models have been proposed that postulate the fate of duplicated genes, among them the duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model. In the DDC model, the common fate of a duplicated gene is lost from the genome owing to nonfunctionalization. Duplicated genes are retained in the genome either by subfunctionalization, where the functions of the ancestral gene are sub-divided between the sister duplicate genes, or by neofunctionalization, where one of the duplicate genes acquires a new function. Both processes occur either by loss or gain of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. Here, we review the genomic organization, evolution, and transcriptional regulation of the multigene family of intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) genes from teleost fishes. Teleost fishes possess many copies of iLBP genes owing to a whole genome duplication (WGD) early in the teleost fish radiation. Moreover, the retention of duplicated iLBP genes is substantially higher than the retention of all other genes duplicated in the teleost genome. The fatty acid-binding protein genes, a subfamily of the iLBP multigene family in zebrafish, are differentially regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms, which may account for the retention of iLBP genes in the zebrafish genome by the process of subfunctionalization of cis-acting regulatory elements in iLBP gene promoters.

  13. Large inverted duplications in the human genome form via a fold-back mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Hermetz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverted duplications are a common type of copy number variation (CNV in germline and somatic genomes. Large duplications that include many genes can lead to both neurodevelopmental phenotypes in children and gene amplifications in tumors. There are several models for inverted duplication formation, most of which include a dicentric chromosome intermediate followed by breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB cycles, but the mechanisms that give rise to the inverted dicentric chromosome in most inverted duplications remain unknown. Here we have combined high-resolution array CGH, custom sequence capture, next-generation sequencing, and long-range PCR to analyze the breakpoints of 50 nonrecurrent inverted duplications in patients with intellectual disability, autism, and congenital anomalies. For half of the rearrangements in our study, we sequenced at least one breakpoint junction. Sequence analysis of breakpoint junctions reveals a normal-copy disomic spacer between inverted and non-inverted copies of the duplication. Further, short inverted sequences are present at the boundary of the disomic spacer and the inverted duplication. These data support a mechanism of inverted duplication formation whereby a chromosome with a double-strand break intrastrand pairs with itself to form a "fold-back" intermediate that, after DNA replication, produces a dicentric inverted chromosome with a disomic spacer corresponding to the site of the fold-back loop. This process can lead to inverted duplications adjacent to terminal deletions, inverted duplications juxtaposed to translocations, and inverted duplication ring chromosomes.

  14. Human-specific duplication and mosaic transcripts: the recent paralogous structure of chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jeffrey A; Yavor, Amy M; Viggiano, Luigi; Misceo, Doriana; Horvath, Juliann E; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Schwartz, Stuart; Rocchi, Mariano; Eichler, Evan E

    2002-01-01

    In recent decades, comparative chromosomal banding, chromosome painting, and gene-order studies have shown strong conservation of gross chromosome structure and gene order in mammals. However, findings from the human genome sequence suggest an unprecedented degree of recent (homologous duplications (> or = 1 kb and > or = 90%) on chromosome 22. Overall, 10.8% (3.7/33.8 Mb) of chromosome 22 is duplicated, with an average sequence identity of 95.4%. To organize the duplications into tractable units, intron-exon structure and well-defined duplication boundaries were used to define 78 duplicated modules (minimally shared evolutionary segments) with 157 copies on chromosome 22. Analysis of these modules provides evidence for the creation or modification of 11 novel transcripts. Comparative FISH analyses of human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaque reveal qualitative and quantitative differences in the distribution of these duplications--consistent with their recent origin. Several duplications appear to be human specific, including a approximately 400-kb duplication (99.4%-99.8% sequence identity) that transposed from chromosome 14 to the most proximal pericentromeric region of chromosome 22. Experimental and in silico data further support a pericentromeric gradient of duplications where the most recent duplications transpose adjacent to the centromere. Taken together, these data suggest that segmental duplications have been an ongoing process of primate genome evolution, contributing to recent gene innovation and the dynamic transformation of genome architecture within and among closely related species.

  15. Evolutionary Fates and Dynamic Functionalization of Young Duplicate Genes in Arabidopsis Genomes1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Tao, Feng; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication is a primary means to generate genomic novelties, playing an essential role in speciation and adaptation. Particularly in plants, a high abundance of duplicate genes has been maintained for significantly long periods of evolutionary time. To address the manner in which young duplicate genes were derived primarily from small-scale gene duplication and preserved in plant genomes and to determine the underlying driving mechanisms, we generated transcriptomes to produce the expression profiles of five tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis lyrata and Capsella rubella. Based on the quantitative analysis metrics, we investigated the evolutionary processes of young duplicate genes in Arabidopsis. We determined that conservation, neofunctionalization, and specialization are three main evolutionary processes for Arabidopsis young duplicate genes. We explicitly demonstrated the dynamic functionalization of duplicate genes along the evolutionary time scale. Upon origination, duplicates tend to maintain their ancestral functions; but as they survive longer, they might be likely to develop distinct and novel functions. The temporal evolutionary processes and functionalization of plant duplicate genes are associated with their ancestral functions, dynamic DNA methylation levels, and histone modification abundances. Furthermore, duplicate genes tend to be initially expressed in pollen and then to gain more interaction partners over time. Altogether, our study provides novel insights into the dynamic retention processes of young duplicate genes in plant genomes. PMID:27485883

  16. De Novo duplication in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandich, P.; Bellone, E.; Ajmar, F. [and others

    1996-09-01

    We read with interest the paper on {open_quotes}Prevalence and Origin of De Novo Duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 1A: First Report of a De Novo Duplication with a Maternal Origin,{close_quotes}. They reported their experience with 10 sporadic cases of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) in which it was demonstrated that the disease had arisen as the result of a de novo duplication. They analyzed the de novo-duplication families by using microsatellite markers and identified the parental origin of the duplication in eight cases. In one family the duplication was of maternal origin, whereas in the remaining seven cases it was of paternal origin. The authors concluded that their report was the first evidence of a de novo duplication of maternal origin, suggesting that this is not a phenomenon associated solely with male meiosis. 7 refs.

  17. Yeast "make-accumulate-consume" life strategy evolved as a multi-step process that predates the whole genome duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Hagman

    Full Text Available When fruits ripen, microbial communities start a fierce competition for the freely available fruit sugars. Three yeast lineages, including baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have independently developed the metabolic activity to convert simple sugars into ethanol even under fully aerobic conditions. This fermentation capacity, named Crabtree effect, reduces the cell-biomass production but provides in nature a tool to out-compete other microorganisms. Here, we analyzed over forty Saccharomycetaceae yeasts, covering over 200 million years of the evolutionary history, for their carbon metabolism. The experiments were done under strictly controlled and uniform conditions, which has not been done before. We show that the origin of Crabtree effect in Saccharomycetaceae predates the whole genome duplication and became a settled metabolic trait after the split of the S. cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lineages, and coincided with the origin of modern fruit bearing plants. Our results suggest that ethanol fermentation evolved progressively, involving several successive molecular events that have gradually remodeled the yeast carbon metabolism. While some of the final evolutionary events, like gene duplications of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes, have been deduced, the earliest molecular events initiating Crabtree effect are still to be determined.

  18. The roles of whole-genome and small-scale duplications in the functional specialization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A Fares

    Full Text Available Researchers have long been enthralled with the idea that gene duplication can generate novel functions, crediting this process with great evolutionary importance. Empirical data shows that whole-genome duplications (WGDs are more likely to be retained than small-scale duplications (SSDs, though their relative contribution to the functional fate of duplicates remains unexplored. Using the map of genetic interactions and the re-sequencing of 27 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes evolving for 2,200 generations we show that SSD-duplicates lead to neo-functionalization while WGD-duplicates partition ancestral functions. This conclusion is supported by: (a SSD-duplicates establish more genetic interactions than singletons and WGD-duplicates; (b SSD-duplicates copies share more interaction-partners than WGD-duplicates copies; (c WGD-duplicates interaction partners are more functionally related than SSD-duplicates partners; (d SSD-duplicates gene copies are more functionally divergent from one another, while keeping more overlapping functions, and diverge in their sub-cellular locations more than WGD-duplicates copies; and (e SSD-duplicates complement their functions to a greater extent than WGD-duplicates. We propose a novel model that uncovers the complexity of evolution after gene duplication.

  19. The Roles of Whole-Genome and Small-Scale Duplications in the Functional Specialization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Mario A.; Keane, Orla M.; Toft, Christina; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Jones, Gary W.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have long been enthralled with the idea that gene duplication can generate novel functions, crediting this process with great evolutionary importance. Empirical data shows that whole-genome duplications (WGDs) are more likely to be retained than small-scale duplications (SSDs), though their relative contribution to the functional fate of duplicates remains unexplored. Using the map of genetic interactions and the re-sequencing of 27 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes evolving for 2,200 generations we show that SSD-duplicates lead to neo-functionalization while WGD-duplicates partition ancestral functions. This conclusion is supported by: (a) SSD-duplicates establish more genetic interactions than singletons and WGD-duplicates; (b) SSD-duplicates copies share more interaction-partners than WGD-duplicates copies; (c) WGD-duplicates interaction partners are more functionally related than SSD-duplicates partners; (d) SSD-duplicates gene copies are more functionally divergent from one another, while keeping more overlapping functions, and diverge in their sub-cellular locations more than WGD-duplicates copies; and (e) SSD-duplicates complement their functions to a greater extent than WGD–duplicates. We propose a novel model that uncovers the complexity of evolution after gene duplication. PMID:23300483

  20. SENTINEL EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Robida

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Objective of the article is a two year statistics on sentinel events in hospitals. Results of a survey on sentinel events and the attitude of hospital leaders and staff are also included. Some recommendations regarding patient safety and the handling of sentinel events are given.Methods. In March 2002 the Ministry of Health introduce a voluntary reporting system on sentinel events in Slovenian hospitals. Sentinel events were analyzed according to the place the event, its content, and root causes. To show results of the first year, a conference for hospital directors and medical directors was organized. A survey was conducted among the participants with the purpose of gathering information about their view on sentinel events. One hundred questionnaires were distributed.Results. Sentinel events. There were 14 reports of sentinel events in the first year and 7 in the second. In 4 cases reports were received only after written reminders were sent to the responsible persons, in one case no reports were obtained. There were 14 deaths, 5 of these were in-hospital suicides, 6 were due to an adverse event, 3 were unexplained. Events not leading to death were a suicide attempt, a wrong side surgery, a paraplegia after spinal anaesthesia, a fall with a femoral neck fracture, a damage of the spleen in the event of pleural space drainage, inadvertent embolization with absolute alcohol into a femoral artery and a physical attack on a physician by a patient. Analysis of root causes of sentinel events showed that in most cases processes were inadequate.Survey. One quarter of those surveyed did not know about the sentinel events reporting system. 16% were having actual problems when reporting events and 47% beleived that there was an attempt to blame individuals. Obstacles in reporting events openly were fear of consequences, moral shame, fear of public disclosure of names of participants in the event and exposure in mass media. The majority of

  1. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics. We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...

  2. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics.We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...

  3. Intragenic Duplication A Novel Mutational Mechanism in Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, M. T.; Geisz, A.; Brusgaard, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide...... pancreatitis. The accelerated activation of p.K23_I24insIDK by cathepsin B is a unique biochemical property not found in any other pancreatitis-associated trypsinogen mutant. In contrast, the robust autoactivation of the novel mutant confirms the notion that increased autoactivation is a disease......-relevant mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis....

  4. Concerted evolution of duplicated protein-coding genes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, D A; Bally-Cuif, L; Abukashawa, S; Payant, V; Benkel, B F

    1991-03-01

    Very rapid rates of gene conversion were observed between duplicated alpha-amylase-coding sequences in Drosophila melanogaster. This gene conversion process was also seen in the related species Drosophila erecta. Specifically, there is virtual sequence identity between the coding regions of the two genes within each species, while the sequence divergence between species is close to that expected based on their phylogenetic relationship. The flanking, noncoding regions are much more highly diverged and do not appear to be subject to gene conversion. Comparison of amylase sequences between the two species provides a clear demonstration that recurrent gene conversion does indeed lead to the concerted evolution of the gene pair.

  5. Bionic Duplication of Fresh Navodon septentrionalis Fish Surface Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Qu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic superhydrophobic surface was fabricated by replicating topography of the fresh fish skin surface of Navodon septentrionalis with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS elastomer. A two-step replicating method was developed to make the surface structure of the fresh fish skin be replicated with high fidelity. After duplication, it was found that the static contact angle of the replica was as large as 173°. Theoretic analysis based on Young's and Cassie-Baxter (C-B model was performed to explain the relationship between structure and hydrophobicity.

  6. 10p Duplication characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiktor, A.; Feldman, G.L.; Van Dyke, D.L.; Kratkoczki, P.; Ditmars, D.M. Jr. [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    1994-09-01

    We describe a patient with severe failure to thrive, mild-moderate developmental delay, cleft lip and palate, and other anomalies. Routine cytogenetic analysis documented a de novo chromosome rearrangement involving chromosome 4, but the origin of the derived material was unknown. Using chromosome specific painting probes, the karyotype was defined as 46,XY,der(4)t(4;10)(q35;p11.23). Characterization of the dup(10p) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis provides another example of the usefulness of this technology in identifying small deletions, duplications, or supernumerary marker chromosomes. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Neofunctionalization of a duplicate hatching enzyme gene during the evolution of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kaori; Kawaguchi, Mari; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yasumasu, Shigeki

    2014-10-19

    Duplication and subsequent neofunctionalization of the teleostean hatching enzyme gene occurred in the common ancestor of Euteleostei and Otocephala, producing two genes belonging to different phylogenetic clades (clade I and II). In euteleosts, the clade I enzyme inherited the activity of the ancestral enzyme of swelling the egg envelope by cleavage of the N-terminal region of egg envelope proteins. The clade II enzyme gained two specific cleavage sites, N-ZPd and mid-ZPd but lost the ancestral activity. Thus, euteleostean clade II enzymes assumed a new function; solubilization of the egg envelope by the cooperative action with clade I enzyme. However, in Otocephala, the clade II gene was lost during evolution. Consequently, in a late group of Otocephala, only the clade I enzyme is present to swell the egg envelope. We evaluated the egg envelope digestion properties of clade I and II enzymes in Gonorynchiformes, an early diverging group of Otocephala, using milkfish, and compared their digestion with those of other fishes. Finally, we propose a hypothesis of the neofunctionalization process. The milkfish clade II enzyme cleaved N-ZPd but not mid-ZPd, and did not cause solubilization of the egg envelope. We conclude that neofunctionalization is incomplete in the otocephalan clade II enzymes. Comparison of clade I and clade II enzyme characteristics implies that the specificity of the clade II enzymes gradually changed during evolution after the duplication event, and that a change in substrate was required for the addition of the mid-ZPd site and loss of activity at the N-terminal region. We infer the process of neofunctionalization of the clade II enzyme after duplication of the gene. The ancestral clade II gene gained N-ZPd cleavage activity in the common ancestral lineage of the Euteleostei and Otocephala. Subsequently, acquisition of cleavage activity at the mid-ZPd site and loss of cleavage activity in the N-terminal region occurred during the evolution of

  8. A green-cotyledon/stay-green mutant exemplifies the ancient whole-genome duplications in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Michiharu; Yamada, Tetsuya; Masuda, Yu; Sato, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Hideki; Ueda, Hiroaki; Morita, Ryouhei; Nishimura, Minoru; Kitamura, Keisuke; Kusaba, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    The recent whole-genome sequencing of soybean (Glycine max) revealed that soybean experienced whole-genome duplications 59 million and 13 million years ago, and it has an octoploid-like genome in spite of its diploid nature. We analyzed a natural green-cotyledon mutant line, Tenshin-daiseitou. The physiological analysis revealed that Tenshin-daiseitou shows a non-functional stay-green phenotype in senescent leaves, which is similar to that of the mutant of Mendel's green-cotyledon gene I, the ortholog of SGR in pea. The identification of gene mutations and genetic segregation analysis suggested that defects in GmSGR1 and GmSGR2 were responsible for the green-cotyledon/stay-green phenotype of Tenshin-daiseitou, which was confirmed by RNA interference (RNAi) transgenic soybean experiments using GmSGR genes. The characterized green-cotyledon double mutant d1d2 was found to have the same mutations, suggesting that GmSGR1 and GmSGR2 are D1 and D2. Among the examined d1d2 strains, the d1d2 strain K144a showed a lower Chl a/b ratio in mature seeds than other strains but not in senescent leaves, suggesting a seed-specific genetic factor of the Chl composition in K144a. Analysis of the soybean genome sequence revealed four genomic regions with microsynteny to the Arabidopsis SGR1 region, which included the GmSGR1 and GmSGR2 regions. The other two regions contained GmSGR3a/GmSGR3b and GmSGR4, respectively, which might be pseudogenes or genes with a function that is unrelated to Chl degradation during seed maturation and leaf senescence. These GmSGR genes were thought to be produced by the two whole-genome duplications, and they provide a good example of such whole-genome duplication events in the evolution of the soybean genome.

  9. The first exon duplication mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A tool for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Simmons, Tabatha R; Rutherford, Andrea M; Findlay, Andrew R; Yurkoski, Jacqueline A; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Exon duplication mutations account for up to 11% of all cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and a duplication of exon 2 is the most common duplication in patients. For use as a platform for testing of duplication-specific therapies, we developed a mouse model that carries a Dmd exon 2 duplication. By using homologous recombination we duplicated exon 2 within intron 2 at a location consistent with a human duplication hotspot. mRNA analysis confirms the inclusion of a duplicated exon 2 in mouse muscle. Dystrophin expression is essentially absent by immunofluorescent and immunoblot analysis, although some muscle specimens show very low-level trace dystrophin expression. Phenotypically, the mouse shows similarities to mdx, the standard laboratory model of DMD. In skeletal muscle, areas of necrosis and phagocytosis are seen at 3 weeks, with central nucleation prominent by four weeks, recapitulating the "crisis" period in mdx. Marked diaphragm fibrosis is noted by 6 months, and remains unchanged at 12 months. Our results show that the Dup2 mouse is both pathologically (in degree and distribution) and physiologically similar to mdx. As it recapitulates the most common single exon duplication found in DMD patients, this new model will be a useful tool to assess the potential of duplicated exon skipping.

  10. Targeted tandem duplication of a large chromosomal segment in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tadashi; Sato, Atsushi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Hanya, Yoshiki; Oguma, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    We describe here the first successful construction of a targeted tandem duplication of a large chromosomal segment in Aspergillus oryzae. The targeted tandem chromosomal duplication was achieved by using strains that had a 5'-deleted pyrG upstream of the region targeted for tandem chromosomal duplication and a 3'-deleted pyrG downstream of the target region. Consequently,strains bearing a 210-kb targeted tandem chromosomal duplication near the centromeric region of chromosome 8 and strains bearing a targeted tandem chromosomal duplication of a 700-kb region of chromosome 2 were successfully constructed. The strains bearing the tandem chromosomal duplication were efficiently obtained from the regenerated protoplast of the parental strains. However, the generation of the chromosomal duplication did not depend on the introduction of double-stranded breaks(DSBs) by I-SceI. The chromosomal duplications of these strains were stably maintained after five generations of culture under nonselective conditions. The strains bearing the tandem chromosomal duplication in the 700-kb region of chromosome 2 showed highly increased protease activity in solid-state culture, indicating that the duplication of large chromosomal segments could be a useful new breeding technology and gene analysis method.

  11. Drosophila duplication hotspots are associated with late-replicating regions of the genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Cardoso-Moreira

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Duplications play a significant role in both extremes of the phenotypic spectrum of newly arising mutations: they can have severe deleterious effects (e.g. duplications underlie a variety of diseases but can also be highly advantageous. The phenotypic potential of newly arisen duplications has stimulated wide interest in both the mutational and selective processes shaping these variants in the genome. Here we take advantage of the Drosophila simulans-Drosophila melanogaster genetic system to further our understanding of both processes. Regarding mutational processes, the study of two closely related species allows investigation of the potential existence of shared duplication hotspots, and the similarities and differences between the two genomes can be used to dissect its underlying causes. Regarding selection, the difference in the effective population size between the two species can be leveraged to ask questions about the strength of selection acting on different classes of duplications. In this study, we conducted a survey of duplication polymorphisms in 14 different lines of D. simulans using tiling microarrays and combined it with an analogous survey for the D. melanogaster genome. By integrating the two datasets, we identified duplication hotspots conserved between the two species. However, unlike the duplication hotspots identified in mammalian genomes, Drosophila duplication hotspots are not associated with sequences of high sequence identity capable of mediating non-allelic homologous recombination. Instead, Drosophila duplication hotspots are associated with late-replicating regions of the genome, suggesting a link between DNA replication and duplication rates. We also found evidence supporting a higher effectiveness of selection on duplications in D. simulans than in D. melanogaster. This is also true for duplications segregating at high frequency, where we find evidence in D. simulans that a sizeable fraction of these mutations is

  12. A survey of innovation through duplication in the reduced genomes of twelve parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D DeBarry

    Full Text Available We characterize the prevalence, distribution, divergence, and putative functions of detectable two-copy paralogs and segmental duplications in the Apicomplexa, a phylum of parasitic protists. Apicomplexans are mostly obligate intracellular parasites responsible for human and animal diseases (e.g. malaria and toxoplasmosis. Gene loss is a major force in the phylum. Genomes are small and protein-encoding gene repertoires are reduced. Despite this genomic streamlining, duplications and gene family amplifications are present. The potential for innovation introduced by duplications is of particular interest. We compared genomes of twelve apicomplexans across four lineages and used orthology and genome cartography to map distributions of duplications against genome architectures. Segmental duplications appear limited to five species. Where present, they correspond to regions enriched for multi-copy and species-specific genes, pointing toward roles in adaptation and innovation. We found a phylum-wide association of duplications with dynamic chromosome regions and syntenic breakpoints. Trends in the distribution of duplicated genes indicate that recent, species-specific duplicates are often tandem while most others have been dispersed by genome rearrangements. These trends show a relationship between genome architecture and gene duplication. Functional analysis reveals: proteases, which are vital to a parasitic lifecycle, to be prominent in putative recent duplications; a pair of paralogous genes in Toxoplasma gondii previously shown to produce the rate-limiting step in dopamine synthesis in mammalian cells, a possible link to the modification of host behavior; and phylum-wide differences in expression and subcellular localization, indicative of modes of divergence. We have uncovered trends in multiple modes of duplicate divergence including sequence, intron content, expression, subcellular localization, and functions of putative recent duplicates that

  13. The discovery of Foxl2 paralogs in chondrichthyan, coelacanth and tetrapod genomes reveals an ancient duplication in vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldo, M T; Valente, G T; Braz, A SK; Martins, C

    2013-01-01

    The Foxl2 (forkhead box L2) gene is an important member of the forkhead domain family, primarily responsible for the development of ovaries during female sex differentiation. The evolutionary studies conducted previously considered the presence of paralog Foxl2 copies only in teleosts. However, to search for possible paralog copies in other groups of vertebrates and ensure that all predicted copies were homolog to the Foxl2 gene, a broad evolutionary analysis was performed, based on the forkhead domain family. A total of 2464 sequences for the forkhead domain were recovered, and subsequently, 64 representative sequences for Foxl2 were used in the evolutionary analysis of this gene. The most important contribution of this study was the discovery of a new subgroup of Foxl2 copies (ortholog to Foxl2B) present in the chondrichthyan Callorhinchus milii, in the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae, in the avian Taeniopygia guttata and in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica. This new scenario indicates a gene duplication event in an ancestor of gnathostomes. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the syntenic regions of both Foxl2 copies, the duplication event was not exclusive to Foxl2. Moreover, the duplicated copy distribution was shown to be complex across vertebrates, especially in tetrapods, and the results strongly support a loss of this copy in eutherian species. Finally, the scenario observed in this study suggests an update for Foxl2 gene nomenclature, extending the actual suggested teleost naming of Foxl2A and Foxl2B to all vertebrate sequences and contributing to the establishment of a new evolutionary context for the Foxl2 gene. PMID:23549337

  14. The discovery of Foxl2 paralogs in chondrichthyan, coelacanth and tetrapod genomes reveals an ancient duplication in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldo, M T; Valente, G T; Braz, A S K; Martins, C

    2013-07-01

    The Foxl2 (forkhead box L2) gene is an important member of the forkhead domain family, primarily responsible for the development of ovaries during female sex differentiation. The evolutionary studies conducted previously considered the presence of paralog Foxl2 copies only in teleosts. However, to search for possible paralog copies in other groups of vertebrates and ensure that all predicted copies were homolog to the Foxl2 gene, a broad evolutionary analysis was performed, based on the forkhead domain family. A total of 2464 sequences for the forkhead domain were recovered, and subsequently, 64 representative sequences for Foxl2 were used in the evolutionary analysis of this gene. The most important contribution of this study was the discovery of a new subgroup of Foxl2 copies (ortholog to Foxl2B) present in the chondrichthyan Callorhinchus milii, in the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae, in the avian Taeniopygia guttata and in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica. This new scenario indicates a gene duplication event in an ancestor of gnathostomes. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the syntenic regions of both Foxl2 copies, the duplication event was not exclusive to Foxl2. Moreover, the duplicated copy distribution was shown to be complex across vertebrates, especially in tetrapods, and the results strongly support a loss of this copy in eutherian species. Finally, the scenario observed in this study suggests an update for Foxl2 gene nomenclature, extending the actual suggested teleost naming of Foxl2A and Foxl2B to all vertebrate sequences and contributing to the establishment of a new evolutionary context for the Foxl2 gene.

  15. Matrix Gla protein and osteocalcin: from gene duplication to neofunctionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela, M Leonor; Laizé, Vincent; Conceição, Natércia

    2014-11-01

    Osteocalcin (OC or bone Gla protein, BGP) and matrix Gla protein (MGP) are two members of the growing family of vitamin K-dependent (VKD) proteins. They were the first VKD proteins found not to be involved in coagulation and synthesized outside the liver. Both proteins were isolated from bone although it is now known that only OC is synthesized by bone cells under normal physiological conditions, but since both proteins can bind calcium and hydroxyapatite, they can also accumulate in bone. Both OC and MGP share similar structural features, both in terms of protein domains and gene organization. OC gene is likely to have appeared from MGP through a tandem gene duplication that occurred concomitantly with the appearance of the bony vertebrates. Despite their relatively close relationship and the fact that both can bind calcium and affect mineralization, their functions are not redundant and they also have other unrelated functions. Interestingly, these two proteins appear to have followed quite different evolutionary strategies in order to acquire novel functionalities, with OC following a gene duplication strategy while MGP variability was obtained mostly by the use of multiple promoters and alternative splicing, leading to proteins with additional functional characteristics and alternative gene regulatory pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid diagnosis of aneuploidy using segmental duplication quantitative fluorescent PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangdong Kong

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was use a simple and rapid procedure, called segmental duplication quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (SD-QF-PCR, for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies. This method is based on the co-amplification of segmental duplications located on two different chromosomes using a single pair of fluorescent primers. The PCR products of different sizes were subsequently analyzed through capillary electrophoresis, and the aneuploidies were determined based on the relative dosage between the two chromosomes. Each primer set, containing five pairs of primers, was designed to simultaneously detect aneuploidies located on chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X and Y in a single reaction. We applied these two primer sets to DNA samples isolated from individuals with trisomy 21 (n = 36; trisomy 18 (n = 6; trisomy 13 (n = 4; 45, X (n = 5; 47, XXX (n = 3; 48, XXYY (n = 2; and unaffected controls (n = 40. We evaluated the performance of this method using the karyotyping results. A correct and unambiguous diagnosis with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity, was achieved for clinical samples examined. Thus, the present study demonstrates that SD-QF-PCR is a robust, rapid and sensitive method for the diagnosis of common aneuploidies, and these analyses can be performed in less than 4 hours for a single sample, providing a competitive alternative for routine use.

  17. On the Approximability of Comparing Genomes with Duplicates

    CERN Document Server

    Angibaud, Sébastien; Rusu, Irena; Thevenin, Annelyse; Vialette, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    A central problem in comparative genomics consists in computing a (dis-)similarity measure between two genomes, e.g. in order to construct a phylogeny. All the existing measures are defined on genomes without duplicates. However, we know that genes can be duplicated within the same genome. One possible approach to overcome this difficulty is to establish a one-to-one correspondence (i.e. a matching) between genes of both genomes, where the correspondence is chosen in order to optimize the studied measure. In this paper, we are interested in three measures (number of breakpoints, number of common intervals and number of conserved intervals) and three models of matching (exemplar, intermediate and maximum matching models). We prove that, for each model and each measure M, computing a matching between two genomes that optimizes M is APX-hard. We also study the complexity of the following problem: is there an exemplarization (resp. an intermediate/maximum matching) that induces no breakpoint? We prove the problem...

  18. Inhibiting translation elongation can aid genome duplication in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myka, Kamila K; Hawkins, Michelle; Syeda, Aisha H; Gupta, Milind K; Meharg, Caroline; Dillingham, Mark S; Savery, Nigel J; Lloyd, Robert G; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-12-11

    Conflicts between replication and transcription challenge chromosome duplication. Escherichia coli replisome movement along transcribed DNA is promoted by Rep and UvrD accessory helicases with Δrep ΔuvrD cells being inviable under rapid growth conditions. We have discovered that mutations in a tRNA gene, aspT, in an aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, AspRS, and in a translation factor needed for efficient proline-proline bond formation, EF-P, suppress Δrep ΔuvrD lethality. Thus replication-transcription conflicts can be alleviated by the partial sacrifice of a mechanism that reduces replicative barriers, namely translating ribosomes that reduce RNA polymerase backtracking. Suppression depends on RelA-directed synthesis of (p)ppGpp, a signalling molecule that reduces replication-transcription conflicts, with RelA activation requiring ribosomal pausing. Levels of (p)ppGpp in these suppressors also correlate inversely with the need for Rho activity, an RNA translocase that can bind to emerging transcripts and displace transcription complexes. These data illustrate the fine balance between different mechanisms in facilitating gene expression and genome duplication and demonstrate that accessory helicases are a major determinant of this balance. This balance is also critical for other aspects of bacterial survival: the mutations identified here increase persistence indicating that similar mutations could arise in naturally occurring bacterial populations facing antibiotic challenge.

  19. Hox gene duplications correlate with posterior heteronomy in scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant P; Schwager, Evelyn E; Extavour, Cassandra G; Wheeler, Ward C

    2014-10-07

    The evolutionary success of the largest animal phylum, Arthropoda, has been attributed to tagmatization, the coordinated evolution of adjacent metameres to form morphologically and functionally distinct segmental regions called tagmata. Specification of regional identity is regulated by the Hox genes, of which 10 are inferred to be present in the ancestor of arthropods. With six different posterior segmental identities divided into two tagmata, the bauplan of scorpions is the most heteronomous within Chelicerata. Expression domains of the anterior eight Hox genes are conserved in previously surveyed chelicerates, but it is unknown how Hox genes regionalize the three tagmata of scorpions. Here, we show that the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus has two paralogues of all Hox genes except Hox3, suggesting cluster and/or whole genome duplication in this arachnid order. Embryonic anterior expression domain boundaries of each of the last four pairs of Hox genes (two paralogues each of Antp, Ubx, abd-A and Abd-B) are unique and distinguish segmental groups, such as pectines, book lungs and the characteristic tail, while maintaining spatial collinearity. These distinct expression domains suggest neofunctionalization of Hox gene paralogues subsequent to duplication. Our data reconcile previous understanding of Hox gene function across arthropods with the extreme heteronomy of scorpions.

  20. Gastric Duplication: A Rare Cause of Recurrent Vomiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduri, Brahmananda; Yost, Christina; Goodman, Michael H.; Hoelzer, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Vomiting is a physical finding that can occur at any age but presents the greatest challenge when it is recurrent in a child. The etiology is varied (Sieunarine and Manmohansingh, 1989; Suzuki, 1982), and recurrent vomiting can be a symptom of life threatening medical or surgical emergencies. Early recognition is mandatory for preventing delay in management and potential complications. Gastric duplication is rare and mostly diagnosed in infancy with only a few cases documented in the medical literature presenting in childhood. We present a three-year-old Vietnamese female with recurrent vomiting. Obstruction and sepsis were ruled out as a cause of the recurrent vomiting by history and appropriate tests. Persistent vomiting and paucity of air on the plain abdominal films provided a clue to the diagnosis. A CT scan of the abdomen with contrast revealed a uniformly thin walled fluid attenuation mass in the epigastric region which did not opacify with contrast. An abdominal ultrasound confirmed gastric duplication cyst and the patient was taken to the operating room for excision of the cyst.

  1. Molecular analysis of two patients with a duplicated 17p11.2 indicates that this entity may be the reciprocal of the deletion seen in Smith-Magenis syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, A.; Schwartz, C.; Rogers, R.C. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    J.M. and H.G. are two unrelated patients that presented at an early age with developmental delay and failure to thrive. Clinical features specific to J.M. include unusual facies, global developmental delay, and clinodactyly of the fifth toe. A cytogenetic analysis of H.G. was performed on amniocytes obtained due to a low MSAFP conducted as part of a routine screening. In both J.M. and H.G., a duplication of chromosome 17p11.2 was discovered. The extent of the duplicated region was determined using single copy DNA probes: cen-D17S58-D17S29-D17S258-D17S71-D17S445-tel. All of the markers were found to be duplicated by dosage analysis except for D17S58. FISH analysis of H.G., using the Smith-Magenis diagnostic probe obtained from ONCOR, also detected a duplication in 17p11.2. The chromosome containing the duplication could be the result of unequal crossing over due to a misalignment of the two chromosomes during meiosis I. It has been shown that the markers deleted in Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) patients are the same as those markers duplicated in J.M. and H.G. Therefore, the chromosomal duplication in 17p11.2 observed in these two patients could be the reciprocal of the chromosomal deletion seen in Smith-Magenis syndrome patients. Interestingly, a similar reciprocal duplication/deletion event is observed for CMT1A and HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies) just distal to the SMS region.

  2. Nested radiations and the pulse of angiosperm diversification: increased diversification rates often follow whole genome duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, David C; Eastman, Jonathan M; Pennell, Matthew W; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Hinchliff, Cody E; Brown, Joseph W; Sessa, Emily B; Harmon, Luke J

    2015-07-01

    Our growing understanding of the plant tree of life provides a novel opportunity to uncover the major drivers of angiosperm diversity. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny, we characterized hot and cold spots of lineage diversification across the angiosperm tree of life by modeling evolutionary diversification using stepwise AIC (MEDUSA). We also tested the whole-genome duplication (WGD) radiation lag-time model, which postulates that increases in diversification tend to lag behind established WGD events. Diversification rates have been incredibly heterogeneous throughout the evolutionary history of angiosperms and reveal a pattern of 'nested radiations' - increases in net diversification nested within other radiations. This pattern in turn generates a negative relationship between clade age and diversity across both families and orders. We suggest that stochastically changing diversification rates across the phylogeny explain these patterns. Finally, we demonstrate significant statistical support for the WGD radiation lag-time model. Across angiosperms, nested shifts in diversification led to an overall increasing rate of net diversification and declining relative extinction rates through time. These diversification shifts are only rarely perfectly associated with WGD events, but commonly follow them after a lag period. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Whole-genome duplications spurred the functional diversification of the globin gene superfamily in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C; Storz, Jay F

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that two successive rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) in the stem lineage of vertebrates provided genetic raw materials for the evolutionary innovation of many vertebrate-specific features. However, it has seldom been possible to trace such innovations to specific functional differences between paralogous gene products that derive from a WGD event. Here, we report genomic evidence for a direct link between WGD and key physiological innovations in the vertebrate oxygen transport system. Specifically, we demonstrate that key globin proteins that evolved specialized functions in different aspects of oxidative metabolism (hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytoglobin) represent paralogous products of two WGD events in the vertebrate common ancestor. Analysis of conserved macrosynteny between the genomes of vertebrates and amphioxus (subphylum Cephalochordata) revealed that homologous chromosomal segments defined by myoglobin + globin-E, cytoglobin, and the α-globin gene cluster each descend from the same linkage group in the reconstructed proto-karyotype of the chordate common ancestor. The physiological division of labor between the oxygen transport function of hemoglobin and the oxygen storage function of myoglobin played a pivotal role in the evolution of aerobic energy metabolism, supporting the hypothesis that WGDs helped fuel key innovations in vertebrate evolution.

  4. Interlocus gene conversion explains at least 2.7% of single nucleotide variants in human segmental duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Beth L

    2015-06-16

    Interlocus gene conversion (IGC) is a recombination-based mechanism that results in the unidirectional transfer of short stretches of sequence between paralogous loci. Although IGC is a well-established mechanism of human disease, the extent to which this mutagenic process has shaped overall patterns of segregating variation in multi-copy regions of the human genome remains unknown. One expected manifestation of IGC in population genomic data is the presence of one-to-one paralogous SNPs that segregate identical alleles. Here, I use SNP genotype calls from the low-coverage phase 3 release of the 1000 Genomes Project to identify 15,790 parallel, shared SNPs in duplicated regions of the human genome. My approach for identifying these sites accounts for the potential redundancy of short read mapping in multi-copy genomic regions, thereby effectively eliminating false positive SNP calls arising from paralogous sequence variation. I demonstrate that independent mutation events to identical nucleotides at paralogous sites are not a significant source of shared polymorphisms in the human genome, consistent with the interpretation that these sites are the outcome of historical IGC events. These putative signals of IGC are enriched in genomic contexts previously associated with non-allelic homologous recombination, including clear signals in gene families that form tandem intra-chromosomal clusters. Taken together, my analyses implicate IGC, not point mutation, as the mechanism generating at least 2.7% of single nucleotide variants in duplicated regions of the human genome.

  5. Colonic duplication in adults: Report of two cases presenting with rectal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C Fotiadis; M Genetzakis; I Papandreou; EP Misiakos; E Agapitos; GC Zografos

    2005-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplication is an uncommon congenital abnormality in two-thirds of cases manifesting before the age of 2 years. Ileal duplication is common while colonic duplication, either cystic or tubular, is a rather unusual clinical entity that remains asymptomatic and undiagnosed in most cases. Mostly occurring in pediatric patients,colonic duplication is encountered in adults only in a few cases. This study reports two cases of colonic duplication in adults. Both cases presented with rectal bleeding on admission. The study was focused on clinical, imaging,histological, and therapeutical aspects of the presenting cases. Gastrografin enema established the diagnosis in both cases. The cystic structure and the adjacent part of the colon were excised en-block. The study implies that colonic duplication, though uncommon, should be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal bleeding.

  6. Prevalence and origin of De Novo duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: First report of a De Novo duplication with a maternal origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, I.P.; Nash, J.; Gordon, M.J.; Nicholson, G.A. [Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Sporadic cases of CMT have been described since the earliest reports of the disease. The most frequent form of the disorder, CMT1A, is associated with a 1.5-Mb DNA duplication on chromosome 17p11.2, which segregates with the disease. In order to investigate the prevalence of de novo CMT1A duplications, this study examined 118 duplication-positive CMT1A families. In 10 of these families it was demonstrated that the disease had arisen as the result of a de novo mutation. By taking into account the ascertainment of families, it can be estimated that {>=}10% of autosomal dominant CMT1 families are due to de novo duplications. The CMT1A duplication is thought to be the product of unequal crossing over between parental chromosome 17 homologues during meiosis. Polymorphic markers from within the duplicated region were used to determine the parental origin of these de novo duplications in eight informative families. Seven were of paternal and one of maternal origin. This study represents the first report of a de novo duplication with a maternal origin and indicates that it is not a phenomenon associated solely with male meioses. Recombination fractions for the region duplicated in CMT1A are larger in females than in males. That suggests that oogenesis may be afforded greater protection from misalignment during synapsis, and/or that there may be lower activity of those factors or mechanisms that lead to unequal crossing over at the CMT1A locus. 41 refs., 2 figs.

  7. An Improved Approach to perform Crawling and avoid Duplicate Web Pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Khurana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available When a web search is performed it includes many duplicate web pages or the websites. It means we can get number of similar pages at different web servers. We are proposing a Web Crawling Approach to Detect and avoid Duplicate or Near Duplicate WebPages. In this proposed work we are presenting a keyword Prioritization based approach to identify the web page over the web. As such pages will beidentified it will optimize the web search.

  8. Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Congenital Disease Often Misdiagnosed in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Falleti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal duplication is a rare congenital disease which affected more commonly the ileum, while the stomach is rarely involved. Generally diagnosed in paediatric or young age, it could be difficult to suspect a gastrointestinal duplication in adults. Herein, we report a 55-year-old male with a gastric duplication cyst found on routinely checkup for chronic hepatitis and first misdiagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST; we also discuss its embryology.

  9. Adaptive evolution of genes duplicated from the Drosophila pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Richard P; Hilldorfer, Benedict B; Koch, Jessica L; Lockton, Steven; Schaeffer, Stephen W

    2010-08-01

    Drosophila X chromosomes are disproportionate sources of duplicated genes, and these duplications are usually the result of retrotransposition of X-linked genes to the autosomes. The excess duplication is thought to be driven by natural selection for two reasons: X chromosomes are inactivated during spermatogenesis, and the derived copies of retroposed duplications tend to be testis expressed. Therefore, autosomal derived copies of retroposed genes provide a mechanism for their X-linked paralogs to "escape" X inactivation. Once these duplications have fixed, they may then be selected for male-specific functions. Throughout the evolution of the Drosophila genus, autosomes have fused with X chromosomes along multiple lineages giving rise to neo-X chromosomes. There has also been excess duplication from the two independent neo-X chromosomes that have been examined--one that occurred prior to the common ancestor of the willistoni species group and another that occurred along the lineage leading to Drosophila pseudoobscura. To determine what role natural selection plays in the evolution of genes duplicated from the D. pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome, we analyzed DNA sequence divergence between paralogs, polymorphism within each copy, and the expression profiles of these duplicated genes. We found that the derived copies of all duplicated genes have elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism, suggesting that they are under relaxed selective constraints. The derived copies also tend to have testis- or male-biased expression profiles regardless of their chromosome of origin. Genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome appear to be under less constraints than those duplicated from other chromosome arms. We also find more evidence for historical adaptive evolution in genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome, suggesting that they are under a unique selection regime in which elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism provides a large reservoir of functional variants, some of which are fixed

  10. Unusual duplicate bladder exstrophy in a female newborn: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouali, Ourdia; Mouttalib, Sofia; Abbo, Olivier; Lemasson, Frédérique; Moscovici, Jacques; Galinier, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    The authors report a rare variant of exstrophy-epispadias complex, a duplicate bladder with normal bladder communicating with an exstrophic bladder by a fistula, in a girl with no genital malformation except for a duplicated clitoris. This variant could be a hybrid form of duplicate bladder exstrophy and superior vesical fistula. It seems easier to repair and has a better prognosis than classic bladder exstrophy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Colonic duplication in an adult who presented with chronic constipation attributed to hypothyroidism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tihomir Kekez; Goran Augustin; Irena Hrstic; Dubravko Smud; Mate Majerovic; Zeljko Jelincic; Emil Kinda

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplications are an uncommon congenital abnormality that manifest before the age of two in 80% of cases. Heal duplication is the most common while colonic duplication, either cystic or tubular, occurs in 10%-15% of cases and remains asymptomatic and undiagnosed in most cases. Mostly occurring in pediatric patients, colonic duplication is encountered in adults in only a few cases. The most common clinical manifestations are abdominal pain and intestinal obstruction. Rarely, duplications present with signs of acute abdomen or acute bleeding. This study reports a case of colonic duplication in an adult who presented with chronic constipation. Complete diagnostic workup was made on several occasions during the previous eight year period, but no pathology was found and chronic constipation was attributed to hypothyroidism caused by long standing Hashimoto thyroiditis. Multislice CT, performed because of abdominal distension, defined colonic pathology but the definite diagnosis of duplication of the transversal colon was made at operation. The cystic duplication and the adjacent part of the ascending and transversal colon were excised en-block. This study implies that colonic duplication, though uncommon, should be included in the differential diagnosis of chronic constipation even when precipitating factors for constipation, such as hypothyroidism are present.

  12. The ethics of scholarly publishing: exploring differences in plagiarism and duplicate publication across nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kathleen A

    2014-04-01

    This study explored national differences in plagiarism and duplicate publication in retracted biomedical literature. The national affiliations of authors and reasons for retraction of papers accessible through PubMed that were published from 2008 to 2012 and subsequently retracted were determined in order to identify countries with the largest numbers and highest rates of retraction due to plagiarism and duplicate publication. Authors from more than fifty countries retracted papers. While the United States retracted the most papers, China retracted the most papers for plagiarism and duplicate publication. Rates of plagiarism and duplicate publication were highest in Italy and Finland, respectively. Unethical publishing practices cut across nations.

  13. The ethics of scholarly publishing: exploring differences in plagiarism and duplicate publication across nations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored national differences in plagiarism and duplicate publication in retracted biomedical literature. The national affiliations of authors and reasons for retraction of papers accessible through PubMed that were published from 2008 to 2012 and subsequently retracted were determined in order to identify countries with the largest numbers and highest rates of retraction due to plagiarism and duplicate publication. Authors from more than fifty countries retracted papers. While the United States retracted the most papers, China retracted the most papers for plagiarism and duplicate publication. Rates of plagiarism and duplicate publication were highest in Italy and Finland, respectively. Unethical publishing practices cut across nations. PMID:24860263

  14. Error analysis of filtering operations in pixel-duplicated images of diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; McLauchlan, Lifford

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, diabetic retinopathy is chosen for a sample target image to demonstrate the effectiveness of image enlargement through pixel duplication in identifying regions of interest. Pixel duplication is presented as a simpler alternative to data interpolation techniques for detecting small structures in the images. A comparative analysis is performed on different image processing schemes applied to both original and pixel-duplicated images. Structures of interest are detected and and classification parameters optimized for minimum false positive detection in the original and enlarged retinal pictures. The error analysis demonstrates the advantages as well as shortcomings of pixel duplication in image enhancement when spatial averaging operations (smoothing filters) are also applied.

  15. Mucinous cystadenoma arising in a completely isolated infected ileal duplication cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaud, Stéphane; Bayerl, Christian; Wille, Georg; Zehnder, Adrian; Grieder, Felix; Meili, Severin; Decurtins, Marco

    2012-03-29

    Gastrointestinal duplications are uncommon congenital lesions that can occur anywhere along the alimentary tract, and the symptoms of which generally develop during infancy or childhood. Completely isolated duplication cysts are an extremely rare variant of duplication, where no communication between the cyst and the adjacent bowel segment is present. We report the unique case of an adult who presented with right lower abdominal pain and systemic signs of inflammation caused by infection of a completely isolated ileal duplication cyst. Histological examination of the cyst additionally revealed a low-grade mucinous cystadenoma. We discuss the clinical presentations, diagnosis and treatment of this rare entity.

  16. Cdc14 phosphatase directs centrosome re-duplication at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition in budding yeast [version 2; referees: 3 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette Fox

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Gametes are generated through a specialized cell division called meiosis, in which ploidy is reduced by half because two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation, meiosis I and meiosis II, occur without intervening DNA replication. This contrasts with the mitotic cell cycle where DNA replication and chromosome segregation alternate to maintain the same ploidy. At the end of mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs are inactivated. This low CDK state in late mitosis/G1 allows for critical preparatory events for DNA replication and centrosome/spindle pole body (SPB duplication. However, their execution is inhibited until S phase, where further preparatory events are also prevented. This “licensing” ensures that both the chromosomes and the centrosomes/SPBs replicate exactly once per cell cycle, thereby maintaining constant ploidy. Crucially, between meiosis I and meiosis II, centrosomes/SPBs must be re-licensed, but DNA re-replication must be avoided. In budding yeast, the Cdc14 protein phosphatase triggers CDK down regulation to promote exit from mitosis. Cdc14 also regulates the meiosis I to meiosis II transition, though its mode of action has remained unclear. Methods Fluorescence and electron microscopy was combined with proteomics to probe SPB duplication in cells with inactive or hyperactive Cdc14. Results We demonstrate that Cdc14 ensures two successive nuclear divisions by re-licensing SPBs at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition. We show that Cdc14 is asymmetrically enriched on a single SPB during anaphase I and provide evidence that this enrichment promotes SPB re-duplication. Cells with impaired Cdc14 activity fail to promote extension of the SPB half-bridge, the initial step in morphogenesis of a new SPB. Conversely, cells with hyper-active Cdc14 duplicate SPBs, but fail to induce their separation. Conclusion Our findings implicate reversal of key CDK-dependent phosphorylations in the differential licensing of

  17. Iron dialyzability from hospital duplicate meals: daily intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Reynold, Carlos; Navarro-Alarcon, Miguel; Lopez-Ga de la Serrana, Herminia; Perez-Valero, Vidal; Lopez-Martinez, María C

    2009-09-01

    Both total and dialyzable iron levels and corresponding dialyzability were determined in 108 duplicate meals during 36 consecutive days. Total mean iron fraction of 5.90 +/- 4.97 mg was found in the meals. The iron supplied by the meals is directly and significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with macromicronutrient content (carbohydrates, fiber, and protein). The mean iron dialyzability (4.81 +/- 3.25%) was low and not significantly different among the three primary meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner). Significant interactions of several minerals on iron levels were found (p < 0.05). Iron dialyzability was only statistically influenced by zinc dialyzability in meals (p < 0.05). The dialyzed iron fraction present in meals was significantly correlated with protein and ascorbic acid levels (p < 0.01). The mean iron daily dietary intake was 17.7 +/- 6.91 mg. The hospital meals provided enough iron. Foods of animal origin are primary sources of iron in diet.

  18. An optimal scheduling algorithm based on task duplication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruan Youlin; Liu Gan; Zhu Guangxi; Lu Xiaofeng

    2005-01-01

    When the communication time is relatively shorter than the computation time for every task, the task duplication based scheduling (TDS) algorithm proposed by Darbha and Agrawal generates an optimal schedule. Park and Choe also proposed an extended TDS algorithm whose optimality condition is less restricted than that of TDS algorithm, but the condition is very complex and is difficult to satisfy when the number of tasks is large. An efficient algorithm is proposed whose optimality condition is less restricted and simpler than both of the algorithms, and the schedule length is also shorter than both of the algorithms. The time complexity of the proposed algorithm is O ( v2 ), where v represents the number of tasks.

  19. Chromosome duplication in Brachiaria (A. Rich. Stapf allows intraspecific crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Simioni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachiaria decumbens cv. Basilisk is the single most important forage grass used for pastures in the tropics.Breeding to produce improved cultivars has been impossible until now due to the lack of compatible sexual ecotypes. Thispaper reports the success of somatic chromosome duplication of sexually reproducing diploid plants of B. decumbens and ofa diploid hybrid between B. decumbens and B. brizantha, which should allow intraspecific crosses with natural apomictictetraploid accessions of either species. Polyploidization was induced in explants cultured in vitro on a medium supplementedwith colchicine at 0.01% for 48 hours, transferred to the same medium without colchicine until shoot regeneration occurred.Five sexual tetraploid plants (3.9% of plants recovered were obtained. Crosses with apomictic cultivars recovered 14 seeds.The novel sexual tetraploids generated were unique and represented a major breakthrough in breeding B. decumbens toobtain superior hybrids.

  20. The structural color of red rose petals and their duplicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lin; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Mingzhu; Zheng, Yongmei; Shen, Weizhi; Jiang, Lei

    2010-09-21

    The observation of the surface of a red rose petal indicates that there are micropapillae on the surface and many nanofolders exist on each papilla. Here, much tinier nanorods with periodic pattern on the nanofolders can be seen by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Angle-resolved UV-vis spectral measurement and reflectance UV-vis spectra by immersion red rose petal in solvents with different refractive indices demonstrate that such periodic nanostructures can induce structural color. The combination of structural color, driven by the nanostructures, and chemical color, driven by pigments, provide flowers bright color and special functions for human and animals' visual system. Biomimic polymer films, that fabricated by duplicating the petal's hierarchical micro/nano structures, exhibit only structural color by UV-vis spectra since there is no pigment introduced.

  1. Region Duplication Forgery Detection Technique Based on SURF and HAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Region duplication forgery detection is a special type of forgery detection approach and widely used research topic under digital image forensics. In copy move forgery, a specific area is copied and then pasted into any other region of the image. Due to the availability of sophisticated image processing tools, it becomes very hard to detect forgery with naked eyes. From the forged region of an image no visual clues are often detected. For making the tampering more robust, various transformations like scaling, rotation, illumination changes, JPEG compression, noise addition, gamma correction, and blurring are applied. So there is a need for a method which performs efficiently in the presence of all such attacks. This paper presents a detection method based on speeded up robust features (SURF and hierarchical agglomerative clustering (HAC. SURF detects the keypoints and their corresponding features. From these sets of keypoints, grouping is performed on the matched keypoints by HAC that shows copied and pasted regions.

  2. Delusional misidentifications and duplications: right brain lesions, left brain delusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinsky, Orrin

    2009-01-01

    When the delusional misidentification syndromes reduplicative paramnesia and Capgras syndromes result from neurologic disease, lesions are usually bifrontal and/or right hemispheric. The related disorders of confabulation and anosognosis share overlapping mechanisms and anatomic pathology. A dual mechanism is postulated for the delusional misidentification syndromes: negative effects from right hemisphere and frontal lobe dysfunction as well as positive effects from release (i.e., overactivity) of preserved left hemisphere areas. Negative effects of right hemisphere injury impair self-monitoring, ego boundaries, and attaching emotional valence and familiarity to stimuli. The unchecked left hemisphere unleashes a creative narrator from the monitoring of self, memory, and reality by the frontal and right hemisphere areas, leading to excessive and false explanations. Further, the left hemisphere's cognitive style of categorization, often into dual categories, leads it to invent a duplicate or impostor to resolve conflicting information. Delusions result from right hemisphere lesions. But it is the left hemisphere that is deluded.

  3. Duplication of the dystroglycan gene in most branches of teleost fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giardina Bruno

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dystroglycan (DG complex is a major non-integrin cell adhesion system whose multiple biological roles involve, among others, skeletal muscle stability, embryonic development and synapse maturation. DG is composed of two subunits: α-DG, extracellular and highly glycosylated, and the transmembrane β-DG, linking the cytoskeleton to the surrounding basement membrane in a wide variety of tissues. A single copy of the DG gene (DAG1 has been identified so far in humans and other mammals, encoding for a precursor protein which is post-translationally cleaved to liberate the two DG subunits. Similarly, D. rerio (zebrafish seems to have a single copy of DAG1, whose removal was shown to cause a severe dystrophic phenotype in adult animals, although it is known that during evolution, due to a whole genome duplication (WGD event, many teleost fish acquired multiple copies of several genes (paralogues. Results Data mining of pufferfish (T. nigroviridis and T. rubripes and other teleost fish (O. latipes and G. aculeatus available nucleotide sequences revealed the presence of two functional paralogous DG sequences. RT-PCR analysis proved that both the DG sequences are transcribed in T. nigroviridis. One of the two DG sequences harbours an additional mini-intronic sequence, 137 bp long, interrupting the uncomplicated exon-intron-exon pattern displayed by DAG1 in mammals and D. rerio. A similar scenario emerged also in D. labrax (sea bass, from whose genome we have cloned and sequenced a new DG sequence that also harbours a shorter additional intronic sequence of 116 bp. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of DG protein products in all the species analysed including two teleost Antarctic species (T. bernacchii and C. hamatus. Conclusion Our evolutionary analysis has shown that the whole-genome duplication event in the Class Actinopterygii (ray-finned fish involved also DAG1. We unravelled new important molecular genetic details

  4. Gene duplications in prokaryotes can be associated with environmental adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lempicki Richard A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication is a normal evolutionary process. If there is no selective advantage in keeping the duplicated gene, it is usually reduced to a pseudogene and disappears from the genome. However, some paralogs are retained. These gene products are likely to be beneficial to the organism, e.g. in adaptation to new environmental conditions. The aim of our analysis is to investigate the properties of paralog-forming genes in prokaryotes, and to analyse the role of these retained paralogs by relating gene properties to life style of the corresponding prokaryotes. Results Paralogs were identified in a number of prokaryotes, and these paralogs were compared to singletons of persistent orthologs based on functional classification. This showed that the paralogs were associated with for example energy production, cell motility, ion transport, and defence mechanisms. A statistical overrepresentation analysis of gene and protein annotations was based on paralogs of the 200 prokaryotes with the highest fraction of paralog-forming genes. Biclustering of overrepresented gene ontology terms versus species was used to identify clusters of properties associated with clusters of species. The clusters were classified using similarity scores on properties and species to identify interesting clusters, and a subset of clusters were analysed by comparison to literature data. This analysis showed that paralogs often are associated with properties that are important for survival and proliferation of the specific organisms. This includes processes like ion transport, locomotion, chemotaxis and photosynthesis. However, the analysis also showed that the gene ontology terms sometimes were too general, imprecise or even misleading for automatic analysis. Conclusions Properties described by gene ontology terms identified in the overrepresentation analysis are often consistent with individual prokaryote lifestyles and are likely to give a competitive

  5. 20-Mb duplication of chromosome 9p in a girl with minimal physical findings and normal IQ: narrowing of the 9p duplication critical region to 6 Mb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaglia, Maria Clara; Giorda, Roberto; Carrozzo, Romeo; Roncoroni, Maria Elena; Grasso, Rita; Borgatti, Renato; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2002-10-01

    We studied the case of a girl with a partial 9p duplication, dup(9)(p22.1 --> p13.1). Molecular cytogenetics studies defined the chromosome 9 rearrangement as a direct duplication of 20 Mb from D9S1213 to D9S52. Microsatellite analysis demonstrated the presence of a double dosage of the paternal alleles and demonstrated that the duplication occurred between sister chromatids. The patient's phenotype was almost normal, with a few minor anomalies (dolichocephaly, crowded teeth, high arched palate) and normal IQ. The breakpoint's location in this patient and previously reported cases suggest that the critical region for the 9p duplication syndrome lies within a 6-Mb portion of chromosome 9p22 between markers D9S267 and D9S1213.

  6. Buffering by gene duplicates: an analysis of molecular correlates and evolutionary conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel Christine

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One mechanism to account for robustness against gene knockouts or knockdowns is through buffering by gene duplicates, but the extent and general correlates of this process in organisms is still a matter of debate. To reveal general trends of this process, we provide a comprehensive comparison of gene essentiality, duplication and buffering by duplicates across seven bacteria (Mycoplasma genitalium, Bacillus subtilis, Helicobacter pylori, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and four eukaryotes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans (worm, Drosophila melanogaster (fly, Mus musculus (mouse. Results In nine of the eleven organisms, duplicates significantly increase chances of survival upon gene deletion (P-value ≤ 0.05, but only by up to 13%. Given that duplicates make up to 80% of eukaryotic genomes, the small contribution is surprising and points to dominant roles of other buffering processes, such as alternative metabolic pathways. The buffering capacity of duplicates appears to be independent of the degree of gene essentiality and tends to be higher for genes with high expression levels. For example, buffering capacity increases to 23% amongst highly expressed genes in E. coli. Sequence similarity and the number of duplicates per gene are weak predictors of the duplicate's buffering capacity. In a case study we show that buffering gene duplicates in yeast and worm are somewhat more similar in their functions than non-buffering duplicates and have increased transcriptional and translational activity. Conclusion In sum, the extent of gene essentiality and buffering by duplicates is not conserved across organisms and does not correlate with the organisms' apparent complexity. This heterogeneity goes beyond what would be expected from differences in experimental approaches alone. Buffering by duplicates contributes to robustness in several organisms

  7. The opsin repertoire of Jenynsia onca: a new perspective on gene duplication and divergence in livebearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owens Gregory L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jenynsia onca, commonly known as the one sided livebearer, is a member of the family Anablepidae. The opsin gene repertoires of J. onca's close relatives, the four-eyed fish (Anableps anableps and the guppy (Poecilia reticulata, have been characterized and each found to include one unique LWS opsin. Currently, the relationship among LWS paralogs and orthologs in these species are unclear, making it difficult to test the hypotheses that link vision to morphology or life history traits. The phylogenetic signal appears to have been disrupted by gene conversion. Here we have sequenced the opsin genes of J. onca in order to resolve these relationships. Findings We identified nine visual opsins; LWS S180r, LWS S180, LWS P180, SWS1, SWS2A, SWS2B, RH1, RH2-1, and RH2-2. Key site analysis revealed only one unique haplotype, RH2-2, although this is unlikely to shift λmax significantly. LWS P180 was found to be a product of a gene conversion event with LWS S180, followed by convergence to a proline residue at the 180 site. Conclusion Jenynsia onca has at least 9 visual opsins: three LWS, one RH1, two RH2, one SWS1 and two SWS2. The presence of LWS P180 moves the location of the LWS P180-S180 tandem duplication event back to the base of the Poeciliidae-Anablepidae clade, expanding the number of species possessing this unusual blue shifted LWS opsin. The presence of the LWS P180 gene also confirms that gene conversion events have homogenized opsin paralogs in fish, just as they have in humans.

  8. Duplication of CYP2D6 predicts high clearance of desipramine but high clearance does not predict duplication of CYP2D6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, T K; Bathum, L; Brøsen, Kim

    2001-01-01

    a duplicated allele. The question is whether gene duplication is a relatively rare cause (perhaps predictor) of very rapid metabolism or whether a low metabolic ratio is a poor predictor of this. METHODS: After measuring metabolic ratios anew, we selected six volunteers with duplication of CYP2D6 and metabolic...... ratios ranging from 0.07 to 0.17 and six volunteers without duplication with metabolic ratios ranging from 0.08 to 0.21. Each subject took 100 mg of desipramine. Blood and urine were collected for 48 h. RESULTS: The median total oral clearance of desipramine was 372 l/h and 196 l/h [median difference 108...... l/h (95.9% c.i., -304-598 l/h)] and the median partial clearance of desipramine by 2-hydroxylation was 155 l/h and 87 l/h [median difference 47 l/h (95.9% c.i., -124-141 l/h)] for the group with duplication and the group without duplication, respectively. CONCLUSION: The predictive value...

  9. Duplicated leptin receptors in two species of eel bring new insights into the evolution of the leptin system in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morini, Marina; Pasquier, Jérémy; Dirks, Ron; van den Thillart, Guido; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Rousseau, Karine; Dufour, Sylvie; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery in mammals as a key-hormone in reproduction and metabolism, leptin has been identified in an increasing number of tetrapods and teleosts. Tetrapods possess only one leptin gene, while most teleosts possess two leptin genes, as a result of the teleost third whole genome duplication event (3R). Leptin acts through a specific receptor (LEPR). In the European and Japanese eels, we identified two leptin genes, and for the first time in vertebrates, two LEPR genes. Synteny analyses indicated that eel LEPRa and LEPRb result from teleost 3R. LEPRb seems to have been lost in the teleost lineage shortly after the elopomorph divergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed a wide distribution of leptins and LEPRs in the European eel, including tissues involved in metabolism and reproduction. Noticeably, leptin1 was expressed in fat tissue, while leptin2 in the liver, reflecting subfunctionalization. Four-month fasting had no impact on the expression of leptins and LEPRs in control European eels. This might be related to the remarkable adaptation of silver eel metabolism to long-term fasting throughout the reproductive oceanic migration. In contrast, sexual maturation induced differential increases in the expression of leptins and LEPRs in the BPG-liver axis. Leptin2 was strikingly upregulated in the liver, the central organ of the reproductive metabolic challenge in teleosts. LEPRs were differentially regulated during sexual maturation, which may have contributed to the conservation of the duplicated LEPRs in this species. This suggests an ancient and positive role of the leptin system in the vertebrate reproductive function. This study brings new insights on the evolutionary history of the leptin system in vertebrates. Among extant vertebrates, the eel represents a unique case of duplicated leptins and leptin receptors as a result of 3R.

  10. Duplicated leptin receptors in two species of eel bring new insights into the evolution of the leptin system in vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Morini

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in mammals as a key-hormone in reproduction and metabolism, leptin has been identified in an increasing number of tetrapods and teleosts. Tetrapods possess only one leptin gene, while most teleosts possess two leptin genes, as a result of the teleost third whole genome duplication event (3R. Leptin acts through a specific receptor (LEPR. In the European and Japanese eels, we identified two leptin genes, and for the first time in vertebrates, two LEPR genes. Synteny analyses indicated that eel LEPRa and LEPRb result from teleost 3R. LEPRb seems to have been lost in the teleost lineage shortly after the elopomorph divergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed a wide distribution of leptins and LEPRs in the European eel, including tissues involved in metabolism and reproduction. Noticeably, leptin1 was expressed in fat tissue, while leptin2 in the liver, reflecting subfunctionalization. Four-month fasting had no impact on the expression of leptins and LEPRs in control European eels. This might be related to the remarkable adaptation of silver eel metabolism to long-term fasting throughout the reproductive oceanic migration. In contrast, sexual maturation induced differential increases in the expression of leptins and LEPRs in the BPG-liver axis. Leptin2 was strikingly upregulated in the liver, the central organ of the reproductive metabolic challenge in teleosts. LEPRs were differentially regulated during sexual maturation, which may have contributed to the conservation of the duplicated LEPRs in this species. This suggests an ancient and positive role of the leptin system in the vertebrate reproductive function. This study brings new insights on the evolutionary history of the leptin system in vertebrates. Among extant vertebrates, the eel represents a unique case of duplicated leptins and leptin receptors as a result of 3R.

  11. Duplicated Leptin Receptors in Two Species of Eel Bring New Insights into the Evolution of the Leptin System in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morini, Marina; Pasquier, Jérémy; Dirks, Ron; van den Thillart, Guido; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Rousseau, Karine; Dufour, Sylvie; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery in mammals as a key-hormone in reproduction and metabolism, leptin has been identified in an increasing number of tetrapods and teleosts. Tetrapods possess only one leptin gene, while most teleosts possess two leptin genes, as a result of the teleost third whole genome duplication event (3R). Leptin acts through a specific receptor (LEPR). In the European and Japanese eels, we identified two leptin genes, and for the first time in vertebrates, two LEPR genes. Synteny analyses indicated that eel LEPRa and LEPRb result from teleost 3R. LEPRb seems to have been lost in the teleost lineage shortly after the elopomorph divergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed a wide distribution of leptins and LEPRs in the European eel, including tissues involved in metabolism and reproduction. Noticeably, leptin1 was expressed in fat tissue, while leptin2 in the liver, reflecting subfunctionalization. Four-month fasting had no impact on the expression of leptins and LEPRs in control European eels. This might be related to the remarkable adaptation of silver eel metabolism to long-term fasting throughout the reproductive oceanic migration. In contrast, sexual maturation induced differential increases in the expression of leptins and LEPRs in the BPG-liver axis. Leptin2 was strikingly upregulated in the liver, the central organ of the reproductive metabolic challenge in teleosts. LEPRs were differentially regulated during sexual maturation, which may have contributed to the conservation of the duplicated LEPRs in this species. This suggests an ancient and positive role of the leptin system in the vertebrate reproductive function. This study brings new insights on the evolutionary history of the leptin system in vertebrates. Among extant vertebrates, the eel represents a unique case of duplicated leptins and leptin receptors as a result of 3R. PMID:25946034

  12. An ancient history of gene duplications, fusions and losses in the evolution of APOBEC3 mutators in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Münk Carsten

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The APOBEC3 (A3 genes play a key role in innate antiviral defense in mammals by introducing directed mutations in the DNA. The human genome encodes for seven A3 genes, with multiple splice alternatives. Different A3 proteins display different substrate specificity, but the very basic question on how discerning self from non-self still remains unresolved. Further, the expression of A3 activity/ies shapes the way both viral and host genomes evolve. Results We present here a detailed temporal analysis of the origin and expansion of the A3 repertoire in mammals. Our data support an evolutionary scenario where the genome of the mammalian ancestor encoded for at least one ancestral A3 gene, and where the genome of the ancestor of placental mammals (and possibly of the ancestor of all mammals already encoded for an A3Z1-A3Z2-A3Z3 arrangement. Duplication events of the A3 genes have occurred independently in different lineages: humans, cats and horses. In all of them, gene duplication has resulted in changes in enzyme activity and/or substrate specificity, in a paradigmatic example of convergent adaptive evolution at the genomic level. Finally, our results show that evolutionary rates for the three A3Z1, A3Z2 and A3Z3 motifs have significantly decreased in the last 100 Mya. The analysis constitutes a textbook example of the evolution of a gene locus by duplication and sub/neofunctionalization in the context of virus-host arms race. Conclusions Our results provide a time framework for identifying ancestral and derived genomic arrangements in the APOBEC loci, and to date the expansion of this gene family for different lineages through time, as a response to changes in viral/retroviral/retrotransposon pressure.

  13. Duplication and Diversification of the Hypoxia-Inducible IGFBP-1 Gene in Zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamei, Hiroyasu; Lu, Ling; Jiao, Shuang

    2008-01-01

    Background: Gene duplication is the primary force of new gene evolution. Deciphering whether a pair of duplicated genes has evolved divergent functions is often challenging. The zebrafish is uniquely positioned to provide insight into the process of functional gene evolution due to its amenabilit...

  14. Small Homologous Blocks in Phytophthora Genomes Do Not Point to an Ancient Whole-Genome Duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, van J.J.E.; Snel, B.; Seidl, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    Genomes of the plant-pathogenic genus Phytophthora are characterized by small duplicated blocks consisting of two consecutive genes (2HOM blocks) and by an elevated abundance of similarly aged gene duplicates. Both properties, in particular the presence of 2HOM blocks, have been attributed to a whol

  15. Small homologous blocks in phytophthora genomes do not oint to an ancient whole-genome duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hooff, Jolien J E; Snel, Berend; Seidl, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Genomes of the plant-pathogenic genus Phytophthora are characterized by small duplicated blocks consisting of two consecutive genes (2HOM blocks) as well as by an elevated abundance of similarly aged gene duplicates. Both properties, in particular the presences of 2HOM blocks, have been attributed t

  16. Interstitial duplications of chromosome region 15q11q13 : Clinical and molecular characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repetto, GR; White, LM; Bader, PJ; Johnson, D; Knoll, JHM

    1998-01-01

    Duplications of chromosome region 15q11q13 often occur as a supernumerary chromosome 15. Less frequently they occur as interstitial duplications [dup(15)]. We describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of three patients with de novo dup(15). The patients, two males and one female (ages 3-21

  17. Divergence of Recently Duplicated Mg-Type MADS-Box Genes in Petunia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, M.; Gordon, J.; Weterings, K.; Angenent, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    The MADS-box transcription factor family has expanded considerably in plants via gene and genome duplications and can be subdivided into type I and MIKC-type genes. The two gene classes show a different evolutionary history. Whereas the MIKC-type genes originated during ancient genome duplications,

  18. Risk of Psychiatric Disorders Among Individuals With the 22q11.2 Deletion or Duplication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeffding, Louise K; Trabjerg, Betina B; Olsen, Line;

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Microdeletions and duplications have been described at the 22q11.2 locus. However, little is known about the clinical and epidemiologic consequences at the population level. Objective: To identify indicators of deletions or duplications at the 22q11.2 locus and estimate the incidence ...

  19. Appendix duplication in association with persistent cloaca and type 2 pouch colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boleken ME

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of the vermiform appendix is extremely rare, and it may be associated with gastrointestinal and genito-urinary anomalies in childhood. Presented herein is a case of association of appendix duplication, pouch colon, and persistent cloaca. Pathogenesis of this association is discussed.

  20. Duplicate publications and related problems in published papers on oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, A; Moran, C M P; Bezuhly, M; Hong, P

    2015-07-01

    As duplicate publication is unethical, our aim was to find out how common it is among published papers on oral and maxillofacial surgery. We used PubMed to identify index articles published in 2010 in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and the European Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, and searched for possible duplicate publications from 2008 to 2012 using the first or second and last authors' names. Suspected duplicates were categorised into "non-duplicate" (no overlap), "duplicate" (identical results and conclusions), or "salami-sliced" publications (part of the index article repeated or continued). Of the 589 index articles, 17 (3%) had some form of duplication, but specifically, we found 3 duplicate, and 15 salami-sliced publications. Most redundant articles originated from China (n=4), followed by Italy, Japan, and Germany (3 from each) and the United States and Denmark (2 each). Of the 18 redundant publications, 9 did not reference the related index article. Duplicate material is still being published, and salami-slicing is relatively common among publications on oral and maxillofacial surgery. Further research is required into the extent and impact of this finding.

  1. 43 CFR 46.440 - Eliminating duplication with State and local procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eliminating duplication with State and... IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT OF 1969 Environmental Impact Statements § 46.440 Eliminating duplication with State and local procedures. A bureau must incorporate in its...

  2. 7 CFR 3430.36 - Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort. 3430.36 Section 3430.36 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued...: Application Review and Evaluation § 3430.36 Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort....

  3. Novel duplication pattern of the mitochondrial control region in Cantor's Giant softshell turtle Pelochelys cantorii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Cheng; Li, Wei; Zhao, Jian; Chen, Hai-Gang; Zhu, Xin-Ping

    2016-11-15

    Cantor's Giant Softshell Turtle, Pelochelys cantorii has become one of the most critically endangered species in the world. When comparative analyses of the P. cantorii complete mitochondrial genome sequences were conducted, we discovered a duplication of a segment of the control region in the mitochondrial genome of P. cantorii. The duplication is characterized by two copies of conserved sequence box 2 (CSB2) and CSB3 in a single control region. In contrast to previous reports of duplications involving the control regions of other animals, this particular pattern of duplications appears to be unique to P. cantorii. Copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 show many of the conserved sequence features typically found in mitochondrial control regions, and rare differences were found between the paralogous copies. Using the primer design principle of simple sequence repeats (SSR) and the reference sequence of the duplicated CSBs, specific primers were designed to amplify the duplicated CSBs. These primers were validated among different individuals and populations of P. cantorii. This unique duplication structure suggests the two copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 may have arisen through occasional tandem duplication and subsequent concerted evolution.

  4. 26 CFR 1.362-4 - Limitations on built-in loss duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations on built-in loss duplication. 1.362-4 Section 1.362-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... duplication. (a) Purpose and scope—(1) In general. (2) Intercompany transactions. For rules relating to...

  5. 40 CFR 1506.2 - Elimination of duplication with State and local procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elimination of duplication with State... OTHER REQUIREMENTS OF NEPA § 1506.2 Elimination of duplication with State and local procedures. (a... 102(2)(D) of the Act may do so. (b) Agencies shall cooperate with State and local agencies to...

  6. 10 CFR 9.39 - Search and duplication provided without charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Search and duplication provided without charge. 9.39 Section 9.39 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Regulations § 9.39 Search and duplication provided without charge. (a) The NRC will search for agency...

  7. Doublet Production in the Development of Medieval and Modern Spanish: New Approaches to Phonolexical Duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Darren W.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation offers new approaches to an old and well-known problem in the study of the development of Romance varieties: duplicate lexis or doublets. Traditional analyses of duplication are narrow in scope both in what qualifies as a doublet (the popular/learned opposition has dominated, to the exclusion of other pairs) and in channels of…

  8. Evolution of vertebrate central nervous system is accompanied by novel expression changes of duplicate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Ding, Yun; Zhang, Zuming; Wang, Wen; Chen, Jun-Yuan; Ueno, Naoto; Mao, Bingyu

    2011-12-20

    The evolution of the central nervous system (CNS) is one of the most striking changes during the transition from invertebrates to vertebrates. As a major source of genetic novelties, gene duplication might play an important role in the functional innovation of vertebrate CNS. In this study, we focused on a group of CNS-biased genes that duplicated during early vertebrate evolution. We investigated the tempo-spatial expression patterns of 33 duplicate gene families and their orthologs during the embryonic development of the vertebrate Xenopus laevis and the cephalochordate Brachiostoma belcheri. Almost all the identified duplicate genes are differentially expressed in the CNS in Xenopus embryos, and more than 50% and 30% duplicate genes are expressed in the telencephalon and mid-hindbrain boundary, respectively, which are mostly considered as two innovations in the vertebrate CNS. Interestingly, more than 50% of the amphioxus orthologs do not show apparent expression in the CNS in amphioxus embryos as detected by in situ hybridization, indicating that some of the vertebrate CNS-biased duplicate genes might arise from non-CNS genes in invertebrates. Our data accentuate the functional contribution of gene duplication in the CNS evolution of vertebrate and uncover an invertebrate non-CNS history for some vertebrate CNS-biased duplicate genes. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Interstitial duplications of chromosome region 15q11q13 : Clinical and molecular characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repetto, GR; White, LM; Bader, PJ; Johnson, D; Knoll, JHM

    1998-01-01

    Duplications of chromosome region 15q11q13 often occur as a supernumerary chromosome 15. Less frequently they occur as interstitial duplications [dup(15)]. We describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of three patients with de novo dup(15). The patients, two males and one female (ages 3-21

  10. Doublet Production in the Development of Medieval and Modern Spanish: New Approaches to Phonolexical Duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Darren W.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation offers new approaches to an old and well-known problem in the study of the development of Romance varieties: duplicate lexis or doublets. Traditional analyses of duplication are narrow in scope both in what qualifies as a doublet (the popular/learned opposition has dominated, to the exclusion of other pairs) and in channels of…

  11. Case of a congenital urethral duplication being unmasked following circumcision for balanitis xerotica obliterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Matthew; Woodward, Mark; Lambert, Anthony

    2010-07-01

    We present the case of an 11-year-old boy diagnosed with an Effmann Type II A1 urethral duplication after routine circumcision for balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO). We discuss the pathophysiology, investigation and management both of BXO and urethral duplication.

  12. Form of 15q proximal duplication appears to be a normal euchromatic variant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalal, S.M.; Persons, D.L.; DeWald, G.W.; Lindor, N.M.

    1994-10-01

    Deletions involving often leads to either Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome, depending on the hereditary path of the deletion (paternal or maternal). A number of cases have been reported in which duplications involving 15q11.2-q13 have not been associated with any detectable phenotypic abnormalities. Ludowese et al. (1991) have summarized 25 such cases that include 10 of their own cases from 5 unrelated families. They conclude that duplication of 15q12-13 does not have an adverse phenotypic effect, though they do not completely rule out the possibility that, instead of 15q12-13 duplication, the extra material could be an insertion from another chromosome. Thus, the dilemma is when duplication of 15q11.2-q13 is clinically significant. We suggest that certain kinds of amplification or duplication involving distal 15q12 and 15q13 may represent a normal variant. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Prenatal Diagnosis of 17p13.1p13.3 Duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Kiiski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here the first prenatal diagnosis of 17p13.1p13.3 duplication. 17p13.3 duplication has recently been defined as a new distinctive syndrome with several diagnosed patients. In the current case prenatal chromosome analysis (G-banding performed on cultured amniocytes revealed additional material in chromosome 19p. This was further defined as a chromosome 17p13.1p13.3 duplication by FISH and genomic microarray analysis (GMA. In addition Prenatal BACs-on-Beads (PN_BoBs assay was performed, which detected the duplication clearly. This enables rapid prenatal diagnosis of the duplication for this family in the future.

  14. Distinct Defects in Spine Formation or Pruning in Two Gene Duplication Mouse Models of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Li, Huiping; Takumi, Toru; Qiu, Zilong; Xu, Xiu; Yu, Xiang; Bian, Wen-Jie

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) encompasses a complex set of developmental neurological disorders, characterized by deficits in social communication and excessive repetitive behaviors. In recent years, ASD is increasingly being considered as a disease of the synapse. One main type of genetic aberration leading to ASD is gene duplication, and several mouse models have been generated mimicking these mutations. Here, we studied the effects of MECP2 duplication and human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication on synaptic development and neural circuit wiring in the mouse sensory cortices. We showed that mice carrying MECP2 duplication had specific defects in spine pruning, while the 15q11-13 duplication mouse model had impaired spine formation. Our results demonstrate that spine pathology varies significantly between autism models and that distinct aspects of neural circuit development may be targeted in different ASD mutations. Our results further underscore the importance of gene dosage in normal development and function of the brain.

  15. Interstitial duplication of proximal 22q: Phenotypic overlap with cat eye syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, J.H.M.; Asamoah, A.; Wagstaff, J. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-16

    We describe a child with downslanting palpebral fissures, preauricular malfunctions, congenital heart defect (total anomalous pulmonary venous return), unilateral absence of a kidney, and developmental delay with an apparent interstitial duplication of proximal 22q. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed duplication of the IGLC locus, and C-banding of the duplicated region was negative. The duplication appears to involve 22q11.2-q12. Although the child has neither colobomas nor microphthalmia, he shows phenotypic overlap with with the cat eye syndrome, which is caused by a supernumerary bisatellited chromosome arising from inverted duplication of the short arm and proximal long arm of chromosome 22. Further molecular studies of this patient should help to define the regions responsible for the manifestations of cat eye syndrome. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A partial MECP2 duplication in a mildly affected adult male: a putative role for the 3' untranslated region in the MECP2 duplication phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanchard Neil A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplications of the X-linked MECP2 gene are associated with moderate to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, and neuropsychiatric illness in males, while triplications are associated with a more severe phenotype. Most carrier females show complete skewing of X-inactivation in peripheral blood and an apparent susceptibility to specific personality traits or neuropsychiatric symptoms. Methods We describe the clinical phenotype of a pedigree segregating a duplication of MECP2 found on clinical array comparative genomic hybridization. The position, size, and extent of the duplication were delineated in peripheral blood samples from affected individuals using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and fluorescence in situ hybridization, as well as targeted high-resolution oligonucleotide microarray analysis and long-range PCR. The molecular consequences of the rearrangement were studied in lymphoblast cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR, reverse transcriptase PCR, and western blot analysis. Results We observed a partial MECP2 duplication in an adult male with epilepsy and mild neurocognitive impairment who was able to function independently; this phenotype has not previously been reported among males harboring gains in MECP2 copy number. The same duplication was inherited by this individual’s daughter who was also affected with neurocognitive impairment and epilepsy and carried an additional copy-number variant. The duplicated segment involved all four exons of MECP2, but excluded almost the entire 3' untranslated region (UTR, and the genomic rearrangement resulted in a MECP2-TEX28 fusion gene mRNA transcript. Increased expression of MECP2 and the resulting fusion gene were both confirmed; however, western blot analysis of lysates from lymphoblast cells demonstrated increased MeCP2 protein without evidence of a stable fusion gene protein product. Conclusion The observations of a mildly affected adult male

  17. Chromosomal duplications and cointegrates generated by the bacteriophage lamdba Red system in Escherichia coli K-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadkarni Ashwini

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An Escherichia coli strain in which RecBCD has been genetically replaced by the bacteriophage λ Red system engages in efficient recombination between its chromosome and linear double-stranded DNA species sharing sequences with the chromosome. Previous studies of this experimental system have focused on a gene replacement-type event, in which a 3.5 kbp dsDNA consisting of the cat gene and flanking lac operon sequences recombines with the E. coli chromosome to generate a chloramphenicol-resistant Lac- recombinant. The dsDNA was delivered into the cell as part of the chromosome of a non-replicating λ vector, from which it was released by the action of a restriction endonuclease in the infected cell. This study characterizes the genetic requirements and outcomes of a variety of additional Red-promoted homologous recombination events producing Lac+ recombinants. Results A number of observations concerning recombination events between the chromosome and linear DNAs were made: (1 Formation of Lac+ and Lac- recombinants depended upon the same recombination functions. (2 High multiplicity and high chromosome copy number favored Lac+ recombinant formation. (3 The Lac+ recombinants were unstable, segregating Lac- progeny. (4 A tetracycline-resistance marker in a site of the phage chromosome distant from cat was not frequently co-inherited with cat. (5 Recombination between phage sequences in the linear DNA and cryptic prophages in the chromosome was responsible for most of the observed Lac+ recombinants. In addition, observations were made concerning recombination events between the chromosome and circular DNAs: (6 Formation of recombinants depended upon both RecA and, to a lesser extent, Red. (7 The linked tetracycline-resistance marker was frequently co-inherited in this case. Conclusions The Lac+ recombinants arise from events in which homologous recombination between the incoming linear DNA and both lac and cryptic prophage

  18. A role for gene duplication and natural variation of gene expression in the evolution of metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kliebenstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most eukaryotic genomes have undergone whole genome duplications during their evolutionary history. Recent studies have shown that the function of these duplicated genes can diverge from the ancestral gene via neo- or sub-functionalization within single genotypes. An additional possibility is that gene duplicates may also undergo partitioning of function among different genotypes of a species leading to genetic differentiation. Finally, the ability of gene duplicates to diverge may be limited by their biological function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test these hypotheses, I estimated the impact of gene duplication and metabolic function upon intraspecific gene expression variation of segmental and tandem duplicated genes within Arabidopsis thaliana. In all instances, the younger tandem duplicated genes showed higher intraspecific gene expression variation than the average Arabidopsis gene. Surprisingly, the older segmental duplicates also showed evidence of elevated intraspecific gene expression variation albeit typically lower than for the tandem duplicates. The specific biological function of the gene as defined by metabolic pathway also modulated the level of intraspecific gene expression variation. The major energy metabolism and biosynthetic pathways showed decreased variation, suggesting that they are constrained in their ability to accumulate gene expression variation. In contrast, a major herbivory defense pathway showed significantly elevated intraspecific variation suggesting that it may be under pressure to maintain and/or generate diversity in response to fluctuating insect herbivory pressures. CONCLUSION: These data show that intraspecific variation in gene expression is facilitated by an interaction of gene duplication and biological activity. Further, this plays a role in controlling diversity of plant metabolism.

  19. Conservation of the abscission signaling peptide IDA during Angiosperm evolution: withstanding genome duplications and gain and loss of the receptors HAE/HSL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida M. Stø

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The peptide INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA, which signals through the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases HAESA (HAE and HAESA-LIKE2 (HSL2, controls different cell separation events in Arabidopsis thaliana. We hypothesize the involvement of this signaling module in abscission processes in other plant species even though they may shed other organs than A. thaliana. As the first step towards testing this hypothesis from an evolutionarily perspective we have identified genes encoding putative orthologues of IDA and its receptors by BLAST searches of publically available protein, nucleotide and genome databases for angiosperms. Genes encoding IDA or IDA-LIKE (IDL peptides and HSL proteins were found in all investigated species, which were selected as to represent each angiosperm order with available genomic sequences. The 12 amino acids representing the bioactive peptide in A. thaliana have virtually been unchanged throughout the evolution of the angiosperms; however, the number of IDL and HSL genes varies between different orders and species. The phylogenetic analyses suggest that IDA, HSL2 and the related HSL1 gene, were present in the species that gave rise to the angiosperms. HAE has arisen from HSL1 after a genome duplication that took place after the monocot - eudicots split. HSL1 has also independently been duplicated in the monocots, while HSL2 has been lost in gingers (Zingiberales and grasses (Poales. IDA has been duplicated in eudicots to give rise to functionally divergent IDL peptides. We postulate that the high number of IDL homologs present in the core eudicots is a result of multiple whole genome duplications. We substantiate the involvement of IDA and HAE/HSL2 homologs in abscission by providing gene expression data of different organ separation events from various species.

  20. Balanced gene losses, duplications and intensive rearrangements led to an unusual regularly sized genome in Arbutus unedo chloroplasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Martínez-Alberola

    Full Text Available Completely sequenced plastomes provide a valuable source of information about the duplication, loss, and transfer events of chloroplast genes and phylogenetic data for resolving relationships among major groups of plants. Moreover, they can also be useful for exploiting chloroplast genetic engineering technology. Ericales account for approximately six per cent of eudicot diversity with 11,545 species from which only three complete plastome sequences are currently available. With the aim of increasing the number of ericalean complete plastome sequences, and to open new perspectives in understanding Mediterranean plant adaptations, a genomic study on the basis of the complete chloroplast genome sequencing of Arbutus unedo and an updated phylogenomic analysis of Asteridae was implemented. The chloroplast genome of A. unedo shows extensive rearrangements but a medium size (150,897 nt in comparison to most of angiosperms. A number of remarkable distinct features characterize the plastome of A. unedo: five-fold dismissing of the SSC region in relation to most angiosperms; complete loss or pseudogenization of a number of essential genes; duplication of the ndhH-D operon and its location within the two IRs; presence of large tandem repeats located near highly re-arranged regions and pseudogenes. All these features outline the primary evolutionary split between Ericaceae and other ericalean families. The newly sequenced plastome of A. unedo with the available asterid sequences allowed the resolution of some uncertainties in previous phylogenies of Asteridae.

  1. Posterior Nutcracker Syndrome with Left Renal Vein Duplication: A Rare Cause of Haematuria in a 12-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Preza Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutcracker syndrome (NCS is a rare cause of haematuria. It embraces an extended nonpathognomonic spectrum of symptoms that imply a difficult diagnosis. Ultimately it may be associated with substantial morbidity and even life-threatening events. We report a rare cause if a 12-year-old boy who presented with a history of frequent intermittent episodes of painless constant haematuria. The cystoscopy showed a bloody urine ejaculate from the left ureter meatus. The Doppler ultrasonography showed turbulent pattern of venous blood flow of the posterior renal vein branch behind the aorta. The abdominopelvic computer tomography (apCT revealed left renal vein (LRV duplication with a dilated retroaortic branch, entrapped between the aorta and the vertebral column, promoting the renal nutcracker syndrome. The patient was initially hospitalized and managed with oral iron supplements and continuous saline bladder irrigation, not requiring additional treatment. The child is currently asymptomatic, with haemoglobin value returning to normal and therefore proposed to conservative management with close followup. The authors present a case report of episodic haematuria caused by a rare entity—posterior nutcracker syndrome with renal vein duplication.

  2. Gene duplication, loss and selection in the evolution of saxitoxin biosynthesis in alveolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Shauna A; Diwan, Rutuja; Orr, Russell J S; Kohli, Gurjeet S; John, Uwe

    2015-11-01

    A group of marine dinoflagellates (Alveolata, Eukaryota), consisting of ∼10 species of the genus Alexandrium, Gymnodinium catenatum and Pyrodinium bahamense, produce the toxin saxitoxin and its analogues (STX), which can accumulate in shellfish, leading to ecosystem and human health impacts. The genes, sxt, putatively involved in STX biosynthesis, have recently been identified, however, the evolution of these genes within dinoflagellates is not clear. There are two reasons for this: uncertainty over the phylogeny of dinoflagellates; and that the sxt genes of many species of Alexandrium and other dinoflagellate genera are not known. Here, we determined the phylogeny of STX-producing and other dinoflagellates based on a concatenated eight-gene alignment. We determined the presence, diversity and phylogeny of sxtA, domains A1 and A4 and sxtG in 52 strains of Alexandrium, and a further 43 species of dinoflagellates and thirteen other alveolates. We confirmed the presence and high sequence conservation of sxtA, domain A4, in 40 strains (35 Alexandrium, 1 Pyrodinium, 4 Gymnodinium) of 8 species of STX-producing dinoflagellates, and absence from non-producing species. We found three paralogs of sxtA, domain A1, and a widespread distribution of sxtA1 in non-STX producing dinoflagellates, indicating duplication events in the evolution of this gene. One paralog, clade 2, of sxtA1 may be particularly related to STX biosynthesis. Similarly, sxtG appears to be generally restricted to STX-producing species, while three amidinotransferase gene paralogs were found in dinoflagellates. We investigated the role of positive (diversifying) selection following duplication in sxtA1 and sxtG, and found negative selection in clades of sxtG and sxtA1, clade 2, suggesting they were functionally constrained. Significant episodic diversifying selection was found in some strains in clade 3 of sxtA1, a clade that may not be involved in STX biosynthesis, indicating pressure for diversification

  3. Resolution and reconciliation of non-binary gene trees with transfers, duplications and losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacox, Edwin; Weller, Mathias; Tannier, Eric; Scornavacca, Celine

    2017-04-01

    Gene trees reconstructed from sequence alignments contain poorly supported branches when the phylogenetic signal in the sequences is insufficient to determine them all. When a species tree is available, the signal of gains and losses of genes can be used to correctly resolve the unsupported parts of the gene history. However finding a most parsimonious binary resolution of a non-binary tree obtained by contracting the unsupported branches is NP-hard if transfer events are considered as possible gene scale events, in addition to gene origination, duplication and loss. We propose an exact, parameterized algorithm to solve this problem in single-exponential time, where the parameter is the number of connected branches of the gene tree that show low support from the sequence alignment or, equivalently, the maximum number of children of any node of the gene tree once the low-support branches have been collapsed. This improves on the best known algorithm by an exponential factor. We propose a way to choose among optimal solutions based on the available information. We show the usability of this principle on several simulated and biological datasets. The results are comparable in quality to several other tested methods having similar goals, but our approach provides a lower running time and a guarantee that the produced solution is optimal. Our algorithm has been integrated into the ecceTERA phylogeny package, available at http://mbb.univ-montp2.fr/MBB/download_sources/16__ecceTERA and which can be run online at http://mbb.univ-montp2.fr/MBB/subsection/softExec.php?soft=eccetera . celine.scornavacca@umontpellier.fr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Gene duplication and divergence affecting drug content in Cannabis sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiblen, George D; Wenger, Jonathan P; Craft, Kathleen J; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Mehmedic, Zlatko; Treiber, Erin L; Marks, M David

    2015-12-01

    Cannabis sativa is an economically important source of durable fibers, nutritious seeds, and psychoactive drugs but few economic plants are so poorly understood genetically. Marijuana and hemp were crossed to evaluate competing models of cannabinoid inheritance and to explain the predominance of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) in marijuana compared with cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) in hemp. Individuals in the resulting F2 population were assessed for differential expression of cannabinoid synthase genes and were used in linkage mapping. Genetic markers associated with divergent cannabinoid phenotypes were identified. Although phenotypic segregation and a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the THCA/CBDA ratio were consistent with a simple model of codominant alleles at a single locus, the diversity of THCA and CBDA synthase sequences observed in the mapping population, the position of enzyme coding loci on the map, and patterns of expression suggest multiple linked loci. Phylogenetic analysis further suggests a history of duplication and divergence affecting drug content. Marijuana is distinguished from hemp by a nonfunctional CBDA synthase that appears to have been positively selected to enhance psychoactivity. An unlinked QTL for cannabinoid quantity may also have played a role in the recent escalation of drug potency.

  5. Duplicate Address Detection Table in IPv6 Mobile Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisherov, Farkhod; Kim, Taihoon

    In IP networks, each computer or communication equipment needs an IP address. To supply enough IP addresses, the new Internet protocol IPv6 is used in next generatoion mobile communication. Although IPv6 improves the existing IPv4 Internet protocol, Duplicate Address Detection (DAD) mechanism may consume resources and suffer from long delay. DAD is used to ensure whether the IP address is unique or not. When a mobile node performs an inter-domain handoff, it will first generate a new IP and perform a DAD procedure. The DAD procedure not only wastes time but also increases the signaling load on Internet. In this paper, the author proposes a new DAD mechanism to speed up the DAD procedure. A DAD table is created in access or mobility routers in IP networks and record all IP addresses of the area. When a new IP address needs to perform DAD, it can just search in the DAD table to confirm the uniqueness of the address.

  6. Duplicated Collecting System in a Series of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belde KASAP

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report a series of children with duplicated collecting system (DCS and associated problems. MATERIAL and METHODS: The data of patients with DCS between 1996 and 2011 was reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: DCS was reported in 59 (M/F:18/41 patients. Mean age at diagnosis was 81.5±41.3 (3- 159 months, mean follow-up duration was 32.2±29.1 (3-130 months. Presenting symptoms were urinary tract infection in 33, nocturnal enuresis in three, diurnal enuresis in two, kidney stones in three and miscellaneous in the rest of the patients. The diagnostic modalities were magnetic resonance urography in three, voiding cystourography in fi ve and intravenous pyelography in the rest. Twentyfour (41% had right-sided, 24 (41% had left-sided and 11 (18% had bilateral DCS in a total of 70 renal units. Insertion of ureters into the bladder could be demonstrated in 33 units (20 incomplete, 13 complete. Vesicoureteral refl ux was found in 16, and ureterocele was found in four renal units. There was refl ux to both moieties in two patients. Surgical interventions included partial nephrectomy in two, ureteroureterostomy in one and anti-refl ux surgery in three of the patients. One patient had Noonan Syndrome and another had atrial septal defect. CONCLUSION: This series was reported to emphasize the clinical and anatomical problems associated with DCS.

  7. Are duplicated genes responsible for anthracnose resistance in common bean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Larissa Carvalho; Nalin, Rafael Storto; Ramalho, Magno Antonio Patto; de Souza, Elaine Aparecida

    2017-01-01

    The race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, etiologic agent of anthracnose in common bean, is distributed worldwide, having great importance in breeding programs for anthracnose resistance. Several resistance alleles have been identified promoting resistance to this race. However, the variability that has been detected within race has made it difficult to obtain cultivars with durable resistance, because cultivars may have different reactions to each strain of race 65. Thus, this work aimed at studying the resistance inheritance of common bean lines to different strains of C. lindemuthianum, race 65. We used six C. lindemuthianum strains previously characterized as belonging to the race 65 through the international set of differential cultivars of anthracnose and nine commercial cultivars, adapted to the Brazilian growing conditions and with potential ability to discriminate the variability within this race. To obtain information on the resistance inheritance related to nine commercial cultivars to six strains of race 65, these cultivars were crossed two by two in all possible combinations, resulting in 36 hybrids. Segregation in the F2 generations revealed that the resistance to each strain is conditioned by two independent genes with the same function, suggesting that they are duplicated genes, where the dominant allele promotes resistance. These results indicate that the specificity between host resistance genes and pathogen avirulence genes is not limited to races, it also occurs within strains of the same race. Further research may be carried out in order to establish if the alleles identified in these cultivars are different from those described in the literature.

  8. Horizontal Transfer, Not Duplication, Drives the Expansion of Protein Families in Prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treangen, Todd J.; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2011-01-01

    Gene duplication followed by neo- or sub-functionalization deeply impacts the evolution of protein families and is regarded as the main source of adaptive functional novelty in eukaryotes. While there is ample evidence of adaptive gene duplication in prokaryotes, it is not clear whether duplication outweighs the contribution of horizontal gene transfer in the expansion of protein families. We analyzed closely related prokaryote strains or species with small genomes (Helicobacter, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Sulfolobus), average-sized genomes (Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae), and large genomes (Pseudomonas, Bradyrhizobiaceae) to untangle the effects of duplication and horizontal transfer. After removing the effects of transposable elements and phages, we show that the vast majority of expansions of protein families are due to transfer, even among large genomes. Transferred genes—xenologs—persist longer in prokaryotic lineages possibly due to a higher/longer adaptive role. On the other hand, duplicated genes—paralogs—are expressed more, and, when persistent, they evolve slower. This suggests that gene transfer and gene duplication have very different roles in shaping the evolution of biological systems: transfer allows the acquisition of new functions and duplication leads to higher gene dosage. Accordingly, we show that paralogs share most protein–protein interactions and genetic regulators, whereas xenologs share very few of them. Prokaryotes invented most of life's biochemical diversity. Therefore, the study of the evolution of biology systems should explicitly account for the predominant role of horizontal gene transfer in the diversification of protein families. PMID:21298028

  9. Horizontal transfer, not duplication, drives the expansion of protein families in prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J Treangen

    Full Text Available Gene duplication followed by neo- or sub-functionalization deeply impacts the evolution of protein families and is regarded as the main source of adaptive functional novelty in eukaryotes. While there is ample evidence of adaptive gene duplication in prokaryotes, it is not clear whether duplication outweighs the contribution of horizontal gene transfer in the expansion of protein families. We analyzed closely related prokaryote strains or species with small genomes (Helicobacter, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Sulfolobus, average-sized genomes (Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae, and large genomes (Pseudomonas, Bradyrhizobiaceae to untangle the effects of duplication and horizontal transfer. After removing the effects of transposable elements and phages, we show that the vast majority of expansions of protein families are due to transfer, even among large genomes. Transferred genes--xenologs--persist longer in prokaryotic lineages possibly due to a higher/longer adaptive role. On the other hand, duplicated genes--paralogs--are expressed more, and, when persistent, they evolve slower. This suggests that gene transfer and gene duplication have very different roles in shaping the evolution of biological systems: transfer allows the acquisition of new functions and duplication leads to higher gene dosage. Accordingly, we show that paralogs share most protein-protein interactions and genetic regulators, whereas xenologs share very few of them. Prokaryotes invented most of life's biochemical diversity. Therefore, the study of the evolution of biology systems should explicitly account for the predominant role of horizontal gene transfer in the diversification of protein families.

  10. Patients with isolated oligo/hypodontia caused by RUNX2 duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Arnaud; Lopez-Cazaux, Serena; Pichon, Olivier; Vincent, Marie; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Caignec, Cédric

    2015-06-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of RUNX2 are responsible for cleidocranial dysplasia, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by delayed closure of cranial sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, moderate short stature and supernumerary teeth. By contrast, an increased gene dosage is expected for duplication of the entire RUNX2 sequence and thus, a phenotype different from cleidocranial dysplasia. To date, two cousins with a duplication including the entire RUNX2 sequence in addition to MIR586, CLIC5 and the 5' half of SUPT3H have been reported. These patients presented with metopic synostosis and hypodontia. Here, we report on a family with an affected mother and three affected children. The four patients carried a 285 kb duplication identified by array comparative genomic hybridization. The duplication includes the entire sequence of RUNX2 and the 5' half of SUPT3H. We confirmed the duplication by real-time quantitative PCR in the four patients. Two children presented with the association of metopic craniosynostosis and oligo/hypodontia previously described, confirming the phenotype caused by RUNX2 duplication. Interestingly, the mother and one child had isolated hypodontia without craniosynostosis, broadening the phenotype observed in patients with such duplications.

  11. Report on 3 patients with 12p duplication including GRIN2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirsier, Celine; Landais, Emilie; Bednarek, Nathalie; Nobecourt, Jean-Marie; Khoury, Maroun; Schmidt, Pascal; Morville, Patrice; Gruson, Nadine; Clomes, Sandrine; Michel, Nicole; Riot, Anita; Manjeongean, Christelle; Gaillard, Dominique; Doco-Fenzy, Martine

    2014-04-01

    The duplication of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 is a rare chromosomal abnormality, and most reported cases result from malsegregation of a balanced parental translocation associated with other chromosomal imbalances. Of the reported cases, only 15 involve a pure and complete 12p duplication and only 10 involve a pure and partial duplication overlapping the 12p12.3p13.1 region, including a single instance of an inherited duplication in two related individuals. Here, we report three new patients with a pure 12p duplication, detected by conventional cytogenetic studies and characterized by array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The first patient was a child carrying a de novo inverted duplication of the short arm of chromosome 12. His phenotype was similar to that of the "trisomy 12p syndrome", characterized by developmental delays and craniofacial abnormalities including a high forehead, a short nose with anteverted nostrils and an everted lower lip. The second and third patients were a mother and son with a direct 12p12.3p13.1 duplication, exhibiting a milder phenotype characterized by moderate developmental delays, dysmorphic facial features, behavioral problems and obesity. The present data, including the rarity of the familial cases, should contribute to our knowledge of the genotype/phenotype correlation in trisomy 12p patients.

  12. Consensus properties and their large-scale applications for the gene duplication problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jucheol; Lin, Harris T; Eulenstein, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    Solving the gene duplication problem is a classical approach for species tree inference from gene trees that are confounded by gene duplications. This problem takes a collection of gene trees and seeks a species tree that implies the minimum number of gene duplications. Wilkinson et al. posed the conjecture that the gene duplication problem satisfies the desirable Pareto property for clusters. That is, for every instance of the problem, all clusters that are commonly present in the input gene trees of this instance, called strict consensus, will also be found in every solution to this instance. We prove that this conjecture does not generally hold. Despite this negative result we show that the gene duplication problem satisfies a weaker version of the Pareto property where the strict consensus is found in at least one solution (rather than all solutions). This weaker property contributes to our design of an efficient scalable algorithm for the gene duplication problem. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm in analyzing large-scale empirical datasets. Finally, we utilize the algorithm to evaluate the accuracy of standard heuristics for the gene duplication problem using simulated datasets.

  13. Tubulin evolution in insects: gene duplication and subfunctionalization provide specialized isoforms in a functionally constrained gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadagkar Sudhindra R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completion of 19 insect genome sequencing projects spanning six insect orders provides the opportunity to investigate the evolution of important gene families, here tubulins. Tubulins are a family of eukaryotic structural genes that form microtubules, fundamental components of the cytoskeleton that mediate cell division, shape, motility, and intracellular trafficking. Previous in vivo studies in Drosophila find a stringent relationship between tubulin structure and function; small, biochemically similar changes in the major alpha 1 or testis-specific beta 2 tubulin protein render each unable to generate a motile spermtail axoneme. This has evolutionary implications, not a single non-synonymous substitution is found in beta 2 among 17 species of Drosophila and Hirtodrosophila flies spanning 60 Myr of evolution. This raises an important question, How do tubulins evolve while maintaining their function? To answer, we use molecular evolutionary analyses to characterize the evolution of insect tubulins. Results Sixty-six alpha tubulins and eighty-six beta tubulin gene copies were retrieved and subjected to molecular evolutionary analyses. Four ancient clades of alpha and beta tubulins are found in insects, a major isoform clade (alpha 1, beta 1 and three minor, tissue-specific clades (alpha 2-4, beta 2-4. Based on a Homarus americanus (lobster outgroup, these were generated through gene duplication events on major beta and alpha tubulin ancestors, followed by subfunctionalization in expression domain. Strong purifying selection acts on all tubulins, yet maximum pairwise amino acid distances between tubulin paralogs are large (0.464 substitutions/site beta tubulins, 0.707 alpha tubulins. Conversely orthologs, with the exception of reproductive tissue isoforms, show little sequence variation except in the last 15 carboxy terminus tail (CTT residues, which serve as sites for post-translational modifications (PTMs and interactions

  14. Recurrent Chromosome 16p13.1 Duplications Are a Risk Factor for Aortic Dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Merry-Lynn N.; Johnson, Ralph J.; Wang, Min; Regalado, Ellen S.; Russell, Ludivine; Cao, Jiu-Mei; Kwartler, Callie; Fraivillig, Kurt; Coselli, Joseph S.; Safi, Hazim J.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Leal, Suzanne M.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Belmont, John W.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions or reciprocal duplications of the 16p13.1 region have been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, epilepsies, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this study, we investigated the association of recurrent genomic copy number variants (CNVs) with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD). By using SNP arrays to screen and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays to validate, we identified 16p13.1 duplications in 8 out of 765 patients of European descent with adult-onset TAAD compared with 4 of 4,569 controls matched for ethnicity (P = 5.0×10−5, OR = 12.2). The findings were replicated in an independent cohort of 467 patients of European descent with TAAD (P = 0.005, OR = 14.7). Patients with 16p13.1 duplications were more likely to harbor a second rare CNV (P = 0.012) and to present with aortic dissections (P = 0.010) than patients without duplications. Duplications of 16p13.1 were identified in 2 of 130 patients with familial TAAD, but the duplications did not segregate with TAAD in the families. MYH11, a gene known to predispose to TAAD, lies in the duplicated region of 16p13.1, and increased MYH11 expression was found in aortic tissues from TAAD patients with 16p13.1 duplications compared with control aortas. These data suggest chromosome 16p13.1 duplications confer a risk for TAAD in addition to the established risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. It also indicates that recurrent CNVs may predispose to disorders involving more than one organ system, an observation critical to the understanding of the role of recurrent CNVs in human disease and a finding that may be common to other recurrent CNVs involving multiple genes. PMID:21698135

  15. Recurrent chromosome 16p13.1 duplications are a risk factor for aortic dissections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Qing Kuang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal deletions or reciprocal duplications of the 16p13.1 region have been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, epilepsies, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. In this study, we investigated the association of recurrent genomic copy number variants (CNVs with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD. By using SNP arrays to screen and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays to validate, we identified 16p13.1 duplications in 8 out of 765 patients of European descent with adult-onset TAAD compared with 4 of 4,569 controls matched for ethnicity (P = 5.0 × 10⁻⁵, OR = 12.2. The findings were replicated in an independent cohort of 467 patients of European descent with TAAD (P = 0.005, OR = 14.7. Patients with 16p13.1 duplications were more likely to harbor a second rare CNV (P = 0.012 and to present with aortic dissections (P = 0.010 than patients without duplications. Duplications of 16p13.1 were identified in 2 of 130 patients with familial TAAD, but the duplications did not segregate with TAAD in the families. MYH11, a gene known to predispose to TAAD, lies in the duplicated region of 16p13.1, and increased MYH11 expression was found in aortic tissues from TAAD patients with 16p13.1 duplications compared with control aortas. These data suggest chromosome 16p13.1 duplications confer a risk for TAAD in addition to the established risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. It also indicates that recurrent CNVs may predispose to disorders involving more than one organ system, an observation critical to the understanding of the role of recurrent CNVs in human disease and a finding that may be common to other recurrent CNVs involving multiple genes.

  16. Antisense-induced exon skipping for duplications in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ommen Gert-Jan B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently one of the most promising therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs targeting specific exons the DMD reading frame is restored and partially functional dystrophins are produced. Following proof of concept in cultured muscle cells from patients with various deletions and point mutations, we now focus on single and multiple exon duplications. These mutations are in principle ideal targets for this approach since the specific skipping of duplicated exons would generate original, full-length transcripts. Methods Cultured muscle cells from DMD patients carrying duplications were transfected with AONs targeting the duplicated exons, and the dystrophin RNA and protein were analyzed. Results For two brothers with an exon 44 duplication, skipping was, even at suboptimal transfection conditions, so efficient that both exons 44 were skipped, thus generating, once more, an out-of-frame transcript. In such cases, one may resort to multi-exon skipping to restore the reading frame, as is shown here by inducing skipping of exon 43 and both exons 44. By contrast, in cells from a patient with an exon 45 duplication we were able to induce single exon 45 skipping, which allowed restoration of wild type dystrophin. The correction of a larger duplication (involving exons 52 to 62, by combinations of AONs targeting the outer exons, appeared problematic due to inefficient skipping and mistargeting of original instead of duplicated exons. Conclusion The correction of DMD duplications by exon skipping depends on the specific exons targeted. Its options vary from the ideal one, restoring for the first time the true, wild type dystrophin, to requiring more 'classical' skipping strategies, while the correction of multi-exon deletions may need the design of tailored approaches.

  17. Tandem Duplications and the Limits of Natural Selection in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Rebekah L; Cridland, Julie M; Shao, Ling; Hu, Tina T; Andolfatto, Peter; Thornton, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Tandem duplications are an essential source of genetic novelty, and their variation in natural populations is expected to influence adaptive walks. Here, we describe evolutionary impacts of recently-derived, segregating tandem duplications in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans. We observe an excess of duplicated genes involved in defense against pathogens, insecticide resistance, chorion development, cuticular peptides, and lipases or endopeptidases associated with the accessory glands across both species. The observed agreement is greater than expectations on chance alone, suggesting large amounts of convergence across functional categories. We document evidence of widespread selection on the D. simulans X, suggesting adaptation through duplication is common on the X. Despite the evidence for positive selection, duplicates display an excess of low frequency variants consistent with largely detrimental impacts, limiting the variation that can effectively facilitate adaptation. Standing variation for tandem duplications spans less than 25% of the genome in D. yakuba and D. simulans, indicating that evolution will be strictly limited by mutation, even in organisms with large population sizes. Effective whole gene duplication rates are low at 1.17 × 10-9 per gene per generation in D. yakuba and 6.03 × 10-10 per gene per generation in D. simulans, suggesting long wait times for new mutations on the order of thousands of years for the establishment of sweeps. Hence, in cases where adaptation depends on individual tandem duplications, evolution will be severely limited by mutation. We observe low levels of parallel recruitment of the same duplicated gene in different species, suggesting that the span of standing variation will define evolutionary outcomes in spite of convergence across gene ontologies consistent with rapidly evolving phenotypes.

  18. Tandem Duplications and the Limits of Natural Selection in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah L Rogers

    Full Text Available Tandem duplications are an essential source of genetic novelty, and their variation in natural populations is expected to influence adaptive walks. Here, we describe evolutionary impacts of recently-derived, segregating tandem duplications in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans. We observe an excess of duplicated genes involved in defense against pathogens, insecticide resistance, chorion development, cuticular peptides, and lipases or endopeptidases associated with the accessory glands across both species. The observed agreement is greater than expectations on chance alone, suggesting large amounts of convergence across functional categories. We document evidence of widespread selection on the D. simulans X, suggesting adaptation through duplication is common on the X. Despite the evidence for positive selection, duplicates display an excess of low frequency variants consistent with largely detrimental impacts, limiting the variation that can effectively facilitate adaptation. Standing variation for tandem duplications spans less than 25% of the genome in D. yakuba and D. simulans, indicating that evolution will be strictly limited by mutation, even in organisms with large population sizes. Effective whole gene duplication rates are low at 1.17 × 10-9 per gene per generation in D. yakuba and 6.03 × 10-10 per gene per generation in D. simulans, suggesting long wait times for new mutations on the order of thousands of years for the establishment of sweeps. Hence, in cases where adaptation depends on individual tandem duplications, evolution will be severely limited by mutation. We observe low levels of parallel recruitment of the same duplicated gene in different species, suggesting that the span of standing variation will define evolutionary outcomes in spite of convergence across gene ontologies consistent with rapidly evolving phenotypes.

  19. Dynamics of gene duplication in the genomes of chlorophyll d-producing cyanobacteria: implications for the ecological niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott R; Wood, A Michelle; Blankenship, Robert E; Kim, Maria; Ferriera, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Gene duplication may be an important mechanism for the evolution of new functions and for the adaptive modulation of gene expression via dosage effects. Here, we analyzed the fate of gene duplicates for two strains of a novel group of cyanobacteria (genus Acaryochloris) that produces the far-red light absorbing chlorophyll d as its main photosynthetic pigment. The genomes of both strains contain an unusually high number of gene duplicates for bacteria. As has been observed for eukaryotic genomes, we find that the demography of gene duplicates can be well modeled by a birth-death process. Most duplicated Acaryochloris genes are of comparatively recent origin, are strain-specific, and tend to be located on different genetic elements. Analyses of selection on duplicates of different divergence classes suggest that a minority of paralogs exhibit near neutral evolutionary dynamics immediately following duplication but that most duplicate pairs (including those which have been retained for long periods) are under strong purifying selection against amino acid change. The likelihood of duplicate retention varied among gene functional classes, and the pronounced differences between strains in the pool of retained recent duplicates likely reflects differences in the nutrient status and other characteristics of their respective environments. We conclude that most duplicates are quickly purged from Acaryochloris genomes and that those which are retained likely make important contributions to organism ecology by conferring fitness benefits via gene dosage effects. The mechanism of enhanced duplication may involve homologous recombination between genetic elements mediated by paralogous copies of recA.

  20. 47 CFR 76.120 - Network non-duplication protection, syndicated exclusivity and sports blackout rules for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Network non-duplication protection, syndicated... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.120 Network non-duplication protection, syndicated exclusivity and sports blackout rules...

  1. A case of asymptomatic ileal duplication cyst associated with acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya İpek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Duplications of the alimentary tract are infrequent anomalies. They are most frequently located in the terminal ileum, and majority of them became symptomatic before the age of 2. Presenting symptoms may include abdominal mass, intestinal obstruction, intussusception, rectal bleeding, and abdominal pain. Preoperative diagnosis is usually difficult, intra-abdominal duplications are usually diagnosed during surgical explorations of above complications. We presented a 12-year-old girl with asymptomatic ileal duplication cyst associated with non-complicated acute appendicitis, whose imaging studies at admission were compatible with complicated perforated appendicitis.

  2. [Complete lower urinary tract duplication with true diphallia associated to anorrectal and neural malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirao, M J; Zambudio, G; Nortes, L; Jiménez, J I Ruiz

    2008-10-01

    We report a case of complete urinary tract duplication with true diphallia associated to intestinal and neural anomalies. Complete penile duplication with hypospadias and bifidum scrotum were showed. Moreover, he had got anorrectal disease (anterior anus) and neural tube defects (myelomeningocele). Radiological and functional studies were performed and complete duplication lower urinary tract with coordinate miction were found. Combined surgical approach were used: perineal to remove lateralized and hypospadic penile and abdominal for cystoplasty. We report a case due to the extremely low prevalence. Only 15 cases have been described in the literature.

  3. Caudal Duplication Syndrome: the Vital Role of a Multidisciplinary Approach and Staged Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuk, Inbal; Levitt, Marc; Dlugy, Elena; Kravarusic, Dragan; Ben-Meir, David; Rajz, Gustavo; Konen, Osnat; Freud, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Caudal duplication syndrome is a rare entity that describes the association between congenital anomalies involving caudal structures and may have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. A full-term male presented with combination of anomalies including anorectal malformation, duplication of the colon and lower urinary tract, split of the lower spine, and lipomyelomeningocele with tethering of the cord. We report this exceptional case of caudal duplication syndrome with special emphasis on surgical strategy and approach combining all disciplines involved. The purpose of this report is to present the pathology, assessment, and management strategy of this complex case. PMID:28018799

  4. Anal canal duplication and triplication: a rare entity with different presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazon, P; Julia, V; Saura, L; de Haro, I; Bejarano, M; Rovira, C; Tarrado, X

    2017-05-01

    Anal canal duplication (ACD) is the rarest of gastrointestinal duplications. Few cases have been reported. Most cases present as an opening in the midline, posterior to the normal anus. The aim of our revision is to contribute with eight new cases, some of them with unusual presentations: five presented as the typical form, one with a perianal nodule, and two presented as two separate orifices (anal canal triplication). Complete excision was performed in all patients with no complications. ACD is the most distal and the least frequent digestive duplication. Its treatment should be surgical excision, to avoid complications such as abscess, fistulization, or malignization. Anal canal triplication has never been described before.

  5. Enteric duplication cyst of the pancreas associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Alexander S; Bluhm, David; Xiao, Shu-Yan; Waxman, Irving; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Pancreas-associated enteric duplication cysts are rare developmental anomalies that communicate with the main pancreatic duct and may be associated with recurrent acute and chronic abdominal pain in children. In adults, these lesions may masquerade as pancreatic pseudocysts or pancreatic cystic neoplasms. An adult patient with a pancreas-associated enteric duplication is described which represents the first reported instance of association with both chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The clinical spectrum of pancreas-associated enteric duplication cyst, including diagnostic and therapeutic options, is reviewed.

  6. Caudal Duplication Syndrome: the Vital Role of a Multidisciplinary Approach and Staged Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuk, Inbal; Levitt, Marc; Dlugy, Elena; Kravarusic, Dragan; Ben-Meir, David; Rajz, Gustavo; Konen, Osnat; Freud, Enrique

    2016-12-01

    Caudal duplication syndrome is a rare entity that describes the association between congenital anomalies involving caudal structures and may have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. A full-term male presented with combination of anomalies including anorectal malformation, duplication of the colon and lower urinary tract, split of the lower spine, and lipomyelomeningocele with tethering of the cord. We report this exceptional case of caudal duplication syndrome with special emphasis on surgical strategy and approach combining all disciplines involved. The purpose of this report is to present the pathology, assessment, and management strategy of this complex case.

  7. 7q11.23 Duplication Syndrome: Physical Characteristics and Natural History

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In order to describe the physical characteristics, medical complications, and natural history of classic 7q11.23 duplication syndrome [hereafter Dup7 (MIM 609757)], reciprocal duplication of the region deleted in Williams syndrome [hereafter WS (MIM 194050)], we systematically evaluated 53 individuals aged 1.25–21.25 years and 11 affected adult relatives identified in cascade testing. In this series, 27% of probands with Dup7 had an affected parent. Seven of the 26 de novo duplications that w...

  8. Gene duplications and losses among vertebrate deoxyribonucleoside kinases of the non-TK1 Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutahir, Zeeshan; Christiansen, Louise Slot; Clausen, Anders R.;

    2016-01-01

    , among vertebrates only four mammalian dNKs have been studied for their substrate specificity and kinetic properties. However, some vertebrates, such as fish, frogs, and birds, apparently possess a duplicated homolog of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK). In this study, we characterized a family of d......CK/deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK)-like enzymes from a frog Xenopus laevis and a bird Gallus gallus. We showed that X. laevis has a duplicated dCK gene and a dGK gene, whereas G. gallus has a duplicated dCK gene but has lost the dGK gene. We cloned, expressed, purified, and subsequently determined the kinetic parameters...

  9. Duplication of the pituitary gland in a newborn with median cleft face syndrome and nasal teratoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamon-Kerautret, M.; Ares, G.S.; Demondion, X.; Pruvo, J.P. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille (France); Rouland, V. [Service de Neonatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille (France); Francke, J.P. [Departement d`Anatomie, Faculte de Medicine, Universite de Lille (France)

    1998-05-01

    A newborn suffered immediate neonatal respiratory distress because of an obstructive, soft-tissue nasal mass. Clinical examination revealed a cleft palate with a protruding polypoid mass. CT and MRI showed a heterogeneous nasopharyngeal mass and associated intracranial abnormalities - duplication of the hypophysis and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Duplication of the hypophysis is a very rare malformation, only 13 cases having been previously described. The suggested pathogenesis is duplication of the prechordal plate and anterior end of the notochord during early embryological development. (orig.) With 2 figs., 3 refs.

  10. Lineage-specific rediploidization is a mechanism to explain time-lags between genome duplication and evolutionary diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Fiona M; Gundappa, Manu Kumar; Grammes, Fabian; Hvidsten, Torgeir R; Redmond, Anthony K; Lien, Sigbjørn; Martin, Samuel A M; Holland, Peter W H; Sandve, Simen R; Macqueen, Daniel J

    2017-06-14

    The functional divergence of duplicate genes (ohnologues) retained from whole genome duplication (WGD) is thought to promote evolutionary diversification. However, species radiation and phenotypic diversification are often temporally separated from WGD. Salmonid fish, whose ancestor underwent WGD by autotetraploidization ~95 million years ago, fit such a 'time-lag' model of post-WGD radiation, which occurred alongside a major delay in the rediploidization process. Here we propose a model, 'lineage-specific ohnologue resolution' (LORe), to address the consequences of delayed rediploidization. Under LORe, speciation precedes rediploidization, allowing independent ohnologue divergence in sister lineages sharing an ancestral WGD event. Using cross-species sequence capture, phylogenomics and genome-wide analyses of ohnologue expression divergence, we demonstrate the major impact of LORe on salmonid evolution. One-quarter of each salmonid genome, harbouring at least 4550 ohnologues, has evolved under LORe, with rediploidization and functional divergence occurring on multiple independent occasions >50 million years post-WGD. We demonstrate the existence and regulatory divergence of many LORe ohnologues with functions in lineage-specific physiological adaptations that potentially facilitated salmonid species radiation. We show that LORe ohnologues are enriched for different functions than 'older' ohnologues that began diverging in the salmonid ancestor. LORe has unappreciated significance as a nested component of post-WGD divergence that impacts the functional properties of genes, whilst providing ohnologues available solely for lineage-specific adaptation. Under LORe, which is predicted following many WGD events, the functional outcomes of WGD need not appear 'explosively', but can arise gradually over tens of millions of years, promoting lineage-specific diversification regimes under prevailing ecological pressures.

  11. Generating new prions by targeted mutation or segment duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Kacy R; Hendrich, Connor G; Waechter, Aubrey; Harman, Madison R; Ross, Eric D

    2015-07-14

    Yeasts contain various protein-based genetic elements, termed prions, that result from the structural conversion of proteins into self-propagating amyloid forms. Most yeast prion proteins contain glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich prion domains that drive prion activity. Here, we explore two mechanisms by which new prion domains could evolve. First, it has been proposed that mutation and natural selection will tend to result in proteins with aggregation propensities just low enough to function under physiological conditions and thus that a small number of mutations are often sufficient to cause aggregation. We hypothesized that if the ability to form prion aggregates was a sufficiently generic feature of Q/N-rich domains, many nonprion Q/N-rich domains might similarly have aggregation propensities on the edge of prion formation. Indeed, we tested four yeast Q/N-rich domains that had no detectable aggregation activity; in each case, a small number of rationally designed mutations were sufficient to cause the proteins to aggregate and, for two of the domains, to create prion activity. Second, oligopeptide repeats are found in multiple prion proteins, and expansion of these repeats increases prion activity. However, it is unclear whether the effects of repeat expansion are unique to these specific sequences or are a generic result of adding additional aggregation-prone segments into a protein domain. We found that within nonprion Q/N-rich domains, repeating aggregation-prone segments in tandem was sufficient to create prion activity. Duplication of DNA elements is a common source of genetic variation and may provide a simple mechanism to rapidly evolve prion activity.

  12. Competing for Iron: Duplication and Amplification of the isd Locus in Staphylococcus lugdunensis HKU09-01 Provides a Competitive Advantage to Overcome Nutritional Limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronner, Simon; Monk, Ian R; Brozyna, Jeremy R; Heinrichs, David E; Skaar, Eric P; Peschel, Andreas; Foster, Timothy J

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase negative bacterial pathogen that is particularly associated with severe cases of infectious endocarditis. Unique amongst the coagulase-negative staphylococci, S. lugdunensis harbors an iron regulated surface determinant locus (isd). This locus facilitates the acquisition of heme as a source of nutrient iron during infection and allows iron limitation caused by "nutritional immunity" to be overcome. The isd locus is duplicated in S. lugdunensis HKU09-01 and we show here that the duplication is intrinsically unstable and undergoes accordion-like amplification and segregation leading to extensive isd copy number variation. Amplification of the locus increased the level of expression of Isd proteins and improved binding of hemoglobin to the cell surface of S. lugdunensis. Furthermore, Isd overexpression provided an advantage when strains were competing for a limited amount of hemoglobin as the sole source of iron. Gene duplications and amplifications (GDA) are events of fundamental importance for bacterial evolution and are frequently associated with antibiotic resistance in many species. As such, GDAs are regarded as evolutionary adaptions to novel selective pressures in hostile environments pointing towards a special importance of isd for S. lugdunensis. For the first time we show an example of a GDA that involves a virulence factor of a Gram-positive pathogen and link the GDA directly to a competitive advantage when the bacteria were struggling with selective pressures mimicking "nutritional immunity".

  13. Brief report: regression timing and associated features in MECP2 duplication syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S U; Hundley, R J; Wilson, A K; Carvalho, C M B; Lupski, J R; Ramocki, M B

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, timing, and associated features of developmental regression in MECP2 duplication syndrome. We also examined whether duplication size was associated with regression. Comprehensive psychological evaluations were used to assess 17 boys with MECP2 duplication syndrome. Information about regression was gathered via parent report. Eight of 17 boys exhibited regression in language skills, while seven of 17 exhibited regression in other skill areas. Regression in "other skill" areas coincided with seizure onset and with a prior autism diagnosis in six of seven participants. Regression was not associated with duplication size. Questions remain as to why some boys regress, and future work is necessary to understand the underlying mechanism(s) that causes regression.

  14. Bilateral inferior vena cava filter insertion in a patient with duplication of the infrarenal vena cava.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, S

    2010-06-19

    BACKGROUND: Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter insertion is a commonly performed procedure for indications such as recurrent pulmonary emboli or contraindication to anticoagulation. Symptomatic duplication of the IVC is exceedingly rare with only a handful of cases being described in the literature. AIM: We report an unusual case of a patient with symptomatic duplication of the IVC. RESULT: A 53-year-old woman presented at our hospital for resection of a cerebral metastasis from a non-small cell lung cancer following a recent diagnosis of bilateral lower limb deep venous thrombosis. This required perioperative reversal of anticoagulation and IVC filter insertion. Conventional venography performed during filter insertion documented the existence of a duplicated IVC. CONCLUSION: We present a case of a symptomatic duplication of the IVC requiring filter insertion. We review the developmental anatomy of the IVC along with the diagnostic findings and management strategies available.

  15. Combined duplication of the colon and vermiform appendix in an adult patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sahin Kabay; Mehmet Yucel; Faik Yaylak; Alper Hacioglu; Mustafa C Algin; Esra G Olgun; Levent Sahin; Tayfun Aydin

    2008-01-01

    Combined duplication of the colon and vermiform appendix is one of the rare congenital anomalities of the alimentary tract. Only a few cases have been reported in the adult population. A 28-year-old man presented to the clinic with a mass in the right flank. Imaging showed only a hydronephrotic atrophic kidney. The final diagnosis was only available at exploration. Combined duplication of the tubular colon and vermiform appendix was confirmed histopathologically. The patient was treated with nephrectomy and complete resection of the duplicated colon and vermiform appendix. The patient recovered uneventfully, and has done well for the past year. This is believed to be one of the first reports of combined duplication of the tubular colon and vermiform appendix as a cause of hydronephrotic atrophic kidney in an adult patient.

  16. Aberrant Pancreatic Tissue in a Mediastinal Enteric Duplication Cyst: A Rarity with Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meha Mansi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediastinal enteric duplication cysts are a rare congenital malformation encountered mainly in neonates and infants. It is a distinct entity within the family of foregut duplication cysts. It can present with respiratory distress due to mass effect and hence surgical excision is the preferred treatment. Histologically, it is characterised by a double layered smooth muscle wall with intestinal lining epithelium. We report a case of mediastinal enteric duplication cyst with aberrant pancreatic tissue in a neonate due to its rarity and early presentation. A neonate presented with respiratory distress and a cystic mass in the right posterior mediastinum. The lesion was excised and on histopathological analysis the diagnosis of mediastinal enteric duplication cyst was made. Also, aberrant pancreatic tissue which has been reported rarely was noted in this case. We discuss this case and review similar cases reported in literature.

  17. Neutral and Non-Neutral Evolution of Duplicated Genes with Gene Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Fawcett

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene conversion is one of the major mutational mechanisms involved in the DNA sequence evolution of duplicated genes. It contributes to create unique patters of DNA polymorphism within species and divergence between species. A typical pattern is so-called concerted evolution, in which the divergence between duplicates is maintained low for a long time because of frequent exchanges of DNA fragments. In addition, gene conversion affects the DNA evolution of duplicates in various ways especially when selection operates. Here, we review theoretical models to understand the evolution of duplicates in both neutral and non-neutral cases. We also explain how these theories contribute to interpreting real polymorphism and divergence data by using some intriguing examples.

  18. Volvulus U-Shaped transverse colonic duplication: Report of a case and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruankha Bilommi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tubular duplication of the colon is very rare especially in adulthood, because it is frequently symptomatic earlier in newborn life, so only few cases are reported in literature. Several theories are proposed to explain the onset and the evolution of gut malformations as the aberrant lumen recanalization or the diverticular theory, the alteration of the lateral closure of the embryonal disk or finally the dorsal protrusion of the yolk-sac for herniation or adhesion to the ectoderm for an abnormality of the longitudinal line, but none clarifies the exact genesis of duplication [1–3]. U Shaped transverse colonic duplication with volvulus has never been reported before and very rare in condition in gastrointestinal duplication.

  19. Isolated omental duplication cyst with respiratory epithelium & pancreatic glands: Case report & review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuoc T. Nguyen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Duplication cysts are uncommon congenital anomalies. They are usually in communication with or are attached to an adjacent segment of bowel. Rarely are they completely isolated from the gastrointestinal tract. To date, there have been 29 reported cases of non-communicating or isolated duplication cysts. Few contain respiratory epithelium and pancreatic glands. Patients may present with pain, an acute abdomen, bleeding or malignant degeneration. Differential diagnoses for an isolated cystic mass should include duplication cyst in the pediatric population. Recognition and awareness of these anomalies and their various presentations can aid in management. The unusual case of an isolated duplication cyst containing respiratory and pancreatic tissue, found within omentum, is presented with a review of the literature.

  20. Characterization of patients with duplicated z-hypnotic use: A population-based study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hua Hsieh, MS

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Duplicated z-hypnotic users were more likely to receive prescriptions with long duration and high daily dose. Healthcare professionals and policy makers are recommended to put more efforts into dealing with this urgent drug safety issue.

  1. Acute abdominal pain presenting as a rare appendiceal duplication: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Ali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Appendiceal duplication is a rare anomaly that can manifest as right lower quadrant pain. There are several variations described for this condition. We recommend aggressive operative management should this anatomical variation present in the presence of acute appendicitis. Case presentation We report the case of a 15-year-old African American girl who presented to our hospital with right lower quadrant pain and was subsequently found to have appendiceal duplication. Conclusion There are two categorical systems that have described and stratified appendiceal duplication. Both classification systems have been outlined and referenced in this case report. A computed tomography scan has been included to provide a visual aid to help identify true vermiform appendiceal duplication. The presence of this anatomical abnormality is not a reason for surgical intervention; however, should this be found in the setting of acute appendicitis, aggressive resection of both appendices is mandatory.

  2. Subfunctionalization of duplicated zebrafish pax6 genes by cis-regulatory divergence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kleinjan, Dirk A; Bancewicz, Ruth M; Gautier, Philippe; Dahm, Ralf; Schonthaler, Helia B; Damante, Giuseppe; Seawright, Anne; Hever, Ann M; Yeyati, Patricia L; van Heyningen, Veronica; Coutinho, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Gene duplication is a major driver of evolutionary divergence. In most vertebrates a single PAX6 gene encodes a transcription factor required for eye, brain, olfactory system, and pancreas development...

  3. [Septate uterus with cervical duplication and vaginal partition: a rare malformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-León, F; Kably-Ambe, A; Von-der-Meden, W; Dosal, M; Escarcega, H

    1998-12-01

    It presents three cases of Mullerian anomalies with septate uterus and cervical duplication and longitudinal vaginal septum. There are a few previous cases reported. The cases are discussed and the literature is revised.

  4. FastUniq: a fast de novo duplicates removal tool for paired short reads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibin Xu

    Full Text Available The presence of duplicates introduced by PCR amplification is a major issue in paired short reads from next-generation sequencing platforms. These duplicates might have a serious impact on research applications, such as scaffolding in whole-genome sequencing and discovering large-scale genome variations, and are usually removed. We present FastUniq as a fast de novo tool for removal of duplicates in paired short reads. FastUniq identifies duplicates by comparing sequences between read pairs and does not require complete genome sequences as prerequisites. FastUniq is capable of simultaneously handling reads with different lengths and results in highly efficient running time, which increases linearly at an average speed of 87 million reads per 10 minutes. FastUniq is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/fastuniq/.

  5. ATLAS EventIndex General Dataflow and Monitoring Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Casani, Alvaro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS EventIndex has been running in production since mid-2015, reliably collecting information worldwide about all produced events and storing them in a central Hadoop infrastructure at CERN. A subset of this information is copied to an Oracle relational database for fast access. The system design and its optimization is serving event picking from requests of a few events up to scales of tens of thousand of events, and in addition, data consistency checks are performed for large production campaigns. Detecting duplicate events with a scope of physics collections has recently arisen as an important use case. This paper describes the general architecture of the project and the data flow and operation issues, which are addressed by recent developments to improve the throughput of the overall system. In this direction, the data collection system is reducing the usage of the messaging infrastructure to overcome the performance shortcomings detected during production peaks; an object storage approach is instea...

  6. Sequencing of Pax6 loci from the elephant shark reveals a family of Pax6 genes in vertebrate genomes, forged by ancient duplications and divergences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vydianathan Ravi

    Full Text Available Pax6 is a developmental control gene essential for eye development throughout the animal kingdom. In addition, Pax6 plays key roles in other parts of the CNS, olfactory system, and pancreas. In mammals a single Pax6 gene encoding multiple isoforms delivers these pleiotropic functions. Here we provide evidence that the genomes of many other vertebrate species contain multiple Pax6 loci. We sequenced Pax6-containing BACs from the cartilaginous elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii and found two distinct Pax6 loci. Pax6.1 is highly similar to mammalian Pax6, while Pax6.2 encodes a paired-less Pax6. Using synteny relationships, we identify homologs of this novel paired-less Pax6.2 gene in lizard and in frog, as well as in zebrafish and in other teleosts. In zebrafish two full-length Pax6 duplicates were known previously, originating from the fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD and expressed in divergent patterns due to paralog-specific loss of cis-elements. We show that teleosts other than zebrafish also maintain duplicate full-length Pax6 loci, but differences in gene and regulatory domain structure suggest that these Pax6 paralogs originate from a more ancient duplication event and are hence renamed as Pax6.3. Sequence comparisons between mammalian and elephant shark Pax6.1 loci highlight the presence of short- and long-range conserved noncoding elements (CNEs. Functional analysis demonstrates the ancient role of long-range enhancers for Pax6 transcription. We show that the paired-less Pax6.2 ortholog in zebrafish is expressed specifically in the developing retina. Transgenic analysis of elephant shark and zebrafish Pax6.2 CNEs with homology to the mouse NRE/Pα internal promoter revealed highly specific retinal expression. Finally, morpholino depletion of zebrafish Pax6.2 resulted in a "small eye" phenotype, supporting a role in retinal development. In summary, our study reveals that the pleiotropic functions of Pax6 in vertebrates are served by

  7. Gastric Duplication Cyst in Association with Duodenal Atresia in a Neonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshemirani, Alireza; Roshanzamir, Fatollah; Razavi, Sajad; Sarafi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Concurrence of duodenal atresia and gastric duplication cyst is extremely rare entity. We report a 6-day-old female neonate who presented with neonatal intestinal obstruction. X-ray abdomen showed double bubble sign. At laparotomy, a huge cystic structure attached to greater curvature of the stomach along with duodenal atresia of second part of duodenum was found. The cystic structure was excised and duodeno-duodenostomy performed. Histopathology report confirmed it gastric duplication cyst. PMID:26816679

  8. Tandem gene arrays in Trypanosoma brucei: Comparative phylogenomic analysis of duplicate sequence variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Andrew P

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome sequence of the protistan parasite Trypanosoma brucei contains many tandem gene arrays. Gene duplicates are created through tandem duplication and are expressed through polycistronic transcription, suggesting that the primary purpose of long, tandem arrays is to increase gene dosage in an environment where individual gene promoters are absent. This report presents the first account of the tandem gene arrays in the T. brucei genome, employing several related genome sequences to establish how variation is created and removed. Results A systematic survey of tandem gene arrays showed that substantial sequence variation existed across the genome; variation from different regions of an array often produced inconsistent phylogenetic affinities. Phylogenetic relationships of gene duplicates were consistent with concerted evolution being a widespread homogenising force. However, tandem duplicates were not usually identical; therefore, any homogenising effect was coincident with divergence among duplicates. Allelic gene conversion was detected using various criteria and was apparently able to both remove and introduce sequence variation. Tandem arrays containing structural heterogeneity demonstrated how sequence homogenisation and differentiation can occur within a single locus. Conclusion The use of multiple genome sequences in a comparative analysis of tandem gene arrays identified substantial sequence variation among gene duplicates. The distribution of sequence variation is determined by a dynamic balance of conservative and innovative evolutionary forces. Gene trees from various species showed that intraspecific duplicates evolve in concert, perhaps through frequent gene conversion, although this does not prevent sequence divergence, especially where structural heterogeneity physically separates a duplicate from its neighbours. In describing dynamics of sequence variation that have consequences beyond gene dosage, this

  9. Molecular and Population Analysis of Natural Selection on the Human Haptoglobin Duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Santiago; Williams, Dylan M; Guthrie, Philip AI; McArdle, Wendy L.; Smith, George Davey; Evans, David M.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Day, Ian NM

    2012-01-01

    Haptoglobin binds free haemoglobin that prevents oxidative damage produced by haemolysis. There is a copy number variant (CNV) in the haptoglobin gene (HP) consisting of two alleles, Hp1 (no duplication), and Hp2 (1.7kb duplication involving two exons). The spread of the Hp2 allele is believed to have taken place under selective pressures conferred by malaria resistance. However, molecular evidence is lacking and Hp did not emerge in genomewide SNPs surveys for evidence of selection. In Europ...

  10. Methods for identifying and mapping recent segmental and gene duplications in eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaja, Razi; MacDonald, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Junjun; Scherer, Stephen W

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide instruction for analyzing and mapping recent segmental and gene duplications in eukaryotic genomes. We describe a bioinformatics-based approach utilizing computational tools to manage eukaryotic genome sequences to characterize and understand the evolutionary fates and trajectories of duplicated genes. An introduction to bioinformatics tools and programs such as BLAST, Perl, BioPerl, and the GFF specification provides the necessary background to complete this analysis for any eukaryotic genome of interest.

  11. Detecting duplicates in a homicide registry using a Bayesian partitioning approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sadinle, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Finding duplicates in homicide registries is an important step in keeping an accurate account of lethal violence. This task is not trivial when unique identifiers of the individuals are not available, and it is especially challenging when records are subject to errors and missing values. Traditional approaches to duplicate detection output independent decisions on the coreference status of each pair of records, which often leads to nontransitive decisions that have to be reconciled in some ad...

  12. Gastric Duplication: A Rare Cause of Massive Lower Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage, Chest Wall Mass, and Enterocutaneous Fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Emeka B. Kesieme; Dongo, Andrew E; Osime, Clement O.; Olomu, Sylvia C.; Awe, Oluwafemi O.; Gerald I Eze; Sylvester U. Eluehike

    2012-01-01

    Gastric duplications are uncommon developmental abnormality reported to present with different clinical scenarios. We present a 2-1/2-year-old Nigerian female who started having intermittent massive lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage at 5 months of age. She subsequently developed a lower chest wall mass and enterocutaneous fistula. She was found to have gastric duplication with fistulous communication with the descending colon, spleen, and lower chest wall. To the best of our knowledge, this...

  13. Esophageal duplication cyst causing unilateral hyperinflation of the lung in a neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, K S; Seith, A; Srinivas, M; Gupta, A Kumar

    2007-06-01

    Esophageal duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies. Frequently asymptomatic, they may cause respiratory distress and feeding difficulties in infants. Unilateral hyperinflation of the lung due to compression of the bronchus by the cyst is rare. We report a case of a 4-day-old male neonate presenting with respiratory distress who had an esophageal duplication cyst causing obstructive hyperinflation of the right lung. The nature of the cyst was confirmed after surgery.

  14. Detecting functional divergence after gene duplication through evolutionary changes in posttranslational regulatory sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Ba, Alex N; Strome, Bob; Hua, Jun Jie; Desmond, Jonathan; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Weiss, Eric L; Landry, Christian R; Moses, Alan M

    2014-12-01

    Gene duplication is an important evolutionary mechanism that can result in functional divergence in paralogs due to neo-functionalization or sub-functionalization. Consistent with functional divergence after gene duplication, recent studies have shown accelerated evolution in retained paralogs. However, little is known in general about the impact of this accelerated evolution on the molecular functions of retained paralogs. For example, do new functions typically involve changes in enzymatic activities, or changes in protein regulation? Here we study the evolution of posttranslational regulation by examining the evolution of important regulatory sequences (short linear motifs) in retained duplicates created by the whole-genome duplication in budding yeast. To do so, we identified short linear motifs whose evolutionary constraint has relaxed after gene duplication with a likelihood-ratio test that can account for heterogeneity in the evolutionary process by using a non-central chi-squared null distribution. We find that short linear motifs are more likely to show changes in evolutionary constraints in retained duplicates compared to single-copy genes. We examine changes in constraints on known regulatory sequences and show that for the Rck1/Rck2, Fkh1/Fkh2, Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, they are associated with previously characterized differences in posttranslational regulation. Finally, we experimentally confirm our prediction that for the Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, Cbk1 regulated localization was lost along the lineage leading to SWI5 after gene duplication. Our analysis suggests that changes in posttranslational regulation mediated by short regulatory motifs systematically contribute to functional divergence after gene duplication.

  15. Events diary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    as Imperial College, the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal College of Art, the Natural History and Science Museums and the Royal Geographical Society. Under the heading `Shaping the future together' BA2000 will explore science, engineering and technology in their wider cultural context. Further information about this event on 6 - 12 September may be obtained from Sandra Koura, BA2000 Festival Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 23 Savile Row, London W1X 2NB (tel: 0171 973 3075, e-mail: sandra.koura@britassoc.org.uk ). Details of the creating SPARKS events may be obtained from creating.sparks@britassoc.org.uk or from the website www.britassoc.org.uk . Other events 3 - 7 July, Porto Alegre, Brazil VII Interamerican conference on physics education: The preparation of physicists and physics teachers in contemporary society. Info: IACPE7@if.ufrgs.br or cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar/iacpe/iacpei.htm 27 August - 1 September, Barcelona, Spain GIREP conference: Physics teacher education beyond 2000. Info: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb/index.html

  16. De Novo Assembly of Coding Sequences of the Mangrove Palm (Nypa fruticans Using RNA-Seq and Discovery of Whole-Genome Duplications in the Ancestor of Palms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziwen He

    Full Text Available Nypa fruticans (Arecaceae is the only monocot species of true mangroves. This species represents the earliest mangrove fossil recorded. How N. fruticans adapts to the harsh and unstable intertidal zone is an interesting question. However, the 60 gene segments deposited in NCBI are insufficient for solving this question. In this study, we sequenced, assembled and annotated the transcriptome of N. fruticans using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 19,918,800 clean paired-end reads were de novo assembled into 45,368 unigenes with a N50 length of 1,096 bp. A total of 41.35% unigenes were functionally annotated using Blast2GO. Many genes annotated to "response to stress" and 15 putative positively selected genes were identified. Simple sequence repeats were identified and compared with other palms. The divergence time between N. fruticans and other palms was estimated at 75 million years ago using the genomic data, which is consistent with the fossil record. After calculating the synonymous substitution rate between paralogs, we found that two whole-genome duplication events were shared by N. fruticans and other palms. These duplication events provided a large amount of raw material for the more than 2,000 later speciation events in Arecaceae. This study provides a high quality resource for further functional and evolutionary studies of N. fruticans and palms in general.

  17. De Novo Assembly of Coding Sequences of the Mangrove Palm (Nypa fruticans) Using RNA-Seq and Discovery of Whole-Genome Duplications in the Ancestor of Palms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ziwen; Zhang, Zhang; Guo, Wuxia; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2015-01-01

    Nypa fruticans (Arecaceae) is the only monocot species of true mangroves. This species represents the earliest mangrove fossil recorded. How N. fruticans adapts to the harsh and unstable intertidal zone is an interesting question. However, the 60 gene segments deposited in NCBI are insufficient for solving this question. In this study, we sequenced, assembled and annotated the transcriptome of N. fruticans using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 19,918,800 clean paired-end reads were de novo assembled into 45,368 unigenes with a N50 length of 1,096 bp. A total of 41.35% unigenes were functionally annotated using Blast2GO. Many genes annotated to "response to stress" and 15 putative positively selected genes were identified. Simple sequence repeats were identified and compared with other palms. The divergence time between N. fruticans and other palms was estimated at 75 million years ago using the genomic data, which is consistent with the fossil record. After calculating the synonymous substitution rate between paralogs, we found that two whole-genome duplication events were shared by N. fruticans and other palms. These duplication events provided a large amount of raw material for the more than 2,000 later speciation events in Arecaceae. This study provides a high quality resource for further functional and evolutionary studies of N. fruticans and palms in general.

  18. Detection of age-related duplications in mtDNA from human muscles and bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacan, Marie; Thèves, Catherine; Keyser, Christine; Farrugia, Audrey; Baraybar, Jose-Pablo; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand

    2011-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the age-related accumulation of duplications in the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) extracted from skeletal muscle. This kind of mutation had not yet been studied in bone. The detection of age-related mutations in bone tissue could help to estimate age at death within the context of legal medicine or/and anthropological identification procedures, when traditional osteological markers studied are absent or inefficient. As we detected an accumulation of a point mutation in mtDNA from an older individual's bones in a previous study, we tried here to identify if three reported duplications (150, 190, 260 bp) accumulate in this type of tissue. We developed a sensitive method which consists in the use of back-to-back primers during amplification followed by an electrophoresis capillary analysis. The aim of this study was to confirm that at least one duplication appears systematically in muscle tissue after the age of 20 and to evaluate the duplication age appearance in bones extracted from the same individuals. We found that the number of duplications increase from 38 years and that at least one duplicated fragment is present in 50% of cases after 70 years in this tissue. These results confirm that several age-related mutations can be detected in the D-loop of mtDNA and open the way for the use of molecular markers for age estimation in forensic and/or anthropological identification.

  19. Compensatory Drift and the Evolutionary Dynamics of Dosage-Sensitive Duplicate Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ammon; Zakon, Harold H; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Dosage-balance selection preserves functionally redundant duplicates (paralogs) at the optimum for their combined expression. Here we present a model of the dynamics of duplicate genes coevolving under dosage-balance selection. We call this the compensatory drift model. Results show that even when strong dosage-balance selection constrains total expression to the optimum, expression of each duplicate can diverge by drift from its original level. The rate of divergence slows as the strength of stabilizing selection, the size of the mutation effect, and/or the size of the population increases. We show that dosage-balance selection impedes neofunctionalization early after duplication but can later facilitate it. We fit this model to data from sodium channel duplicates in 10 families of teleost fish; these include two convergent lineages of electric fish in which one of the duplicates neofunctionalized. Using the model, we estimated the strength of dosage-balance selection for these genes. The results indicate that functionally redundant paralogs still may undergo radical functional changes after a prolonged period of compensatory drift.

  20. Analysis of filtering techniques and image quality in pixel duplicated images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; McLauchlan, Lifford

    2009-08-01

    When images undergo filtering operations, valuable information can be lost besides the intended noise or frequencies due to averaging of neighboring pixels. When the image is enlarged by duplicating pixels, such filtering effects can be reduced and more information retained, which could be critical when analyzing image content automatically. Analysis of retinal images could reveal many diseases at early stage as long as minor changes that depart from a normal retinal scan can be identified and enhanced. In this paper, typical filtering techniques are applied to an early stage diabetic retinopathy image which has undergone digital pixel duplication. The same techniques are applied to the original images for comparison. The effects of filtering are then demonstrated for both pixel duplicated and original images to show the information retention capability of pixel duplication. Image quality is computed based on published metrics. Our analysis shows that pixel duplication is effective in retaining information on smoothing operations such as mean filtering in the spatial domain, as well as lowpass and highpass filtering in the frequency domain, based on the filter window size. Blocking effects due to image compression and pixel duplication become apparent in frequency analysis.

  1. Clustering of diverse replicated sequences in the MHC: Evidence for en bloc duplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leelayuwat, C.; Pinelli, M. [Univ. Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Dawkins, R.L. [Royal Perth Hospital (Australia)

    1995-07-15

    The MHC contains clusters of polymorphic duplicated genes and gene sequences. It has been thought that these duplicated genes and sequences have arisen from single gene duplications. We compared the cloned region between TNF and HLA-B with the region in close proximity to HLA-A using sequence analysis and DNA hybridization. The results indicate that several sequences existing in the region centromeric of HLA-B are also present in close proximity to HLA-A. These include sequences belonging to the P5, BAT1, and PERB11 gene families as well as HLA class I gene sequences. Interestingly, when the two regions of approximately 200 kilobases are compared, the replicated sequences are organized similarly but in an inverted fashion suggesting the existence of an historical inverted en bloc duplication. Thus, we propose that the origin of these MHC gene clusters involves several mechanisms. In addition to single gene replication, a long-range duplication of a genomic block must have occurred. It is possible that a block at the telomeric end of the MHC represents a basic functional genomic unit conserved and duplicated en bloc. 49 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Eberhard, Jessica R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Sanchez, Juan J.; Hernandez, Alexis; Müeller, Heinrich; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Wright, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified with increasing frequency, particularly in birds (Class Aves). In this study, we investigate the evolutionary history of mitochondrial control region states within the avian order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). To this aim, we reconstructed a comprehensive multi-locus phylogeny of parrots, used PCR of three diagnostic fragments to classify the mitochondrial control region state as single or duplicated, and mapped these states onto the phylogeny. We further sequenced 44 selected species to validate these inferences of control region state. Ancestral state reconstruction using a range of weighting schemes identified six independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications within Psittaciformes. Analysis of sequence data showed that varying levels of mitochondrial gene and tRNA homology and degradation were present within a given clade exhibiting duplications. Levels of divergence between control regions within an individual varied from 0–10.9% with the differences occurring mainly between 51 and 225 nucleotides 3′ of the goose hairpin in domain I. Further investigations into the fates of duplicated mitochondrial genes, the potential costs and benefits of having a second control region, and the complex relationship between evolutionary rates, selection, and time since duplication are needed to fully explain these patterns in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:22543055

  3. De-Duplication Complexity of Fingerprint Data in Large-Scale Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nalla Pattabhi Ramaiah; C. Krishna Mohan

    2014-01-01

    De-duplication using biometrics has gained much attention from research communities as it provides a unique identity for each and every individual among the large population. De-duplication is the process of removing the instances of multiple enrollments by the same person using the person’s biometric data. An important issue in the large-scale de-duplication applications is the speed of matching and the accuracy of the matching because the number of persons to be enrolled runs into millions. This paper presents an efficient method to improve the accuracy of fingerprint de-duplication in de-centralized manner. De-duplication accuracy decreases because of the noise present in the data, which would cause improper slap fingerprint segmentation. In this paper, an attempt is made to remove the noise present in the data by using binarization of slap fingerprint images and region labeling of desired regions with 8-adjacency neighborhood. The distinct feature of this technique is to remove the noise present in the data for an accurate slap fingerprint segmentation and improve the de-duplica- tion accuracy. Experimental results demonstrate that the fingerprint segmentation rate and de-duplication accuracy are improved significantly.

  4. Duplication of OsHAP family genes and their association with heading date in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuping; Yan, Wenhao; Chen, Huaxia; Tan, Cong; Han, Zhongmin; Yao, Wen; Li, Guangwei; Yuan, Mengqi; Xing, Yongzhong

    2016-03-01

    Heterotrimeric Heme Activator Protein (HAP) family genes are involved in the regulation of flowering in plants. It is not clear how many HAP genes regulate heading date in rice. In this study, we identified 35 HAP genes, including seven newly identified genes, and performed gene duplication and candidate gene-based association analyses. Analyses showed that segmental duplication and tandem duplication are the main mechanisms of HAP gene duplication. Expression profiling and functional identification indicated that duplication probably diversifies the functions of HAP genes. A nucleotide diversity analysis revealed that 13 HAP genes underwent selection. A candidate gene-based association analysis detected four HAP genes related to heading date. An investigation of transgenic plants or mutants of 23 HAP genes confirmed that overexpression of at least four genes delayed heading date under long-day conditions, including the previously cloned Ghd8/OsHAP3H. Our results indicate that the large number of HAP genes in rice was mainly produced by gene duplication, and a few HAP genes function to regulate heading date. Selection of HAP genes is probably caused by their diverse functions rather than regulation of heading.

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of foetuses with congenital abnormalities and duplication of the MECP2 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Fang; Liu, Huan-ling; Li, Ru; Han, Jin; Yang, Xin; Min, Pan; Zhen, Li; Zhang, Yong-ling; Xie, Gui-e; Lei, Ting-ying; Li, Yan; Li, Jian; Li, Dong-zhi; Liao, Can

    2014-08-10

    MECP2 duplication results in a well-recognised syndrome in 100% of affected male children; this syndrome is characterised by severe neurodevelopmental disabilities and recurrent infections. However, no sonographic findings have been reported for affected foetuses, and prenatal molecular diagnosis has not been possible for this disease due to lack of prenatal clinical presentation. In this study, we identified a small duplication comprising the MECP2 and L1CAM genes in the Xq28 region in a patient from a family with severe X-linked mental retardation and in a prenatal foetus with brain structural abnormalities. Using high-resolution chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) to screen 108 foetuses with congenital structural abnormalities, we identified additional three foetuses with the MECP2 duplication. Our study indicates that ventriculomegaly, hydrocephalus, agenesis of the corpus callosum, choroid plexus cysts, foetal growth restriction and hydronephrosis might be common ultrasound findings in prenatal foetuses with the MECP2 duplication and provides the first set of prenatal cases with MECP2 duplication, the ultrasonographic phenotype described in these patients will help to recognise the foetuses with possible MECP2 duplication and prompt the appropriate molecular testing.

  6. "Tandem duplication-random loss" is not a real feature of oyster mitochondrial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Guofan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Duplications and rearrangements of coding genes are major themes in the evolution of mitochondrial genomes, bearing important consequences in the function of mitochondria and the fitness of organisms. Yu et al. (BMC Genomics 2008, 9:477 reported the complete mt genome sequence of the oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis (16,475 bp and found that a DNA segment containing four tRNA genes (trnK1, trnC, trnQ1 and trnN, a duplicated (rrnS and a split rRNA gene (rrnL5' was absent compared with that of two other Crassostrea species. It was suggested that the absence was a novel case of "tandem duplication-random loss" with evolutionary significance. We independently sequenced the complete mt genome of three C. hongkongensis individuals, all of which were 18,622 bp and contained the segment that was missing in Yu et al.'s sequence. Further, we designed primers, verified sequences and demonstrated that the sequence loss in Yu et al.'s study was an artifact caused by placing primers in a duplicated region. The duplication and split of ribosomal RNA genes are unique for Crassostrea oysters and not lost in C. hongkongensis. Our study highlights the need for caution when amplifying and sequencing through duplicated regions of the genome.

  7. Incidence of Data Duplications in a Randomly Selected Pool of Life Science Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksvold, Morten P

    2016-04-01

    Since the solution to many public health problems depends on research, it is critical for the progress and well-being for the patients that we can trust the scientific literature. Misconduct and poor laboratory practice in science threatens the scientific progress, leads to loss of productivity and increased healthcare costs, and endangers lives of patients. Data duplication may represent one of challenges related to these problems. In order to estimate the frequency of data duplication in life science literature, a systematic screen through 120 original scientific articles published in three different cancer related journals [journal impact factor (IF) 20] was completed. The study revealed a surprisingly high proportion of articles containing data duplication. For the IF 20 journals, 25% of the articles were found to contain data duplications. The IF 5-10 journal showed a comparable proportion (22.5%). The proportion of articles containing duplicated data was comparable between the three journals and no significant correlation to journal IF was found. The editorial offices representing the journals included in this study and the individual authors of the detected articles were contacted to clarify the individual cases. The editorial offices did not reply and only 1 out of 29 cases were apparently clarified by the authors, although no supporting data was supplied. This study questions the reliability of life science literature, it illustrates that data duplications are widespread and independent of journal impact factor and call for a reform of the current peer review and retraction process of scientific publishing.

  8. Duplication and loss of chromosome 21 in two children with Down Syndrome and acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogan, P.K.; Close, P.; Seip, J.R. [Pennsylvania State Univ. College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Acute leukemia in patients with Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome; DS) may often result in additional karyotypic changes in the number or structure of chromosome 21. We present two DS patients whose immunoblast karyotypes were associated with changes in chromosome 21 ploidy. Patient L.E. developed acute lymphocytic leukemia concomitant with the loss of a single copy of chromosome 21. Trisomy 21 in this individual was due to maternal meiosis I nondisjunction. A recombination event resulted in reduction of maternal alleles to homozygosity distal to D21S167. Loss of the paternal chromosomes in the leukemia clone produced uniparental maternal disomy with isodisomy over a 25cM interval. This could, in theory, permit the unopposed expression of one or more homozygous recessive maternal tumor-associated genes, thus providing an explanation for leukemogenesis in this patient. Patient E.H. was diagnosed with acute monoblastic leukemia and consistently displayed tetrasomy 21 in the blast cell population. The DS karyotype probably arose from a mitotic error in which the paternal chromosome was duplicated. DNA polymorphism analysis indicated that the additional chromosome in the leukemia clone was of maternal origin. The presence of equal numbers of maternal and paternal chromosomes in the tetraploid blast clone would not appear to be consistent with the expression of a mutant tumor suppressor gene in this patient. Although tetrasomy 21 could be a non-specific karyotypic abnormality unrelated to leukemogenesis, it is possible that monoblastic leukemia may be a consequence of increased expression of one or more genes on this chromosome.

  9. Characterization of genes encoding poly(A polymerases in plants: evidence for duplication and functional specialization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R Meeks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poly(A polymerase is a key enzyme in the machinery that mediates mRNA 3' end formation in eukaryotes. In plants, poly(A polymerases are encoded by modest gene families. To better understand this multiplicity of genes, poly(A polymerase-encoding genes from several other plants, as well as from Selaginella, Physcomitrella, and Chlamydomonas, were studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using bioinformatics tools, poly(A polymerase-encoding genes were identified in the genomes of eight species in the plant lineage. Whereas Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was found to possess a single poly(A polymerase gene, other species possessed between two and six possible poly(A polymerase genes. With the exception of four intron-lacking genes, all of the plant poly(A polymerase genes (but not the C. reinhardtii gene possessed almost identical intron positions within the poly(A polymerase coding sequences, suggesting that all plant poly(A polymerase genes derive from a single ancestral gene. The four Arabidopsis poly(A polymerase genes were found to be essential, based on genetic analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants. GFP fusion proteins containing three of the four Arabidopsis poly(A polymerases localized to the nucleus, while one such fusion protein was localized in the cytoplasm. The fact that this latter protein is largely pollen-specific suggests that it has important roles in male gametogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that poly(A polymerase genes have expanded from a single ancestral gene by a series of duplication events during the evolution of higher plants, and that individual members have undergone sorts of functional specialization so as to render them essential for plant growth and development. Perhaps the most interesting of the plant poly(A polymerases is a novel cytoplasmic poly(A polymerase that is expressed in pollen in Arabidopsis; this is reminiscent of spermatocyte-specific cytoplasmic poly(A polymerases in

  10. Genomics 4.0 : syntenic gene and genome duplication drives diversification of plant secondary metabolism and innate immunity in flowering plants : advanced pattern analytics in duplicate genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofberger, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Genomics 4.0 - Syntenic Gene and Genome Duplication Drives Diversification of Plant Secondary Metabolism and Innate Immunity in Flowering Plants   Johannes A. Hofberger1, 2, 3 1 Biosystematics Group, Wageningen University & Research Center, Droevendaalsesteeg 1, 6708 PB Wageningen, The Neth

  11. The vertebrate ancestral repertoire of visual opsins, transducin alpha subunits and oxytocin/vasopressin receptors was established by duplication of their shared genomic region in the two rounds of early vertebrate genome duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, David; Ocampo Daza, Daniel; Widmark, Jenny; Abalo, Xesús M; Sundström, Görel; Larhammar, Dan

    2013-11-02

    Vertebrate color vision is dependent on four major color opsin subtypes: RH2 (green opsin), SWS1 (ultraviolet opsin), SWS2 (blue opsin), and LWS (red opsin). Together with the dim-light receptor rhodopsin (RH1), these form the family of vertebrate visual opsins. Vertebrate genomes contain many multi-membered gene families that can largely be explained by the two rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD) in the vertebrate ancestor (2R) followed by a third round in the teleost ancestor (3R). Related chromosome regions resulting from WGD or block duplications are said to form a paralogon. We describe here a paralogon containing the genes for visual opsins, the G-protein alpha subunit families for transducin (GNAT) and adenylyl cyclase inhibition (GNAI), the oxytocin and vasopressin receptors (OT/VP-R), and the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CACNA1-L). Sequence-based phylogenies and analyses of conserved synteny show that the above-mentioned gene families, and many neighboring gene families, expanded in the early vertebrate WGDs. This allows us to deduce the following evolutionary scenario: The vertebrate ancestor had a chromosome containing the genes for two visual opsins, one GNAT, one GNAI, two OT/VP-Rs and one CACNA1-L gene. This chromosome was quadrupled in 2R. Subsequent gene losses resulted in a set of five visual opsin genes, three GNAT and GNAI genes, six OT/VP-R genes and four CACNA1-L genes. These regions were duplicated again in 3R resulting in additional teleost genes for some of the families. Major chromosomal rearrangements have taken place in the teleost genomes. By comparison with the corresponding chromosomal regions in the spotted gar, which diverged prior to 3R, we could time these rearrangements to post-3R. We present an extensive analysis of the paralogon housing the visual opsin, GNAT and GNAI, OT/VP-R, and CACNA1-L gene families. The combined data imply that the early vertebrate WGD events contributed to the evolution of vision and the

  12. The role of gene duplication and unconstrained selective pressures in the melanopsin gene family evolution and vertebrate circadian rhythm regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Rui; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2012-01-01

    Melanopsin is a photosensitive cell protein involved in regulating circadian rhythms and other non-visual responses to light. The melanopsin gene family is represented by two paralogs, OPN4x and OPN4m, which originated through gene duplication early in the emergence of vertebrates. Here we studied the melanopsin gene family using an integrated gene/protein evolutionary approach, which revealed that the rhabdomeric urbilaterian ancestor had the same amino acid patterns (DRY motif and the Y and E conterions) as extant vertebrate species, suggesting that the mechanism for light detection and regulation is similar to rhabdomeric rhodopsins. Both OPN4m and OPN4x paralogs are found in vertebrate genomic paralogons, suggesting that they diverged following this duplication event about 600 million years ago, when the complex eye emerged in the vertebrate ancestor. Melanopsins generally evolved under negative selection (ω = 0.171) with some minor episodes of positive selection (proportion of sites = 25%) and functional divergence (θ(I) = 0.349 and θ(II) = 0.126). The OPN4m and OPN4x melanopsin paralogs show evidence of spectral divergence at sites likely involved in melanopsin light absorbance (200F, 273S and 276A). Also, following the teleost lineage-specific whole genome duplication (3R) that prompted the teleost fish radiation, type I divergence (θ(I) = 0.181) and positive selection (affecting 11% of sites) contributed to amino acid variability that we related with the photo-activation stability of melanopsin. The melanopsin intracellular regions had unexpectedly high variability in their coupling specificity of G-proteins and we propose that Gq/11 and Gi/o are the two G-proteins most-likely to mediate the melanopsin phototransduction pathway. The selection signatures were mainly observed on retinal-related sites and the third and second intracellular loops, demonstrating the physiological plasticity of the melanopsin protein group. Our results provide new insights on

  13. The role of gene duplication and unconstrained selective pressures in the melanopsin gene family evolution and vertebrate circadian rhythm regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Borges

    Full Text Available Melanopsin is a photosensitive cell protein involved in regulating circadian rhythms and other non-visual responses to light. The melanopsin gene family is represented by two paralogs, OPN4x and OPN4m, which originated through gene duplication early in the emergence of vertebrates. Here we studied the melanopsin gene family using an integrated gene/protein evolutionary approach, which revealed that the rhabdomeric urbilaterian ancestor had the same amino acid patterns (DRY motif and the Y and E conterions as extant vertebrate species, suggesting that the mechanism for light detection and regulation is similar to rhabdomeric rhodopsins. Both OPN4m and OPN4x paralogs are found in vertebrate genomic paralogons, suggesting that they diverged following this duplication event about 600 million years ago, when the complex eye emerged in the vertebrate ancestor. Melanopsins generally evolved under negative selection (ω = 0.171 with some minor episodes of positive selection (proportion of sites = 25% and functional divergence (θ(I = 0.349 and θ(II = 0.126. The OPN4m and OPN4x melanopsin paralogs show evidence of spectral divergence at sites likely involved in melanopsin light absorbance (200F, 273S and 276A. Also, following the teleost lineage-specific whole genome duplication (3R that prompted the teleost fish radiation, type I divergence (θ(I = 0.181 and positive selection (affecting 11% of sites contributed to amino acid variability that we related with the photo-activation stability of melanopsin. The melanopsin intracellular regions had unexpectedly high variability in their coupling specificity of G-proteins and we propose that Gq/11 and Gi/o are the two G-proteins most-likely to mediate the melanopsin phototransduction pathway. The selection signatures were mainly observed on retinal-related sites and the third and second intracellular loops, demonstrating the physiological plasticity of the melanopsin protein group. Our results provide new

  14. A critical assessment of cross-species detection of gene duplicates using comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renn Suzy CP

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of genomic DNA among closely related strains or species is a powerful approach for identifying variation in evolutionary processes. One potent source of genomic variation is gene duplication, which is prevalent among individuals and species. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH has been successfully utilized to detect this variation among lineages. Here, beyond the demonstration that gene duplicates among species can be quantified with aCGH, we consider the effect of sequence divergence on the ability to detect gene duplicates. Results Using the X chromosome genomic content difference between male D. melanogaster and female D. yakuba and D. simulans, we describe a decrease in the ability to accurately measure genomic content (copy number for orthologs that are only 90% identical. We demonstrate that genome characteristics (e.g. chromatin environment and non-orthologous sequence similarity can also affect the ability to accurately measure genomic content. We describe a normalization strategy and statistical criteria to be used for the identification of gene duplicates among any species group for which an array platform is available from a closely related species. Conclusions Array CGH can be used to effectively identify gene duplication and genome content; however, certain biases are present due to sequence divergence and other genome characteristics resulting from the divergence between lineages. Highly conserved gene duplicates will be more readily recovered by aCGH. Duplicates that have been retained for a selective advantage due to directional selection acting on many loci in one or both gene copies are likely to be under-represented. The results of this study should inform the interpretation of both previously published and future work that employs this powerful technique.

  15. Cyclin E in centrosome duplication and reduplication in sea urchin zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnackenberg, Bradley J; Marzluff, William F; Sluder, Greenfield

    2008-12-01

    When protein synthesis is completely blocked from before fertilization, the sea urchin zygote arrests in first S phase and the paternal centrosome reduplicates multiple times. However, when protein synthesis is blocked starting in prophase of first mitosis, the zygote divides and the blastomeres arrest in a G1-like state. The centrosome inherited from this mitosis duplicates only once in each blastomere for reasons that are not understood. The late G1 rise in cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity initiates centrosome duplication in mammalian cells and its activity is needed for centrosome duplication in Xenopus egg extracts. Since the half-time for cyclin E turnover is normally approximately 1 h in sea urchin zygotes, the different behaviors of centrosomes during G1 and S phase arrests could be due to differential losses of cyclin E and its associated kinase activities at these two arrest points. To better understand the mechanisms that limit centrosome duplication, we characterize the levels of cyclin E and its associated kinase activity at the S phase and G1 arrest points. We first demonstrate that cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity is required for centrosome duplication and reduplication in sea urchin zygotes. Next we find that cyclin E levels and cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activities are both constitutively and equivalently elevated during both the S phase and G1 arrests. This indicates that centrosome duplication during the G1 arrest is limited by a block to reduplication under conditions permissive for duplication. The cytoplasmic conditions of S phase, however, abrogate this block to reduplication.

  16. Chromosome 17 centromere duplication and responsiveness to anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibau, Ariadna; López-Vilaró, Laura; Pérez-Olabarria, Maitane; Vázquez, Tania; Pons, Cristina; Gich, Ignasi; Alonso, Carmen; Ojeda, Belén; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Lerma, Enrique; Barnadas, Agustí; Escuin, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) genes have been proposed as predictive biomarkers of sensitivity to anthracycline chemotherapy. Recently, chromosome 17 centromere enumeration probe (CEP17) duplication has also been associated with increased responsiveness to anthracyclines. However, reports are conflicting and none of these tumor markers can yet be considered a clinically reliable predictor of response to anthracyclines. We studied the association of TOP2A gene alterations, HER2 gene amplification, and CEP17 duplication with response to anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 140 patients with operable or locally advanced breast cancer. HER2 was tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization and TOP2A and CEP17 by chromogenic in situ hybridization. Thirteen patients (9.3%) achieved pathologic complete response (pCR). HER2 amplification was present in 24 (17.5%) of the tumors. TOP2A amplification occurred in seven tumors (5.1%). CEP17 duplication was detected in 13 patients (9.5%). CEP17 duplication correlated with a higher rate of pCR [odds ratio (OR) 6.55, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.25-34.29, P = .026], and analysis of TOP2A amplification showed a trend bordering on statistical significance (OR 6.97, 95% CI 0.96-50.12, P = .054). TOP2A amplification and CEP17 duplication combined were strongly associated with pCR (OR 6.71, 95% CI 1.66-27.01, P = .007). HER2 amplification did not correlate with pCR. Our results suggest that CEP17 duplication predicts pCR to primary anthracycline-based chemotherapy. CEP17 duplication, TOP2A amplifications, and HER2 amplifications were not associated with prognosis.

  17. Rapid genome reshaping by multiple-gene loss after whole-genome duplication in teleost fish suggested by mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Jun; Sato, Yukuto; Sinclair, Robert; Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2015-12-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD) is believed to be a significant source of major evolutionary innovation. Redundant genes resulting from WGD are thought to be lost or acquire new functions. However, the rates of gene loss and thus temporal process of genome reshaping after WGD remain unclear. The WGD shared by all teleost fish, one-half of all jawed vertebrates, was more recent than the two ancient WGDs that occurred before the origin of jawed vertebrates, and thus lends itself to analysis of gene loss and genome reshaping. Using a newly developed orthology identification pipeline, we inferred the post-teleost-specific WGD evolutionary histories of 6,892 protein-coding genes from nine phylogenetically representative teleost genomes on a time-calibrated tree. We found that rapid gene loss did occur in the first 60 My, with a loss of more than 70-80% of duplicated genes, and produced similar genomic gene arrangements within teleosts in that relatively short time. Mathematical modeling suggests that rapid gene loss occurred mainly by events involving simultaneous loss of multiple genes. We found that the subsequent 250 My were characterized by slow and steady loss of individual genes. Our pipeline also identified about 1,100 shared single-copy genes that are inferred to have become singletons before the divergence of clupeocephalan teleosts. Therefore, our comparative genome analysis suggests that rapid gene loss just after the WGD reshaped teleost genomes before the major divergence, and provides a useful set of marker genes for future phylogenetic analysis.

  18. Identification of a novel leptin receptor duplicate in Atlantic salmon: Expression analyses in different life stages and in response to feeding status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angotzi, Anna R; Stefansson, Sigurd O; Nilsen, Tom O; Øvrebø, Jan I; Andersson, Eva; Taranger, Geir L; Rønnestad, Ivar

    2016-09-01

    In recent years rapidly growing research has led to identification of several fish leptin orthologs and numerous duplicated paralogs possibly arisen from the third and fourth round whole genome duplication (3R and 4R WGD) events. In this study we identify in Atlantic salmon a duplicated LepRA gene, named LepRA2, that further extend possible evolutionary scenarios of the leptin and leptin receptor system. The 1121 amino acid sequence of the novel LepRA2 shares 80% sequence identity with the LepRA1 paralog, and contains the protein motifs typical of the functional (long form) leptin receptor in vertebrates. In silico predictions showed similar electrostatic properties of LepRA1 and LepRA2 and high sequence conservation at the leptin interaction surfaces within the CHR/leptin-binding and FNIII domains, suggesting conserved functional specificity between the two duplicates. Analysis of temporal expression profiles during pre-hatching stages indicate that both transcripts are involved in modulating leptin developmental functions, although the LepRA1 paralog may play a major role as the embryo complexity increases. There is ubiquitous distribution of LepRs underlying pleiotropism of leptin in all tissues investigated. LepRA1 and LepRA2 are differentially expressed with LepRA1 more abundant than LepRA2 in most of the tissues investigated, with the only exception of liver. Analysis of constitutive LepRA1 and LepRA2 expression in brain and liver at parr, post-smolt and adult stages reveal striking spatial divergence between the duplicates at all stages investigated. This suggests that, beside increased metabolic requirements, leptin sensitivity in the salmon brain might be linked to important variables such as habitat, ecology and life cycle. Furthermore, leptins and LepRs mRNAs in the brain showed gene-specific variability in response to long term fasting, suggesting that leptin's roles as modulator of nutritional status in Atlantic salmon might be governed by distinct

  19. A Wandering Abdominal Mass in a Neonate: An Enteric Duplication Cyst Mimicking an Ovarian Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Enteric duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies that are prenatally diagnosed through antenatal ultrasonography (US). In female patients, however, attention must be paid since these formations might be confused with ovarian cysts. Herein, we present a case of a low birth weight female infant with an enteric duplication cyst. A cystic lesion was detected in the right abdomen of the fetus on antenatal US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Serial US and MRI examinations performed after birth showed a single cyst that wandered from side to side in the abdomen; the initial diagnosis was thought to be an ovarian cyst. During laparotomy, however, it was found to be an enteric duplication cyst with volvulus. To our knowledge, there has been no report of an enteric duplication cyst presenting as a wandering abdominal mass. Our experience indicates that early intervention is necessary for patients who have a wandering abdominal mass to avoid complications and urgent surgery, whether it is an ovarian cyst or an enteric duplication cyst.

  20. Application for Data De-duplication Algorithm Based on Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingchen Ge

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of Mobile Devices, coupled with the rise of the personal cloud service, the business of Cloud Storage and Cloud Synchronization grows rapidly in recent years. As a result, it imposes pressure on the space of the network storage and the network bandwidth, especially in the field of the Mobile Internet. Data De-duplication algorithm can reduce the data redundancy in the method of deleting the same file or the same data chunk in data storage systems so that the space of network storage could be saved and the utilization ratio of network bandwidth could be improved. The algorithm which takes Fixed-size Partition as chunking strategy has been applied in systems of Cloud Storage and Cloud Synchronization in the Mobile Internet field. Though this method is simple and efficient, it is so sensitive to the operation of adding or deleting data that the Data De-duplication Rate is lower than expected. An application for Data De-duplication algorithm based on Content-Defined Chunking is proposed to provide basis in the field of Cloud Storage and Cloud Synchronization through mobile devices. In this way, a file is divided into chunks of different sizes instead of a pre-fixed size based on file contents. Key steps of Data De-duplication algorithm were optimized to make it accommodate to mobile devices. Experimental results showed that the approach brought relatively higher Data De-duplication Rate and lower machine overhead.

  1. A case of de novo duplication of 15q24-q26.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Ran Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Distal duplication, or trisomy 15q, is an extremely rare chromosomal disorder characterized by prenatal and postnatal overgrowth, mental retardation, and craniofacial malformations. Additional abnormalities typically include an unusually short neck, malformations of the fingers and toes, scoliosis and skeletal malformations, genital abnormalities, particularly in affected males, and, in some cases, cardiac defects. The range and severity of symptoms and physical findings may vary from case to case, depending upon the length and location of the duplicated portion of chromosome 15q. Most reported cases of duplication of the long arm of chromosome 15 frequently have more than one segmental imbalance resulting from unbalanced translocations involving chromosome 15 and deletions in another chromosome, as well as other structural chromosomal abnormalities. We report a female newborn with a de novo duplication, 15q24- q26.3, showing intrauterine overgrowth, a narrow asymmetric face with down-slanting palpebral fissures, a large, prominent nose, and micrognathia, arachnodactyly, camptodactyly, congenital heart disease, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter. Chromosomal analysis showed a 46,XX,inv(9(p12q13,dup(15(q24q26.3. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed a gain of 42 clones on 15q24-q26.3. This case represents the only reported patient with a de novo 15q24-q26.3 duplication that did not result from an unbalanced translocation and did not have a concomitant monosomic component in Korea.

  2. Augmented HR Repair Mediates Acquired Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Del Alcazar, Carlos Rodrigo; Todorova, Pavlina Krasimirova; Habib, Amyn A; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Burma, Sandeep

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults and is universally fatal. The DNA alkylating agent temozolomide is part of the standard-of-care for GBM. However, these tumors eventually develop therapy-driven resistance and inevitably recur. While loss of mismatch repair (MMR) and re-expression of MGMT have been shown to underlie chemoresistance in a fraction of GBMs, resistance mechanisms operating in the remaining GBMs are not well understood. To better understand the molecular basis for therapy-driven temozolomide resistance, mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts were subjected to protracted temozolomide treatment, and cell lines were generated from the primary (untreated) and recurrent (temozolomide-treated) tumors. As expected, the cells derived from primary tumors were sensitive to temozolomide, whereas the cells from the recurrent tumors were significantly resistant to the drug. Importantly, the acquired resistance to temozolomide in the recurrent lines was not driven by re-expression of MGMT or loss of MMR but was due to accelerated repair of temozolomide-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Temozolomide induces DNA replication-associated DSBs that are primarily repaired by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Augmented HR appears to underpin temozolomide resistance in the recurrent lines, as these cells were cross-resistant to other agents that induced replication-associated DSBs, exhibited faster resolution of damage-induced Rad51 foci, and displayed higher levels of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). Furthermore, in light of recent studies demonstrating that CDK1 and CDK2 promote HR, it was found that CDK1/2 inhibitors countered the heightened HR in recurrent tumors and sensitized these therapy-resistant tumor cells to temozolomide.

  3. Event Index - an LHCb Event Search System

    CERN Document Server

    Ustyuzhanin, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    During LHC Run 1, the LHCb experiment recorded around 1011 collision events. This paper describes Event Index | an event search system. Its primary function is to quickly select subsets of events from a combination of conditions, such as the estimated decay channel or number of hits in a subdetector. Event Index is essentially Apache Lucene [1] optimized for read-only indexes distributed over independent shards on independent nodes.

  4. Gastrointestinal events with clopidogrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Würtz, Morten; Schwarz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Clopidogrel prevents cardiovascular events, but has been linked with adverse gastrointestinal (GI) complications, particularly bleeding events.......Clopidogrel prevents cardiovascular events, but has been linked with adverse gastrointestinal (GI) complications, particularly bleeding events....

  5. Seven complete mitochondrial genome sequences of bushtits (Passeriformes, Aegithalidae, Aegithalos): the evolution pattern in duplicated control regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yuan; Liu, Nian; Yang, Jing; Lei, Fumin

    2015-06-01

    The control region (CR) of the mitochondrial DNA exhibits important functions in replication and transcription, and duplications of the CR have been reported in a wide range of animal groups. In most cases, concerted evolution is expected to explain the high similarity of duplicated CRs. In this paper, we present seven complete mitochondrial genome sequences from the bushtits (genus Aegithalos), in which we discovered two duplicated CRs, and try to survey the evolution pattern of these duplicated CRs. We also found that the duplicated CRs within one individual were almost identical, and variations were concentrated in two sections, one located between a poly-C site and a potential TAS (termination associated sequence) element, the other one located at the 3' end of the duplicated CRs. The phylogenetic analyses of paralogous CRs showed that the tree topology were depending on whether the two high variable regions at the upstream of TAS element and the 3'end of duplicated CRs: when they were concluded, the orthologous copies were closely related; when they were excluded, the paralogous copies in the same lineages were closely related. This may suggest the role of recombination in the evolution of duplicated CRs. Consequently, the recombination was detected, and the breakpoints were found at ∼120 bp (the upstream of the potential TAS element) and ∼1150 bp of the alignment of duplicated CRs. According to these results, we supposed that homologous recombination occurred between paralogous CRs from different mtDNA molecule was proposed as the most suitable mechanism for concerted evolution of the duplicated CRs, and the recombination took place in every replication cycle, so that most part of the duplicated regions remain identical within an individual, while the 5' and 3'end of the duplicated CRs were not involved in recombination, and evolved independently.

  6. Cecal duplication cyst: A rare case report with review of literature

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    Vikas Shyam Raj Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Duplication cysts of the alimentary tract are very rare congenital anomalies. Out of all these cases, two-thirds of them manifest before the age of 2 years. They are common in ileum, but very rare in cecum. Some of them may remain asymptomatic and present in the adulthood. The lesion may be tubular or cystic. Several theories have been postulated, but true etiology is not known. We hereby report a case of a 10-year-old female who presented with abdominal pain in the pediatric surgery outpatient department. Diagnosis of cecal duplication cyst was confirmed on histopathology. This report implies that although alimentary tract duplications are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children who presents with acute abdominal pain.

  7. Promotion and Suppression of Centriole Duplication Are Catalytically Coupled through PLK4 to Ensure Centriole Homeostasis

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    Minhee Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available PLK4 is the major kinase driving centriole duplication. Duplication occurs only once per cell cycle, forming one new (or daughter centriole that is tightly engaged to the preexisting (or mother centriole. Centriole engagement is known to block the reduplication of mother centrioles, but the molecular identity responsible for the block remains unclear. Here, we show that the centriolar cartwheel, the geometric scaffold for centriole assembly, forms the identity of daughter centrioles essential for the block, ceasing further duplication of the mother centriole to which it is engaged. To ensure a steady block, we found that the cartwheel requires constant maintenance by PLK4 through phosphorylation of the same substrate that drives centriole assembly, revealing a parsimonious control in which “assembly” and “block for new assembly” are linked through the same catalytic reaction to achieve homeostasis. Our results support a recently deduced model that the cartwheel-bound PLK4 directly suppresses centriole reduplication.

  8. Artificial duplicate reads in sequencing data of 454 Genome Sequencer FLX System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Dong; Yangyi Chen; Yan Shen; Shengyue Wang; Guoping Zhao; Weirong Jin

    2011-01-01

    The 454 Genome Sequencer (GS) FLX System is one of the next-generation sequencing systems featured by long reads, high accuracy, and ultra-high throughput.Based on the mechanism of emulsion PCR, a unique DNA template would only generate a unique sequence read after being amplified and sequenced on GS FLX.However,biased amplification of DNA templates might occur in the process of emulsion PCR, which results in production of artificial duplicate reads.Under the condition that each DNA template is unique to another, 3.49%-18.14% of total reads in GS FLX-sequencing data were found to be artificial duplicate reads.These duplicate reads may lead to misunderstanding of sequencing data and special attention should be paid to the potential biases they introduced to the data.

  9. Small homologous blocks in phytophthora genomes do not point to an ancient whole-genome duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooff, Jolien J E; Snel, Berend; Seidl, Michael F

    2014-05-01

    Genomes of the plant-pathogenic genus Phytophthora are characterized by small duplicated blocks consisting of two consecutive genes (2HOM blocks) and by an elevated abundance of similarly aged gene duplicates. Both properties, in particular the presence of 2HOM blocks, have been attributed to a whole-genome duplication (WGD) at the last common ancestor of Phytophthora. However, large intraspecies synteny-compelling evidence for a WGD-has not been detected. Here, we revisited the WGD hypothesis by deducing the age of 2HOM blocks. Two independent timing methods reveal that the majority of 2HOM blocks arose after divergence of the Phytophthora lineages. In addition, a large proportion of the 2HOM block copies colocalize on the same scaffold. Therefore, the presence of 2HOM blocks does not support a WGD at the last common ancestor of Phytophthora. Thus, genome evolution of Phytophthora is likely driven by alternative mechanisms, such as bursts of transposon activity.

  10. Sample Duplication Method for Monte Carlo Simulation of Large Reaction-Diffusion System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红东; 陆建明; 杨玉良

    1994-01-01

    The sample duplication method for the Monte Carlo simulation of large reaction-diffusion system is proposed in this paper. It is proved that the sample duplication method will effectively raise the efficiency and statistical precision of the simulation without changing the kinetic behaviour of the reaction-diffusion system and the critical condition for the bifurcation of the steady-states. The method has been applied to the simulation of spatial and time dissipative structure of Brusselator under the Dirichlet boundary condition. The results presented in this paper definitely show that the sample duplication method provides a very efficient way to sol-’e the master equation of large reaction-diffusion system. For the case of two-dimensional system, it is found that the computation time is reduced at least by a factor of two orders of magnitude compared to the algorithm reported in literature.

  11. [Duplication of the acromioclavicular joint: A case dating from the end of the 19th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verna, E; Parmentier, S; Richier, A; Chaumoitre, K; Panuel, M; Ardagna, Y

    2017-08-03

    The duplication of the acromioclavicular joint is a very rare anomaly of shoulder girdle. Here, we present a new case of unilateral duplication of the acromioclavicular joint observed on an individual from the 19th century. In the literature, two hypotheses are proposed to explain the origin of this anomaly. The first is a congenital origin that could be explained by in utero displacement of one of the clavicle's primary ossification centers, or the existence of an additional ossification center. The second is a traumatic origin resulting from an acromioclavicular fracture that occurred during the growth period of the individual. Our macroscopic observations and CT-scan images show no sign of a healed fracture, of complications, or of a bone callus after healing. The hypothesis of a congenital origin for this acromioclavicular duplication is therefore preferred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The PLK4-STIL-SAS-6 module at the core of centriole duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arquint, Christian; Nigg, Erich A

    2016-10-15

    Centrioles are microtubule-based core components of centrosomes and cilia. They are duplicated exactly once during S-phase progression. Central to formation of each new (daughter) centriole is the formation of a nine-fold symmetrical cartwheel structure onto which microtubule triplets are deposited. In recent years, a module comprising the protein kinase polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4) and the two proteins STIL and SAS-6 have been shown to stay at the core of centriole duplication. Depletion of any one of these three proteins blocks centriole duplication and, conversely, overexpression causes centriole amplification. In this short review article, we summarize recent insights into how PLK4, STIL and SAS-6 co-operate in space and time to form a new centriole. These advances begin to shed light on the very first steps of centriole biogenesis.

  13. Duodenal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Differential Diagnosis in a Neonate with Bilious Vomiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Župančić, Božidar; Gliha, Andro; Fuenzalida, Jose Varas; Višnjić, Stjepan

    2015-01-01

    Bilious vomiting is a relevant sign in neonates that requires immediate evaluation and diagnosis. A duplication of the intestinal tract is a possible cause of obstruction if located distally to the major duodenal papilla of Vater and most of them involve the jejunum, stomach, or colon. Duodenal duplications are very rare and can have an endoscopic or surgical treatment after diagnosis. We present a case of a 16-day-old term newborn that consulted because of bilious vomiting and after evaluation with imaging and upper endoscopy, a duodenal duplication cyst was found at the level of the third portion causing compression of the intestinal lumen that required surgical resolution with duodenocystostomy. PMID:26788454

  14. Scintigraphic detection of 'yo-yo' phenomenon in incomplete ureteric duplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Winnie C.W.; Chan, Kam-wing; Metreweli, Constantine [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong (China)

    2003-01-01

    'Yo-yo' reflux in an incompletely duplicated renal system was demonstrated on {sup 99m}Tc-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) renal scintigraphy in a 7-year-old girl presenting with low-grade fever and pyelonephritis. Incomplete duplication and a bifid renal pelvis, which may be seen in up to 4% of the North American population, occasionally causes symptoms because of recurrent urinary tract infection or loin pain. {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 renal scintigraphy can demonstrate 'yo-yo' reflux in patients with incomplete renal duplication and should be considered in cases with unexplained loin pain, even if {sup 99m}Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scintigraphy is normal. (orig.)

  15. Creating Special Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  16. A rare case of plastid protein-coding gene duplication in the chloroplast genome of Euglena archaeoplastidiata (Euglenophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Matthew S; Shiu, Shin-Han; Triemer, Richard E

    2017-03-12

    Gene duplication is an important evolutionary process that allows duplicate functions to diverge, or, in some cases, allows for new functional gains. However, in contrast to the nuclear genome, gene duplications within the chloroplast are extremely rare. Here, we present the chloroplast genome of the photosynthetic protist Euglena archaeoplastidiata. Upon annotation, it was found that the chloroplast genome contained a novel tandem direct duplication that encoded a portion of RuBisCO large subunit (rbcL) followed by a complete copy of ribosomal protein L32 (rpl32), as well as the associated intergenic sequences. Analyses of the duplicated rpl32 were inconclusive regarding selective pressures, although it was found that substitutions in the duplicated region, all non-synonymous, likely had a neutral functional effect. The duplicated region did not exhibit patterns consistent with previously described mechanisms for tandem direct duplications, and demonstrated an unknown mechanism of duplication. In addition, a comparison of this chloroplast genome to other previously characterized chloroplast genomes from the same family revealed characteristics that indicated E. archaeoplastidiata was probably more closely related to taxa in the genera Monomorphina, Cryptoglena, and Euglenaria than it was to other Euglena taxa. Taken together, the chloroplast genome of E. archaeoplastidiata demonstrated multiple characteristics unique to the euglenoid world, and has justified the longstanding curiosity regarding this enigmatic taxon.

  17. Demonstration of the Coexistence of Duplicated LH Receptors in Teleosts, and Their Origin in Ancestral Actinopterygians.

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    Gersende Maugars

    Full Text Available Pituitary gonadotropins, FSH and LH, control gonad activity in vertebrates, via binding to their respective receptors, FSHR and LHR, members of GPCR superfamily. Until recently, it was accepted that gnathostomes possess a single FSHR and a single LHR, encoded by fshr and lhcgr genes. We reinvestigated this question, focusing on vertebrate species of key-phylogenetical positions. Genome analyses supported the presence of a single fshr and a single lhcgr in chondrichthyans, and in sarcopterygians including mammals, birds, amphibians and coelacanth. In contrast, we identified a single fshr but two lhgcr in basal teleosts, the eels. We further showed the coexistence of duplicated lhgcr in other actinopterygians, including a non-teleost, the gar, and other teleosts, e.g. Mexican tetra, platyfish, or tilapia. Phylogeny and synteny analyses supported the existence in actinopterygians of two lhgcr paralogs (lhgcr1/ lhgcr2, which do not result from the teleost-specific whole-genome duplication (3R, but likely from a local gene duplication that occurred early in the actinopterygian lineage. Due to gene losses, there was no impact of 3R on the number of gonadotropin receptors in extant teleosts. Additional gene losses during teleost radiation, led to a single lhgcr (lhgcr1 or lhgcr2 in some species, e.g. medaka and zebrafish. Sequence comparison highlighted divergences in the extracellular and intracellular domains of the duplicated lhgcr, suggesting differential properties such as ligand binding and activation mechanisms. Comparison of tissue distribution in the European eel, revealed that fshr and both lhgcr transcripts are expressed in the ovary and testis, but are differentially expressed in non-gonadal tissues such as brain or eye. Differences in structure-activity relationships and tissue expression may have contributed as selective drives in the conservation of the duplicated lhgcr. This study revises the evolutionary scenario and nomenclature of

  18. Copy number expansion of the STX17 duplication in melanoma tissue from Grey horses

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    Sundström Elisabeth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Greying with age in horses is an autosomal dominant trait, associated with loss of hair pigmentation, melanoma and vitiligo-like depigmentation. We recently identified a 4.6 kb duplication in STX17 to be associated with the phenotype. The aims of this study were to investigate if the duplication in Grey horses shows copy number variation and to exclude that any other polymorphism is uniquely associated with the Grey mutation. Results We found little evidence for copy number expansion of the duplicated sequence in blood DNA from Grey horses. In contrast, clear evidence for copy number expansions was indicated in five out of eight tested melanoma tissues or melanoma cell lines. A tendency of a higher copy number in aggressive tumours was also found. Massively parallel resequencing of the ~350 kb Grey haplotype did not reveal any additional mutations perfectly associated with the phenotype, confirming the duplication as the true causative mutation. We identified three SNP alleles that were present in a subset of Grey haplotypes within the 350 kb region that shows complete linkage disequilibrium with the causative mutation. Thus, these three nucleotide substitutions must have occurred subsequent to the duplication, consistent with our interpretation that the Grey mutation arose more than 2,000 years before present. Conclusions These results suggest that the mutation acts as a melanoma-driving regulatory element. The elucidation of the mechanistic features of the duplication will be of considerable interest for the characterization of these horse melanomas as well as for the field of human melanoma research.

  19. Biased exonization of transposed elements in duplicated genes: A lesson from the TIF-IA gene

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    Shomron Noam

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplication and exonization of intronic transposed elements are two mechanisms that enhance genomic diversity. We examined whether there is less selection against exonization of transposed elements in duplicated genes than in single-copy genes. Results Genome-wide analysis of exonization of transposed elements revealed a higher rate of exonization within duplicated genes relative to single-copy genes. The gene for TIF-IA, an RNA polymerase I transcription initiation factor, underwent a humanoid-specific triplication, all three copies of the gene are active transcriptionally, although only one copy retains the ability to generate the TIF-IA protein. Prior to TIF-IA triplication, an Alu element was inserted into the first intron. In one of the non-protein coding copies, this Alu is exonized. We identified a single point mutation leading to exonization in one of the gene duplicates. When this mutation was introduced into the TIF-IA coding copy, exonization was activated and the level of the protein-coding mRNA was reduced substantially. A very low level of exonization was detected in normal human cells. However, this exonization was abundant in most leukemia cell lines evaluated, although the genomic sequence is unchanged in these cancerous cells compared to normal cells. Conclusion The definition of the Alu element within the TIF-IA gene as an exon is restricted to certain types of cancers; the element is not exonized in normal human cells. These results further our understanding of the delicate interplay between gene duplication and alternative splicing and of the molecular evolutionary mechanisms leading to genetic innovations. This implies the existence of purifying selection against exonization in single copy genes, with duplicate genes free from such constrains.

  20. Gallstone fistula with a gastric duplication cyst: an unusual complication of cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamrah, Jasprit; Diep, Phuoc-Tan; Bennet, John; Warren, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Cholecystitis can result in complications if not completely treated. These include gallbladder empyema, perforation and cholecystoenteric fistula. We report the first incidence of cholecystitis resulting in a gallstone fistula with a gastric duplication cyst. A 71 year old patient presented with generalised peritonism that was worst in the epigastric area. Computer tomography (CT) revealed a perforated necrotic gallbladder. Emergency laparotomy, cholecystectomy, partial gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y reconstruction was required. The patient made a slow but full recovery. Pathology results revealed that chronic cholecystitis had resulted in a fistula with a duplication cyst overlying the greater curve of the stomach. Several one centimeter gallstones were found within the cyst cavity. PMID:24946358