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Sample records for repair stem cells

  1. Stem cells and repair of lung injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randell Scott H

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fueled by the promise of regenerative medicine, currently there is unprecedented interest in stem cells. Furthermore, there have been revolutionary, but somewhat controversial, advances in our understanding of stem cell biology. Stem cells likely play key roles in the repair of diverse lung injuries. However, due to very low rates of cellular proliferation in vivo in the normal steady state, cellular and architectural complexity of the respiratory tract, and the lack of an intensive research effort, lung stem cells remain poorly understood compared to those in other major organ systems. In the present review, we concisely explore the conceptual framework of stem cell biology and recent advances pertinent to the lungs. We illustrate lung diseases in which manipulation of stem cells may be physiologically significant and highlight the challenges facing stem cell-related therapy in the lung.

  2. Stem Cells in Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Falanga, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    The field of tissue repair and wound healing has blossomed in the last 30 years. We have gone from recombinant growth factors, to living tissue engineering constructs, to stem cells. The task now is to pursue true regeneration, thus achieving full restoration of structures and their function.

  3. Mismatch repair deficient hematopoietic stem cells are preleukemic stem cells.

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    Yulan Qing

    Full Text Available Whereas transformation events in hematopoietic malignancies may occur at different developmental stages, the initial mutation originates in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, creating a preleukemic stem cell (PLSC. Subsequent mutations at either stem cell or progenitor cell levels transform the PLSC into lymphoma/leukemia initiating cells (LIC. Thymic lymphomas have been thought to develop from developing thymocytes. T cell progenitors are generated from HSCs in the bone marrow (BM, but maturation and proliferation of T cells as well as T-lymphomagenesis depends on both regulatory mechanisms and microenvironment within the thymus. We studied PLSC linked to thymic lymphomas. In this study, we use MSH2-/- mice as a model to investigate the existence of PLSC and the evolution of PLSC to LIC. Following BM transplantation, we found that MSH2-/- BM cells from young mice are able to fully reconstitute multiple hematopoietic lineages of lethally irradiated wild-type recipients. However, all recipients developed thymic lymphomas within three and four months post transplantation. Transplantation of different fractions of BM cells or thymocytes from young health MSH2-/- mice showed that an HSC enriched fraction always reconstituted hematopoiesis followed by lymphoma development. In addition, lymphomas did not occur in thymectomized recipients of MSH2-/- BM. These results suggest that HSCs with DNA repair defects such as MSH2-/- are PLSCs because they retain hematopoietic function, but also carry an obligate lymphomagenic potential within their T-cell progeny that is dependent on the thymic microenvironment.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tissue Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M DiMarino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The advent of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC based therapies for clinical therapeutics has been an exciting and new innovation for the treatment of a variety of diseases associated with inflammation, tissue damage and subsequent regeneration and repair. Application-based ability to measure MSC potency and fate of the cells post-MSC therapy are the variables that confound the use of MSCs therapeutics in human diseases. An evaluation of MSC function and applications with attention to detail in the preparation as well as quality control (QC and quality assurance (QA are only as good as the assays that are developed. In vivo measures of efficacy and potency require an appreciation of the overall pathophysiology of the model and standardization of outcome measures. The new concepts of how MSC’s participate in the tissue regeneration and wound repair process and further, how this is impacted by estimates of efficacy and potency Are important new topics. In this regard,,, this chapter will review some of the in vitro and in vivo assays for MSC function and activity and their application to the clinical arena.

  5. Repair and regeneration: opportunities for carcinogenesis from tissue stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Perryman, Scott V; Sylvester, Karl G

    2007-01-01

    This review will discuss the mechanisms of repair and regeneration in various tissue types and how dysregulation of these mechaisms may lead to cancer. Normal homeostasis involves a careful balance between cell loss and cell renewal. Stem and progenitor cells perform these biologic processes as the functional units of regeneration during both tissue homeostasis and repair. The concept of tissue stem cells capable of giving rise to all differentiated cells within a given tissue led to the conc...

  6. DNA repair in murine embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichy, Elisia D.; Stambrook, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are rapidly proliferating, self-renewing cells that have the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers to form the embryo proper. Since these cells are critical for embryo formation, they must have robust prophylactic mechanisms to ensure that their genomic integrity is preserved. Indeed, several studies have suggested that ES cells are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents and readily undergo apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells from the population. Other evidence suggests that DNA damage can cause premature differentiation in these cells. Several laboratories have also begun to investigate the role of DNA repair in the maintenance of ES cell genomic integrity. It does appear that ES cells differ in their capacity to repair damaged DNA compared to differentiated cells. This minireview focuses on repair mechanisms ES cells may use to help preserve genomic integrity and compares available data regarding these mechanisms with those utilized by differentiated cells

  7. Adipose stem cells for bone tissue repair

    OpenAIRE

    Ciuffi, Simone; Zonefrati, Roberto; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs), together with adipocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells, are contained in fat tissue. ASCs, like the human bone marrow stromal/stem cells (BMSCs), can differentiate into several lineages (adipose cells, fibroblast, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, neuronal cells, endothelial cells, myocytes, and cardiomyocytes). They have also been shown to be immunoprivileged, and genetically stable in long-term cultures. Nevertheless, unlik...

  8. Therapeutic potential of stem cells in auditory hair cell repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji Hata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of acquired hearing loss is very high. About 10% of the total population and more than one third of the population over 65 years suffer from debilitating hearing loss. The most common type of hearing loss in adults is idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL. In the majority of cases, ISSHL is permanent and typically associated with loss of sensory hair cells in the organ of Corti. Following the loss of sensory hair cells, the auditory neurons undergo secondary degeneration. Sensory hair cells and auditory neurons do not regenerate throughout life, and loss of these cells is irreversible and cumulative. However, recent advances in stem cell biology have gained hope that stem cell therapy comes closer to regenerating sensory hair cells in humans. A major advance in the prospects for the use of stem cells to restore normal hearing comes with the recent discovery that hair cells can be generated ex vivo from embryonic stem (ES cells, adult inner ear stem cells and neural stem cells. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that stem cells can promote damaged cell repair in part by secreting diffusible molecules such as growth factors. These results suggest that stem-cell-based treatment regimens can be applicable to the damaged inner ear as future clinical applications.Previously we have established an animal model of cochlear ischemia in gerbils and showed progressive hair cell loss up to 4 days after ischemia. Auditory brain stem response (ABR recordings have demonstrated that this gerbil model displays severe deafness just after cochlear ischemia and gradually recovers thereafter. These pathological findings and clinical manifestations are reminiscent of ISSHL in humans. In this study, we have shown the effectiveness of stem cell therapy by using this animal model of ISSHL.

  9. The stem cell secretome and its role in brain repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Denise; Cossetti, Chiara; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Musco, Giovanna; Bachi, Angela; Pluchino, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    Compelling evidence exists that non-haematopoietic stem cells, including mesenchymal (MSCs) and neural/progenitor stem cells (NPCs), exert a substantial beneficial and therapeutic effect after transplantation in experimental central nervous system (CNS) disease models through the secretion of immune modulatory or neurotrophic paracrine factors. This paracrine hypothesis has inspired an alternative outlook on the use of stem cells in regenerative neurology. In this paradigm, significant repair of the injured brain may be achieved by injecting the biologics secreted by stem cells (secretome), rather than implanting stem cells themselves for direct cell replacement. The stem cell secretome (SCS) includes cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, and has gained increasing attention in recent years because of its multiple implications for the repair, restoration or regeneration of injured tissues. Thanks to recent improvements in SCS profiling and manipulation, investigators are now inspired to harness the SCS as a novel alternative therapeutic option that might ensure more efficient outcomes than current stem cell-based therapies for CNS repair. This review discusses the most recent identification of MSC- and NPC-secreted factors, including those that are trafficked within extracellular membrane vesicles (EVs), and reflects on their potential effects on brain repair. It also examines some of the most convincing advances in molecular profiling that have enabled mapping of the SCS. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tissue Growth and Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Kalinina, N.I.; Sysoeva, V.Yu.; Rubina, K.A.; Parfenova, Ye.V.; Tkachuk, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    It has been established in the recent several decades that stem cells play a crucial role in tissue renewal and regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are part of the most important population of adult stem cells. These cells have hereby been identified for the very first time and subsequently isolated from bone marrow stroma. Bone marrow-derived MSCs have been believed to play the role of a source of cells for the renewal and repair of connective tissues, including bone, cartilage and a...

  11. Myocardium repair with stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peix, Amalia; Hidalgo, Jose; Dorticos, Elvira; Llerena, Lorenzo; Paredes, Angel; Torres, Maritza; Macias, Consuelo; Del Valle, Lazaro; Cabrera, Lazaro O; Carrillo, Regla; Mena, Eric; Fernandez, Yoel

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of assessing the efficacy of bone marrow-derived stem cells transplantation in patients with myocardial infarction and severe chronic heart failure through nuclear cardiology techniques, 15 revascularized patients were studied: nine (Group I) received autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells. The other six were controls (Group II). All underwent a clinical evaluation, radionuclide ventriculography, and gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MIBI-technetium99m, two-day protocol: dipyridamole - rest), before and three months after the procedure. At three months there was a clinical improvement in 89% of patients from Group I. The left ventricular ejection fraction increased: from 32±9% to 44±13% (p=0.03; Group I) and from 38±2% to 48±14% (p NS; Group II). The peak filling rate improved from 120±11 to 196±45 EDV/sec (p=0.03; Group I). The dipyridamole summed score diminished significantly only in Group I (from 35±5 to 23±14; p=0.02). The perfusion improvement was related to the implantation site in 60% of cases. We conclude that the bone marrow-derived stem cells transplantation is effective in patients with severe chronic heart failure of ischemic origin (au)

  12. Stem cells for brain repair in neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

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    Chicha, L; Smith, T; Guzman, R

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic insults are a significant cause of pediatric encephalopathy, developmental delays, and spastic cerebral palsy. Although the developing brain's plasticity allows for remarkable self-repair, severe disruption of normal myelination and cortical development upon neonatal brain injury are likely to generate life-persisting sensory-motor and cognitive deficits in the growing child. Currently, no treatments are available that can address the long-term consequences. Thus, regenerative medicine appears as a promising avenue to help restore normal developmental processes in affected infants. Stem cell therapy has proven effective in promoting functional recovery in animal models of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury and therefore represents a hopeful therapy for this unmet medical condition. Neural stem cells derived from pluripotent stem cells or fetal tissues as well as umbilical cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have all shown initial success in improving functional outcomes. However, much still remains to be understood about how those stem cells can safely be administered to infants and what their repair mechanisms in the brain are. In this review, we discuss updated research into pathophysiological mechanisms of neonatal brain injury, the types of stem cell therapies currently being tested in this context, and the potential mechanisms through which exogenous stem cells might interact with and influence the developing brain.

  13. The Bright and the Dark Sides of DNA Repair in Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frosina, Guido

    2010-01-01

    DNA repair is a double-edged sword in stem cells. It protects normal stem cells in both embryonic and adult tissues from genetic damage, thus allowing perpetuation of intact genomes into new tissues. Fast and efficient DNA repair mechanisms have evolved in normal stem and progenitor cells. Upon differentiation, a certain degree of somatic mutations becomes more acceptable and, consequently, DNA repair dims. DNA repair turns into a problem when stem cells transform and become cancerous. Tran...

  14. Stem cell death and survival in heart regeneration and repair.

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    Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Kalvelyte, Audrone; Stulpinas, Aurimas; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Foldes, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis disrupts cardiac function and leads to cardiac decompensation and terminal heart failure. Delineating the regulatory signaling pathways that orchestrate cell survival in the heart has significant therapeutic implications. Cardiac tissue has limited capacity to regenerate and repair. Stem cell therapy is a successful approach for repairing and regenerating ischemic cardiac tissue; however, transplanted cells display very high death percentage, a problem that affects success of tissue regeneration. Stem cells display multipotency or pluripotency and undergo self-renewal, however these events are negatively influenced by upregulation of cell death machinery that induces the significant decrease in survival and differentiation signals upon cardiovascular injury. While efforts to identify cell types and molecular pathways that promote cardiac tissue regeneration have been productive, studies that focus on blocking the extensive cell death after transplantation are limited. The control of cell death includes multiple networks rather than one crucial pathway, which underlies the challenge of identifying the interaction between various cellular and biochemical components. This review is aimed at exploiting the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells resist death signals to develop into mature and healthy cardiac cells. Specifically, we focus on a number of factors that control death and survival of stem cells upon transplantation and ultimately affect cardiac regeneration. We also discuss potential survival enhancing strategies and how they could be meaningful in the design of targeted therapies that improve cardiac function.

  15. Endogenous Cartilage Repair by Recruitment of Stem Cells.

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    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Articular cartilage has a very limited capacity for repair after injury. The adult body has a pool of stem cells that are mobilized during injury or disease. These cells exist inside niches in bone marrow, muscle, adipose tissue, synovium, and other connective tissues. A method that mobilizes this endogenous pool of stem cells will provide a less costly and less invasive alternative if these cells successfully regenerate defective cartilage. Traditional microfracture procedures employ the concept of bone marrow stimulation to regenerate cartilage. However, the regenerated tissue usually is fibrous cartilage, which has very poor mechanical properties compared to those of normal hyaline cartilage. A method that directs the migration of a large number of autologous mesenchymal stem cells toward injury sites, retains these cells around the defects, and induces chondrogenic differentiation that would enhance success of endogenous cartilage repair. This review briefly summarizes chemokines and growth factors that induce recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation of endogenous progenitor cells, endogenous cell sources for regenerating cartilage, scaffolds for delivery of bioactive factors, and bioadhesive materials that are necessary to bring about endogenous cartilage repair.

  16. Skin appendage-derived stem cells: cell biology and potential for wound repair

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Jiangfan; Yao, Bin; Han, Yutong; Huang, Sha; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells residing in the epidermis and skin appendages are imperative for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also participate in the repair of the epidermis after injuries, inducing restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unlike epidermis-derived stem cells, comprehensive knowledge about skin appendage-derived stem cells remains limited. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of skin appendage-derived stem cells, including their fundament...

  17. Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair: Preclinical Studies and Insights in Translational Animal Models and Outcome Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Monaco, Melissa; Merckx, Greet; Ratajczak, Jessica; Gervois, Pascal; Hilkens, Petra; Clegg, Peter; Bronckaers, Annelies; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2018-01-01

    Due to the restricted intrinsic capacity of resident chondrocytes to regenerate the lost cartilage postinjury, stem cell-based therapies have been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach for cartilage repair. Moreover, stem cell-based therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used successfully in preclinical and clinical settings. Despite these promising reports, the exact mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated cartilage repair remain...

  18. Skin appendage-derived stem cells: cell biology and potential for wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiangfan; Yao, Bin; Han, Yutong; Huang, Sha; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells residing in the epidermis and skin appendages are imperative for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also participate in the repair of the epidermis after injuries, inducing restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unlike epidermis-derived stem cells, comprehensive knowledge about skin appendage-derived stem cells remains limited. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of skin appendage-derived stem cells, including their fundamental characteristics, their preferentially expressed biomarkers, and their potential contribution involved in wound repair. Finally, we will also discuss current strategies, future applications, and limitations of these stem cells, attempting to provide some perspectives on optimizing the available therapy in cutaneous repair and regeneration.

  19. Further proof of the plasticity of adult stem cells and their role in tissue repair

    OpenAIRE

    Prockop, Darwin J.

    2003-01-01

    In this issue, De Bari et al. (2003) present elegant data to counter the recent claims that adult stem cells have a limited plasticity. Further, they provide evidence that adult stem cells can seek out damaged tissues and repair them.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing Ihh promote bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shasha; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Yanan; Tian, Ruhui; Zhang, Lingling; Song, Pingping; Yang, Shi; Zhu, Yong; Guo, Xizhi; Huang, Yiran; Li, Zheng; Kan, Lixin; Hu, Hongliang

    2014-10-28

    Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway is known to play key roles in various aspects of normal endochondral bone development. This study tested the potential roles of high Ihh signaling in the context of injury-induced bone regeneration. A rabbit tibia defect model was established to test the effects of the implant of Ihh/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)/scaffold complex. Computed tomography (CT), gross observation, and standard histological and immunohistological techniques were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. In vitro studies with MSCs and C3H10T1/2 cells were also employed to further understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms. We found that the implanted Ihh/MSCs/scaffold complex promoted bone repair. Consistently, in vitro study found that Ihh induced the upregulation of chondrocytic, osteogenic, and vascular cell markers, both in C3H10T1/2 cells and MSCs. Our study has demonstrated that high Ihh signaling in a complex with MSCs enhanced bone regeneration effectively in a clinically relevant acute injury model. Even though the exact underlying mechanisms are still far from clear, our primary data suggested that enhanced chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and angiogenesis of MSCs at least partially contribute to the process. This study not only has implications for basic research of MSCs and Ihh signaling pathway but also points to the possibility of direct application of this specific paradigm to clinical bone repair.

  1. Stem Cells and Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

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    Umile Giuseppe Longo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage defects represent a common problem in orthopaedic practice. Predisposing factors include traumas, inflammatory conditions, and biomechanics alterations. Conservative management of cartilage defects often fails, and patients with this lesions may need surgical intervention. Several treatment strategies have been proposed, although only surgery has been proved to be predictably effective. Usually, in focal cartilage defects without a stable fibrocartilaginous repair tissue formed, surgeons try to promote a natural fibrocartilaginous response by using marrow stimulating techniques, such as microfracture, abrasion arthroplasty, and Pridie drilling, with the aim of reducing swelling and pain and improving joint function of the patients. These procedures have demonstrated to be clinically useful and are usually considered as first-line treatment for focal cartilage defects. However, fibrocartilage presents inferior mechanical and biochemical properties compared to normal hyaline articular cartilage, characterized by poor organization, significant amounts of collagen type I, and an increased susceptibility to injury, which ultimately leads to premature osteoarthritis (OA. Therefore, the aim of future therapeutic strategies for articular cartilage regeneration is to obtain a hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue by transplantation of tissues or cells. Further studies are required to clarify the role of gene therapy and mesenchimal stem cells for management of cartilage lesions.

  2. Stem cell-derived angiogenic/vasculogenic cells: Possible therapies for tissue repair and tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaginga, J. J.; Doevendans, P.

    2003-01-01

    1. The recent ability to isolate stem cells and study their specific capacity of self-renewal with the formation of different cell types has opened up exciting vistas to help the repair of damaged tissue and even the formation of new tissue. In the present review, we deal with the characteristics

  3. Current status of stem cells in cardiac repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Robert J

    2018-03-01

    One out of every two men and one out of every three women greater than the age of 40 will experience an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at some time during their lifetime. As more patients survive their AMIs, the incidence of congestive heart failure (CHF) is increasing. 6 million people in the USA have ischemic cardiomyopathies and CHF. The search for new and innovative treatments for patients with AMI and CHF has led to investigations and use of human embryonic stem cells, cardiac stem/progenitor cells, bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of these heart conditions. This paper reviews current investigations with human embryonic, cardiac, bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells, and also stem cell paracrine factors and exosomes.

  4. The Potential for Synovium-derived Stem Cells in Cartilage Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubosch, Eva Johanna; Lang, Gernot Michael; Fürst, David

    2018-01-01

    for the treatment of large, isolated, full thickness cartilage defects. Several disadvantages such as the need for two surgical procedures or hypertrophic regenerative cartilage, underline the need for alternative cell sources. OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stem cells, particularly synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells......, represent a promising cell source. Synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells have attracted considerable attention since they display great chondrogenic potential and less hypertrophic differentiation than mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow. The aim of this review was to summarize the current...... knowledge on the chondrogenic potential for synovial stem cells in regard to cartilage repair purposes. RESULTS: A literature search was carried out identifying 260 articles in the databases up to January 2017. Several in vitro and initial animal in vivo studies of cartilage repair using synovia stem cell...

  5. Roles of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Lu, Chang-Feng; Peng, Jiang; Hu, Cheng-Dong; Wang, Yu

    2017-12-01

    Currently, researchers are using neural stem cell transplantation to promote regeneration after peripheral nerve injury, as neural stem cells play an important role in peripheral nerve injury repair. This article reviews recent research progress of the role of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. Neural stem cells can not only differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, but can also differentiate into Schwann-like cells, which promote neurite outgrowth around the injury. Transplanted neural stem cells can differentiate into motor neurons that innervate muscles and promote the recovery of neurological function. To promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury, neural stem cells secrete various neurotrophic factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, fibroblast growth factor, nerve growth factor, insulin-like growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor. In addition, neural stem cells also promote regeneration of the axonal myelin sheath, angiogenesis, and immune regulation. It can be concluded that neural stem cells promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury through a variety of ways.

  6. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ya-jing; Liu, Jian-min; Wei, Shu-ming; Zhang, Yun-hao; Qu, Zhen-hua; Chen, Shu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-l...

  7. Signaling factors in stem cell-mediated repair of infarcted myocardium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandervelde, S; van Luyn, MJA; Tio, RA; Harmsen, MC

    Myocardial infarction leads to scar formation and subsequent reduced cardiac performance. The ultimate therapy after myocardial infarction would pursue stem cell-based regeneration. The aim of stem cell-mediated cardiac repair embodies restoration of cardiac function by regeneration of healthy

  8. Parthenogenetic stem cells for tissue-engineered heart repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didie, Michael; Christalla, Peter; Rubart, Michael; Muppala, Vijayakumar; Doeker, Stephan; Unsoeld, Bernhard; El-Armouche, Ali; Rau, Thomas; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Schwoerer, Alexander P.; Ehmke, Heimo; Schumacher, Udo; Fuchs, Sigrid; Lange, Claudia; Becker, Alexander; Tao, Wen; Scherschel, John A.; Soonpaa, Mark H.; Yang, Tao; Lin, Qiong; Zenke, Martin; Han, Dong-Wook; Schoeler, Hans R.; Rudolph, Cornelia; Steinemann, Doris; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Kattman, Steve; Witty, Alec; Keller, Gordon; Field, Loren J.; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    Uniparental parthenotes are considered an unwanted byproduct of in vitro fertilization. In utero parthenote development is severely compromised by defective organogenesis and in particular by defective cardiogenesis. Although developmentally compromised, apparently pluripotent stem cells can be

  9. Potential of human dental stem cells in repairing the complete transection of rat spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Li, Xinghan; Sun, Liang; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2017-04-01

    Objective. The adult spinal cord of mammals contains a certain amount of neural precursor cells, but these endogenous cells have a limited capacity for replacement of lost cells after spinal cord injury. The exogenous stem cells transplantation has become a therapeutic strategy for spinal cord repairing because of their immunomodulatory and differentiation capacity. In addition, dental stem cells originating from the cranial neural crest might be candidate cell sources for neural engineering. Approach. Human dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs), stem cells from apical papilla (SCAPs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and identified in vitro, then green GFP-labeled stem cells with pellets were transplanted into completely transected spinal cord. The functional recovery of rats and multiple neuro-regenerative mechanisms were explored. Main results. The dental stem cells, especially DFSCs, demonstrated the potential in repairing the completely transected spinal cord and promote functional recovery after injury. The major involved mechanisms were speculated below: First, dental stem cells inhibited the expression of interleukin-1β to reduce the inflammatory response; second, they inhibited the expression of ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) to promote neurite regeneration; third, they inhibited the sulfonylurea receptor1 (SUR-1) expression to reduce progressive hemorrhagic necrosis; lastly, parts of the transplanted cells survived and differentiated into mature neurons and oligodendrocytes but not astrocyte, which is beneficial for promoting axons growth. Significance. Dental stem cells presented remarkable tissue regenerative capability after spinal cord injury through immunomodulatory, differentiation and protection capacity.

  10. Heterogeneous Stem Cells in Skin Homeostatis and Wound Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meilana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The skin protects mammals from insults, infection and dehydration and enables thermoregulation and sensory perception. Various skin-resident cells carry out these diverse functions. Constant turnover of cells and healing upon injury necessitate multiple reservoirs of stem cells. The skin is a complex organ harboring several distinct populations of stem cells and a rich array of cell types. Advances in genetic and imaging tools have brought new findings about the lineage relationships between skin stem cells and their progeny. Such knowledge may offer novel avenues for therapeutics and regenerative medicine. CONTENT: In the past years, our view of the mechanisms that govern skin homeostasis and regeneration have markedly changed. New populations of stem cells have been identified that behave spatio-temporally differently in healthy tissues and in situations of damage, indicating that a great level of stem cell heterogeneity is present in the skin. There are believed to be distinct populations of stem cells in different locations. The lineages that they feed are normally constrained by signals from their local environment, but they can give rise to all epidermal lineages in response to appropriate stimuli. Given the richness of structures such as blood vessels, subcutaneous fat, innervation and the accumulation of fibroblasts under the upper parts of the rete ridges (in the case of human skin, it is reasonable to speculate that the microenvironment might be essential for interfollicular epidermal homeostasis. The bloodstream is probably the main source of long-range signals reaching the skin, and cues provided by the vascular niche might be essential for skin homeostasis. SUMMARY: A key function of the interfollicular epidermis is to act as a protective interface between the body and the external environment, and it contains several architectural elements that enable it to fulfill this function. All elements of the epidermis play

  11. Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair: Preclinical Studies and Insights in Translational Animal Models and Outcome Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Lo Monaco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the restricted intrinsic capacity of resident chondrocytes to regenerate the lost cartilage postinjury, stem cell-based therapies have been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach for cartilage repair. Moreover, stem cell-based therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been used successfully in preclinical and clinical settings. Despite these promising reports, the exact mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated cartilage repair remain uncertain. Stem cells can contribute to cartilage repair via chondrogenic differentiation, via immunomodulation, or by the production of paracrine factors and extracellular vesicles. But before novel cell-based therapies for cartilage repair can be introduced into the clinic, rigorous testing in preclinical animal models is required. Preclinical models used in regenerative cartilage studies include murine, lapine, caprine, ovine, porcine, canine, and equine models, each associated with its specific advantages and limitations. This review presents a summary of recent in vitro data and from in vivo preclinical studies justifying the use of MSCs and iPSCs in cartilage tissue engineering. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing small and large animals will be discussed, while also describing suitable outcome measures for evaluating cartilage repair.

  12. Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair: Preclinical Studies and Insights in Translational Animal Models and Outcome Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, Melissa; Merckx, Greet; Ratajczak, Jessica; Gervois, Pascal; Hilkens, Petra; Clegg, Peter; Bronckaers, Annelies; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2018-01-01

    Due to the restricted intrinsic capacity of resident chondrocytes to regenerate the lost cartilage postinjury, stem cell-based therapies have been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach for cartilage repair. Moreover, stem cell-based therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used successfully in preclinical and clinical settings. Despite these promising reports, the exact mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated cartilage repair remain uncertain. Stem cells can contribute to cartilage repair via chondrogenic differentiation, via immunomodulation, or by the production of paracrine factors and extracellular vesicles. But before novel cell-based therapies for cartilage repair can be introduced into the clinic, rigorous testing in preclinical animal models is required. Preclinical models used in regenerative cartilage studies include murine, lapine, caprine, ovine, porcine, canine, and equine models, each associated with its specific advantages and limitations. This review presents a summary of recent in vitro data and from in vivo preclinical studies justifying the use of MSCs and iPSCs in cartilage tissue engineering. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing small and large animals will be discussed, while also describing suitable outcome measures for evaluating cartilage repair.

  13. Calvarial Suture-Derived Stem Cells and Their Contribution to Cranial Bone Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Doro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the natural turnover during life, the bones in the skeleton possess the ability to self-repair in response to injury or disease-related bone loss. Based on studies of bone defect models, both processes are largely supported by resident stem cells. In the long bones, the source of skeletal stem cells has been widely investigated over the years, where the major stem cell population is thought to reside in the perivascular niche of the bone marrow. In contrast, we have very limited knowledge about the stem cells contributing to the repair of calvarial bones. In fact, until recently, the presence of specific stem cells in adult craniofacial bones was uncertain. These flat bones are mainly formed via intramembranous rather than endochondral ossification and thus contain minimal bone marrow space. It has been previously proposed that the overlying periosteum and underlying dura mater provide osteoprogenitors for calvarial bone repair. Nonetheless, recent studies have identified a major stem cell population within the suture mesenchyme with multiple differentiation abilities and intrinsic reparative potential. Here we provide an updated review of calvarial stem cells and potential mechanisms of regulation in the context of skull injury repair.

  14. Effectiveness of Wharton's jelly stem cells in gastroschisis repair ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inner surface of the umbilical patch is a 'live' structure with WJ, which contains mucoid connective tissue and fibroblast-like cells – that is, stem cells producing cutis, adipose, and connective tissue. Results Using our method, early control assessment of 18 of 21 patients with gastroschisis, at intervals of 1–3 months, ...

  15. Mechanisms of DNA damage repair in adult stem cells and implications for cancer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Clare E; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse

    2018-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity in tissue-specific stem cells is critical for tissue homeostasis and the prevention of deleterious diseases such as cancer. Stem cells are subject to DNA damage induced by endogenous replication mishaps or exposure to exogenous agents. The type of DNA lesion and the cell cycle stage will invoke different DNA repair mechanisms depending on the intrinsic DNA repair machinery of a cell. Inappropriate DNA repair in stem cells can lead to cell death, or to the formation and accumulation of genetic alterations that can be transmitted to daughter cells and so is linked to cancer formation. DNA mutational signatures that are associated with DNA repair deficiencies or exposure to carcinogenic agents have been described in cancer. Here we review the most recent findings on DNA repair pathways activated in epithelial tissue stem and progenitor cells and their implications for cancer mutational signatures. We discuss how deep knowledge of early molecular events leading to carcinogenesis provides insights into DNA repair mechanisms operating in tumours and how these could be exploited therapeutically. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Human embryonic stem cells have enhanced repair of multiple forms of DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Swistowska, Anna Maria; Lee, Jae Wan

    2008-01-01

    cells compared with various differentiated murine cells. Using single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) we found that human embryonic stem cells (BG01, I6) have more efficient repair of different types of DNA damage (generated from H2O2, UV-C, ionizing radiation, or psoralen) than human primary...

  17. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ya-jing; Liu, Jian-min; Wei, Shu-ming; Zhang, Yun-hao; Qu, Zhen-hua; Chen, Shu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and fluorogold-labeled nerve fibers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was markedly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats. PMID:26487860

  18. Cell Therapy in Parkinson's Disease: Host Brain Repair Machinery Gets a Boost From Stem Cell Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Eleonora; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2017-06-01

    This commentary highlights the major findings and future research directions arising from the recent publication by Zuo and colleagues in Stem Cells 2017 (in press). Here, we discuss the novel observations that transplanted human neural stem cells can induce endogenous brain repair by specifically stimulating a host of regenerative processes in the neurogenic niche (i.e., subventricular zone [SVZ]) in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. That the identified therapeutic proteomes, neurotrophic factors, and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the SVZ may facilitate brain regeneration and behavioral recovery open a new venue of research for our understanding of the pathology and treatment of Parkinson's disease. Stem Cells 2017;35:1443-1445. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  19. DNA Repair in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Is Distinct from That in Non-Pluripotent Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li Z.; Park, Sang-Won; Bates, Steven E.; Zeng, Xianmin; Iverson, Linda E.; O'Connor, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for human disease treatment using human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), also carries the risk of added genomic instability. Genomic instability is most often linked to DNA repair deficiencies, which indicates that screening/characterization of possible repair deficiencies in pluripotent human stem cells should be a necessary step prior to their clinical and research use. In this study, a comparison of DNA repair pathways in pluripotent cells, as compared to those in non-pluripotent cells, demonstrated that DNA repair capacities of pluripotent cell lines were more heterogeneous than those of differentiated lines examined and were generally greater. Although pluripotent cells had high DNA repair capacities for nucleotide excision repair, we show that ultraviolet radiation at low fluxes induced an apoptotic response in these cells, while differentiated cells lacked response to this stimulus, and note that pluripotent cells had a similar apoptotic response to alkylating agent damage. This sensitivity of pluripotent cells to damage is notable since viable pluripotent cells exhibit less ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage than do differentiated cells that receive the same flux. In addition, the importance of screening pluripotent cells for DNA repair defects was highlighted by an iPSC line that demonstrated a normal spectral karyotype, but showed both microsatellite instability and reduced DNA repair capacities in three out of four DNA repair pathways examined. Together, these results demonstrate a need to evaluate DNA repair capacities in pluripotent cell lines, in order to characterize their genomic stability, prior to their pre-clinical and clinical use. PMID:22412831

  20. The role of undifferentiated adipose-derived stem cells in peripheral nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Rosen, Joseph M

    2018-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries impose significant health and economic consequences, yet no surgical repair can deliver a complete recovery of sensory or motor function. Traditional methods of repair are less than ideal: direct coaptation can only be performed when tension-free repair is possible, and transplantation of nerve autograft can cause donor-site morbidity and neuroma formation. Cell-based therapy delivered via nerve conduits has thus been explored as an alternative method of nerve repair in recent years. Stem cells are promising sources of the regenerative core material in a nerve conduit because stem cells are multipotent in function, abundant in supply, and more accessible than the myelinating Schwann cells. Among different types of stem cells, undifferentiated adipose-derived stem cell (uASC), which can be processed from adipose tissue in less than two hours, is a promising yet underexplored cell type. Studies of uASC have emerged in the past decade and have shown that autologous uASCs are non-immunogenic, easy to access, abundant in supply, and efficacious at promoting nerve regeneration. Two theories have been proposed as the primary regenerative mechanisms of uASC: in situ trans-differentiation towards Schwann cells, and secretion of trophic and anti-inflammatory factors. Future studies need to fully elucidate the mechanisms, side effects, and efficacy of uASC-based nerve regeneration so that uASCs can be utilized in clinical settings.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-1 sustains stem cell mediated renal repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imberti, B.; Morigi, M.; Tomasoni, S.; Rota, C.; Corna, D.; Longaretti, L.; Rottoli, D.; Valsecchi, F.; Benigni, A.; Wang, J.; Abbate, M.; Zoja, C.; Remuzzi, G.

    2007-01-01

    In mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, administration of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) restores renal tubular structure and improves renal function, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we examined the process of kidney cell repair in co-culture experiments

  2. Stem cells applications in bone and tooth repair and regeneration: New insights, tools, and hopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Meguid, Eiman; Ke, Yuehai; Ji, Junfeng; El-Hashash, Ahmed H K

    2018-03-01

    The exploration of stem and progenitor cells holds promise for advancing our understanding of the biology of tissue repair and regeneration mechanisms after injury. This will also help in the future use of stem cell therapy for the development of regenerative medicine approaches for the treatment of different tissue-species defects or disorders such as bone, cartilages, and tooth defects or disorders. Bone is a specialized connective tissue, with mineralized extracellular components that provide bones with both strength and rigidity, and thus enable bones to function in body mechanical supports and necessary locomotion process. New insights have been added to the use of different types of stem cells in bone and tooth defects over the last few years. In this concise review, we briefly describe bone structure as well as summarize recent research progress and accumulated information regarding the osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, as well as stem cell contributions to bone repair/regeneration, bone defects or disorders, and both restoration and regeneration of bones and cartilages. We also discuss advances in the osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration of dental and periodontal stem cells as well as in stem cell contributions to dentine regeneration and tooth engineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Translational Application of Microfluidics and Bioprinting for Stem Cell-Based Cartilage Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Lopa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage defects can impair the most elementary daily activities and, if not properly treated, can lead to the complete loss of articular function. The limitations of standard treatments for cartilage repair have triggered the development of stem cell-based therapies. In this scenario, the development of efficient cell differentiation protocols and the design of proper biomaterial-based supports to deliver cells to the injury site need to be addressed through basic and applied research to fully exploit the potential of stem cells. Here, we discuss the use of microfluidics and bioprinting approaches for the translation of stem cell-based therapy for cartilage repair in clinics. In particular, we will focus on the optimization of hydrogel-based materials to mimic the articular cartilage triggered by their use as bioinks in 3D bioprinting applications, on the screening of biochemical and biophysical factors through microfluidic devices to enhance stem cell chondrogenesis, and on the use of microfluidic technology to generate implantable constructs with a complex geometry. Finally, we will describe some new bioprinting applications that pave the way to the clinical use of stem cell-based therapies, such as scaffold-free bioprinting and the development of a 3D handheld device for the in situ repair of cartilage defects.

  4. Translational Application of Microfluidics and Bioprinting for Stem Cell-Based Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondadori, Carlotta; Mainardi, Valerio Luca; Talò, Giuseppe; Candrian, Christian; Święszkowski, Wojciech

    2018-01-01

    Cartilage defects can impair the most elementary daily activities and, if not properly treated, can lead to the complete loss of articular function. The limitations of standard treatments for cartilage repair have triggered the development of stem cell-based therapies. In this scenario, the development of efficient cell differentiation protocols and the design of proper biomaterial-based supports to deliver cells to the injury site need to be addressed through basic and applied research to fully exploit the potential of stem cells. Here, we discuss the use of microfluidics and bioprinting approaches for the translation of stem cell-based therapy for cartilage repair in clinics. In particular, we will focus on the optimization of hydrogel-based materials to mimic the articular cartilage triggered by their use as bioinks in 3D bioprinting applications, on the screening of biochemical and biophysical factors through microfluidic devices to enhance stem cell chondrogenesis, and on the use of microfluidic technology to generate implantable constructs with a complex geometry. Finally, we will describe some new bioprinting applications that pave the way to the clinical use of stem cell-based therapies, such as scaffold-free bioprinting and the development of a 3D handheld device for the in situ repair of cartilage defects. PMID:29535776

  5. RAD51 Is a Selective DNA Repair Target to Radiosensitize Glioma Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Harry O; Brend, Tim; Payne, Helen L; Wright, Alexander; Ward, Thomas A; Patel, Karan; Egnuni, Teklu; Stead, Lucy F; Patel, Anjana; Wurdak, Heiko; Short, Susan C

    2017-01-10

    Patients with glioblastoma die from local relapse despite surgery and high-dose radiotherapy. Resistance to radiotherapy is thought to be due to efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in stem-like cells able to survive DNA damage and repopulate the tumor. We used clinical samples and patient-derived glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) to confirm that the DSB repair protein RAD51 is highly expressed in GSCs, which are reliant on RAD51-dependent DSB repair after radiation. RAD51 expression and RAD51 foci numbers fall when these cells move toward astrocytic differentiation. In GSCs, the small-molecule RAD51 inhibitors RI-1 and B02 prevent RAD51 focus formation, reduce DNA DSB repair, and cause significant radiosensitization. We further demonstrate that treatment with these agents combined with radiation promotes loss of stem cells defined by SOX2 expression. This indicates that RAD51-dependent repair represents an effective and specific target in GSCs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. EGR1 induces tenogenic differentiation of tendon stem cells and promotes rabbit rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xu; Liu, Junpeng; Chen, Lei; Zhou, You; Tang, Kanglai

    2015-01-01

    The rate of healing failure after surgical repair of chronic rotator cuff tears is considerably high. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the zinc finger transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) in the differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs) and in tendon formation, healing, and tendon tear repair using an animal model of rotator cuff repair. Tenocyte, adipocyte, osteocyte, and chondrocyte differentiation as well as the expression of related genes were determined in EGR1-overexpressing TSCs (EGR1-TSCs) using tissue-specific staining, immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, and western blotting. A rabbit rotator cuff repair model was established, and TSCs and EGR1-TSCs in a fibrin glue carrier were applied onto repair sites. The rabbits were sacrificed 8 weeks after repair operation, and tissues were histologically evaluated and tenocyte-related gene expression was determined. EGR1 induced tenogenic differentiation of TSCs and inhibited non-tenocyte differentiation of TSCs. Furthermore, EGR1 promoted tendon repair in a rabbit model of rotator cuff injury. The BMP12/Smad1/5/8 signaling pathway was involved in EGR1-induced tenogenic differentiation and rotator cuff tendon repair. EGR1 plays a key role in tendon formation, healing, and repair through BMP12/Smad1/5/8 pathway. EGR1-TSCs is a promising treatment for rotator cuff tendon repair surgeries. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. EGR1 Induces Tenogenic Differentiation of Tendon Stem Cells and Promotes Rabbit Rotator Cuff Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The rate of healing failure after surgical repair of chronic rotator cuff tears is considerably high. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the zinc finger transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1 in the differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs and in tendon formation, healing, and tendon tear repair using an animal model of rotator cuff repair. Methods: Tenocyte, adipocyte, osteocyte, and chondrocyte differentiation as well as the expression of related genes were determined in EGR1-overexpressing TSCs (EGR1-TSCs using tissue-specific staining, immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, and western blotting. A rabbit rotator cuff repair model was established, and TSCs and EGR1-TSCs in a fibrin glue carrier were applied onto repair sites. The rabbits were sacrificed 8 weeks after repair operation, and tissues were histologically evaluated and tenocyte-related gene expression was determined. Results: EGR1 induced tenogenic differentiation of TSCs and inhibited non-tenocyte differentiation of TSCs. Furthermore, EGR1 promoted tendon repair in a rabbit model of rotator cuff injury. The BMP12/Smad1/5/8 signaling pathway was involved in EGR1-induced tenogenic differentiation and rotator cuff tendon repair. Conclusion: EGR1 plays a key role in tendon formation, healing, and repair through BMP12/Smad1/5/8 pathway. EGR1-TSCs is a promising treatment for rotator cuff tendon repair surgeries.

  8. Molecular phenotyping of human ovarian cancer stem cells unravels the mechanisms for repair and chemoresistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvero, Ayesha B; Chen, Rui; Fu, Han-Hsuan

    2009-01-01

    A major burden in the treatment of ovarian cancer is the high percentage of recurrence and chemoresistance. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) provide a reservoir of cells that can self-renew, can maintain the tumor by generating differentiated cells [non-stem cells (non-CSCs)] which make up the bulk...... to form spheroids in suspension, and the ability to recapitulate in vivo the original tumor. Chemotherapy eliminates the bulk of the tumor but it leaves a core of cancer cells with high capacity for repair and renewal. The molecular properties identified in these cells may explain some of the unique...... of the tumor and may be the primary source of recurrence. We describe the characterization of human ovarian cancer stem cells (OCSCs). These cells have a distinctive genetic profile that confers them with the capacity to recapitulate the original tumor, proliferate with chemotherapy, and promote recurrence...

  9. Implanted hair follicle stem cells form Schwann cells that support repair of severed peripheral nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Campillo, Raul; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Katsuoka, Kensei; Penman, Sheldon; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    The hair follicle bulge area is an abundant, easily accessible source of actively growing, pluripotent adult stem cells. Nestin, a protein marker for neural stem cells, also is expressed in follicle stem cells and their immediate, differentiated progeny. The fluorescent protein GFP, whose expression is driven by the nestin regulatory element in transgenic mice, served to mark the follicle cell fate. The pluripotent nestin-driven GFP stem cells are positive for the stem cell marker CD34 but ne...

  10. Uninduced adipose-derived stem cells repair the defect of full-thickness hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Ning; Li, Lei; Leng, Ping; Wang, Ying-Zhen; Lv, Cheng-Yu

    2009-04-01

    To testify the effect of the stem cells derived from the widely distributed fat tissue on repairing full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were derived from adipose tissue and cultured in vitro. Twenty-seven New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three groups randomly. The cultured ADSCs mixed with calcium alginate gel were used to fill the full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects created at the patellafemoral joint, and the defects repaired with gel or without treatment served as control groups. After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, the reconstructed tissue was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Histological analysis and qualitative scoring were also performed to detect the outcome. Full thickness hyaline cartilage defects were repaired completely with ADSCs-derived tissue. The result was better in ADSCs group than the control ones. The microstructure of reconstructed tissue with ADSCs was similar to that of hyaline cartilage and contained more cells and regular matrix fibers, being better than other groups. Plenty of collagen fibers around cells could be seen under transmission electron microscopy. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in comparison with other groups at each time point (t equal to 4.360, P less than 0.01). These results indicate that stem cells derived from mature adipose without induction possess the ability to repair cartilage defects.

  11. CD133 positive U87 glioma stem cell radiosensitivity and DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ping; Zong Tianzhou; Ji Xiaoqin; Lu Xueguan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the radiosensitivity and DNA double-strand break repair of CD133 + U87 glioma stem cell. Methods: CD133 + and CD133 - cells were isolated from glioma U87 cell lines by flow cytometry sorter system. After irradiated vertically by 4 Gy X-rays, the radiosensitivity of cells was determined by clonogenic assay. The radiation-induced DNA double-strand break repair of CD133 + and CD133 - cells was determined by the neutral comet assay,and the expression of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) and Rad51 foci were measured by immunofluorescence. Results: The clone forming rate of CD133 + cells was higher than CD133 - cells (t=3.66, P<0.01) with no radiation. The clone forming rate of CD133 + cells irradiated by 4 Gy X-rays has no significant changes compared to that of the non-irradiation cells (t=0.71, P>0.05), but for CD133 - cells, it decreased compared to non-irradiation cells (t=2.91, P<0.05). The tailmoment between CD133 + cells and CD133 - cells had no difference at 0.5 h after irradiation (t=1.44, P>0.05); the tailmoment of CD133 + cells was lower than CD133 - cells at 6 and 24 h after irradiation,respectively (t=5.31 and 8.09, P<0.01). There was no significant difference in the expression of γ-H2AX foci between CD133 + and CD133 - cells at 0.5 and 6 h after irradiation (t=0.12 and 0.99, P>0.05), γ-H2AX foci of CD133 + cells was significantly decreased compared to CD133 - cells at 24 h after irradiation (t=4.99, P<0.01). For Rad 51 foci, there was no difference between CD133 + and CD133 - cells at 0.5 h after irradiation (t=1.12, P>0.05). The expression of Rad 51 foci of CD133 - cells was decreased compared to that of CD133 + cells at 6 and 24 h after irradiation,respectively (t=22.88 and 12.43, P<0.01). And the expression of Rad51 foci of CD133 + cells had no significant changes at 6-24 h after irradiation. Conclusions: Glioma stem cells is more radioresistive than glioma non-stem cells. The probable mechanism is that the DNA double

  12. More efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks in skeletal muscle stem cells compared to their committed progeny

    OpenAIRE

    Leyla Vahidi Ferdousi; Pierre Rocheteau; Romain Chayot; Benjamin Montagne; Zayna Chaker; Patricia Flamant; Shahragim Tajbakhsh; Miria Ricchetti

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The loss of genome integrity in adult stem cells results in accelerated tissue aging and is possibly cancerogenic. Adult stem cells in different tissues appear to react robustly to DNA damage. We report that adult skeletal stem (satellite) cells do not primarily respond to radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via differentiation and exhibit less apoptosis compared to other myogenic cells. Satellite cells repair these DNA lesions more efficiently than their...

  13. Repair of Ischemic Injury by Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Cell Therapy without Teratoma through Selective Photosensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ju Cho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem-toxic small molecules have been developed to induce selective cell death of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs to lower the risk of teratoma formation. However, despite their high efficacies, chemical-based approaches may carry unexpected toxicities on specific differentiated cell types. Herein, we took advantage of KillerRed (KR as a suicide gene, to selectively induce phototoxicity using visible light via the production of reactive oxygen species. PSCs in an undifferentiated state that exclusively expressed KR (KR-PSCs were eliminated by a single exposure to visible light. This highly selective cell death in KR-PSCs was exploited to successfully inhibit teratoma formation. In particular, endothelial cells from KR-mPSCs remained fully functional in vitro and sufficient to repair ischemic injury in vivo regardless of light exposure, suggesting that a genetic approach in which KR is expressed in a tightly controlled manner would be a viable strategy to inhibit teratoma formation for future safe PSC-based therapies.

  14. Stem Cells and Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Berton, Alessandra; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Cartilage defects represent a common problem in orthopaedic practice. Predisposing factors include traumas, inflammatory conditions, and biomechanics alterations. Conservative management of cartilage defects often fails, and patients with this lesions may need surgical intervention. Several treatment strategies have been proposed, although only surgery has been proved to be predictably effective. Usually, in focal cartilage defects without a stable fibrocartilaginous repair tissue formed, sur...

  15. Potential Roles of Dental Pulp Stem Cells in Neural Regeneration and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lihua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Key, Brian; Lee, Bae Hoon

    2018-01-01

    This review summarizes current advances in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and their potential applications in the nervous diseases. Injured adult mammalian nervous system has a limited regenerative capacity due to an insufficient pool of precursor cells in both central and peripheral nervous systems. Nerve growth is also constrained by inhibitory factors (associated with central myelin) and barrier tissues (glial scarring). Stem cells, possessing the capacity of self-renewal and multicellular differentiation, promise new therapeutic strategies for overcoming these impediments to neural regeneration. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) derive from a cranial neural crest lineage, retain a remarkable potential for neuronal differentiation, and additionally express multiple factors that are suitable for neuronal and axonal regeneration. DPSCs can also express immunomodulatory factors that stimulate formation of blood vessels and enhance regeneration and repair of injured nerve. These unique properties together with their ready accessibility make DPSCs an attractive cell source for tissue engineering in injured and diseased nervous systems. In this review, we interrogate the neuronal differentiation potential as well as the neuroprotective, neurotrophic, angiogenic, and immunomodulatory properties of DPSCs and its application in the injured nervous system. Taken together, DPSCs are an ideal stem cell resource for therapeutic approaches to neural repair and regeneration in nerve diseases. PMID:29853908

  16. Exploiting endogenous fibrocartilage stem cells to regenerate cartilage and repair joint injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embree, Mildred C.; Chen, Mo; Pylawka, Serhiy; Kong, Danielle; Iwaoka, George M.; Kalajzic, Ivo; Yao, Hai; Shi, Chancheng; Sun, Dongming; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Koslovsky, David A.; Koch, Alia; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue regeneration using stem cell-based transplantation faces many hurdles. Alternatively, therapeutically exploiting endogenous stem cells to regenerate injured or diseased tissue may circumvent these challenges. Here we show resident fibrocartilage stem cells (FCSCs) can be used to regenerate and repair cartilage. We identify FCSCs residing within the superficial zone niche in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle. A single FCSC spontaneously generates a cartilage anlage, remodels into bone and organizes a haematopoietic microenvironment. Wnt signals deplete the reservoir of FCSCs and cause cartilage degeneration. We also show that intra-articular treatment with the Wnt inhibitor sclerostin sustains the FCSC pool and regenerates cartilage in a TMJ injury model. We demonstrate the promise of exploiting resident FCSCs as a regenerative therapeutic strategy to substitute cell transplantation that could be beneficial for patients suffering from fibrocartilage injury and disease. These data prompt the examination of utilizing this strategy for other musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:27721375

  17. Tissue engineering and the use of stem/progenitor cells for airway epithelium repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GM Roomans

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem/progenitor cells can be used to repair defects in the airway wall, resulting from e.g., tumors, trauma, tissue reactions following long-time intubations, or diseases that are associated with epithelial damage. Several potential sources of cells for airway epithelium have been identified. These can be divided into two groups. The first group consists of endogenous progenitor cells present in the respiratory tract. This group can be subdivided according to location into (a a ductal cell type in the submucosal glands of the proximal trachea, (b basal cells in the intercartilaginous zones of the lower trachea and bronchi, (c variant Clara cells (Clarav-cells in the bronchioles and (d at the junctions between the bronchioles and the alveolar ducts, and (e alveolar type II cells. This classification of progenitor cell niches is, however, controversial. The second group consists of exogenous stem cells derived from other tissues in the body. This second group can be subdivided into: (a embryonic stem (ES cells, induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells, or amniotic fluid stem cells, (b side-population cells from bone marrow or epithelial stem cells present in bone marrow or circulation and (c fat-derived mesenchymal cells. Airway epithelial cells can be co-cultured in a system that includes a basal lamina equivalent, extracellular factors from mesenchymal fibroblasts, and in an air-liquid interface system. Recently, spheroid-based culture systems have been developed. Several clinical applications have been suggested: cystic fibrosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstructive lung disease, pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary edema, and pulmonary hypertension. Clinical applications so far are few, but include subglottic stenosis, tracheomalacia, bronchiomalacia, and emphysema.

  18. Germline stem cell gene PIWIL2 mediates DNA repair through relaxation of chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Tao Yin

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR is an intrinsic barrier of cell to tumorigenesis initiated by genotoxic agents. However, the mechanisms underlying the DDR are not completely understood despite of extensive investigation. Recently, we have reported that ectopic expression of germline stem cell gene PIWIL2 is associated with tumor stem cell development, although the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we show that PIWIL2 is required for the repair of DNA-damage induced by various types of genotoxic agents. Upon ultraviolet (UV irradiation, silenced PIWIL2 gene in normal human fibroblasts was transiently activated after treatment with UV light. This activation was associated with DNA repair, because Piwil2-deficienct mouse embryonic fibroblasts (mili(-/- MEFs were defective in cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD repair after UV treatment. As a result, the UV-treated mili(-/- MEFs were more susceptible to apoptosis, as characterized by increased levels of DNA damage-associated apoptotic proteins, such as active caspase-3, cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP and Bik. The impaired DNA repair in the mili(-/- MEFs was associated with the reductions of histone H3 acetylation and chromatin relaxation, although the DDR pathway downstream chromatin relaxation appeared not to be directly affected by Piwil2. Moreover, guanine-guanine (Pt-[GG] and double strand break (DSB repair were also defective in the mili(-/- MEFs treated by genotoxic chemicals Cisplatin and ionizing radiation (IR, respectively. The results indicate that Piwil2 can mediate DNA repair through an axis of Piwil2 → histone acetylation → chromatin relaxation upstream DDR pathways. The findings reveal a new role for Piwil2 in DNA repair and suggest that Piwil2 may act as a gatekeeper against DNA damage-mediated tumorigenesis.

  19. Schwann Cell Precursors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Myelin Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Seop; Lee, Jungwoon; Lee, Da Yong; Kim, Young-Dae; Kim, Jae Yun; Lim, Hyung Jin; Lim, Sungmin; Cho, Yee Sook

    2017-06-06

    Schwann cells play a crucial role in successful nerve repair and regeneration by supporting both axonal growth and myelination. However, the sources of human Schwann cells are limited both for studies of Schwann cell development and biology and for the development of treatments for Schwann cell-associated diseases. Here, we provide a rapid and scalable method to produce self-renewing Schwann cell precursors (SCPs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), using combined sequential treatment with inhibitors of the TGF-β and GSK-3 signaling pathways, and with neuregulin-1 for 18 days under chemically defined conditions. Within 1 week, hPSC-derived SCPs could be differentiated into immature Schwann cells that were functionally confirmed by their secretion of neurotrophic factors and their myelination capacity in vitro and in vivo. We propose that hPSC-derived SCPs are a promising, unlimited source of functional Schwann cells for treating demyelination disorders and injuries to the peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adipose, Bone Marrow and Synovial Joint-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, Christopher R.; Matta, Csaba; Zakany, Roza; Khan, Ilyas M.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Current cell-based repair strategies have proven unsuccessful for treating cartilage defects and osteoarthritic lesions, consequently advances in innovative therapeutics are required and mesenchymal stem cell-based (MSC) therapies are an expanding area of investigation. MSCs are capable of differentiating into multiple cell lineages and exerting paracrine effects. Due to their easy isolation, expansion, and low immunogenicity, MSCs are an attractive option for regenerative medicine for joint repair. Recent studies have identified several MSC tissue reservoirs including in adipose tissue, bone marrow, cartilage, periosteum, and muscle. MSCs isolated from these discrete tissue niches exhibit distinct biological activities, and have enhanced regenerative potentials for different tissue types. Each MSC type has advantages and disadvantages for cartilage repair and their use in a clinical setting is a balance between expediency and effectiveness. In this review we explore the challenges associated with cartilage repair and regeneration using MSC-based cell therapies and provide an overview of phenotype, biological activities, and functional properties for each MSC population. This paper also specifically explores the therapeutic potential of each type of MSC, particularly focusing on which cells are capable of producing stratified hyaline-like articular cartilage regeneration. Finally we highlight areas for future investigation. Given that patients present with a variety of problems it is unlikely that cartilage regeneration will be a simple “one size fits all,” but more likely an array of solutions that need to be applied systematically to achieve regeneration of a biomechanically competent repair tissue. PMID:28066501

  1. Adipose, Bone Marrow and Synovial Joint-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Fellows

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Current cell-based repair strategies have proven unsuccessful for treating cartilage defects and osteoarthritic lesions, consequently advances in innovative therapeutics are required and mesenchymal stem cell-based (MSC therapies are an expanding area of investigation. MSCs are capable of differentiating into multiple cell lineages and exerting paracrine effects. Due to their easy isolation, expansion and low immunogenicity, MSCs are an attractive option for regenerative medicine for joint repair. Recent studies have identified several MSC tissue reservoirs including in adipose tissue, bone marrow, cartilage, periosteum and muscle. MSCs isolated from these discrete tissue niches exhibit distinct biological activities, and have enhanced regenerative potentials for different tissue types. Each MSC type has advantages and disadvantages for cartilage repair and their use in a clinical setting is a balance between expediency and effectiveness. In this review we explore the challenges associated with cartilage repair and regeneration using MSC-based cell therapies and provide an overview of phenotype, biological activities and functional properties for each MSC population. This paper also specifically explores the therapeutic potential of each type of MSC, particularly focusing on which cells are capable of producing stratified hyaline-like articular cartilage regeneration. Finally we highlight areas for future investigation. Given that patients present with a variety of problems it is unlikely that cartilage regeneration will be a simple ‘one size fits all’, but more likely an array of solutions that need to applied systematically to achieve regeneration of a biomechanically competent repair tissue.

  2. Adult Stem Cell Based Enhancement of Nerve Conduit for Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    accompanied by injuries to peripheral nerves; if not repaired, the trauma can lead to significant dysfunction and disability . While nerves have the ability to...recovery, minimized disability , and increased quality of life for our wounded warriors. 2. KEYWORDS: Stem Cell, Nerve Conduit, Peripheral Nerve...would be a paradigm shift away from ordering X-rays at 10-12 weeks and only ordering a CT scan. It has the potential to change the standard of care

  3. CXCL12 Promotes Stem Cell Recruitment and Uterine Repair after Injury in Asherman’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulcin Sahin Ersoy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Asherman’s syndrome is an acquired condition of uterine fibrosis and adhesions in response to injury that adversely affects fertility and pregnancy. We have previously demonstrated that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDSCs contribute to uterine repair after injury and that stem cells supplementation improves fertility. Here, we demonstrate that CXCL12 is the chemokine that mediates stem cell engraftment and functional improvement using a murine model of Asherman’s syndrome. After uterine injury, we demonstrate that CXCL12 augmentation increased BMDSC engraftment and that the CXCL12 receptor (CXCR4 antagonist, ADM3100, blocked stem cell recruitment. CXCL12 reduced, whereas ADM3100 increased fibrosis. CXCL12 treatment led to improved fertility and litter size, whereas ADM3100 treatment reduced fertility and litter size. ADM3100 prevented optimal spontaneous uterine repair mediated by endogenous CXCL12 production, reducing pregnancies after injury in the absence of supplemental CXCL12 administration; however, ADM3100 treatment could be partially rescued by CXCL12 augmentation. CXCL12 or other CXCR4 receptor agonists may be useful in the treatment of infertility or adverse pregnancy outcomes in Asherman’s syndrome and other related uterine disorders.

  4. HORSE SPECIES SYMPOSIUM: Use of mesenchymal stem cells in fracture repair in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govoni, K E

    2015-03-01

    Equine bone fractures are often catastrophic, potentially fatal, and costly to repair. Traditional methods of healing fractures have limited success, long recovery periods, and a high rate of reinjury. Current research in the equine industry has demonstrated that stem cell therapy is a promising novel therapy to improve fracture healing and reduce the incidence of reinjury; however, reports of success in horses have been variable and limited. Stem cells can be derived from embryonic, fetal, and adult tissue. Based on the ease of collection, opportunity for autologous cells, and proven success in other models, adipose- or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are often used in equine therapies. Methods for isolation, proliferation, and differentiation of MSC are well established in rodent and human models but are not well characterized in horses. There is recent evidence that equine bone marrow MSC are able to proliferate in culture for several passages in the presence of autologous and fetal bovine serum, which is important for expansion of cells. Mesenchymal stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts, the bone forming cells, and this complex process is regulated by a number of transcription factors including runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and osterix (Osx). However, it has not been well established if equine MSC are regulated in a similar manner. The data presented in this review support the view that equine bone marrow MSC are regulated by the same transcription factors that control the differentiation of rodent and human MSC into osteoblasts. Although stem cell therapy is promising in equine bone repair, additional research is needed to identify optimal methods for reintroduction and potential manipulations to improve their ability to form new bone.

  5. Loss of DNA mismatch repair imparts a selective advantage in planarian adult stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica P Hollenbach

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS leads to an increased risk of early-onset colorectal and other types of cancer and is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. Loss of MMR function results in a mutator phenotype that likely underlies its role in tumorigenesis. However, loss of MMR also results in the elimination of a DNA damage-induced checkpoint/apoptosis activation barrier that may allow damaged cells to grow unchecked. A fundamental question is whether loss of MMR provides pre-cancerous stem cells an immediate selective advantage in addition to establishing a mutator phenotype. To test this hypothesis in an in vivo system, we utilized the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea which contains a significant population of identifiable adult stem cells. We identified a planarian homolog of human MSH2, a MMR gene which is mutated in 38% of LS cases. The planarian Smed-msh2 is expressed in stem cells and some progeny. We depleted Smed-msh2 mRNA levels by RNA-interference and found a striking survival advantage in these animals treated with a cytotoxic DNA alkylating agent compared to control animals. We demonstrated that this tolerance to DNA damage is due to the survival of mitotically active, MMR-deficient stem cells. Our results suggest that loss of MMR provides an in vivo survival advantage to the stem cell population in the presence of DNA damage that may have implications for tumorigenesis.

  6. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Yuzhen; Yang, Libin; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal ...

  7. Diploid, but not haploid, human embryonic stem cells can be derived from microsurgically repaired tripronuclear human zygotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yong; Li, Rong; Huang, Jin; Yu, Yang; Qiao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have shown tremendous potential in regenerative medicine, and the recent progress in haploid embryonic stem cells provides new insights for future applications of embryonic stem cells. Disruption of normal fertilized embryos remains controversial; thus, the development of a new source for human embryonic stem cells is important for their usefulness. Here, we investigated the feasibility of haploid and diploid embryo reconstruction and embryonic stem cell derivation using microsurgically repaired tripronuclear human zygotes. Diploid and haploid zygotes were successfully reconstructed, but a large proportion of them still had a tripolar spindle assembly. The reconstructed embryos developed to the blastocyst stage, although the loss of chromosomes was observed in these zygotes. Finally, triploid and diploid human embryonic stem cells were derived from tripronuclear and reconstructed zygotes (from which only one pronucleus was removed), but haploid human embryonic stem cells were not successfully derived from the reconstructed zygotes when two pronuclei were removed. Both triploid and diploid human embryonic stem cells showed the general characteristics of human embryonic stem cells. These results indicate that the lower embryo quality resulting from abnormal spindle assembly contributed to the failure of the haploid embryonic stem cell derivation. However, the successful derivation of diploid embryonic stem cells demonstrated that microsurgical tripronuclear zygotes are an alternative source of human embryonic stem cells. In the future, improving spindle assembly will facilitate the application of triploid zygotes to the field of haploid embryonic stem cells. PMID:23255130

  8. Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  9. Novel Stem Cell Therapies for Applications to Wound Healing and Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grada, Ayman; Falanga, Vincent

    2016-10-26

    The number of individuals with chronic cutaneous wounds has been increasing worldwide due to an aging population, diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. In the United States, almost seven million Americans have chronic skin ulcers. Many therapeutic approaches have been used. However, the treatment outcomes are not always ideal because of failure to achieve complete wound closure in around 60% of cases, scarring, and high rate of recurrence. Therefore, there is a need for more effective therapies. Stem cells offer promising possibilities. Pre-clinical studies have shown that bone- or adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a competitive advantage over other types of stem cells due to their better defined multipotent differentiating potential, paracrine effects, immunomodulatory properties, and safety. However, large controlled clinical trials are needed to examine the capabilities of MSCs in humans and to assess their safety profile. In this review, we highlight emerging treatments in tissue regeneration and repair and provide some perspectives on how to translate current knowledge about stem cells-both multipotent and pluripotent-into viable clinical approaches for treating patients with difficult to heal wounds.

  10. Implanted hair follicle stem cells form Schwann cells that support repair of severed peripheral nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Campillo, Raul; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Katsuoka, Kensei; Penman, Sheldon; Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-12-06

    The hair follicle bulge area is an abundant, easily accessible source of actively growing, pluripotent adult stem cells. Nestin, a protein marker for neural stem cells, also is expressed in follicle stem cells and their immediate, differentiated progeny. The fluorescent protein GFP, whose expression is driven by the nestin regulatory element in transgenic mice, served to mark the follicle cell fate. The pluripotent nestin-driven GFP stem cells are positive for the stem cell marker CD34 but negative for keratinocyte marker keratin 15, suggesting their relatively undifferentiated state. These cells can differentiate into neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. In vivo studies show the nestin-driven GFP hair follicle stem cells can differentiate into blood vessels and neural tissue after transplantation to the subcutis of nude mice. Equivalent hair follicle stem cells derived from transgenic mice with beta-actin-driven GFP implanted into the gap region of a severed sciatic nerve greatly enhance the rate of nerve regeneration and the restoration of nerve function. The follicle cells transdifferentiate largely into Schwann cells, which are known to support neuron regrowth. Function of the rejoined sciatic nerve was measured by contraction of the gastrocnemius muscle upon electrical stimulation. After severing the tibial nerve and subsequent transplantation of hair follicle stem cells, walking print length and intermediate toe spread significantly recovered, indicating that the transplanted mice recovered the ability to walk normally. These results suggest that hair follicle stem cells provide an important, accessible, autologous source of adult stem cells for regenerative medicine.

  11. Electrical Stimulation Elicit Neural Stem Cells Activation:New Perspectives in CNS Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratrel eHuang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Researchers are enthusiastically concerned about neural stem cell (NSC therapy in a wide array of diseases, including stroke, neurodegenerative disease, spinal cord injury (SCI and depression. Although enormous evidences have demonstrated that neurobehavioral improvement may benefit from NSC-supporting regeneration in animal models, approaches to endogenous and transplanted NSCs are blocked by hurdles of migration, proliferation, maturation and integration of NSCs. Electrical stimulation (ES may be a selective nondrug approach for mobilizing NSCs in the central nervous system (CNS. This technique is suitable for clinic application, because it is well established and its potential complications are manageable. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the emerging positive role of different electrical cues in regulating NSC biology in vitro and in vivo, as well as biomaterial-based and chemical stimulation of NSCs. In the future, ES combined with stem cell therapy or other cues probably becomes an approach for promoting brain repair.

  12. Repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defect using stem cell-encapsulated thermogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanbo; Zhang, Jin; Chang, Fei; Xu, Weiguo; Ding, Jianxun

    2018-07-01

    Cartilage defect repair by hydrogel-based tissue engineering is becoming one of the most potential treatment strategies. In this work, a thermogel of triblock copolymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) was prepared as scaffold of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) for repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defect. At first, the copolymer solution showed a reversible sol-gel transition at physiological temperature range, and the mechanical properties of such thermogel were high enough to support the repair of cartilage. Additionally, excellent biodegradability and biocompatibility of the thermogel were demonstrated. By implanting the BMMSC-encapsulated thermogel into the full-thickness articular cartilage defect (5.0 mm in diameter and 4.0 mm in depth) in the rabbit, it was found that the regenerated cartilage integrated well with the surrounding normal cartilage and subchondral bone at 12 weeks post-surgery. The upregulated expression of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen in the repaired cartilage, and the comparable biomechanical properties with normal cartilage suggested that the cell-encapsulated PLGA-PEG-PLGA thermogel had great potential in serving as the promising scaffold for cartilage regeneration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. More efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks in skeletal muscle stem cells compared to their committed progeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Vahidi Ferdousi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The loss of genome integrity in adult stem cells results in accelerated tissue aging and is possibly cancerogenic. Adult stem cells in different tissues appear to react robustly to DNA damage. We report that adult skeletal stem (satellite cells do not primarily respond to radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs via differentiation and exhibit less apoptosis compared to other myogenic cells. Satellite cells repair these DNA lesions more efficiently than their committed progeny. Importantly, non-proliferating satellite cells and post-mitotic nuclei in the fiber exhibit dramatically distinct repair efficiencies. Altogether, reduction of the repair capacity appears to be more a function of differentiation than of the proliferation status of the muscle cell. Notably, satellite cells retain a high efficiency of DSB repair also when isolated from the natural niche. Finally, we show that repair of DSB substrates is not only very efficient but, surprisingly, also very accurate in satellite cells and that accurate repair depends on the key non-homologous end-joining factor DNA-PKcs.

  14. More efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks in skeletal muscle stem cells compared to their committed progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidi Ferdousi, Leyla; Rocheteau, Pierre; Chayot, Romain; Montagne, Benjamin; Chaker, Zayna; Flamant, Patricia; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Ricchetti, Miria

    2014-11-01

    The loss of genome integrity in adult stem cells results in accelerated tissue aging and is possibly cancerogenic. Adult stem cells in different tissues appear to react robustly to DNA damage. We report that adult skeletal stem (satellite) cells do not primarily respond to radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via differentiation and exhibit less apoptosis compared to other myogenic cells. Satellite cells repair these DNA lesions more efficiently than their committed progeny. Importantly, non-proliferating satellite cells and post-mitotic nuclei in the fiber exhibit dramatically distinct repair efficiencies. Altogether, reduction of the repair capacity appears to be more a function of differentiation than of the proliferation status of the muscle cell. Notably, satellite cells retain a high efficiency of DSB repair also when isolated from the natural niche. Finally, we show that repair of DSB substrates is not only very efficient but, surprisingly, also very accurate in satellite cells and that accurate repair depends on the key non-homologous end-joining factor DNA-PKcs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. BLM has early and late functions in homologous recombination repair in mouse embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, W K; Hanada, K; Kanaar, R

    2010-01-01

    function of BLM remains unclear. Multiple roles have been proposed for BLM in the homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway, including 'early' functions, such as the stimulation of resection of DNA double-strand break ends or displacement of the invading strand of DNA displacement loops, and 'late......' roles, such as dissolution of double Holliday junctions. However, most of the evidence for these putative roles comes from in vitro biochemical data. In this study, we report the characterization of mouse embryonic stem cells with disruption of Blm and/or Rad54 genes. We show that Blm has roles both...

  16. Endogenous repair mechanisms enhanced in Parkinson's disease following stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Napoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review highlights the innovative observation that transplanted human neural stem cells can bring about endogenous brain repair through the stimulation of multiple regenerative processes in the neurogenic area (i.e., subventricular zone [SVZ] in an animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD. In addition, we convey that identifying anti-inflammatory cytokines, therapeutic proteomes, and neurotrophic factors within the SVZ may be essential to induce brain repair and behavioral recovery. This work opens up a new area of research for further understanding the pathology and treatment of PD. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the references section. The datasets supporting the conclusions of this article are available online by searching various databases, including PubMed. Some original points in this article come from the laboratory practice in our research center and the authors' experiences.

  17. Reserve stem cells: Differentiated cells reprogram to fuel repair, metaplasia, and neoplasia in the adult gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jason C; Sansom, Owen J

    2015-07-14

    It has long been known that differentiated cells can switch fates, especially in vitro, but only recently has there been a critical mass of publications describing the mechanisms adult, postmitotic cells use in vivo to reverse their differentiation state. We propose that this sort of cellular reprogramming is a fundamental cellular process akin to apoptosis or mitosis. Because reprogramming can invoke regenerative cells from mature cells, it is critical to the long-term maintenance of tissues like the pancreas, which encounter large insults during adulthood but lack constitutively active adult stem cells to repair the damage. However, even in tissues with adult stem cells, like the stomach and intestine, reprogramming may allow mature cells to serve as reserve ("quiescent") stem cells when normal stem cells are compromised. We propose that the potential downside to reprogramming is that it increases risk for cancers that occur late in adulthood. Mature, long-lived cells may have years of exposure to mutagens. Mutations that affect the physiological function of differentiated, postmitotic cells may lead to apoptosis, but mutations in genes that govern proliferation might not be selected against. Hence, reprogramming with reentry into the cell cycle might unmask those mutations, causing an irreversible progenitor-like, proliferative state. We review recent evidence showing that reprogramming fuels irreversible metaplastic and precancerous proliferation in the stomach and pancreas. Finally, we illustrate how we think reprogrammed differentiated cells are likely candidates as cells of origin for cancers of the intestine. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Reserve stem cells: Reprogramming of differentiated cells fuels repair, metaplasia, and neoplasia in the adult gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jason C.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that differentiated cells can switch fates, especially in vitro, but only recently has there been a critical mass of publications describing the mechanisms adult, post-mitotic cells use in vivo to reverse their differentiation state. We propose that this sort of cellular reprogramming is a fundamental cellular process akin to apoptosis or mitosis. Because reprogramming can invoke regenerative cells from mature cells, it is critical to the longterm maintenance of tissues like the pancreas, which encounter large insults during adulthood but lack constitutively active adult stem cells to repair the damage. However, even in tissues with adult stem cells, like stomach and intestine, reprogramming may allow mature cells to serve as reserve (“quiescent”) stem cells when normal stem cells are compromised. We propose that the potential downside to reprogramming is that it increases risk for cancers that occur late in adulthood. Mature, long-lived cells may have years of exposure to mutagens. Mutations that affect the physiological function of differentiated, post-mitotic cells may lead to apoptosis, but mutations in genes that govern proliferation might not be selected against. Hence, reprogramming with reentry into the cell cycle might unmask those mutations, causing an irreversible progenitor-like, proliferative state. We review recent evidence showing that reprogramming fuels irreversible metaplastic and precancerous proliferations in stomach and pancreas. Finally, we illustrate how we think reprogrammed differentiated cells are likely candidates as cells of origin for cancers of the intestine. PMID:26175494

  19. Neural crest stem cell population in craniomaxillofacial development and tissue repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M La Noce

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells, delaminating from the neural tube during migration, undergo an epithelial-mesenchymal transition and differentiate into several cell types strongly reinforcing the mesoderm of the craniofacial body area – giving rise to bone, cartilage and other tissues and cells of this human body area. Recent studies on craniomaxillofacial neural crest-derived cells have provided evidence for the tremendous plasticity of these cells. Actually, neural crest cells can respond and adapt to the environment in which they migrate and the cranial mesoderm plays an important role toward patterning the identity of the migrating neural crest cells. In our experience, neural crest-derived stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells, can actively proliferate, repair bone and give rise to other tissues and cytotypes, including blood vessels, smooth muscle, adipocytes and melanocytes, highlighting that their use in tissue engineering is successful. In this review, we provide an overview of the main pathways involved in neural crest formation, delamination, migration and differentiation; and, in particular, we concentrate our attention on the translatability of the latest scientific progress. Here we try to suggest new ideas and strategies that are needed to fully develop the clinical use of these cells. This effort should involve both researchers/clinicians and improvements in good manufacturing practice procedures. It is important to address studies towards clinical application or take into consideration that studies must have an effective therapeutic prospect for humans. New approaches and ideas must be concentrated also toward stem cell recruitment and activation within the human body, overcoming the classical grafting.

  20. Chondroitinase ABC plus bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for repair of spinal cord injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; He, Xijing; Li, Haopeng; Wang, Guoyu

    2013-01-01

    As chondroitinase ABC can improve the hostile microenvironment and cell transplantation is proven to be effective after spinal cord injury, we hypothesized that their combination would be a more effective treatment option. At 5 days after T8 spinal cord crush injury, rats were injected with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell suspension or chondroitinase ABC 1 mm from the edge of spinal cord damage zone. Chondroitinase ABC was first injected, and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell suspension was injected on the next day in the combination group. At 14 days, the mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score of the rats in the combination group was higher than other groups. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that the necrotic area was significantly reduced in the combination group compared with other groups. Glial fibrillary acidic protein-chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan double staining showed that the damage zone of astrocytic scars was significantly reduced without the cavity in the combination group. Glial fibrillary acidic protein/growth associated protein-43 double immunostaining revealed that positive fibers traversed the damage zone in the combination group. These results suggest that the combination of chondroitinase ABC and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury. PMID:25206389

  1. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuzhen; Yang, Libin; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-08-15

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal cord injury. These results indicate that neurotrophin-3 can promote the survival of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into the region of spinal cord injury and potentially enhance the therapeutic effect in the repair of spinal cord injury.

  2. Identification of Drugs that Regulate Dermal Stem Cells and Enhance Skin Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Naska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we asked whether we could identify pharmacological agents that enhance endogenous stem cell function to promote skin repair, focusing on skin-derived precursors (SKPs, a dermal precursor cell population. Libraries of compounds already used in humans were screened for their ability to enhance the self-renewal of human and rodent SKPs. We identified and validated five such compounds, and showed that two of them, alprostadil and trimebutine maleate, enhanced the repair of full thickness skin wounds in middle-aged mice. Moreover, SKPs isolated from drug-treated skin displayed long-term increases in self-renewal when cultured in basal growth medium without drugs. Both alprostadil and trimebutine maleate likely mediated increases in SKP self-renewal by moderate hyperactivation of the MEK-ERK pathway. These findings identify candidates for potential clinical use in human skin repair, and provide support for the idea that pharmacological activation of endogenous tissue precursors represents a viable therapeutic strategy.

  3. Transplanted Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Facilitate Lesion Repair in B6.Fas Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-ping Ruan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a multisystem disease that is characterized by the appearance of serum autoantibodies. No effective treatment for SLE currently exists. Methods. We used human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (H-UC-MSC transplantation to treat B6.Fas mice. Results. After four rounds of cell transplantation, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the levels of mouse anti-nuclear, anti-histone, and anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies in transplanted mice compared with controls. The percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells in mouse peripheral blood significantly increased after H-UC-MSC transplantation. Conclusions. The results showed that H-UC-MSCs could repair lesions in B6.Fas mice such that all of the relevant disease indicators in B6.Fas mice were restored to the levels observed in normal C57BL/6 mice.

  4. Cartilage Repair With Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation: Review of Preclinical and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Mera, Hisashi; Itokazu, Maki; Hashimoto, Yusuke; Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials of various procedures, including bone marrow stimulation, mosaicplasty, and autologous chondrocyte implantation, have been explored to treat articular cartilage defects. However, all of them have some demerits. We focused on autologous culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), which can proliferate without losing their capacity for differentiation. First, we transplanted BMSC into the defective articular cartilage of rabbit and succeeded in regenerating osteochondral tissue. We then applied this transplantation in humans. Our previous reports showed that treatment with BMSC relieves the clinical symptoms of chondral defects in the knee and elbow joint. We investigated the efficacy of BMSC for osteoarthritic knee treated with high tibial osteotomy, by comparing 12 BMSC-transplanted patients with 12 cell-free patients. At 16-month follow-up, although the difference in clinical improvement between both groups was not significant, the arthroscopic and histological grading score was better in the cell-transplanted group. At the over 10-year follow-up, Hospital for Special Surgery knee scores improved to 76 and 73 in the BMSC-transplanted and cell-free groups, respectively, which were better than preoperative scores. Additionally, neither tumors nor infections were observed in all patients, and in the clinical study, we have never observed hypertrophy of repaired tissue, thereby guaranteeing the clinical safety of this therapy. Although we have never observed calcification above the tidemark in rabbit model and human histologically, the repair cartilage was not completely hyaline cartilage. To elucidate the optimum conditions for cell therapy, other stem cells, culture conditions, growth factors, and gene transfection methods should be explored.

  5. Mouse embryonic stem cells, but not somatic cells, predominantly use homologous recombination to repair double-strand DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Elisia D; Pillai, Resmi; Deng, Li; Liang, Li; Tischfield, Jay; Schwemberger, Sandy J; Babcock, George F; Stambrook, Peter J

    2010-11-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells give rise to all cell types of an organism. Since mutations at this embryonic stage would affect all cells and be detrimental to the overall health of an organism, robust mechanisms must exist to ensure that genomic integrity is maintained. To test this proposition, we compared the capacity of murine ES cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks with that of differentiated cells. Of the 2 major pathways that repair double-strand breaks, error-prone nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) predominated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, whereas the high fidelity homologous recombinational repair (HRR) predominated in ES cells. Microhomology-mediated end joining, an emerging repair pathway, persisted at low levels in all cell types examined. The levels of proteins involved in HRR and microhomology-mediated end joining were highly elevated in ES cells compared with mouse embryonic fibroblasts, whereas those for NHEJ were quite variable, with DNA Ligase IV expression low in ES cells. The half-life of DNA Ligase IV protein was also low in ES cells. Attempts to increase the abundance of DNA Ligase IV protein by overexpression or inhibition of its degradation, and thereby elevate NHEJ in ES cells, were unsuccessful. When ES cells were induced to differentiate, however, the level of DNA Ligase IV protein increased, as did the capacity to repair by NHEJ. The data suggest that preferential use of HRR rather than NHEJ may lend ES cells an additional layer of genomic protection and that the limited levels of DNA Ligase IV may account for the low level of NHEJ activity.

  6. Bone repair by periodontal ligament stem cell-seeded nanohydroxyapatite-chitosan scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Shaohua Ge,1 Ning Zhao,1 Lu Wang,1 Meijiao Yu,1 Hong Liu,2 Aimei Song,1 Jing Huang,1 Guancong Wang,2 Pishan Yang11Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine of Shandong Province, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, 2Center of Bio and Micro/Nano Functional Materials, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, ChinaBackground: A nanohydroxyapatite-coated chitosan scaffold has been developed in recent years, but the effect of this composite scaffold on the viability and differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and bone repair is still unknown. This study explored the behavior of PDLSCs on a new nanohydroxyapatite-coated genipin-chitosan conjunction scaffold (HGCCS in vitro as compared with an uncoated genipin-chitosan framework, and evaluated the effect of PDLSC-seeded HGCCS on bone repair in vivo.Methods: Human PDLSCs were cultured and identified, seeded on a HGCCS and on a genipin-chitosan framework, and assessed by scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, MTT, alkaline phosphatase activity, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction at different time intervals. Moreover, PDLSC-seeded scaffolds were used in a rat calvarial defect model, and new bone formation was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining at 12 weeks postoperatively.Results: PDLSCs were clonogenic and positive for STRO-1. They had the capacity to undergo osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation in vitro. When seeded on HGCCS, PDLSCs exhibited significantly greater viability, alkaline phosphatase activity, and upregulated the bone-related markers, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, and osteocalcin to a greater extent compared with PDLSCs seeded on the genipin-chitosan framework. The use of PDLSC-seeded HGCCS promoted calvarial bone repair.Conclusion: This study demonstrates the potential of HGCCS combined with PDLSCs as a promising tool for bone regeneration.Keywords: periodontal ligament, stem

  7. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells promote peripheral nerve repair via paracrine mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yuan Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs represent a promising young-state stem cell source for cell-based therapy. hUCMSC transplantation into the transected sciatic nerve promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery. To further clarify the paracrine effects of hUCMSCs on nerve regeneration, we performed human cytokine antibody array analysis, which revealed that hUCMSCs express 14 important neurotrophic factors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, neurotrophin-3, basic fibroblast growth factor, type I collagen, fibronectin and laminin were highly expressed. Treatment with hUCMSC-conditioned medium enhanced Schwann cell viability and proliferation, increased nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite growth from dorsal root ganglion explants. These findings suggest that paracrine action may be a key mechanism underlying the effects of hUCMSCs in peripheral nerve repair.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells for cardiac repair: are the actors ready for the clinical scenario?

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    Santiago Roura

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For years, sufficient progress has been made in treating heart failure following myocardial infarction; however, the social and economic burdens and the costs to world health systems remain high. Moreover, treatment advances have not resolved the underlying problem of functional heart tissue loss. In this field of research, for years we have actively explored innovative biotherapies for cardiac repair. Here, we present a general, critical overview of our experience in using mesenchymal stem cells, derived from cardiac adipose tissue and umbilical cord blood, in a variety of cell therapy and tissue engineering approaches. We also include the latest advances and future challenges, including good manufacturing practice and regulatory issues. Finally, we evaluate whether recent approaches hold potential for reliable translation to clinical trials.

  9. Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent or Embryonic Stem Cells Decreases the DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination

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    Kalpana Mujoo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The nitric oxide (NO-cyclic GMP pathway contributes to human stem cell differentiation, but NO free radical production can also damage DNA, necessitating a robust DNA damage response (DDR to ensure cell survival. How the DDR is affected by differentiation is unclear. Differentiation of stem cells, either inducible pluripotent or embryonic derived, increased residual DNA damage as determined by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci, with increased S-phase-specific chromosomal aberration after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting reduced homologous recombination (HR repair as supported by the observation of decreased HR-related repair factor foci formation (RAD51 and BRCA1. Differentiated cells also had relatively increased fork stalling and R-loop formation after DNA replication stress. Treatment with NO donor (NOC-18, which causes stem cell differentiation has no effect on double-strand break (DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining but reduced DSB repair by HR. Present studies suggest that DNA repair by HR is impaired in differentiated cells.

  10. The use of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair and regeneration: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Andy; Mitchell, Katrina; Soans, Julian; Kim, Louise; Zaidi, Razi

    2017-03-09

    The management of articular cartilage defects presents many clinical challenges due to its avascular, aneural and alymphatic nature. Bone marrow stimulation techniques, such as microfracture, are the most frequently used method in clinical practice however the resulting mixed fibrocartilage tissue which is inferior to native hyaline cartilage. Other methods have shown promise but are far from perfect. There is an unmet need and growing interest in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering to improve the outcome for patients requiring cartilage repair. Many published reviews on cartilage repair only list human clinical trials, underestimating the wealth of basic sciences and animal studies that are precursors to future research. We therefore set out to perform a systematic review of the literature to assess the translation of stem cell therapy to explore what research had been carried out at each of the stages of translation from bench-top (in vitro), animal (pre-clinical) and human studies (clinical) and assemble an evidence-based cascade for the responsible introduction of stem cell therapy for cartilage defects. This review was conducted in accordance to PRISMA guidelines using CINHAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and Web of Knowledge databases from 1st January 1900 to 30th June 2015. In total, there were 2880 studies identified of which 252 studies were included for analysis (100 articles for in vitro studies, 111 studies for animal studies; and 31 studies for human studies). There was a huge variance in cell source in pre-clinical studies both of terms of animal used, location of harvest (fat, marrow, blood or synovium) and allogeneicity. The use of scaffolds, growth factors, number of cell passages and number of cells used was hugely heterogeneous. This review offers a comprehensive assessment of the evidence behind the translation of basic science to the clinical practice of cartilage repair. It has revealed a lack of connectivity between the in vitro, pre

  11. Lifespan differences in hematopoietic stem cells are due to imperfect repair and unstable mean-reversion.

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    Hans B Sieburg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The life-long supply of blood cells depends on the long-term function of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. HSCs are functionally defined by their multi-potency and self-renewal capacity. Because of their self-renewal capacity, HSCs were thought to have indefinite lifespans. However, there is increasing evidence that genetically identical HSCs differ in lifespan and that the lifespan of a HSC is predetermined and HSC-intrinsic. Lifespan is here defined as the time a HSC gives rise to all mature blood cells. This raises the intriguing question: what controls the lifespan of HSCs within the same animal, exposed to the same environment? We present here a new model based on reliability theory to account for the diversity of lifespans of HSCs. Using clonal repopulation experiments and computational-mathematical modeling, we tested how small-scale, molecular level, failures are dissipated at the HSC population level. We found that the best fit of the experimental data is provided by a model, where the repopulation failure kinetics of each HSC are largely anti-persistent, or mean-reverting, processes. Thus, failure rates repeatedly increase during population-wide division events and are counteracted and decreased by repair processes. In the long-run, a crossover from anti-persistent to persistent behavior occurs. The cross-over is due to a slow increase in the mean failure rate of self-renewal and leads to rapid clonal extinction. This suggests that the repair capacity of HSCs is self-limiting. Furthermore, we show that the lifespan of each HSC depends on the amplitudes and frequencies of fluctuations in the failure rate kinetics. Shorter and longer lived HSCs differ significantly in their pre-programmed ability to dissipate perturbations. A likely interpretation of these findings is that the lifespan of HSCs is determined by preprogrammed differences in repair capacity.

  12. Chondrogenesis of human adipose derived stem cells for future microtia repair using co-culture technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Bee See; Che Omar, Siti Nurhadis; Ubaidah, Muhammad Azhan; Saim, Lokman; Sulaiman, Shamsul; Chua, Kien Hui

    2017-04-01

    In conclusion, these result showed HADSCs could differentiate into chondrocytes-like cells, dependent on signaling induced by TGF-β3 and chondrocytes. This is a promising result and showed that HADSCs is a potential source for future microtia repair. The technique of co-culture is a positive way forward to assist the microtia tissue. Reconstructive surgery for the repair of microtia still remains the greatest challenge among the surgeons. Its repair is associated with donor-site morbidity and the degree of infection is inevitable when using alloplastic prosthesis with uncertain long-term durability. Thus, human adipose derived stem cells (HADSCs) can be an alternative cell source for cartilage regeneration. This study aims to evaluate the chondrogenic potential of HADSCs cultured with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and interaction of auricular chondrocytes with HADSCs for new cartilage generation. Multi-lineages differentiation features of HADSCs were monitored by Alcian Blue, Alizarin Red, and Oil Red O staining for chondrogenic, adipogenic, and osteogenic differentiation capacity, respectively. Further, HADSCs alone were culture in medium added with TGF-β3; and human auricular chondrocytes were interacted indirectly in the culture with and without TGF-βs for up to 21 days, respectively. Cell morphology and chondrogenesis were monitored by inverted microscope. For cell viability, Alamar Blue assay was used to measure the cell viability and the changes in gene expression of auricular chondrocyte markers were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. For the induction of chondrogenic differentiation, HADSCs showed a feature of aggregation and formed a dense matrix of proteoglycans. Staining results from Alizirin Red and Oil Red O indicated the HADSCs also successfully differentiated into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages after 21 days. According to a previous study, HADSCs were strongly positive for the mesenchymal markers CD90, CD73

  13. Fibroblast growth factor 2 and DNA repair involvement in the keratinocyte stem cells response to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harfouche, L'Emira Ghida

    2010-02-01

    Keratinocyte stem cells (KSCs) from the human inter follicular epidermis are regarded as the major target to radiation during radiotherapy. We found herein that KSCs are more resistant to ionizing radiation than their direct progeny, and presented more rapid DNA damage repair kinetics than the progenitors. Furthermore, we provided evidence describing the effect of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) signaling on the ability of KSCs and progenitors to repair damaged DNA. Despite our knowledge of the fact, that FGF is an anti-apoptotic factor in multiple cell types, the direct link between DNA repair and FGF2 signaling has rarely been shown. Existence of such link is an important issue with implications not only to stem cell field but also to cancer therapy. (author)

  14. Effectiveness of mesenchymal stems cells cultured by hanging drop vs. conventional culturing on the repair of hypoxic-ischemic-damaged mouse brains, measured by stemness gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Lou Yongli; Guo Dewei; Zhang Hui; Song Laijun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) cultured by hanging drop and conventional culturing methods on cerebellar repair in hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injured mice. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to analyze the expression levels of three stemness genes, Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog, and the migration related gene CXCR4. MSC prepared by hanging drop or conventional techniques were adminis...

  15. Dynamic dependence on ATR and ATM for double-strand break repair in human embryonic stem cells and neural descendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bret R; Golding, Sarah E; Rao, Raj R; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2010-04-02

    The DNA double-strand break (DSB) is the most toxic form of DNA damage. Studies aimed at characterizing DNA repair during development suggest that homologous recombination repair (HRR) is more critical in pluripotent cells compared to differentiated somatic cells in which nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is dominant. We have characterized the DNA damage response (DDR) and quality of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and in vitro-derived neural cells. Resolution of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF) was used as a surrogate for DSB repair. The resolution of gamma-H2AX foci occurred at a slower rate in hESCs compared to neural progenitors (NPs) and astrocytes perhaps reflective of more complex DSB repair in hESCs. In addition, the resolution of RAD51 foci, indicative of active homologous recombination repair (HRR), showed that hESCs as well as NPs have high capacity for HRR, whereas astrocytes do not. Importantly, the ATM kinase was shown to be critical for foci formation in astrocytes, but not in hESCs, suggesting that the DDR is different in these cells. Blocking the ATM kinase in astrocytes not only prevented the formation but also completely disassembled preformed repair foci. The ability of hESCs to form IRIF was abrogated with caffeine and siRNAs targeted against ATR, implicating that hESCs rely on ATR, rather than ATM for regulating DSB repair. This relationship dynamically changed as cells differentiated. Interestingly, while the inhibition of the DNA-PKcs kinase (and presumably non-homologous endjoining [NHEJ]) in astrocytes slowed IRIF resolution it did not in hESCs, suggesting that repair in hESCs does not utilize DNA-PKcs. Altogether, our results show that hESCs have efficient DSB repair that is largely ATR-dependent HRR, whereas astrocytes critically depend on ATM for NHEJ, which, in part, is DNA-PKcs-independent.

  16. 'Cold shock' increases the frequency of homology directed repair gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Q; Mintier, G; Ma-Edmonds, M; Storton, D; Wang, X; Xiao, X; Kienzle, B; Zhao, D; Feder, John N

    2018-02-01

    Using CRISPR/Cas9 delivered as a RNA modality in conjunction with a lipid specifically formulated for large RNA molecules, we demonstrate that homology directed repair (HDR) rates between 20-40% can be achieved in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Furthermore, low HDR rates (between 1-20%) can be enhanced two- to ten-fold in both iPSCs and HEK293 cells by 'cold shocking' cells at 32 °C for 24-48 hours following transfection. This method can also increases the proportion of loci that have undergone complete sequence conversion across the donor sequence, or 'perfect HDR', as opposed to partial sequence conversion where nucleotides more distal to the CRISPR cut site are less efficiently incorporated ('partial HDR'). We demonstrate that the structure of the single-stranded DNA oligo donor can influence the fidelity of HDR, with oligos symmetric with respect to the CRISPR cleavage site and complementary to the target strand being more efficient at directing 'perfect HDR' compared to asymmetric non-target strand complementary oligos. Our protocol represents an efficient method for making CRISPR-mediated, specific DNA sequence changes within the genome that will facilitate the rapid generation of genetic models of human disease in iPSCs as well as other genome engineered cell lines.

  17. Combination of edaravone and neural stem cell transplantation repairs injured spinal cord in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y Y; Peng, C G; Ye, X B

    2015-12-29

    This study sought to observe the effect of the combination of edaravone and neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation on the repair of complete spinal cord transection in rats. Eighty adult female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used to establish the injury model of complete spinal cord transection at T9. Animals were divided randomly into four groups (N = 20 each): control, edaravone, transplantation, and edaravone + transplantation. The recovery of spinal function was evaluated with the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) rating scale on days 1, 3, and 7 each week after the surgery. After 8 weeks, the BBB scores of the control, edaravone, transplantation, and combination groups were 4.21 ± 0.11, 8.46 ± 0.1, 8.54 ± 0.13, and 11.21 ± 0.14, respectively. At 8 weeks after surgery, the spinal cord was collected; the survival and transportation of transplanted cells were observed with PKH-26 labeling, and the regeneration and distribution of spinal nerve fibers with fluorescent-gold (FG) retrograde tracing. Five rats died due to the injury. PKH-26-labeled NSCs had migrated into the spinal cord. A few intact nerve fibers and pyramidal neurons passed the injured area in the transplantation and combination groups. The numbers of PKH-26-labeled cells and FG-labeled nerve fibers were in the order: combination group > edaravone group and transplantation group > control group (P edaravone can enhance the survival and differentiation of NSCs in injured areas; edaravone with NSC transplantation can improve the effectiveness of spinal cord injury repair in rats.

  18. Identification of Pathways in Liver Repair Potentially Targeted by Secretory Proteins from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Sandra Winkler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The beneficial impact of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on both acute and chronic liver diseases has been confirmed, although the molecular mechanisms behind it remain elusive. We aim to identify factors secreted by undifferentiated and hepatocytic differentiated MSC in vitro in order to delineate liver repair pathways potentially targeted by MSC. Methods: Secreted factors were determined by protein arrays and related pathways identified by biomathematical analyses. Results: MSC from adipose tissue and bone marrow expressed a similar pattern of surface markers. After hepatocytic differentiation, CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1 increased and CD166 (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, ALCAM decreased. MSC secreted different factors before and after differentiation. These comprised cytokines involved in innate immunity and growth factors regulating liver regeneration. Pathway analysis revealed cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, chemokine signalling pathways, the complement and coagulation cascades as well as the Januskinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NOD-like receptor signalling pathways as relevant networks. Relationships to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α signalling seemed also relevant. Conclusion: MSC secreted proteins, which differed depending on cell source and degree of differentiation. The factors might address inflammatory and growth factor pathways as well as chemo-attraction and innate immunity. Since these are prone to dysregulation in most liver diseases, MSC release hepatotropic factors, potentially supporting liver regeneration.

  19. A Systematic Review of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Spinal Cord Injury, Intervertebral Disc Repair and Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shujhat; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim

    2018-01-01

    Spinal surgery presents a challenge for both neurosurgery and orthopaedic surgery. Due to the heterogeneous differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells, there is much interest in the treatment of spine surgery. Animal and human trials focussing on the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury, spine fusion and disc degeneration were included in this systematic review. Published articles up to January 2016 from MEDLINE, PubMed and Ovid were used by searching for specific terms. Of the 2595 articles found, 53 met the selection criteria and were included for analysis (16 on spinal cord injury, 28 on intervertebral disc repair and 9 on spinal fusion). Numerous studies reported better results when the mesenchymal stem cells were used in co-culture with other cells or used in scaffolds. Mesenchymal stem cells were also found to have an immune-modulatory role, which can improve surgical outcome. This systematic review suggests that mesenchymal stem cells can be used safely and effectively for these spinal surgery treatments. Whilst, in certain studies, mesenchymal stem cells did not necessarily show improved results from existing treatments, they provide an alternative option. This can reduce morbidity that arises from current surgical treatment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. PLGA-based microcarriers induce mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis and stimulate cartilage repair in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morille, Marie; Toupet, Karine; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we aimed at evaluating the ability of novel PLGA-P188-PLGA-based microspheres to induce the differentiation of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) into chondrocytes. To this aim, we tested microspheres releasing TGFβ3 (PAM-T) in vitro and in situ, in a pathological osteoarthritic (OA) environment. We first evaluated the chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs seeded onto PAM-T in vitro and confirmed the up-regulation of chondrogenic markers while the secretome of the cells was not changed by the 3D environment. We then injected human MSC seeded onto PAM-T in the knee joints of mice with collagenase-induced OA. After 6 weeks, histological analysis revealed that formation of a cartilage-like tissue occurred at the vicinity of PAM-T that was not observed when MSCs were seeded onto PAM. We also noticed that the endogenous articular cartilage was less degraded. The extent of cartilage protection was further analysed by confocal laser microscopy. When MSCs seeded onto PAM-T were injected early after OA induction, protection of cartilage against degradation was evidenced and this effect was associated to a higher survival of MSCs in presence of TGFβ3. This study points to the interest of using MSCs seeded onto PAM for cartilage repair and stimulation of endogenous cartilage regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Repair of Tissues by Adult Stem/Progenitor Cells (MSCs): Controversies, Myths, and Changing Paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Prockop, Darwin J

    2009-01-01

    Research on stem cells has progressed at a rapid pace and, as might be anticipated, the results have generated several controversies, a few myths and a change in a major paradigm. Some of these issues will be reviewed in this study with special emphasis on how they can be applied to the adult stem/progenitor cells from bone marrow, referred to as MSCs.

  2. Effects of cell-to-collagen ratio in stem cell-seeded constructs for Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia; Boivin, Gregory P; Galloway, Marc T; Gooch, Cindi; West, John R; Butler, David L

    2006-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the hypotheses that implantation of cell-seeded constructs in a rabbit Achilles tendon defect model would 1) improve repair biomechanics and matrix organization and 2) result in higher failure forces than measured in vivo forces in normal rabbit Achilles tendon (AT) during an inclined hopping activity. Autogenous tissue-engineered constructs were fabricated in culture between posts in the wells of silicone dishes at four cell-to-collagen ratios by seeding mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from 18 adult rabbits at each of two seeding densities (0.1 x 10(6) and 1 x 10(6) cell/mL) in each of two collagen concentrations (1.3 and 2.6 mg/mL). After 5 days of contraction, constructs having the two highest ratios (0.4 and 0.8 M/mg) were damaged by excessive cell traction forces and could not be used in subsequent in vivo studies. Constructs at the lower ratios (0.04 and 0.08 M/mg) were implanted in bilateral, 2 cm long gap defects in the rabbit's lateral Achilles tendon. At 12 weeks after surgery, both repair tissues were isolated and either failed in tension (n = 13) to determine their biomechanical properties or submitted for histological analysis (n = 5). No significant differences were observed in any structural or mechanical properties or in histological appearance between the two repair conditions. However, the average maximum force and maximum stress of these repairs achieved 50 and 85% of corresponding values for the normal AT and exceeded the largest peak in vivo forces (19% of failure) previously recorded in the rabbit AT. Average stiffness and modulus were 60 and 85% of normal values, respectively. New constructs with lower cell densities and higher scaffold stiffness that do not excessively contract and tear in culture and that further improve the repair stiffness needed to withstand various levels of expected in vivo loading are currently being investigated.

  3. In vitro chondrogenesis and in vivo repair of osteochondral defect with human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji-Yun; Kim, Kyung-Il; Park, Siyeon; Im, Gun-Il

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chondrogenic features of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and examine the differences in the chondrogenesis between hiPSCs and human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBMMSCs). Embryoid bodies (EBs) were formed from undifferentiated hiPSCs. After EBs were dissociated into single cells, chondrogenic culture was performed in pellets and alginate hydrogel. Chondro-induced hiPSCs were implanted in osteochondral defects created on the patellar groove of immunosuppressed rats and evaluated after 12 weeks. The ESC markers NANOG, SSEA4 and OCT3/4 disappeared while the mesodermal marker BMP-4 appeared in chondro-induced hiPSCs. After 21 days of culture, greater glycosaminoglycan contents and better chondrocytic features including lacuna and abundant matrix formation were observed from chondro-induced hiPSCs compared to chondro-induced hBMMSCs. The expression of chondrogenic markers including SOX-9, type II collagen, and aggrecan in chondro-induced hiPSCs was comparable to or greater than chondro-induced hBMMSCs. A remarkably low level of hypertrophic and osteogenic markers including type X collagen, type I collagen and Runx-2 was noted in chondro-induced hiPSCs compared to chondro-induced hBMMSCs. hiPSCs had significantly greater methylation of several CpG sites in COL10A1 promoter than hBMMSCs in either undifferentiated or chondro-induced state, suggesting an epigenetic cause of the difference in hypertrophy. The defects implanted with chondro-induced hiPSCs showed a significantly better quality of cartilage repair than the control defects, and the majority of cells in the regenerated cartilage consisted of implanted hiPSCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Progenitor/stem cell transplantation for repair of myocardial infarction: Hype or hope?

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yuliang; Wang, Yuhua; Cao, Nan; Yang, Huangtian; Wang, Yigang

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant therapeutic advances, heart failure remains the predominant cause of mortality worldwide. Currently, progenitor/stem cell biology holds great promise for a new era of cell-based therapy for salvaging the failing heart. However, the translational arm of progenitor/stem cell science is in a relatively primitive state. For the time being, the clinical trials have been both encouraging and disappointing. How to improve the engraftment, long-term survival and appropriate differ...

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Protection and Repair of Injured Vital Organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poll, D.; Parekkadan, B.; Rinkes, I. H. M. Borel; Tilles, A. W.; Yarmush, M. L.

    Recently there has been a paradigm shift in what is considered to be the therapeutic promise of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in diseases of vital organs. Originally, research focused on MSCs as a source of regenerative cells by differentiation of transplanted cells into lost cell types. It is now

  6. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-ping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T 7-8 . Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury.

  7. Skeletal Muscle Regeneration, Repair and Remodelling in Aging: The Importance of Muscle Stem Cells and Vascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanisse, Sophie; Nederveen, Joshua P; Snijders, Tim; McKay, Bryon R; Parise, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. Ultimately, sarcopenia results in the loss of independence, which imposes a large financial burden on healthcare systems worldwide. A critical facet of sarcopenia is the diminished ability for aged muscle to regenerate, repair and remodel. Over the years, research has focused on elucidating underlying mechanisms of sarcopenia and the impaired ability of muscle to respond to stimuli with aging. Muscle-specific stem cells, termed satellite cells (SC), play an important role in maintaining muscle health throughout the lifespan. It is well established that SC are essential in skeletal muscle regeneration, and it has been hypothesized that a reduction and/or dysregulation of the SC pool, may contribute to accelerated loss of skeletal muscle mass that is observed with advancing age. The preservation of skeletal muscle tissue and its ability to respond to stimuli may be impacted by reduced SC content and impaired function observed with aging. Aging is also associated with a reduction in capillarization of skeletal muscle. We have recently demonstrated that the distance between type II fibre-associated SC and capillaries is greater in older compared to younger adults. The greater distance between SC and capillaries in older adults may contribute to the dysregulation in SC activation ultimately impairing muscle's ability to remodel and, in extreme circumstances, regenerate. This viewpoint will highlight the importance of optimal SC activation in addition to skeletal muscle capillarization to maximize the regenerative potential of skeletal muscle in older adults. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Lung Basal Stem Cells Rapidly Repair DNA Damage Using the Error-Prone Nonhomologous End-Joining Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Clare E.; Chen, Yunshun; Ma, Stephen B.; Hu, Yifang; Ramm, Georg; Sutherland, Kate D.; Smyth, Gordon K.

    2017-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC), the second most common subtype of lung cancer, is strongly associated with tobacco smoking and exhibits genomic instability. The cellular origins and molecular processes that contribute to SqCC formation are largely unexplored. Here we show that human basal stem cells (BSCs) isolated from heavy smokers proliferate extensively, whereas their alveolar progenitor cell counterparts have limited colony-forming capacity. We demonstrate that this difference arises in part because of the ability of BSCs to repair their DNA more efficiently than alveolar cells following ionizing radiation or chemical-induced DNA damage. Analysis of mice harbouring a mutation in the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), a key enzyme in DNA damage repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), indicated that BSCs preferentially repair their DNA by this error-prone process. Interestingly, polyploidy, a phenomenon associated with genetically unstable cells, was only observed in the human BSC subset. Expression signature analysis indicated that BSCs are the likely cells of origin of human SqCC and that high levels of NHEJ genes in SqCC are correlated with increasing genomic instability. Hence, our results favour a model in which heavy smoking promotes proliferation of BSCs, and their predilection for error-prone NHEJ could lead to the high mutagenic burden that culminates in SqCC. Targeting DNA repair processes may therefore have a role in the prevention and therapy of SqCC. PMID:28125611

  9. Dynamic dependence on ATR and ATM for double-strand break repair in human embryonic stem cells and neural descendants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret R Adams

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The DNA double-strand break (DSB is the most toxic form of DNA damage. Studies aimed at characterizing DNA repair during development suggest that homologous recombination repair (HRR is more critical in pluripotent cells compared to differentiated somatic cells in which nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ is dominant. We have characterized the DNA damage response (DDR and quality of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, and in vitro-derived neural cells. Resolution of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF was used as a surrogate for DSB repair. The resolution of gamma-H2AX foci occurred at a slower rate in hESCs compared to neural progenitors (NPs and astrocytes perhaps reflective of more complex DSB repair in hESCs. In addition, the resolution of RAD51 foci, indicative of active homologous recombination repair (HRR, showed that hESCs as well as NPs have high capacity for HRR, whereas astrocytes do not. Importantly, the ATM kinase was shown to be critical for foci formation in astrocytes, but not in hESCs, suggesting that the DDR is different in these cells. Blocking the ATM kinase in astrocytes not only prevented the formation but also completely disassembled preformed repair foci. The ability of hESCs to form IRIF was abrogated with caffeine and siRNAs targeted against ATR, implicating that hESCs rely on ATR, rather than ATM for regulating DSB repair. This relationship dynamically changed as cells differentiated. Interestingly, while the inhibition of the DNA-PKcs kinase (and presumably non-homologous endjoining [NHEJ] in astrocytes slowed IRIF resolution it did not in hESCs, suggesting that repair in hESCs does not utilize DNA-PKcs. Altogether, our results show that hESCs have efficient DSB repair that is largely ATR-dependent HRR, whereas astrocytes critically depend on ATM for NHEJ, which, in part, is DNA-PKcs-independent.

  10. Prospect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Genetic Repair to Cure Genetic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Adiwinata Pawitan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In genetic diseases, where the cells are already damaged, the damaged cells can be replaced by new normal cells, which can be differentiated from iPSC. To avoid immune rejection, iPSC from the patient’s own cell can be developed. However, iPSC from the patients’s cell harbors the same genetic aberration. Therefore, before differentiating the iPSCs into required cells, genetic repair should be done. This review discusses the various technologies to repair the genetic aberration in patient-derived iPSC, or to prevent the genetic aberration to cause further damage in the iPSC-derived cells, such as Zn finger and TALE nuclease genetic editing, RNA interference technology, exon skipping, and gene transfer method. In addition, the challenges in using the iPSC and the strategies to manage the hurdles are addressed.

  11. Adult Stem Cell-Based Enhancement of Nerve Conduit for Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    neurotrophically activated cell types and conditioned media (via RT-PCR and ELISA of neurotrophic factors), followed by cell storage Specific objective 9...Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells (NI-MiMPCs) and Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs), quantified via ELISA . MiMPCs and MSCs were cultured in neurotrophic induction...LIF, (E) osteonectin, and (F) clusterin. All ELISA results are expressed in pg/ml or ng/ml produced per million cells. Medium taken from NI-MiMPC

  12. The role of immunosuppression of mesenchymal stem cells in tissue repair and tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Han Zhipeng; Jing Yingying; Zhang Shanshan; Liu Yan; Shi Yufang; Wei Lixin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have acquired great interests for their potential use in the clinical therapy of many diseases because of their functions including multiple lineage differentiation, low immunogenicity and immunosuppression. Many studies suggest that MSCs are strongly immunosuppressive in vitro and in vivo. MSCs exert a profound inhibitory effect on the proliferation of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and natural killer cells. In addition, several soluble factors have ...

  13. A Preliminary Study: Human Fibroid Stro-1+/CD44+ Stem Cells Isolated From Uterine Fibroids Demonstrate Decreased DNA Repair and Genomic Integrity Compared to Adjacent Myometrial Stro-1+/CD44+ Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusinski Fernung, Lauren E; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Yang, Qiwei

    2018-01-01

    Although uterine fibroids (UFs) continue to place a major burden on female reproductive health, the mechanisms behind their origin remain undetermined. Normal myometrial stem cells may be transformed into tumor-initiating stem cells, causing UFs, due to unknown causes of somatic mutations in MED12, found in up to 85% of sporadically formed UFs. It is well established in other tumor types that defective DNA repair increases the risk of such tumorigenic somatic mutations, mechanisms not yet studied in UFs. To examine the putative cause(s) of this stem cell transformation, we analyzed DNA repair within stem cells from human UFs compared to those from adjacent myometrium to determine whether DNA repair in fibroid stem cells is compromised. Human fibroid (F) and adjacent myometrial (Myo) stem cells were isolated from fresh tissues, and gene expression relating to DNA repair was analyzed. Fibroid stem cells differentially expressed DNA repair genes related to DNA double- (DSBs) and single-strand breaks. DNA damage was measured using alkaline comet assay. Additionally, DNA DSBs were induced in these stem cells and DNA DSB repair evaluated (1) by determining changes in phosphorylation of DNA DSB-related proteins and (2) by determining differences in γ-H2AX foci formation and relative DNA repair protein RAD50 expression. Overall, F stem cells demonstrated increased DNA damage and altered DNA repair gene expression and signaling, suggesting that human F stem cells demonstrate impaired DNA repair. Compromised F stem cell DNA repair may contribute to further mutagenesis and, consequently, further growth and propagation of UF tumors.

  14. Stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jukes, Jojanneke; Both, Sanne; Post, Janine; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Marcel; de Boer, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter defines stem cells and their properties. It identifies the major differences between embryonic and adult stem cells. Stem cells can be defined by two properties: the ability to make identical copies of themselves and the ability to form other cell types of the body. These properties are

  15. Perivascular Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Sheep: Characterization and Autologous Transplantation in a Model of Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Paul; Baily, James; Khan, Nusrat; Biant, Leela C; Simpson, A Hamish R; Péault, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Previous research has indicated that purified perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have increased chondrogenic potential compared to conventional mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived in culture. This study aimed to develop an autologous large animal model for PSC transplantation and to specifically determine if implanted cells are retained in articular cartilage defects. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting were used to ascertain the reactivity of anti-human and anti-ovine antibodies, which were combined and used to identify and isolate pericytes (CD34 - CD45 - CD146 + ) and adventitial cells (CD34 + CD45 - CD146 - ). The purified cells demonstrated osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic potential in culture. Autologous ovine PSCs (oPSCs) were isolated, cultured, and efficiently transfected using a green fluorescence protein (GFP) encoding lentivirus. The cells were implanted into articular cartilage defects on the medial femoral condyle using hydrogel and collagen membranes. Four weeks following implantation, the condyle was explanted and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the presence of oPSCs in the defect repaired with the hydrogel. These data suggest the testability in a large animal of native MSC autologous grafting, thus avoiding possible biases associated with xenotransplantation. Such a setting will be used in priority for indications in orthopedics, at first to model articular cartilage repair.

  16. Deterministic Encapsulation of Human Cardiac Stem Cells in Variable Composition Nanoporous Gel Cocoons To Enhance Therapeutic Repair of Injured Myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Pushpinder; Alarcon, Emilio I; Yeuchyk, Tanya; Parent, Sandrine; de Kemp, Robert A; Variola, Fabio; Courtman, David; Stewart, Duncan J; Davis, Darryl R

    2018-04-20

    Although cocooning explant-derived cardiac stem cells (EDCs) in protective nanoporous gels (NPGs) prior to intramyocardial injection boosts long-term cell retention, the number of EDCs that finally engraft is trivial and unlikely to account for salutary effects on myocardial function and scar size. As such, we investigated the effect of varying the NPG content within capsules to alter the physical properties of cocoons without influencing cocoon dimensions. Increasing NPG concentration enhanced cell migration and viability while improving cell-mediated repair of injured myocardium. Given that the latter occurred with NPG content having no detectable effect on the long-term engraftment of transplanted cells, we found that changing the physical properties of cocoons prompted explant-derived cardiac stem cells to produce greater amounts of cytokines, nanovesicles, and microRNAs that boosted the generation of new blood vessels and new cardiomyocytes. Thus, by altering the physical properties of cocoons by varying NPG content, the paracrine signature of encapsulated cells can be enhanced to promote greater endogenous repair of injured myocardium.

  17. Types of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  18. TAK1 modulates satellite stem cell homeostasis and skeletal muscle repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yuji; Hindi, Sajedah M.; Sato, Shuichi; Xiong, Guangyan; Akira, Shizuo; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Satellite cells are resident adult stem cells that are required for regeneration of skeletal muscle. However, signalling mechanisms that regulate satellite cell function are less understood. Here we demonstrate that transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is important in satellite stem cell homeostasis and function. Inactivation of TAK1 in satellite cells inhibits muscle regeneration in adult mice. TAK1 is essential for satellite cell proliferation and its inactivation causes precocious differentiation. Moreover, TAK1-deficient satellite cells exhibit increased oxidative stress and undergo spontaneous cell death, primarily through necroptosis. TAK1 is required for the activation of NF-κB and JNK in satellite cells. Forced activation of NF-κB improves survival and proliferation of TAK1-deficient satellite cells. Furthermore, TAK1-mediated activation of JNK is essential to prevent oxidative stress and precocious differentiation of satellite cells. Collectively, our study suggests that TAK1 is required for maintaining the pool of satellite stem cells and for regenerative myogenesis. PMID:26648529

  19. ALDH1A1 maintains ovarian cancer stem cell-like properties by altered regulation of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair network signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhong Meng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH expressing cells have been characterized as possessing stem cell-like properties. We evaluated ALDH+ ovarian cancer stem cell-like properties and their role in platinum resistance. METHODS: Isogenic ovarian cancer cell lines for platinum sensitivity (A2780 and platinum resistant (A2780/CP70 as well as ascites from ovarian cancer patients were analyzed for ALDH+ by flow cytometry to determine its association to platinum resistance, recurrence and survival. A stable shRNA knockdown model for ALDH1A1 was utilized to determine its effect on cancer stem cell-like properties, cell cycle checkpoints, and DNA repair mediators. RESULTS: ALDH status directly correlated to platinum resistance in primary ovarian cancer samples obtained from ascites. Patients with ALDHHIGH displayed significantly lower progression free survival than the patients with ALDHLOW cells (9 vs. 3 months, respectively p<0.01. ALDH1A1-knockdown significantly attenuated clonogenic potential, PARP-1 protein levels, and reversed inherent platinum resistance. ALDH1A1-knockdown resulted in dramatic decrease of KLF4 and p21 protein levels thereby leading to S and G2 phase accumulation of cells. Increases in S and G2 cells demonstrated increased expression of replication stress associated Fanconi Anemia DNA repair proteins (FANCD2, FANCJ and replication checkpoint (pS317 Chk1 were affected. ALDH1A1-knockdown induced DNA damage, evidenced by robust induction of γ-H2AX and BAX mediated apoptosis, with significant increases in BRCA1 expression, suggesting ALDH1A1-dependent regulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair networks in ovarian cancer stem-like cells. CONCLUSION: This data suggests that ovarian cancer cells expressing ALDH1A1 may maintain platinum resistance by altered regulation of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair network signaling.

  20. The promotion of cartilage defect repair using adenovirus mediated Sox9 gene transfer of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Yang, Fei; Liu, Guangwang; Yu, Degang; Li, Huiwu; Fan, Qiming; Gan, Yaokai; Tang, Tingting; Dai, Kerong

    2011-06-01

    Although Sox9 is essential for chondrogenic differentiation and matrix production, its application in cartilage tissue engineering has been rarely reported. In this study, the chondrogenic effect of Sox9 on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and its application in articular cartilage repair in vivo were evaluated. Rabbit BMSCs were transduced with adenoviral vector containing Sox9. Toluidine blue, safranin O staining and real-time PCR were performed to check chondrogenic differentiation. The results showed that Sox9 could induce chondrogenesis of BMSCs both in monolayer and on PGA scaffold effectively. The rabbit model with full-thickness cartilage defects was established and then repaired by PGA scaffold and rabbit BMSCs with or without Sox9 transduction. HE, safranin O staining and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the repair of defects by the complex. Better repair, including more newly-formed cartilage tissue and hyaline cartilage-specific extracellular matrix and greater expression of several chondrogenesis marker genes were observed in PGA scaffold and BMSCs with Sox9 transduction, compared to that without transduction. Our findings defined the important role of Sox9 in the repair of cartilage defects in vivo and provided evidence that Sox9 had the potential and advantage in the application of tissue engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stem Cells and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliakos, George

    2017-02-01

    The article is a presentation at the 4th Conference of ESAAM, which took place on October 30-31, 2015, in Athens, Greece. Its purpose was not to cover all aspects of cellular aging but to share with the audience of the Conference, in a 15-minute presentation, current knowledge about the rejuvenating and repairing somatic stem cells that are distinct from other stem cell types (such as embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells), emphasize that our body in old age cannot take advantage of these rejuvenating cells, and provide some examples of novel experimental stem cell applications in the field of rejuvenation and antiaging biomedical research.

  2. Electroacupuncture in the repair of spinal cord injury: inhibiting the Notch signaling pathway and promoting neural stem cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Geng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroacupuncture for the treatment of spinal cord injury has a good clinical curative effect, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In our experiments, the spinal cord of adult Sprague-Dawley rats was clamped for 60 seconds. Dazhui (GV14 and Mingmen (GV4 acupoints of rats were subjected to electroacupuncture. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the expression of serum inflammatory factors was apparently downregulated in rat models of spinal cord injury after electroacupuncture. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that electroacupuncture contributed to the proliferation of neural stem cells in rat injured spinal cord, and suppressed their differentiation into astrocytes. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot assays showed that electroacupuncture inhibited activation of the Notch signaling pathway induced by spinal cord injury. These findings indicate that electroacupuncture repaired the injured spinal cord by suppressing the Notch signaling pathway and promoting the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells.

  3. Stem cells and the repair of radiation-induced salivary gland damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, R. P.; Stokman, M. A.

    Hyposalivation underlying xerostomia after radiotherapy is still a major problem in the treatment of head and neck cancer. Stem cell therapy may provide a means to reduce radiation-induced hyposalivation and improve the quality of life of patients. This review discusses the current status in

  4. Adult Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Primed for fhe Repair of Damaged Cardiac Tissue After Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Edward D.

    The burden of cardiovascular disease around the world is growing, despite improvements in hospital care and time to treatment. As more people survive an initial myocardial infarction (MI), the decompensated heart tissue is strained, leading to heart failure (HF) and an increased risk for a second MI. While extensive progress has been made in treating the symptoms after MI, including HF and angina, little success has come from repairing the damaged heart tissue to alleviate the progression to these end- stage symptoms. One promising area of regenerative research has been the use of adult stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow (BMSCs). These cells can differentiate towards the cardiac cell lineage in vitro while producing trophic factors that can repair damaged tissue. When placed in the heart after MI though, BMSCs have mixed results, producing profound changes in some patients but zero or even negative effects in others. In this report, we used BMSCs as a stem cell base for a regenerative medicine system for the repair of damaged cardiac tissue. These cells are seeded on a polycaprolactone nanoscaffolding support system, which provides a growth substrate for in vitro work, as well as a housing system for protected in vivo delivery. When the nanoscaffold is pre-coated with a novel combination of a cardiac protein, thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4), and a small molecule effector of the WNT protein pathway, IWP-2, BMSCs differentiated towards the cardiac lineage in as little as 24hours. When injected into rat hearts that have been given an ischemic MI, the nanoscaffolding system slowly dissolves, leaving the cells in place of the damaged cardiac tissue. After two weeks of monitoring, BMSCs are present within the damaged hearts, as evidenced by immunofluorescence and nanoparticle tracking. Injections of the nanoscaffolding/cell system led to robust healing of the rat hearts that had been given small- and medium- damage heart attacks, outperforming PBS sham and cell

  5. Insight on stem cell preconditioning and instructive biomaterials to enhance cell adhesion, retention, and engraftment for tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Stem cells are a promising solution for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the limited survival and engraftment of transplanted cells due to a hostile ischemic environment is a bottleneck for effective utilization and commercialization. Within this environment, the majority of transplanted cells undergo apoptosis prior to participating in lineage differentiation and cellular integration. Therefore, in order to maximize the clinical utility of stem/progenitor cells, strategies must be employed to increase their adhesion, retention, and engraftment in vivo. Here, we reviewed key strategies that are being adopted to enhance the survival, retention, and engraftment of transplanted stem cells through the manipulation of both the stem cells and the surrounding environment. We describe how preconditioning of cells or cell manipulations strategies can enhance stem cell survival and engraftment after transplantation. We also discuss how biomaterials can enhance the function of stem cells for effective tissue regeneration. Biomaterials can incorporate or mimic extracellular function (ECM) function and enhance survival or differentiation of transplanted cells in vivo. Biomaterials can also promote angiogenesis, enhance engraftment and differentiation, and accelerate electromechanical integration of transplanted stem cells. Insight gained from this review may direct the development of future investigations and clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Potential Role of Dentin Sialoprotein by Inducing Dental Pulp Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Mineralization for Dental Tissue Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Chen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentin sialoprotein (DSP is a dentin extracellular matrix protein, a unique marker of dentinogenesis and plays a vital role in odontoblast differentiation and dentin mineralization. Recently, studies have shown that DSP induces differentiation and mineralization of periodontal ligament stem cells and dental papilla mesenchymal cells in vitro and rescues dentin deficiency and increases enamel mineralization in animal models.The hypothesis: DSP as a nature therapeutic agent stimulates dental tissue repair by inducing endogenous dental pulp mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells into odontoblast-like cells to synthesize and to secrete dentin extracellular matrix forming new tertiary dentin as well as to regenerate a functional dentin-pulp complex. As DSP is a nature protein, and clinical procedure for DSP therapy is easy and simple, application of DSP may provide a new avenue for dentists with additional option for the treatment of substantially damaged vital teeth.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Dental caries is the most common dental disease. Deep caries and pulp exposure have been treated by various restorative materials with limited success. One promising approach is dental pulp stem/progenitor-based therapies to regenerate dentin-pulp complex and restore its functions by DSP induction in vivo.

  7. Potential Role of Dentin Sialoprotein by Inducing Dental Pulp Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Mineralization for Dental Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guo-Hua; Yang, Guo-Bin; Wu, Li-An; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) is a dentin extracellular matrix protein, a unique marker of dentinogenesis and plays a vital role in odontoblast differentiation and dentin mineralization. Recently, studies have shown that DSP induces differentiation and mineralization of periodontal ligament stem cells and dental papilla mesenchymal cells in vitro and rescues dentin deficiency and increases enamel mineralization in animal models. THE HYPOTHESIS: DSP as a nature therapeutic agent stimulates dental tissue repair by inducing endogenous dental pulp mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells into odontoblast-like cells to synthesize and to secrete dentin extracellular matrix forming new tertiary dentin as well as to regenerate a functional dentin-pulp complex. As DSP is a nature protein, and clinical procedure for DSP therapy is easy and simple, application of DSP may provide a new avenue for dentists with additional option for the treatment of substantially damaged vital teeth. EVALUATION OF THE HYPOTHESIS: Dental caries is the most common dental disease. Deep caries and pulp exposure have been treated by various restorative materials with limited success. One promising approach is dental pulp stem/progenitor-based therapies to regenerate dentin-pulp complex and restore its functions by DSP induction in vivo.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells delivered in a microsphere-based engineered skin contribute to cutaneous wound healing and sweat gland repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sha; Lu, Gang; Wu, Yan; Jirigala, Enhe; Xu, Yongan; Ma, Kui; Fu, Xiaobing

    2012-04-01

    Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) can contribute to wound healing after skin injury. However, the role of BM-MSCs on repairing skin appendages in renewal tissues is incompletely explored. Moreover, most preclinical studies suggest that the therapeutic effects afforded by BM-MSCs transplantation are short-lived and relatively unstable. To assess whether engrafted bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells via a delivery system can participate in cutaneous wound healing and sweat-gland repair in mice. For safe and effective delivery of BM-MSCs to wounds, epidermal growth factor (EGF) microspheres were firstly developed to both support cells and maintain appropriate stimuli, then cell-seeded microspheres were incorporated with biomimetic scaffolds and thus fabricated an engineered skin construct with epithelial differentiation and proliferative potential. The applied efficacy was examined by implanting them into excisional wounds on both back and paws of hind legs in mice. After 3 weeks, BM-MSC-engineered skin (EGF loaded) treated wounds exhibited accelerated healing with increased re-epithelialization rates and less skin contraction. Furthermore, histological and immunofluorescence staining analysis revealed sweat glands-like structures became more apparent in BM-MSC-engineered skin (EGF loaded) treated wounds but the number of implanted BM-MSCs were decreased gradually in later phases of healing progression. Our study suggests that BM-MSCs delivered by this EGF microspheres-based engineered skin model may be a promising strategy to repair sweat glands and improve cutaneous wound healing after injury and success in this study might provide a potential benefit for BM-MSCs administration clinically. Copyright © 2012 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Involvement of Indian hedgehog signaling in mesenchymal stem cell-augmented rotator cuff tendon repair in an athymic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Jian-Chun; Mosca, Michael J; Degen, Ryan M; Lebaschi, Amir; Carballo, Camila; Carbone, Andrew; Cong, Guang-Ting; Ying, Liang; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-04-01

    Bone marrow aspirate has been used in recent years to augment tendon-to-bone healing, including in rotator cuff repair. However, the healing mechanism in cell-based therapy has not been elucidated in detail. Sixteen athymic nude rats were randomly allocated to 2 groups: experimental (human mesenchymal stem cells in fibrin glue carrier) and control (fibrin glue only). Animals were sacrificed at 2 and 4 weeks. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to evaluate Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling and SOX9 signaling in the healing enthesis. Macrophages were identified using CD68 and CD163 staining, and proliferating cells were identified using proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining. More organized and stronger staining for collagen II and a higher abundance of SOX9 + cells were observed at the enthesis in the experimental group at 2 weeks. There was significantly higher Gli1 and Patched1 expression in the experimental group at the enthesis at 2 weeks and higher numbers of Ihh + cells in the enthesis of the experimental group vs control at both 2 weeks and 4 weeks postoperatively. There were more CD68 + cells localized to the tendon midsubstance at 2 weeks compared with 4 weeks, and there was a higher level of CD163 staining in the tendon midsubstance in the experimental group than in the control group at 4 weeks. Stem cell application had a positive effect on fibrocartilage formation at the healing rotator cuff repair site. Both SOX9 and Ihh signaling appear to play an important role in the healing process. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human induced pluripotent cells resemble embryonic stem cells demonstrating enhanced levels of DNA repair and efficacy of nonhomologous end-joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Jinshui; Robert, Carine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 West Baltimore Street, BRB 7-023A, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Jang, Yoon-Young; Liu Hua; Sharkis, Saul; Baylin, Stephen Bruce [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Baltimore, MD 21231-1000 (United States); Rassool, Feyruz Virgilia, E-mail: frassool@som.umaryland.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 West Baltimore Street, BRB 7-023A, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: {yields} iPSC and hESC demonstrate a similar cell cycle profile, with increased S phase cells and decreased G0/G1. {yields} iPSC and hESC increased ROS and decreased DSBs, compared with differentiated parental cells. {yields} iPSC and hESC demonstrate elevated DSB repair activity, including nonhomologous end-joining, compared with differentiated parental cells. {yields} iPSC however show a partial apoptotic response to DNA damage, compared to hESC. {yields} DNA damage responses may constitute important markers for the efficacy of iPSC reprogramming. - Abstract: To maintain the integrity of the organism, embryonic stem cells (ESC) need to maintain their genomic integrity in response to DNA damage. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most lethal forms of DNA damage and can have disastrous consequences if not repaired correctly, leading to cell death, genomic instability and cancer. How human ESC (hESC) maintain genomic integrity in response to agents that cause DSBs is relatively unclear. Adult somatic cells can be induced to 'dedifferentiate' into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and reprogram into cells of all three germ layers. Whether iPSC have reprogrammed the DNA damage response is a critical question in regenerative medicine. Here, we show that hESC demonstrate high levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can contribute to DNA damage and may arise from high levels of metabolic activity. To potentially counter genomic instability caused by DNA damage, we find that hESC employ two strategies: First, these cells have enhanced levels of DNA repair proteins, including those involved in repair of DSBs, and they demonstrate elevated nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) activity and repair efficacy, one of the main pathways for repairing DSBs. Second, they are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents, as evidenced by a high level of apoptosis upon irradiation. Importantly, iPSC, unlike the parent cells they are derived

  11. Human induced pluripotent cells resemble embryonic stem cells demonstrating enhanced levels of DNA repair and efficacy of nonhomologous end-joining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Jinshui; Robert, Carine; Jang, Yoon-Young; Liu Hua; Sharkis, Saul; Baylin, Stephen Bruce; Rassool, Feyruz Virgilia

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → iPSC and hESC demonstrate a similar cell cycle profile, with increased S phase cells and decreased G0/G1. → iPSC and hESC increased ROS and decreased DSBs, compared with differentiated parental cells. → iPSC and hESC demonstrate elevated DSB repair activity, including nonhomologous end-joining, compared with differentiated parental cells. → iPSC however show a partial apoptotic response to DNA damage, compared to hESC. → DNA damage responses may constitute important markers for the efficacy of iPSC reprogramming. - Abstract: To maintain the integrity of the organism, embryonic stem cells (ESC) need to maintain their genomic integrity in response to DNA damage. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most lethal forms of DNA damage and can have disastrous consequences if not repaired correctly, leading to cell death, genomic instability and cancer. How human ESC (hESC) maintain genomic integrity in response to agents that cause DSBs is relatively unclear. Adult somatic cells can be induced to 'dedifferentiate' into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and reprogram into cells of all three germ layers. Whether iPSC have reprogrammed the DNA damage response is a critical question in regenerative medicine. Here, we show that hESC demonstrate high levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can contribute to DNA damage and may arise from high levels of metabolic activity. To potentially counter genomic instability caused by DNA damage, we find that hESC employ two strategies: First, these cells have enhanced levels of DNA repair proteins, including those involved in repair of DSBs, and they demonstrate elevated nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) activity and repair efficacy, one of the main pathways for repairing DSBs. Second, they are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents, as evidenced by a high level of apoptosis upon irradiation. Importantly, iPSC, unlike the parent cells they are derived from, mimic hESC in their ROS levels

  12. Honey can repairing damage of liver tissue due to protein energy malnutrition through induction of endogenous stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Heru Prasetyo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was to evaluate effect of honey in repairing damage of liver tissue due to energy protein malnutrition and in mobilization of endogenous stem cells. Materials and Methods: Male mice model of degenerative liver was obtained through food fasting but still have drinking water for 5 days. It caused energy protein malnutrition and damage of liver tissue. The administration of 50% (v/v honey was performed for 10 consecutive days, while the positive control group was fasted and not given honey and the negative control not fasted and without honey. Observations of regeneration the liver tissue based on histologically examination, observation of Hsp70 expression, and homing signal based on vascular endothelial growth factor-1 (VEGF-1 expression using immunohistochemistry technique. Observation on expression of CD34 and CD45 as the marker of auto mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells using flow cytometry technique. Results: There is regeneration of the liver tissue due to protein energy malnutrition, decrease of Hsp70 expression, increase of VEGF-1 expression, and high expression of CD34 and CD45. Conclusion: Honey can improve the liver tissue based on: (1 Mobilization of endogenous stem cells (CD34 and CD45; (2 Hsp70 and VEGF-1 expressions as regeneration marker of improvement, and (3 regeneration histologically of liver tissue.

  13. Honey can repairing damage of liver tissue due to protein energy malnutrition through induction of endogenous stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, R Heru; Hestianah, Eka Pramyrtha

    2017-06-01

    This study was to evaluate effect of honey in repairing damage of liver tissue due to energy protein malnutrition and in mobilization of endogenous stem cells. Male mice model of degenerative liver was obtained through food fasting but still have drinking water for 5 days. It caused energy protein malnutrition and damage of liver tissue. The administration of 50% (v/v) honey was performed for 10 consecutive days, while the positive control group was fasted and not given honey and the negative control not fasted and without honey. Observations of regeneration the liver tissue based on histologically examination, observation of Hsp70 expression, and homing signal based on vascular endothelial growth factor-1 (VEGF-1) expression using immunohistochemistry technique. Observation on expression of CD34 and CD45 as the marker of auto mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells using flow cytometry technique. There is regeneration of the liver tissue due to protein energy malnutrition, decrease of Hsp70 expression, increase of VEGF-1 expression, and high expression of CD34 and CD45. Honey can improve the liver tissue based on: (1) Mobilization of endogenous stem cells (CD34 and CD45); (2) Hsp70 and VEGF-1 expressions as regeneration marker of improvement, and (3) regeneration histologically of liver tissue.

  14. Explanation for excessive DNA single-strand breaks and endogenous repair foci in pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banáth, J P; Bañuelos, C A; Klokov, D; MacPhail, S M; Lansdorp, P M; Olive, P L

    2009-05-01

    Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (mES cells) exhibit approximately 100 large gammaH2AX repair foci in the absence of measurable numbers of DNA double-strand breaks. Many of these cells also show excessive numbers of DNA single-strand breaks (>10,000 per cell) when analyzed using the alkaline comet assay. To understand the reasons for these unexpected observations, various methods for detecting DNA strand breaks were applied to wild-type mES cells and to mES cells lacking H2AX, ATM, or DNA-PKcs. H2AX phosphorylation and expression of other repair complexes were measured using flow and image analysis of antibody-stained cells. Results indicate that high numbers of endogenous gammaH2AX foci and single-strand breaks in pluripotent mES cells do not require ATM or DNA-PK kinase activity and appear to be associated with global chromatin decondensation rather than pre-existing DNA damage. This will limit applications of gammaH2AX foci analysis in mES cells to relatively high levels of initial or residual DNA damage. Excessive numbers of single-strand breaks in the alkaline comet assay can be explained by the vulnerability of replicating chromatin in mES cells to osmotic shock. This suggests that caution is needed in interpreting results with the alkaline comet assay when applied to certain cell types or after treatment with agents that make chromatin vulnerable to osmotic changes. Differentiation of mES cells caused a reduction in histone acetylation, gammaH2AX foci intensity, and DNA single-strand breakage, providing a link between chromatin structural organization, excessive gammaH2AX foci, and sensitivity of replicating mES cell chromatin to osmotic shock.

  15. Glia, stem cells and biomaterials - working together to repair spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 186, Supplement 1 (2006), s. 47-47 ISSN 1748-1708. [The German Society of Physiology The Federation of European Physiological Societies. 26.03.2006-29.03.2006, Mnichov] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC554; GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Glia * Stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  16. Programmed Application of Transforming Growth Factor β3 and Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Committed Hyaline Cartilage Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Osteochondral Defect Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shouan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Si; Sun, Heng; Xia, Qingqing; Shi, Libing; Liu, Huanhuan; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2014-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage differentiation is always the challenge with application of stem cells for joint repair. Transforming growth factors (TGFs) and bone morphogenetic proteins can initiate cartilage differentiation but often lead to hypertrophy and calcification, related to abnormal Rac1 activity. In this study, we developed a strategy of programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 to commit the hyaline cartilage differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for joint cartilage repair. ADSCs were isolated and cultured in a micromass and pellet culture model to evaluate chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation. The function of Rac1 was investigated with constitutively active Rac1 mutant and dominant negative Rac1 mutant. The efficacy of ADSCs with programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor for cartilage repair was studied in a rat model of osteochondral defects. The results showed that TGFβ3 promoted ADSCs chondro-lineage differentiation and that NSC23766 prevented ADSC-derived chondrocytes from hypertrophy in vitro. The combination of ADSCs, TGFβ3, and NSC23766 promoted quality osteochondral defect repair in rats with much less chondrocytes hypertrophy and significantly higher International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and microscopic scores. The findings have illustrated that programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 can commit ADSCs to chondro-lineage differentiation and improve the efficacy of ADSCs for cartilage defect repair. These findings suggest a promising stem cell-based strategy for articular cartilage repair. ©AlphaMed Press.

  17. Osteochondral defect repair using bilayered hydrogels encapsulating both chondrogenically and osteogenically pre-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells in a rabbit model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, J.; Lu, S.; Lee, E.J.; Trachtenberg, J.E.; Meretoja, V.V.; Dahlin, R.L.; van den Beucken, J.J.; Tabata, Y.; Wong, M.E.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.; Kasper, F.K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the ability of cell-laden bilayered hydrogels encapsulating chondrogenically and osteogenically (OS) pre-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to effect osteochondral defect repair in a rabbit model. By varying the period of chondrogenic pre-differentiation from 7

  18. Human mandible bone defect repair by the grafting of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells and collagen sponge biocomplexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R d’Aquino

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we used a biocomplex constructed from dental pulp stem/progenitor cells (DPCs and a collagen sponge scaffold for oro-maxillo-facial (OMF bone tissue repair in patients requiring extraction of their third molars. The experiments were carried out according to our Internal Ethical Committee Guidelines and written informed consent was obtained from the patients. The patients presented with bilateral bone reabsorption of the alveolar ridge distal to the second molar secondary to impaction of the third molar on the cortical alveolar lamina, producing a defect without walls, of at least 1.5 cm in height. This clinical condition does not permit spontaneous bone repair after extraction of the third molar, and eventually leads to loss also of the adjacent second molar. Maxillary third molars were extracted first for DPC isolation and expansion. The cells were then seeded onto a collagen sponge scaffold and the obtained biocomplex was used to fill in the injury site left by extraction of the mandibular third molars. Three months after autologous DPC grafting, alveolar bone of patients had optimal vertical repair and complete restoration of periodontal tissue back to the second molars, as assessed by clinical probing and X-rays. Histological observations clearly demonstrated the complete regeneration of bone at the injury site. Optimal bone regeneration was evident one year after grafting. This clinical study demonstrates that a DPC/collagen sponge biocomplex can completely restore human mandible bone defects and indicates that this cell population could be used for the repair and/or regeneration of tissues and organs.

  19. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells cultured on biomatrix support induces repairing of digestive tract defects, in animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sîrbu-Boeţi, Mirela-Patricia; Chivu, Mihaela; Pâslaru, Liliana Livia; Efrimescu, C; Herlea, V; Pecheanu, C; Moldovan, Lucia; Dragomir, Laura; Bleotu, Coralia; Ciucur, Elena; Vidulescu, Cristina; Vasilescu, Mihaela; Boicea, Anişoara; Mănoiu, S; Ionescu, M I; Popescu, I

    2009-01-01

    Transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) appear to play a significant role in adult tissue repair. The aim of this research was to obtain MSCs enriched, three dimensional (3D) patches for transplant, and to test their ability to induce repair of iatrogenic digestive tract defects in rats. MSCs were obtained from human and rat bone marrow, cultured in vitro, and seeded in a collagen-agarose scaffold, where they showed enhanced viability and proliferation. The phenotype of the cultured cells was representative for MSCs (CD105+, CD90+, and CD34-, CD45-, CD3-, CD14-). The 3D patch was obtained by laying the MSCs enriched collagen-agarose scaffold on a human or swine aortic fragment. After excision of small portions of the rat digestive tract, the 3D patches were sutured at the edge of the defect using micro-surgical techniques. The rats were sacrificed at time-points and the regeneration of the digestive wall was investigated by immunofluorescence, light and electron microscopy. The MSCs enriched 3D patches were biocompatible, biodegradable, and prompted the regeneration of the four layers of the stomach and intestine wall in rats. Human cells were identified in the rat regenerated digestive wall as a hallmark of the transplanted MSCs. For the first time we constructed 3D patches made of cultured bone marrow MSCs, embedded into a collagen-rich biomatrix, on vascular bio-material support, and transplanted them in order to repair iatrogenic digestive tract defects. The result was a complete repair with preservation of the four layered structure of the digestive wall.

  20. Steric Interference of Adhesion Supports In-Vitro Chondrogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Hydrogels for Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldshmid, Revital; Cohen, Shlomit; Shachaf, Yonatan; Kupershmit, Ilana; Sarig-Nadir, Offra; Seliktar, Dror; Wechsler, Roni

    2015-09-28

    Recent studies suggest the presence of cell adhesion motifs found in structural proteins can inhibit chondrogenesis. In this context, the current study aims to determine if a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified fibrinogen matrix could support better chondrogenesis of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) based on steric interference of adhesion, when compared to a natural fibrin matrix. Hydrogels used as substrates for two-dimensional (2D) BM-MSC cultures under chondrogenic conditions were made from cross-linked PEG-fibrinogen (PF) and compared to thrombin-activated fibrin. Cell morphology, protein expression, DNA and sulfated proteoglycan (GAG) content were correlated to substrate properties such as stiffness and adhesiveness. Cell aggregation and chondrogenic markers, including collagen II and aggrecan, were observed on all PF substrates but not on fibrin. Shielding fibrinogen's adhesion domains and increasing stiffness of the material are likely contributing factors that cause the BM-MSCs to display a more chondrogenic phenotype. One composition of PF corresponding to GelrinC™--a product cleared in the EU for cartilage repair--was found to be optimal for supporting chondrogenic differentiation of BM-MSC while minimizing hypertrophy (collagen X). These findings suggest that semi-synthetic biomaterials based on ECM proteins can be designed to favourably affect BM-MSC towards repair processes involving chondrogenesis.

  1. Stem cell therapy to protect and repair the developing brain: a review of mechanisms of action of cord blood and amnion epithelial derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie eCastillo-Melendez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the research, clinical and wider community there is great interest in the use of stem cells to reduce the progression, or indeed repair brain injury. Perinatal brain injury may result from acute or chronic insults sustained during fetal development, during the process of birth, or in the newborn period. The most readily identifiable outcome of perinatal brain injury is cerebral palsy, however this is just one consequence in a spectrum of mild to severe neurological deficits. As we review, there are now clinical trials taking place worldwide targeting cerebral palsy with stem cell therapies. It will likely be many years before strong evidence-based results emerge from these trials. With such trials underway, it is both appropriate and timely to address the physiological basis for the efficacy of stem-like cells in preventing damage to, or regenerating, the newborn brain. Appropriate experimental animal models are best placed to deliver this information. Cell availability, the potential for immunological rejection, ethical and logistical considerations, together with the propensity for native cells to form terratomas, make it unlikely that embryonic or fetal stem cells will be practical. Fortunately, these issues do not pertain to the use of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs, or umbilical cord blood (UCB stem cells that are readily and economically obtained from the placenta and umbilical cord discarded at birth. These cells have the potential for transplantation to the newborn where brain injury is diagnosed or even suspected. We will explore the novel characteristics of hAECs and undifferentiated UCB cells, as well as UCB-derived endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem cells, and how immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory properties are principal mechanisms of action that are common to these cells, and which in turn may ameliorate the cerebral hypoxia and inflammation that are final pathways in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain

  2. Use of the second harmonic generation microscopy to evaluate chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeaux-Rego, P.; Baratti, M. O.; Duarte, A. S. S.; Ribeiro, T. B.; Andreoli-Risso, M. F.; Vidal, B.; Miranda, J. B.; Adur, J.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Pelegati, V. B.; Costa, F. F.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.; Luzo, A.; Olalla Saad, S. T.

    2012-03-01

    Articular cartilage injury remains one of the major concerns in orthopedic surgery. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has been introduced to avoid some of the side effects and complications of current techniques.. With the aim to evaluate chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, we used Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy to analyze the aggregation and orientation of collagen fibrils in the hyaline cartilage of rabbit knees. The experiment was performed using implants with type II collagen hydrogel (a biomaterial that mimics the microenvironment of the cartilage), one implant containing MSC and one other without MSC (control). After 10 weeks, the rabbit knees were dissected and fibril collagen distribution and spatial organization in the extracellular matrix of the lesions were verified by SHG. The result showed significant differences, whereas in histological sections of the cartilaginous lesions with MSC the collagen fibers are organized and regular; in the control sections the collagen fibers are more irregular, with absence of cells. A macroscopic analysis of the lesions confirmed this difference, showing a greater percentage of lesions filling in knees treated with MSC than in the knees used as controls. This study demonstrates that SHG microscopy will be an excellent tool to help in the evaluation of the effectiveness of MSC-based cell therapy for cartilage repair.

  3. Enrichment of G2/M cell cycle phase in human pluripotent stem cells enhances HDR-mediated gene repair with customizable endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Diane; Scavuzzo, Marissa A; Chmielowiec, Jolanta; Sharp, Robert; Bajic, Aleksandar; Borowiak, Malgorzata

    2016-02-18

    Efficient gene editing is essential to fully utilize human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in regenerative medicine. Custom endonuclease-based gene targeting involves two mechanisms of DNA repair: homology directed repair (HDR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). HDR is the preferred mechanism for common applications such knock-in, knock-out or precise mutagenesis, but remains inefficient in hPSCs. Here, we demonstrate that synchronizing synchronizing hPSCs in G2/M with ABT phase increases on-target gene editing, defined as correct targeting cassette integration, 3 to 6 fold. We observed improved efficiency using ZFNs, TALENs, two CRISPR/Cas9, and CRISPR/Cas9 nickase to target five genes in three hPSC lines: three human embryonic stem cell lines, neural progenitors and diabetic iPSCs. neural progenitors and diabetic iPSCs. Reversible synchronization has no effect on pluripotency or differentiation. The increase in on-target gene editing is locus-independent and specific to the cell cycle phase as G2/M phase enriched cells show a 6-fold increase in targeting efficiency compared to cells in G1 phase. Concurrently inhibiting NHEJ with SCR7 does not increase HDR or improve gene targeting efficiency further, indicating that HR is the major DNA repair mechanism after G2/M phase arrest. The approach outlined here makes gene editing in hPSCs a more viable tool for disease modeling, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies.

  4. Autologous, allogeneic, induced pluripotent stem cell or a combination stem cell therapy? Where are we headed in cartilage repair and why: a concise review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, L.A.; de Windt, T.S.; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke C.M.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of articular cartilage repair procedures has resulted in a variety of cell-based therapies that use both autologous and allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). As these cells are increasingly available and show promising results both in vitro and in vivo, cell-based strategies,

  5. Distinctive features of single nucleotide alterations in induced pluripotent stem cells with different types of DNA repair deficiency disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Kohji; Sakaguchi, Hironari; Sakamoto-Abutani, Rie; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nishimura, Ken; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Ohtaka, Manami; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Alshatwi, Ali Abdullah; Higuchi, Akon; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Hata, Kenichiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used as a model to analyze pathogenesis of disease. In this study, we generated iPSCs derived from a fibroblastic cell line of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A (XPA-iPSCs), a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease in which patients develop skin cancer in the areas of skin exposed to sunlight. XPA-iPSCs exhibited hypersensitivity to ultraviolet exposure and accumulation of single-nucleotide substitutions when compared with ataxia telangiectasia-derived iPSCs that were established in a previous study. However, XPA-iPSCs did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro, i.e. intact chromosomes were maintained. The results were mutually compensating for examining two major sources of mutations, nucleotide excision repair deficiency and double-strand break repair deficiency. Like XP patients, XPA-iPSCs accumulated single-nucleotide substitutions that are associated with malignant melanoma, a manifestation of XP. These results indicate that XPA-iPSCs may serve a monitoring tool (analogous to the Ames test but using mammalian cells) to measure single-nucleotide alterations, and may be a good model to clarify pathogenesis of XP. In addition, XPA-iPSCs may allow us to facilitate development of drugs that delay genetic alteration and decrease hypersensitivity to ultraviolet for therapeutic applications. PMID:27197874

  6. Effectiveness of mesenchymal stems cells cultured by hanging drop vs. conventional culturing on the repair of hypoxic-ischemic-damaged mouse brains, measured by stemness gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Yongli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs cultured by hanging drop and conventional culturing methods on cerebellar repair in hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injured mice. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR was used to analyze the expression levels of three stemness genes, Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog, and the migration related gene CXCR4. MSC prepared by hanging drop or conventional techniques were administered intranasally to nine day old mice, and analyzed by MRI at day 28. Results indicate that the MSCs, especially the hanging drop cultured MSCs, significantly improved the mice’s cerebellar damage repair. MSCs derived from the hanging drop culture were smaller than those from the conventional culture. The gene expression levels were significantly increased for the MSCs derived from the hanging drop culture. The mechanism might relate to the fact that the hanging drop cultured MSCs can be kept in an undifferentiated state, resulting in its higher expression level of migration receptor of CXCR4.

  7. Learn About Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Handbook Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Stem Cell Basics Stem cells are the foundation from which ... original cell’s DNA, cytoplasm and cell membrane. About stem cells Stem cells are the foundation of development in ...

  8. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Ando

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-mediated tissue was more fibrocartilage-like, in contrast to the middle or deep zones that were more hyaline cartilage-like with Safranin O staining. Histological scoring of the TEC-mediated tissue was significantly lower in the superficial zone than in the middle and deep zones. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thick tangential bundle of collagen fibres at the most superficial layer of uninjured cartilage, while no corresponding structure was detected at the surface of TEC-mediated tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PRG4 was localised in the superficial area of uninjured cartilage, as well as the TEC-mediated tissue. Friction testing showed that the lubrication properties of the two tissues was similar, however, micro-indentation analysis revealed that the surface stiffness of the TEC-repair tissue was significantly lower than that of uninjured cartilage. Permeability testing indicated that the TEC-mediated tissue exhibited lower water retaining capacity than did uninjured cartilage, specifically at the superficial zone. Thus, TEC-mediated tissue exhibited compromised mechanical properties at the superficial zone, properties which need improvement in the future for maintenance of long term repair cartilage integrity.

  9. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Wataru; Fujie, Hiromichi; Moriguchi, Yu; Nansai, Ryosuke; Shimomura, Kazunori; Hart, David A; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2012-09-28

    The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-mediated tissue was more fibrocartilage-like, in contrast to the middle or deep zones that were more hyaline cartilage-like with Safranin O staining. Histological scoring of the TEC-mediated tissue was significantly lower in the superficial zone than in the middle and deep zones. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thick tangential bundle of collagen fibres at the most superficial layer of uninjured cartilage, while no corresponding structure was detected at the surface of TEC-mediated tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PRG4 was localised in the superficial area of uninjured cartilage, as well as the TEC-mediated tissue. Friction testing showed that the lubrication properties of the two tissues was similar, however, micro-indentation analysis revealed that the surface stiffness of the TEC-repair tissue was significantly lower than that of uninjured cartilage. Permeability testing indicated that the TEC-mediated tissue exhibited lower water retaining capacity than did uninjured cartilage, specifically at the superficial zone. Thus, TEC-mediated tissue exhibited compromised mechanical properties at the superficial zone, properties which need improvement in the future for maintenance of long term repair cartilage integrity.

  10. Analysing the bioactive makeup of demineralised dentine matrix on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for enhanced bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, S J; Sadaghiani, L; Sloan, A J; Waddington, R J

    2017-07-10

    Dentine matrix has proposed roles for directing mineralised tissue repair in dentine and bone; however, the range of bioactive components in dentine and specific biological effects on bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in humans are less well understood. The aims of this study were to further elucidate the biological response of MSCs to demineralised dentine matrix (DDM) in enhancing wound repair responses and ascertain key contributing components. Dentine was obtained from human teeth and DDM proteins solubilised with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Bone marrow derived MSCs were commercially obtained. Cells with a more immature phenotype were then selected by preferential fibronectin adhesion (FN-BMMSCs) for use in subsequent in vitro assays. DDM at 10 µg/mL reduced cell expansion, attenuated apoptosis and was the minimal concentration capable of inducing osteoblastic differentiation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) quantification of growth factors indicated physiological levels produced the above responses; transforming growth factor β (TGF-β1) was predominant (15.6 ng/mg DDM), with relatively lower concentrations of BMP-2, FGF, VEGF and PDGF (6.2-4.7 ng/mg DDM). Fractionation of growth factors from other DDM components by heparin affinity chromatography diminished osteogenic responses. Depletion of biglycan from DDM also attenuated osteogenic potency, which was partially rescued by the isolated biglycan. Decorin depletion from DDM had no influence on osteogenic potency. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential of DDM for the delivery of physiological levels of growth factors for bone repair processes, and substantiate a role for biglycan as an additional adjuvant for driving osteogenic pathways.

  11. Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Ts65Dn Mice Are Deficient in the Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingying; Chang, Jianhui; Shao, Lijian; Feng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Chow, Marie; Du, Wei; Meng, Aimin; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-06-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of an extra partial or whole copy of chromosome 21. In addition to musculoskeletal and neurodevelopmental abnormalities, children with DS exhibit various hematologic disorders and have an increased risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute megakaryocytic leukemia. Using the Ts65Dn mouse model, we investigated bone marrow defects caused by trisomy for 132 orthologs of the genes on human chromosome 21. The results showed that, although the total bone marrow cellularity as well as the frequency of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) was comparable between Ts65Dn mice and their age-matched euploid wild-type (WT) control littermates, human chromosome 21 trisomy led to a significant reduction in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers and clonogenic function in Ts65Dn mice. We also found that spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were significantly increased in HSCs from the Ts65Dn mice, which was correlated with the significant reduction in HSC clonogenic activity compared to those from WT controls. Moreover, analysis of the repair kinetics of radiation-induced DSBs revealed that HSCs from Ts65Dn mice were less proficient in DSB repair than the cells from WT controls. This deficiency was associated with a higher sensitivity of Ts65Dn HSCs to radiation-induced suppression of HSC clonogenic activity than that of euploid HSCs. These findings suggest that an additional copy of genes on human chromosome 21 may selectively impair the ability of HSCs to repair DSBs, which may contribute to DS-associated hematological abnormalities and malignancies.

  12. Human bone marrow stem cell-encapsulating calcium phosphate scaffolds for bone repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Michael D.; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2010-01-01

    Due to its injectability and excellent osteoconductivity, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is highly promising for orthopedic applications. However, a literature search revealed no report on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hBMSC) encapsulation in CPC for bone tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to encapsulate hBMSCs in alginate hydrogel beads and then incorporate them into CPC, CPC–chitosan and CPC–chitosan–fiber scaffolds. Chitosan and degradable fibers were used to mechanically reinforce the scaffolds. After 21 days, that the percentage of live cells and the cell density of hBMSCs inside CPC-based constructs matched those in alginate without CPC, indicating that the CPC setting reaction did not harm the hBMSCs. Alkaline phosphate activity increased by 8-fold after 14 days. Mineral staining, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirmed that apatitic mineral was deposited by the cells. The amount of hBMSC-synthesized mineral in CPC–chitosan–fiber matched that in CPC without chitosan and fibers. Hence, adding chitosan and fibers, which reinforced the CPC, did not compromise hBMSC osteodifferentiation and mineral synthesis. In conclusion, hBMSCs were encapsulated in CPC and CPC–chitosan–fiber scaffolds for the first time. The encapsulated cells remained viable, osteodifferentiated and synthesized bone minerals. These self-setting, hBMSC-encapsulating CPC-based constructs may be promising for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:20451676

  13. Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with hyperbaric oxygen treatment for repair of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hai-xiao; Liu, Zhi-gang; Liu, Xiao-jiao; Chen, Qian-xue

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) for repair of traumatic brain injury has been used in the clinic. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment has long been widely used as an adjunctive therapy for treating traumatic brain injury. UC-MSC transplantation combined with HBO treatment is expected to yield better therapeutic effects on traumatic brain injury. In this study, we established rat models of severe traumatic brain injury by pressurized fluid (2.5–3.0 atm impact force). The injured rats were then administered UC-MSC transplantation via the tail vein in combination with HBO treatment. Compared with monotherapy, aquaporin 4 expression decreased in the injured rat brain, but growth-associated protein-43 expression, calaxon-like structures, and CM-Dil-positive cell number increased. Following combination therapy, however, rat cognitive and neurological function significantly improved. UC-MSC transplantation combined with HBO therapyfor repair of traumatic brain injury shows better therapeutic effects than monotherapy and significantly promotes recovery of neurological functions. PMID:26981097

  14. Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with hyperbaric oxygen treatment for repair of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-xiao Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs for repair of traumatic brain injury has been used in the clinic. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO treatment has long been widely used as an adjunctive therapy for treating traumatic brain injury. UC-MSC transplantation combined with HBO treatment is expected to yield better therapeutic effects on traumatic brain injury. In this study, we established rat models of severe traumatic brain injury by pressurized fluid (2.5-3.0 atm impact force. The injured rats were then administered UC-MSC transplantation via the tail vein in combination with HBO treatment. Compared with monotherapy, aquaporin 4 expression decreased in the injured rat brain, but growth-associated protein-43 expression, calaxon-like structures, and CM-Dil-positive cell number increased. Following combination therapy, however, rat cognitive and neurological function significantly improved. UC-MSC transplantation combined with HBO therapyfor repair of traumatic brain injury shows better therapeutic effects than monotherapy and significantly promotes recovery of neurological functions.

  15. Proteomics-based network analysis characterizes biological processes and pathways activated by preconditioned mesenchymal stem cells in cardiac repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Silvestre, Dario; Brambilla, Francesca; Scardoni, Giovanni; Brunetti, Pietro; Motta, Sara; Matteucci, Marco; Laudanna, Carlo; Recchia, Fabio A; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Mauri, Pierluigi

    2017-05-01

    We have demonstrated that intramyocardial delivery of human mesenchymal stem cells preconditioned with a hyaluronan mixed ester of butyric and retinoic acid (MSCp + ) is more effective in preventing the decay of regional myocardial contractility in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). However, the understanding of the role of MSCp + in proteomic remodeling of cardiac infarcted tissue is not complete. We therefore sought to perform a comprehensive analysis of the proteome of infarct remote (RZ) and border zone (BZ) of pigs treated with MSCp + or unconditioned stem cells. Heart tissues were analyzed by MudPIT and differentially expressed proteins were selected by a label-free approach based on spectral counting. Protein profiles were evaluated by using PPI networks and their topological analysis. The proteomic remodeling was largely prevented in MSCp + group. Extracellular proteins involved in fibrosis were down-regulated, while energetic pathways were globally up-regulated. Cardioprotectant pathways involved in the production of keto acid metabolites were also activated. Additionally, we found that new hub proteins support the cardioprotective phenotype characterizing the left ventricular BZ treated with MSCp + . In fact, the up-regulation of angiogenic proteins NCL and RAC1 can be explained by the increase of capillary density induced by MSCp + . Our results show that angiogenic pathways appear to be uniquely positioned to integrate signaling with energetic pathways involving cardiac repair. Our findings prompt the use of proteomics-based network analysis to optimize new approaches preventing the post-ischemic proteomic remodeling that may underlie the limited self-repair ability of adult heart. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhancement of the repair of dog alveolar cleft by an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuanzheng, Chen; Yan, Gao; Ting, Li; Yanjie, Fu; Peng, Wu; Nan, Bai

    2015-05-01

    Autologous bone graft has been regarded as the criterion standard for the repair of alveolar cleft. However, the most prominent issue in alveolar cleft treatment is the high absorption rate of the bone graft. The authors' objective was to investigate the effects of an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture on the repair of dog alveolar cleft. Twenty beagle dogs with unilateral alveolar clefts created by surgery were divided randomly into four groups: group A underwent repair with an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture; group B underwent repair with autologous iliac bone and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells; group C underwent repair with autologous iliac bone and platelet-rich fibrin; and group D underwent repair with autologous iliac bone as the control. One day and 6 months after transplantation, the transplant volumes and bone mineral density were assessed by quantitative computed tomography. All of the transplants were harvested for hematoxylin and eosin staining 6 months later. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin transplants formed the greatest amounts of new bone among the four groups. The new bone formed an extensive union with the underlying maxilla in groups A, B, and C. Transplants with the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich fibrin, and their mixture retained the majority of their initial volume, whereas the transplants in the control group showed the highest absorption rate. Bone mineral density of transplants with the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich fibrin, and their mixture 6 months later was significantly higher than in the control group (p platelet-rich fibrin mixed transplants. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that the structure of new bones formed the best in group A. Both bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet

  17. Evaluation of phototherapy in the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in the tissue repair of rats submitted to a hyperlipidemic diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C. R. B.; Santos, L. S.; Silva, V. D. U.; Vitória, L. A.; Rodriguez, T. T.; Marques, A. M. C.; Xavier, F. C. A.; Ramalho, L.

    2018-04-01

    Obese people present a greater risk of developing other systemic diseases and comorbidities such as compromising the tissue repair process. Laser phototherapy can contribute to this repair by improving cellular functions, since stem cells may play an important role in repair due to their pluripotent potential. In this way, the influence of Laser Phototherapy (LP) was evaluated in the tissue repair of rats submitted to a hyperlipid diet through CD49 immunostaining for adipose stem cells. Forty-eight Wistar albinus rats were divided into two experimental groups: Standard Diet (SD) and Hyperlipid Diet (HD) for 20 weeks. After this period, excisional dorsal cutaneous wounds of 1 cm2 were made. The groups were subdivided into control and laser, the laser groups were irradiated (Diode Laser of Gallium and Aluminum Arsenide, λ660nm, 40mW, 6J / cm2) immediately after the surgery and every 48 hours. A group of rats were killed on day 7 and the other group on day 14 and the specimens processed by the immunohistochemical technique. The SD group presented antibodies marked with moderate to intense intensity, whereas in the HD group the weak staining for the time of 14 days prevailed. The irradiation protocol employed had no influence on the CD49 marker when compared to the control and irradiated groups over the same period. According to the methodology used and the results obtained it is concluded that laser light does not influence the recruitment of adipoderivative stem cells for the tissue repair process.

  18. Repair effect of transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on liver injury in severe burned rats and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hao; Zhou Yubo; Zhang Ying; Qin Yonggang; Guo Li; Yin Fei; Meng Chunyang; Yang Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the repair effect of transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on liver injury in severe burned rats, and to clarify its mechanism. Methods: The BMSCs of rats were isolated, cultured, amplified, identified, and labeled in vitro. 30 Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control group (n=10), model group (n=10) and cell therapy group (n=10). The burned rat model was established. The BMSCs labeled by chlormethyl-benzamidodialkylcarbocyanine (CM-Dil) were transplanted into the rats in cell therapy group by retro-orbital intravenous injection and the saline was injected into the rats in model group. The general status of all rats were observed. The liver tissues of rats were obtained 2 weeks after transplantation, and the pathohistological changes were observed and the pathohistological scores were detected; the apoptotic rate of liver cells was detected by TUNEL method; the engraftment of BMSCs in liver tissues of the rats was observed under laser scanning confocal microscope. Results: 2 weeks after transplantation, the rats in model group were obviously malaise dispirited and the rats in cell therapy group showed obviously better, and the body weight of the rats in cell therapy group was higher than that in model group (P<0.05). The pathohistological results showed the normal liver lobules of the rats in model group disappeared, and the liver cords disordered, and some liver sinusoids dilated and congested, lymphocytes infiltrated with occasional focal aggregating, and cell edema was found, cytoplasm loose and steatosis were seen in liver tissue. However, the pathohistological changes of liver tissue of the rats in cell therapy group were significantly better than those in model group. The pathohistological score of the rats in cell therapy group was significantly lower than that in model group (P<0.05). The TUNEL staining results showed that there were lots of apoptotic liver cells in liver tissue of the rats in

  19. Dual Differentiation-Exogenous Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Repair in a Murine Hemisection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation has shown tremendous promise as a therapy for repair of various tissues of the musculoskeletal, vascular, and central nervous systems. Based on this success, recent research in this field has focused on complex tissue damage, such as that which occurs from traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI. As the critical event for successful exogenous, MSC therapy is their migration to the injury site, which allows for their anti-inflammatory and morphogenic effects on fracture healing, neuronal regeneration, and functional recover. Thus, there is a need for a cost-effective in vivo model that can faithfully recapitulate the salient features of the injury, therapy, and recovery. To address this, we review the recent advances in exogenous MSC therapy for TSCI and traumatic vertebral fracture repair and the existing challenges regarding their translational applications. We also describe a novel murine model designed to take advantage of multidisciplinary collaborations between musculoskeletal and neuroscience researchers, which is needed to establish an efficacious MSC therapy for TSCI.

  20. Cartilage repair by mesenchymal stem cells: Clinical trial update and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Yuk-wai Lee

    2017-04-01

    The translational potential of this article: This review summarises recent MSC-related clinical research that focuses on cartilage repair. We also propose a novel possible translational direction for hyaline cartilage formation and a new paradigm making use of extra-cellular signalling and epigenetic regulation in the application of MSCs for cartilage repair.

  1. Reprogramming Cells for Brain Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall D. McKinnon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available At present there are no clinical therapies that can repair traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury or degenerative brain disease. While redundancy and rewiring of surviving circuits can recover some lost function, the brain and spinal column lack sufficient endogenous stem cells to replace lost neurons or their supporting glia. In contrast, pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that exogenous transplants can have remarkable efficacy for brain repair in animal models. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs can provide paracrine factors that repair damage caused by ischemic injury, and oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC grafts give dramatic functional recovery from spinal cord injury. These studies have progressed to clinical trials, including human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived OPCs for spinal cord repair. However, ESC-derived allografts are less than optimal, and we need to identify a more appropriate donor graft population. The cell reprogramming field has developed the ability to trans-differentiate somatic cells into distinct cell types, a technology that has the potential to generate autologous neurons and glia which address the histocompatibility concerns of allografts and the tumorigenicity concerns of ESC-derived grafts. Further clarifying how cell reprogramming works may lead to more efficient direct reprogram approaches, and possibly in vivo reprogramming, in order to promote brain and spinal cord repair.

  2. Intranasally administered mesenchymal stem cells promote a regenerative niche for repair of neonatal ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donega, Vanessa; Nijboer, Cora H; van Tilborg, Geralda; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J

    2014-11-01

    Previous work from our group has shown that intranasal MSC-treatment decreases lesion volume and improves motor and cognitive behavior after hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage in neonatal mice. Our aim was to determine the kinetics of MSC migration after intranasal administration, and the early effects of MSCs on neurogenic processes and gliosis at the lesion site. HI brain injury was induced in 9-day-old mice and MSCs were administered intranasally at 10days post-HI. The kinetics of MSC migration were investigated by immunofluorescence and MRI analysis. BDNF and NGF gene expression was determined by qPCR analysis following MSC co-culture with HI brain extract. Nestin, Doublecortin, NeuN, GFAP, Iba-1 and M1/M2 phenotypic expression was assessed over time. MRI and immunohistochemistry analyses showed that MSCs reach the lesion site already within 2h after intranasal administration. At 12h after administration the number of MSCs at the lesion site peaks and decreases significantly at 72h. The number of DCX(+) cells increased 1 to 3days after MSC administration in the SVZ. At the lesion, GFAP(+)/nestin(+) and DCX(+) expression increased 3 to 5days after MSC-treatment. The number of NeuN(+) cells increased within 5days, leading to a dramatic regeneration of the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus at 18days after intranasal MSC administration. Interestingly, MSCs expressed significantly more BDNF gene when exposed to HI brain extract in vitro. Furthermore, MSC-treatment resulted in the resolution of the glial scar surrounding the lesion, represented by a decrease in reactive astrocytes and microglia and polarization of microglia towards the M2 phenotype. In view of the current lack of therapeutic strategies, we propose that intranasal MSC administration is a powerful therapeutic option through its functional repair of the lesion represented by regeneration of the cortical and hippocampal structure and decrease of gliosis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwood, Nicole J.; Dazzi, Francesco; Zaher, Walid

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are stem cell populations present among the bone marrow stroma and a number of other tissues that are capable of multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC provide supportive stroma for growth...... and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and hematopoiesis. These cells have been described as important immunoregulators due to their ability to suppress T cells proliferation. MSC can also directly contribute to tissue repair by migrating to sites of injury and providing a source of cells...... for differentiation and/or providing bystander support for resident stromal cells. This chapter discusses the cellular and molecular properties of MSC, the mechanisms by which they can modulate immune responses and the clinical applications of MSC in disorders such as graft-versus-host disease and aplastic anaemia...

  4. Combination of heterologous fibrin sealant and bioengineered human embryonic stem cells to improve regeneration following autogenous sciatic nerve grafting repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari, Roghayeh; Kyrylenko, Sergiy; Castro, Mateus Vidigal; Ferreira, Rui Seabra; Barraviera, Benedito; Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem, and the preferred surgical method for treating it is the end-to-end neurorrhaphy. When it is not possible due to a large nerve gap, autologous nerve grafting is used. However, these surgical techniques result in nerve regeneration at highly variable degrees. It is thus very important to seek complementary techniques to improve motor and sensory recovery. One promising approach could be cell therapy. Transplantation therapy with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is appealing because these cells are pluripotent and can differentiate into specialized cell types and have self-renewal ability. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to find conditions under which functional recovery is improved after sciatic nerve neurorrhaphy. We assumed that hESC, either alone or in combination with heterologous fibrin sealant scaffold, could be used to support regeneration in a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury and repair via autografting with end-to-end neurorrhaphy. Five millimeters of the sciatic nerve of C57BL/6 J mice were transected off and rotated 180 degrees to simulate an injury, and then stumps were sutured. Next, we applied heterologous fibrin sealant and/or human embryonic stem cells genetically altered to overexpress fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) at the site of the injury. The study was designed to include six experimental groups comprising neurorrhaphy (N), neurorrhaphy + heterologous fibrin sealant (N + F), neurorrhaphy + heterologous fibrin sealant + doxycycline (N + F + D), neurorrhaphy + heterologous fibrin sealant + wild-type hESC (N + F + W), neurorrhaphy + heterologous fibrin sealant + hESC off (N + F + T), and neurorrhaphy + heterologous fibrin sealant + hESC on via doxycycline (N + F + D + T). We evaluated the recovery rate using Catwalk and von Frey functional recovery tests, as well as immunohistochemistry analysis. The experiments indicated that

  5. Action of Obestatin in Skeletal Muscle Repair: Stem Cell Expansion, Muscle Growth, and Microenvironment Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-01-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration. PMID:25762009

  6. [Progress in epidermal stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Juan; Wang, You-Liang; Yang, Xiao

    2010-03-01

    Mammalian skin epidermis contains different epidermal stem cell pools which contribute to the homeostasis and repair of skin epithelium. Epidermal stem cells possess two essential features common to all stem cells: self-renewal and differentiation. Disturbing the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of epidermal stem cell often causes tumors or other skin diseases. Epidermal stem cell niches provide a special microenvironment that maintains a balance of stem cell quiescence and activity. This review primarily concentrates on the following points of the epidermal stem cells: the existing evidences, the self-renewal and differentiation, the division pattern, the signal pathways regulating self-renewal and differentiation, and the microenvironment (niche) and macroenvironment maintaining the homeostasis of stem cells.

  7. The relative contribution of paracine effect versus direct differentiation on adipose-derived stem cell transplantation mediated cardiac repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezhong Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated that transplantation of adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC can improve cardiac function in animal models of myocardial infarction (MI. However, the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect are not fully understood. In this study, we characterized the paracrine effect of transplanted ADSC and investigated its relative importance versus direct differentiation in ADSC transplantation mediated cardiac repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MI was experimentally induced in mice by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Either human ADSC, conditioned medium (CM collected from the same amount of ADSC or control medium was injected into the peri-infarct region immediately after MI. Compared with the control group, both ADSC and ADSC-CM significantly reduced myocardial infarct size and improved cardiac function. The therapeutic efficacy of ADSC was moderately superior to ADSC-CM. ADSC-CM significantly reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in the infarct border zone, to a similar degree with ADSC treatment. ADSC enhanced angiogenesis in the infarct border zone, but to a stronger degree than that seen in the ADSC-CM treatment. ADSC was able to differentiate to endothelial cell and smooth muscle cell in post-MI heart; these ADSC-derived vascular cells amount to about 9% of the enhanced angiogenesis. No cardiomyocyte differentiated from ADSC was found. CONCLUSIONS: ADSC-CM is sufficient to improve cardiac function of infarcted hearts. The therapeutic function of ADSC transplantation is mainly induced by paracrine-mediated cardioprotection and angiogenesis, while ADSC differentiation contributes a minor benefit by being involved in angiogenesis. Highlights 1 ADSC-CM is sufficient to exert a therapeutic potential. 2. ADSC was able to differentiate to vascular cells but not cardiomyocyte. 3. ADSC derived vascular cells amount to about 9% of the enhanced angiogenesis. 4. Paracrine effect is the major

  8. Study on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in repairing of radiation induced acute liver injury of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Yongxing; Lou Fan; Zhao Huarong; Zhu Huhu; Ma Yan; Wen Hao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of mesenchymal stem cells in the repair of radiation induced liver injury. Methods: 12 female SD rats were irradiated with 20 Gy 6 MV X-rays on the right lobe of the liver, to establish the model of radiation induced liver injury. The rats were divided randomly into two groups as invention group and control group, and transplanted with 1 ml male mesenchymal suspension or 1 ml normal saline in 4 hours after radiotherapy. The morphological changes of liver were observed. The existence of sex determining gene Y(SRY) and the level of alpha-smooth muscle actin (a-SMA) were detected. Results: Some injury of right lobe liver in two groups were observed, and the injury degree of right lobe liver in intervention group were lower than that of control group. The amount of SRY positive cells in the right lobe liver of intervention group was higher than that in the left lobe liver (t = 3.77, P <0.05). The positive expression rate of a-SMA in right lobe liver of intervention group was lower than that of control group. Conclusions: Acute radiation induced liver injury could lead BMSCs' homing in order to decrease the degree of liver fibrosis. (authors)

  9. Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2004-01-01

    In his influential essay on markets, An essay on framing and overflowing (1998), Michel Callon writes that `the growing complexity of industrialized societies [is] due in large part to the movements of the technosciences, which are causing connections and interdependencies to proliferate'. This p...... and tantalizing than stem cells, in research, in medicine, or as products.......'. This paper is about tech-noscience, and about the proliferation of connections and interdependencies created by it.More specifically, the paper is about stem cells. Biotechnology in general has the power to capture the imagination. Within the field of biotechnology nothing seems more provocative...

  10. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  11. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A

    2011-01-01

    cells, use of platelet rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed.......This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and fetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem...

  12. Chondrogenic Differentiation of Defined Equine Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood for Use in Cartilage Repair Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Desancé

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage engineering is a new strategy for the treatment of cartilage damage due to osteoarthritis or trauma in humans. Racehorses are exposed to the same type of cartilage damage and the anatomical, cellular, and biochemical properties of their cartilage are comparable to those of human cartilage, making the horse an excellent model for the development of cartilage engineering. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiated into chondrocytes with chondrogenic factors in a biomaterial appears to be a promising therapeutic approach for direct implantation and cartilage repair. Here, we characterized equine umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (eUCB-MSCs and evaluated their potential for chondrocyte differentiation for use in cartilage repair therapy. Our results show that isolated eUCB-MSCs had high proliferative capacity and differentiated easily into osteoblasts and chondrocytes, but not into adipocytes. A three-dimensional (3D culture approach with the chondrogenic factors BMP-2 and TGF-β1 potentiated chondrogenic differentiation with a significant increase in cartilage-specific markers at the mRNA level (Col2a1, Acan, Snorc and the protein level (type II and IIB collagen without an increase in hypertrophic chondrocyte markers (Col10a1 and Mmp13 in normoxia and in hypoxia. However, these chondrogenic factors caused an increase in type I collagen, which can be reduced using small interfering RNA targeting Col1a2. This study provides robust data on MSCs characterization and demonstrates that eUCB-MSCs have a great potential for cartilage tissue engineering.

  13. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells repair spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting axonal growth and anti-autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Meng, Chunyang; Lu, Rifeng; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Hao; Qin, Yonggang; Guo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neurons and astrocytes after transplantation in the spinal cord of rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury. Although bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are known to protect against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury through anti-apoptotic effects, the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and proliferated, then transplanted into rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury via retro-orbital injection. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence with subsequent quantification revealed that the expression of the axonal regeneration marker, growth associated protein-43, and the neuronal marker, microtubule-associated protein 2, significantly increased in rats with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, the expression of the autophagy marker, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, and Beclin 1, was significantly reduced in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament-H increased but light chain 3B and Beclin 1 decreased in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Our results therefore suggest that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes neurite growth and regeneration and prevents autophagy. These responses may likely be mechanisms underlying the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25374587

  14. Clinical Evaluation of Decellularized Nerve Allograft with Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells to Improve Peripheral Nerve Repair and Functional Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    with autologous mesenchymal stem cells . Exp Neurol. 2007 Apr; 204(2):658-66. 19. Dezawa M., et al., Sciatic nerve regeneration in rats induced by...36 23. Mimura T., et al., Peripheral nerve regeneration by transplantation of bone marrow stromal cell -derived Schwann cells in adult rats. J...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0026 TITLE: Clinical Evaluation of Decellularized Nerve Allograft with Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells to Improve

  15. Gefitinib Radiosensitizes Stem-Like Glioma Cells: Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Akt-DNA-PK Signaling, Accompanied by Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Khong Bee; Zhu Congju; Wong Yinling; Gao Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–Akt-DNA–dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, γ-H 2 AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, γ-H 2 AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Results: Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G 2 /M arrest and increased γ-H 2 AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased γ-H 2 AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Conclusions: Stem-like gliomaspheres are resistant to irradiation

  16. Gefitinib radiosensitizes stem-like glioma cells: inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor-Akt-DNA-PK signaling, accompanied by inhibition of DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Khong Bee; Zhu, Congju; Wong, Yin Ling; Gao, Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2012-05-01

    We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Akt-DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, γ-H(2)AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, γ-H(2)AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G(2)/M arrest and increased γ-H(2)AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased γ-H(2)AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Stem-like gliomaspheres are resistant to irradiation-induced cytotoxicity, G(2)/M arrest, and DNA DSBs, compared with nonstem

  17. Gefitinib Radiosensitizes Stem-Like Glioma Cells: Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Akt-DNA-PK Signaling, Accompanied by Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Khong Bee, E-mail: dmskkb@nccs.com.sg [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); Zhu Congju; Wong Yinling; Gao Qiuhan; Ty, Albert; Wong, Meng Cheong [Brain Tumour Research Laboratory, Division of Medical Sciences, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: We compared radiosensitivity of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) with matched nonstem glioma cells, and determined whether gefitinib enhanced BTSC radiosensitivity by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Akt-DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling, followed by enhanced DNA double-stand breaks (DSBs) and inhibition of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity of stem-like gliomaspheres and nonstem glioma cells (obtained at patient neurosurgical resection) were evaluated by clonogenic assays, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining and cell cycle distribution. Survival of irradiated and nonirradiated NOD-SCID mice intracranially implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres were monitored. Glioma cells treated with gefitinib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival, {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, DNA-PKcs expression, and phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt. Results: Stem-like gliomaspheres displayed BTSC characteristics of self-renewal; differentiation into lineages of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes; and initiation of glioma growth in NOD-SCID mice. Irradiation dose-dependently reduced clonogenic survival, induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining of nonstem glioma cells, but not stem-like gliomaspheres. There was no difference in survival of irradiated and nonirradiated mice implanted with stem-like gliomaspheres. The addition of gefitinib significantly inhibited clonogenic survival, increased {gamma}-H{sub 2}AX immunostaining, and reduced DNA-PKcs expression of irradiated stem-like gliomaspheres, without affecting irradiated-nonstem glioma cells. Gefitinib alone, and when combined with irradiation, inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR (Y1068 and Y1045) and Akt (S473) in stem-like gliomaspheres. In nonstem glioma cells, gefitinib alone inhibited EGFR Y1068 phosphorylation, with further inhibition by combined gefitinib and irradiation. Conclusions: Stem-like gliomaspheres are

  18. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... Basics » Stem Cell Basics I. Back to top Stem Cell Basics I. Introduction: What are stem cells, and ...

  19. Repair of facial nerve defects with decellularized artery allografts containing autologous adipose-derived stem cells in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Zhou, Ke; Mi, Wen-Juan; Qiu, Jian-Hua

    2011-07-20

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a decellularized artery allograft containing autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on an 8-mm facial nerve branch lesion in a rat model. At 8 weeks postoperatively, functional evaluation of unilateral vibrissae movements, morphological analysis of regenerated nerve segments and retrograde labeling of facial motoneurons were all analyzed. Better regenerative outcomes associated with functional improvement, great axonal growth, and improved target reinnervation were achieved in the artery-ADSCs group (2), whereas the cut nerves sutured with artery conduits alone (group 1) achieved inferior restoration. Furthermore, transected nerves repaired with nerve autografts (group 3) resulted in significant recovery of whisking, maturation of myelinated fibers and increased number of labeled facial neurons, and the latter two parameters were significantly different from those of group 2. Collectively, though our combined use of a decellularized artery allograft with autologous ADSCs achieved regenerative outcomes inferior to a nerve autograft, it certainly showed a beneficial effect on promoting nerve regeneration and thus represents an alternative approach for the reconstruction of peripheral facial nerve defects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Exonuclease 1 is a critical mediator of survival during DNA double strand break repair in nonquiescent hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Amar; Qing, Yulan; Gerson, Stanton L

    2014-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) populations require DNA repair pathways to maintain their long-term survival and reconstitution capabilities, but mediators of these processes are still being elucidated. Exonuclease 1 (Exo1) participates in homologous recombination (HR) and Exo1 loss results in impaired 5' HR end resection. We use cultured Exo1(mut) fibroblasts and bone marrow to demonstrate that loss of Exo1 function results in defective HR in cycling cells. Conversely, in Exo1(mut) mice HR is not required for maintenance of quiescent HSCs at steady state, confirming the steady state HSC reliance on nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Exo1(mut) mice sustained serial repopulation, displayed no defect in competitive repopulation or niche occupancy, and exhibited no increased sensitivity to whole body ionizing radiation. However, when Exo1(mut) HSCs were pushed into cell cycle in vivo with 5-fluorouracil or poly IC, the hematopoietic population became hypersensitive to IR, resulting in HSC defects and animal death. We propose Exo1-mediated HR is dispensable for stem cell function in quiescent HSC, whereas it is essential to HSC response to DNA damage processing after cell cycle entry, and its loss is not compensated by intact NHEJ. In HSCs, the maintenance of stem cell function after DNA damage is dependent on the DNA repair capacity, segregated by active versus quiescent points in cell cycle. © AlphaMed Press.

  1. Stem Cell Therapies in Orthopaedic Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Marcucio, Ralph S.; Nauth, Aaron; Giannoudis, Peter V.; Bahney, Chelsea; Piuzzi, Nicolas S.; Muschler, George; Miclau, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells offer great promise to help understand the normal mechanisms of tissue renewal, regeneration, and repair, and also for development of cell-based therapies to treat patients after tissue injury. Most adult tissues contain stem cells and progenitor cells that contribute to homeostasis, remodeling and repair. Multiple stem and progenitor cell populations in bone are found in the marrow, the endosteum, and the periosteum. They contribute to the fracture healing process after injury and...

  2. In Vitro Expansion of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alters DNA Double Strand Break Repair of Etoposide Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Hare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are of interest for use in diverse cellular therapies. Ex vivo expansion of MSCs intended for transplantation must result in generation of cells that maintain fidelity of critical functions. Previous investigations have identified genetic and phenotypic alterations of MSCs with in vitro passage, but little is known regarding how culturing influences the ability of MSCs to repair double strand DNA breaks (DSBs, the most severe of DNA lesions. To investigate the response to DSB stress with passage in vitro, primary human MSCs were exposed to etoposide (VP16 at various passages with subsequent evaluation of cellular damage responses and DNA repair. Passage number did not affect susceptibility to VP16 or the incidence and repair kinetics of DSBs. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ transcripts showed little alteration with VP16 exposure or passage; however, homologous recombination (HR transcripts were reduced following VP16 exposure with this decrease amplified as MSCs were passaged in vitro. Functional evaluations of NHEJ and HR showed that MSCs were unable to activate NHEJ repair following VP16 stress in cells after successive passage. These results indicate that ex vivo expansion of MSCs alters their ability to perform DSB repair, a necessary function for cells intended for transplantation.

  3. In Vitro Expansion of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alters DNA Double Strand Break Repair of Etoposide Induced DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Ian; Gencheva, Marieta; Evans, Rebecca; Fortney, James; Piktel, Debbie; Vos, Jeffrey A; Howell, David; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are of interest for use in diverse cellular therapies. Ex vivo expansion of MSCs intended for transplantation must result in generation of cells that maintain fidelity of critical functions. Previous investigations have identified genetic and phenotypic alterations of MSCs with in vitro passage, but little is known regarding how culturing influences the ability of MSCs to repair double strand DNA breaks (DSBs), the most severe of DNA lesions. To investigate the response to DSB stress with passage in vitro, primary human MSCs were exposed to etoposide (VP16) at various passages with subsequent evaluation of cellular damage responses and DNA repair. Passage number did not affect susceptibility to VP16 or the incidence and repair kinetics of DSBs. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) transcripts showed little alteration with VP16 exposure or passage; however, homologous recombination (HR) transcripts were reduced following VP16 exposure with this decrease amplified as MSCs were passaged in vitro. Functional evaluations of NHEJ and HR showed that MSCs were unable to activate NHEJ repair following VP16 stress in cells after successive passage. These results indicate that ex vivo expansion of MSCs alters their ability to perform DSB repair, a necessary function for cells intended for transplantation.

  4. DNA repair , cell repair and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    Data obtained in laboratory of radiation cytology and literature data testifying to a considerable role of DNA repair in cell sensitivity to radiation and chemical DNA-tropic agents have been considered. Data pointing to the probability of contribution of inducible repair of DNA into plant cells sensitivity to X-rays are obtained. Certain violations of DNA repair do not result in the increase of radiosensitivity. It is assumed that in the cases unknown mechanisms of DNA repair operate

  5. Biochemistry of epidermal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard L; Adhikary, Gautam; Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Rorke, Ellen A; Vemuri, Mohan C; Boucher, Shayne E; Bickenbach, Jackie R; Kerr, Candace

    2013-02-01

    The epidermis is an important protective barrier that is essential for maintenance of life. Maintaining this barrier requires continuous cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, these processes must be balanced to produce a normal epidermis. The stem cells of the epidermis reside in specific locations in the basal epidermis, hair follicle and sebaceous glands and these cells are responsible for replenishment of this tissue. A great deal of effort has gone into identifying protein epitopes that mark stem cells, in identifying stem cell niche locations, and in understanding how stem cell populations are related. We discuss these studies as they apply to understanding normal epidermal homeostasis and skin cancer. An assortment of stem cell markers have been identified that permit assignment of stem cells to specific regions of the epidermis, and progress has been made in understanding the role of these cells in normal epidermal homeostasis and in conditions of tissue stress. A key finding is the multiple stem cell populations exist in epidermis that give rise to different structures, and that multiple stem cell types may contribute to repair in damaged epidermis. Understanding epidermal stem cell biology is likely to lead to important therapies for treating skin diseases and cancer, and will also contribute to our understanding of stem cells in other systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing for repair of spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Zhanxiu; Zhao, Lili; Li, Hui; Wang, Suxia; Shen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that RNA interference to silence Nogo-66 receptor gene expression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells before transplantation might further improve neurological function in rats with spinal cord transection injury. After 2 weeks, the number of neurons and BrdU-positive cells in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group was higher than in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group, and significantly greater compared with the model group. After 4 weeks, behavioral performance was significantly enhanced in the model group. After 8 weeks, the number of horseradish peroxidase-labeled nerve fibers was higher in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group than in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group, and significantly higher than in the model group. The newly formed nerve fibers and myelinated nerve fibers were detectable in the central transverse plane section in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group and in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group. PMID:25206893

  7. Exosomal DMBT1 from human urine-derived stem cells facilitates diabetic wound repair by promoting angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yuan; Rao, Shan-Shan; Ren, Lu; Hu, Xiong-Ke; Tan, Yi-Juan; Hu, Yin; Luo, Juan; Liu, Yi-Wei; Yin, Hao; Huang, Jie; Cao, Jia; Wang, Zhen-Xing; Liu, Zheng-Zhao; Liu, Hao-Ming; Tang, Si-Yuan; Xu, Ran; Xie, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds represent one of the most common complications of diabetes and need advanced treatment strategies. Exosomes are key mediators of cell paracrine action and can be directly utilized as therapeutic agents for tissue repair and regeneration. Here, we explored the effects of exosomes from human urine-derived stem cells (USC-Exos) on diabetic wound healing and the underlying mechanism. Methods: USCs were characterized by flow cytometry and multipotent differentiation potential analyses. USC-Exos were isolated from the conditioned media of USCs and identified by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. A series of functional assays in vitro were performed to assess the effects of USC-Exos on the activities of wound healing-related cells. Protein profiles in USC-Exos and USCs were examined to screen the candidate molecules that mediate USC-Exos function. The effects of USC-Exos on wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were tested by measuring wound closure rates, histological and immunofluorescence analyses. Meanwhile, the role of the candidate protein in USC-Exos-induced regulation of angiogenic activities of endothelial cells and diabetic wound healing was assessed. Results: USCs were positive for CD29, CD44, CD73 and CD90, but negative for CD34 and CD45. USCs were able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. USC-Exos exhibited a cup- or sphere-shaped morphology with a mean diameter of 51.57 ± 2.93 nm and positive for CD63 and TSG101. USC-Exos could augment the functional properties of wound healing-related cells including the angiogenic activities of endothelial cells. USC-Exos were enriched in the proteins that are involved in regulation of wound healing-related biological processes. Particularly, a pro-angiogenic protein called deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) was highly expressed in USC-Exos. Further functional assays showed that DMBT1 protein was required for USC

  8. Effect of hBD2 genetically modified dermal multipotent stem cells on repair of infected irradiated wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong Zhaowen; Li Nan; Xiao Taoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Deficiencies in repair cells and infection are two of the main factors that can hinder the process of wound healing. In the present study, we investigated the ability of human beta-defensin-2 (hBD2) genetically modified dermal multipotent stem cells (dMSCs) to accelerate the healing irradiated wounds complicated by infections. An hBD2 adenovirus expression vector (Adv-hBD2) was firstly constructed and used to infect dMSCs. The antibacterial activity of the supernatant was determined by Kirby-Bauer method and macrodilution broth assay. Time to complete wound healing, residual percentage of wound area, and the number of bacteria under the scar were measured to assess the effects of Adv-hBD2-infected dMSC transplantation on the healing of irradiated wounds complicated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Results showed that the supernatant from Adv-hBD2-infected dMSCs had obvious antibacterial effects. Transplantation of Adv-hBD2-infected dMSCs killed bacteria in the wound. The complete wound healing time was 19.8±0.45 days, which was significantly shorter than in the control groups (P<0.05). From 14 days after transplantation, the residual wound area was smaller in the experimental group than in the control groups (P<0.05). In conculsion, we found that transplantation of hBD2 genetically modified dMSCs accelerated the healing of wounds complicated by P. aeruginosa infection in whole body irradiated rats. (author)

  9. Embryological origin of the endocardium and derived valve progenitor cells: from developmental biology to stem cell-based valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucéat, Michel

    2013-04-01

    The cardiac valves are targets of both congenital and acquired diseases. The formation of valves during embryogenesis (i.e., valvulogenesis) originates from endocardial cells lining the myocardium. These cells undergo an endothelial-mesenchymal transition, proliferate and migrate within an extracellular matrix. This leads to the formation of bilateral cardiac cushions in both the atrioventricular canal and the outflow tract. The embryonic origin of both the endocardium and prospective valve cells is still elusive. Endocardial and myocardial lineages are segregated early during embryogenesis and such a cell fate decision can be recapitulated in vitro by embryonic stem cells (ESC). Besides genetically modified mice and ex vivo heart explants, ESCs provide a cellular model to study the early steps of valve development and might constitute a human therapeutic cell source for decellularized tissue-engineered valves. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Cardiac Pathways of Differentiation, Metabolism and Contraction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Ability of Human Nasal Inferior Turbinate-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Repair Vocal Fold Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choung-Soo; Choi, Hyunsu; Park, Ki Cheol; Kim, Sung Won; Sun, Dong-Il

    2018-03-01

    Objective This study investigated the ability of implanted human nasal inferior turbinate-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hTMSCs) to repair injured vocal folds. To this end, we used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyze the early phase of wound healing and histopathological analysis to explore the late phase of wound healing in xenograft animal models. Study Design Prospective animal study. Setting Research laboratory. Subjects and Methods The right-side lamina propria of the vocal fold was injured in 20 rabbits and 30 rats. Next, hTMSCs were implanted into half of the injured vocal folds (hTMSC groups). As a control, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was injected into the other half of the injured vocal folds (PBS groups). Rat vocal folds were harvested for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at 1 week after injury. Rabbit vocal folds were evaluated endoscopically and the larynges harvested for histological and immunohistochemical examination at 2 and 8 weeks after injury. Results In the hTMSC group, PCR showed that hyaluronan synthase ( HAS) 1, HAS 2, and transforming growth factor ( TGF)-β1 were significantly upregulated compared with the PBS group. Procollagen type III ( COL III) messenger RNA expression was significantly upregulated in the PBS group compared with the normal group. Histological analyses showed that hTMSC administration afforded more favorable collagen and hyaluronic acid deposition than was evident in the controls. Implanted hTMSCs were observed in injured vocal folds 2 weeks after implantation. Conclusions Our results show that hTMSCs implantation into injured vocal folds facilitated vocal fold regeneration, with presenting antifibrotic effects.

  11. The role of HUCB derived stem cells therapy in repair of renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye Samuel

    and improvement of renal function in cisplatin-induced ARF model. Forty four rats ... 88.9% of animals in MSCs treated rats versus 87.5% in CD34+ cells treated rats. HUCB derived .... containing 5 ml of citrate phosphate dextrose adenine-1.

  12. Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Sykova, Eva; Forostyak, Serhiy

    2013-01-01

    Background: A number of cardiovascular, neurological, musculoskeletal and other diseases have a limited capacity for repair and only a modest progress has been made in treatment of brain diseases. The discovery of stem cells has opened new possibilities for the treatment of these maladies, and cell therapy now stands at the cutting-edge of modern regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Experimental data and the first clinical trials employing stem cells have shown their broad therapeuti...

  13. Bone marrow stem cells delivered into the subarachnoid space via cisterna magna improve repair of injured rat spinal cord white matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcol, Wiesław; Slusarczyk, Wojciech; Sieroń, Aleksander L; Koryciak-Komarska, Halina; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The influence of bone marrow stem cells on regeneration of spinal cord in rats was investigated. Young adult male Wistar rats were used (n=22). Focal injury of spinal cord white matter at Th10 level was produced using our original non-laminectomy method by means of high-pressured air stream. Cells from tibial and femoral bone marrow of 1-month old rats (n=3) were cultured, labeled with BrdU/Hoechst and injected into cisterna magna (experimental group) three times: immediately after spinal cord injury and 3 as well as 7 days later. Neurons in brain stem and motor cortex were labeled with FluoroGold (FG) delivered caudally from the injury site a week before the end of experiment. Functional outcome and morphological features of regeneration were analyzed during 12-week follow-up. The lesions were characterized by means of MRI. Maximal distance of expansion of implanted cells in the spinal cord was measured and the number of FG-positive neurons in the brain was counted. Rats treated with stem cells presented significant improvement of locomotor performance and spinal cord morphology when compared to the control group. Distance covered by stem cells was 7 mm from the epicenter of the injury. Number of brain stem and motor cortex FG-positive neurons in experimental group was significantly higher than in control. Obtained data showed that bone marrow stem cells are able to induce the repair of injured spinal cord white matter. The route of cells application via cisterna magna appeared to be useful for their delivery in spinal cord injury therapy. PMID:26628950

  14. Stem cells in endodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Rama Kumar M, Madhu Varma K, Kalyan Satish R, Manikya kumar Nanduri.R, Murali Krishnam Raju S, Mohan rao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body. Serving as a sort of repair system for the body, they can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. However, progress in stem cell biology and tissue engineering may present new options for replacing heavily damaged or lost teeth, or even individual tooth structures. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential impact of dental pulp stem cells on regenerative endodontics.

  15. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  16. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  17. Long-Term Engraftment of Primary Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Repairs Niche Damage and Improves Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbuehl, Jean-Paul; Tatarova, Zuzana; Held, Werner; Huelsken, Joerg

    2017-08-03

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation represents a curative treatment for various hematological disorders. However, delayed reconstitution of innate and adaptive immunity often causes fatal complications. HSC maintenance and lineage differentiation are supported by stromal niches, and we now find that bone marrow stroma cells (BMSCs) are severely and permanently damaged by the pre-conditioning irradiation required for efficient HSC transplantation. Using mouse models, we show that stromal insufficiency limits the number of donor-derived HSCs and B lymphopoiesis. Intra-bone transplantation of primary, but not cultured, BMSCs quantitatively reconstitutes stroma function in vivo, which is mediated by a multipotent NT5E + (CD73) + ENG - (CD105) - LY6A + (SCA1) + BMSC subpopulation. BMSC co-transplantation doubles the number of functional, donor-derived HSCs and significantly reduces clinically relevant side effects associated with HSC transplantation including neutropenia and humoral immunodeficiency. These data demonstrate the potential of stroma recovery to improve HSC transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Repair kinetics of DNA double-strand breaks and incidence of apoptosis in mouse neural stem/progenitor cells and their differentiated neurons exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Hiroki; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Sakaguchi, Kenta; Nakahama, Tomoya; Kodama, Seiji

    2018-05-01

    Neuronal loss leads to neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. Because of their long lifespans, neurons are assumed to possess highly efficient DNA repair ability and to be able to protect themselves from deleterious DNA damage such as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) produced by intrinsic and extrinsic sources. However, it remains largely unknown whether the DSB repair ability of neurons is more efficient compared with that of other cells. Here, we investigated the repair kinetics of X-ray-induced DSBs in mouse neural cells by scoring the number of phosphorylated 53BP1 foci post irradiation. We found that p53-independent apoptosis was induced time dependently during differentiation from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) into neurons in culture for 48 h. DSB repair in neurons differentiated from NSPCs in culture was faster than that in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), possibly due to the higher DNA-dependent protein kinase activity, but it was similar to that in NSPCs. Further, the incidence of p53-dependent apoptosis induced by X-irradiation in neurons was significantly higher than that in NSPCs. This difference in response of X-ray-induced apoptosis between neurons and NSPCs may reflect a difference in the fidelity of non-homologous end joining or a differential sensitivity to DNA damage other than DSBs.

  19. Stem cell biobanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardelli, Silvana

    2010-04-01

    Stem cells contribute to innate healing and harbor a promising role for regenerative medicine. Stem cell banking through long-term storage of different stem cell platforms represents a fundamental source to preserve original features of stem cells for patient-specific clinical applications. Stem cell research and clinical translation constitute fundamental and indivisible modules catalyzed through biobanking activity, generating a return of investment.

  20. Dental Stem Cell in Tooth Development and Advances of Adult Dental Stem Cell in Regenerative Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiali; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jiong; Fan, Li; Zheng, Yuting; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered as a promising treatment for many clinical usage such as tooth regeneration, bone repairation, spinal cord injury, and so on. However, the ideal stem cell for stem cell-based therapy still remains to be elucidated. In the past decades, several types of stem cells have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs) and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), which may be a good source for stem cell-based therapy in certain disease, especially when they origin from neural crest is considered. In this review, the specific characteristics and advantages of the adult dental stem cell population will be summarized and the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation of dental stem cell during tooth development will be also discussed.

  1. Natural Type II Collagen Hydrogel, Fibrin Sealant, and Adipose-Derived Stem Cells as a Promising Combination for Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarini, Mariana; Bordeaux-Rego, Pedro; Giardini-Rosa, Renata; Duarte, Adriana S S; Baratti, Mariana Ozello; Zorzi, Alessandro Rozim; de Miranda, João Batista; Lenz Cesar, Carlos; Luzo, Ângela; Olalla Saad, Sara Teresinha

    2017-10-01

    Objective Articular cartilage is an avascular tissue with limited ability of self-regeneration and the current clinical treatments have restricted capacity to restore damages induced by trauma or diseases. Therefore, new techniques are being tested for cartilage repair, using scaffolds and/or stem cells. Although type II collagen hydrogel, fibrin sealant, and adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) represent suitable alternatives for cartilage formation, their combination has not yet been investigated in vivo for focal articular cartilage defects. We performed a simple experimental procedure using the combination of these 3 compounds on cartilage lesions of rabbit knees. Design The hydrogel was developed in house and was first tested in vitro for chondrogenic differentiation. Next, implants were performed in chondral defects with or without ASCs and the degree of regeneration was macroscopically and microscopically evaluated. Results Production of proteoglycans and the increased expression of collagen type II (COL2α1), aggrecan (ACAN), and sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) confirmed the chondrogenic character of ASCs in the hydrogel in vitro. Importantly, the addition of ASC induced a higher overall repair of the chondral lesions and a better cellular organization and collagen fiber alignment compared with the same treatment without ASCs. This regenerating tissue also presented the expression of cartilage glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen. Conclusions Our results indicate that the combination of the 3 compounds is effective for articular cartilage repair and may be of future clinical interest.

  2. Repair of full-thickness tendon injury using connective tissue progenitors efficiently derived from human embryonic stem cells and fetal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Shahar; Leshansky, Lucy; Zussman, Eyal; Burman, Michael; Srouji, Samer; Livne, Erella; Abramov, Natalie; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2010-10-01

    The use of stem cells for tissue engineering (TE) encourages scientists to design new platforms in the field of regenerative and reconstructive medicine. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have been proposed to be an important cell source for cell-based TE applications as well as an exciting tool for investigating the fundamentals of human development. Here, we describe the efficient derivation of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from hESC lines and fetal tissues. The CTPs were significantly expanded and induced to generate tendon tissues in vitro, with ultrastructural characteristics and biomechanical properties typical of mature tendons. We describe a simple method for engineering tendon grafts that can successfully repair injured Achilles tendons and restore the ankle joint extension movement in mice. We also show the CTP's ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and fat both in vitro and in vivo. This study offers evidence for the possibility of using stem cell-derived engineered grafts to replace missing tissues, and sets a basic platform for future cell-based TE applications in the fields of orthopedics and reconstructive surgery.

  3. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in lymphoma patients is associated with a decrease in the double strand break repair capacity of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Sandrine; Bhatia, Smita; Chen, Yanjun; Bhatia, Ravi; O'Connor, Timothy R

    2017-01-01

    Patients who undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHCT) for treatment of a relapsed or refractory lymphoma are at risk of developing therapy related- myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML). Part of the risk likely resides in inherent interindividual differences in their DNA repair capacity (DRC), which is thought to influence the effect chemotherapeutic treatments have on the patient's stem cells prior to aHCT. Measuring DRC involves identifying small differences in repair proficiency among individuals. Initially, we investigated the cell model in healthy individuals (primary lymphocytes and/or lymphoblastoid cell lines) that would be appropriate to measure genetically determined DRC using host-cell reactivation assays. We present evidence that interindividual differences in DRC double-strand break repair (by non-homologous end-joining [NHEJ] or single-strand annealing [SSA]) are better preserved in non-induced primary lymphocytes. In contrast, lymphocytes induced to proliferate are required to assay base excision (BER) or nucleotide excision repair (NER). We established that both NHEJ and SSA DRCs in lymphocytes of healthy individuals were inversely correlated with the age of the donor, indicating that DSB repair in lymphocytes is likely not a constant feature but rather something that decreases with age (~0.37% NHEJ DRC/year). To investigate the predictive value of pre-aHCT DRC on outcome in patients, we then applied the optimized assays to the analysis of primary lymphocytes from lymphoma patients and found that individuals who later developed t-MDS/AML (cases) were indistinguishable in their DRC from controls who never developed t-MDS/AML. However, when DRC was investigated shortly after aHCT in the same individuals (21.6 months later on average), aHCT patients (both cases and controls) showed a significant decrease in DSB repair measurements. The average decrease of 6.9% in NHEJ DRC observed among aHCT patients was much higher

  4. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in lymphoma patients is associated with a decrease in the double strand break repair capacity of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Lacoste

    Full Text Available Patients who undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHCT for treatment of a relapsed or refractory lymphoma are at risk of developing therapy related- myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML. Part of the risk likely resides in inherent interindividual differences in their DNA repair capacity (DRC, which is thought to influence the effect chemotherapeutic treatments have on the patient's stem cells prior to aHCT. Measuring DRC involves identifying small differences in repair proficiency among individuals. Initially, we investigated the cell model in healthy individuals (primary lymphocytes and/or lymphoblastoid cell lines that would be appropriate to measure genetically determined DRC using host-cell reactivation assays. We present evidence that interindividual differences in DRC double-strand break repair (by non-homologous end-joining [NHEJ] or single-strand annealing [SSA] are better preserved in non-induced primary lymphocytes. In contrast, lymphocytes induced to proliferate are required to assay base excision (BER or nucleotide excision repair (NER. We established that both NHEJ and SSA DRCs in lymphocytes of healthy individuals were inversely correlated with the age of the donor, indicating that DSB repair in lymphocytes is likely not a constant feature but rather something that decreases with age (~0.37% NHEJ DRC/year. To investigate the predictive value of pre-aHCT DRC on outcome in patients, we then applied the optimized assays to the analysis of primary lymphocytes from lymphoma patients and found that individuals who later developed t-MDS/AML (cases were indistinguishable in their DRC from controls who never developed t-MDS/AML. However, when DRC was investigated shortly after aHCT in the same individuals (21.6 months later on average, aHCT patients (both cases and controls showed a significant decrease in DSB repair measurements. The average decrease of 6.9% in NHEJ DRC observed among aHCT patients was

  5. Effects of Transplanted Heparin-Poloxamer Hydrogel Combining Dental Pulp Stem Cells and bFGF on Spinal Cord Injury Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Luo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is one of serious traumatic diseases of the central nervous system and has no effective treatment because of its complicated pathophysiology. Tissue engineering strategy which contains scaffolds, cells, and growth factors can provide a promising treatment for SCI. Hydrogel that has 3D network structure and biomimetic microenvironment can support cellular growth and embed biological macromolecules for sustaining release. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, derived from cranial neural crest, possess mesenchymal stem cell (MSC characteristics and have an ability to provide neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties for SCI treatment. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF is able to promote cell survival and proliferation and also has beneficial effect on neural regeneration and functional recovery after SCI. Herein, a thermosensitive heparin-poloxamer (HP hydrogel containing DPSCs and bFGF was prepared, and the effects of HP-bFGF-DPSCs on neuron restoration after SCI were evaluated by functional recovery tests, western blotting, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, histology evaluation, and immunohistochemistry. The results suggested that transplanted HP hydrogel containing DPSCs and bFGF had a significant impact on spinal cord repair and regeneration and may provide a promising strategy for neuron repair, functional recovery, and tissue regeneration after SCI.

  6. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Repaired but Did Not Prevent Gentamicin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury through Paracrine Effects in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Luciana A.; Borges, Fernanda T.; Simões, Manuel J.; Borges, Andrea A.; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Schor, Nestor

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) or their conditioned medium (CM) on the repair and prevention of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) induced by gentamicin (G). Animals received daily injections of G up to 20 days. On the 10(th) day, injections of BMSCs, CM, CM+trypsin, CM+RNase or exosome-like microvesicles extracted from the CM were administered. In the prevention groups, the animals received the BMSCs 24 h before or on the 5(th) day of G treatmen...

  7. Fanconi Anemia: A DNA repair disorder characterized by accelerated decline of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment and other features of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosh, Robert M; Bellani, Marina; Liu, Yie; Seidman, Michael M

    2017-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal genetic disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), endocrine dysfunction, cancer, and other clinical features commonly associated with normal aging. The anemia stems directly from an accelerated decline of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment. Although FA is a complex heterogeneous disease linked to mutations in 19 currently identified genes, there has been much progress in understanding the molecular pathology involved. FA is broadly considered a DNA repair disorder and the FA gene products, together with other DNA repair factors, have been implicated in interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair. However, in addition to the defective DNA damage response, altered epigenetic regulation, and telomere defects, FA is also marked by elevated levels of inflammatory mediators in circulation, a hallmark of faster decline in not only other hereditary aging disorders but also normal aging. In this review, we offer a perspective of FA as a monogenic accelerated aging disorder, citing the latest evidence for its multi-factorial deficiencies underlying its unique clinical and cellular features. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Potency of Stem Cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Potency of Stem Cells. Totipotent Stem Cells (Zygote + first 2 divisions). -Can form placenta, embryo, and any cell of the body. Pluripotent (Embryonic Stem Cells). -Can form any cell of the body but can not form placenta, hence no embryo. Multipotent (Adult stem cells).

  9. Steric Interference of Adhesion Supports In-Vitro Chondrogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Hydrogels for Cartilage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Goldshmid, Revital; Cohen, Shlomit; Shachaf, Yonatan; Kupershmit, Ilana; Sarig-Nadir, Offra; Seliktar, Dror; Wechsler, Roni

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest the presence of cell adhesion motifs found in structural proteins can inhibit chondrogenesis. In this context, the current study aims to determine if a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified fibrinogen matrix could support better chondrogenesis of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) based on steric interference of adhesion, when compared to a natural fibrin matrix. Hydrogels used as substrates for two-dimensional (2D) BM-MSC cultures under chondrogenic conditi...

  10. Potential Role of Dentin Sialoprotein by Inducing Dental Pulp Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Mineralization for Dental Tissue Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Guo-Hua; Yang, Guo-Bin; Wu, Li-An; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) is a dentin extracellular matrix protein, a unique marker of dentinogenesis and plays a vital role in odontoblast differentiation and dentin mineralization. Recently, studies have shown that DSP induces differentiation and mineralization of periodontal ligament stem cells and dental papilla mesenchymal cells in vitro and rescues dentin deficiency and increases enamel mineralization in animal models.The hypothesis: DSP as a nature therapeutic agent stimu...

  11. Injectable calcium phosphate with hydrogel fibers encapsulating induced pluripotent, dental pulp and bone marrow stem cells for bone repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin [VIP Integrated Department, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130011,China (China); Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zhang, Chi [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Chunyan [VIP Integrated Department, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130011,China (China); Weir, Michael D. [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Wang, Ping, E-mail: pwang@umaryland.edu [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Reynolds, Mark A. [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zhao, Liang, E-mail: lzhaonf@126.com [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Xu, Hockin H.K. [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Center for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore County, MD 21250 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPSC-MSCs), dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and bone marrow MSCs (hBMSCs) are exciting cell sources in regenerative medicine. However, there has been no report comparing hDPSCs, hBMSCs and hiPSC-MSCs for bone engineering in an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffold. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel injectable CPC containing hydrogel fibers encapsulating stem cells for bone engineering, and (2) compare cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow (BM-hiPSC-MSCs) and from foreskin (FS-hiPSC-MSCs), and hBMSCs in CPC for the first time. The results showed that the injection did not harm cell viability. The porosity of injectable CPC was 62%. All four types of cells proliferated and differentiated down the osteogenic lineage inside hydrogel fibers in CPC. hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs exhibited high alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor, collagen I, and osteocalcin gene expressions. Cell-synthesized minerals increased with time (p < 0.05), with no significant difference among hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs (p > 0.1). Mineralization by hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs inside CPC at 14 d was 14-fold that at 1 d. FS-hiPSC-MSCs were inferior in osteogenic differentiation compared to the other cells. In conclusion, hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs are similarly and highly promising for bone tissue engineering; however, FS-hiPSC-MSCs were relatively inferior in osteogenesis. The novel injectable CPC with cell-encapsulating hydrogel fibers may enhance bone regeneration in dental, craniofacial and orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • The osteogenic differentiation of hiPSC-MSCs from different origins, hDPSCs and hBMSCs were first investigated and compared in this study. • hDPSCs and hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow represented viable alternatives to hBMSCs in bone tissue engineering. • hi

  12. Injectable calcium phosphate with hydrogel fibers encapsulating induced pluripotent, dental pulp and bone marrow stem cells for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lin; Zhang, Chi; Li, Chunyan; Weir, Michael D.; Wang, Ping; Reynolds, Mark A.; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPSC-MSCs), dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and bone marrow MSCs (hBMSCs) are exciting cell sources in regenerative medicine. However, there has been no report comparing hDPSCs, hBMSCs and hiPSC-MSCs for bone engineering in an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffold. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel injectable CPC containing hydrogel fibers encapsulating stem cells for bone engineering, and (2) compare cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow (BM-hiPSC-MSCs) and from foreskin (FS-hiPSC-MSCs), and hBMSCs in CPC for the first time. The results showed that the injection did not harm cell viability. The porosity of injectable CPC was 62%. All four types of cells proliferated and differentiated down the osteogenic lineage inside hydrogel fibers in CPC. hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs exhibited high alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor, collagen I, and osteocalcin gene expressions. Cell-synthesized minerals increased with time (p < 0.05), with no significant difference among hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs (p > 0.1). Mineralization by hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs inside CPC at 14 d was 14-fold that at 1 d. FS-hiPSC-MSCs were inferior in osteogenic differentiation compared to the other cells. In conclusion, hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs are similarly and highly promising for bone tissue engineering; however, FS-hiPSC-MSCs were relatively inferior in osteogenesis. The novel injectable CPC with cell-encapsulating hydrogel fibers may enhance bone regeneration in dental, craniofacial and orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • The osteogenic differentiation of hiPSC-MSCs from different origins, hDPSCs and hBMSCs were first investigated and compared in this study. • hDPSCs and hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow represented viable alternatives to hBMSCs in bone tissue engineering. • hi

  13. Detection of Repair of the Zone of Calcified Cartilage with Osteoarthritis through Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Ultrashort Echo Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Quan; Li, Shao-Lin; Ma, Ya-Jun; de Tal, Vicki; Li, Wei; Zhao, Ying-Hua

    2018-05-05

    Currently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most commonly used imaging modality for observing the growth and development of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after in vivo transplantation to treat osteoarthritis (OA). However, it is a challenge to accurately monitor the treatment effects of MSCs in the zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC) with OA. This is especially true in the physiological and biochemical views that are not accurately detected by MRI contrast agents. In contrast, ultrashort time echo (UTE) MRI has been shown to be sensitive to the presence of the ZCC, creating the potential for more effectively observing the repair of the ZCC in OA by MSCs. A special focus is given to the outlook of the use of UTE MRI to detect repair of the ZCC with OA through MSCs. The limitations of the current techniques for clinical applications and future directions are also discussed. Using the combined keywords: "osteoarthritis", "mesenchymal stem cells", "calcified cartilage", and "magnetic resonance imaging", the PubMed/MEDLINE literature search was conducted up to June 1, 2017. A total of 132 published articles were initially identified citations. Of the 132 articles, 48 articles were selected after further detailed review. This study referred to all the important English literature in full. In contrast, UTE MRI has been shown to be sensitive to the presence of the ZCC, creating the potential for more effectively observing the repair of the ZCC in OA by MSCs. The current studies showed that the ZCC could be described in terms of its histomorphology and biochemistry by UTE MRI. We prospected that UTE MRI has been shown the potential for more effectively observing the repair of the ZCC in OA by MSCs in vivo.

  14. Engineering endostatin-producing cartilaginous constructs for cartilage repair using nonviral transfection of chondrocyte-seeded and mesenchymal-stem-cell-seeded collagen scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Lily; Olsen, Bjorn R; Spector, Myron

    2010-10-01

    Although there is widespread recognition of the importance of angiogenesis in tissue repair, there is little work on the inhibition of angiogenesis in the context of tissue engineering of naturally avascular tissues, like articular cartilage. The objective was to engineer a collagen-scaffold-based cartilaginous construct overexpressing a potent antiangiogenic factor, endostatin, using nonviral transfection. Endostatin-plasmid-supplemented collagen scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes and cultured for 20–22 days. The effects of the following variables on endostatin expression and chondrogenesis were examined: collagen scaffold material, method of nonviral vector incorporation, plasmid load, culture medium, and oxygen tension. An increase and peak of endostatin protein was observed during the first week of culture, followed by a decrease to low levels, suggesting that overexpression of endostatin could be sustained for several days using the nonviral vector. The amount of endostatin produced was tunable with the external factors. Chondrogenesis was observed in the engineered constructs cultured in chondrogenic medium at the 3-week time point, demonstrating that endostatin did not inhibit the chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells or the general viability of the cells. The ability to engineer endostatin-expressing cartilaginous constructs will be of value for future work exercising regulatory control of angiogenesis in cartilage repair.

  15. Nanopolymers Delivery of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein-4 Plasmid to Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical application of viral vectors for gene therapy is limited for biosafety consideration. In this study, to promote articular cartilage repair, poly (lactic-co glycolic acid (PLGA nanopolymers were used as non-viral vectors to transfect rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with the pDC316-BMP4-EGFP plasmid. The cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency in vitro were acceptable measuring by CCK-8 and flow cytometry. After transfection, Chondrogenic markers (mRNA of Col2a1, Sox9, Bmp4, and Agg of experimental cells (MSCs being transfected with BMP-4 plasmid by PLGA nanopolymers were increased more than those of control cells (MSCs being transfected with naked BMP-4 plasmid alone. In vivo study, twelve rabbits (24 knees with large full thickness articular cartilage defects were randomly divided into the experimental group (MSCs being transfected with BMP-4 plasmid by PLGA nanopolymers and the control group (MSCs being transfected with naked BMP-4 plasmid. The experimental group showed better regeneration than the control group 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively. Hyaline-like cartilage formed at week 12 in the experimental group, indicating the local delivery of BMP-4 plasmid to MSCs by PLGA nanopolymers improved articular cartilage repair significantly. PLGA nanopolymers could be a promising and effective non-viral vector for gene therapy in cartilage repair.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor/bone morphogenetic protein-2 bone marrow combined modification of the mesenchymal stem cells to repair the avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Wei; Cui, Da-Ping; Zhao, De-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) was used to repair avascular necrosis of the femoral head, which can maintain the osteogenic phenotype of seed cells, and effectively secrete VEGF and BMP-2, and effectively promote blood vessel regeneration and contribute to formation and revascularization of tissue engineered bone tissues. To observe the therapeutic effect on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) modified by VEGF-165 and BMP-2 in vitro. The models were avascular necrosis of femoral head of rabbits on right leg. There groups were single core decompression group, core decompression + BMSCs group, core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group. Necrotic bone was cleared out under arthroscope. Arthroscopic observation demonstrated that necrotic bone was cleared out in each group, and fresh blood flowed out. Histomorphology determination showed that blood vessel number and new bone area in the repair region were significantly greater at various time points following transplantation in the core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group compared with single core decompression group and core decompression + BMSCs group (P < 0.05). These suggested that VEGF-165/BMP-2 gene transfection strengthened osteogenic effects of BMSCs, elevated number and quality of new bones and accelerated the repair of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:26629044

  17. A Conditioned Medium of Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Overexpressing Wnt7a Promotes Wound Repair and Regeneration of Hair Follicles in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can affect the microenvironment of a wound and thereby accelerate wound healing. Wnt proteins act as key mediators of skin development and participate in the formation of skin appendages such as hair. The mechanisms of action of MSCs and Wnt proteins on skin wounds are largely unknown. Here, we prepared a Wnt7a-containing conditioned medium (Wnt-CM from the supernatant of cultured human umbilical cord-MSCs (UC-MSCs overexpressing Wnt7a in order to examine the effects of this CM on cutaneous healing. Our results revealed that Wnt-CM can accelerate wound closure and induce regeneration of hair follicles. Meanwhile, Wnt-CM enhanced expression of extracellular matrix (ECM components and cell migration of fibroblasts but inhibited the migratory ability and expression of K6 and K16 in keratinocytes by enhancing expression of c-Myc. However, we found that the CM of fibroblasts treated with Wnt-CM (HFWnt-CM-CM can also promote wound repair and keratinocyte migration; but there was no increase in the number of hair follicles of regeneration. These data indicate that Wnt7a and UC-MSCs have synergistic effects: they can accelerate wound repair and induce hair regeneration via cellular communication in the wound microenvironment. Thus, this study opens up new avenues of research on the mechanisms underlying wound repair.

  18. Phenotypic plasticity of mesenchymal stem cells is crucial for mesangial repair in a model of immunoglobulin light chain-associated mesangial damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Guillermo A; Teng, Jiamin; Zeng, Chun; Xu, Hongzhi; Liang, Man; Alexander, J Steven; Liu, Bing; Boyer, Chris; Turbat-Herrera, Elba A

    2018-01-01

    Mesangiopathies produced by glomerulopathic monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains (GLCs) acting on the glomerular mesangium produce two characteristic lesions: AL-amyloidosis (AL-Am) and light chain deposition disease (LCDD). In both cases, the pathology is centered in the mesangium, where initial and progressive damage occurs. In AL-Am the mesangial matrix is destroyed and replaced by amyloid fibrils and in LCDD, the mesangial matrix is increased and remodeled. The collagen IV rich matrix is replaced by tenascin. In both conditions, mesangial cells (MCs) become apoptotic as a direct effect of the GLCs. MCs were incubated in-vitro with GLCs and animal kidneys were perfused ex-vivo via the renal artery with GLCs, producing expected lesions, and then mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were added to both platforms. Each of the two platforms provided unique information that when put together created a comprehensive evaluation of the processes involved. A "cocktail" with growth and differentiating factors was used to study its effect on mesangial repair. MSCs displayed remarkable phenotypic plasticity during the repair process. The first role of the MSCs after migrating to the affected areas was to dispose of the amyloid fibrils (in AL-Am), the altered mesangial matrix (in LCDD) and apoptotic MCs/debris. To accomplish this task, MSCs transformed into facultative macrophages acquiring an abundance of lysosomes and endocytotic capabilities required to engage in phagocytic functions. Once the mesangial cleaning was completed, MSCs transformed into functional MCs restoring the mesangium to normal. "Cocktail" made the repair process more efficient.

  19. Repair of segmental load-bearing bone defect by autologous mesenchymal stem cells and plasma-derived fibrin impregnated ceramic block results in early recovery of limb function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Min Hwei; Duski, Suryasmi; Tan, Kok Keong; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Low, Kiat Cheong; Rose, Isa Mohamed; Mohamed, Zahiah; Bin Saim, Aminuddin; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes have not been used to repair load-bearing bone defects due to their weak mechanical property. In this study, we reevaluated the functional outcomes of combining ceramic block with osteogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma (TEB) to repair critical-sized segmental tibial defect. Comparisons were made with fresh marrow-impregnated ceramic block (MIC) and partially demineralized allogeneic bone block (ALLO). Six New Zealand White female rabbits were used in each study group and three rabbits with no implants were used as negative controls. By Day 90, 4/6 rabbits in TEB group and 2/6 in ALLO and MIC groups resumed normal gait pattern. Union was achieved significantly faster in TEB group with a radiological score of 4.50 ± 0.78 versus ALLO (1.06 ± 0.32), MIC (1.28 ± 0.24), and negative controls (0). Histologically, TEB group scored the highest percentage of new bone (82% ± 5.1%) compared to ALLO (5% ± 2.5%) and MIC (26% ± 5.2%). Biomechanically, TEB-treated tibiae achieved the highest compressive strength (43.50 ± 12.72 MPa) compared to those treated with ALLO (15.15 ± 3.57 MPa) and MIC (23.28 ± 6.14 MPa). In conclusion, TEB can repair critical-sized segmental load-bearing bone defects and restore limb function.

  20. Combination therapy with intra-articular injection of mesenchymal stem cells and articulated joint distraction for repair of a chronic osteochondral defect in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Yohei; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Mahmoud, Elhussein Elbadry; Kamei, Goki; Adachi, Nobuo; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    The present study investigated intra-articular injection of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) combined with articulated joint distraction as treatment for osteochondral defects. Large osteochondral defects were created in the weight-bearing area of the medial femoral condyle in rabbit knees. Four weeks after defect creation, rabbits were divided into six groups: control group, MSC group, distraction group, distraction + MSC group, temporary distraction group, and temporary distraction + MSC group. Groups with MSC received intra-articular injection of MSCs. Groups with distraction underwent articulated distraction arthroplasty. Groups with temporary distraction discontinued the distraction after 4 weeks. The rabbits were euthanized at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment except temporary distraction groups which were euthanized at only 12 weeks. Histological scores in the distraction + MSC group were significantly better than in the control, MSC group or distraction group at 4 and 8 weeks, but showed no further improvement. At 12 weeks, the temporary distraction + MSC group showed the best results, demonstrating hyaline cartilage repair with regeneration of the osteochondral junction. In conclusion, joint distraction with intra-articular injection of MSCs promotes early cartilage repair, and compressive loading of the repair tissue after temporary distraction stimulates articular cartilage regeneration. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects by cultured mesenchymal stem cells transfected with the transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Xiaodong [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zheng Qixin [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Yang Shuhua [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Shao Zengwu [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Yuan Quan [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Pan Zhengqi [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Tang Shuo [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Liu Kai [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Quan Daping [Institute of Polymer Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2006-12-15

    Articular cartilage repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on the combined techniques of gene transfer and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) is a multifunctional molecule that plays a central role in promotion of cartilage repair, and inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune response. Cell mediated gene therapy can allow a sustained expression of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} that may circumvent difficulties associated with growth factor delivery. The objective of this study was to investigate whether TGF-{beta}{sub 1} gene modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could enhance the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in allogeneic rabbits. The pcDNA{sub 3}-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} gene transfected MSCs were seeded onto biodegradable poly-L-lysine coated polylactide (PLA) biomimetic scaffolds in vitro and allografted into full-thickness articular cartilage defects in 18 New Zealand rabbits. The pcDNA{sub 3} gene transfected MSCs/biomimetic scaffold composites and the cell-free scaffolds were taken as control groups I and II, respectively. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks. Macroscopical, histological and ultrastructural studies were performed. In vitro SEM studies found that abundant cartilaginous matrices were generated and completely covered the interconnected pores of the scaffolds two weeks post-seeding in the experimental groups. In vivo, the quality of regenerated tissue improved over time with hyaline cartilage filling the chondral region and a mixture of trabecular and compact bone filling the subchondral region at 24 weeks post-implantation. Joint repair in the experimental groups was better than that of either control group I or II, with respect to: (1) synthesis of hyaline cartilage specific extracellular matrix at the upper portion of the defect; (2) reconstitution of the subchondral bone at the lower portion of the defect and (3) inhibition of

  2. Repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects by cultured mesenchymal stem cells transfected with the transforming growth factor β1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaodong; Zheng Qixin; Yang Shuhua; Shao Zengwu; Yuan Quan; Pan Zhengqi; Tang Shuo; Liu Kai; Quan Daping

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on the combined techniques of gene transfer and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β 1 ) is a multifunctional molecule that plays a central role in promotion of cartilage repair, and inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune response. Cell mediated gene therapy can allow a sustained expression of TGF-β 1 that may circumvent difficulties associated with growth factor delivery. The objective of this study was to investigate whether TGF-β 1 gene modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could enhance the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in allogeneic rabbits. The pcDNA 3 -TGF-β 1 gene transfected MSCs were seeded onto biodegradable poly-L-lysine coated polylactide (PLA) biomimetic scaffolds in vitro and allografted into full-thickness articular cartilage defects in 18 New Zealand rabbits. The pcDNA 3 gene transfected MSCs/biomimetic scaffold composites and the cell-free scaffolds were taken as control groups I and II, respectively. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks. Macroscopical, histological and ultrastructural studies were performed. In vitro SEM studies found that abundant cartilaginous matrices were generated and completely covered the interconnected pores of the scaffolds two weeks post-seeding in the experimental groups. In vivo, the quality of regenerated tissue improved over time with hyaline cartilage filling the chondral region and a mixture of trabecular and compact bone filling the subchondral region at 24 weeks post-implantation. Joint repair in the experimental groups was better than that of either control group I or II, with respect to: (1) synthesis of hyaline cartilage specific extracellular matrix at the upper portion of the defect; (2) reconstitution of the subchondral bone at the lower portion of the defect and (3) inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune responses. The

  3. Beneficial effect of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural precursors in spinal cord injury repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Nataliya; Amemori, Takashi; Turnovcová, Karolína; Procházka, Pavel; Onteniente, B.; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 9 (2015), s. 1781-1797 ISSN 0963-6897 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12024; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00939S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : human induced pluripotent stem cells * neural precursors * spinal cord injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.427, year: 2015

  4. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... here Home » Glossary Back to top Glossary Adult stem cell Astrocyte Blastocoel Blastocyst Bone marrow stromal cells Bone ...

  5. Repairing rabbit radial defects by combining bone marrow stroma stem cells with bone scaffold material comprising a core-cladding structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Liu, G H; Wu, Q; Yu, B

    2015-10-05

    We prepared a bone scaffold material comprising a PLGA/β-TCP core and a Type I collagen cladding, and recombined it with bone marrow stroma stem cells (BMSCs) to evaluate its potential for use in bone tissue engineering by in vivo and in vitro experiments. PLGA/β-TCP without a cladding was used for comparison. The adherence rate of the BMSCs to the scaffold was determined by cell counting. Cell proliferation rate was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. The osteogenic capability was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity. The scaffold materials were recombined with the BMSCs and implanted into a large segmental rabbit radial defect model to evaluate defect repair. Osteogenesis was assessed in the scaffold materials by histological and double immunofluorescence labeling, etc. The adherence number, proliferation number, and alkaline phosphatase expression of the cells on the bone scaffold material with core-cladding structure were significantly higher than the corresponding values in the PLGA/β-TCP composite scaffold material (P structure completely degraded at the bone defect site and bone formation was completed. The rabbit large sentimental radial defect was successfully repaired. The degradation and osteogenesis rates matched well. The bone scaffold with core-cladding structure exhibited better osteogenic activity and capacity to repair a large segmental bone defect compared to the PLGA/β-TCP composite scaffold. The bone scaffold with core-cladding structure has excellent physical properties and biocompatibility. It is an ideal scaffold material for bone tissue engineering.

  6. Repair of articular cartilage defects by tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with adipose-derived stem cells and acellular cartilaginous matrix in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z J; An, R Z; Zhao, J Y; Zhang, Q; Yang, J; Wang, J B; Wen, G Y; Yuan, X H; Qi, X W; Li, S J; Ye, X C

    2014-06-18

    After injury, inflammation, or degeneration, articular cartilage has limited self-repair ability. We aimed to explore the feasibility of repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered cartilage constructed by acellular cartilage matrices (ACMs) seeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). The ADSCs were isolated from 3-month-old New Zealand albino rabbit by using collagenase and cultured and amplified in vitro. Fresh cartilage isolated from adult New Zealand albino rabbit were freeze-dried for 12 h and treated with Triton X-100, DNase, and RNase to obtain ACMs. ADSCs were seeded in the acellular cartilaginous matrix at 2x10(7)/mL, and cultured in chondrogenic differentiation medium for 2 weeks to construct tissue-engineered cartilage. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, and C groups. Engineered cartilage was transplanted into cartilage defect position of rabbits in group A, group B obtained ACMs, and group C did not receive any transplants. The rabbits were sacrificed in week 12. The restored tissue was evaluated using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the tissue-engineered cartilage group (group A), articular cartilage defects of the rabbits were filled with chondrocyte-like tissue with smooth surface. Immunohistochemistry showed type II-collagen expression and Alcian blue staining was positive. TEM showed chondrocytes in the recesses, with plenty of secretary matrix particles. In the scaffold group (group B), the defect was filled with fibrous tissue. No repaired tissue was found in the blank group (group C). Tissue-engineered cartilage using ACM seeded with ADSCs can help repair articular cartilage defects in rabbits.

  7. Plant stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Yvonne; Simon, Rüdiger

    2005-01-01

    Stem cells are required to support the indeterminate growth style of plants. Meristems are a plants stem cell niches that foster stem cell survival and the production of descendants destined for differentiation. In shoot meristems, stem cell fate is decided at the populational level. The size of the stem cell domain at the meristem tip depends on signals that are exchanged with cells of the organizing centre underneath. In root meristems, individual stem cells are controlled by direct interaction with cells of the quiescent centre that lie in the immediate neighbourhood. Analysis of the interactions and signaling processes in the stem cell niches has delivered some insights into the molecules that are involved and revealed that the two major niches for plant stem cells are more similar than anticipated.

  8. A functional model for adult stem cells in epithelial tissues.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, J.; Katsaros, C.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2009-01-01

    Tissue turnover, regeneration, and repair take place throughout life. Stem cells are key players in these processes. The characteristics and niches of the stem cell populations in different tissues, and even in related tissues, vary extensively. In this review, stem cell differentiation and stem

  9. Purified Human Skeletal Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Enhance the Repair and Regeneration in the Damaged Urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Hirata, Maki; Soeda, Shuichi; Nitta, Masahiro; Hoshi, Akio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2017-10-01

    Postoperative damage of the urethral rhabdosphincter and nerve-vascular networks is a major complication of radical prostatectomy and generally causes incontinence and/or erectile dysfunction. The human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells, which have a synchronized reconstitution capacity of muscle-nerve-blood vessel units, were applied to this damage. Cells were enzymatically extracted from the human skeletal muscle, sorted using flow cytometry as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD29/34/45 (Sk-DN/29) fractions, and separately cultured/expanded in appropriate conditions within 2 weeks. Urethral damage was induced by manually removing one third of the wall of the muscle layer in nude rats. A mixture of expanded Sk-34 and Sk-DN/29 cells was applied on the damaged portion for the cell transplantation (CT) group. The same amount of media was used for the non-CT (NT) group. Urethral pressure profile was evaluated via electrical stimulation to assess functional recovery. Cell engraftments and differentiations were detected using immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. Expression of angiogenic cytokines was also analyzed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and protein array. At 6 weeks after transplantation, the CT group showed a significantly higher functional recovery than the NT group (70.2% and 39.1%, respectively; P cells differentiated into skeletal muscle fibers, nerve-related Schwann cells, perineuriums, and vascular pericytes. Active paracrine angiogenic cytokines in the mixed cells were also detected with enhanced vascular formation in vivo. The transplantation of Sk-34 and Sk-DN/29 cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of postoperative damage of the urethral rhabdosphincter and nerve-vascular networks.

  10. Overexpression of HIF-1α in mesenchymal stem cells contributes to repairing hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Deju; Zhou, Liping; Wang, Biao; Liu, Lizhen; Cong, Li; Hu, Chuanqin; Ge, Tingting; Yu, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical researches on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation, which is used to treat hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage, have received inspiring achievements. However, the insufficient migration of active cells to damaged tissues has limited their potential therapeutic effects. There are some evidences that hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) promotes the viability and migration of the cells. Here, we aim to investigate whether overexpression of HIF-1α in MSCs could improve the viability and migration capacity of cells, and its therapeutic efficiency on HI brain damage. In the study, MSCs with HIF-1α overexpression was achieved by recombinant lentiviral vector and transplanted to the rats subsequent to HI. Our data indicated that overexpression of HIF-1α promoted the viability and migration of MSCs, HIF-1α overexpressed MSCs also had a stronger therapeutic efficiency on HI brain damaged treatment by mitigating the injury on behavioral and histological changes evoked by HI insults, accompanied with more MSCs migrating to cerebral damaged area. This study demonstrated that HIF-1α overexpression could increase the MSCs' therapeutic efficiency in HI and the promotion of the cells' directional migration to cerebral HI area by overexpression may be responsible for it, which showed that transplantation of MSCs with HIF-1α overexpression is an attractive therapeutic option to treat HI-induced brain injury in the future. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair with mesenchymal stem cells during arthroscopy improves healing and prevents further tears: a case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe; Flouzat Lachaniette, Charles Henri; Delambre, Jerome; Zilber, Sebastien; Duffiet, Pascal; Chevallier, Nathalie; Rouard, Helene

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair with iliac crest bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The prevalence of healing and prevention of re-tears were correlated with the number of MSCs received at the tendon-to-bone interface. Forty-five patients in the study group received concentrated bone marrow-derived MSCs as an adjunct to single-row rotator cuff repair at the time of arthroscopy. The average number of MSCs returned to the patient was 51,000 ± 25,000. Outcomes of patients receiving MSCs during their repair were compared to those of a matched control group of 45 patients who did not receive MSCs. All patients underwent imaging studies of the shoulder with iterative ultrasound performed every month from the first postoperative month to the 24th month. The rotator cuff healing or re-tear was confirmed with MRI postoperatively at three and six months, one and two years and at the most recent follow up MRI (minimum ten-year follow-up). Bone marrow-derived MSC injection as an adjunctive therapy during rotator cuff repair enhanced the healing rate and improved the quality of the repaired surface as determined by ultrasound and MRI. Forty-five (100 %) of the 45 repairs with MSC augmentation had healed by six months, versus 30 (67 %) of the 45 repairs without MSC treatment by six months. Bone marrow concentrate (BMC) injection also prevented further ruptures during the next ten years. At the most recent follow-up of ten years, intact rotator cuffs were found in 39 (87 %) of the 45 patients in the MSC-treated group, but just 20 (44 %) of the 45 patients in the control group. The number of transplanted MSCs was determined to be the most relevant to the outcome in the study group, since patients with a loss of tendon integrity at any time up to the ten-year follow-up milestone received fewer MSCs as compared with those who had maintained a successful repair during the same interval. This

  12. HDAC4 and HDAC6 sustain DNA double strand break repair and stem-like phenotype by promoting radioresistance in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marampon, Francesco; Megiorni, Francesca; Camero, Simona; Crescioli, Clara; McDowell, Heather P; Sferra, Roberta; Vetuschi, Antonella; Pompili, Simona; Ventura, Luca; De Felice, Francesca; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Dominici, Carlo; Maggio, Roberto; Festuccia, Claudio; Gravina, Giovanni Luca

    2017-07-01

    The role of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4 and 6 in glioblastoma (GBM) radioresistance was investigated. We found that tumor samples from 31 GBM patients, who underwent temozolomide and radiotherapy combined treatment, showed HDAC4 and HDAC6 expression in 93.5% and 96.7% of cases, respectively. Retrospective clinical data analysis demonstrated that high-intensity HDAC4 and/or HDAC6 immunostaining was predictive of poor clinical outcome. In vitro experiments revealed that short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of HDAC4 or HDAC6 radiosensitized U87MG and U251MG GBM cell lines by promoting DNA double-strand break (DSBs) accumulation and by affecting DSBs repair molecular machinery. We found that HDAC6 knock-down predisposes to radiation therapy-induced U251MG apoptosis- and U87MG autophagy-mediated cell death. HDAC4 silencing promoted radiation therapy-induced senescence, independently by the cellular context. Finally, we showed that p53 WT expression contributed to the radiotherapy lethal effects and that HDAC4 or HDAC6 sustained GBM stem-like radioresistant phenotype. Altogether, these observations suggest that HDAC4 and HDAC6 are guardians of irradiation-induced DNA damages and stemness, thus promoting radioresistance, and may represent potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in GBM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent advances in hematopoietic stem cell biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A; Nolta, Jan A

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Exciting advances have been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell biology during the past year. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification, culture, and in vivo tracking of hematopoietic stem cells. RECENT FINDINGS: The roles of Wnt and Notch proteins...... in regulating stem cell renewal in the microenvironment, and how these molecules can be exploited in ex vivo stem cell culture, are reviewed. The importance of identification of stem cells using functional as well as phenotypic markers is discussed. The novel field of nanotechnology is then discussed...... in the context of stem cell tracking in vivo. This review concludes with a section on the unexpected potential of bone marrow-derived stem cells to contribute to the repair of damaged tissues. The contribution of cell fusion to explain the latter phenomenon is discussed. SUMMARY: Because of exciting discoveries...

  14. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graft-versus-host disease: A potential risk when stem cells come from donors If you receive a transplant ... medications and blood products into your body. Collecting stem cells for transplant If a transplant using your own ...

  15. Translational findings from cardiovascular stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhari, Ramesh; Hare, Joshua M

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using stem cells to regenerate damaged myocardium has been actively investigated since the late 1990s. Consistent with the traditional view that the heart is a "postmitotic" organ that possesses minimal capacity for self-repair, much of the preclinical and clinical work has focused exclusively on introducing stem cells into the heart, with the hope of differentiation of these cells into functioning cardiomyocytes. This approach is ongoing and retains promise but to date has yielded inconsistent successes. More recently, it has become widely appreciated that the heart possesses endogenous repair mechanisms that, if adequately stimulated, might regenerate damaged cardiac tissue from in situ cardiac stem cells. Accordingly, much recent work has focused on engaging and enhancing endogenous cardiac repair mechanisms. This article reviews the literature on stem cell-based myocardial regeneration, placing emphasis on the mutually enriching interaction between basic and clinical research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Preparation of a nano- and micro-fibrous decellularized scaffold seeded with autologous mesenchymal stem cells for inguinal hernia repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Yinlong Zhang,1,* Yuanyuan Zhou,1,* Xu Zhou,2,* Bin Zhao,1,* Jie Chai,1 Hongyi Liu,1 Yifei Zheng,1 Jinling Wang,3 Yaozong Wang,4 Yilin Zhao2 1Medical College, Xiamen University, 2Department of Oncology and Vascular Intervention Radiology, 3Department of Emergency, 4Department of Orthopaedics, Zhongshan Hospital, Xiamen University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Prosthetic meshes used for hernioplasty are usually complicated with chronic pain due to avascular fibrotic scar or mesh shrinkage. In this study, we developed a tissue-engineered mesh (TEM by seeding autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells onto nanosized fibers decellularized aorta (DA. DA was achieved by decellularizing the aorta sample sequentially with physical, mechanical, biological enzymatic digestion, and chemical detergent processes. The tertiary structure of DA was constituted with micro-, submicro-, and nanosized fibers, and the original strength of fresh aorta was retained. Inguinal hernia rabbit models were treated with TEMs or acellular meshes (AMs. After implantation, TEM-treated rabbit models showed no hernia recurrence, whereas AM-treated animals displayed bulges in inguinal area. At harvest, TEMs were thicker, have less adhesion, and have stronger mechanical strength compared to AMs (P<0.05. Moreover, TEM showed better cell infiltration, tissue regeneration, and neovascularization (P<0.05. Therefore, these cell-seeded DAs with nanosized fibers have potential for use in inguinal hernioplasty. Keywords: nanobiomaterial, tissue engineering, inguinal hernia, hernioplasty, decellularized aorta 

  17. Plant stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  18. Nucleotide excision repair in differentiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wees, Caroline van der [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Jansen, Jacob [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Vrieling, Harry [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Laarse, Arnoud van der [Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Zeeland, Albert van [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mullenders, Leon [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)]. E-mail: l.mullenders@lumc.nl

    2007-01-03

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the principal pathway for the removal of a wide range of DNA helix-distorting lesions and operates via two NER subpathways, i.e. global genome repair (GGR) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Although detailed information is available on expression and efficiency of NER in established mammalian cell lines, little is known about the expression of NER pathways in (terminally) differentiated cells. The majority of studies in differentiated cells have focused on repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and 6-4-photoproducts (6-4PP) because of the high frequency of photolesions at low level of toxicity and availability of sensitive technologies to determine photolesions in defined regions of the genome. The picture that emerges from these studies is blurred and rather complex. Fibroblasts and terminally differentiated myocytes of the rat heart display equally efficient GGR of 6-4PP but poor repair of CPD due to the absence of p48 expression. This repair phenotype is clearly different from human terminal differentiated neurons. Furthermore, both cell types were found to carry out TCR of CPD, thus mimicking the repair phenotype of established rodent cell lines. In contrast, in intact rat spermatogenic cells repair was very inefficient at the genome overall level and in transcriptionally active genes indicating that GGR and TCR are non-functional. Also, non-differentiated mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells exhibit low levels of NER after UV irradiation. However, the mechanisms that lead to low NER activity are clearly different: in differentiated spermatogenic cells differences in chromatin compaction and sequestering of NER proteins may underlie the lack of NER activity in pre-meiotic cells, whereas in non-differentiated ES cells NER is impaired by a strong apoptotic response.

  19. Repair of Segmental Load-Bearing Bone Defect by Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Plasma-Derived Fibrin Impregnated Ceramic Block Results in Early Recovery of Limb Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hwei Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes have not been used to repair load-bearing bone defects due to their weak mechanical property. In this study, we reevaluated the functional outcomes of combining ceramic block with osteogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma (TEB to repair critical-sized segmental tibial defect. Comparisons were made with fresh marrow-impregnated ceramic block (MIC and partially demineralized allogeneic bone block (ALLO. Six New Zealand White female rabbits were used in each study group and three rabbits with no implants were used as negative controls. By Day 90, 4/6 rabbits in TEB group and 2/6 in ALLO and MIC groups resumed normal gait pattern. Union was achieved significantly faster in TEB group with a radiological score of 4.50 ± 0.78 versus ALLO (1.06 ± 0.32, MIC (1.28 ± 0.24, and negative controls (0. Histologically, TEB group scored the highest percentage of new bone (82% ± 5.1% compared to ALLO (5% ± 2.5% and MIC (26% ± 5.2%. Biomechanically, TEB-treated tibiae achieved the highest compressive strength (43.50 ± 12.72 MPa compared to those treated with ALLO (15.15 ± 3.57 MPa and MIC (23.28 ± 6.14 MPa. In conclusion, TEB can repair critical-sized segmental load-bearing bone defects and restore limb function.

  20. Transplantation of an LGR6+ Epithelial Stem Cell-Enriched Scaffold for Repair of Full-Thickness Soft-Tissue Defects: The In Vitro Development of Polarized Hair-Bearing Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Denver M; Wetter, Nathan; Madsen, Christopher; Reichensperger, Joel; Cosenza, Nicole; Cox, Lisa; Harrison, Carrie; Neumeister, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    Recent literature has shown that full-thickness wounds, devoid of the stem cell niche, can subsequently be reconstructed with functional skin elements following migration of the LGR6 epithelial stem cell into the wound bed. In this study, the authors use a variety of LGR6 epithelial stem cell-seeded scaffolds to determine therapeutic utility and regenerative potential in the immediate reconstruction of full-thickness wounds. Isolated LGR6 epithelial stem cells were seeded onto a spectrum of acellular matrices and monitored in both in vitro and in vivo settings to determine their relative capacity to regenerate tissues and heal wounds. Wound beds containing LGR6 stem cell-seeded scaffolds showed significantly augmented rates of healing, epithelialization, and hair growth compared with controls. Gene and proteomic expression studies indicate that LGR6 stem cell-seeded constructs up-regulate WNT, epidermal growth factor, and angiogenesis pathways. Finally, the addition of stromal vascular fraction to LGR6 stem cell-seeded constructs induces polarized tissue formation, nascent hair growth, and angiogenesis within wounds. LGR6 stem cells are able to undergo proliferation, differentiation, and migration following seeding onto a variety of collagen-based scaffolding. In addition, deployment of these constructs induces epithelialization, hair growth, and angiogenesis within wound beds. The addition of stromal vascular fraction to LGR6 stem cell-containing scaffolds initiated an early form of tissue polarization, providing for the first time a clinically applicable stem cell-based construct that is capable of the repair of full-thickness wounds and hair regeneration. Therapeutic, V.

  1. Transplantation of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite scaffold improves bone repair in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Wang, Jun; Huang, Jian; Huang, Fang; Fu, Jianhong; Yang, Xinjing; Miao, Zongning

    2014-11-01

    The main requirements for successful tissue engineering of the bone are non-immunogenic cells with osteogenic potential and a porous biodegradable scaffold. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of a silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite (SF/HA) porous material as a delivery vehicle for human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs) in a rabbit radius defect model. In this study, we randomly assigned 16 healthy adult New Zealand rabbits into two groups, subjected to transplantation with either SF/HA and PMSCs (experimental group) or SF/HA alone (control group). To evaluate fracture healing, we assessed the extent of graft absorption, the quantity of newly formed bone, and re-canalization of the cavitas medullaris using radiographic and histological tools. We performed flow cytometric analysis to characterize PMSCs, and found that while they express CD90, CD105 and CD73, they stain negative for HLA-DR and the hematopoietic cell surface markers CD34 and CD45. When PMSCs were exposed to osteogenic induction medium, they secreted calcium crystals that were identified by von Kossa staining. Furthermore, when seeded on the surface of SF/HA scaffold, they actively secreted extracellular matrix components. Here, we show, through radiographic and histological analyses, that fracture healing in the experimental group is significantly improved over the control group. This strongly suggests that transplantation of human PMSCs grown in an SF/HA scaffold into injured radius segmental bone in rabbits, can markedly enhance tissue repair. Our finding provides evidence supporting the utility of human placenta as a potential source of stem cells for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Improvement in the repair of defects in maxillofacial soft tissue in irradiated minipigs by a mixture of adipose-derived stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanzheng; Niu, Zhanguo; Xue, Yan; Yuan, Fukang; Fu, Yanjie; Bai, Nan

    2014-10-01

    To find out if adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), alone or combined, had any effect on the repair of maxillofacial soft tissue defects in irradiated minipigs, ASC were isolated, characterised, and expanded. Twenty female minipigs, the right parotid glands of which had been irradiated, were randomly divided into 4 groups of 5 each: those in the first group were injected with both ASC and PRF (combined group), the second group was injected with ASC alone (ASC group), the third group with PRF alone (PRF group), and the fourth group with phosphate buffer saline (PBS) (control group). Six months after the last injection, the size and depth of each defect were assessed, and subcutaneous tissues were harvested, stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and examined immunohistologically and for apoptosis. Expanded cells were successfully isolated and identified. Six months after injection the defects in the 3 treated groups were significantly smaller (p<0.001) and shallower (p<0.001) than those in the control group. Those in the combined group were the smallest and shallowest. Haematoxylin and eosin showed that the 3 treated groups contained more subcutaneous adipose tissue than the control group, and also had significantly greater vascular density (p<0.001) and fewer apoptotic cells (p<0.001). Both ASC and PRF facilitate the repair of defects in maxillofacial soft tissue in irradiated minipigs, and their combined use is more effective than their use as single agents. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Does an Injection of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Loaded in Fibrin Glue Influence Rotator Cuff Repair Outcomes? A Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sang; Sung, Chang Hun; Chung, Sung Hoon; Kwak, Sang Joon; Koh, Yong Gon

    2017-07-01

    The mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based tissue engineering approach has been developed to improve the treatment of rotator cuff tears. Hypothesis/Purpose: The purpose was to determine the effect of an injection of adipose-derived MSCs loaded in fibrin glue during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair on clinical outcomes and to evaluate its effect on structural integrity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hypothesis was that the application of adipose-derived MSCs would improve outcomes after the surgical repair of a rotator cuff tear. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Among 182 patients treated with arthroscopic surgery for a rotator cuff tear, 35 patients treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair alone (conventional group) were matched with 35 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with an injection of adipose-derived MSCs loaded in fibrin glue (injection group) based on sex, age, and lesion size. Outcomes were assessed with respect to the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, range of motion (ROM) (including forward flexion, external rotation at the side, and internal rotation at the back), and functional measures of the Constant score and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale. Repaired tendon structural integrity was assessed by using MRI at a minimum of 12 months after surgery, and the mean clinical follow-up was 28.8 ± 4.2 months in the conventional group and 28.3 ± 3.8 months in the injection group. The mean VAS score at rest and during motion improved significantly in both groups after surgery. However, there were no significant differences between the groups at the final follow-up ( P = .256 and .776, respectively). Compared with preoperative measurements, forward flexion and external rotation at the side significantly improved at the final follow-up in both groups (all P rotation at the back were observed in either group ( P = .625 and .834 for the conventional and injection groups, respectively

  4. Stem Cell Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dah-Jiun; Miller, Andrew D; Southard, Teresa L; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Ellenson, Lora H; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2018-01-24

    Rapid advances in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have opened new opportunities for better understanding disease pathogenesis and the development of new diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment approaches. Many stem cell niches are well defined anatomically, thereby allowing their routine pathological evaluation during disease initiation and progression. Evaluation of the consequences of genetic manipulations in stem cells and investigation of the roles of stem cells in regenerative medicine and pathogenesis of various diseases such as cancer require significant expertise in pathology for accurate interpretation of novel findings. Therefore, there is an urgent need for developing stem cell pathology as a discipline to facilitate stem cell research and regenerative medicine. This review provides examples of anatomically defined niches suitable for evaluation by diagnostic pathologists, describes neoplastic lesions associated with them, and discusses further directions of stem cell pathology.

  5. Hardwiring Stem Cell Communication through Tissue Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianchi; Greco, Valentina; Myung, Peggy

    2016-03-10

    Adult stem cells across diverse organs self-renew and differentiate to maintain tissue homeostasis. How stem cells receive input to preserve tissue structure and function largely relies on their communication with surrounding cellular and non-cellular elements. As such, how tissues are organized and patterned not only reflects organ function, but also inherently hardwires networks of communication between stem cells and their environment to direct tissue homeostasis and injury repair. This review highlights how different methods of stem cell communication reflect the unique organization and function of diverse tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hardwiring stem cell communication through tissue structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianchi; Greco, Valentina; Myung, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells across diverse organs self-renew and differentiate to maintain tissue homeostasis. How stem cells receive input to preserve tissue structure and function largely relies on their communication with surrounding cellular and non-cellular elements. As such, how tissues are organized and patterned not only reflects organ function but also inherently hardwires networks of communication between stem cells and their environment to direct tissue homeostasis and injury repair. This review highlights how different methods of stem cell communication reflect the unique organization and function of diverse tissues. PMID:26967287

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells and their conditioned medium can enhance the repair of uterine defects in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hong Ho

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated that transplantation of MSCs could enhance uterine defect repair by paracrine effects involving IL-6, which are findings that may be applied to facilitate uterine wound healing in the removal of huge intramural masses.

  8. Cellular Mechanisms of Somatic Stem Cell Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yunjoon

    2014-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity rely on rare populations of somatic stem cells endowed with the potential to self-renew and differentiate. During aging, many tissues show a decline in regenerative potential coupled with a loss of stem cell function. Cells including somatic stem cells have evolved a series of checks and balances to sense and repair cellular damage to maximize tissue function. However, during aging the mechanisms that protect normal cell function begin to fail. In this review, we will discuss how common cellular mechanisms that maintain tissue fidelity and organismal lifespan impact somatic stem cell function. We will highlight context-dependent changes and commonalities that define aging, by focusing on three age-sensitive stem cell compartments: blood, neural, and muscle. Understanding the interaction between extrinsic regulators and intrinsic effectors that operate within different stem cell compartments is likely to have important implications for identifying strategies to improve health span and treat age-related degenerative diseases. PMID:24439814

  9. Cetuximab modified collagen scaffold directs neurogenesis of injury-activated endogenous neural stem cells for acute spinal cord injury repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Zhao, Yannan; Cheng, Shixiang; Han, Sufang; Shu, Muya; Chen, Bing; Chen, Xuyi; Tang, Fengwu; Wang, Nuo; Tu, Yue; Wang, Bin; Xiao, Zhifeng; Zhang, Sai; Dai, Jianwu

    2017-08-01

    Studies have shown that endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs) activated by spinal cord injury (SCI) primarily generate astrocytes to form glial scar. The NSCs do not differentiate into neurons because of the adverse microenvironment. In this study, we defined the activation timeline of endogenous NSCs in rats with severe SCI. These injury-activated NSCs then migrated into the lesion site. Cetuximab, an EGFR signaling antagonist, significantly increased neurogenesis in the lesion site. Meanwhile, implanting cetuximab modified linear ordered collagen scaffolds (LOCS) into SCI lesion sites in dogs resulted in neuronal regeneration, including neuronal differentiation, maturation, myelination, and synapse formation. The neuronal regeneration eventually led to a significant locomotion recovery. Furthermore, LOCS implantation could also greatly decrease chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) deposition at the lesion site. These findings suggest that endogenous neurogenesis following acute complete SCI is achievable in species ranging from rodents to large animals via functional scaffold implantation. LOCS-based Cetuximab delivery system has a promising therapeutic effect on activating endogenous neurogenesis, reducing CSPGs deposition and improving motor function recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Weft-knitted silk-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) mesh scaffold combined with collagen matrix and seeded with mesenchymal stem cells for rabbit Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyuan; Yang, Yadong; Zhang, Keji; Li, Ying; Fang, Guojian

    2015-02-01

    Natural silk fibroin fiber scaffolds have excellent mechanical properties, but degrade slowly. In this study, we used poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, 10:90) fibers to adjust the overall degradation rate of the scaffolds and filled them with collagen to reserve space for cell growth. Silk fibroin-PLGA (36:64) mesh scaffolds were prepared using weft-knitting, filled with type I collagen, and incubated with rabbit autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These scaffold-cells composites were implanted into rabbit Achilles tendon defects. At 16 weeks after implantation, morphological and histological observations showed formation of tendon-like tissues that expressed type I collagen mRNA and a uniformly dense distribution of collagen fibers. The maximum load of the regenerated Achilles tendon was 58.32% of normal Achilles tendon, which was significantly higher than control group without MSCs. These findings suggest that it is feasible to construct tissue engineered tendon using weft-knitted silk fibroin-PLGA fiber mesh/collagen matrix seeded with MSCs for rabbit Achilles tendon defect repair.

  11. Hypoxia precondition promotes adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells based repair of diabetic erectile dysfunction via augmenting angiogenesis and neuroprotection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XiYou Wang

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine whether hypoxia preconditioning could improve therapeutic effects of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs for diabetes induced erectile dysfunction (DED. AMSCs were pretreated with normoxia (20% O2, N-AMSCs or sub-lethal hypoxia (1% O2, H-AMSCs. The hypoxia exposure up-regulated the expression of several angiogenesis and neuroprotection related cytokines in AMSCs, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and its receptor FIK-1, angiotensin (Ang-1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and its CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4. DED rats were induced via intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg and were randomly divided into three groups-Saline group: intracavernous injection with phosphate buffer saline; N-AMSCs group: N-AMSCs injection; H-AMSCs group: H-AMSCs injection. Ten rats without any treatment were used as normal control. Four weeks after injection, the mean arterial pressure (MAP and intracavernosal pressure (ICP were measured. The contents of endothelial, smooth muscle, dorsal nerve in cavernoursal tissue were assessed. Compared with N-AMSCs and saline, intracavernosum injection of H-AMSCs significantly raised ICP and ICP/MAP (p<0.05. Immunofluorescent staining analysis demonstrated that improved erectile function by MSCs was significantly associated with increased expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF (p<0.01 and smooth muscle markers (α-SMA (p<0.01. Meanwhile, the expression of nNOS was also significantly higher in rats receiving H-AMSCs injection than those receiving N-AMSCs or saline injection. The results suggested that hypoxic preconditioning of MSCs was an effective approach to enhance their therapeutic effect for DED, which may be due to their augmented angiogenesis and neuroprotection.

  12. DNA repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Kusano, I.; Furuno-Fukushi, I.; Dunn, W.C. Jr.; Francis, A.A.; Lee, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    Our primary objective is to elucidate the molecular events in human cells when cellular macromolecules such as DNA are damaged by radiation or chemical agents. We study and characterize (i) the sequence of DNA repair events, (ii) the various modalities of repair, (iii) the genetic inhibition of repair due to mutation, (iv) the physiological inhibition of repair due to mutation, (v) the physiological inhibition of repair due to biochemical inhibitors, and (vi) the genetic basis of repair. Our ultimate goals are to (i) isolate and analyze the repair component of the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic event in human cells, and (ii) elucidate the magnitude and significance of this repair component as it impinges on the practical problems of human irradiation or exposure to actual or potential chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The significance of these studies lies in (i) the ubiquitousness of repair (most organisms, including man, have several complex repair systems), (ii) the belief that mutagenic and carcinogenic events may arise only from residual (nonrepaired) lesions or that error-prone repair systems may be the major induction mechanisms of the mutagenic or carcinogenic event, and (iii) the clear association of repair defects and highly carcinogenic disease states in man [xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  13. Overexpression of c-Met in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells improves their effectiveness in homing and repair of acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Li, Yuwen; Zhu, Tiantian; Zhang, Yongting; Li, Wenting; Lin, Wenyu; Li, Jun; Zhu, Chuanlong

    2017-07-05

    Transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) has emerged as a novel therapy for acute liver failure (ALF). However, the homing efficiency of BMSCs to the injured liver sites appears to be poor. In this study, we aimed to determine if overexpression of c-Met in BMSCs could promote the homing ability of BMSCs to rat livers affected by ALF. Overexpression of c-Met in BMSCs (c-Met-BMSCs) was attained by transfection of naive BMSCs with the lenti-c-Met-GFP. The impact of transplanted c-Met-BMSCs on both homing and repair of ALF was evaluated and compared with lenti-GFP empty vector transfected BMSCs (control BMSCs). After cells were transfected with the lenti-c-Met-GFP vector, the BMSCs displayed very high expression of c-Met protein as demonstrated by Western blot. In addition, in vitro transwell migration assays showed that the migration ability of c-Met-BMSCs was significantly increased in comparison with that of control BMSCs (P liver; this was accompanied by elevated survival rates and liver function in the ALF rats. Parallel pathological examination further confirmed that transplantation of c-Met-BMSCs ameliorated liver injury with reduced hepatic activity index (HAI) scores, and that the effects of c-Met-BMSCs were more profound than those of control BMSCs. Overexpression of c-Met promotes the homing of BMSCs to injured hepatic sites in a rat model of ALF, thereby improving the efficacy of BMSC therapy for ALF repair.

  14. TOB1 Deficiency Enhances the Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Tendon-Bone Healing in a Rat Rotator Cuff Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulei Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study investigated the effect of silencing TOB1 (Transducer of ERBB2, 1 expression in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on MSC-facilitated tendon-bone healing in a rat supraspinatus repair model. Methods: Rat MSCs were transduced with a recombinant lentivirus encoding short hairpin RNA (shRNA against TOB1. MSC cell proliferation was analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. The effect of MSCs with TOB1 deficiency on tendon-bone healing in a rat rotator cuff repair model was evaluated by biomechanical testing, histological analysis and collagen type I and II gene expression. An upstream regulator (miR-218 of TOB1 was determined in MSCs. Results: We found that knockdown of TOB1 significantly increased the proliferative activity of rat MSCs in vitro. When MSCs with TOB1 deficiency were injected into injured rat supraspinatus tendon-bone junctions, the effect on tendon-bone healing was enhanced compared to treatment with control MSCs with normal TOB1 expression, as evidenced by elevated levels of ultimate load to failure and stiffness, increased amount of fibrocartilage and augmented expression of collagen type I and type II genes. In addition, we found that the TOB1 3′ untranslated region is a direct target of miR-218. Similar to the effect of TOB1 deficiency, overexpression of miR-218 effectively promoted tendon-bone healing in rat. Conclusion: These results suggest that TOB1 may play a negative role in the effect of MSCs on tendon-bone healing, and imply that expression of TOB1 may be regulated by miR-218.

  15. Stem cell-based approaches in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TA Mitsiadis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Repair of dental pulp and periodontal lesions remains a major clinical challenge. Classical dental treatments require the use of specialised tissue-adapted materials with still questionable efficacy and durability. Stem cell-based therapeutic approaches could offer an attractive alternative in dentistry since they can promise physiologically improved structural and functional outcomes. These therapies necessitate a sufficient number of specific stem cell populations for implantation. Dental mesenchymal stem cells can be easily isolated and are amenable to in vitro expansion while retaining their stemness. In vivo studies realised in small and large animals have evidenced the potential of dental mesenchymal stem cells to promote pulp and periodontal regeneration, but have also underlined new important challenges. The homogeneity of stem cell populations and their quality control, the delivery method, the quality of the regenerated dental tissues and their integration to the host tissue are some of the key challenges. The use of bioactive scaffolds that can elicit effective tissue repair response, through activation and mobilisation of endogenous stem cell populations, constitutes another emerging therapeutic strategy. Finally, the use of stem cells and induced pluripotent cells for the regeneration of entire teeth represents a novel promising alternative to dental implant treatment after tooth loss. In this mini-review, we present the currently applied techniques in restorative dentistry and the various attempts that are made to bridge gaps in knowledge regarding treatment strategies by translating basic stem cell research into the dental practice.

  16. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  17. Tissue-specific designs of stem cell hierarchies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visvader, Jane E.; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in the field of stem cell biology suggests that there is no single design for an adult tissue stem cell hierarchy, and that different tissues employ distinct strategies to meet their self-renewal and repair requirements. Stem cells may be multipotent or unipotent, and can exist in

  18. Tissue-specific designs of stem cell hierarchies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visvader, Jane E; Clevers, Hans

    Recent work in the field of stem cell biology suggests that there is no single design for an adult tissue stem cell hierarchy, and that different tissues employ distinct strategies to meet their self-renewal and repair requirements. Stem cells may be multipotent or unipotent, and can exist in

  19. Hematopoietic stem cells : Self-renewing or aging?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, G

    2002-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by their extensive self-renewal properties, and yet there is abundant evidence of erosion of stem cell functioning during aging. Whereas intracellular repair and protection mechanisms determine the lifespan of an individual cell, here an argument is made that somatic stem

  20. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  1. Impact of genomic damage and ageing on stem cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Axel; van Deursen, Jan M.; Rudolph, K. Lenhard; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Impairment of stem cell function contributes to the progressive deterioration of tissue maintenance and repair with ageing. Evidence is mounting that age-dependent accumulation of DNA damage in both stem cells and cells that comprise the stem cell microenvironment are partly responsible for stem cell dysfunction with ageing. Here, we review the impact of the various types of DNA damage that accumulate with ageing on stem cell functionality, as well as the development of cancer. We discuss DNA-damage-induced cell intrinsic and extrinsic alterations that influence these processes, and review recent advances in understanding systemic adjustments to DNA damage and how they affect stem cells. PMID:24576896

  2. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to

  3. Dazlin' pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM) of blastocyst embryos and differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro. However, despite their similar origin, mouse embryonic stem cells represent a more naïve ICM-like pluripotent state whereas human

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ian A.; Sanina, Cristina; Balkan, Wayne; Hare, Joshua M.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for more deaths globally than any other single disease. There are on average 1.5 million episodes of myocardial infarction (heart attack) each year in the United States alone with roughly one third resulting in death. There is therefore a major need for developing new and effective strategies to promote cardiac repair. Intramyocardial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a leading contender in the pursuit of clinical intervention and therapy. MSCs are potent mediators of cardiac repair and are therefore an attractive tool in the development of pre-clinical and clinical trials. MSCs are capable of secreting a large array of soluble factors, which have had demonstrated effects on pathogenic cardiac remolding, fibrosis, immune activation and cardiac stem cell proliferation within the damaged heart. MSCs are also capable of differentiation into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, although the relative contribution of trilineage differentiation and paracrine effectors on cardiac repair remains the subject of active investigation. PMID:27236666

  5. Nonclinical safety strategies for stem cell therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Michaela E., E-mail: michaela_sharpe@yahoo.com [Investigative Toxicology, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Ltd, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, CT13 9NJ (United Kingdom); Morton, Daniel [Exploratory Drug Safety, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc, Cambridge, 02140 (United States); Rossi, Annamaria [Investigative Toxicology, Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Ltd, Ramsgate Road, Sandwich, CT13 9NJ (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology, especially the development of the induced pluripotent stem cell techniques, have generated tremendous enthusiasm and efforts to explore the therapeutic potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies are being considered for the treatment of degenerative diseases, inflammatory conditions, cancer and repair of damaged tissue. The safety of a stem cell therapy depends on many factors including the type of cell therapy, the differentiation status and proliferation capacity of the cells, the route of administration, the intended clinical location, long term survival of the product and/or engraftment, the need for repeated administration, the disease to be treated and the age of the population. Understanding the product profile of the intended therapy is crucial to the development of the nonclinical safety study design.

  6. Nonclinical safety strategies for stem cell therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, Michaela E.; Morton, Daniel; Rossi, Annamaria

    2012-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology, especially the development of the induced pluripotent stem cell techniques, have generated tremendous enthusiasm and efforts to explore the therapeutic potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies are being considered for the treatment of degenerative diseases, inflammatory conditions, cancer and repair of damaged tissue. The safety of a stem cell therapy depends on many factors including the type of cell therapy, the differentiation status and proliferation capacity of the cells, the route of administration, the intended clinical location, long term survival of the product and/or engraftment, the need for repeated administration, the disease to be treated and the age of the population. Understanding the product profile of the intended therapy is crucial to the development of the nonclinical safety study design.

  7. Stem Cell Therapy: An emerging science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Muhammad M.

    2007-01-01

    The research on stem cells is advancing knowledge about the development of an organism from a single cell and to how healthy cells replace damaged cells in adult organisms. Stem cell therapy is emerging rapidly nowadays as a technical tool for tissue repair and replacement. The purpose of this review to provide a framework of understanding for the challenges behind translating fundamental stem cell biology and its potential use into clinical therapies, also to give an overview on stem cell research to the scientists of Saudi Arabia in general. English language MEDLINE publications from 1980 through January 2007 for experimental, observational and clinical studies having relation with stem cells with different diseases were reviewed. Approximately 85 publications were reviewed based on the relevance, strength and quality of design and methods, 36 publications were selected for inclusion. Stem cells reside in a specific area of each tissue where they may remain undivided for several years until they are activated by disease or tissue injury. The embryonic stem cells are typically derived from four or five days old embryos and they are pluripotent. The adult tissues reported to contain stem cells brain, bone marrow, peripheral blood, blood vessels, skeletal muscle, skin and liver. The promise of stem cell therapies is an exciting one, but significant technical hurdles remain that will only be overcome through years of intensive research. (author)

  8. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells repaired but did not prevent gentamicin-induced acute kidney injury through paracrine effects in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana A Reis

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs or their conditioned medium (CM on the repair and prevention of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI induced by gentamicin (G. Animals received daily injections of G up to 20 days. On the 10(th day, injections of BMSCs, CM, CM+trypsin, CM+RNase or exosome-like microvesicles extracted from the CM were administered. In the prevention groups, the animals received the BMSCs 24 h before or on the 5(th day of G treatment. Creatinine (Cr, urea (U, FENa and cytokines were quantified. The kidneys were evaluated using hematoxylin/eosin staining and immunohystochemistry. The levels of Cr, U and FENa increased during all the periods of G treatment. The BMSC transplantation, its CM or exosome injections inhibited the increase in Cr, U, FENa, necrosis, apoptosis and also increased cell proliferation. The pro-inflammatory cytokines decreased while the anti-inflammatory cytokines increased compared to G. When the CM or its exosomes were incubated with RNase (but not trypsin, these effects were blunted. The Y chromosome was not observed in the 24-h prevention group, but it persisted in the kidney for all of the periods analyzed, suggesting that the injury is necessary for the docking and maintenance of BMSCs in the kidney. In conclusion, the BMSCs and CM minimized the G-induced renal damage through paracrine effects, most likely through the RNA carried by the exosome-like microvesicles. The use of the CM from BMSCs can be a potential therapeutic tool for this type of nephrotoxicity, allowing for the avoidance of cell transplantations.

  9. Cancer stem cells revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batlle, Eduard; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept was proposed four decades ago, and states that tumor growth, analogous to the renewal of healthy tissues, is fueled by small numbers of dedicated stem cells. It has gradually become clear that many tumors harbor CSCs in dedicated niches, and yet their

  10. Donating Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print this page My Cart Donating peripheral blood stem cells Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is a nonsurgical procedure to collect ... Donating bone marrow Donor experiences videos Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is one of two methods of ...

  11. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth / For Teens / Stem Cell Transplants What's ... Take to Recover? Coping Print What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  12. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  13. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roccio, M.; Goumans, M. J.; Sluijter, J. P. G.; Doevendans, P. A.

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new

  14. VARIATIONS IN RADIATION SENSITIVITY AND REPAIR AMONG DIFFERENT HEMATOPOIETIC STEM-CELL SUBSETS FOLLOWING FRACTIONATED-IRRADIATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOWN, JD; BOUDEWIJN, A; VANOS, R; THAMES, HD; PLOEMACHER, RE

    1995-01-01

    The radiation dose-survival of various hematopoietic cell subsets in murine bone marrow (BM) was determined in the cobblestone area forming cell (CAFC) assay under conditions of single-, split-, and multiple-dose irradiation. A greater recovery in cell survival with decreasing dose per fraction, or

  15. What is a stem cell?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Jonathan M W

    2018-05-15

    The historical roots of the stem cell concept are traced with respect to its usage in embryology and in hematology. The modern consensus definition of stem cells, comprising both pluripotent stem cells in culture and tissue-specific stem cells in vivo, is explained and explored. Methods for identifying stem cells are discussed with respect to cell surface markers, telomerase, label retention and transplantability, and properties of the stem cell niche are explored. The CreER method for identifying stem cells in vivo is explained, as is evidence in favor of a stochastic rather than an obligate asymmetric form of cell division. In conclusion, it is found that stem cells do not possess any unique and specific molecular markers; and stem cell behavior depends on the environment of the cell as well as the stem cell's intrinsic qualities. Furthermore, the stochastic mode of division implies that stem cell behavior is a property of a cell population not of an individual cell. In this sense, stem cells do not exist in isolation but only as a part of multicellular system. This article is categorized under: Adult Stem Cells, Tissue Renewal, and Regeneration > Tissue Stem Cells and Niches Adult Stem Cells, Tissue Renewal, and Regeneration > Methods and Principles Adult Stem Cells, Tissue Renewal, and Regeneration > Environmental Control of Stem Cells. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Muscle Stem Cells: A Model System for Adult Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelison, Ddw; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells, originally termed satellite cells for their position adjacent to differentiated muscle fibers, are absolutely required for the process of skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last decade, satellite cells have become one of the most studied adult stem cell systems and have emerged as a standard model not only in the field of stem cell-driven tissue regeneration but also in stem cell dysfunction and aging. Here, we provide background in the field and discuss recent advances in our understanding of muscle stem cell function and dysfunction, particularly in the case of aging, and the potential involvement of muscle stem cells in genetic diseases such as the muscular dystrophies.

  17. Targeted inactivation of integrin-linked kinase in hair follicle stem cells reveals an important modulatory role in skin repair after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Rudkouskaya, Alena; Irvine, Timothy S; D'Souza, Sudhir J A; Dagnino, Lina

    2011-07-15

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is key for normal epidermal morphogenesis, but little is known about its role in hair follicle stem cells and epidermal regeneration. Hair follicle stem cells are important contributors to newly formed epidermis following injury. We inactivated the Ilk gene in the keratin 15--expressing stem cell population of the mouse hair follicle bulge. Loss of ILK expression in these cells resulted in impaired cutaneous wound healing, with substantially decreased wound closure rates. ILK-deficient stem cells produced very few descendants that moved toward the epidermal surface and into the advancing epithelium that covers the wound. Furthermore, those few mutant cells that homed in the regenerated epidermis exhibited a reduced residence time. Paradoxically, ILK-deficient bulge stem cells responded to anagen growth signals and contributed to newly regenerated hair follicles during this phase of hair follicle growth. Thus ILK plays an important modulatory role in the normal contribution of hair follicle stem cell progeny to the regenerating epidermis following injury.

  18. Stem cell plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmipathy, Uma; Verfaillie, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The central dogma in stem cell biology has been that cells isolated from a particular tissue can renew and differentiate into lineages of the tissue it resides in. Several studies have challenged this idea by demonstrating that tissue specific cell have considerable plasticity and can cross-lineage restriction boundary and give rise to cell types of other lineages. However, the lack of a clear definition for plasticity has led to confusion with several reports failing to demonstrate that a single cell can indeed differentiate into multiple lineages at significant levels. Further, differences between results obtained in different labs has cast doubt on some results and several studies still await independent confirmation. In this review, we critically evaluate studies that report stem cell plasticity using three rigid criteria to define stem cell plasticity; differentiation of a single cell into multiple cell lineages, functionality of differentiated cells in vitro and in vivo, robust and persistent engraft of transplanted cells.

  19. Effect of Transplanting Various Concentrations of a Composite of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel on Articular Cartilage Repair in a Rabbit Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Beom Park

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are known to have therapeutic potential for cartilage repair. However, the optimal concentration of MSCs for cartilage repair remains unclear. Therefore, we aimed to explore the feasibility of cartilage repair by human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs and to determine the optimal concentrations of the MSCs in a rabbit model.Osteochondral defects were created in the trochlear groove of femur in 55 rabbits. Four experimental groups (11 rabbits/group were treated by transplanting the composite of hUCB-MSCs and HA with various MSCs concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 x 107 cells/ml. One control group was left untreated. At 4, 8, and 16 weeks post-transplantation, the degree of cartilage repair was evaluated grossly and histologically.Overall, transplanting hUCB-MSCs and HA hydrogel resulted in cartilage repair tissue with better quality than the control without transplantation (P = 0.015 in 0.1, P = 0.004 in 0.5, P = 0.004 in 1.0, P = 0.132 in 1.5 x 107 cells/ml. Interestingly, high cell concentration of hUCB-MSCs (1.5×107 cells/ml was inferior to low cell concentrations (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 x 107 cells/ml in cartilage repair (P = 0.394,P = 0.041, P = 0.699, respectively. The 0.5 x 107 cells/ml group showed the highest cartilage repair score at 4, 8 and 16 weeks post transplantation, and followed by 0.1x107 cells/ml group or 1.0 x 107 cell/ml group.The results of this study suggest that transplantation of the composite of hUCB-MSCs and HA is beneficial for cartilage repair. In addition, this study shows that optimal MSC concentration needs to be determined for better cartilage repair.

  20. The Role of Recipient T Cells in Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in stem cell biology, regenerative medicine, and stem cell-based tissue engineering. Such scientific strides highlight the potential of replacing or repairing damaged tissues in congenital abnormalities, diseases, or injuries, as well as constructing functional tissue or organs in vivo. Since mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of differentiating into bone-forming cells, they constitute an appropriate cell source to repair damaged bone tissues. In addi...

  1. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Stimulate Cartilage Regeneration and Are Safe for Single-Stage Cartilage Repair in Humans upon Mixture with Recycled Autologous Chondrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Windt, Tommy S; Vonk, Lucienne A; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke C M; van den Broek, Marcel P H; Nizak, Razmara; van Rijen, Mattie H P; de Weger, Roel A; Dhert, Wouter J A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10261847X; Saris, Daniel B F

    Traditionally, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from adult bone marrow were described as being capable of differentiating to various lineages including cartilage. Despite increasing interest in these MSCs, concerns regarding their safety, in vivo behavior and clinical effectiveness have

  2. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Stimulate Cartilage Regeneration and Are Safe for Single-Stage Cartilage Repair in Humans upon Mixture with Recycled Autologous Chondrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Windt, Tommy S.; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke C.M.; den Broek, Marcel P. H; Nizak, Razmara; van Rijen, Mattie H.P.; de Weger, Roel A.; Dhert, Wouter J.A.; Saris, Daniel B.F.

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from adult bone marrow were described as being capable of differentiating to various lineages including cartilage. Despite increasing interest in these MSCs, concerns regarding their safety, in vivo behavior and clinical effectiveness have

  3. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mead

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC. Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs, MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC, adipose tissues (ADSC and dental pulp (DPSC, together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment.

  4. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Ben; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Scott, Robert A H; Leadbeater, Wendy; Scheven, Ben A

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs) and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs), MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC), adipose tissues (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC), together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Repair of Traumatic Skeletal Muscle Injury with Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Seeded on Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    expressing full length dystrophin can complement Duchenne muscular dystrophy myotubes by cell fusion. Hum Mol Genet 15, 213, 2006. 52. Pittenger, M.F., et al... muscle , and vascular tissue, that are necessary for viable muscular regeneration after muscle defect injury.29–32 Cells from the bone marrow are known to...3,3-diaminobenzidine. Muscular infiltration into the ECM was further confirmed by immunofluorescent staining for the muscle -specific cyto- skeleton

  6. Delivery of bioactive lipids from composite microgel-microsphere injectable scaffolds enhances stem cell recruitment and skeletal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anusuya; Barker, Daniel A; Wang, Tiffany; Lau, Cheryl M; Lin, Yong; Botchwey, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a microgel composed of chitosan and inorganic phosphates was used to deliver poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) microspheres loaded with sphingolipid growth factor FTY720 to critical size cranial defects in Sprague Dawley rats. We show that sustained release of FTY720 from injected microspheres used alone or in combination with recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP2) improves defect vascularization and bone formation in the presence and absence of rhBMP2 as evaluated by quantitative microCT and histological measurements. Moreover, sustained delivery of FTY720 from PLAGA and local targeting of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors reduces CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltration, promotes endogenous recruitment of CD29+CD90+ bone progenitor cells and enhances the efficacy of rhBMP2 from chitosan microgels. Companion in vitro studies suggest that selective activation of sphingosine receptor subtype-3 (S1P3) via FTY720 treatment induces smad-1 phosphorylation in bone-marrow stromal cells. Additionally, FTY720 enhances stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) mediated chemotaxis of CD90+CD11B-CD45- bone progenitor cells in vitro after stimulation with rhBMP2. We believe that use of such small molecule delivery formulations to recruit endogenous bone progenitors may be an attractive alternative to exogenous cell-based therapy.

  7. Delivery of bioactive lipids from composite microgel-microsphere injectable scaffolds enhances stem cell recruitment and skeletal repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusuya Das

    Full Text Available In this study, a microgel composed of chitosan and inorganic phosphates was used to deliver poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAGA microspheres loaded with sphingolipid growth factor FTY720 to critical size cranial defects in Sprague Dawley rats. We show that sustained release of FTY720 from injected microspheres used alone or in combination with recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP2 improves defect vascularization and bone formation in the presence and absence of rhBMP2 as evaluated by quantitative microCT and histological measurements. Moreover, sustained delivery of FTY720 from PLAGA and local targeting of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P receptors reduces CD45+ inflammatory cell infiltration, promotes endogenous recruitment of CD29+CD90+ bone progenitor cells and enhances the efficacy of rhBMP2 from chitosan microgels. Companion in vitro studies suggest that selective activation of sphingosine receptor subtype-3 (S1P3 via FTY720 treatment induces smad-1 phosphorylation in bone-marrow stromal cells. Additionally, FTY720 enhances stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 mediated chemotaxis of CD90+CD11B-CD45- bone progenitor cells in vitro after stimulation with rhBMP2. We believe that use of such small molecule delivery formulations to recruit endogenous bone progenitors may be an attractive alternative to exogenous cell-based therapy.

  8. Bony defect repair in rabbit using hybrid rapid prototyping polylactic co glycolic acid/β tricalciumphosphate collagen I/apatite scaffold and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Pang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In bone tissue engineering, extracellular matrix exerts critical influence on cellular interaction with porous biomaterial and the apatite playing an important role in the bonding process of biomaterial to bone tissue. The aim of this study was to observe the therapeutic effects of hybrid rapid prototyping (RP scaffolds comprising polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, β-tricalciumphosphate (β-TCP, collagen I and apatite (PLGA/β-TCP-collagen I/apatite on segmental bone defects in conjunction with combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs. Materials and Methods: BMSCs were seeded into the hybrid RP scaffolds to repair 15 mm defect in the radius of rabbits. Radiograph, microcomputed tomography and histology were used to evaluate new bone formation. Results: Radiographic analysis done from 12 to 36 weeks postoperative period demonstrated that new bone formed at the radial defect site and continues to increase until the medullary cavity is recanalized and remodelling is complete. The bone defect remained unconnected in the original RP scaffolds (PLGA/β-TCP during the whole study. Histological observations conformed to the radiographic images. In hybrid RP scaffold group, woven bone united the radial defect at 12 weeks and consecutively remodeled into lamellar bone 24 weeks postoperation and finally matured into cortical bone with normal marrow cavity after another 12 weeks. No bone formation but connective tissue has been detected in RP scaffold at the same time. Conclusion: Collagen I/apatite sponge composite coating could improve new bone formation in vivo. The hybrid RP scaffold of PLGA/β-TCP skeleton with collagen I/apatite sponge composite coating is a promising candidate for bone tissue engineering.

  9. Stem Cells for Skeletal Muscle Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelic, Molly N; Larkin, Lisa M

    2018-04-19

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) is a debilitating condition wherein muscle loss overwhelms the body's normal physiological repair mechanism. VML is particularly common among military service members who have sustained war injuries. Because of the high social and medical cost associated with VML and suboptimal current surgical treatments, there is great interest in developing better VML therapies. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering (SMTE) is a promising alternative to traditional VML surgical treatments that use autogenic tissue grafts, and rather uses isolated stem cells with myogenic potential to generate de novo skeletal muscle tissues to treat VML. Satellite cells are the native precursors to skeletal muscle tissue, and are thus the most commonly studied starting source for SMTE. However, satellite cells are difficult to isolate and purify, and it is presently unknown whether they would be a practical source in clinical SMTE applications. Alternative myogenic stem cells, including adipose-derived stem cells, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, perivascular stem cells, umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and embryonic stem cells, each have myogenic potential and have been identified as possible starting sources for SMTE, although they have yet to be studied in detail for this purpose. These alternative stem cell varieties offer unique advantages and disadvantages that are worth exploring further to advance the SMTE field toward highly functional, safe, and practical VML treatments. The following review summarizes the current state of satellite cell-based SMTE, details the properties and practical advantages of alternative myogenic stem cells, and offers guidance to tissue engineers on how alternative myogenic stem cells can be incorporated into SMTE research.

  10. Myeloproliferative neoplasm stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Adam J; Mullally, Ann

    2017-03-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) arise in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment as a result of the acquisition of somatic mutations in a single HSC that provides a selective advantage to mutant HSC over normal HSC and promotes myeloid differentiation to engender a myeloproliferative phenotype. This population of somatically mutated HSC, which initiates and sustains MPNs, is termed MPN stem cells. In >95% of cases, mutations that drive the development of an MPN phenotype occur in a mutually exclusive manner in 1 of 3 genes: JAK2 , CALR , or MPL The thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, is the key cytokine receptor in MPN development, and these mutations all activate MPL-JAK-STAT signaling in MPN stem cells. Despite common biological features, MPNs display diverse disease phenotypes as a result of both constitutional and acquired factors that influence MPN stem cells, and likely also as a result of heterogeneity in the HSC in which MPN-initiating mutations arise. As the MPN clone expands, it exerts cell-extrinsic effects on components of the bone marrow niche that can favor the survival and expansion of MPN stem cells over normal HSC, further sustaining and driving malignant hematopoiesis. Although developed as targeted therapies for MPNs, current JAK2 inhibitors do not preferentially target MPN stem cells, and as a result, rarely induce molecular remissions in MPN patients. As the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the clonal dominance of MPN stem cells advances, this will help facilitate the development of therapies that preferentially target MPN stem cells over normal HSC. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalz, Philip G.R.; Shen, Michael J.; Park, John K.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed

  12. Three-dimensional printed PLA scaffold and human gingival stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles: a new tool for bone defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomede, Francesca; Gugliandolo, Agnese; Cardelli, Paolo; Merciaro, Ilaria; Ettorre, Valeria; Traini, Tonino; Bedini, Rossella; Scionti, Domenico; Bramanti, Alessia; Nanci, Antonio; Caputi, Sergio; Fontana, Antonella; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2018-04-13

    The role of bone tissue engineering in the field of regenerative medicine has been a main research topic over the past few years. There has been much interest in the use of three-dimensional (3D) engineered scaffolds (PLA) complexed with human gingival mesenchymal stem cells (hGMSCs) as a new therapeutic strategy to improve bone tissue regeneration. These devices can mimic a more favorable endogenous microenvironment for cells in vivo by providing 3D substrates which are able to support cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. The present study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo capability of bone defect regeneration of 3D PLA, hGMSCs, extracellular vesicles (EVs), or polyethyleneimine (PEI)-engineered EVs (PEI-EVs) in the following experimental groups: 3D-PLA, 3D-PLA + hGMSCs, 3D-PLA + EVs, 3D-PLA + EVs + hGMSCs, 3D-PLA + PEI-EVs, 3D-PLA + PEI-EVs + hGMSCs. The structural parameters of the scaffold were evaluated using both scanning electron microscopy and nondestructive microcomputed tomography. Nanotopographic surface features were investigated by means of atomic force microscopy. Scaffolds showed a statistically significant mass loss along the 112-day evaluation. Our in vitro results revealed that both 3D-PLA + EVs + hGMSCs and 3D-PLA + PEI-EVs + hGMSCs showed no cytotoxicity. However, 3D-PLA + PEI-EVs + hGMSCs exhibited greater osteogenic inductivity as revealed by morphological evaluation and transcriptomic analysis performed by next-generation sequencing (NGS). In addition, in vivo results showed that 3D-PLA + PEI-EVs + hGMSCs and 3D-PLA + PEI-EVs scaffolds implanted in rats subjected to cortical calvaria bone tissue damage were able to improve bone healing by showing better osteogenic properties. These results were supported also by computed tomography evaluation that revealed the repair of bone calvaria damage. The re-establishing of the integrity of the bone lesions could be a

  13. 3K3A-activated protein C stimulates postischemic neuronal repair by human neural stem cells in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yaoming; Zhao, Zhen; Rege, Sanket V

    2016-01-01

    -APC (Lys191-193Ala) mutant in which three Lys residues (KKK191-193) were replaced with alanine, and/or its other mutants with reduced (>90%) anticoagulant activity, engineered to reduce APC-associated bleeding risk while retaining normal cell-signaling activity, have shown benefits in preclinical models...... of ischemic stroke, brain trauma, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, sepsis, ischemic and reperfusion injury of heart, kidney and liver, pulmonary, kidney and gastrointestinal inflammation, diabetes and lethal body radiation. On the basis of proof-of-concept studies and an excellent safety...

  14. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  15. Mammary gland stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Petersen, Ole W; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Distinct subsets of cells, including cells with stem cell-like properties, have been proposed to exist in normal human breast epithelium and breast carcinomas. The cellular origins of epithelial cells contributing to gland development, tissue homeostasis and cancer are, however, still poorly...... and differences between mouse and human gland development with particular emphasis on the identity and localization of stem cells, and the influence of the surrounding microenvironment. It is concluded that while recent advances in the field have contributed immense insight into how the normal mammary gland...... develops and is maintained, significant discrepancies exist between the mouse and human gland which should be taken into consideration in current and future models of mammary stem cell biology....

  16. Stem cell heterogeneity revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne S; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    The skin forms a protective, water-impermeable barrier consisting of heavily crosslinked epithelial cells. However, the specific role of stem cells in sustaining this barrier remains a contentious issue. A detailed analysis of the interfollicular epidermis now proposes a model for how a composite...... of cells with different properties are involved in its maintenance....

  17. SIGNALING PATHWAYS ASSOCIATED WITH VX EXPOSURE IN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Director, ECBC, ATTN: RDCB-DRB-D, APG, MD 21010-5424 Excet, Inc., 8001 Braddock Road , Suite 303...Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells that are key regulators of tissue maintenance and repair. These cells have been identified in...adipocytes) and play a significant role in tissue maintenance and repair (15, 16). MSCs have been shown to be capable of self-renewal and can be maintained

  18. A new source of mesenchymal stem cells for articular cartilage repair: MSCs derived from mobilized peripheral blood share similar biological characteristics in vitro and chondrogenesis in vivo as MSCs from bone marrow in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-Li; Zhou, Chun-Yan; Yu, Jia-Kuo

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow (BM) has been considered as a major source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but it has many disadvantages in clinical application. However, MSCs from peripheral blood (PB) could be obtained by a less invasive method and be more beneficial for autologous transplantation than BM MSCs, which makes PB a promising source for articular cartilage repair in clinical use. To assess whether MSCs from mobilized PB of New Zealand White rabbits have similar biological characteristics in vitro and chondrogenesis in vivo as BM MSCs. Controlled laboratory study. A combined method of drug administration containing granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) plus CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 was adopted to mobilize the PB stem cells of adult New Zealand White rabbits in vitro. The isolated cells were identified as MSCs by morphological characteristics, surface markers, and differentiation potentials. A comparison between PB MSCs and BM MSCs was made in terms of biological characteristics in vitro and chondrogenesis in vivo. This issue was investigated from the aspects of morphology, immune phenotype, multiple differentiation capacity, expansion potential, antiapoptotic capacity, and ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo of PB MSCs compared with BM MSCs. Peripheral blood MSCs were successfully mobilized by the method of combined drug administration, then isolated, expanded, and identified in vitro. No significant difference was found concerning the morphology, immune phenotype, and antiapoptotic capacity between PB MSCs and BM MSCs. Significantly, MSCs from both sources compounded with decalcified bone matrix showed the same ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo. For multipluripotency, BM MSCs exhibited a more osteogenic potential and higher proliferation capacity than PB MSCs, whereas PB MSCs possessed a stronger adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential than BM MSCs in vitro. Although there are some differences in the proliferation and

  19. Isolation, Characterization, and Differentiation of Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Beane, Olivia S.; Darling, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of tissue engineering is to create a functional replacement for tissues damaged by injury or disease. In many cases, impaired tissues cannot provide viable cells, leading to the investigation of stem cells as a possible alternative. Cartilage, in particular, may benefit from the use of stem cells since the tissue has low cellularity and cannot effectively repair itself. To address this need, researchers are investigating the chondrogenic capabilities of several multipotent stem cell ...

  20. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic

  1. Stem cell research: applicability in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Shivani; Chopra, Rahul; Pandit, I K; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    In the face of extraordinary advances in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases, the inability of most tissues and organs to repair and regenerate after damage is a problem that needs to be solved. Stem cell research is being pursued in the hope of achieving major medical breakthroughs. Scientists are striving to create therapies that rebuild or replace damaged cells with tissues grown from stem cells that will offer hope to people suffering from various ailments. Regeneration of damaged periodontal tissue, bone, pulp, and dentin is a problem that dentists face today. Stem cells present in dental pulp, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone marrow have the potential to repair and regenerate teeth and periodontal structures. These stem cells can be harvested from dental pulp, periodontal ligament, and/or alveolar bone marrow; expanded; embedded in an appropriate scaffold; and transplanted back into a defect to regenerate bone and tooth structures. These cells have the potential to regenerate dentin, periodontal ligament, and cementum and can also be used to restore bone defects. The kind of scaffold, the source of cells, the type of in vitro culturing, and the type of surgical procedure to be used all require careful consideration. The endeavor is clearly multidisciplinary in nature, and the practicing dental surgeon has a critical role in it. Playing this role in the most effective way requires awareness of the huge potential associated with the use of stem cells in a clinical setting, as well as a proper understanding of the related problems.

  2. Biomechanics of stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, A. A.; Yuan, D.; Somers, S.; Grayson, W. L.

    2018-04-01

    Stem cells play a key role in the healthy development and maintenance of organisms. They are also critically important in medical treatments of various diseases. It has been recently demonstrated that the mechanical factors such as forces, adhesion, stiffness, relaxation, etc. have significant effects on stem cell functions. Under physiological conditions, cells (stem cells) in muscles, heart, and blood vessels are under the action of externally applied strains. We consider the stem cell microenvironment and performance associated with their conversion (differentiation) into skeletal muscle cells. Two problems are studied by using mathematical models whose parameters are then optimized by fitting experiments. First, we present our analysis of the process of stem cell differentiation under the application of cyclic unidirectional strain. This process is interpreted as a transition through several (six) stages where each of them is defined in terms of expression of a set of factors typical to skeletal muscle cells. The stem cell evolution toward muscle cells is described by a system of nonlinear ODEs. The parameters of the model are determined by fitting the experimental data on the time course of expression of the factors under consideration. Second, we analyse the mechanical (relaxation) properties of a scaffold that serves as the microenvironment for stem cells differentiation into skeletal muscle cells. This scaffold (surrounded by a liquid solution) is composed of unidirectional fibers with pores between them. The relaxation properties of the scaffold are studied in an experiment where a long cylindrical specimen is loaded by the application of ramp displacement until the strain reaches a prescribed value. The magnitude of the corresponding load is recorded. The specimen is considered as transversely isotropic poroelastic cylinder whose force relaxation is associated with liquid diffusion through the pores. An analytical solution for the total force applied to

  3. Repair of the myocardium infarct, with intracoronary implant of mother cells (stem cells) precocious improvement of the ventricular function and the ischemy (first reports of the TECELCOR report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Vina, Roberto; Vrsalovic, Francisco; Andrin, Oberdan and others

    2004-01-01

    Twenty patients who suffered extensive anterior myocardial infarction with an evolution of 5 to 72 hours were submitted to a primary PTCA with Stent. The ventricular ejection fraction oscillated between 21 to 30% in correlation to the bidimensional echocardiography. Between the 7th and 12th day, mononuclear CD 34(+) and CD 38(-) cells extracted from the patient's bone marrow were implanted through the anterior descendent coronary artery, with occlusion of the anterior coronary vein, in an average amount of 22 x 10 P6. echocardiographic controls were performed each 7 days until 60 days, noticing a progressive increment in the ejection fraction (EF) from 25 to 45% in the first 60 days, and an improvement of the EF up to 80% after 90 days. Between 90 and 120 days after, a coronary ventriculography was performed, and the permeability of all the implanted stents and an improvement of the EF up to 80% with respect to the basal EF, were observed. The Spect studies were negative with negative ergonometry at 700 kgm. This group of patients was comparing red with 16 patients who were submitted only to primary PTCA with Stent. They had an increase of only 45% of the EF respect to the basal one in the next 90 days and 12 % presented restenosis. Stems cells implant improves the left ventricular performance after a myocardial infarction and it seems to avoid the coronary post-restenosis

  4. Nanotechnology in the regulation of stem cell behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, King-Chuen; Tseng, Ching-Li; Wu, Chi-Chang; Wang, Yang-Kao; Kao, Feng-Chen; Tu, Yuan-Kun; C So, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are known for their potential to repair damaged tissues. The adhesion, growth and differentiation of stem cells are likely controlled by the surrounding microenvironment which contains both chemical and physical cues. Physical cues in the microenvironment, for example, nanotopography, were shown to play important roles in stem cell fate decisions. Thus, controlling stem cell behavior by nanoscale topography has become an important issue in stem cell biology. Nanotechnology has emerged as a new exciting field and research from this field has greatly advanced. Nanotechnology allows the manipulation of sophisticated surfaces/scaffolds which can mimic the cellular environment for regulating cellular behaviors. Thus, we summarize recent studies on nanotechnology with applications to stem cell biology, including the regulation of stem cell adhesion, growth, differentiation, tracking and imaging. Understanding the interactions of nanomaterials with stem cells may provide the knowledge to apply to cell–scaffold combinations in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. (review)

  5. Gastric stem cells and gastric cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Myoung-Eun; Oh, Sae-Ock

    2013-01-01

    The gastric epithelium is continuously regenerated by gastric stem cells, which give rise to various kinds of daughter cells, including parietal cells, chief cells, surface mucous cells, mucous neck cells, and enteroendocrine cells. The self-renewal and differentiation of gastric stem cells need delicate regulation to maintain the normal physiology of the stomach. Recently, it was hypothesized that cancer stem cells drive the cancer growth and metastasis. In contrast to conventional clonal ev...

  6. Stem Cell Antigen-1 in Skeletal Muscle Function

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, Harold S.; Samad, Tahmina; Cholsiripunlert, Sompob; Khalifian, Saami; Gong, Wenhui; Ritner, Carissa; Aurigui, Julian; Ling, Vivian; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Bennett, Stephen; Hoffman, Julien; Oishi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is a member of the Ly-6 multigene family encoding highly homologous, glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. Sca-1 is expressed on muscle-derived stem cells and myogenic precursors recruited to sites of muscle injury. We previously reported that inhibition of Sca-1 expression stimulated myoblast proliferation in vitro and regulated the tempo of muscle repair in vivo. Despite its function in myoblast expansion during muscle repair, a role for Sca-1...

  7. Effects of Transplanted Heparin-Poloxamer Hydrogel Combining Dental Pulp Stem Cells and bFGF on Spinal Cord Injury Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Lihua; Albashari, Abdullkhaleg Ali; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jin, Ling; Zhang, Yanni; Zheng, Lina; Xia, Jianjian; Xu, Helin; Zhao, Yingzheng; Xiao, Jian; He, Yan; Ye, Qingsong

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of serious traumatic diseases of the central nervous system and has no effective treatment because of its complicated pathophysiology. Tissue engineering strategy which contains scaffolds, cells, and growth factors can provide a promising treatment for SCI. Hydrogel that has 3D network structure and biomimetic microenvironment can support cellular growth and embed biological macromolecules for sustaining release. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), derived from cra...

  8. Reduction of microhemorrhages in the spinal cord of symptomatic ALS mice after intravenous human bone marrow stem cell transplantation accompanies repair of the blood-spinal cord barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J.; Steiner, George; Mahendrasah, Ajay; Sanberg, Paul R.; Kurien, Crupa; Thomson, Avery; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2018-01-01

    Blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) alterations, including capillary rupture, have been demonstrated in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ALS patients. To date, treatment to restore BSCB in ALS is underexplored. Here, we evaluated whether intravenous transplantation of human bone marrow CD34+ (hBM34+) cells into symptomatic ALS mice leads to restoration of capillary integrity in the spinal cord as determined by detection of microhemorrhages. Three different doses of hBM34+ cells (5 × 104, 5 × 105 or 1 × 106) or media were intravenously injected into symptomatic G93A SOD1 mice at 13 weeks of age. Microhemorrhages were determined in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords of mice at 4 weeks post-treatment, as revealed by Perls’ Prussian blue staining for ferric iron. Numerous microhemorrhages were observed in the gray and white matter of the spinal cords in media-treated mice, with a greater number of capillary ruptures within the ventral horn of both segments. In cell-treated mice, microhemorrhage numbers in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords were inversely related to administered cell doses. In particular, the pervasive microvascular ruptures determined in the spinal cords in late symptomatic ALS mice were significantly decreased by the highest cell dose, suggestive of BSCB repair by grafted hBM34+ cells. The study results provide translational outcomes supporting transplantation of hBM34+ cells at an optimal dose as a potential therapeutic strategy for BSCB repair in ALS patients. PMID:29535831

  9. Stem cell self-renewal in intestinal crypt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, B.D.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    As a rapidly cycling tissue capable of fast repair and regeneration, the intestinal epithelium has emerged as a favored model system to explore the principles of adult stem cell biology. However, until recently, the identity and characteristics of the stem cell population in both the small intestine

  10. Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Burn Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0024 TITLE: Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Burn Wound Healing PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Carl Schulman, MD, PhD, MSPH...NUMBER Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Burn Wound Healing 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Carl Schulman, MD, PhD, MSPH...treatments, steroid injections, and compression garments. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC’s) have been used in a variety of clinical applications to repair

  11. The Promise and Perils of Stem Cell Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Daley, George Q.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are the seeds of tissue repair and regeneration and a promising source for novel therapies. However, apart from hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation for hematologic disease, essentially all other stem cell treatments remain experimental. High hopes have inspired numerous clinical trials, but it has been difficult to obtain unequivocal evidence for robust clinical benefit, likely owing to our primitive state of knowledge about therapeutic mechanisms. Outside the standard cl...

  12. Advancing Stem Cell Biology toward Stem Cell Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Scadden, David; Srivastava, Alok

    2012-01-01

    Here, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Clinical Translation Committee introduces a series of articles outlining the current status, opportunities, and challenges surrounding the clinical translation of stem cell therapeutics for specific medical conditions.

  13. Stem Cells in Burn Eschar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, V. C.; Vlig, M.; van Milligen-Kummer, F.J.; de Vries, S.I.; Middelkoop, E.; Ulrich, M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares mesenchymal cells isolated from excised burn wound eschar with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and dermal fibroblasts in their ability to conform to the requirements for multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). A population of multipotent stem cells in burn eschar could be an

  14. Stem cell organization in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendrich, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of plant tissues and organs depends on continuous production of new cells, by niches of stem cells. Stem cells typically divide to give rise to one differentiating daughter and one non-differentiating daughter. This constant process of self-renewal ensures that the niches of stem cells or

  15. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells, early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium, using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration, timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury, single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications.

  16. Stem cell therapy for diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K O Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy holds immense promise for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Recent advances in stem cell therapy may turn this into a realistic treatment for diabetes in the near future.

  17. Engineering stem cell niches in bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Meimei; Liu, Ning; Zang, Ru; Li, Yan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and amniotic fluid stem cells have the potential to be expanded and differentiated into various cell types in the body. Efficient differentiation of stem cells with the desired tissue-specific function is critical for stem cell-based cell therapy, tissue engineering, drug discovery and disease modeling. Bioreactors provide a great platform to regulate the stem cell microenvironment, known as “ni...

  18. Microencapsulation of Stem Cells for Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Shirae K; Kinney, Ramsey C; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2017-01-01

    An increasing demand to regenerate tissues from patient-derived sources has led to the development of cell-based therapies using autologous stem cells, thereby decreasing immune rejection of scaffolds coupled with allogeneic stem cells or allografts. Adult stem cells are multipotent and are readily available in tissues such as fat and bone marrow. They possess the ability to repair and regenerate tissue through the production of therapeutic factors, particularly vasculogenic proteins. A major challenge in cell-based therapies is localizing the delivered stem cells to the target site. Microencapsulation of cells provides a porous polymeric matrix that can provide a protected environment, localize the cells to one area, and maintain their viability by enabling the exchange of nutrients and waste products between the encapsulated cells and the surrounding tissue. In this chapter, we describe a method to produce injectable microbeads containing a tunable number of stem cells using the biopolymer alginate. The microencapsulation process involves extrusion of the alginate suspension containing cells from a microencapsulator, a syringe pump to control its flow rate, an electrostatic potential to overcome capillary forces and a reduced Ca ++ cross-linking solution containing a nutrient osmolyte, to form microbeads. This method allows the encapsulated cells to remain viable up to three weeks in culture and up to three months in vivo and secrete growth factors capable of supporting tissue regeneration.

  19. Clonal analysis of stem cells in differentiation and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colom, Bartomeu; Jones, Philip H

    2016-12-01

    Tracking the fate of individual cells and their progeny by clonal analysis has redefined the concept of stem cells and their role in health and disease. The maintenance of cell turnover in adult tissues is achieved by the collective action of populations of stem cells with an equal likelihood of self-renewal or differentiation. Following injury stem cells exhibit striking plasticity, switching from homeostatic behavior in order to repair damaged tissues. The effects of disease states on stem cells are also being uncovered, with new insights into how somatic mutations trigger clonal expansion in early neoplasia. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Fake news portrayals of stem cells and stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alessandro R; Murdoch, Blake; Caulfield, Timothy

    2017-10-01

    This study examines how stem cells and stem cell research are portrayed on websites deemed to be purveyors of distorted and dubious information. Content analysis was conducted on 224 articles from 2015 to 2016, compiled by searching with the keywords 'stem cell(s)' on a list of websites flagged for containing either 'fake' or 'junk science' news. Articles contained various exaggerated positive and negative claims about stem cells and stem cell science, health and science related conspiracy theories, and statements promoting fear and mistrust of conventional medicine. Findings demonstrate the existence of organized misinformation networks, which may lead the public away from accurate information and facilitate a polarization of public discourse.

  1. Stem cell self-renewal in intestinal crypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, Benjamin D.; Clevers, Hans

    2011-01-01

    As a rapidly cycling tissue capable of fast repair and regeneration, the intestinal epithelium has emerged as a favored model system to explore the principles of adult stem cell biology. However, until recently, the identity and characteristics of the stem cell population in both the small intestine and colon has remained the subject of debate. Recent studies based on targeted lineage tracing strategies, combined with the development of an organotypic culture system, have identified the crypt base columnar cell as the intestinal stem cell, and have unveiled the strategy by which the balance between proliferation and differentiation is maintained. These results show that intestinal stem cells operate in a dynamic environment in which frequent and stochastic stem cell loss is compensated by the proliferation of neighboring stem cells. We review the basis of these experimental findings and the insights they offer into the mechanisms of homeostatic stem cell regulation.

  2. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases.As células-tronco têm uma infinidade de implicações clínicas no pulmão. Este artigo é uma revisão crítica que inclui estudos clínicos e experimentais advindos do banco de dados do MEDLINE e SciElo nos últimos 10 anos, onde foram destacados os efeitos da terapia celular na síndrome do desconforto respiratório agudo ou doenças mais crônicas, como fibrose pulmonar e enfisema. Apesar de muitos estudos demonstrarem os efeitos benéficos das células-tronco no desenvolvimento, reparo e remodelamento pulmonar; algumas questões ainda precisam ser respondidas para um melhor entendimento dos mecanismos que controlam a divisão celular e diferenciação, permitindo o uso da terapia celular nas doenças respiratórias.

  3. Some applications of nanotechnologies in stem cells research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belicchi, M.; Cancedda, R.; Cedola, A.; Fiori, F.; Gavina, M.; Giuliani, A.; Komlev, V.S.; Lagomarsino, S.; Mastrogiacomo, M.; Renghini, C.; Rustichelli, F.

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell based tissue engineering therapies involve the administration of ex vivo manipulated stem cell populations with the purpose of repairing and regenerating damaged or diseased tissue. Currently available methods of monitoring transplanted cells are quite limited. To monitor the outcomes of stem cell therapy longitudinally requires the development of non-destructive strategies that are capable of identifying the location, magnitude, and duration of cellular survival and fate. The recent development of imaging techniques offers great potential to address these critical issues by non-invasively tracking the fate of the transplanted cells. This review offers a focused presentation of some examples of the use of imaging techniques connected to the nanotechnological world in research areas related to stem cells. In particular investigations will be considered concerning tissue-engineered bone, treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration, treatment by human stem cells of muscular dystrophy of Duchenne in small animal models and the repair of spinal cord injuries.

  4. Some applications of nanotechnologies in stem cells research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belicchi, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico di Milano, Via Francesco Sforza, Milano 20122 (Italy); Cancedda, R. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro and Dipartimento di Oncologia Biologia e Genetica - Universita di Genova, Largo R. Benzi 10, Genova 16132 (Italy); Cedola, A. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cinto Romano 42, Roma 00156 (Italy); Fiori, F. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Gavina, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico di Milano, Via Francesco Sforza, Milano 20122 (Italy); Giuliani, A. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Komlev, V.S. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); Institute for Physical Chemistry of Ceramics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ozernaya 48, 119361 Moscow (Russian Federation); Lagomarsino, S. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Via Cinto Romano 42, Roma 00156 (Italy); Mastrogiacomo, M. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro and Dipartimento di Oncologia Biologia e Genetica - Universita di Genova, Largo R. Benzi 10, Genova 16132 (Italy); Renghini, C. [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy); Rustichelli, F., E-mail: f.rustichelli@univpm.i [Dipartimento S.A.I.F.E.T. Sezione di Scienze Fisiche - Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, Ancona 60131 (Italy); INBB - Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi (Italy); CNISM - Matec (Ancona) (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Stem cell based tissue engineering therapies involve the administration of ex vivo manipulated stem cell populations with the purpose of repairing and regenerating damaged or diseased tissue. Currently available methods of monitoring transplanted cells are quite limited. To monitor the outcomes of stem cell therapy longitudinally requires the development of non-destructive strategies that are capable of identifying the location, magnitude, and duration of cellular survival and fate. The recent development of imaging techniques offers great potential to address these critical issues by non-invasively tracking the fate of the transplanted cells. This review offers a focused presentation of some examples of the use of imaging techniques connected to the nanotechnological world in research areas related to stem cells. In particular investigations will be considered concerning tissue-engineered bone, treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration, treatment by human stem cells of muscular dystrophy of Duchenne in small animal models and the repair of spinal cord injuries.

  5. Porcine embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2008-01-01

    The development of porcine embryonic stem cell lines (pESC) has received renewed interest given the advances being made in the production of immunocompatible transgenic pigs. However, difficulties are evident in the production of pESCs in-vitro. This may largely be attributable to differences...

  6. Epidermal stem cells response to radiative genotoxic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Human skin is the first organ exposed to various environmental stresses, which requires the development by skin stem cells of specific mechanisms to protect themselves and to ensure tissue homeostasis. As stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of epidermis during individual lifetime, the preservation of genomic integrity in these cells is essential. My PhD aimed at exploring the mechanisms set up by epidermal stem cells in order to protect themselves from two genotoxic stresses, ionizing radiation (Gamma Rays) and ultraviolet radiation (UVB). To begin my PhD, I have taken part of the demonstration of protective mechanisms used by keratinocyte stem cells after ionizing radiation. It has been shown that these cells are able to rapidly repair most types of radiation-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this repair is activated by the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). In order to know if this protective mechanism is also operating in cutaneous carcinoma stem cells, we investigated the response to gamma Rays of carcinoma stem cells isolated from a human carcinoma cell line. As in normal keratinocyte stem cells, we demonstrated that cancer stem cells could rapidly repair radio-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factor 2 also mediates this repair, notably thanks to its nuclear isoforms. The second project of my PhD was to study human epidermal stem cells and progenitors responses to UVB radiation. Once cytometry and irradiation conditions were set up, the toxicity of UVB radiation has been evaluate in the primary cell model. We then characterized UVB photons effects on cell viability, proliferation and repair of DNA damage. This study allowed us to bring out that responses of stem cells and their progeny to UVB are different, notably at the level of part of their repair activity of DNA damage. Moreover, progenitors and stem cells transcriptomic responses after UVB irradiation have been study in order to analyze the global

  7. Spermatogonial stem cell renewal following irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1979-05-01

    The spermatogonial cell renewal system can maintain function and a steady level of cell population for relatively long periods of continuous low-level irradiation indicating that there does not appear to be a serious accumulation, over many generations, of damage affecting proliferation. Provided the dose-rate is quite low, there is an effective selective removal of damaged cells with almost complete repair of cellular nonlethal damage. At dose-rates greater than 2 rad/day, spermatogonia are very sensitive to radiation death, and the main reason for the low tolerance to continuous stress could, in part, be the limited extent of compensatory mechanisms regulating spermatogonial cell production. However, there is some capacity to change the patterns of cellular proliferation while still remaining under homeostatic control, and this capacity appears to reside in the relatively radioresistant A/sub s/ stem-cell population. Little is known about the extent to which the spermatogonial cell population can repair nonlethal cellular radiation damage accumulated under continuous stress affecting the regenerative capacity of the tissue. After acute exposure, a minimum number of surviving type A/sub s/ stem-cells are required to repopulate the functional seminiferous epithelium, regeneration proceeds along an ordered cell stage sequence, and is dependent on the time required for all stages from type A/sub s/ spermatogonia to mature spermatozoa. Under continuous irradiation, provided the dose-rate is not too high, the repopulating ability of the seminiferous epithelium is maintained, in the presence of injury, due to initial repair and long-term repair of cellular radiation damage. There is evidence for initial repair, since a dose-rate effect exists in type A survival, at low doses. Long-term repair occurs due to differential radiosensitivities of spermatogonia

  8. Facts about Stem Cells and Importance of Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumeh Saeidi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are undifferentiated biological cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and can divide (through mitosis to produce more stem cells. They are found in multicellular organisms. In mammals, there are two broad types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells, which are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and adult stem cells, which are found in various tissues. In adult organisms, stem cells and progenitor cells act as a repair system for the body, replenishing adult tissues. In a developing embryo, stem cells can differentiate into all the specialized cells—ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm (see induced pluripotent stem cells—but also maintain the normal turnover of regenerative organs, such as blood, skin, or intestinal tissues. There are three accessible sources of autologous adult stem cells in humans: Bone marrow, which requires extraction by harvesting, that is, drilling into bone (typically the femur or iliac crest, Adipose tissue (lipid cells, which requires extraction by liposuction, and Blood, which requires extraction through apheresis, wherein blood is drawn from the donor (similar to a blood donation, and passed through a machine that extracts the stem cells and returns other portions of the blood to the donor. Stem cells can also be taken from umbilical cord blood just after birth. Of all stem cell types, autologous harvesting involves the least risk. By definition, autologous cells are obtained from one's own body, just as one may bank his or her own blood for elective surgical procedures. Adult stem cells are frequently used in medical therapies, for example in bone marrow transplantation. Stem cells can now be artificially grown and transformed (differentiated into specialized cell types with characteristics consistent with cells of various tissues such as muscles or nerves. Embryonic cell lines and autologous embryonic stem cells generated through Somatic-cell nuclear transfer or dedifferentiation

  9. Materials as stem cell regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:24845994

  10. Stem cells in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruixia; Li, Junqin; Niu, Xuping; Liu, Ruifeng; Chang, Wenjuan; Zhao, Xincheng; Wang, Qiang; Li, Xinhua; Yin, Guohua; Zhang, Kaiming

    2017-06-01

    Psoriasis is a complex chronic relapsing inflammatory disease. Although the exact mechanism remains unknown, it is commonly accepted that the development of psoriasis is a result of multi-system interactions among the epidermis, dermis, blood vessels, immune system, neuroendocrine system, metabolic system, and hematopoietic system. Many cell types have been confirmed to participate in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Here, we review the stem cell abnormalities related to psoriasis that have been investigated recently. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... renowned stem cell and regenerative medicine community. More stem cell research Take a closer look Recent Blogs View ... story independent nonprofit organization & the voice of the stem cell research community The International Society for Stem Cell ...

  12. The Evolution of the Stem Cell Theory for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Menasché, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Various stem cell-based approaches for cardiac repair have achieved encouraging results in animal experiments, often leading to their rapid proceeding to clinical testing. However, freewheeling evolutionary developments of the stem cell theory might lead to dystopian scenarios where heterogeneous sources of therapeutic cells could promote mixed clinical outcomes in un-stratified patient populations. This review focuses on the lessons that should be learnt from the first generation of stem cell-based strategies and emphasizes the absolute requirement to better understand the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology and cardiogenesis. We will also discuss about the unexpected "big bang" in the stem cell theory, "blasting" the therapeutic cells to their unchallenged ability to release paracrine factors such as extracellular membrane vesicles. Paradoxically, the natural evolution of the stem cell theory for cardiac regeneration may end with the development of cell-free strategies with multiple cellular targets including cardiomyocytes but also other infiltrating or resident cardiac cells.

  13. Information on Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Current Research » Focus on Research Focus on Stem Cell Research Stem cells possess the unique ability to differentiate into ... virus infection. To search the complete list of stem cell research projects funded by NIH please go to NIH ...

  14. Regenerating the injured kidney with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Robbins, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of adult stem cells is being used to facilitate repair or regeneration of damaged or diseased tissues. However, in many cases, the therapeutic effects of the injected stem cells are mediated by factors secreted by stem cells and not by differentiation of the transplanted stem cells. Recent reports have identified a class of microvesicles, termed exosomes, released by stem cells that are able to confer therapeutic effects on injured renal and cardiac tissue. In this issue of St...

  15. Genetic modification of stem cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M Ian; Tang, Yao Liang

    2008-01-14

    Gene modification of cells prior to their transplantation, especially stem cells, enhances their survival and increases their function in cell therapy. Like the Trojan horse, the gene-modified cell has to gain entrance inside the host's walls and survive and deliver its transgene products. Using cellular, molecular and gene manipulation techniques the transplanted cell can be protected in a hostile environment from immune rejection, inflammation, hypoxia and apoptosis. Genetic engineering to modify cells involves constructing modules of functional gene sequences. They can be simple reporter genes or complex cassettes with gene switches, cell specific promoters and multiple transgenes. We discuss methods to deliver and construct gene cassettes with viral and non-viral delivery, siRNA, and conditional Cre/Lox P. We review the current uses of gene-modified stem cells in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurological diseases, (including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and spinal cord injury repair), bone defects, hemophilia, and cancer.

  16. The Need to Study, Mimic, and Target Stem Cell Niches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vishwakarma, Ajaykumar; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Jones, Peter Anthony; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Vishwakarma, Ajaykumar; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite important advances in tissue repair and regeneration over the past few decades, complete functional repair of damaged or diseased human tissues has remained elusive. Recent discoveries in stem cell niche molecular biology and biomaterials engineering may hold the key to true regeneration.

  17. Reduction of microhemorrhages in the spinal cord of symptomatic ALS mice after intravenous human bone marrow stem cell transplantation accompanies repair of the blood-spinal cord barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J; Steiner, George; Mahendrasah, Ajay; Sanberg, Paul R; Kurien, Crupa; Thomson, Avery; Borlongan, Cesar V; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2018-02-13

    Blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) alterations, including capillary rupture, have been demonstrated in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ALS patients. To date, treatment to restore BSCB in ALS is underexplored. Here, we evaluated whether intravenous transplantation of human bone marrow CD34 + (hBM34 + ) cells into symptomatic ALS mice leads to restoration of capillary integrity in the spinal cord as determined by detection of microhemorrhages. Three different doses of hBM34 + cells (5 × 10 4 , 5 × 10 5 or 1 × 10 6 ) or media were intravenously injected into symptomatic G93A SOD1 mice at 13 weeks of age. Microhemorrhages were determined in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords of mice at 4 weeks post-treatment, as revealed by Perls' Prussian blue staining for ferric iron. Numerous microhemorrhages were observed in the gray and white matter of the spinal cords in media-treated mice, with a greater number of capillary ruptures within the ventral horn of both segments. In cell-treated mice, microhemorrhage numbers in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords were inversely related to administered cell doses. In particular, the pervasive microvascular ruptures determined in the spinal cords in late symptomatic ALS mice were significantly decreased by the highest cell dose, suggestive of BSCB repair by grafted hBM34 + cells. The study results provide translational outcomes supporting transplantation of hBM34 + cells at an optimal dose as a potential therapeutic strategy for BSCB repair in ALS patients.

  18. Biodegradable Polymers and Stem Cells for Bioprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meijuan Lei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is imperative to develop organ manufacturing technologies based on the high organ failure mortality and serious donor shortage problems. As an emerging and promising technology, bioprinting has attracted more and more attention with its super precision, easy reproduction, fast manipulation and advantages in many hot research areas, such as tissue engineering, organ manufacturing, and drug screening. Basically, bioprinting technology consists of inkjet bioprinting, laser-based bioprinting and extrusion-based bioprinting techniques. Biodegradable polymers and stem cells are common printing inks. In the printed constructs, biodegradable polymers are usually used as support scaffolds, while stem cells can be engaged to differentiate into different cell/tissue types. The integration of biodegradable polymers and stem cells with the bioprinting techniques has provided huge opportunities for modern science and technologies, including tissue repair, organ transplantation and energy metabolism.

  19. Biodegradable Polymers and Stem Cells for Bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Meijuan; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-04-29

    It is imperative to develop organ manufacturing technologies based on the high organ failure mortality and serious donor shortage problems. As an emerging and promising technology, bioprinting has attracted more and more attention with its super precision, easy reproduction, fast manipulation and advantages in many hot research areas, such as tissue engineering, organ manufacturing, and drug screening. Basically, bioprinting technology consists of inkjet bioprinting, laser-based bioprinting and extrusion-based bioprinting techniques. Biodegradable polymers and stem cells are common printing inks. In the printed constructs, biodegradable polymers are usually used as support scaffolds, while stem cells can be engaged to differentiate into different cell/tissue types. The integration of biodegradable polymers and stem cells with the bioprinting techniques has provided huge opportunities for modern science and technologies, including tissue repair, organ transplantation and energy metabolism.

  20. Stem cell migration after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nothdurft, W.; Fliedner, T.M.

    1979-01-01

    The survival rate of irradiated rodents could be significantly improved by shielding only the small parts of hemopoietic tissues during the course of irradiation. The populations of circulating stem cells in adult organisms are considered to be of some importance for the homeostasis between the many sites of blood cell formation and for the necessary flexibility of hemopoietic response in the face of fluctuating demands. Pluripotent stem cells are migrating through peripheral blood as has been shown for several mammalian species. Under steady state conditions, the exchange of stem cells between the different sites of blood cell formation appears to be restricted. Their presence in blood and the fact that they are in balance with the extravascular stem cell pool may well be of significance for the surveilance of the integrity of local stem cell populations. Any decrease of stem cell population in blood below a critical size results in the rapid immigration of circulating stem cells in order to restore local stem cell pool size. Blood stem cells are involved in the regeneration after whole-body irradiation if the stem cell population in bone marrows is reduced to less than 10% of the normal state. In the animals subjected to partial-body irradiation, the circulating stem cells appear to be the only source for the repopulation of the heavily irradiated, aplastic sites of hemopoietic organs. (Yamashita, S.)

  1. Novel in vivo imaging techniques for trafficking the behavior of subventricular zone neural stem cells (SVZSC) and SVZSC induced functional repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anna-Liisa Brownell

    2003-11-28

    Adult progenitor cells hold promise for therapeutic treatment where there has been a disabling loss of function due to death of cells from trauma, disease or aging. However, it will be essential in clinical application to be able to follow the fate of the transplanted cells over time using in vivo tracking methods. We have developed protocol for labeling of progenitor cells to monitor cell trafficking by high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and super high resolution positron emission tomography (PET). We have transfected rat subventricular zone stem cells (SVZ, progenitor cell line) and another control cell line (PC12, pheochromocytoma cells) utilizing super paramagnetic iron oxide and poly-L-lysine complex for MR imaging or radiolabeling with 18F-fluor deoxy-D- glucose for PET imaging. The labeled cells were transplanted into the rostral migratory stream (RMS) or striatum of normal or 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Spraque-Dawley rats. Longitudinal MRI studies (up to 40 days) showed that transplantation site has significant impact to the fate of the cells; when SVZ cells were transplanted into the RMS, cells migrated several centimeter into the olfactory bulb; after transplantation into the striatum, the migration was minimal, only 2 mm. PC 12 cells grew a massive tumor after the striatal implantation and significantly smaller tumor after the RMS implantation. PET studies conducted immediately after transplantation verified the transplantation site. MRI studies were able to show the whole path of migration in one image, since part of the cells die during migration and will get detected because of iron content. Endpoint histological studies verified the cell survival and immunohistochemical studies revealed the differentiation of the transplanted cells into astrocytes and neurons.

  2. Novel in vivo imaging techniques for trafficking the behavior of subventricular zone neural stem cells (SVZSC) and SVZSC induced functional repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anna-Liisa Brownell

    2003-01-01

    Adult progenitor cells hold promise for therapeutic treatment where there has been a disabling loss of function due to death of cells from trauma, disease or aging. However, it will be essential in clinical application to be able to follow the fate of the transplanted cells over time using in vivo tracking methods. We have developed protocol for labeling of progenitor cells to monitor cell trafficking by high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and super high resolution positron emission tomography (PET). We have transfected rat subventricular zone stem cells (SVZ, progenitor cell line) and another control cell line (PC12, pheochromocytoma cells) utilizing super paramagnetic iron oxide and poly-L-lysine complex for MR imaging or radiolabeling with 18F-fluor deoxy-D- glucose for PET imaging. The labeled cells were transplanted into the rostral migratory stream (RMS) or striatum of normal or 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Spraque-Dawley rats. Longitudinal MRI studies (up to 40 days) showed that transplantation site has significant impact to the fate of the cells; when SVZ cells were transplanted into the RMS, cells migrated several centimeter into the olfactory bulb; after transplantation into the striatum, the migration was minimal, only 2 mm. PC 12 cells grew a massive tumor after the striatal implantation and significantly smaller tumor after the RMS implantation. PET studies conducted immediately after transplantation verified the transplantation site. MRI studies were able to show the whole path of migration in one image, since part of the cells die during migration and will get detected because of iron content. Endpoint histological studies verified the cell survival and immunohistochemical studies revealed the differentiation of the transplanted cells into astrocytes and neurons

  3. Legislation governing pluripotent stem cells in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pepper

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most exciting areas of medical research involves the use of stem cells for the treatment of patients with a variety of diseases and for tissue repair. Although stem cell research is accelerating rapidly in many countries, it has in the past been limited in South Africa (SA; very little has been done in this country to explore the great potential offered by stem cells to address the high disease burden. Stem cell therapy has however been practised for many years, in SA and worldwide, in the form of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, mainly for haematological malignancies. From a therapeutic perspective, two types of stem cells can be defined: pluripotent stem cells and adult stem cells. Pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts (either from in vitro fertilisation or following somatic cell nuclear transfer are called embryonic stem (ES cells, while those derived by reprogramming adult cells are called induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells. Adult stem cells include haematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells.The purpose of this article is to critically examine the SA legislation with regard to elements that impact on pluripotent stem cell research and the use of pluripotent stem cells for therapeutic purposes. This includes (but is not limited to legislation from the National Health Act (Chapter 8 in particular and its regulations, and deals with matters related to research on embryos in the stem cell context, somatic cell nuclear transfer, reproductive and therapeutic cloning and the generation and therapeutic use of iPS and ES cells.

  4. [Perinatal sources of stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskorska-Jasiulewicz, Magdalena Maria; Witkowska-Zimny, Małgorzata

    2015-03-08

    Recently, stem cell biology has become an interesting topic. Several varieties of human stem cells have been isolated and identified in vivo and in vitro. Successful application of hematopoietic stem cells in hematology has led to the search for other sources of stem cells and expanding the scale of their application. Perinatal stem cells are a versatile cell population, and they are interesting for both scientific and practical objectives. Stem cells from perinatal tissue may be particularly useful in the clinic for autologous transplantation for fetuses and newborns, and after banking in later stages of life, as well as for in utero transplantation in the case of genetic disorders. In this review paper we focus on the extraction and therapeutic potential of stem cells derived from perinatal tissues such as the placenta, the amnion, amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood and Wharton's jelly.

  5. Perinatal sources of stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Maria Piskorska-Jasiulewicz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, stem cell biology has become an interesting topic. Several varieties of human stem cells have been isolated and identified in vivo and in vitro. Successful application of hematopoietic stem cells in hematology has led to the search for other sources of stem cells and expanding the scale of their application. Perinatal stem cells are a versatile cell population, and they are interesting for both scientific and practical objectives. Stem cells from perinatal tissue may be particularly useful in the clinic for autologous transplantation for fetuses and newborns, and after banking in later stages of life, as well as for in utero transplantation in the case of genetic disorders. In this review paper we focus on the extraction and therapeutic potential of stem cells derived from perinatal tissues such as the placenta, the amnion, amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood and Wharton’s jelly.

  6. Embryos, Clones, and Stem Cells: A Scientific Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon S. Tweedell

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is intended to give the nonspecialist an insight into the nuances of “clones”, cloning, and stem cells. It distinguishes embryonic and adult stem cells, their normal function in the organism, their origin, and how they are recovered to produce stem cell lines in culture. As background, the fundamental processes of embryo development are reviewed and defined, since the manipulation of stem cell lines into desired specialized cells employs many of the same events. Stem cells are defined and characterized and shown how they function in the intact organism during early development and later during cell regeneration in the adult. The complexity of stem cell recovery and their manipulation into specific cells and tissue is illustrated by reviewing current experimentation on both embryonic and adult stem cells in animals and limited research on human stem cell lines. The current and projected use of stem cells for human diseases and repair, along with the expanding methodology for the recovery of human embryonic stem cells, is described. An assessment on the use of human embryonic stem cells is considered from ethical, legal, religious, and political viewpoints.

  7. Multifaceted Roles of Connexin 43 in Stem Cell Niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Nafiisha; Bhatt, Neha; Bourdieu, Antonin; Hirschi, Karen K

    2018-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the field of stem cell research; nonetheless, the use of stem cells for regenerative medicine therapies, for either endogenous tissue repair or cellular grafts post injury, remains a challenge. To better understand how to maintain stem cell potential in vivo and promote differentiation ex vivo, it is fundamentally important to elucidate the interactions between stem cells and their surrounding partners within their distinct niches. Among the vast array of proteins depicted as mediators for cell-to-cell interactions, connexin-comprised gap junctions play pivotal roles in the regulation of stem cell fate both in vivo and in vitro. This review summarizes and illustrates the current knowledge regarding the multifaceted roles of Cx43, specifically, in various stem cell niches.

  8. Proteomics in studying cancer stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Onno; Emmink, Benjamin L; Knol, Jaco; van Houdt, Winan J; Rinkes, Inne H M Borel; Jimenez, Connie R

    2012-06-01

    Normal multipotent tissue stem cells (SCs) are the driving force behind tissue turnover and repair. The cancer stem cell theory holds that tumors also contain stem-like cells that drive tumor growth and metastasis formation. However, very little is known about the regulation of SC maintenance pathways in cancer and how these are affected by cancer-specific genetic alterations and by treatment. Proteomics is emerging as a powerful tool to identify the signaling complexes and pathways that control multi- and pluri-potency and SC differentiation. Here, the authors review the novel insights that these studies have provided and present a comprehensive strategy for the use of proteomics in studying cancer SC biology.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells induce dermal fibroblast responses to injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Andria N.; Willis, Elise; Chan, Vincent T.; Muffley, Lara A.; Isik, F. Frank; Gibran, Nicole S.; Hocking, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote repair when applied to cutaneous wounds, the mechanism for this response remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of paracrine signaling from mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast responses to injury including proliferation, migration and expression of genes important in wound repair. Dermal fibroblasts were co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells grown in inserts, which allowed for paracrine interactions without direct cell contact. In this co-culture model, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate dermal fibroblast proliferation, migration and gene expression. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts show increased proliferation and accelerated migration in a scratch assay. A chemotaxis assay also demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts migrate towards bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A PCR array was used to analyze the effect of mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast gene expression. In response to mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts up-regulate integrin alpha 7 expression and down-regulate expression of ICAM1, VCAM1 and MMP11. These observations suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may provide an important early signal for dermal fibroblast responses to cutaneous injury.

  10. Living labeling techniques of mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Qingyu; Chen Li

    2007-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well known for their self-renew and multi- differentiation potentiality. With the transplantation of the MSCs which can promote the regeneration and repair of the injured tissue, a new route for the treatment of dieases is hopeful to be effective. To trace the distribution, migration, proliferation and differentiation of the implanted MSCs, there need effective labeling techniques, especially living labeling techniques. (authors)

  11. Characterizing the radioresponse of pluripotent and multipotent human stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary L Lan

    Full Text Available The potential capability of stem cells to restore functionality to diseased or aged tissues has prompted a surge of research, but much work remains to elucidate the response of these cells to genotoxic agents. To more fully understand the impact of irradiation on different stem cell types, the present study has analyzed the radioresponse of human pluripotent and multipotent stem cells. Human embryonic stem (ES cells, human induced pluripotent (iPS cells, and iPS-derived human neural stem cells (iPS-hNSCs cells were irradiated and analyzed for cell survival parameters, differentiation, DNA damage and repair and oxidative stress at various times after exposure. While irradiation led to dose-dependent reductions in survival, the fraction of surviving cells exhibited dose-dependent increases in metabolic activity. Irradiation did not preclude germ layer commitment of ES cells, but did promote neuronal differentiation. ES cells subjected to irradiation exhibited early apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression, but otherwise showed normal repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Cells surviving irradiation also showed acute and persistent increases in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that were significant at nearly all post-irradiation times analyzed. We suggest that stem cells alter their redox homeostasis to adapt to adverse conditions and that radiation-induced oxidative stress plays a role in regulating the function and fate of stem cells within tissues compromised by radiation injury.

  12. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic–inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius; Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen; Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50 mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2 h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21 days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell–material combination in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy image depicting cell adhesion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into a pore of a hybrid Direct Laser Writing

  13. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic–inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria, E-mail: mchatzin@materials.uoc.gr [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen [Hematology Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Crete (Greece); Farsari, Maria [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Vamvakaki, Maria [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece)

    2015-03-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50 mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2 h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21 days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell–material combination in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy image depicting cell adhesion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into a pore of a hybrid Direct Laser Writing

  14. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency and Treatment with Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut Selver, Özlem; Yağcı, Ayşe; Eğrilmez, Sait; Gürdal, Mehmet; Palamar, Melis; Çavuşoğlu, Türker; Ateş, Utku; Veral, Ali; Güven, Çağrı; Wolosin, Jose Mario

    2017-10-01

    The cornea is the outermost tissue of the eye and it must be transparent for the maintenance of good visual function. The superficial epithelium of the cornea, which is renewed continuously by corneal stem cells, plays a critical role in the permanence of this transparency. These stem cells are localized at the cornea-conjunctival transition zone, referred to as the limbus. When this zone is affected/destroyed, limbal stem cell deficiency ensues. Loss of limbal stem cell function allows colonization of the corneal surface by conjunctival epithelium. Over 6 million people worldwide are affected by corneal blindness, and limbal stem cell deficiency is one of the main causes. Fortunately, it is becoming possible to recover vision by autologous transplantation of limbal cells obtained from the contralateral eye in unilateral cases. Due to the potential risks to the donor eye, only a small amount of tissue can be obtained, in which only 1-2% of the limbal epithelial cells are actually limbal stem cells. Vigorous attempts are being made to expand limbal stem cells in culture to preserve or even enrich the stem cell population. Ex vivo expanded limbal stem cell treatment in limbal stem cell deficiency was first reported in 1997. In the 20 years since, various protocols have been developed for the cultivation of limbal epithelial cells. It is still not clear which method promotes effective stem cell viability and this remains a subject of ongoing research. The most preferred technique for limbal cell culture is the explant culture model. In this approach, a small donor eye limbal biopsy is placed as an explant onto a biocompatible substrate (preferably human amniotic membrane) for expansion. The outgrowth (cultivated limbal epithelial cells) is then surgically transferred to the recipient eye. Due to changing regulations concerning cell-based therapy, the implementation of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation in accordance with Good Laboratory Practice using

  15. Stem cell therapy for ischemic heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Lu, Kai; Zhu, Jinyun; Wang, Jian'an

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart diseases, especially the myocardial infarction, is a major hazard problem to human health. Despite substantial advances in control of risk factors and therapies with drugs and interventions including bypass surgery and stent placement, the ischemic heart diseases usually result in heart failure (HF), which could aggravate social burden and increase the mortality rate. The current therapeutic methods to treat HF stay at delaying the disease progression without repair and regeneration of the damaged myocardium. While heart transplantation is the only effective therapy for end-stage patients, limited supply of donor heart makes it impossible to meet the substantial demand from patients with HF. Stem cell-based transplantation is one of the most promising treatment for the damaged myocardial tissue. Key recent published literatures and ClinicalTrials.gov. Stem cell-based therapy is a promising strategy for the damaged myocardial tissue. Different kinds of stem cells have their advantages for treatment of Ischemic heart diseases. The efficacy and potency of cell therapies vary significantly from trial to trial; some clinical trials did not show benefit. Diverged effects of cell therapy could be affected by cell types, sources, delivery methods, dose and their mechanisms by which delivered cells exert their effects. Understanding the origin of the regenerated cardiomyocytes, exploring the therapeutic effects of stem cell-derived exosomes and using the cell reprogram technology to improve the efficacy of cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases. Recently, stem cell-derived exosomes emerge as a critical player in paracrine mechanism of stem cell-based therapy. It is promising to exploit exosomes-based cell-free therapy for ischemic heart diseases in the future. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Stem cells in dentistry--part I: stem cell sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Sonoyama, Wataru; Nishimura, Masahiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Akiyama, Kentaro

    2012-07-01

    Stem cells can self-renew and produce different cell types, thus providing new strategies to regenerate missing tissues and treat diseases. In the field of dentistry, adult mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been identified in several oral and maxillofacial tissues, which suggests that the oral tissues are a rich source of stem cells, and oral stem and mucosal cells are expected to provide an ideal source for genetically reprogrammed cells such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Furthermore, oral tissues are expected to be not only a source but also a therapeutic target for stem cells, as stem cell and tissue engineering therapies in dentistry continue to attract increasing clinical interest. Part I of this review outlines various types of intra- and extra-oral tissue-derived stem cells with regard to clinical availability and applications in dentistry. Additionally, appropriate sources of stem cells for regenerative dentistry are discussed with regard to differentiation capacity, accessibility and possible immunomodulatory properties. Copyright © 2012 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Osteocalcin expressing cells from tendon sheaths in mice contribute to tendon repair by activating Hedgehog signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi; Zhang, Xu; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Yao, YiFei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming; Wang, Li; Zhang, Chenglin; Huang, Yu; Mak, Kingston King-Lun

    2017-01-01

    Both extrinsic and intrinsic tissues contribute to tendon repair, but the origin and molecular functions of extrinsic tissues in tendon repair are not fully understood. Here we show that tendon sheath cells harbor stem/progenitor cell properties and contribute to tendon repair by activating Hedgehog signaling. We found that Osteocalcin (Bglap) can be used as an adult tendon-sheath-specific marker in mice. Lineage tracing experiments show that Bglap-expressing cells in adult sheath tissues pos...

  18. Systemic Injection of Neural Stem/progenitor Cells in Mice With Chronic EAE

    OpenAIRE

    Donegà, Matteo; Giusto, Elena; Cossetti, Chiara; Schaeffer, Julia; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are a promising stem cell source for transplantation approaches aiming at brain repair or restoration in regenerative neurology. This directive has arisen from the extensive evidence that brain repair is achieved after focal or systemic NPC transplantation in several pre clinical models of neurological diseases.

  19. The Influence of Physical Forces on Progenitor Cell Migration, Proliferation and Differentiation in Fracture Repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldstein, Steven A; Hankerson, Kurt; Kilbourn, Michael

    2006-01-01

    ... and quality of fracture repair in long bones. In support of these goals we will test the global hypothesis that the migration proliferation and differentiation of systemically or locally delivered Mesenchymal Stem Cells is temporarily dependent...

  20. FGF2 mediates DNA repair in epidermoid carcinoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Melanie; Hafner, Sophie; Moratille, Sandra; Vaigot, Pierre; Rigaud, Odile; Martin, Michele T.; Mine, Solene

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a well-known survival factor. However, its role in DNA repair is poorly documented. The present study was designed to investigate in epidermoid carcinoma cells the potential role of FGF2 in DNA repair. The side population (SP) with cancer stem cell-like properties and the main population (MP) were isolated from human A431 squamous carcinoma cells. Radiation-induced DNA damage and repair were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. FGF2 expression was quantified by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SP cells exhibited rapid repair of radiation induced DNA damage and a high constitutive level of nuclear FGF2. Blocking FGF2 signaling abrogated the rapid DNA repair. In contrast, in MP cells, a slower repair of damage was associated with low basal expression of FGF2. Moreover, the addition of exogenous FGF2 accelerated DNA repair in MP cells. When irradiated, SP cells secreted FGF2, whereas MP cells did not. FGF2 was found to mediate DNA repair in epidermoid carcinoma cells. We postulate that carcinoma stem cells would be intrinsically primed to rapidly repair DNA damage by a high constitutive level of nuclear FGF2. In contrast, the main population with a low FGF2 content exhibits a lower repair rate which can be increased by exogenous FGF2. (authors)

  1. Therapeutic strategies involving uterine stem cells in reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Michael; Taylor, Hugh S

    2018-04-12

    The current review provides an update on recent advances in stem cell biology relevant to female reproduction. Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that often serve as a reservoir of cells to regenerate tissue in settings or injury or cell loss. The endometrium has progenitor stem cells that can replace all of the endometrium during each menstrual cycle. In addition, multipotent endometrial cells replace these progenitor cells when depleted. Recruitment of stem cells from outside of the uterus occurs in setting of increased demand such as ischemia or injury. Bone marrow-derived multipotent stem cells are recruited to the uterus by estrogen or injury-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL12. In the setting of overwhelming injury, especially in the setting of low estrogen levels, there may be insufficient stem cell recruitment to adequately repair the uterus resulting in conditions such as Asherman syndrome or other endometrial defects. In contrast, excessive recruitment of stem cells underlies endometriosis. Enhanced understanding of stem-cell mobilization, recruitment, and engraftment has created the possibility of improved therapy for endometrial defects and endometriosis through enhanced manipulation of stem-cell trafficking. Further, the normal endometrium is a rich source of multipotent stem cells that can be used for numerous applications in regenerative medicine beyond reproduction. A better understanding of reproductive stem-cell biology may allow improved treatment of endometrial disease such as Asherman syndrome and other endometrial receptivity defects. Inhibiting stem-cell mobilization may also be helpful in endometriosis therapy. Finally, endometrial derived multipotent stem cells may play a crucial role in cell therapy for regenerative medicine.

  2. Rejuvenating Strategies for Stem Cell-based Therapies in Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Joana; Sousa-Victor, Pedro; Jasper, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent advances in our understanding of tissue regeneration and the development of efficient approaches to induce and differentiate pluripotent stem cells for cell replacement therapies promise exciting avenues for treating degenerative age-related diseases. However, clinical studies and insights from model organisms have identified major roadblocks that normal aging processes impose on tissue regeneration. These new insights suggest that specific targeting of environmental niche components, including growth factors, ECM and immune cells, and intrinsic stem cell properties that are affected by aging will be critical for development of new strategies to improve stem cell function and optimize tissue repair processes. PMID:28157498

  3. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cartilage Repair Using Composites of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel in a Minipig Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Chul-Won; Park, Yong-Beom; Chung, Jun-Young; Park, Yong-Geun

    2015-09-01

    The cartilage regeneration potential of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) with a hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel composite has shown remarkable results in rat and rabbit models. The purpose of the present study was to confirm the consistent regenerative potential in a pig model using three different cell lines. A full-thickness chondral injury was intentionally created in the trochlear groove of each knee in 6 minipigs. Three weeks later, an osteochondral defect, 5 mm wide by 10 mm deep, was created, followed by an 8-mm-wide and 5-mm-deep reaming. A mixture (1.5 ml) of hUCB-MSCs (0.5×10(7) cells per milliliter) and 4% HA hydrogel composite was then transplanted into the defect on the right knee. Each cell line was used in two minipigs. The osteochondral defect created in the same manner on the left knee was untreated to act as the control. At 12 weeks postoperatively, the pigs were sacrificed, and the degree of subsequent cartilage regeneration was evaluated by gross and histological analysis. The transplanted knee resulted in superior and more complete hyaline cartilage regeneration compared with the control knee. The cellular characteristics (e.g., cellular proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation capacity) of the hUCB-MSCs influenced the degree of cartilage regeneration potential. This evidence of consistent cartilage regeneration using composites of hUCB-MSCs and HA hydrogel in a large animal model could be a stepping stone to a human clinical trial in the future. To date, several studies have investigated the chondrogenic potential of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs); however, the preclinical studies are still limited in numbers with various results. In parallel, in the past several years, the cartilage regeneration potential of hUCB-MSCs with a hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel composite have been investigated and remarkable results in rat and rabbit models have been attained. (These

  5. Role of adipose-derived stem cells in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Waqar Ul; Greiser, Udo; Wang, Wenxin

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing remains a challenge to date and causes debilitating effects with tremendous suffering. Recent advances in tissue engineering approaches in the area of cell therapy have provided promising treatment options to meet the challenges of impaired skin wound healing such as diabetic foot ulcers. Over the last few years, stem cell therapy has emerged as a novel therapeutic approach for various diseases including wound repair and tissue regeneration. Several different types of stem cells have been studied in both preclinical and clinical settings such as bone marrow-derived stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), circulating angiogenic cells (e.g., endothelial progenitor cells), human dermal fibroblasts, and keratinocytes for wound healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown an improved outcome in wound healing studies. ASCs are pluripotent stem cells with the ability to differentiate into different lineages and to secrete paracrine factors initiating tissue regeneration process. The abundant supply of fat tissue, ease of isolation, extensive proliferative capacities ex vivo, and their ability to secrete pro-angiogenic growth factors make them an ideal cell type to use in therapies for the treatment of nonhealing wounds. In this review, we look at the pathogenesis of chronic wounds, role of stem cells in wound healing, and more specifically look at the role of ASCs, their mechanism of action and their safety profile in wound repair and tissue regeneration. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  6. Stem Cell Transplantation from Bench to Bedside

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Stem Cell Transplantation from Bench to Bedside · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Principles of an allogeneic stem cell transplant · Principle of an allogeneic stem cell transplant · Principle of an autologous Stem Cell Transplant · Slide 8 · Conditioning · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Stem Cell Transplantation · Slide 13.

  7. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  8. Haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Ryohichi; Jha, Deepak Kumar; Han, Areum; Soria-Valles, Clara; da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Lu, Yi-Fen; Goettel, Jeremy A.; Serrao, Erik; Rowe, R. Grant; Malleshaiah, Mohan; Wong, Irene; Sousa, Patricia; Zhu, Ted N.; Ditadi, Andrea; Keller, Gordon; Engelman, Alan N.; Snapper, Scott B.; Doulatov, Sergei; Daley, George Q.

    2018-01-01

    A variety of tissue lineages can be differentiated from pluripotent stem cells by mimicking embryonic development through stepwise exposure to morphogens, or by conversion of one differentiated cell type into another by enforced expression of master transcription factors. Here, to yield functional human haematopoietic stem cells, we perform morphogen-directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into haemogenic endothelium followed by screening of 26 candidate haematopoietic stem-cell-specifying transcription factors for their capacity to promote multi-lineage haematopoietic engraftment in mouse hosts. We recover seven transcription factors (ERG, HOXA5, HOXA9, HOXA10, LCOR, RUNX1 and SPI1) that are sufficient to convert haemogenic endothelium into haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells that engraft myeloid, B and T cells in primary and secondary mouse recipients. Our combined approach of morphogen-driven differentiation and transcription-factor-mediated cell fate conversion produces haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from pluripotent stem cells and holds promise for modelling haematopoietic disease in humanized mice and for therapeutic strategies in genetic blood disorders. PMID:28514439

  9. Stem Cells: New Hope For Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazdic Marina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy offers several attractive strategies for spinal cord repair. The regenerative potential of pluripotent stem cells was confirmed in an animal model of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI; nevertheless, optimized growth and differentiation protocols along with reliable safety assays should be established prior to the clinical application of hESCs and iPSCs. Th e therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in SCI result from neurotrophin secretion, angiogenesis, and antiinflammatory actions. Several preclinical SCI studies have reported that the occurrence of axonal extension, remyelination and neuroprotection occur after the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs. The transplantation of neural stem cells NSCs (NSCs promotes partial functional improvement after SCI because of their potential to differentiate into neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. The ideal source of stem cells for safe and efficient cell-based therapy for SCI remains a challenging issue that requires further investigation.

  10. Involvement of plant stem cells or stem cell-like cells in dedifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangwei eJiang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation.

  11. Treatment of radiation syndrome with emphasis on stem cell implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, O.M.

    2010-01-01

    Within few years, the possibility that the human body contains cells that can repair and regenerate damaged and diseased tissue has gone from an unlikely proposition to a virtual certainty. Patients who have received doses of radiation in the potentially low to mid-lethal range (2-6 Gy) will have depression in bone-marrow function with cessation of blood-cell production leading to pancytopenia. Selection of cases for stem cell transplantation is based upon clinical signs and symptoms. Hematopoietic stem cell which produces blood cell progeny provides support for hematopoietic and other cells within the marrow, and has also been a focus for possible tissue repair. Another cell type termed mesenchymal or stromal also exists in the marrow. This cell provides support for hematopoietic and other cells within the marrow, and has also been a focus for possible tissue repair. Stem cells are obtained from bone marrow, peripheral blood, placental and umbilical cord blood, embryonic stem cells and embryonic germ cells. These cells have great potential for clinical research due to their potential to regenerate tissue. As well known, the cryo preservation process can store any cell type, particularly blood cells, for an indeterminate time. (author)

  12. Stem cells in pharmaceutical biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Józkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Józef

    2011-11-01

    Multiple populations of stem cells have been indicated to potentially participate in regeneration of injured organs. Especially, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and recently inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPS) receive a marked attention from scientists and clinicians for regenerative medicine because of their high proliferative and differentiation capacities. Despite that ESC and iPS cells are expected to give rise into multiple regenerative applications when their side effects are overcame during appropriate preparation procedures, in fact their most recent application of human ESC may, however, reside in their use as a tool in drug development and disease modeling. This review focuses on the applications of stem cells in pharmaceutical biotechnology. We discuss possible relevance of pluripotent cell stem populations in developing physiological models for any human tissue cell type useful for pharmacological, metabolic and toxicity evaluation necessary in the earliest steps of drug development. The present models applied for preclinical drug testing consist of primary cells or immortalized cell lines that show limitations in terms of accessibility or relevance to their in vivo counterparts. The availability of renewable human cells with functional similarities to their in vivo counterparts is the first landmark for a new generation of cell-based assays. We discuss the approaches for using stem cells as valuable physiological targets of drug activity which may increase the strength of target validation and efficacy potentially resulting in introducing new safer remedies into clinical trials and the marketplace. Moreover, we discuss the possible applications of stem cells for elucidating mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. The knowledge about the mechanisms governing the development and progression of multitude disorders which would come from the cellular models established based on stem cells, may give rise to new therapeutical strategies for such diseases. All

  13. DNA damage responses in human induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Momcilovic

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells have the capability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation into all somatic cell types. Since they can be produced through somatic cell reprogramming, which uses a defined set of transcription factors, iPS cells represent important sources of patient-specific cells for clinical applications. However, before these cells can be used in therapeutic designs, it is essential to understand their genetic stability.Here, we describe DNA damage responses in human iPS cells. We observe hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents resulting in rapid induction of apoptosis after γ-irradiation. Expression of pluripotency factors does not appear to be diminished after irradiation in iPS cells. Following irradiation, iPS cells activate checkpoint signaling, evidenced by phosphorylation of ATM, NBS1, CHEK2, and TP53, localization of ATM to the double strand breaks (DSB, and localization of TP53 to the nucleus of NANOG-positive cells. We demonstrate that iPS cells temporary arrest cell cycle progression in the G(2 phase of the cell cycle, displaying a lack of the G(1/S cell cycle arrest similar to human embryonic stem (ES cells. Furthermore, both cell types remove DSB within six hours of γ-irradiation, form RAD51 foci and exhibit sister chromatid exchanges suggesting homologous recombination repair. Finally, we report elevated expression of genes involved in DNA damage signaling, checkpoint function, and repair of various types of DNA lesions in ES and iPS cells relative to their differentiated counterparts.High degrees of similarity in DNA damage responses between ES and iPS cells were found. Even though reprogramming did not alter checkpoint signaling following DNA damage, dramatic changes in cell cycle structure, including a high percentage of cells in the S phase, increased radiosensitivity and loss of DNA damage-induced G(1/S cell cycle arrest, were observed in stem cells generated by induced pluripotency.

  14. Bioprinting for stem cell research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest to apply bioprinting techniques to stem cell research. Several bioprinting methods have been developed utilizing acoustics, piezoelectricity, and lasers to deposit living cells onto receiving substrates. Using these technologies, spatially defined gradients of immobilized proteins can be engineered to direct stem cell differentiation into multiple subpopulations of different lineages. Stem cells can also be patterned in a high-throughput manner onto flexible implementation patches for tissue regeneration or onto substrates with the goal of accessing encapsulated stem cell of interest for genomic analysis. Here, we review recent achievements with bioprinting technologies in stem cell research, and identify future challenges and potential applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, wound healing, and genomics. PMID:23260439

  15. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolay, Nils H.; Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute; Trinh, Thuy; Sisombath, Sonevisay; Debus, Jürgen; Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer; Huber, Peter E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression

  17. Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are the building blocks for all other cells in an organism. The human body has about 200 different types of cells and any of those cells can be produced by a stem cell. This fact emphasizes the significance of stem cells in transplantational medicine, regenerative therapy and bioengineering. Whether embryonic or adult, these cells can be used for the successful treatment of a wide range of diseases that were not treatable before, such as osteogenesis imperfecta in children, different forms of leukemias, acute myocardial infarction, some neural damages and diseases, etc. Bioengineering, e.g. successful manipulation of these cells with multipotential capacity of differentiation toward appropriate patterns and precise quantity, are the prerequisites for successful outcome and treatment. By combining in vivo and in vitro techniques, it is now possible to manage the wide spectrum of tissue damages and organ diseases. Although the stem-cell therapy is not a response to all the questions, it provides more...

  18. Induced repair and mutagenesis in animal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, Koichi

    1981-01-01

    Induced repair and mutagenesis of animal cells against UV were studied in contrast with SOS repair of E. coli primarily by the use of viruses. Since UV-enhanced reactivation is a phenomenon similar to UV-reactivation (mutagenesis) and the presence of lesion bypass synthsis has been suggested, UV-enhanced reactivation has several common aspects with SOS reactivation of E. coli. However, correlation is not necessarily noted between increase in the viral survival rate and mutagenesis, nor do protease blockers exert any effect. Therefore, SOS repair of E. coli may have different mechansms from induced repair and mutagenesis in animal cells. (Ueda, J.)

  19. DNA replication and repair in Tilapia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yew, F.H.; Chang, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of ultraviolet radiation on a cell line established from the warm water fish Tilapia has been assessed by measuring the rate of DNA synthesis, excision repair, post-replication repair and cell survival. The cells tolerate ultraviolet radiation better than mammalian cells with respect to DNA synthesis, post-replication repair and cell survival. They are also efficient in excision repair, which in other fish cell lines has been found to be at a low level or absent. Their response to the inhibitors hydroxyurea and 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine is less sensitive than that of other cell lines, yet the cells seem to have very small pools of DNA precursor. (author)

  20. Counting stem cells : methodological constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Verovskaya, Evgenia; Zwart, Erik; Broekhuis, Mathilde; de Haan, Gerald

    The number of stem cells contributing to hematopoiesis has been a matter of debate. Many studies use retroviral tagging of stem cells to measure clonal contribution. Here we argue that methodological factors can impact such clonal analyses. Whereas early studies had low resolution, leading to

  1. Stem cell function and maintenance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stem cell research holds a promise to treat and prevent age-related degenerative changes in humans. Literature is replete with studies showing that stem cell function declines with aging, especially in highly proliferative tissues/organs. Among others, telomerase and telomere damage is one of the intrinsic physical ...

  2. Stem cells: progressions and applications in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hosseini Bereshneh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are undifferentiated and multi pluripotent cells which can differentiate into a variety of mature cells and tissues such as nervous tissue, muscle tissue, epithelial tissue, skeletal tissue and etc. Stem cells from all different source have three unique features: 1 Proliferative capability: Stem cells are capable of self dividing and self renewing for long periods or more than six months at least that called immortalization. 2 Undifferentiated nature: It’s considered as one of the essential characteristics of stem cell, so it doesn't have any tissue-specific construction. 3 Differentiation to the different cells from all organs: This ability can Induced by tissue specific transcription factors. Because of that, they are so important in prevention and treatment of human disease. Depending on the sources from which they derive, they have different types which can be used to produce special cells and tissues. The most significant types of stem cells are; embryonic stem cells (ESCs which are derived from embryos, adult stem cells (ASCs which are derived from differentiated cells in a specific tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSs which are produced from adult differentiated cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to act resemble to an embryonic stem cell and cord blood stem cells which contains haematopoietic stem cells and derived from the umbilical cord after gestation. By providing a medium containing of special growth factor, it is possible to orientated stem cell differentiation pathway and gained certain cells from them. The important uses of stem cells includes damaged heart tissue cells improvements and bone tissue repairing, cancer treatment, damaged neurological and spinal tissue repairing, improving burns and injuries and the treatment of diabetes, infertility and spermatogenesis dysfunction. Furthermore, the application of them in gene therapy is an important issue in the modern medicine science due to the role

  3. Stem Cell Transplants (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Transplants Transplantation Recovery Coping Print en español Trasplantes de células madre Stem cells are cells in ... finding a match is called tissue typing (or HLA [human leukocyte antigen] typing). HLA is a protein ...

  4. Lasers, stem cells, and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Necochea-Campion Rosalia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The medical use of low level laser (LLL irradiation has been occurring for decades, primarily in the area of tissue healing and inflammatory conditions. Despite little mechanistic knowledge, the concept of a non-invasive, non-thermal intervention that has the potential to modulate regenerative processes is worthy of attention when searching for novel methods of augmenting stem cell-based therapies. Here we discuss the use of LLL irradiation as a "photoceutical" for enhancing production of stem cell growth/chemoattractant factors, stimulation of angiogenesis, and directly augmenting proliferation of stem cells. The combination of LLL together with allogeneic and autologous stem cells, as well as post-mobilization directing of stem cells will be discussed.

  5. Developmental origin and lineage plasticity of endogenous cardiac stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Maria Paola; Forte, Elvira; Harvey, Richard P.; Kovacic, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, several populations of cardiac stem cells have been described in the adult mammalian heart. For the most part, however, their lineage origins and in vivo functions remain largely unexplored. This Review summarizes what is known about different populations of embryonic and adult cardiac stem cells, including KIT+, PDGFRα+, ISL1+ and SCA1+ cells, side population cells, cardiospheres and epicardial cells. We discuss their developmental origins and defining characteristics, and consider their possible contribution to heart organogenesis and regeneration. We also summarize the origin and plasticity of cardiac fibroblasts and circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and consider what role these cells have in contributing to cardiac repair. PMID:27095490

  6. Stem cells for tooth engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bluteau

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Tooth development results from sequential and reciprocal interactions between the oral epithelium and the underlying neural crest-derived mesenchyme. The generation of dental structures and/or entire teeth in the laboratory depends upon the manipulation of stem cells and requires a synergy of all cellular and molecular events that finally lead to the formation of tooth-specific hard tissues, dentin and enamel. Although mesenchymal stem cells from different origins have been extensively studied in their capacity to form dentin in vitro, information is not yet available concerning the use of epithelial stem cells. The odontogenic potential resides in the oral epithelium and thus epithelial stem cells are necessary for both the initiation of tooth formation and enamel matrix production. This review focuses on the different sources of stem cells that have been used for making teeth in vitro and their relative efficiency. Embryonic, post-natal or even adult stem cells were assessed and proved to possess an enormous regenerative potential, but their application in dental practice is still problematic and limited due to various parameters that are not yet under control such as the high risk of rejection, cell behaviour, long tooth eruption period, appropriate crown morphology and suitable colour. Nevertheless, the development of biological approaches for dental reconstruction using stem cells is promising and remains one of the greatest challenges in the dental field for the years to come.

  7. Brain mesenchymal stem cells: The other stem cells of the brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appaix, Florence; Nissou, Marie-France; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dreyfus, Matthieu; Berger, François; Issartel, Jean-Paul; Wion, Didier

    2014-04-26

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), have the potential to differentiate into cells of the mesenchymal lineage and have non-progenitor functions including immunomodulation. The demonstration that MSCs are perivascular cells found in almost all adult tissues raises fascinating perspectives on their role in tissue maintenance and repair. However, some controversies about the physiological role of the perivascular MSCs residing outside the bone marrow and on their therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine exist. In brain, perivascular MSCs like pericytes and adventitial cells, could constitute another stem cell population distinct to the neural stem cell pool. The demonstration of the neuronal potential of MSCs requires stringent criteria including morphological changes, the demonstration of neural biomarkers expression, electrophysiological recordings, and the absence of cell fusion. The recent finding that brain cancer stem cells can transdifferentiate into pericytes is another facet of the plasticity of these cells. It suggests that the perversion of the stem cell potential of pericytes might play an even unsuspected role in cancer formation and tumor progression.

  8. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  9. Modulating the stem cell niche for tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Steven W; Williams, David A; Watt, Fiona M

    2015-01-01

    The field of regenerative medicine holds considerable promise for treating diseases that are currently intractable. Although many researchers are adopting the strategy of cell transplantation for tissue repair, an alternative approach to therapy is to manipulate the stem cell microenvironment, or niche, to facilitate repair by endogenous stem cells. The niche is highly dynamic, with multiple opportunities for intervention. These include administration of small molecules, biologics or biomaterials that target specific aspects of the niche, such as cell-cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions, to stimulate expansion or differentiation of stem cells, or to cause reversion of differentiated cells to stem cells. Nevertheless, there are several challenges in targeting the niche therapeutically, not least that of achieving specificity of delivery and responses. We envisage that successful treatments in regenerative medicine will involve different combinations of factors to target stem cells and niche cells, applied at different times to effect recovery according to the dynamics of stem cell–niche interactions. PMID:25093887

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as skeletal therapeutics-an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Saleem, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells hold the promise to treat not only several congenital and acquired bone degenerative diseases but also to repair and regenerate morbid bone tissues. Utilizing MSCs, several lines of evidences advocate promising clinical outcomes in skeletal diseases and skeletal tissue repair....../regeneration. In this context, both, autologous and allogeneic cell transfer options have been utilized. Studies suggest that MSCs are transplanted either alone by mixing with autogenous plasma/serum or by loading onto repair/induction supportive resorb-able scaffolds. Thus, this review is aimed at highlighting a wide range...

  11. Stem cells: roadmap to the clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, George Q.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, a remarkable number of papers have been published in which the biology of stem cells is introduced with words and phrases such as “promise,” “rapid progress,” and “future therapies.” To separate myth and hype from reality, the articles in this Stem Cells Review series comprise a rich resource on the state of this fast-paced field and provide a balanced perspective on some of the major advances. They recount what the field has achieved over the past decade and where the field is headed. They also highlight the challenges to be faced in translating what is indeed highly promising science into proven therapies that will regenerate and repair diseased tissues. PMID:20051631

  12. Glial origin of mesenchymal stem cells in a tooth model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaukua, Nina; Shahidi, Maryam Khatibi; Konstantinidou, Chrysoula; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav; Kaucka, Marketa; Furlan, Alessandro; An, Zhengwen; Wang, Longlong; Hultman, Isabell; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars; Blom, Hans; Brismar, Hjalmar; Lopes, Natalia Assaife; Pachnis, Vassilis; Suter, Ueli; Clevers, Hans; Thesleff, Irma; Sharpe, Paul; Ernfors, Patrik; Fried, Kaj; Adameyko, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells occupy niches in stromal tissues where they provide sources of cells for specialized mesenchymal derivatives during growth and repair. The origins of mesenchymal stem cells have been the subject of considerable discussion, and current consensus holds that perivascular cells

  13. Stem cell transplantation therapy for multifaceted therapeutic benefits after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ling; Wei, Zheng Z; Jiang, Michael Qize; Mohamad, Osama; Yu, Shan Ping

    2017-10-01

    One of the exciting advances in modern medicine and life science is cell-based neurovascular regeneration of damaged brain tissues and repair of neuronal structures. The progress in stem cell biology and creation of adult induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has significantly improved basic and pre-clinical research in disease mechanisms and generated enthusiasm for potential applications in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including stroke. Endogenous neural stem cells and cultured stem cells are capable of self-renewal and give rise to virtually all types of cells essential for the makeup of neuronal structures. Meanwhile, stem cells and neural progenitor cells are well-known for their potential for trophic support after transplantation into the ischemic brain. Thus, stem cell-based therapies provide an attractive future for protecting and repairing damaged brain tissues after injury and in various disease states. Moreover, basic research on naïve and differentiated stem cells including iPS cells has markedly improved our understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of neurological disorders, and provides a platform for the discovery of novel drug targets. The latest advances indicate that combinatorial approaches using cell based therapy with additional treatments such as protective reagents, preconditioning strategies and rehabilitation therapy can significantly improve therapeutic benefits. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of cell therapy in different ischemic models and the application of stem cells and progenitor cells as regenerative medicine for the treatment of stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Repair in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanna-Nakamura, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS), an indicator of excision repair, was induced in freshly drawn Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT), using ionizing radiation, far ultraviolet light (254 nm) or near uv light (365 nm) in combination with 8-methoxypsoralen. UDS was scored by grain counts in autoradiographs following the incorporation of tritium-labelled thymidine. The amount of UDS after each of these agents was expressed in terms of two parameters, viz. numer of cells showing repair and the mean number of grains per nucleus. The influence of radiation dose and of the duration of radioactive thymidine incubation were also examined. To test for a possible relationship between low mitotic index and repair capability, EAT cells were incubated in buffered salt media to lower the mitotic index. Cells kept in a buffered salt solution for 7 h show a marked drop in mitotic index compared to those incubated in minimal medium containing 15% fetal calf serum (MEM + FCS). This drop in mitotic index was reversible for up to 5 h, if cells were returned to MEM + FCS. Cells incubated in MEM + FCS also showed a decrease in mitotic activity compared to freshly drawn cells. This reduced mitotic index is approximately constant for up to 24 h. With the drop in mitotic index, EAT cells also show a drop in repair compared to freshly drawn cells. The repair capability of cells incubated in buffer can be restored by returning cells to MEM + FCS

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a Potent Cell Source for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Zomorodian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While small bone defects heal spontaneously, large bone defects need surgical intervention for bone transplantation. Autologous bone grafts are the best and safest strategy for bone repair. An alternative method is to use allogenic bone graft. Both methods have limitations, particularly when bone defects are of a critical size. In these cases, bone constructs created by tissue engineering technologies are of utmost importance. Cells are one main component in the manufacture of bone construct. A few cell types, including embryonic stem cells (ESCs, adult osteoblast, and adult stem cells, can be used for this purpose. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, as adult stem cells, possess characteristics that make them good candidate for bone repair. This paper discusses different aspects of MSCs that render them an appropriate cell type for clinical use to promote bone regeneration.

  16. Priming of the Cells: Hypoxic Preconditioning for Stem Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng Z; Zhu, Yan-Bing; Zhang, James Y; McCrary, Myles R; Wang, Song; Zhang, Yong-Bo; Yu, Shan-Ping; Wei, Ling

    2017-10-05

    Stem cell-based therapies are promising in regenerative medicine for protecting and repairing damaged brain tissues after injury or in the context of chronic diseases. Hypoxia can induce physiological and pathological responses. A hypoxic insult might act as a double-edged sword, it induces cell death and brain damage, but on the other hand, sublethal hypoxia can trigger an adaptation response called hypoxic preconditioning or hypoxic tolerance that is of immense importance for the survival of cells and tissues. This review was based on articles published in PubMed databases up to August 16, 2017, with the following keywords: "stem cells," "hypoxic preconditioning," "ischemic preconditioning," and "cell transplantation." Original articles and critical reviews on the topics were selected. Hypoxic preconditioning has been investigated as a primary endogenous protective mechanism and possible treatment against ischemic injuries. Many cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of hypoxic preconditioning have been identified. In cell transplantation therapy, hypoxic pretreatment of stem cells and neural progenitors markedly increases the survival and regenerative capabilities of these cells in the host environment, leading to enhanced therapeutic effects in various disease models. Regenerative treatments can mobilize endogenous stem cells for neurogenesis and angiogenesis in the adult brain. Furthermore, transplantation of stem cells/neural progenitors achieves therapeutic benefits via cell replacement and/or increased trophic support. Combinatorial approaches of cell-based therapy with additional strategies such as neuroprotective protocols, anti-inflammatory treatment, and rehabilitation therapy can significantly improve therapeutic benefits. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress regarding cell types and applications in regenerative medicine as well as future applications.

  17. Clinical potentials of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Cristina; Serzanti, Marialaura; Consiglio, Antonella; Memo, Maurizio; Dell'Era, Patrizia

    2017-08-01

    Aging, injuries, and diseases can be considered as the result of malfunctioning or damaged cells. Regenerative medicine aims to restore tissue homeostasis by repairing or replacing cells, tissues, or damaged organs, by linking and combining different disciplines including engineering, technology, biology, and medicine. To pursue these goals, the discipline is taking advantage of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), a peculiar type of cell possessing the ability to differentiate into every cell type of the body. Human PSCs can be isolated from the blastocysts and maintained in culture indefinitely, giving rise to the so-called embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, since 2006, it is possible to restore in an adult cell a pluripotent ESC-like condition by forcing the expression of four transcription factors with the rejuvenating reprogramming technology invented by Yamanaka. Then the two types of PSC can be differentiated, using standardized protocols, towards the cell type necessary for the regeneration. Although the use of these derivatives for therapeutic transplantation is still in the preliminary phase of safety and efficacy studies, a lot of efforts are presently taking place to discover the biological mechanisms underlying genetic pathologies, by differentiating induced PSCs derived from patients, and new therapies by challenging PSC-derived cells in drug screening.

  18. Repair of furocoumarin adducts in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolan, M.E.; Smith, C.A.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    DNA repair was studied in cultured mammalian cells treated with the furocoumarins 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), aminomethyl trioxsalen, or angelicin and irradiated with near UV light. The amount of DNA cross-linked by 8-MOP in normal human cells decreased by about one-half in 24 hours after treatment; no decrease was observed in xeroderma pigmentosum cells, group A. At present, it is not known to what extent this decrease represents complete repair events at the sites of cross-links. Furocoumarin adducts elicited excision repair in normal human and monkey cells but not in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. This excision repair resembled in several aspects that elicited by pyrimidine dimers, formed in DNA by irradiation with 254-nm UV light; however, it appeared that for at least 8-MOP and aminomethyl trioxsalen, removal of adducts was not as efficient as was the removal of pyrimidine dimers. A comparison was also made of repair in the 172-base-pair repetitive alpha-DNA component of monkey cells to repair in the bulk of the genome. Although repair elicited by pyrimidine dimers in alpha-DNA was the same as in the bulk DNA, that following treatment of cells with either aminomethyl trioxsalen or angelicin and near UV was markedly deficient in alpha-DNA. This deficiency reflected the removal of fewer adducts from alpha-DNA after the same initial adduct frequencies. These results could mean that each furocoumarin may produce several structurally distinct adducts to DNA in cells and that the capacity of cellular repair systems to remove these various adducts may vary greatly

  19. Stem cells: Concepts and prospects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    development exemplified by murine experiments motivated the ... from specific regions of the brain, cardiac stem cells from atrial ..... have also been shown to integrate and differentiate .... to vascular network structures in three dimensional.

  20. Breast cancer stem cell-like cells are more sensitive to ionizing radiation than non-stem cells: role of ATM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seog-Young Kim

    Full Text Available There are contradictory observations about the different radiosensitivities of cancer stem cells and cancer non-stem cells. To resolve these contradictory observations, we studied radiosensitivities by employing breast cancer stem cell (CSC-like MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB453 cells as well as their corresponding non-stem cells. CSC-like cells proliferate without differentiating and have characteristics of tumor-initiating cells [1]. These cells were exposed to γ-rays (1.25-8.75 Gy and survival curves were determined by colony formation. A final slope, D(0, of the survival curve for each cell line was determined to measure radiosensitivity. The D(0 of CSC-like and non-stem MDA-MB-453 cells were 1.16 Gy and 1.55 Gy, respectively. Similar results were observed in MDA-MB-231 cells (0.94 Gy vs. 1.56 Gy. After determination of radiosensitivity, we investigated intrinsic cellular determinants which influence radiosensitivity including cell cycle distribution, free-radical scavengers and DNA repair. We observed that even though cell cycle status and antioxidant content may contribute to differential radiosensitivity, differential DNA repair capacity may be a greater determinant of radiosensitivity. Unlike non-stem cells, CSC-like cells have little/no sublethal damage repair, a low intracellular level of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM and delay of γ-H2AX foci removal (DNA strand break repair. These results suggest that low DNA repair capacity is responsible for the high radiosensitivity of these CSC-like cells.

  1. [Progress in stem cells and regenerative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libin; Zhu, He; Hao, Jie; Zhou, Qi

    2015-06-01

    Stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all types of cells in the body and therefore have great application potential in regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modelling and drug screening. In recent years, stem cell technology has made great progress, and induced pluripotent stem cell technology revolutionizes the whole stem cell field. At the same time, stem cell research in our country has also achieved great progress and becomes an indispensable power in the worldwide stem cell research field. This review mainly focuses on the research progress in stem cells and regenerative medicine in our country since the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell technology, including induced pluripotent stem cells, transdifferentiation, haploid stem cells, and new gene editing tools.

  2. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  3. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis

  4. Satellite Cells and the Muscle Stem Cell Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hang; Price, Feodor

    2013-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle in mammals is a stable tissue under normal circumstances but has remarkable ability to repair after injury. Skeletal muscle regeneration is a highly orchestrated process involving the activation of various cellular and molecular responses. As skeletal muscle stem cells, satellite cells play an indispensible role in this process. The self-renewing proliferation of satellite cells not only maintains the stem cell population but also provides numerous myogenic cells, which proliferate, differentiate, fuse, and lead to new myofiber formation and reconstitution of a functional contractile apparatus. The complex behavior of satellite cells during skeletal muscle regeneration is tightly regulated through the dynamic interplay between intrinsic factors within satellite cells and extrinsic factors constituting the muscle stem cell niche/microenvironment. For the last half century, the advance of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics has greatly improved our understanding of skeletal muscle biology. Here, we review some recent advances, with focuses on functions of satellite cells and their niche during the process of skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:23303905

  5. Understanding the application of stem cell therapy in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma RK

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rakesh K Sharma, Donald J Voelker, Roma Sharma, Hanumanth K ReddyUniversity of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Medical Center of South Arkansas, El Dorado, AR, USAAbstract: Throughout their lifetime, an individual may sustain many injuries and recover spontaneously over a period of time, without even realizing the injury in the first place. Wound healing occurs due to a proliferation of stem cells capable of restoring the injured tissue. The ability of adult stem cells to repair tissue is dependent upon the intrinsic ability of tissues to proliferate. The amazing capacity of embryonic stem cells to give rise to virtually any type of tissue has intensified the search for similar cell lineage in adults to treat various diseases including cardiovascular diseases. The ability to convert adult stem cells into pluripotent cells that resemble embryonic cells, and to transplant those in the desired organ for regenerative therapy is very attractive, and may offer the possibility of treating harmful disease-causing mutations. The race is on to find the best cells for treatment of cardiovascular disease. There is a need for the ideal stem cell, delivery strategies, myocardial retention, and time of administration in the ideal patient population. There are multiple modes of stem cell delivery to the heart with different cell retention rates that vary depending upon method and site of injection, such as intra coronary, intramyocardial or via coronary sinus. While there are crucial issues such as retention of stem cells, microvascular plugging, biodistribution, homing to myocardium, and various proapoptotic factors in the ischemic myocardium, the regenerative potential of stem cells offers an enormous impact on clinical applications in the management of cardiovascular diseases.Keywords: stem cell therapy, stem cell delivery, cardiovascular diseases, myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy

  6. CD34+ cells from dental pulp stem cells with a ZFN-mediated and homology-driven repair-mediated locus-specific knock-in of an artificial β-globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattong, S; Ruangwattanasuk, O; Yindeedej, W; Setpakdee, A; Manotham, K

    2017-07-01

    In humans, mutations in the β-globin gene (HBB) have two important clinical manifestations: β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. The progress in genome editing and stem cell research may be relevant to the treatment of β-globin-related diseases. In this work, we employed zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated gene integration of synthetic β-globin cDNA into HBB loci, thus correcting almost all β-globin mutations. The integration was achieved in both HEK 293 cells and isolated dental pulp stem cell (DPSCs). We also showed that DPSCs with an artificial gene knock-in were capable of generating stable six-cell clones and were expandable at least 10 8 -fold; therefore, they may serve as a personalized stem cell factory. In addition, transfection with non-integrated pCAG-hOct4 and culturing in a conditioned medium converted the genome-edited DPSCs to CD34 + HSC-like cells. We believe that this approach may be useful for the treatment of β-globin-related diseases, especially the severe form of β-thalassemia.

  7. Stem cell homing-based tissue engineering using bioactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinxian; Sun, Binbin; Yi, Chengqing; Mo, Xiumei

    2017-06-01

    Tissue engineering focuses on repairing tissue and restoring tissue functions by employing three elements: scaffolds, cells and biochemical signals. In tissue engineering, bioactive material scaffolds have been used to cure tissue and organ defects with stem cell-based therapies being one of the best documented approaches. In the review, different biomaterials which are used in several methods to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds were explained and show good properties (biocompatibility, biodegradability, and mechanical properties etc.) for cell migration and infiltration. Stem cell homing is a recruitment process for inducing the migration of the systemically transplanted cells, or host cells, to defect sites. The mechanisms and modes of stem cell homing-based tissue engineering can be divided into two types depending on the source of the stem cells: endogenous and exogenous. Exogenous stem cell-based bioactive scaffolds have the challenge of long-term culturing in vitro and for endogenous stem cells the biochemical signal homing recruitment mechanism is not clear yet. Although the stem cell homing-based bioactive scaffolds are attractive candidates for tissue defect therapies, based on in vitro studies and animal tests, there is still a long way before clinical application.

  8. Isolation, characterization, and differentiation of stem cells for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, Olivia S; Darling, Eric M

    2012-10-01

    The goal of tissue engineering is to create a functional replacement for tissues damaged by injury or disease. In many cases, impaired tissues cannot provide viable cells, leading to the investigation of stem cells as a possible alternative. Cartilage, in particular, may benefit from the use of stem cells since the tissue has low cellularity and cannot effectively repair itself. To address this need, researchers are investigating the chondrogenic capabilities of several multipotent stem cell sources, including adult and extra-embryonic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Comparative studies indicate that each cell type has advantages and disadvantages, and while direct comparisons are difficult to make, published data suggest some sources may be more promising for cartilage regeneration than others. In this review, we identify current approaches for isolating and chondrogenically differentiating MSCs from bone marrow, fat, synovium, muscle, and peripheral blood, as well as cells from extra-embryonic tissues, ESCs, and iPSCs. Additionally, we assess chondrogenic induction with growth factors, identifying standard cocktails used for each stem cell type. Cell-only (pellet) and scaffold-based studies are also included, as is a discussion of in vivo results.

  9. Stem Cell Lineages: Between Cell and Organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Bonnie Fagan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies of living things are increasingly grounded on the concepts and practices of current life science. Biological development is a process, undergone by living things, which begins with a single cell and (in an important class of cases ends with formation of a multicellular organism. The process of development is thus prima facie central for ideas about biological individuality and organismality. However, recent accounts of these concepts do not engage developmental biology. This paper aims to fill the gap, proposing the lineage view of stem cells as an ontological framework for conceptualizing organismal development. This account is grounded on experimental practices of stem cell research, with emphasis on new techniques for generating biological organization in vitro. On the lineage view, a stem cell is the starting point of a cell lineage with a specific organismal source, time-interval of existence, and ‘tree topology’ of branch-points linking the stem to developmental termini. The concept of ‘enkapsis’ accommodates the cell-organism relation within the lineage view; this hierarchical notion is further explicated by considering the methods and results of stem cell experiments. Results of this examination include a (partial characterization of stem cells’ developmental versatility, and the context-dependence of developmental processes involving stem cells.

  10. Plasticity of the Muscle Stem Cell Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinulovic, Ivana; Furrer, Regula; Handschin, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells (SCs) are adult muscle stem cells capable of repairing damaged and creating new muscle tissue throughout life. Their functionality is tightly controlled by a microenvironment composed of a wide variety of factors, such as numerous secreted molecules and different cell types, including blood vessels, oxygen, hormones, motor neurons, immune cells, cytokines, fibroblasts, growth factors, myofibers, myofiber metabolism, the extracellular matrix and tissue stiffness. This complex niche controls SC biology-quiescence, activation, proliferation, differentiation or renewal and return to quiescence. In this review, we attempt to give a brief overview of the most important players in the niche and their mutual interaction with SCs. We address the importance of the niche to SC behavior under physiological and pathological conditions, and finally survey the significance of an artificial niche both for basic and translational research purposes.

  11. Human embryonic stem cells handbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available After the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine was awarded jointly to Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent it became imperative to write down the review for a book entirely devoted to human embryonic stem cells (hES, those cells that are a urgent need for researchers, those cells that rekindle the ethical debates and finally, last but not least, those cells whose study paved the way to obtain induced pluripotent stem cells by the OSKC’s Yamanaka method (the OSKC acronim refers, for those not familiar with the topic, to the four stemness genes used to transfect somatic fibroblasts: Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc....

  12. Plasticity of spermatogonial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S Cooke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There have been significant breakthroughs over the past decade in the development and use of pluripotent stem cells as a potential source of cells for applications in regenerative medicine. It is likely that this methodology will begin to play an important role in human clinical medicine in the years to come. This review describes the plasticity of one type of pluripotent cell, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs, and their potential therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine and male infertility. Normally, SSCs give rise to sperm when in the testis. However, both human and murine SSCs can give rise to cells with embryonic stem (ES cell-like characteristics that can be directed to differentiate into tissues of all three embryonic germ layers when placed in an appropriate inductive microenvironment, which is in contrast to other postnatal stem cells. Previous studies have reported that SSCs expressed an intermediate pluripotent phenotype before differentiating into a specific cell type and that extended culture was necessary for this to occur. However, recent studies from our group using a tissue recombination model demonstrated that SSCs differentiated rapidly into another tissue, in this case, prostatic epithelium, without expression of pluripotent ES cell markers before differentiation. These results suggest that SSCs are capable of directly differentiating into other cell types without going through an intermediate ES cell-like stage. Because SSCs do not require reprogramming to achieve a pluripotent state, they are an attractive source of pluripotent cells for use in regenerative medicine.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savkovic, Vuk; Li, Hanluo; Seon, Jong-Keun; Hacker, Michael; Franz, Sandra; Simon, Jan-Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage provides life-long weight-bearing and mechanical lubrication with extraordinary biomechanical performance and simple structure. However, articular cartilage is apparently vulnerable to multifactorial damage and insufficient to self-repair, isolated in articular capsule without nerves or blood vessels. Osteoarthritis (OA) is known as a degenerative articular cartilage deficiency progressively affecting large proportion of the world population, and restoration of hyaline cartilage is clinical challenge to repair articular cartilage lesion and recreate normal functionality over long period. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are highly proliferative and multipotent somatic cells that are able to differentiate mesoderm-derived cells including chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Continuous endeavors in basic research and preclinical trial have achieved promising outcomes in cartilage regeneration using MSCs. This review focuses on rationale and technologies of MSC-based hyaline cartilage repair involving tissue engineering, 3D biomaterials and growth factors. By comparing conventional treatment and current research progress, we describe insights of advantage and challenge in translation and application of MSC-based chondrogenesis for OA treatment.

  14. Stem cell therapy: From bench to bedside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamarat, R.; Lataillade, J. J.; Bey, E.; Gourmelon, P.; Benderitter, M.

    2012-01-01

    Several countries have increased efforts to develop medical countermeasures to protect against radiation toxicity due to acts of bio-terrorism as well as cancer treatment. Both acute radiation injuries and delayed effects such as cutaneous effects and impaired wound repair depend, to some extent, on angiogenesis deficiency. Vascular damage influences levels of nutrients, oxygen available to skin tissue and epithelial cell viability. Consequently, the evolution of radiation lesions often becomes uncontrolled and surgery is the final option-amputation leading to a disability. Therefore, the development of strategies designed to promote healing of radiation injuries is a major therapeutic challenge. Adult mesenchymal stem cell therapy has been combined with surgery in some cases and not in others and successfully applied in patients with accidental radiation injuries. Although research in the field of radiation skin injury management has made substantial progress in the past 10 y, several strategies are still needed in order to enhance the beneficial effect of stem cell therapy and to counteract the deleterious effect of an irradiated tissue environment. This review summarises the current and evolving advances concerning basic and translational research based on stem cell therapy for the management of radiological burns. (authors)

  15. Saturation of DNA repair in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, F E; Setlow, R B

    1979-01-01

    Excision repair seems to reach a plateau in normal human cells at a 254 nm dose near 20 J/m/sup 2/. We measured excision repair in normal human fibroblasts up to 80 J/m/sup 2/. The four techniques used (unscheduled DNA synthesis, photolysis of BrdUrd incorporated during repair, loss of sites sensitive to a UV endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus, and loss of pyrimidine dimers from DNA) showed little difference between the two doses. Moreover, the loss of endonuclease sites in 24h following two 20 J/m/sup 2/ doses separated by 24h was similar to the loss observed following one dose. Hence, we concluded that the observed plateau in excision repair is real and does not represent some inhibitory process at high doses but a true saturation of one of the rate limiting steps in repair.

  16. Stem Cell Therapy for Healing Wounded Skin and Soft Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    healing process. We selected fibrin and hydrogel as delivery vehicles for our test. The rationale is that fibrin, which is a natural biopolymer of blood...E.U. Alt, IFATS collection: Human adipose-derived stem cells seeded on a silk fibroin- chitosan scaffold enhance wound repair in a murine soft

  17. The clinical application of mesenchymal stromal cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent stem cells well known for repairing tissue, supporting hematopoiesis, and modulating immune and inflammation response. These outstanding properties make MSCs as an attractive candidate for cellular therapy in immune-based disorders, especially hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. In this review, we outline the progress of MSCs in preventing and treating engraftment failure (EF, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD following HSCT and critically discuss unsolved issues in clinical applications.

  18. DNA repair in human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Lechner, J.F.; Grafstrom, R.C.; Harris, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the response of human cell types (bronchial epithelial cells and fibroblasts and skin fibroblasts) to various DNA damaging agents. Repair of DNA single strand breaks (SSB) induced by 5 krads of X-ray was similar for all cell types; approximately 90% of the DNA SSB were rejoined within one hour. During excision repair of DNA damage from u.v.-radiation, the frequencies of DNA SSB as estimated by the alkaline elution technique, were similar in all cell types. Repair replication as measured by BND cellulose chromatography was also similar in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after u.v.-irradiation. Similar levels of SSB were also observed in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after exposure to chemical carcinogens: 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene; benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE); or N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Significant repair replication of BPDE-induced DNA damage was detected in both bronchial epithelial and fibroblastic cells, although the level in fibroblasts was approximately 40% of that in epithelial cells. The pulmonary carcinogen asbestos did not damage DNA. DNA-protein crosslinks induced by formaldehyde were rapidly removed in bronchial cells. Further, epithelial and fibroblastic cells, which were incubated with formaldehyde and the polymerase inhibitor combination of cytosine arabinoside and hydroxyurea, accumulated DNA SSB at approximately equal frequencies. These results should provide a useful background for further investigations of the response of human bronchial cells to various DNA damaging agents

  19. Stem cells therapy for ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Letizia; Vescovi, Angelo; Cantello, Roberto; Gelati, Maurizio; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Despite knowledge on the molecular basis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) having quickly progressed over the last few years, such discoveries have not yet translated into new therapeutics. With the advancement of stem cell technologies there is hope for stem cell therapeutics as novel treatments for ALS. We discuss in detail the therapeutic potential of different types of stem cells in preclinical and clinical works. Moreover, we address many open questions in clinical translation. SC therapy is a potentially promising new treatment for ALS and the need to better understand how to develop cell-based experimental treatments, and how to implement them in clinical trials, becomes more pressing. Mesenchymal stem cells and neural fetal stem cells have emerged as safe and potentially effective cell types, but there is a need to carry out appropriately designed experimental studies to verify their long-term safety and possibly efficacy. Moreover, the cost-benefit analysis of the results must take into account the quality of life of the patients as a major end point. It is our opinion that a multicenter international clinical program aime d at fine-tuning and coordinating transplantation procedures and protocols is mandatory.

  20. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics...... in tumor biopsies such as brain and breast. Evidence supporting the cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained impact due to progress in stem cell biology and development of new models to validate the self-renewal potential of stem cells. Recent evidence on the possible identification of cancer stem cells may...... offer an opportunity to use these cells as future therapeutic targets. Therefore, model systems in this field have become very important and useful. This review will focus on the state of knowledge on cancer stem cell research, including cell line models for cancer stem cells. The latter will, as models...

  1. Interactions Between Epidermal Keratinocytes, Dendritic Epidermal T-Cells, and Hair Follicle Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badarinath, Krithika; Dutta, Abhik; Hegde, Akshay; Pincha, Neha; Gund, Rupali; Jamora, Colin

    2018-06-13

    The interplay of immune cells and stem cells in maintaining skin homeostasis and repair is an exciting new frontier in cutaneous biology. With the growing appreciation of the importance of this new crosstalk comes the requirement of methods to interrogate the molecular underpinnings of these leukocyte-stem cell interactions. Here we describe how a combination of FACS, cellular coculture assays, and conditioned media treatments can be utilized to advance our understanding of this emerging area of intercellular communication between immune cells and stem cells.

  2. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation into Functional Epicardial Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Guadix

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are widely used to study cardiovascular cell differentiation and function. Here, we induced differentiation of hPSCs (both embryonic and induced to proepicardial/epicardial progenitor cells that cover the heart during development. Addition of retinoic acid (RA and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 promoted expression of the mesodermal marker PDGFRα, upregulated characteristic (proepicardial progenitor cell genes, and downregulated transcription of myocardial genes. We confirmed the (proepicardial-like properties of these cells using in vitro co-culture assays and in ovo grafting of hPSC-epicardial cells into chick embryos. Our data show that RA + BMP4-treated hPSCs differentiate into (proepicardial-like cells displaying functional properties (adhesion and spreading over the myocardium of their in vivo counterpart. The results extend evidence that hPSCs are an excellent model to study (proepicardial differentiation into cardiovascular cells in human development and evaluate their potential for cardiac regeneration. : The authors have shown that hPSCs can be instructed in vitro to differentiate into a specific cardiac embryonic progenitor cell population called the proepicardium. Proepicardial cells are required for normal formation of the heart during development and might contribute to the development of cell-based therapies for heart repair. Keywords: human pluripotent stem cells, proepicardium, progenitor cells, cardiovascular, differentiation

  3. Three-dimensional poly (ε-caprolactone)/hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffolds incorporating bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of bone defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Xin; Huang, Yinjun; Zhang, Jieyuan; Cao, Jiaqing; Jin, Xiangyun; Huang, Jinghuan; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Ting; Han, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that three-dimensional (3D) hydroxyapatite (HAP)-collagen (COL)-coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds (HAP-COL-PCL) possess appropriate nano-structures, surface roughness, and nutrients, providing a favorable environment for osteogenesis. However, the effect of using 3D HAP-COL-PCL scaffolds incorporating BMSCs for the repair of bone defects in rats has been not evaluated. 3D PCL scaffolds coated with HAP, collagen or HAP/COL and incorporating BMSCs were implanted into calvarial defects. At 12 weeks after surgery, the rats were sacrificed and crania were harvested to assess the bone defect repair using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), histology, immunohistochemistry and sequential fluorescent labeling analysis. 3D micro-CT reconstructed images and quantitative analysis showed that HAP-COL-PCL groups possessed better bone-forming capacity than HAP-PCL groups or COL-PCL groups. Fluorescent labeling analysis revealed the percentage of tetracycline labeling, alizarin red labeling, and calcein labeling in HAP-COL-PCL groups were all greater than in the other two groups (P  <  0.05), and the result was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining and histological analysis of bone regeneration. This study demonstrates that 3D HAP-COL-PCL scaffolds incorporating BMSCs markedly enhance bone regeneration of bone defects in rats. (paper)

  4. Stem Cell Therapy: A Promising Therapeutic Method for Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liansheng; Xu, Weilin; Li, Tao; Chen, Jingyin; Shao, Anwen; Yan, Feng; Chen, Gao

    2018-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is one type of the most devastating cerebrovascular diseases worldwide, which causes high morbidity and mortality. However, efficient treatment is still lacking. Stem cell therapy has shown good neuroprotective and neurorestorative effect in ICH and is a promising treatment. In this study, our aim was to review the therapeutic effects, strategies, related mechanisms and safety issues of various types of stem cell for ICH treatment. Numerous studies had demonstrated the therapeutic effects of diverse stem cell types in ICH. The potential mechanisms include tissue repair and replacement, neurotrophy, promotion of neurogenesis and angiogenesis, anti-apoptosis, immunoregulation and anti-inflammation and so forth. The microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS) can also influence the effects of stem cell therapy. The detailed therapeutic strategies for ICH treatment such as cell type, the number of cells, time window, and the routes of medication delivery, varied greatly among different studies and had not been determined. Moreover, the safety issues of stem cell therapy for ICH should not be ignored. Stem cell therapy showed good therapeutic effect in ICH, making it a promising treatment. However, safety should be carefully evaluated, and more clinical trials are required before stem cell therapy can be extensively applied to clinical use.

  5. Designing the stem cell microenvironment for guided connective tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, Danielle R; Lu, Helen H

    2017-12-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for regenerative medicine because of their ability to self-renew and their capacity for multilineage differentiation and tissue regeneration. For connective tissues, such as ligaments or tendons, MSCs are vital to the modulation of the inflammatory response following acute injury while also interacting with resident fibroblasts to promote cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. To date, MSC injection for connective tissue repair has yielded mixed results in vivo, likely due to a lack of appropriate environmental cues to effectively control MSC response and promote tissue healing instead of scar formation. In healthy tissues, stem cells reside within a complex microenvironment comprising cellular, structural, and signaling cues that collectively maintain stemness and modulate tissue homeostasis. Changes to the microenvironment following injury regulate stem cell differentiation, trophic signaling, and tissue healing. Here, we focus on models of the stem cell microenvironment that are used to elucidate the mechanisms of stem cell regulation and inspire functional approaches to tissue regeneration. Recent studies in this frontier area are highlighted, focusing on how microenvironmental cues modulate MSC response following connective tissue injury and, more importantly, how this unique cell environment can be programmed for stem cell-guided tissue regeneration. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Pituitary cell differentiation from stem cells and other cells: toward restorative therapy for hypopituitarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Christophe; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary gland, key regulator of our endocrine system, produces multiple hormones that steer essential physiological processes. Hence, deficient pituitary function (hypopituitarism) leads to severe disorders. Hypopituitarism can be caused by defective embryonic development, or by damage through tumor growth/resection and traumatic brain injury. Lifelong hormone replacement is needed but associated with significant side effects. It would be more desirable to restore pituitary tissue and function. Recently, we showed that the adult (mouse) pituitary holds regenerative capacity in which local stem cells are involved. Repair of deficient pituitary may therefore be achieved by activating these resident stem cells. Alternatively, pituitary dysfunction may be mended by cell (replacement) therapy. The hormonal cells to be transplanted could be obtained by (trans-)differentiating various kinds of stem cells or other cells. Here, we summarize the studies on pituitary cell regeneration and on (trans-)differentiation toward hormonal cells, and speculate on restorative therapies for pituitary deficiency.

  7. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  8. Functional dysregulation of stem cells during aging: a focus on skeletal muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Prat, Laura; Sousa-Victor, Pedro; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2013-09-01

    Aging of an organism is associated with the functional decline of tissues and organs, as well as a sharp decline in the regenerative capacity of stem cells. A prevailing view holds that the aging rate of an individual depends on the ratio of tissue attrition to tissue regeneration. Therefore, manipulations that favor the balance towards regeneration may prevent or delay aging. Skeletal muscle is a specialized tissue composed of postmitotic myofibers that contract to generate force. Satellite cells are the adult stem cells responsible for skeletal muscle regeneration. Recent studies on the biology of skeletal muscle and satellite cells in aging have uncovered the critical impact of systemic and niche factors on stem cell functionality and demonstrated the capacity of aged satellite cells to rejuvenate and increase their regenerative potential when exposed to a youthful environment. Here we review the current literature on the coordinated relationship between cell extrinsic and intrinsic factors that regulate the function of satellite cells, and ultimately determine tissue homeostasis and repair during aging, and which encourage the search for new anti-aging strategies. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  9. The Potential of Stem Cells in Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Nicole M; Sun, Dong

    2018-01-25

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a global public health concern, with limited treatment options available. Despite improving survival rate after TBI, treatment is lacking for brain functional recovery and structural repair in clinic. Recent studies have suggested that the mature brain harbors neural stem cells which have regenerative capacity following brain insults. Much progress has been made in preclinical TBI model studies in understanding the behaviors, functions, and regulatory mechanisms of neural stem cells in the injured brain. Different strategies targeting these cell population have been assessed in TBI models. In parallel, cell transplantation strategy using a wide range of stem cells has been explored for TBI treatment in pre-clinical studies and some in clinical trials. This review summarized strategies which have been explored to enhance endogenous neural stem cell-mediated regeneration and recent development in cell transplantation studies for post-TBI brain repair. Thus far, neural regeneration through neural stem cells either by modulating endogenous neural stem cells or by stem cell transplantation has attracted much attention. It is highly speculated that targeting neural stem cells could be a potential strategy to repair and regenerate the injured brain. Neuroprotection and neuroregeneration are major aspects for TBI therapeutic development. With technique advancement, it is hoped that stem cell-based therapy targeting neuroregeneration will be able to translate to clinic in not so far future.

  10. Stem cells and regenerative medicine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2005), s. 45-46 ISSN 1214-021X. [Cells VI - Biological Days /18./. 24.10.2005-26.10.2005, České Budějovice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  11. Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Forostyak, Serhiy

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2013), s. 87-92 ISSN 0898-5901 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0189; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : cell therapy * stem cells * clinical study Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  12. The spermatogonial stem cell niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Dirk G.

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs; A(s) spermatogonia) and their direct descendants (A(pr) and A(al) spermatogonia) are preferentially located in those areas of the seminiferous tubules that border on the interstitial tissue. Fewer of these cells are present in tubule areas directly bordering on

  13. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  14. Stem cells: sources and therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Monti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical, lexical and conceptual issues embedded in stem cell biology are reviewed from technical, ethical, philosophical, judicial, clinical, economic and biopolitical perspectives. The mechanisms assigning the simultaneous capacity to self-renew and to differentiate to stem cells (immortal template DNA and asymmetric division are evaluated in the light of the niche hypothesis for the stemness state. The induction of cell pluripotency and the different stem cells sources are presented (embryonic, adult and cord blood. We highlight the embryonic and adult stem cell properties and possible therapies while we emphasize the particular scientific and social values of cord blood donation to set up cord blood banks. The current scientific and legal frameworks of cord blood banks are reviewed at an international level as well as allogenic, dedicated and autologous donations. The expectations and the challenges in relation to present-day targeted diseases like diabetes mellitus type I, Parkinson's disease and myocardial infarction are evaluated in the light of the cellular therapies for regenerative medicine.

  15. Development of heart muscle-cell diversity: a help or a hindrance for phenotyping embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijnvandraat, Arnoud C.; Lekanne Deprez, Ronald H.; Moorman, Antoon F. M.

    2003-01-01

    Despite the advances in cardiovascular treatment, cardiac disease remains a major cause of morbidity in all industrialized countries. The extraordinary potential of (embryonic) stem cells for therapeutic purposes has revolutionized ideas about cardiac repair of diseased cardiac muscle to exciting

  16. Cell surface glycan engineering of neural stem cells augments neurotropism and improves recovery in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen; Imitola, Jaime; Starossom, Sarah C.; Zhu, Bing; Wang, Yue; Lee, Jack; Ali, Amal J.; Olah, Marta; AbuElela, Ayman; Khoury, Samia J.; Sackstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cell (NSC)-based therapies offer potential for neural repair in central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory and degenerative disorders. Typically, these conditions present with multifocal CNS lesions making it impractical to inject NSCs

  17. From regenerative dentistry to regenerative medicine: progress, challenges, and potential applications of oral stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Li Xiao,1 Masanori Nasu2 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Research Center, The Nippon Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and epithelial stem cells play essential roles in tissue repair and self-healing. Oral MSCs and epithelial stem cells can be isolated from adult human oral tissues, for example, teeth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Cocultivated adult oral epithelial stem cells and MSCs could represent some developmental events, such as epithelial invagination and tubular structure formation, signifying their potentials for tissue regeneration. Oral epithelial stem cells have been used in regenerative medicine over 1 decade. They are able to form a stratified cell sheet under three-dimensional culture conditions. Both experimental and clinical data indicate that the cell sheets can not only safely and effectively reconstruct the damaged cornea in humans, but also repair esophageal ulcer in animal models. Oral MSCs include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED, stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs, and mesenchymal stem cells from gingiva (GMSCs. They are widely applied in both regenerative dentistry and medicine. DPSCs, SHED, and SCAP are able to form dentin–pulp complex when being transplanted into immunodeficient animals. They have been experimentally used for the regeneration of dental pulp, neuron, bone muscle and blood vessels in animal models and have shown promising results. PDLSCs and GMSCs are demonstrated to be ideal cell sources for repairing the damaged tissues of periodontal, muscle, and tendon. Despite the abovementioned applications of oral stem cells, only a few human clinical trials are now underway to use them for the treatment of certain diseases. Since clinical use is the end goal, their true regenerative power and safety need to be further examined.Keywords: oral mesenchymal stem cells, oral

  18. Multifaceted Interpretation of Colon Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Kenji; Hirata, Akihiro; Hara, Akira; Tomita, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-05

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, despite recent advances in clinical oncology. Accumulating evidence sheds light on the existence of cancer stem cells and their role in conferring therapeutic resistance. Cancer stem cells are a minor fraction of cancer cells, which enable tumor heterogeneity and initiate tumor formation. In addition, these cells are resistant to various cytotoxic factors. Therefore, elimination of cancer stem cells is difficult but essential to cure the malignant foci completely. Herein, we review the recent evidence for intestinal stem cells and colon cancer stem cells, methods to detect the tumor-initiating cells, and clinical significance of cancer stem cell markers. We also describe the emerging problems of cancer stem cell theory, including bidirectional conversion and intertumoral heterogeneity of stem cell phenotype.

  19. Transcriptional profiling of putative human epithelial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koçer Salih S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human interfollicular epidermis is sustained by the proliferation of stem cells and their progeny, transient amplifying cells. Molecular characterization of these two cell populations is essential for better understanding of self renewal, differentiation and mechanisms of skin pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to obtain gene expression profiles of alpha 6+/MHCI+, transient amplifying cells and alpha 6+/MHCI-, putative stem cells, and to compare them with existing data bases of gene expression profiles of hair follicle stem cells. The expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I, previously shown to be absent in stem cells in several tissues, and alpha 6 integrin were used to isolate MHCI positive basal cells, and MHCI low/negative basal cells. Results Transcriptional profiles of the two cell populations were determined and comparisons made with published data for hair follicle stem cell gene expression profiles. We demonstrate that presumptive interfollicular stem cells, alpha 6+/MHCI- cells, are enriched in messenger RNAs encoding surface receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, transcripts encoding members of IFN-alpha family proteins and components of IFN signaling, but contain lower levels of transcripts encoding proteins which take part in energy metabolism, cell cycle, ribosome biosynthesis, splicing, protein translation, degradation, DNA replication, repair, and chromosome remodeling. Furthermore, our data indicate that the cell signaling pathways Notch1 and NF-κB are downregulated/inhibited in MHC negative basal cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells have additional characteristics attributed to stem cells. Moreover, the transcription profile of alpha 6+/MHCI- cells shows similarities to transcription profiles of mouse hair follicle bulge cells known to be enriched for stem cells. Collectively, our data suggests that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells

  20. Engaging Stem Cells for Customized Tendon Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim Thaker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for a consistent therapeutic approach to tendon injury repair is long overdue. Patients with tendon microtears or full ruptures are eligible for a wide range of invasive and non invasive interventions, often subjectively decided by the physician. Surgery produces the best outcomes, and while studies have been conducted to optimize graft constructs and to track outcomes, the data from these studies have been inconclusive on the whole. What has been established is a clear understanding of healthy tendon architecture and the inherent process of healing. With this knowledge, tissue regeneration efforts have achieved immense progress in scaffold design, cell line selection, and, more recently, the appropriate use of cytokines and growth factors. This paper evaluates the plasticity of bone-marrow-derived stem cells and the elasticity of recently developed biomaterials towards tendon regeneration efforts. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, hematopoietic progenitor cells, and poly(1,8-octanediol co-citrate scaffolds (POC are discussed in the context of established grafting strategies. With POC scaffolds to cradle the growth of MSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells, developing a fibroelastic network guided by cytokines and growth factors may contribute towards consistent graft constructs, enhanced functionality, and better patient outcomes.

  1. Repair-misrepair model of cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Ngo, F.Q.H.

    1980-01-01

    During the last three years a new model, the repair-misrepair model (RMR) has been proposed, to interpret radiobiological experiments with heavy ions. In using the RMR model it became apparent that some of its features are suitable for handling the effects produced by a variety of environmental agents in addition to ionizing radiation. Two separate sequences of events are assumed to take place in an irradiated cell. The first sequence begins with an initial energy transfer consisting of ionizations and excitations, culminating via fast secondary physical and chemical processes in established macromolecular lesions in essential cell structures. The second sequence contains the responses of the cell to the lesions and consists of the processes of recognition and molecular repair. In normal cells there exists one repair process or at most a few enzymatic repair processes for each essential macromolecular lesion. The enzymatic repair processes may last for hours and minutes, and can be separated in time from the initial physicochemical and later genetic phases

  2. The Evolution of the Stem Cell Theory for Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sébastien Silvestre

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Various stem cell-based approaches for cardiac repair have achieved encouraging results in animal experiments, often leading to their rapid proceeding to clinical testing. However, freewheeling evolutionary developments of the stem cell theory might lead to dystopian scenarios where heterogeneous sources of therapeutic cells could promote mixed clinical outcomes in un-stratified patient populations. This review focuses on the lessons that should be learnt from the first generation of stem cell-based strategies and emphasizes the absolute requirement to better understand the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology and cardiogenesis. We will also discuss about the unexpected “big bang” in the stem cell theory, “blasting” the therapeutic cells to their unchallenged ability to release paracrine factors such as extracellular membrane vesicles. Paradoxically, the natural evolution of the stem cell theory for cardiac regeneration may end with the development of cell-free strategies with multiple cellular targets including cardiomyocytes but also other infiltrating or resident cardiac cells.

  3. Turnover of circulating hematopoietic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorie, M J; Maloney, M A; Patt, H M

    1979-10-01

    Short-term parabiosis of male and female CBA/CaJ mice was used to investigate the turnover of circulating hematopoietic stem cells. The change and subsequent disappearance of donor stem cells were monitored by spleen colony assay and chromosome analysis of individual colonies. The results revealed an exponential disappearance of pluripotent stem cells from blood with a characteristic half time of 1.7 h. Blood-borne stem cells were shown to be equilibrated with a subpopulation of marrow stem cells exhibiting a disappearance half time of 9.5 h. Splenectomy did not change the apparent rate of stem cell removal from the blood.

  4. Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Chao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is becoming an effective therapeutic modality for a variety of diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be used to enhance hematopoietic engraftment, accelerate lymphocyte recovery, reduce the risk of graft failure, prevent and treat graft-versus-host disease, and repair tissue damage in patients receiving HSCT. Till now, most MSCs for human clinical application have been derived from bone marrow. However, acquiring bone-marrow-derived MSCs involves an invasive procedure. Umbilical cord is rich with MSCs. Compared to bone-marrow-derived MSCs, umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UCMSCs are easier to obtain without harm to the donor and can proliferate faster. No severe adverse effects were noted in our previous clinical application of UCMSCs in HSCT. Accordingly, application of UCMSCs in humans appears to be feasible and safe. Further studies are warranted.

  5. Myocardial regeneration potential of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xiaowen, E-mail: baixw01@yahoo.com [Department of Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Alt, Eckhard, E-mail: ealt@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving tremendous attention from basic scientists and clinicians and hold great promise for myocardial regeneration. {yields} For practical reasons, human adipose tissue-derived stem cells are attractive stem cells for future clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium. {yields} This review summarizes the characteristics of cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential and the, underlying mechanisms, and safety issues. -- Abstract: Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving attention from basic scientists and clinicians as they hold promise for myocardial regeneration. For practical reasons, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are attractive cells for clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium based on the following advantages: abundant adipose tissue in most patients and easy accessibility with minimally invasive lipoaspiration procedure. Several recent studies have demonstrated that both cultured and freshly isolated ASCs could improve cardiac function in animal model of myocardial infarction. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect of ASCs on myocardial regeneration are not fully understood. Growing evidence indicates that transplantation of ASCs improve cardiac function via the differentiation into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, and through paracrine pathways. Paracrine factors secreted by injected ASCs enhance angiogenesis, reduce cell apoptosis rates, and promote neuron sprouts in damaged myocardium. In addition, Injection of ASCs increases electrical stability of the injured heart. Furthermore, there are no reported cases of arrhythmia or tumorigenesis in any studies regarding myocardial regeneration with ASCs. This review summarizes the characteristics of both cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential, and the

  6. Myocardial regeneration potential of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xiaowen; Alt, Eckhard

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving tremendous attention from basic scientists and clinicians and hold great promise for myocardial regeneration. → For practical reasons, human adipose tissue-derived stem cells are attractive stem cells for future clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium. → This review summarizes the characteristics of cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential and the, underlying mechanisms, and safety issues. -- Abstract: Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving attention from basic scientists and clinicians as they hold promise for myocardial regeneration. For practical reasons, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are attractive cells for clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium based on the following advantages: abundant adipose tissue in most patients and easy accessibility with minimally invasive lipoaspiration procedure. Several recent studies have demonstrated that both cultured and freshly isolated ASCs could improve cardiac function in animal model of myocardial infarction. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect of ASCs on myocardial regeneration are not fully understood. Growing evidence indicates that transplantation of ASCs improve cardiac function via the differentiation into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, and through paracrine pathways. Paracrine factors secreted by injected ASCs enhance angiogenesis, reduce cell apoptosis rates, and promote neuron sprouts in damaged myocardium. In addition, Injection of ASCs increases electrical stability of the injured heart. Furthermore, there are no reported cases of arrhythmia or tumorigenesis in any studies regarding myocardial regeneration with ASCs. This review summarizes the characteristics of both cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential, and the underlying

  7. On the dynamics of StemBells: Microbubble-conjugated stem cells for ultrasound-controlled delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhuis, Tom J. A.; Naaijkens, Benno A.; Juffermans, Lynda J. M.; Kamp, Otto; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2017-07-01

    The use of stem cells for regenerative tissue repair is promising but hampered by the low number of cells delivered to the site of injury. To increase the delivery, we propose a technique in which stem cells are linked to functionalized microbubbles, creating echogenic complex dubbed StemBells. StemBells are highly susceptible to acoustic radiation force which can be employed after injection to push the StemBells locally to the treatment site. To optimally benefit from the delivery technique, a thorough characterization of the dynamics of StemBells during ultrasound exposure is needed. Using high-speed optical imaging, we study the dynamics of StemBells as a function of the applied frequency from which resonance curves were constructed. A theoretical model, based on a modified Rayleigh-Plesset type equation, captured the experimental resonance characteristics and radial dynamics in detail.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells in human placental chorionic villi reside in a vascular Niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castrechini, N. M.; Murthi, P.; Gude, N. M.; Erwich, J. J. H. M.; Gronthos, S.; Zannettino, A.; Brennecke, S. R.; Kalionis, B.; Brennecke, S.P.

    The chorionic villi of human term placentae are a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs) The stem cell "niche" within the chorionic villi regulates how PMSCs participate in placental tissue generation, maintenance and repair, but the anatomic location of the niche has not been defined A

  9. Crypt base columnar stem cells in small intestines of mice are radioresistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, G.; Thin, T.H.; Feldman, R.; Haimovitz-Friedman, A.; Clevers, H.; Fuks, Z.; Kolesnick, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Adult stem cells have been proposed to be quiescent and radiation resistant, repairing DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end joining. However, the population of putative small intestinal stem cells (ISCs) at position +4 from the crypt base contradicts this model, in that

  10. Efficient and Fast Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapies have been used for repairing damaged brain tissue and helping functional recovery after brain injury. Aberrance neurogenesis is related with brain injury, and multipotential neural stem cells from human embryonic stem (hES cells provide a great promise for cell replacement therapies. Optimized protocols for neural differentiation are necessary to produce functional human neural stem cells (hNSCs for cell therapy. However, the qualified procedure is scarce and detailed features of hNSCs originated from hES cells are still unclear. In this study, we developed a method to obtain hNSCs from hES cells, by which we could harvest abundant hNSCs in a relatively short time. Then, we examined the expression of pluripotent and multipotent marker genes through immunostaining and confirmed differentiation potential of the differentiated hNSCs. Furthermore, we analyzed the mitotic activity of these hNSCs. In this report, we provided comprehensive features of hNSCs and delivered the knowledge about how to obtain more high-quality hNSCs from hES cells which may help to accelerate the NSC-based therapies in brain injury treatment.

  11. Organizing Organoids: Stem Cells Branch Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jamie A

    2017-12-07

    In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Taguchi and Nishinakamura (2017) describe a carefully optimized method for making a branch-competent ureteric bud, a tissue fundamental to kidney development, from mouse embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells. The work illuminates embryology and has important implications for making more realistic kidney organoids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. nduced pluripotent stem cells and cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu İskender

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst-stage embryo. They hold a huge promise for cell therapy with their self-renewing ability and pluripotency, which is known as the potential to differentiate into all cell types originating from three embryonic germ layers. However, their unique pluripotent feature could not be utilised for therapeutic purposes due to the ethical and legal problems during derivation. Recently, it was shown that the cells from adult tissues could be reverted into embryonic state, thereby restoring their pluripotent feature. This has strenghtened the possiblity of directed differentition of the reprogrammed somatic cells into the desired cell types in vitro and their use in regenerative medicine. Although these cells were termed as induced pluripotent cells, the mechanism of pluripotency has yet to be understood. Still, induced pluripotent stem cell technology is considered to be significant by proposing novel approaches in disease modelling, drug screening and cell therapy. Besides their self-renewing ability and their potential to differentiate into all cell types in a human body, they arouse a great interest in scientific world by being far from the ethical concerns regarding their embryonic counterparts and their unique feature of being patient-specific in prospective cell therapies. In this review, induced pluripotent stem cell technology and its role in cell-based therapies from past to present will be discussed. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 550-561

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells display different gene expression profiles compared to hyaline and elastic chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Li-Jie; Zhao, Ke-Qing; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Feng, Ya; Xing, Shuang-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage has a poor intrinsic repair capacity, requiring surgical intervention to effect biological repair. Tissue engineering technologies or regenerative medicine strategies are currently being employed to address cartilage repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered to be an excellent cell source for this application. However, the different gene expression profiles between the MSCs and differentiated cartilage remain unclear. In this report, we first examined the gene expression ...

  14. Differentiation of hepatocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xu; Lv, Shuang; He, Xia; Liu, Xiaomei; Sun, Meiyu; Li, Meiying; Chi, Guangfan; Li, Yulin

    2016-10-01

    Due to the limitations of organ donors and immune rejection in severe liver diseases, stem cell-based therapy presents a promising application for tissue repair and regeneration. As a novel cell source, mesenchymal stem cells separated from human hair follicles (HF-MSCs) are convenient to obtain and have no age limit. To date, the differentiation of HF-MSCs into hepatocytes has not been reported. In this study, we explored whether HF-MSCs and HF-MSC-derived-induced pluripotent stem cells (HF-iPS) could differentiate into hepatocytes in vitro. Flow cytometry, Oil Red O stain and Alizarin Red stain were used to identify the characteristics of HF-MSCs. The expression of liver-specific gene was detected by immunofluorescence and Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction. Periodic Acid-Schiff stain, Indocyanine Green stain and Low-Density Lipoprotein stain were performed to evaluate the functions of induced hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). HF-MSCs were unable to differentiate into HLCs using previously reported procedures for MSCs from other tissues. However, HF-iPS efficiently induced the generation of HLCs that expressed hepatocyte markers and drug metabolism-related genes. HF-iPS can be used as novel and alternative cellular tools for inducing hepatocytes in vitro, simultaneously benefiting from utilizing HF-MSCs as a noninvasive and convenient cell source for reprogramming.

  15. Chemically Induced Reprogramming of Somatic Cells to Pluripotent Stem Cells and Neural Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Dhruba; Jiang, Peng

    2016-02-06

    The ability to generate transplantable neural cells in a large quantity in the laboratory is a critical step in the field of developing stem cell regenerative medicine for neural repair. During the last few years, groundbreaking studies have shown that cell fate of adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed through lineage specific expression of transcription factors (TFs)-and defined culture conditions. This key concept has been used to identify a number of potent small molecules that could enhance the efficiency of reprogramming with TFs. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that small molecules targeting specific epigenetic and signaling pathways can replace all of the reprogramming TFs. Here, we provide a detailed review of the studies reporting the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs), neural stem cells (ciNSCs), and neurons (ciN). We also discuss the main mechanisms of actions and the pathways that the small molecules regulate during chemical reprogramming.

  16. Characterization and comparison of osteoblasts derived from mouse embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming San; Kannan, Vishnu; de Vries, Anneriek E; Czepiel, Marcin; Wesseling, Evelyn; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Kuijer, Roelof; Vissink, Arjan; Copray, Sjef; Raghoebar, Gerry

    New developments in stem cell biology offer alternatives for the reconstruction of critical-sized bone defects. One of these developments is the use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These stem cells are similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, but can be generated from adult somatic cells and

  17. Stem cells and chronic wound healing: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leavitt T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tripp Leavitt, Michael S Hu, Clement D Marshall, Leandra A Barnes, Michael T Longaker, H Peter Lorenz Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Currently available treatments for chronic wounds are inadequate. A clearly effective therapy does not exist, and treatment is often supportive. This is largely because the cellular and molecular processes underlying failure of wound repair are still poorly understood. With an increase in comorbidities, such as diabetes and vascular disease, as well as an aging population, the incidence of these intractable wounds is expected to rise. As such, chronic wounds, which are already costly, are rapidly growing as a tremendous burden to the health-care system. Stem cells have garnered much interest as a therapy for chronic wounds due to their inherent ability to differentiate into multiple lineages and promote regeneration. Herein, we discuss the types of stem cells used for chronic wound therapy, as well as the proposed means by which they do so. In particular, we highlight mesenchymal stem cells (including adipose-derived stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. We include the results of recent in vitro and in vivo studies in both animal models and human clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the current studies to improve stem cell therapies and the limitations of stem cell-based therapeutics. Stem cells promise improved therapies for healing chronic wounds, but further studies that are well-designed with standardized protocols are necessary for fruition. Keywords: stem cells, chronic wounds, cell therapy, wound healing

  18. Systems Biology and Stem Cell Pluripotency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mashayekhi, Kaveh; Hall, Vanessa Jane; Freude, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology have accelerated research in the area of regenerative medicine. Over the past years, it has become possible to derive patient-specific stem cells which can be used to generate different cell populations for potential cell therapy. Systems biological...... modeling of stem cell pluripotency and differentiation have largely been based on prior knowledge of signaling pathways, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic factors. However, there is a great need to extend the complexity of the modeling and to integrate different types of data, which would further...... improve systems biology and its uses in the field. In this chapter, we first give a general background on stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Stem cell potency is introduced together with the hierarchy of stem cells ranging from pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem...

  19. Matrix regulators in neural stem cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Anna; McKinney, Andrew; Phillips, Joanna J

    2014-08-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) reside within a complex and dynamic extracellular microenvironment, or niche. This niche regulates fundamental aspects of their behavior during normal neural development and repair. Precise yet dynamic regulation of NSPC self-renewal, migration, and differentiation is critical and must persist over the life of an organism. In this review, we summarize some of the major components of the NSPC niche and provide examples of how cues from the extracellular matrix regulate NSPC behaviors. We use proteoglycans to illustrate the many diverse roles of the niche in providing temporal and spatial regulation of cellular behavior. The NSPC niche is comprised of multiple components that include; soluble ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, chemokines, and neurotransmitters, the extracellular matrix, and cellular components. As illustrated by proteoglycans, a major component of the extracellular matrix, the NSPC, niche provides temporal and spatial regulation of NSPC behaviors. The factors that control NSPC behavior are vital to understand as we attempt to modulate normal neural development and repair. Furthermore, an improved understanding of how these factors regulate cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation, crucial for malignancy, may reveal novel anti-tumor strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Matrix-mediated cell behaviour and properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Platelet-Rich Plasma Derived Growth Factors Contribute to Stem Cell Differentiation in Musculoskeletal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Qian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell treatment and platelet-rich plasma (PRP therapy are two significant issues in regenerative medicine. Stem cells such as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells can be successfully applied in the field of tissue regeneration. PRP, a natural product isolated from whole blood, can secrete multiple growth factors (GFs for regulating physiological activities. These GFs can stimulate proliferation and differentiation of different stem cells in injury models. Therefore, combination of both agents receives wide expectations in regenerative medicine, especially in bone, cartilage and tendon repair. In this review, we thoroughly discussed the interaction and underlying mechanisms of PRP derived GFs with stem cells, and assessed their functions in cell differentiation for musculoskeletal regeneration.